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Sample records for diarrhea experimentally induced

  1. Effect of zinc treatment on intestinal motility in experimentally induced diarrhea in rats.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, O S; Akomolafe, R O; Ojabo, C O; Eru, E U; Olaleye, S B

    2014-06-19

    Zinc supplementation is a critical new intervention for treating diarrheal episodes in children. Recent studies suggest that administration of zinc along with new low osmolarity oral rehydration solutions / salts (ORS) can reduce the duration and severity of diarrheal episodes for up to three months. Several mechanisms of action of zinc has been proposed, however there is dearth of information about the effect of zinc on intestinal motility during diarrhea. Male albino Wistar rats (80-100g) were used. The effect of different doses of zinc sulphate (25, 50, 100, 150 mg/Kg) on the number of wet faeces was investigated. Intestinal motility during castor oil induced diarrhea was assessed using activated charcoal meal and the mechanisms of action of zinc sulphate on motility were investigated. The effective dose of zinc sulphate (100mg/Kg) significantly reduced (p< 0.001) the number of wet faeces (3.0 ± 0.00) compared with control (6.8 ± 0.25) during diarrhea. This antidiarrheal effect of zinc was abolished by propranolol and nifedipine. Zinc sulphate significantly reduced (p< 0.05) intestinal transit time (60.7 ± 7.13%) compared with control (85.7 ± 2.35%). It is concluded that zinc sulphate reduces the frequency of wet faeces output and intestinal motility during diarrhea via activation of β adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel.

  2. Inflammation and disintegration of intestinal villi in an experimental model for Vibrio parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Jennifer M; Rui, Haopeng; Zhou, Xiaohui; Iida, Tetsuya; Kodoma, Toshio; Ito, Susuma; Davis, Brigid M; Bronson, Roderick T; Waldor, Matthew K

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-borne gastroenteritis in many parts of the world, but there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus-induced diarrhea. The absence of an oral infection-based small animal model to study V. parahaemolyticus intestinal colonization and disease has constrained analyses of the course of infection and the factors that mediate it. Here, we demonstrate that infant rabbits oro-gastrically inoculated with V. parahaemolyticus develop severe diarrhea and enteritis, the main clinical and pathologic manifestations of disease in infected individuals. The pathogen principally colonizes the distal small intestine, and this colonization is dependent upon type III secretion system 2. The distal small intestine is also the major site of V. parahaemolyticus-induced tissue damage, reduced epithelial barrier function, and inflammation, suggesting that disease in this region of the gastrointestinal tract accounts for most of the diarrhea that accompanies V. parahaemolyticus infection. Infection appears to proceed through a characteristic sequence of steps that includes remarkable elongation of microvilli and the formation of V. parahaemolyticus-filled cavities within the epithelial surface, and culminates in villus disruption. Both depletion of epithelial cell cytoplasm and epithelial cell extrusion contribute to formation of the cavities in the epithelial surface. V. parahaemolyticus also induces proliferation of epithelial cells and recruitment of inflammatory cells, both of which occur before wide-spread damage to the epithelium is evident. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. parahaemolyticus damages the host intestine and elicits disease via previously undescribed processes and mechanisms.

  3. Antidiarrheal activity of Pterocarpus erinaceus methanol leaf extract in experimentally-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ezeja, I Maxwell; Ezeigbo, Ihechiluru I; Madubuike, Kelechi G; Udeh, Nkiru E; Ukweni, Iheanacho A; Akomas, Stella C; Ifenkwe, Daniel C

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the antidiarrheal activity of the methanol leaf extract of Pterocarpus erinaceus in vivo. The methanol leaf extract of Pterocarpus erinaceus was evaluated using different doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) orally for antidiarrheal activity using castor oil-induced diarrhea, charcoal meal transit time and castor oil-induced enteropooling in different groups of albino Wistar mice. The activity of the extract at different doses were compared to diphenoxylate (5 mg/kg) and atropine sulphate (3 mg/kg) which were used as standard reference drugs and also to the distilled water administered negative control group of mice. The extract at the doses used caused a significant (P< 0.01) reduction in the wet faeces passed by the mice in the castor oil-induced diarrhea, decreased the distance travelled by the charcoal meal by up to 54.8% and also caused a dose dependent and significant (P< 0.001) reduction in the intraluminal fluid accumulation in the castor oil-induced enteropooling. Our results indicate that Pterocarpus erinaceus extract produced significant antidiarrheal activity and the action may attribute to inhibition of gastrointestinal movement and fluid secretion. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Drug-induced diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... health care provider about taking supplements containing healthy bacteria (probiotics). Some of these products may reduce the risk of diarrhea. Keep taking these supplements for a few days after you finish your antibiotics.

  5. [Chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shigenori; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2011-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a clinically important and sometimes dose-limiting toxicity of cancer treatment, including standard-dose chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Consequently, dose reductions or treatment delays resulting from mucositis may impair treatment effectiveness. Symptoms are oral mucositis, dysphagia, abdominal pain and diarrhea, depending on the affected site. Although the underlying pathobiology of oral mucositis has been considerably elucidated over the past decade, there are few interventions for the prevention or treatment validated by randomized trials. The most commonly accepted intervention is basic oral care. Diarrhea is most common in patients treated with irinotecan and in some cases, life-threatening. No definitive interventions for the prevention of diarrhea exist, but there is evidence that loperamide and octreotide are effective for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. In future, there is a need for well designed trials, preferably including a placebo or no treatment control, validating more effective interventions for managing chemotherapy- induced mucositis.

  6. Bile acids in radiation-induced diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Arlow, F.L.; Dekovich, A.A.; Priest, R.J.; Beher, W.T.

    1987-10-01

    Radiation-induced bowel disease manifested by debilitating diarrhea is an unfortunate consequence of therapeutic irradiation for pelvic malignancies. Although the mechanism for this diarrhea is not well understood, many believe it is the result of damage to small bowel mucosa and subsequent bile acid malabsorption. Excess amounts of bile acids, especially the dihydroxy components, are known to induce water and electrolyte secretion and increase bowel motility. We have directly measured individual and total bile acids in the stool samples of 11 patients with radiation-induced diarrhea and have found bile acids elevated two to six times normal in eight of them. Our patients with diarrhea and increased bile acids in their stools had prompt improvement when given cholestyramine. They had fewer stools and returned to a more normal life-style.

  7. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... ages can get diarrhea. On average, adults In the United States have acute diarrhea once a year. ... consuming contaminated food or water. What causes diarrhea? The most common causes of diarrhea include Bacteria from ...

  8. A study on neonatal calf diarrhea induced by rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, G; Ferrari, M; Frigeri, F; Traldi, V; Angelillo, V

    1994-01-01

    This review summarizes the results of a study on rotaviruses isolated from calves affected by neonatal diarrhea. The results indicated that rotavirus infection is widespread and supported the evidence for an etiologic role of these viruses in neonatal diarrhea. Differences in virulence among bovine rotaviruses appeared also to be confirmed. Conventionally reared calves were fully susceptible to the experimental infection induced by rotaviruses originating from heterologous hosts, i.e. monkeys, pigs and rabbits. When rotavirus strains of bovine, simian and rabbit origin were compared by cross neutralization tests, it was found the simian and porcine strains were indistinguishable and both appeared to relate antigenically to the bovine strain. Finally, it was proven that feeding newborn calves with colostrum and first milk of their dams, previously vaccinated with an inactivated adjuvanted rotavirus vaccine, could prevent the neonatal diarrhea from occurring.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin administered in drinking water to recently weaned 3- to 4-week-old pigs with diarrhea experimentally induced by Escherichia coli O149:F4.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gerda M; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Frydendahl, Kai; Møller, Kristian; Svendsen, Ove

    2006-04-01

    To measure effects of Escherichia coli O149:F4-induced diarrhea on water consumption and pharmacokinetics of amoxicillin after administration in drinking water. 24 recently weaned 24- to 28-day-old crossbred pigs. 10 pigs were inoculated with E. coli O149:F4; all 10 pigs subsequently developed diarrhea. Pigs were medicated by administration of amoxicillin in the drinking water (0.75 mg/mL) for a 4-hour period on 2 consecutive days. Fourteen age-matched noninfected healthy pigs (control group) were medicated in a similar manner. Blood samples were obtained from both groups daily, and plasma concentrations of amoxicillin were analyzed by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. Diarrhea reduced the area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of amoxicillin on the first day of medication by 56% and 63%, respectively. The AUC of amoxicillin on the second day of medication for diarrheic pigs did not differ significantly from that of control pigs on the first day of medication. E. coli-induced diarrhea reduced the AUC of amoxicillin and time that plasma concentration of amoxicillin was > 0.025 microg/mL and, hence, less likely to have a therapeutic effect on the first day of administration in drinking water. On the assumption that plasma concentrations may indirectly reflect concentrations at the site of infection, analysis of our results suggests that higher doses of amoxicillin may be appropriate for administration in drinking water during a 4-hour period on the first day that pigs have diarrhea attributable to E. coli O149:F4.

  10. Overview of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Viele, Carol S

    2003-11-01

    To provide a general overview of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID) that will highlight the pathophysiology, incidence, and impact of this problem, as well as describe the oncology nurse's role in the management of CID. Primary and tertiary literature, the authors' clinical experience. CID is a frequent complication of many types of chemotherapy that can significantly affect patient quality of life, increase treatment costs, and limit the ability to deliver full doses of chemotherapy. Because patients may be reluctant to discuss diarrhea with their health care providers, vigilance on the part of the health care team is needed. Through ongoing, regular patient contact, the oncology nurse is uniquely situated to monitor patients for the development of CID, assess its severity, and provide guidance to the health care team on the patient's status.

  11. Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ralph E.

    1983-01-01

    The four major mechanisms of diarrhea are osmotic forces, secretory forces, exudation from a disrupted intestinal mucosa, and disturbed intestinal motility. In many illnesses, more than one mechanism produces diarrhea. The rotaviruses and the Norwalk viruses have recently been recognized as common causes of viral gastroenteritis. Also, the major cause of antibiotic-associated colitis is now known to be an overgrowth of Clostridium difficile. Campylobacter has also been identified as a common cause of acute bacterial diarrhea both abroad and in Canada. Most cases of travellers' diarrhea are caused by strains of Escherichia coli to which the traveller has little immunity. Most travellers who develop diarrhea benefit from treatment with diphenoxylate, loperamide or bismuth subsalicylate. The few patients who develop more severe, incapacitating diarrhea are candidates for treatment with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Antibiotics should not be used to prevent travellers' diarrhea, because antibiotic resistance is becoming a problem. PMID:21283398

  12. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... be given an oral rehydration solution (ORS). Avoid solid foods until the diarrhea goes away.If your ... back into eating with bland foods and clear liquids.Contact your doctor if you have a high ...

  13. Comparison of efficacy of sulbactam: ampicillin to ampicillin and saline for treatment of experimentally induced Escherichia coli diarrhea in neonatal calves.

    PubMed Central

    Lofstedt, J; Miller, L; Duizer, G; Daley, J

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the efficacy of sulbactam: ampicillin (SAMP) (3.3:6.6 mg/kg body weight (BW), IM, q24 h) to that of ampicillin trihydrate (AMP) (6 mg/kg BW, IM, q24 h) and 0.9% saline (SAL) (3 mL IM, q24 h) for the treatment of diarrhea in calves induced by oral inoculation with Escherichia coli strain B44 (O9:K30:K99:H-). Treatment was initiated when severe diarrhea was noted (T0) and continued for at least 3 d; or for 24 h after clinical signs resolved; or for a maximum duration of 7 d. Starting at T0, calves were examined twice daily: appetite; rectal temperature (TEMP); and fecal consistency (FECAL), mental status (ATTD), eye position (EYE), and skin elasticity (SKIN) scores were recorded. Feces collected at T0 were submitted for bacteriology, electron microscopy, and parasitology. A complete blood count was performed at T0 and T3 (24 h after third treatment). Severely dehydrated, depressed, and anorexic calves were euthanized and considered mortalities. Cause of death was determined by post mortem examination. A total of 30 calves were included in the study. Three calves were excluded from final analysis. E. coli strain B44 was cultured from feces of all calves at T0. At T2 (24 h after second treatment) mean TEMP of SAMP calves was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than mean TEMP of SAL calves; EYE and SKIN scores of SAMP calves were significantly lower (P < alpha beta = 0.025) than those of SAL and AMP calves; and ATTD and FECAL scores of SAMP calves were significantly lower (P < alpha beta = 0.025) than in SAL calves. At T3, SAMP calves had significantly lower (P < 0.05) mean hematocrit than SAL calves and lower mean total plasma protein concentration than AMP and SAL calves. Mean fibrinogen concentration in SAMP calves at T3 was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than that of calves receiving either SAL or AMP. The number of surviving SAMP calves (10/10) was significantly higher (P < alpha beta = 0.025) than the number of surviving SAL calves (2

  14. Use of probiotics for prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Delia, P; Sansotta, G; Donato, V; Frosina, P; Messina, G; De Renzis, C; Famularo, G

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of a high-potency probiotic preparation on prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea in cancer patients. METHODS: This was a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Four hundred and ninety patients who underwent adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy after surgery for sigmoid, rectal, or cervical cancer were assigned to either the high-potency probiotic preparation VSL#3 (one sachet t.i.d.,) or placebo starting from the first day of radiation therapy. Efficacy endpoints were incidence and severity of radiation-induced diarrhea, daily number of bowel movements, and the time from the start of the study to the use of loperamide as rescue medication. RESULTS: More placebo patients had radiation-induced diarrhea than VSL#3 patients (124 of 239 patients, 51.8%, and 77 of 243 patients, 31.6%; P < 0.001) and more patients given placebo suffered grade 3 or 4 diarrhea compared with VSL#3 recipients (55.4% and 1.4%, P < 0.001). Daily bowel movements were 14.7 ± 6 and 5.1 ± 3 among placebo and VSL#3 recipients (P < 0.05), and the mean time to the use of loperamide was 86 ± 6 h for placebo patients and 122 ± 8 h for VSL#3 patients (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Probiotic lactic acid-producing bacteria are an easy, safe, and feasible approach to protect cancer patients against the risk of radiation-induced diarrhea. PMID:17352022

  15. Drug-induced secretory diarrhea: A role for CFTR.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sundaram, Nambirajan; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Reddy, Vadde Sudhakar; Arora, Kavisha; Helmrath, Michael A; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-12-01

    Many medications induce diarrhea as a side effect, which can be a major obstacle to therapeutic efficacy and also a life-threatening condition. Secretory diarrhea can be caused by excessive fluid secretion in the intestine under pathological conditions. The cAMP/cGMP-regulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the primary chloride channel at the apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells and plays a major role in intestinal fluid secretion and homeostasis. CFTR forms macromolecular complexes at discreet microdomains at the plasma membrane, and its chloride channel function is regulated spatiotemporally through protein-protein interactions and cAMP/cGMP-mediated signaling. Drugs that perturb CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes in the intestinal epithelium and upregulate intracellular cAMP and/or cGMP levels can hyperactivate the CFTR channel, causing excessive fluid secretion and secretory diarrhea. Inhibition of CFTR chloride-channel activity may represent a novel approach to the management of drug-induced secretory diarrhea.

  16. Therapeutic Targeting of CPT-11 Induced Diarrhea: A Case for Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Swami, Umang; Goel, Sanjay; Mani, Sridhar

    2014-01-01

    CPT-11 (irinotecan), a DNA topoisomerase I inhibitor is one of the main treatments for colorectal cancer. The main dose limiting toxicities are neutropenia and late onset diarrhea. Though neutropenia is manageable, CPT-11 induced diarrhea is frequently severe, resulting in hospitalizations, dose reductions or omissions leading to ineffective treatment administration. Many potential agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies to prevent or ameliorate CPT-11 induced late onset diarrhea. It is predicted that prophylaxis of CPT-11 induced diarrhea will reduce sub-therapeutic dosing as well as hospitalizations and will eventually lead to dose escalations resulting in better response rates. This article reviews various experimental agents and strategies employed to prevent this debilitating toxicity. Covered topics include schedule/dose modification, intestinal alkalization, structural/chemical modification, genetic testing, anti-diarrheal therapies, transporter (ABCB1, ABCC2, BCRP2) inhibitors, enzyme (β-glucuronidase, UGT1A1, CYP3A4, carboxylesterase, COX-2) inducers and inhibitors, probiotics, antibiotics, adsorbing agents, cytokine and growth factor activators and inhibitors and other miscellaneous agents. PMID:23597015

  17. Na+/Ca2+ exchanger contributes to stool transport in mice with experimental diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    NISHIYAMA, Kazuhiro; TANIOKA, Kohta; AZUMA, Yasu-Taka; HAYASHI, Satomi; FUJIMOTO, Yasuyuki; YOSHIDA, Natsuho; KITA, Satomi; SUZUKI, Sho; NAKAJIMA, Hidemitsu; IWAMOTO, Takahiro; TAKEUCHI, Tadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) is a bidirectional transporter that is controlled by membrane potential and transmembrane gradients of Na+ and Ca2+. To reveal the functional role of NCX on gastrointestinal motility, we have previously used NCX1 and NCX2 heterozygote knockout mice (HET). We found that NCX1 and NCX2 play important roles in the motility of the gastric fundus, ileum and distal colon. Therefore, we believed that NCX1 and NCX2 play an important role in transport of intestinal contents. Here, we investigated the role of NCX in a mouse model of drug-induced diarrhea. The fecal consistencies in NCX1 HET and NCX2 HET were assessed using a diarrhea induced by magnesium sulfate, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). NCX2 HET, but not NCX1 HET, exacerbated magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea by increasing watery fecals. Likewise, 5-HT-induced diarrheas were exacerbated in NCX2 HET, but not NCX1 HET. However, NCX1 HET and NCX2 HET demonstrated PGE2 induced diarrhea similar to those of wild-type mice (WT). As well as the result of the distal colon shown previously, in the proximal and transverse colons of WT, the myenteric plexus layers and the longitudinal and circular muscle layers were strongly immunoreactive to NCX1 and NCX2. In this study, we demonstrate that NCX2 has important roles in development of diarrhea. PMID:27928109

  18. Pathogen-induced secretory diarrhea and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mandal, S; Patil, P; Tomar, S K

    2016-11-01

    Secretory diarrhea is a historically known serious health implication around the world which primarily originates through pathogenic microorganisms rather than immunological or genetical disorders. This review highlights infective mechanisms of non-inflammatory secretory diarrhea causing pathogens, known therapeutics and their efficacy against them. These non-inflammatory diarrheal pathogens breach cell barriers, induce inflammation, disrupt fluid secretion across the epithelium by alteration in ion transport by faulting cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), calcium activated chloride channels and ion exchanger functions. Currently, a variety of prevention strategies have been used to treat these symptoms like use of antibacterial drugs, vaccines, fluid and nutritional therapy, probiotics and prebiotics as adjuncts. In progression of the need for a therapy having quick physiological effects, withdrawing the symptoms with a wide and safe therapeutic index, newer antisecretory agents like potent inhibitors, agonists and herbal remedies are some of the interventions which have come into light through greater understanding of the mechanisms and molecular targets involved in intestinal fluid secretion. Although these therapies have their own pros and cons inside the host, the quest for new antisecretory agents has been a successful elucidation to reduce burden of diarrheal disease.

  19. Cancer treatment-induced diarrhea: interventions to minimize the roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    This program used a case-study approach to discuss interventions that nurses can implement in their daily clinical environment to minimize cancer treatment-induced diarrhea. Manifestations of cancer treatment-induced diarrhea, medical treatment options, and nutritional interventions were covered.

  20. [Hypokalemia-induced paraplegia secondary to acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Ortuño Andériz, F; Cabello Clotet, N; de Diego Gamarra, R; Salaverría Garzón, I; Vázquez Rizaldos, S

    2002-02-01

    Hypokalemia can give a variety of syntomatology but more often courses without it or with inespecific clinical manifestations. In our enviroment the etiology of hypokalemia is wide but one of the most common causes in third world countries are diarrheas. We describe a case of severe hypokalemia due to acute diarrhea which was manifested with severe neurologic symtoms but improves with conventional treatment.

  1. Experimental infection of mice with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to test the ability of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) to infect mice. Two mice each were either mock infected or inoculated with one of three BVDV strains by the intraperitoneal (IP) (n = 8) or intranasal (IN) (n = 8) route. All mice were euthanized at day 7 postinfection (p.i.). None of the infected mice exhibited any clinical signs of illness; however, the tissues harvested after BVDV challenge showed significant histopathological changes. Blood samples from five mice that were injected IP and one mouse that was inoculated IN were positive for BVDV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assess the presence of viral antigen in the organs of mice infected with three BVDV strains. In IP-injected mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the spleen (5/6), mesenteric lymph nodes (4/6), lymphatic tissue of the lung (3/6), lung (1/6), and stomach (1/6) of the infected mice; however, it was not detected in the liver (0/6) or kidney (0/6). In IN-inoculated mice, BVDV antigen was detected in the lung and mesenteric lymph nodes of one BVDV-infected mouse but was not detected in other tissues. The results of this study suggest that the spleen is the most reliable tissue for BVDV antigen detection using IHC in the IP-injected group. Our study demonstrates that mice can be infected by BVDV. This is the first report of BVDV infection in mice.

  2. VSL#3 probiotic treatment reduces chemotherapy-induced diarrhea and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Joanne M; Stringer, Andrea M; Gibson, Rachel J; Yeoh, Ann S J; Hannam, Sarah; Keefe, Dorothy M K

    2007-09-01

    One of the most common toxicities of cancer treatment is diarrhea. Probiotics have been shown effective at preventing diarrhea in inflammatory bowel disease and may prove useful in the oncology setting. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the probiotic mixture, VSL#3, for amelioration of chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID). This experiment was carried out in a clinically relevant model of CID. VSL#3 was administered to female DA rats in one of three schedules. Irinotecan was used to induce mucositis and diarrhea, with rats monitored for seven days to record incidence of weight-loss and diarrhea. At study completion, intestines were collected to investigate histological and proliferative changes, apoptosis levels and mucin composition. VSL#3 reduced weight loss following irinotecan when administered before and after chemotherapy. Moderate and severe diarrhea was also prevented in these rats. This was associated with a significant increase in crypt proliferation combined with an inhibition of apoptosis in both the small and large intestines. VSL#3 also prevented irinotecan-induced increases in goblet cells within jejunal crypts. VSL#3 is effective at preventing severe diarrhea following chemotherapy with irinotecan and therefore has potential to be used clinically by cancer patients.

  3. An experimental contribution to the study of the pathogenesis of bovine viral diarrhea virus infection.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, G; Osburn, B I; Ferrari, M; Traldi, V

    1992-07-01

    This presentation summarizes the results of a study on the pathogenesis of bovine viral diarrhea (BVDV) infection. The cytopathic (CP) strain TVM-2 of BVDV induced in calves an overt clinical disease which is usually recorded as the acute primary BVDV infection observed under natural conditions. In contrast the non-cytopathic (NCP) strain New York-1 of BVDV did not cause any significant signs of disease. However, when the calves were immunosuppressed by treatment with dexamethasone (DMS) the biotype of BVDV involved did not seem to be as important as it appeared to be in an immunologically normal animal. This was shown in this study by the NCP BVDV which caused a fatal disease in calves treated with DMS. A mixed infection given to calves by injecting them with both CP and NCP BVDV, did not result in any particularly serious disease. So, the potential immunosuppressive activity of BVDV itself for the host has not been proven under the experimental procedures used in this experiment. Finally, a modified-live CP BVDV vaccine was unable to cause clinical disease when injected into calves that had been infected previously with strain New York-1 of BVDV.

  4. Studies of osmotic diarrhea induced in normal subjects by ingestion of polyethylene glycol and lactulose.

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, H F; Santa Ana, C A; Schiller, L R; Fordtran, J S

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to gain insight into the pathophysiology of pure osmotic diarrhea and the osmotic diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption. Diarrhea was induced in normal volunteers by ingestion of polyethylene glycol (PEG), which is nonabsorbable, not metabolized by colonic bacteria, and carries no electrical charge. In PEG-induced diarrhea, (a) stool weight was directly correlated with the total mass of PEG ingested; (b) PEG contributed 40-60% of the osmolality of the fecal fluid, the remainder being contributed by other solutes either of dietary, endogenous, or bacterial origin; and (c) fecal sodium, potassium, and chloride were avidly conserved by the intestine, in spite of stool water losses exceeding 1,200 g/d. Diarrhea was also induced in normal subjects by ingestion of lactulose, a disaccharide that is not absorbed by the small intestine but is metabolized by colonic bacteria. In lactulose-induced diarrhea, (a) a maximum of approximate 80 g/d of lactulose was metabolized by colonic bacteria to noncarbohydrate moieties such as organic acids; (b) the organic acids were partially absorbed in the colon; (c) unabsorbed organic acids obligated the accumulation of inorganic cations (Na greater than Ca greater than K greater than Mg) in the diarrheal fluid; (d) diarrhea associated with low doses of lactulose was mainly due to unabsorbed organic acids and associated cations, whereas with larger doses of lactulose unmetabolized carbohydrates also played a major role; and (e) the net effect of bacterial metabolism of lactulose and partial absorption of organic acids on stool water output was done dependent. With low or moderate doses of lactulose, stool water losses were reduced by as much as 600 g/d (compared with equimolar osmotic loads of PEG); with large dose, the increment in osmotically active solutes within the lumen exceeded the increment of the ingested osmotic load, and the severity of diarrhea was augmented. PMID:2794043

  5. [Lactose-induced diarrhea increases oxidative stress and it is more severe in rats deficient in vitamin E].

    PubMed

    Dellán, Graciela; Carías, Diamela; Cioccia, Anna M; González, Eduardo; Hevia, Patricio

    2005-03-01

    Diarrhea is the disease with high incidence in the world and causes infant mortality and malnutrition in the developing world. This justifies the study of nutrition and diarrhea. Due to ethical and financial considerations it is difficult to study nutrition and diarrhea in children thus animal models have become a convenient alternative. In previous studies it was shown that lactose induced diarrhea in rats was associated with a reduction in tissue levels of vitamin E and also with evidence of an inflammatory response of the intestine. Accordingly, in this study, in order to determine the effect of this type of diarrhea on the level of oxidative stress, diarrhea was induced in vitamin E sufficient and deficient rats. The results showed that after 23 days the tissue concentration of vitamin E decreased in all the rats with diarrhea but this reduction was substantially greater in the vitamin E deficient group. Moreover, diarrhea was 60% more severe in the vitamin E deficient rats than in the vitamin E sufficient group that also had diarrhea. Both diarrhea and vitamin E deficiency altered malonaldehyde and superoxide dismutase levels in various tissues. However, the most outstanding changes associated with diarrhea were a 100% increment in plasma malonaldehyde and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activities which were 8 to 11 times higher than those seen in the rats without diarrhea. These non-invasive changes correlated well with the severity of diarrhea. The study shows that vitamin E deficiency results in diarrheas which are more severe and that lactose induced diarrhea is associated with higher levels of oxidative stress.

  6. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Mengjia; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Tan, Xin; Guo, Hengke; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Guokai; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Li, Zhonghua; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhang, Bingzhou; Ku, Xugang; Wu, Meizhou; Fan, Shengxian; He, Qigai

    2017-01-01

    The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:28335505

  7. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaozhen; Zhang, Mengjia; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Tan, Xin; Guo, Hengke; Zeng, Wei; Yan, Guokai; Memon, Atta Muhammad; Li, Zhonghua; Zhu, Yinxing; Zhang, Bingzhou; Ku, Xugang; Wu, Meizhou; Fan, Shengxian; He, Qigai

    2017-03-19

    The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  8. Inhibition of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin-induced diarrhea by Chaenomeles speciosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Wu, Shih-Lu; Chao, De-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2007-09-05

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is responsible for millions of deaths in developing countries. Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), the virulence factor of ETEC, induces diarrhea by initially binding to the G(M1) on the surface of intestinal epithelial cells and consequently leading to the massive loss of fluid and ions from cells. Fruit of Chaenomeles (FC), the dried fruit of Chaenomeles speciosa, has been used for diarrhea in China. However, the anti-diarrheal mechanism of FC is still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that FC extract (FCE) inhibited the LT-induced diarrhea in mice by blocking the binding of the B subunit of LT (LTB) to G(M1). The ethyl acetate (EA) soluble fraction was the most active fraction of FC that significantly abolished the LTB and G(M1) interaction. Furthermore, the oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, and betulinic acid from EA fraction, blocked the toxin binding effects, resulting in the suppression of LT-induced diarrhea. Moreover, by docking techniques, these compounds fitted LTB well via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts with amino acid residues of LTB. In conclusion, our findings suggested that oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, and betulinic acid were the active constituents from FC and might be considered as lead therapeutic agents in the treatment of LT-induced diarrhea.

  9. Virulent Properties of Russian Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Strains in Experimentally Infected Calves

    PubMed Central

    Koteneva, Svetlana V.; Semenova, Olga V.; Sergeev, Alexander A.; Titova, Ksenya A.; Morozova, Anastasia A.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental study of three noncytopathic and two cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strains isolated from cattle in the Siberian region and belonging to the type 1 (subtypes 1a, 1b, and 1d) have been presented. All investigated strains caused the development of infectious process in the seronegative 4–6-month-old calves after aerosol challenge with the dose of 6 log10 TCID50. The greatest virulence had noncytopathic strain and cytopathic strain related to the subtypes 1d and 1b, respectively. All strains in infected calves caused some signs of moderate acute respiratory disease and diarrhea: depression 3–5 days postinfection (p.i.), refusal to food, severe hyperthermia to 41.9°С, serous exudate discharges from the nasal cavity and eyes, transient diarrhea with blood, leukopenia (up to 2700 cells/mm3), and macroscopic changes in the respiratory organs and intestine. The infected animals recovered from 12 to 15 days p.i. and in 90% cases formed humoral immune response 25 days p.i. (antibody titers to BVDV: 1 : 4–1 : 16). Our results confirmed the presence of virulent BVDV1 strains and showed the need for researches on the molecular epidemiology of the disease, development of more effective diagnostic systems, and optimization of control programs with use of vaccines. PMID:27190687

  10. Chemotherapy-induced diarrhea: pathophysiology, frequency and guideline-based management

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Alexander; Voigt, Wieland; Jordan, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of the main drawbacks for cancer patients. Possible etiologies could be radiotherapy, chemotherapeutic agents, decreased physical performance, graft versus host disease and infections. Chemotherapy-induced diarrhea (CID) is a common problem, especially in patients with advanced cancer. The incidence of CID has been reported to be as high as 50–80% of treated patients (≥30% CTC grade 3–5), especially with 5-fluorouracil bolus or some combination therapies of irinotecan and fluoropyrimidines (IFL, XELIRI). Regardless of the molecular targeted approach of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and antibodies, diarrhea is a common side effect in up to 60% of patients with up to 10% having severe diarrhea. Furthermore, the underlying pathophysiology is still under investigation. Despite the number of clinical trials evaluating therapeutic or prophylactic measures in CID, there are just three drugs recommended in current guidelines: loperamide, deodorized tincture of opium and octreotide. Newer strategies and more effective agents are being developed to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with CID. Recent research focusing on the prophylactic use of antibiotics, budesonide, probiotics or activated charcoal still have to define the role of these drugs in the routine clinical setting. Whereas therapeutic management and clinical work-up of patients presenting with diarrhea after chemotherapy are rather well defined, prediction and prevention of CID is an evolving field. Current research focuses on establishing predictive factors for CID like uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase-1A1 polymorphisms for irinotecan or dihydropyrimidine-dehydrogenase insufficiency for fluoropyrimidines. PMID:21789126

  11. Probiotics for prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Meng; Li, Shu-Ting; Shu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is commonly used for abdominal or pelvic cancer, and patients receiving radiotherapy have a high risk developing to an acute radiation-induced diarrhea. Several previous studies have discussed the effect of probiotics on prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea, but the results are still inconsistent. Objective We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the efficacy of probiotic supplementation for prevention the radiation-induced diarrhea. Methods Relevant RCTs studies assessing the effect of probiotic supplementation on clinical outcomes compared with placebo were searched in PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library databases (up to March 30 2016). Heterogeneity was assessed with I2 and H2, and publication bias was evaluated using sensitive analysis. Results Six trials, a total of 917 participants (490 participants received prophylactic probiotics and 427 participants received placebo), were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with placebo, probiotics were associated with a lower incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea (RR: 0.55; 95% CI: 0.34–0.88; P = 0.01; I2: 87%; 95% CI: 75%-94%; H2: 2.8; 95% CI: 2.0–4.0). However, there is no significant difference in the anti-diarrheal medication use (RR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.40–1.14; P = 0.14) or bristol scale on stool form (RR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.35–1.17; P = 0.14). Conclusion Probiotics may be beneficial to prevent radiation-induced diarrhea in patients who suffered from abdominal or pelvic cancers during radiotherapy period. PMID:28575095

  12. Dietary plant extracts alleviate diarrhea and alter immune responses of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Almeida, J A S; Lee, J J; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2013-11-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of 3 different plant extracts on diarrhea, immune response, intestinal morphology, and growth performance of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic F-18 Escherichia coli (E. coli). Sixty-four weaned pigs (6.3±0.2 kg BW, and 21 d old) were housed in individual pens in disease containment chambers for 15 d: 4 d before and 11 d after the first inoculation (d 0). Treatments were in a 2×4 factorial arrangement: with or without an F-18 E. coli challenge (toxins: heat-labile toxin, heat-stable toxin b, and Shiga-like toxin 2; 10(10) cfu/3 mL oral dose; daily for 3 d from d 0) and 4 diets [a nursery basal diet (CON) or 10 ppm of capsicum oleoresin, garlic botanical, or turmeric oleoresin]. The growth performance was measured on d 0 to 5, 5 to 11, and 0 to 11. Diarrhea score (1, normal, to 5, watery diarrhea) was recorded for each pig daily. Frequency of diarrhea was the percentage of pig days with a diarrhea score of 3 or greater. Blood was collected on d 0, 5, and 11 to measure total and differential white blood cell counts and serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, C-reactive protein, and haptoglobin. On d 5 and 11, half of the pigs were euthanized to measure villi height and crypt depth of the small intestine and macrophage and neutrophil number in the ileum. The E. coli infection increased (P<0.05) diarrhea score, frequency of diarrhea, white blood cell counts, serum TNF-α and haptoglobin, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils but reduced (P<0.05) villi height and the ratio of villi height to crypt depth of the small intestine on d 5. In the challenged group, feeding plant extracts reduced (P<0.05) average diarrhea score from d 0 to 2 and d 6 to 11 and frequency of diarrhea and decreased (P<0.05) TNF-α and haptoglobin on d 5, white blood cell counts and neutrophils on d 11, and ileal macrophages and neutrophils on d 5. Feeding plant extracts increased (P<0

  13. Anti-diarrhea activity of the aqueous root bark extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus on castor oil-induced diarrhea in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ejeh, Sunday A; Onyeyili, Patrick; Abalaka, Samson E

    2017-07-01

    The use of traditional medicine as an alternative source of cure for many ailments has played an important role in health care delivery in both developing and developed countries. Byrsocarpus coccineus Schum and Thonn (Connaraceae) is used in traditional medicine for treatment of various disease conditions, including diarrhea. The anti-diarrhea activity of the root bark aqueous extract of B. coccineus was investigated in this study. Acute toxicity evaluation of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark was performed in exposed rats. Diarrhea was induced in exposed rats with castor oil, and the effect of the extract on castor oil-induced gastrointestinal motility and enteropooling was consequently investigated. In the acute toxicity study, the extract caused no death in treated rats nor produced signs of delayed toxicity, even at 5000 mg/kg. The aqueous root bark extract of B. coccineus also decreased the distance travelled by activated charcoal in the gastrointestinal tract of treated rats when compared to control rats. Results of castor oil-induced enteropooling revealed slight reduction in the weight of intestinal contents of treated rats compared to control rats. There was significant (p<0.05) decrease in the frequency of defecation as well as in the number of unformed feces produced by castor oil-induced diarrhea at 100 mg/kg dose with 74.96% inhibition of defecation. The study demonstrated the anti-diarrheic property of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark as currently exploited in our traditional herbal therapy.

  14. Correlation between Diarrhea Severity and Oocyst Count via Quantitative PCR or Fluorescence Microscopy in Experimental Cryptosporidiosis in Calves

    PubMed Central

    Operario, Darwin J.; Bristol, Lauren S.; Liotta, Janice; Nydam, Daryl V.; Houpt, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important diarrhea-associated pathogen, however the correlation between parasite burden and diarrhea severity remains unclear. We studied this relationship in 10 experimentally infected calves using immunofluorescence microscopy and real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (N = 124 fecal samples). The qPCR data were corrected for extraction/amplification efficiency and gene copy number to generate parasite counts. The qPCR and microscopic oocyst quantities exhibited significant correlation (R2 = 0.33, P < 0.05), however qPCR had increased sensitivity. Upon comparison with diarrhea severity scores (from 0 to 3), a PCR-based count of ≥ 2.6 × 105 parasites or an immunofluorescence microscopy count of ≥ 4.5 × 104 oocysts were discriminatory predictors of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (versus no-to-mild diarrhea), with accuracies and predictive values of 72–82%. In summary, a quantitative approach for Cryptosporidium can refine predictive power for diarrhea and appears useful for distinguishing clinical cryptosporidiosis versus subclinical infection. PMID:25371182

  15. IgY antibodies protect against human Rotavirus induced diarrhea in the neonatal gnotobiotic piglet disease model.

    PubMed

    Vega, Celina G; Bok, Marina; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Fernández, Fernando M; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Parreño, Viviana G; Saif, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Group A Rotaviruses are the most common cause of severe, dehydrating diarrhea in children worldwide. The aim of the present work was to evaluate protection against rotavirus (RV) diarrhea conferred by the prophylactic administration of specific IgY antibodies (Ab) to gnotobiotic piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] human rotavirus (HRV). Chicken egg yolk IgY Ab generated from Wa HRV hyperimmunized hens specifically recognized (ELISA) and neutralized Wa HRV in vitro. Supplementation of the RV Ab free cow milk diet with Wa HRV-specific egg yolk IgY Ab at a final ELISA Ab titer of 4096 (virus neutralization -VN- titer = 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against Wa HRV associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. This protection was dose-dependent. The oral administration of semi-purified passive IgY Abs from chickens did not affect the isotype profile of the pig Ab secreting cell (ASC) responses to Wa HRV infection, but it was associated with significantly fewer numbers of HRV-specific IgA ASC in the duodenum. We further analyzed the pigś immune responses to the passive IgY treatment. The oral administration of IgY Abs induced IgG Ab responses to chicken IgY in serum and local IgA and IgG Ab responses to IgY in the intestinal contents of neonatal piglets in a dose dependent manner. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that IgY Abs administered orally as a milk supplement passively protect neonatal pigs against an enteric viral pathogen (HRV). Piglets are an animal model with a gastrointestinal physiology and an immune system that closely mimic human infants. This strategy can be scaled-up to inexpensively produce large amounts of polyclonal IgY Abs from egg yolks to be applied as a preventive and therapeutic passive Ab treatment to control RV diarrhea.

  16. Garcinia buchananii bark extract is an effective anti-diarrheal remedy for lactose-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Boakye, Paul A; Brierley, Stuart M; Pasilis, Sofie P; Balemba, Onesmo B

    2012-07-13

    The extract from the stem bark of Garcinia buchananii trees is used as an anti-diarrhea remedy in sub-Saharan Africa. We tested the hypothesis that G. buchananii bark extract and its anti-motility fractions are effective treatments against lactose-induced diarrhea. A high-lactose (35%) diet was used to induce diarrhea in Wistar rats, which were then treated with either G. buchananii bark extract (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 g bark powder), and its anti-motility fractions isolated using preparative thin layer chromatography; termed PTLC1 (15 mg) and PTLC5 (3.8 mg) or loperamide (8.4 mg). Drug preparations were dissolved in 1L except PTCL1 and PTLC5 that were dissolved in 100mL tap water. Numerous parameters were measured in each condition including consistency, fluid and mucus content of feces, body weight, water and food consumption, urine production and bloating. Diarrheic rats produced watery or loose, mucuoid, sticky, feces. Fluids constituted 86% of stool mass compared with only 42% for control rats fed standard chow. Compared with controls, diarrheic rats produced more urine, lost weight and had bloated ceca and colons. All doses of the extract, its anti-motility fractions and loperamide individually stopped diarrhea within 6-24 h of administration, whilst significantly reducing mucus and fecal fluid content, urine production and intestinal bloating. Rats treated with 0.1g extract, PTLC1 and PTLC5 gained weight, whilst PTLC5 also increased water intake. Garcinia buchananii extract and its anti-motility fractions are effective remedies against lactose-induced diarrhea. The extract contains compounds that reverse weight loss, promote food and water intake, supporting the notion that characterization of the compounds could lead to new therapies against diarrheal diseases. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Calcium polycarbophil, a water absorbing polymer, increases bowel movement and prevents sennoside-induced diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Yamada, T; Iwanaga, Y; Morikawa, K; Nagata, O; Kato, H; Mizumoto, A; Itoh, Z

    2000-07-01

    The effects of calcium polycarbophil (CP), a water-absorbing polymer, on bowel movement were examined in comparison with known laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents in dogs, a species that resembles humans for stool output. CP increased stool frequency, fecal water content and fecal weight in a dose-dependent manner, but did not induce diarrhea. Sennoside and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (CMC-Na) increased fecal water content and induced diarrhea at lower doses than that which enhanced stool frequency. Trimebutine decreased stool frequency, fecal weight and fecal water content, resulting in inhibition rather than stimulation of defecation. In sennoside-induced diarrhea, loperamide and CP improved stool consistency and this was accompanied by reduced fecal moisture and frequency of diarrhea. In contrast, CMC-Na aggravated stool consistency with increased fecal water content and frequency of diarrhea, and trimebutine had little noticeable effect apart from reducing fecal weight. Our results show that CP has both laxative and anti-diarrheal effects in dogs and differed from conventional laxatives and anti-diarrheal agents. CP may be a suitable agent for treatment of idiopathic constipation, secretory diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome with alternating constipation and diarrhea and with either predominating in terms of less side effects such as diarrhea or constipation.

  18. Effects of Debaryomyces hansenii treatment on intestinal microorganisms in mice with antibiotics-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    He, Lu; Long, Chengxing; Liu, Youjia; Guo, Yanfang; Xiao, Nenqun; Tan, Zhoujin

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the influence of Debaryomyces hansenii treatment on intestinal microorganisms in mice with antibiotics-induced diarrhea, mouse model of antibiotics-induced diarrhea was created by gavaging mice with mixed antibiotics (23.33 mL/kg/days) composed of gentamycin sulfate and cefradine for 5 days. Mice with the symptom of diarrhea were then treated with D. hansenii by intragastric administration. The control group mice were given with sterile water. After 4 day treatment, total DNA of intestinal microflora of treated and control mice was extracted, and their quantities were measured by sequencing the V4 region of 16S rDNA. The results showed that when compared to the control (sterile water), treatment with D. hansenii increased the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of intestinal bacteria. The Chao index in diarrhea treated group was higher than diarrhea control group and was similar to healthy control group, while all differences had no significance (P > 0.05). D. hansenii treatment increased the Shannon index but not significantly (P > 0.05). Moreover, there was not significant impact on density and diversity of intestinal bacterial population at phylum and genus levels (P > 0.05). Interestingly, D. hansenii treatment recovered the population density of certain bacterium species, such as Bacteroidaceae (in family level) (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that D. hansenii has potency of adjusting the density and diversity of intestinal bacteria and recovering the population density of Bacteroidaceae in family level.

  19. Recombinant monovalent llama-derived antibody fragments (VHH) to rotavirus VP6 protect neonatal gnotobiotic piglets against human rotavirus-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Vega, Celina G; Bok, Marina; Vlasova, Anastasia N; Chattha, Kuldeep S; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Nuñez, Carmen; Alvarado, Carmen; Lasa, Rodrigo; Escribano, José M; Garaicoechea, Lorena L; Fernandez, Fernando; Bok, Karin; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Saif, Linda J; Parreño, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs) against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH) to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea.

  20. Recombinant Monovalent Llama-Derived Antibody Fragments (VHH) to Rotavirus VP6 Protect Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglets against Human Rotavirus-Induced Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Chattha, Kuldeep S.; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Nuñez, Carmen; Alvarado, Carmen; Lasa, Rodrigo; Escribano, José M.; Garaicoechea, Lorena L.; Fernandez, Fernando; Bok, Karin; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Saif, Linda J.; Parreño, Viviana

    2013-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) is the leading cause of severe diarrhea in children. The aims of the present study were to determine the neutralizing activity of VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH nanoAbs) against different RVA strains in vitro and to evaluate the ability of G6P[1] VP6-specific llama-derived single domain nanoantibodies (VHH) to protect against human rotavirus in gnotobiotic (Gn) piglets experimentally inoculated with virulent Wa G1P[8] rotavirus. Supplementation of the daily milk diet with 3B2 VHH clone produced using a baculovirus vector expression system (final ELISA antibody -Ab- titer of 4096; virus neutralization -VN- titer of 256) for 9 days conferred full protection against rotavirus associated diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. The administration of comparable levels of porcine IgG Abs only protected 4 out of 6 of the animals from human RVA diarrhea but significantly reduced virus shedding. In contrast, G6P[1]-VP6 rotavirus-specific IgY Abs purified from eggs of hyperimmunized hens failed to protect piglets against human RVA-induced diarrhea or virus shedding when administering similar quantities of Abs. The oral administration of VHH nanoAb neither interfered with the host's isotype profiles of the Ab secreting cell responses to rotavirus, nor induced detectable host Ab responses to the treatment in serum or intestinal contents. This study shows that the oral administration of rotavirus VP6-VHH nanoAb is a broadly reactive and effective treatment against rotavirus-induced diarrhea in neonatal pigs. Our findings highlight the potential value of a broad neutralizing VP6-specific VHH nanoAb as a treatment that can complement or be used as an alternative to the current strain-specific RVA vaccines. Nanobodies could also be scaled-up to develop pediatric medication or functional food like infant milk formulas that might help treat RVA diarrhea. PMID:23658521

  1. Anti-diarrhea activity of the aqueous root bark extract of Byrsocarpus coccineus on castor oil-induced diarrhea in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Ejeh, Sunday A.; Onyeyili, Patrick; Abalaka, Samson E.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The use of traditional medicine as an alternative source of cure for many ailments has played an important role in health care delivery in both developing and developed countries. Byrsocarpus coccineus Schum and Thonn (Connaraceae) is used in traditional medicine for treatment of various disease conditions, including diarrhea. The anti-diarrhea activity of the root bark aqueous extract of B. coccineus was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Acute toxicity evaluation of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark was performed in exposed rats. Diarrhea was induced in exposed rats with castor oil, and the effect of the extract on castor oil-induced gastrointestinal motility and enteropooling was consequently investigated. Results: In the acute toxicity study, the extract caused no death in treated rats nor produced signs of delayed toxicity, even at 5000 mg/kg. The aqueous root bark extract of B. coccineus also decreased the distance travelled by activated charcoal in the gastrointestinal tract of treated rats when compared to control rats. Results of castor oil-induced enteropooling revealed slight reduction in the weight of intestinal contents of treated rats compared to control rats. There was significant (p<0.05) decrease in the frequency of defecation as well as in the number of unformed feces produced by castor oil-induced diarrhea at 100 mg/kg dose with 74.96% inhibition of defecation. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the anti-diarrheic property of the aqueous extract of B. coccineus root bark as currently exploited in our traditional herbal therapy. PMID:28831215

  2. An experimental study and a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to evaluate the antisecretory activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB against nonrotavirus diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Sarrazin-Davila, Luis E; Servin, Alain L

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that selected strains of Lactobacillus have the capacity to antagonize rotavirus-induced diarrhea. However, only a few reports have documented their efficacy against nonrotavirus diarrhea. This study involved an experimental investigation and a clinical trial of the antisecretory activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus strain LB in the context of nonrotavirus diarrhea. The activity of a culture of L. acidophilus LB or of the lyophilized, heat-killed L. acidophilus LB bacteria plus their spent culture medium was tested in inhibiting the formation of fluid-formed domes in cultured human intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cell monolayers infected with diarrheagenic, diffusely adhering Afa/Dr Escherichia coli C1845 bacteria. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of male or female children who were 10 months of age and presented with nonrotavirus, well-established diarrhea was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of a pharmaceutical preparation that contains 10 billion heat-killed L. acidophilus LB plus 160 mg of spent culture medium. Infection of the cells with C1845 bacteria that were treated with L. acidophilus LB culture or the lyophilized, heat-killed L. acidophilus LB bacteria plus their culture medium produced a dosage-dependent decrease in the number of fluid-formed domes as compared with cells that were infected with untreated C1845 bacteria. The clinical results show that in selected and controlled homogeneous groups of children with well-established, nonrotavirus diarrhea, adding lyophilized, heat-killed L. acidophilus LB bacteria plus their culture medium to a solution of oral rehydration solution shortened by 1 day the recovery time (ie, the time until the first normal stool was passed) as compared with children who received placebo oral rehydration solution. Heat-killed L. acidophilus LB plus its culture medium antagonizes the C1845-induced increase in paracellular permeability in intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells

  3. Use of probiotics for prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Blanarova, C; Galovicova, A; Petrasova, D

    2009-01-01

    Probiotics can be applied in therapy and mainly in prevention of many civilization disorders. Experimental studies in animal models and clinical trials of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have consistently shown that the use of probiotic organisms may effectively down-modulate the severity of intestinal inflammation by altering the composition and metabolic and functional properties of indigenous flora of the gut. Previous studies showed a protective effect of probiotic administration after radiation therapy, and probiotic may play an important role in the pathogenesis of radiation enteropathy. These studies indicate that probiotics may decrease the risk of accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in host organisms and could potentially be used as probiotic food supplements to reduce oxidative stress (Tab. 2, Ref. 47). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  4. Intestinal alkalization as a possible preventive mechanism in irinotecan (CPT-11)-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Tadashi; Ha, Linan; Arimori, Kazuhiko; Latham, Patricia; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Ceryak, Susan; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Bouscarel, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of irinotecan (CPT-11), a DNA topoisomerase inhibitor, is often limited by the induction of severe late-onset diarrhea. This prodrug and its active metabolite, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin (SN-38), have a labile alpha-hydroxy-lactone ring that undergoes pH-dependent reversible hydrolysis. At physiological pH and higher, equilibrium favors the less toxic carboxylate form, whereas at acidic pH, the more potent lactone form is favored. We have reported previously that the initial uptake rate of CPT-11 and SN-38 by intestinal cells was significantly different between the respective lactone and carboxylate form. Results from the present study in HT-29 cells further demonstrate the correlation between the CPT-11/SN-38 initial uptake rate and the induced toxicity, cell cycle alteration, apoptosis, and colony-forming efficiency. The exposure of HT-29 cells to SN-38 for a limited period of time (<2 h) was sufficient to induce these events. Because the decreased initial uptake of SN-38 carboxylate resulted in a reduced cellular toxicity, we postulated that the CPT-11-induced diarrhea was preventable by influencing the equilibrium toward the carboxylate form and, thus, reducing its intestinal uptake. In the golden Syrian hamster model, p.o. sodium bicarbonate supplementation (5 mg/ml in drinking water) led to alkalization of the intestinal contents. In addition, this alkalization resulted in the reduction of the histopathological damage to the mucosa of the small and large intestine, as well as a 20% reduction of the intestinal SN-38 lactone concentration of animals receiving CPT-11 (20-50 mg/kg x 7 days). Taken together, these results from in vitro and in vivo studies support intestinal alkalization by sodium bicarbonate supplementation as a preventive mechanism against CPT-11-induced diarrhea. In addition, this provides a strong rationale for the usage of this measure as an adjunct to CPT-11 treatment.

  5. Reproduction of mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea and colitis indistinguishable from swine dysentery following experimental inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii" strain 30446.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Joseph E; Costa, Matheus O; Hill, Janet E; Kittrell, Heather E; Fernando, Champika; Huang, Yanyun; O'Connor, Brendan; Harding, John C S

    2013-01-01

    Mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, swine dysentery, is a severe production limiting disease of swine. Recently, pigs in western Canada with clinical signs indistinguishable from swine dysentery were observed. Despite the presence of spirochetes on fecal smears, recognized Brachyspira spp. including B. hyodysenteriae could not be identified. A phylogenetically distinct Brachyspira, called "B. hampsonii" strain 30446, however was isolated. The purpose of this study was to experimentally reproduce mucohaemorrhagic colitis and characterize strain 30446 shedding following inoculation. Eighteen 13-week-old pigs were randomly assigned to inoculation (n = 12) or control (n = 6) groups in each of two trials. In trial 1, pigs were inoculated with a tissue homogenate collected from clinically affected field cases. In trial 2, pigs were inoculated with a pure broth culture of strain 30446. In both trials, mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea was significantly more common in inoculated pigs than controls, all of which remained healthy. In animals with mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea, significantly more spirochetes were observed on Gram stained fecal smears, and higher numbers of strain 30446 genome equivalents were detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Strain 30446 was cultured from colon and/or feces of all affected but no control animals at necropsy. "Brachyspira hampsonii" strain 30446 causes mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea in pigs following a 4-9 day incubation period. Fecal shedding was detectable by day 4 post inoculation, and rarely preceded the onset of mucoid or haemorrhagic diarrhea by more than 2 days. Culture and 30446-specific qPCR are reliable methods of detection of this organism in feces and tissues of diarrheic pigs. The emergence of a novel Brachyspira spp., such as "B. hampsonii", creates diagnostic challenges including higher risk of false negative diagnostic tests. We therefore recommend diagnostic laboratories routinely use Brachyspira culture

  6. Experimental persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus in white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Passler, Thomas; Walz, Paul H; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Givens, M Daniel; Maxwell, Herris S; Brock, Kenny V

    2007-06-21

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections cause substantial economic losses to the cattle industries. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the most important reservoir for BVDV. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are the most abundant species of wild ruminants in the United States and contact between cattle and deer is common. If the outcome of fetal infection of white-tailed deer is similar to cattle, PI white-tailed deer may pose a threat to BVDV control programs. The objective of this study was to determine if experimental infection of pregnant white-tailed deer with BVDV would result in the birth of PI offspring. Nine female and one male white-tailed deer were captured and housed at a captive deer isolation facility. After natural mating had occurred, all does were inoculated intranasally at approximately 50 days of pregnancy with 10(6) CCID(50) each of a BVDV 1 (BJ) and BVDV 2 (PA131) strain. Although no clinical signs of BVDV infection were observed or abortions detected, only one pregnancy advanced to term. On day 167 post-inoculation, one doe delivered a live fawn and a mummified fetus. The fawn was translocated to an isolation facility to be hand-raised. The fawn was determined to be PI with BVDV 2 by serial virus isolation from serum and white blood cells, immunohistochemistry on skin biopsy, and RT-PCR. This is the first report of persistent infection of white-tailed deer with BVDV. Further research is needed to assess the impact of PI white-tailed deer on BVDV control programs in cattle.

  7. Oral rice-based vaccine induces passive and active immunity against enterotoxigenic E. coli-mediated diarrhea in pigs.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Oroku, Kazuki; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Kuroda, Masaharu; Kodama, Toshiaki; Nagai, Shinya; Ueda, Susumu; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2015-09-22

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes severe diarrhea in both neonatal and weaned pigs. Because the cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) has a high level of amino acid identity to the ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) B-subunit (LTB), we selected MucoRice-CTB as a vaccine candidate against ETEC-induced pig diarrhea. When pregnant sows were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, increased amounts of antigen-specific IgG and IgA were produced in their sera. CTB-specific IgG was secreted in the colostrum and transferred passively to the sera of suckling piglets. IgA antibodies in the colostrum and milk remained high with a booster dose after farrowing. Additionally, when weaned minipigs were orally immunized with MucoRice-CTB, production of CTB-specific intestinal SIgA, as well as systemic IgG and IgA, was induced. To evaluate the cross-protective effect of MucoRice-CTB against ETEC diarrhea, intestinal loop assay with ETEC was conducted. The fluid volume accumulated in the loops of minipigs immunized with MucoRice-CTB was significantly lower than that in control minipigs, indicating that MucoRice-CTB-induced cross-reactive immunity could protect weaned pigs from diarrhea caused by ETEC. MucoRice-CTB could be a candidate oral vaccine for inducing both passive and active immunity to protect both suckling and weaned piglets from ETEC diarrhea.

  8. 5-Fluorouracil induces diarrhea with changes in the expression of inflammatory cytokines and aquaporins in mouse intestines.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Sato, Ken; Nishizaki, Maiko; Shoji, Tetsuro; Horie, Syunji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Tokuyama, Shogo; Narita, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced diarrhea remain unclear, accumulating evidence has indicated that changes in the mucosal immune system and aquaporins (AQPs) may play a role in its pathogenesis. Therefore, we investigated the possible changes in the gene expression of inflammatory cytokines and AQPs in the intestines of mice with 5-FU-induced diarrhea. In the present study, the expressions of mRNAs that encode inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, Il-17A and IL-22, were significantly increased throughout the entire colon of mice that exhibited diarrhea following 5-FU administration. In contrast, the gene expression of IFNγ was upregulated only in the distal colon. These increases were significantly reduced by the administration of etanercept. However, 5-FU-induced diarrhea was not recovered by etanercept. On the other hand, the genes for AQPs 4 and 8 were markedly present in the colon, and these expressions in the intestines were significantly decreased by treatment with 5-FU. These decreases were not reversed by etanercept. These findings suggest TNF-α neutralization had no effect on the acutely 5-FU-induced diarrhea and impaired AQPs but reduced dramatically several inflammatory cytokines.

  9. Bovine viral diarrhea virus cyclically impairs long bone trabecular modeling in experimental persistently infected fetuses.

    PubMed

    Webb, B T; Norrdin, R W; Smirnova, N P; Van Campen, H; Weiner, C M; Antoniazzi, A Q; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Hansen, T R

    2012-11-01

    Persistent infection (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with osteopetrosis and other long bone lesions, most commonly characterized as transverse zones of unmodeled metaphyseal trabeculae in fetuses and calves. This study was undertaken to characterize the morphogenesis of fetal long bone lesions. Forty-six BVDV-naïve pregnant Hereford heifers of approximately 18 months of age were inoculated with noncytopathic BVDV type 2 containing media or media alone on day 75 of gestation to produce PI and control fetuses, respectively, which were collected via cesarean section on days 82, 89, 97, 192, and 245 of gestation. Radiographic and histomorphometric abnormalities were first detected on day 192, at which age PI fetal long bone metaphyses contained focal densities (4 of 7 fetuses) and multiple alternating transverse radiodense bands (3 of 7 fetuses). Day 245 fetuses were similarly affected. Histomorphometric analysis of proximal tibial metaphyses from day 192 fetuses revealed transverse zones with increased calcified cartilage core (Cg.V/BV, %) and trabecular bone (BV/TV, %) volumes in regions corresponding to radiodense bands (P < .05). Numbers of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase positive osteoclasts (N.Oc/BS, #/mm(2)) and bone perimeter occupied (Oc.S/BS, %) were both decreased (P < .05). Mineralizing surface (MS/BS, %), a measure of tissue level bone formation activity, was reduced in PI fetuses (P < .05). It is concluded that PI with BVDV induces cyclic abnormal trabecular modeling, which is secondary to reduced numbers of osteoclasts. The factors responsible for these temporal changes are unknown but may be related to the time required for osteoclast differentiation from precursor cells.

  10. Diarrhea in the immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Krones, Elisabeth; Högenauer, Christoph

    2012-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common problem in patients with immunocompromising conditions. The etiologic spectrum differs from patients with diarrhea who have a normal immune system. This article reviews the most important causes of diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, ranging from infectious causes to noninfectious causes of diarrhea in the setting of HIV infection as a model for other conditions of immunosuppression. It also deals with diarrhea in specific situations, eg, after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation, diarrhea induced by immunosuppressive drugs, and diarrhea in congenital immunodeficiency syndromes.

  11. Zinc influences innate immune responses in children with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Shamsuzzaman, Sohel; Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Nasrin, Dilruba; Nahar, Setarun; Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Al Tarique, Abdullah; Begum, Yasmin Ara; Qadri, Syed Saleheen; Chowdhury, Mohiul Islam; Saha, Amit; Larson, Charles P; Qadri, Firdausi

    2010-05-01

    Information is limited on the effect of zinc on immune responses in children with diarrhea due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), the most common bacterial pathogen in children. We studied the immunological effect of zinc treatment (20 mg/d) and supplementation (10 mg/d) in children with diarrhea due to ETEC. A total of 148 children aged 6-24 mo were followed up for 9 mo after a 10-d zinc treatment (ZT; n = 74) or a 10-d zinc treatment plus 3-mo supplementation (ZT+S; n = 74), as well as 50 children with ETEC-induced diarrhea that were not treated with zinc (UT). Fifty control children (HC) of the same age group from the same location were also studied. Serum zinc concentrations were higher in both the ZT (P < 0.001) and ZT+S groups (P < 0.001) than in the UT group but did not differ from the HC group. We found higher serum complement C3 immediately after zinc administration in both ZT (P < 0.001) and ZT+S (P < 0.001) groups than in the UT group. Phagocytic activity in children in both ZT (P < 0.01) and ZT+S (P < 0.01) groups was greater than in the UT group. However, oxidative burst capacity was lower in zinc-receiving groups (ZT, P < 0.001 and ZT+S, P < 0.001) than in the UT group. The naïve:memory T cell ratio in both ZT (P < 0.05) and ZT+S (P < 0.01) groups was higher than in the UT group from d 2 to 15. Increased responses, including complement C3, phagocytic activity, and changes in T cell phenotypes, suggest that zinc administration enhances innate immunity against ETEC infection in children.

  12. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-08-21

    To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection.

  13. Development of a human rotavirus induced diarrhea model in Chinese mini-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Tao; Wei, Jing; Guo, Hong-Xia; Han, Jiang-Bo; Ye, Nan; He, Hai-Yang; Yu, Tian-Tian; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To establish a new animal model for the research of human rotavirus (HRV) infection, its pathogenesis and immunity and evaluation of potential vaccines. METHODS 5-d, 30-d and 60-d-old Chinese mini-pigs, Guizhou and Bamma, were inoculated with a single oral dose of attenuated strain Wa, G1, G3 of HRV, and PBS (control), respectively, and fecal samples of pigs from 0 to 7 d post infection (DPI) were collected individually. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect HRV antigen in feces. The HRV was tested by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The sections of the intestinal tissue were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to observe the morphologic variation by microscopy. Immunofluorescence was used to determine the HRV in intestinal tissue. HRV particles in cells of the ileum were observed by electron micrography. RESULTS When inoculated with HRV, mini-pigs younger than 30 d developed diarrhea in an age-dependent manner and shed HRV antigen of the same inoculum, as demonstrated by RT-PCR. Histopathological changes were observed in HRV inoculated mini-pigs including small intestinal cell tumefaction and necrosis. HRV that was distributed in the small intestine was restricted to the top part of the villi on the internal wall of the ileum, which was observed by immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Virus particles were observed in Golgi like follicles in HRV-infected neonatal mini-pigs. Guizhou mini-pigs were more sensitive to HRV than Bamma with respect to RV antigen shedding and clinical diarrhea. CONCLUSION These results indicate that we have established a mini-pig model of HRV induced diarrhea. Our findings are useful for the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of HRV infection. PMID:27610023

  14. Diarrhea induced by Treponema hyodysenteriae: a young chick cecal model for swine dysentery.

    PubMed Central

    Sueyoshi, M; Adachi, Y

    1990-01-01

    released from the apical cytoplasm of epithelial cells. Microvilli also became scarce and irregular. The junctional complexes between cuboidal cells became unclear, the interdigitations between cuboidal cells became loose, and the intercellular spaces were widened. In conclusion, the appearance of numerous membrane-bound vesicles at the terminal web and the dilated intercellular space indicates increased secretion of water and electrolytes, and the abnormal proliferation of such immature epithelial cells indicates impaired absorption. On the basis of our findings, we can say that diarrhea induced by T. hyodysenteriae can be developed by synergism between impaired absorption and increased secretion by intestinal mucosae with hyperplastic immature epithelial cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images PMID:2205578

  15. An Adult Mouse Model of Vibrio cholerae-induced Diarrhea for Studying Pathogenesis and Potential Therapy of Cholera

    PubMed Central

    Sawasvirojwong, Sutthipong; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2013-01-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. This study aimed to establish an adult mouse model of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhea and to characterize its pathophysiology. Ligated ileal loops of adult mice were inoculated for 6, 9, 12 and 18 h with a classical O1 hypertoxigenic 569B strain of V. cholerae (107 CFU/loop). Time-course studies demonstrated that the optimal period for inducing diarrhea was 12 h post-inoculation, when peak intestinal fluid accumulation (loop/weight ratio of ∼0.2 g/cm) occurred with the highest diarrhea success rate (90%). In addition, pathogenic numbers of V. cholerae (∼109 CFU/g tissue) were recovered from ileal loops at all time points between 6–18 h post-inoculation with the diarrheagenic amount of cholera toxin being detected in the secreted intestinal fluid at 12 h post-inoculation. Interestingly, repeated intraperitoneal administration of CFTRinh-172 (20 µg every 6 h), an inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), completely abolished the V. cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion without affecting V. cholerae growth in vivo. As analyzed by ex vivo measurement of intestinal electrical resistance and in vivo assay of fluorescein thiocyanate (FITC)-dextran trans-intestinal flux, V. cholerae infection had no effect on intestinal paracellular permeability. Measurements of albumin in the diarrheal fluid suggested that vascular leakage did not contribute to the pathogenesis of diarrhea in this model. Furthermore, histological examination of V. cholerae-infected intestinal tissues illustrated edematous submucosa, congestion of small vessels and enhanced mucus secretion from goblet cells. This study established a new adult mouse model of V. cholerae-induced diarrhea, which could be useful for studying the pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea and for evaluating future therapeutics/cholera vaccines. In addition, our study confirmed the major role of CFTR in V

  16. An Adult Mouse Model of Vibrio cholerae-induced Diarrhea for Studying Pathogenesis and Potential Therapy of Cholera.

    PubMed

    Sawasvirojwong, Sutthipong; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2013-06-01

    Cholera is a diarrheal disease causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. This study aimed to establish an adult mouse model of Vibrio cholerae-induced diarrhea and to characterize its pathophysiology. Ligated ileal loops of adult mice were inoculated for 6, 9, 12 and 18 h with a classical O1 hypertoxigenic 569B strain of V. cholerae (10(7) CFU/loop). Time-course studies demonstrated that the optimal period for inducing diarrhea was 12 h post-inoculation, when peak intestinal fluid accumulation (loop/weight ratio of ∼0.2 g/cm) occurred with the highest diarrhea success rate (90%). In addition, pathogenic numbers of V. cholerae (∼10(9) CFU/g tissue) were recovered from ileal loops at all time points between 6-18 h post-inoculation with the diarrheagenic amount of cholera toxin being detected in the secreted intestinal fluid at 12 h post-inoculation. Interestingly, repeated intraperitoneal administration of CFTRinh-172 (20 µg every 6 h), an inhibitor of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), completely abolished the V. cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion without affecting V. cholerae growth in vivo. As analyzed by ex vivo measurement of intestinal electrical resistance and in vivo assay of fluorescein thiocyanate (FITC)-dextran trans-intestinal flux, V. cholerae infection had no effect on intestinal paracellular permeability. Measurements of albumin in the diarrheal fluid suggested that vascular leakage did not contribute to the pathogenesis of diarrhea in this model. Furthermore, histological examination of V. cholerae-infected intestinal tissues illustrated edematous submucosa, congestion of small vessels and enhanced mucus secretion from goblet cells. This study established a new adult mouse model of V. cholerae-induced diarrhea, which could be useful for studying the pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea and for evaluating future therapeutics/cholera vaccines. In addition, our study confirmed the major role of CFTR in V

  17. Neutrophil recruitment is critical for 5-fluorouracil-induced diarrhea and the decrease in aquaporins in the colon.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Jo, Ara; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Sato, Ken; Ikegami, Daigo; Horie, Syunji; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-09-01

    Diarrhea is a common side effect experienced by cancer patients undergoing clinical chemotherapy, such as with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the precise mechanisms underlying 5-FU-induced diarrhea remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of neutrophil in 5-FU-induced diarrhea. Mice were given 5-FU (50mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 4 days. Sivelestat sodium (100 or 300 mg/kg, i.p., neutorophil elastase inhibitor) or SB225002 (3 or 9 mg/kg, i.p., CXCR2 antagonist) was administered before the administration of 5-FU. Gene expression levels of aquaporin (AQP) 4 and 8, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, neutrophil elastase (Elane) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the colon were examined by real-time RT-PCR. The neutrophil (Ly-6G positive cell) number in the mucosa of colon was measured by flow-cytometric analysis. Administration of 5-FU induced diarrhea and decreased the expression levels of AQP 4 and 8 in the colon. Under the present conditions, the expression levels of CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL3, the neutrophil markers Elane and MPO, as well as Ly-6G-positive neutrophils, in the colon were significantly increased by 5-FU. Neutrophil recruitment with decreased levels of AQP 4 and 8 were dramatically inhibited by either sivelestat sodium or SB225002. Furthermore, these reagents reduced the 5-FU-induced body weight loss and diarrhea. These findings provide evidence that neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil elastase may decrease the levels of AQP 4 and 8 in the colon of mice treated with 5-FU and contribute to the pathophysiology of 5-FU-induced body weight loss and diarrhea.

  18. Experimental infection of pregnant goats with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)1 or 2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) of the genus pestivirus, family Flaviviridae, are not limited to cattle but occur in various artiodactyls. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the main source of BVDV. Persistent infections also occur in heterologous hosts such as sheep and deer. ...

  19. The effect of synbiotics on acute radiation-induced diarrhea and its association with mucosal inflammatory and adaptive responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulos, Basileios G; Theodoropoulos, George; Misiakos, Evangelos P; Stoidis, Christos N; Zapatis, Haralambos; Diamantopoulou, Kalliopi; Gialeli, Chrisostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K; Karatzas, Gabriel; Machairas, Anastasios; Fotiadis, Constantinos; Zografos, George C; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouloulias, Vasileios

    2013-09-01

    Previous clinical studies advocated that probiotics beneficially affect acute radiation-induced diarrhea. These encouraging results were attributed to the restoration of the intestinal flora; however, there is lack of evidence if and how probiotics influence the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The present study was conducted to investigate the potential supporting role of a synbiotic preparation (combination of pro- and pre-biotics) on experimentally-induced acute radiation diarrhea from the perspective of mucosal inflammation and histological injury. Ninety adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned into six groups. Group A (non-irradiated), group B (non-irradiated/synbiotic supplemented), group C (irradiated), and group D (irradiated/synbiotic supplemented) were followed up to a week after the beginning of the experiment. Group E (irradiated) and group F (irradiated/synbiotic supplemented) were followed up for four days. On the last day of the experiments tissues were harvested for structural and molecular assessments. Synbiotic administration could not avert the occurrence of diarrhea, but significantly attenuated its severity. This effect was associated with the significant downregulation of neutrophil accumulation and lipid peroxidation during the acute phase. During the subacute phase, synbiotic treatment significantly improved both the histological profile and radiation mucositis. These mechanisms significantly contributed to the rehabilitation of the intestinal absorptive function as further indicated from the significantly reduced weight loss. Given the optimization of the intestinal flora exerted by synbiotics, the resolution of diarrhea relies on the suppression of the "reactive" and the augmentation of "regenerative" components of acute radiation-induced intestinal response.

  20. The suppressive activities of six sources of medicinal ferns known as gusuibu on heat-labile enterotoxin-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hung-Chi; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Yang, Jiun-Long; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2014-02-18

    Diarrheal disease is one of the most important worldwide health problems. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most frequently isolated enteropathogen in diarrheal diseases. In developing countries, a very large number of people, especially children, suffer from diarrhea. To combat this problem, World Health Organization has constituted the Diarrhea Diseases Control Program which guides studies on traditional medicinal practices and preventive measures. Gusuibu, a traditional folk medicine, has been claimed to heal certain types of diarrhea. However, so far no scientific study has been carried out on the anti-diarrheal mechanism of Gusiubu. The present study was performed to examine the suppressive activities of ethanol extracts of six sources of folk medicinal ferns used as Gusuibu on heat-labile enterotoxin (LT)-induced diarrhea. Inhibitory effects of six sources were evaluated on the ETEC LT subunit B (LTB) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GMI) interaction by GM1-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and patent mouse gut assay. Our results indicated that Drynaria fortunei had no anti-diarrheal effect, while, among the remaining five folk medicinal ferns, four belonging to family Davalliaceae had significant abilities on both the blocking of LTB and GM1 interaction and the inhibition of LT-induced diarrhea. In conclusion, these findings suggested the potential application of Gusuibu as an anti-diarrheal remedy.

  1. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey Jr, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-01-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l−1 HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l−1) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l−1) (PRE) (n=19–21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7–8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection. PMID:24522264

  2. Human milk oligosaccharides shorten rotavirus-induced diarrhea and modulate piglet mucosal immunity and colonic microbiota.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Monaco, Marcia H; Wang, Mei; Comstock, Sarah S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Fahey, George C; Miller, Michael J; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Donovan, Sharon M

    2014-08-01

    The impact of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) on mucosal immunity, gut microbiota and response to rotavirus (RV) infection was investigated in the piglet model. Newborn piglets were fed with formula alone (FF) or formula supplemented with 4 g l(-1) HMO (HMO) or a prebiotic mixture of 9:1 short-chain galactooligosaccharides (3.6 g l(-1)) and long-chain fructooligosaccharides (0.4 g l(-1)) (PRE) (n=19-21 per group) for 15 days. Piglets (n=7-8) in each dietary group were orally infected with porcine rotavirus (RV) OSU strain on d10, and stool consistency was assessed daily. Blood, small intestine and colonic contents were collected at day 15. Serum RV-specific antibody concentrations, intestinal histomorphology, RV non-structural protein-4 (NSP4) and cytokine mRNA expression were assessed. Colonic content pH, dry matter (DM) and short-chain fatty acid concentrations were measured. Ascending colonic microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA gene v1-3 region pyrosequencing. HMO- and PRE-fed groups had shorter duration of diarrhea than FF piglets. Infection changed intestinal histomorphology, increased serum RV-specific antibody response and intestinal RV NSP4 expression, and modulated ileal cytokine expression. HMO enhanced T helper type 1 (interferon-gamma) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin-10) cytokines in the ileum, while prebiotics promoted RV-specific immunoglobulin M response to the infection. RV infection and HMO supplementation altered intraluminal environment and gut microbiota. HMO increased pH and lowered DM of colonic contents and enhanced the abundance of unclassified Lachnospiraceae, which contains numerous butyrate-producing bacteria. In conclusion, HMO and prebiotics did not prevent the onset of RV infection but reduced the duration of RV-induced diarrhea in piglets, in part, by modulating colonic microbiota and immune response to RV infection.

  3. Egg yolk IgY: protection against rotavirus induced diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves.

    PubMed

    Vega, C; Bok, M; Chacana, P; Saif, L; Fernandez, F; Parreño, V

    2011-08-15

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer - VN=65,536; ELISA BRV IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp 1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer=4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp 2) VN<4; ELISA IgY Ab titer<4] twice a day, for 14 days. Calves receiving CC only or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 10(5.85)focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves' diets for the first 14 days of life with egg yolk

  4. Egg Yolk IgY: Protection against Rotavirus induced Diarrhea and Modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in newborn calves

    PubMed Central

    Vega, C.; Bok, M.; Chacana, P.; Saif, L.; Fernandez, F.; Parreño, V.

    2011-01-01

    Bovine rotavirus (BRV) is an important cause of diarrhea in newborn calves. Local passive immunity is the most efficient protective strategy to control the disease. IgY technology (the use of chicken egg yolk immunoglobulins) is an economic and practical alternative to prevent BRV diarrhea in dairy calves. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protection and immunomodulation induced by the oral administration of egg yolk enriched in BRV specific IgY to experimentally BRV infected calves. All calves in groups Gp 1, 2 and 3 received control colostrum (CC; BRV virus neutralization Ab titer – VN- =65,536; ELISA BRV IgG1 =16,384) prior to gut closure. After gut closure, calves received milk supplemented with 6% BRV-immune egg yolk [(Gp1) VN=2048; ELISA IgY Ab titer =4096] or non-immune control egg yolk [(Gp2) VN <4; ELISA IgY Ab titer <4) twice a day, for 14 days. Calves receiving CC only or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4, respectively). Calves were inoculated with 105.85 focus forming units (FFU) of virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Control calves (Gp 3 and 4) and calves fed control IgY (Gp 2) were infected and developed severe diarrhea. Around 80% calves in Gp 1 (IgY 4096) were infected, but they showed 80% (4/5) protection against BRV diarrhea. Bovine RV-specific IgY Ab were detected in the feces of calves in Gp 1, indicating that avian antibodies (Abs) remained intact after passage through the gastrointestinal tract. At post infection day 21, the duodenum was the major site of BRV specific antibody secreting cells (ASC) in all experimental groups. Mucosal ASC responses of all isotypes were significantly higher in the IgY treated groups, independently of the specificity of the treatment, indicating that egg yolk components modulated the immune response against BRV infection at the mucosal level. These results indicate that supplementing newborn calves’ diets for the first 14 days of life with egg

  5. Preventive Effects of a Chinese Herbal Formula, Shengjiang Xiexin Decoction, on Irinotecan-Induced Delayed-Onset Diarrhea in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pan; Liu, Sida; Pan, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Irinotecan is a well-known chemotherapy drug for the treatment of various cancers. However, delayed-onset diarrhea is a common adverse reaction, limiting the application of the drug. The study presented was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of Shengjiang Xiexin decoction (SXD) on irinotecan-induced diarrhea and to explore the possible mechanisms of this action. We established a diarrhea rat model. The condition of the rats was observed. The proliferation and apoptosis of intestinal cells were measured using immunohistochemical assays and a caspase-3 activity assay, respectively. The expression of Lgr5 and CD44 staining were used to observe intestinal stem cells (ISCs). In addition, the activity of β-glucuronidase in the rats' feces was measured. Our results showed that the number of proliferating intestinal cells in the SXD groups was obviously higher, while the activity of caspase-3 was lower. The expression of Lgr5 and the integrated option density (IOD) of CD44 stain were increased significantly by SXD. Additionally, SXD decreased the activity of β-glucuronidase after irinotecan administration. In conclusion, SXD exhibited preventive effects on irinotecan-induced diarrhea, and this action was associated with an inhibitory effect on intestinal apoptosis and β-glucuronidase and a promotive effect on intestinal cell proliferation due to increased maintenance of ISCs. PMID:28167974

  6. Preventive Effects of a Chinese Herbal Formula, Shengjiang Xiexin Decoction, on Irinotecan-Induced Delayed-Onset Diarrhea in Rats.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Deng, Bo; Jia, Liqun; Tan, Huangying; Zhang, Pan; Liu, Sida; Zhang, Yanan; Song, Aiping; Pan, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Irinotecan is a well-known chemotherapy drug for the treatment of various cancers. However, delayed-onset diarrhea is a common adverse reaction, limiting the application of the drug. The study presented was designed to evaluate the preventive effects of Shengjiang Xiexin decoction (SXD) on irinotecan-induced diarrhea and to explore the possible mechanisms of this action. We established a diarrhea rat model. The condition of the rats was observed. The proliferation and apoptosis of intestinal cells were measured using immunohistochemical assays and a caspase-3 activity assay, respectively. The expression of Lgr5 and CD44 staining were used to observe intestinal stem cells (ISCs). In addition, the activity of β-glucuronidase in the rats' feces was measured. Our results showed that the number of proliferating intestinal cells in the SXD groups was obviously higher, while the activity of caspase-3 was lower. The expression of Lgr5 and the integrated option density (IOD) of CD44 stain were increased significantly by SXD. Additionally, SXD decreased the activity of β-glucuronidase after irinotecan administration. In conclusion, SXD exhibited preventive effects on irinotecan-induced diarrhea, and this action was associated with an inhibitory effect on intestinal apoptosis and β-glucuronidase and a promotive effect on intestinal cell proliferation due to increased maintenance of ISCs.

  7. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments

    PubMed Central

    McQuade, Rachel M.; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C.; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers. PMID:27857691

  8. Chemotherapy-Induced Constipation and Diarrhea: Pathophysiology, Current and Emerging Treatments.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Rachel M; Stojanovska, Vanesa; Abalo, Raquel; Bornstein, Joel C; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) side-effects of chemotherapy are a debilitating and often overlooked clinical hurdle in cancer management. Chemotherapy-induced constipation (CIC) and Diarrhea (CID) present a constant challenge in the efficient and tolerable treatment of cancer and are amongst the primary contributors to dose reductions, delays and cessation of treatment. Although prevalence of CIC is hard to estimate, it is believed to affect approximately 16% of cancer patients, whilst incidence of CID has been estimated to be as high as 80%. Despite this, the underlying mechanisms of both CID and CIC remain unclear, but are believed to result from a combination of intersecting mechanisms including inflammation, secretory dysfunctions, GI dysmotility and alterations in GI innervation. Current treatments for CIC and CID aim to reduce the severity of symptoms rather than combating the pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction, and often result in worsening of already chronic GI symptoms or trigger the onset of a plethora of other side-effects including respiratory depression, uneven heartbeat, seizures, and neurotoxicity. Emerging treatments including those targeting the enteric nervous system present promising avenues to alleviate CID and CIC. Identification of potential targets for novel therapies to alleviate chemotherapy-induced toxicity is essential to improve clinical outcomes and quality of life amongst cancer sufferers.

  9. [Prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea by smectite. Results of a double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Hombrink, J; Fröhlich, D; Glatzel, M; Krauss, A; Thiel, H J; Meier, J; Hamann, D; Mücke, R; Glaser, F H; Köst, S

    2000-04-01

    Diarrhea and abdominal pain are well-known side effects abdominal or pelvic of radiation therapy that may lead to interruption of treatment in serious cases. In recent trials the silicate smectite has proven a promising drug in the prophylaxis of these adverse events. The presented trial aimed at the verification of earlier studies and the evaluation of a dose-effect relationship. Between April 1994 and May 1995, a total of 176 patients obtaining radiotherapy of the pelvis or the abdomen were evaluated in a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled investigation regarding the prophylactic effect of smectite (= Colina) against radiotherapy-induced diarrhea. During the whole period of radiotherapy 85 patients obtained 2 x 6 g smectite daily and 91 patients received 2 x 6 g placebo. The primary end point of the analysis was the time to the first appearance of diarrhea (> or = 3 pappy stools). All 176 patients were evaluated according to an intent-to-treat analysis. There was no significant difference between the prophylactic effects of smectite and placebo. For an explorative post-hoc analysis the total study group was split up into 2 subgroups, one with an irradiated small bowel volume < or = 837.5 ml, the other with a small bowel volume > 837.5 ml (median); the analysis indicated that the first subgroup showed a benefit for the smectite-treated patients in contrast to the placebo treatment (32 vs. 18 calendar days to the first appearance of diarrhea). This benefit was statistically not significant. Prophylactic application of smectite during irradiation of the pelvis and the abdomen can delay the development of radiotherapy-induced diarrhea, a statistical significance could not be verified neither in the total study group nor in the post-hoc subgroup analysis.

  10. Synergistic experimental/computational studies on arylazoenamine derivatives that target the bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Giliberti, Gabriele; Ibba, Cristina; Marongiu, Esther; Loddo, Roberta; Tonelli, Michele; Boido, Vito; Laurini, Erik; Posocco, Paola; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina

    2010-08-15

    Starting from a series of arylazoenamine derivatives, shown to be selectively and potently active against the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), we developed a hierarchical combined experimental/molecular modeling strategy to explore the drug leads for the BVDV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Accordingly, BVDV mutants resistant to lead compounds in our series were isolated, and the mutant residues on the viral molecular target, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, were identified. Docking procedures upon previously identified pharmacophoric constraints and actual mutational data were carried out, and the binding affinity of all active compounds for the RdRp was estimated. Given the excellent agreement between in silico and in vitro data, this procedure is currently being employed in the design a new series of more selective and potent BVDV inhibitors.

  11. Approved and experimental countermeasures against pestiviral diseases: Bovine viral diarrhea, classical swine fever and border disease.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Givens, M Daniel

    2013-10-01

    The pestiviruses, bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), classical swine fever (CSFV) and border disease virus, are important livestock pathogens in many countries, but current vaccines do not completely prevent the spread of infection. Control of pestiviral diseases is especially difficult due to the constant viremia and viral shedding of persistently infected (PI) animals, which must be identified and eliminated to prevent disease transmission. Existing vaccines are limited by the delay between vaccination and the onset of protection, the difficulty of differentiating serologically between vaccinated and naturally infected animals and the need for broad vaccine cross-protection against diverse virus strains. Antiviral therapy could potentially supplement vaccination by providing immediate protection in the case of an outbreak. Numerous compounds with in vitro antiviral activity against BVDV have been identified through its role as a surrogate for hepatitis C virus. Fewer drugs active against CSFV have been identified, but many compounds that are effective against BVDV will likely inhibit CSFV, given their similar genomic sequences. While in vitro research has been promising, the paucity of efficacy studies in animals has hindered the commercial development of effective antiviral drugs against the pestiviruses. In this article, we summarize the clinical syndromes and routes of transmission of BVD, CSF and border disease, discuss currently approved vaccines, review efforts to develop antiviral therapies for use in outbreak control and suggest promising directions for future research.

  12. Failure of lactose-restricted diets to prevent radiation-induced diarrhea in patients undergoing whole pelvis irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Bartholomew, M.

    1986-05-01

    Sixty-four patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy into one of three dietary groups: the control group maintained a regular diet except that they drank at least 480 cc of milk daily; the lactose-restricted group was placed on a lactose-restricted diet; and the lactase group drank at least 480 cc of milk with lactase enzyme added to hydrolyze 90% of the lactose. The patients kept records of their stool frequency and the number of diphenoxylate tablets required to control their diarrhea during a 5 week course of standard whole pelvis irradiation. The data does not support the concept that one of the mechanisms of radiation-induced diarrhea associated with pelvic irradiation is a reduction the ability of the intestine to hydrolyze ingested lactose due to the effect of the radiation on the small intestine. There was not a significant difference in stool frequency or diphenoxylate usage among the dietary groups.

  13. Diarrhea (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drinking water contaminated with organisms like bacteria and parasites. Medications can also cause diarrhea, especially antibiotics, laxatives containing magnesium, and chemotherapy for cancer treatment.

  14. Altered Expression and Localization of Ion Transporters Contribute to Diarrhea in Mice With Salmonella-Induced Enteritis

    PubMed Central

    MARCHELLETTA, RONALD R.; GAREAU, MELANIE G.; MCCOLE, DECLAN F.; OKAMOTO, SHARON; ROEL, ELISE; KLINKENBERG, RACHEL; GUINEY, DONALD G.; FIERER, JOSHUA; BARRETT, KIM E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteropathogen that causes self-limiting diarrhea in healthy individuals, but poses a significant health threat to vulnerable populations. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced diarrhea has been hampered by the lack of a suitable mouse model. After a dose of oral kanamycin, Salmonella-infected congenic BALB/c.D2NrampG169 mice, which carry a wild-type Nramp1 gene, develop clear manifestations of diarrhea. We used this model to elucidate the pathophysiology of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. METHODS BALB /c.D2NrampG169 mice were treated with kanamycin and then infected with wild-type or mutant Salmonella by oral gavage. Colon tissues were isolated and Ussing chambers, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot, and confocal microscopy analyses were used to study function and expression of ion transporters and cell proliferation. RESULTS Studies with Ussing chambers demonstrated reduced basal and/or adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate–mediated electrogenic ion transport in infected colonic tissues, attributable to changes in chloride or sodium transport, depending on the segment studied. The effects of infection were mediated, at least in part, by effector proteins secreted by the bacterial Salmonella pathogenicity island 1– and Salmonella pathogenicity island-2–encoded virulence systems. Infected tissue showed reduced expression of the chloride–bicarbonate exchanger down-regulated in adenoma in surface colonic epithelial cells. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was internalized in colonic crypt epithelial cells without a change in overall expression levels. Confocal analyses, densitometry, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression of epithelial sodium channel β was reduced in distal colons of Salmonella-infected mice. The changes in transporter expression, localization, and/or function were accompanied by crypt

  15. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Infection Induced the Unbalance of Gut Microbiota in Piglets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuyun; Zhao, Lele; Zhai, Zhengxiao; Zhao, Wenjing; Ding, Jinmei; Dai, Ronghua; Sun, Tao; Meng, He

    2015-12-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED) is a devastating disease in livestock industry. Most of the previous studies related to the PED were focused on the pathology and etiology of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). A little was known regarding the status of gut microbiota after piglets infected by PEDV. In this study, aided by metagenome sequencing technology, gut microbiota profiles in feces of viral diarrhea (VD) and viral control (VC) piglets were investigated. The results showed that the abundance of four dominant phyla (Fusobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, and Proteobacteria) in feces was affected greatly by porcine epidemic diarrhea. Especially, the abundance of Fusobacteria was higher in VD piglets (36%) than in VC piglets (5%). On the contrary, the Verrucomicrobia was detected in lower distribution proportion in VD piglets (around 0%) than in VC piglets (20%). Furthermore, 25 genera were significantly different between VC and VD piglets at the genus level. Among the 25 genera, Leptotrichia belonging to Fusobacteria was remarkably lower in VC piglets than in VD piglets. Akkermansia belonging to Verrucomicrobia was higher in VC piglets than in VD piglets. Our findings implicated that the gut microbiota associated with PED significantly provided an insight into the pathology and physiology of PED.

  16. Infectious diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Diarrhea caused by enteric infections is a major factor in morbidity and mortality worldwide. An estimated 2–4 billion episodes of infectious diarrhea occur each year and are especially prevalent in infants. This review highlights the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying diarrhea associated with the three classes of infectious agents, i.e., bacteria, viruses and parasites. Several bacterial pathogens have been chosen as model organisms, including Vibrio cholerae as a classical example of secretory diarrhea, Clostridium difficile and Shigella species as agents of inflammatory diarrhea and selected strains of pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) to discuss the recent advances in alteration of epithelial ion absorption. Many of the recent studies addressing epithelial ion transport and barrier function have been carried out using viruses and parasites. Here, we focus on the rapidly developing field of viral diarrhea including rotavirus, norovirus and astrovirus infections. Finally we discuss Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica as examples of parasitic diarrhea. Parasites have a greater complexity than the other pathogens and are capable of creating molecules similar to those produced by the host, such as serotonin and PGE2. The underlying mechanisms of infectious diarrhea discussed include alterations in ion transport and tight junctions as well as the virulence factors, which alter these processes either through direct effects or indirectly through inflammation and neurotransmitters. PMID:21327112

  17. Travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hill, David R; Beeching, Nick J

    2010-10-01

    Travelers' diarrhea affects 20-60% of travelers to low-income regions of the world. Much of the evidence for the clinical description and management of travelers' diarrhea was generated years ago, however, there is new information on geographic and host risk, etiology, and prevention strategies. Travel to South Asia, followed by sub-Saharan Africa and South America, carries the highest risk for diarrheal syndromes in returned travelers. Women are more susceptible to travel-related diarrhea than men. Host genetic studies have demonstrated that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the lactoferrin, osteoprotegerin, and IL-10 genes are associated with small but increased risks for diarrhea and enteric pathogens. Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis is likely to be a new agent identified as causing travelers' diarrhea, and heat-stable toxin-producing Escherichia coli appears to be more common than heat-labile toxin E. coli. Overall levels of sanitation at the travel destination, including individual eating establishments, are strong predictors for acquisition of travelers' diarrhea. A new transdermal LT vaccine shows promise in modifying the severity of travelers' diarrhea. It remains uncertain whether prophylaxis or prompt self-treatment of travelers' diarrhea will prevent late-onset irritable bowel syndrome. For self-treatment, azithromycin is the drug of choice in travelers to areas where there is a high risk of fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter spp., such as South and Southeast Asia and possibly North Africa, Central and South America. There is increased understanding of the determinants of travelers' diarrhea. Despite this travelers' diarrhea remains one of the most common illnesses in travelers. Continued focus on intervention strategies may ultimately lead to decreased incidence.

  18. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  19. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  20. [Persistent diarrhea

    PubMed

    Andrade, J A; Moreira, C; Fagundes Neto, U

    2000-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent diarrhea has high impact on infantile morbidity and mortality rates in developing countries. Several studies have shown that 3 to 20% of acute diarrheal episodes in children under 5 years of age become persistent. DEFINITION: Persistent diarrhea is defined as an episode that lasts more than 14 days. ETIOLOGY: The most important agents isolated in persistent diarrhea are: Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Salmonella, Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), Klebisiella and Cryptosporidium. CLINICAL ASPECTS: In general, the clinical characteristics of patients with persistent diarrhea do not change with the pathogenic agent. Persistent diarrhea seems to represent the final result of a several insults a infant suffers that predisposes to a more severe episode of diarrhea due to a combination of host factors and high rates of enviromental contamination. Therefore, efforts should be made to promptly treat all episodes of diarrhea with apropriate follow-up. THERAPY: The aim of the treatment is to restore hydroelectrolytic deficits and to replace losses until the diarrheal ceases. It is possible in the majority of the cases, using oral rehydration therapy and erly an appropriate type of diet. PREVENTION: It is imperative that management strategies also focus on preventive aspects. The most effective diarrheal prevention strategy in young infants worldwide is promotion of exclusive breast feeding.

  1. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barr, Wendy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Acute diarrhea in adults is a common problem encountered by family physicians. The most common etiology is viral gastroenteritis, a self-limited disease. Increases in travel, comorbidities, and foodborne illness lead to more bacteria-related cases of acute diarrhea. A history and physical examination evaluating for risk factors and signs of inflammatory diarrhea and/or severe dehydration can direct any needed testing and treatment. Most patients do not require laboratory workup, and routine stool cultures are not recommended. Treatment focuses on preventing and treating dehydration. Diagnostic investigation should be reserved for patients with severe dehydration or illness, persistent fever, bloody stool, or immunosuppression, and for cases of suspected nosocomial infection or outbreak. Oral rehydration therapy with early refeeding is the preferred treatment for dehydration. Antimotility agents should be avoided in patients with bloody diarrhea, but loperamide/simethicone may improve symptoms in patients with watery diarrhea. Probiotic use may shorten the duration of illness. When used appropriately, antibiotics are effective in the treatment of shigellosis, campylobacteriosis, Clostridium difficile, traveler's diarrhea, and protozoal infections. Prevention of acute diarrhea is promoted through adequate hand washing, safe food preparation, access to clean water, and vaccinations.

  2. Pathogenesis of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. Preliminary studies in miniature swine piglet.

    PubMed

    Graham, D Y; Sackman, J W; Estes, M K

    1984-11-01

    The pathogenesis of diarrhea caused by rotavirus infection was studied in miniature swine piglets. The animals were inoculated orally with 2 X 10(7) plaque-forming units of porcine rotavirus (OSU strain). During the height of diarrhea, intestinal function was investigated by in vivo perfusion of a 30-cm segment of proximal jejunum and a 30-cm segment of distal ileum. Absorption of Na+ and water decreased and 3-O-methylglucose transport was markedly reduced, P less than 0.01 compared to control animals. Mucosal lactase and sucrase levels were depressed in both the jejunum and ileum, P less than 0.001. Na+,K+-ATPase activity was significantly depressed only in the ileum, P less than 0.001. These changes were associated with a marked reduction in villous height, suggesting that the diarrhea could be an osmotic diarrhea due to nutrient (carbohydrate) malabsorption. Fresh stool samples were obtained and analyzed immediately for NA+,K+, osmolarity, glucose, and lactose; the osmotic gap was also determined. Stool osmolarity continually increased from 248 +/- 20 mosm/liter prior to inoculation to 348 +/- 20 mosm/liter at 75 +/- 1 hr postinoculation (P less than 0.005); the majority of the fecal osmotic gap could be accounted for by the amount of lactose present in the stools. Stool sodium increased from 34 +/- 6 mM prior to inoculation to a maximum of 65 +/- 4 mM at 53 +/- 1 hr postinoculation, P less than 0.001. There was no significant change in potassium concentration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Prevention of irinotecan-induced diarrhea by oral sodium bicarbonate and influence on pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takao; Yasutake, Koichi; Nishisaki, Hogara; Nakashima, Takatoshi; Horita, Kazutugu; Hirohata, Sigeya; Ishii, Arata; Hamano, Kenichi; Aoyama, Nobuo; Shirasaka, Daisuke; Kamigaki, Takashi; Kasuga, Masato

    2004-01-01

    Alkalization of the intestinal tract by oral administration of sodium bicarbonate has been reported to be a promising method for preventing delayed diarrhea, a dose-limiting toxicity in patients receiving chemotherapy with irinotecan hydrochloride. However, it is feared that this method may adversely affect the pharmacokinetics of irinotecan by inhibiting its intestinal absorption and that of its active metabolites. We compared the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of irinotecan with and without oral alkalization in a cross-over study that enrolled 10 colorectal cancer patients. We found that alkalization did not decrease the blood levels of irinotecan and its active metabolite. In fact, the area under concentration versus time curves (AUCs) of irinotecan and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin glucuronide (SN-38G) were statistically equivalent both with and without oral alkalization. Also, the AUC of SN-38 with alkalization was statistically equivalent or larger than that without alkalization. Oral alkalization reduced the incidence of diarrhea and gastrointestinal symptoms, and these adverse effects were not worsened by long-term administration. These results suggest that oral alkalization can control diarrhea and gastrointestinal toxicity without decreasing the blood levels of irinotecan and its active metabolites, thus improving the tolerability of long-term chemotherapy without reducing efficacy.

  4. Diarrhea - overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... to developing countries can get diarrhea from unclean water or food that has not been handled safely. Plan ahead ... body does not have the proper amount of water and fluids) Which foods you should or should not eat What to ...

  5. [Parasitic diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, D

    2003-12-01

    In many areas, Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar are found together and their microscopic appearance is identical. Biochemical tests which can show cell wall differences are often falsely negative and the only possible way is to treat with metronidazole when amoebiasis is suspected. In case of clinical failure of metronidazole, a bacterial diarrhea is frequently found. Giardia is an other protozoa frequently found in stools of children in endemic areas. Diarrheas due to Giardia are possible in normal children and frequent in malnourished. They can determine severe atrophy of jejunal mucosa and must be treated. Cryptoridiosis is frequently asymptomatic but induces diarrhea in malnourished children. Diarrhea due to helminths is rare and only Strongyloides stercoralis induces severe diarrhea in malnourished child and must be treated in emergency with Ivermectin to avoid dissemination. In immune deficiency induced by corticosteroid treatment or cancer chemotherapy, a prophylactic treatment with Ivermectin against Strongyloides stercoralis must be given in endemic areas or after return, and probably also with metronidazole against Giardia.

  6. Experimental test of induced rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincher, Curtis R.; Gochanour, Craig R.

    1987-02-01

    Recent theoretical models for the nematic phase of semiflexible polymer chains predict a strong coupling between order and the conformational degrees of freedom of the chain. The presence of order in the nematic phase results in a strong preference for linear or rod-like conformations over flexible, random coil conformations. This conformational selection or induced rigidity is predicted to be general phenomenon associated with semiflexible chains. We have tested these predictions using a soluble polydiacetylene (4BCMU) as a probe. The 4BCMU chain undergoes a conformational transition (rod-coil) as a function of temperature in toluene which is accompanied by a large change in optical properties allowing the conformational transition to be followed spectroscopically in extremely dilute solutions. 4BCMU is miscible with both isotropic and nematic solutions of poly-(n-hexyl isocyanate) in toluene. If current models of induced rigidity are accurate, there should be a large shift in the transition temperature for the 4BCMU transition in nematic poly-(n-hexyl isocyanate) solutions. Experimentally we find no shift in the transition for nematic solutions when compared to dilute isotropic solutions. Possible explanations for the discrepancy between theory and experiment are discussed.

  7. Use of three-dimensional accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Jenna E; Walz, Paul H; Passler, Thomas; White, Brad J; Theurer, Miles E; van Santen, Edzard

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the use of 3-D accelerometers to evaluate behavioral changes in cattle experimentally infected with a low-virulent strain of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). ANIMALS 20 beef steers (mean weight, 238 kg). PROCEDURES Calves were allocated to a BVDV (n = 10) or control (10) group. On day 0, calves in the BVDV group were inoculated with a low-virulent strain of BVDV (4 × 10(6) TCID50, intranasally), and calves in the control group were sham inoculated with BVDV-free medium (4 mL; intranasally). An accelerometer was affixed to the right hind limb of each calf on day -7 to record activity (lying, walking, and standing) continuously until 35 days after inoculation. Baseline was defined as days -7 to -1. Blood samples were collected at predetermined times for CBC, serum biochemical analysis, virus isolation, and determination of anti-BVDV antibody titers. RESULTS All calves in the BVDV group developed viremia and anti-BVDV antibodies but developed only subclinical or mild disease. Calves in the control group did not develop viremia or anti-BVDV antibodies. Mean time allocated to each activity did not differ significantly between the BVDV and control groups on any day except day 8, when calves in the BVDV group spent less time standing than the calves in the control group. Following inoculation, calves in both groups tended to spend more time lying and less time walking and standing than they did during baseline. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that behavioral data obtained by accelerometers could not distinguish calves subclinically infected with BVDV from healthy control calves. However, subtle changes in the behavior of the BVDV-infected calves were detected and warrant further investigation.

  8. Effect on hematopoietic tissue of experimental infection of calves with noncytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the hematologic abnormalities observed with noncytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV-2), calves 6 to 8 mo old were inoculated with an isolate of either high virulence (HV24515) or low virulence (LV11Q); control animals received the same volume of uninfected cell-culture supernatant. Peripheral blood neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet counts decreased in all the virus-inoculated calves but were significantly lower and remained decreased longer in the calves given HV24515. For each isolate, a decrease in the number of mature myeloid cells in the bone marrow coincided with the development of neutropenia, but the depletion persisted significantly longer (4 to 6 d) in the calves given HV24515. In the bone marrow of calves given LV11Q, the number of proliferating myeloid cells increased in proportion to the decrease in the number of mature myeloid cells. In the calves inoculated with HV24515, BVDV antigen was observed in bone marrow cells when the peripheral blood counts were lowest. Megakaryocytes were the predominant cell type exhibiting positive BVDV staining; myeloid cells rarely stained positively. Viral antigen was not observed in the bone marrow of calves given LV11Q. These experiments demonstrated that ncpBVDV-2 isolates of both high and low virulence caused decreased leukocyte and platelet counts, but only the high-virulence HV24515 isolate caused a delay in the production of myeloid proliferating cells. The delay may contribute to the ability of certain ncpBVDV-2 isolates to induce severe disease. PMID:14979434

  9. Compartmentalized accumulation of cAMP near complexes of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) contributes to drug-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Ren, Aixia; Arora, Kavisha; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Woodrooffe, Koryse; Schuetz, John D; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; de Jonge, Hugo R; Shanmukhappa, Shiva Kumar; Shata, Mohamed Tarek M; Buddington, Randal K; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2015-05-01

    Diarrhea is one of the most common adverse side effects observed in ∼7% of individuals consuming Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs. The mechanism of how these drugs alter fluid secretion in the gut and induce diarrhea is not clearly understood. Several drugs are either substrates or inhibitors of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4), such as the anti-colon cancer drug irinotecan and an anti-retroviral used to treat HIV infection, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT). These drugs activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated fluid secretion by inhibiting MRP4-mediated cAMP efflux. Binding of drugs to MRP4 augments the formation of MRP4-CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes that is mediated via scaffolding protein PDZK1. Importantly, HIV patients on AZT treatment demonstrate augmented MRP4-CFTR complex formation in the colon, which defines a novel paradigm of drug-induced diarrhea.

  10. An Outbreak of Late-Term Abortions, Premature Births, and Congenital Deformities Associated with a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 1 Subtype b that Induces Thrombocytopenia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) genotype 1 subtype b caused an outbreak of premature births, late term abortions, brachygnathism, growth retardation, brain deformities and rare other skeletal deformities in Holstein calves born to first calf heifers on one dairy. Experimental challenge of three,...

  11. Acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tobillo, E T; Schwartz, S M

    1998-10-01

    Diarrhea can result from damage to the intestinal lining caused by viruses or bacteria, malabsorption, inflammatory processes, bile salt and pancreatic enzyme deficiency, abnormal motility, or the presence of osmotically active solutes in the gut. While it is important to elicit information to determine the possible cause of diarrhea, be sure to check circulatory status first. Some patients may need rehydration therapy more urgently than they need a diagnosis. The main goals of treatment are to prevent dehydration and correct electrolyte imbalance, to provide supportive and symptomatic therapy, and to treat underlying disease. In most cases, a specific diagnosis is not necessary to guide initial treatment.

  12. Recent advances and new perspectives in targeting CFTR for therapy of cystic fibrosis and enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiqiang; Fujii, Naoaki; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-regulated chloride channel localized primarily at the apical surfaces of epithelial cells lining airway, gut and exocrine glands, where it is responsible for transepithelial salt and water transport. Several human diseases are associated with an altered channel function of CFTR. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by the loss or dysfunction of CFTR-channel activity resulting from the mutations on the gene; whereas enterotoxin-induced secretory diarrheas are caused by the hyperactivation of CFTR channel function. CFTR is a validated target for drug development to treat these diseases. Significant progress has been made in developing CFTR modulator therapy by means of high-throughput screening followed by hit-to-lead optimization. Several oral administrated investigational drugs are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for CF. Also importantly, new ideas and methodologies are emerging. Targeting CFTR-containing macromolecular complexes is one such novel approach. PMID:22393940

  13. Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus virus-like particles produced in insect cells induce specific immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiling; Yan, Feihu; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Wang, Chong; Zhao, Yongkun; Feng, Na; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2017-03-29

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), which causes 80-100% mortality in neonatal piglets, is one of the most devastating viral diseases affecting swine worldwide. To date, the lack of effective vaccines and drugs is the main problem preventing control of the global spread of PEDV. In this study, we produced PEDV virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of S, M, and E proteins with a baculovirus expression system and tested them via indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA)and Western blot analysis. Electron microscopy showed that the morphological structure of the PEDV VLPs was similar to that of the protovirus. Microneutralization assays and ELISpot analysis demonstrated that PEDV VLPs induced highly specific antibody responses and Th2-mediated humoral immunity. As a result, the PEDV VLPs displayed excellent immunogenicity in mice. Therefore, a VLP-based vaccine has the potential to prevent PEDV infection.

  14. The effectiveness of a rotavirus vaccine in preventing hospitalizations and deaths presumably due to acute infectious diarrhea in Brazilian children: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Teles, Estêvão; Moscovici, Leonardo; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Alves, Domingos; Laprega, Milton Roberto; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the main etiologic agent of acute infectious diarrhea in children worldwide. Considering that a rotavirus vaccine (G1P8, strain RIX4414) was added to the Brazilian vaccination schedule in 2006, we aimed to study its effectiveness and safety regarding intestinal intussusception. A quasi-experimental trial was performed in which the primary outcome was the number of hospitalizations that were presumably due to acute infectious diarrhea per 100,000 children at risk (0-4 years old). The secondary outcomes included mortality due to acute infectious diarrhea and the intestinal intussusception rates in children in the same age range. We analyzed three scenarios: Health Division XIII of the State of São Paulo (DRS XIII) from 2002 to 2008, the State of São Paulo, and Brazil from 2002 to 2012. The averages of the hospitalization rates for 100,000 children in the pre- and post-vaccination periods were 1,413 and 959, respectively, for DRS XIII (RR=0.67), 312 and 249, respectively, for the State of São Paulo (RR=0.79), and 718 and 576, respectively, for Brazil (RR=0.8). The mortality rate per 100,000 children in the pre- and post-vaccination periods was 2.0 and 1.3, respectively, for DRS XIII (RR=0.66), 5.5 and 2.5, respectively, for the State of São Paulo (RR=0.47), and 15.0 and 8.0, respectively, for Brazil (RR=0.53). The average annual rates of intussusception for 100,000 children in DRS XIII were 28.0 and 22.0 (RR=0.77) in the pre- and post-vaccination periods, respectively. A monovalent rotavirus vaccine was demonstrated to be effective in preventing the hospitalizations and deaths of children that were presumably due to acute infectious diarrhea, without increasing the risk of intestinal intussusception.

  15. [The treatment of acute diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Leemans, L

    2013-09-01

    Racecadotril has sufficient proven efficacy in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. Treatment outcomes in adults are less convincing. The place of gelatin tannate is unclear. Some sources point to potential hepatotoxicity and diminished iron absorption, with a concomitant risk of anemia, at least in case of excessive or prolonged use. Loperamide still has a prominent place in the treatment of acute and chronic diarrhea. Attention should be payed to correct dosing and some well-known contra-indications. Probiotics are indicated in children, as well as in the prevention of antibiotics-induced diarrhea. There is no evidence to support their use in the treatment of acute diarrhea in adults. Up till now publications disagree on the efficacy in the prevention of travelers' diarrhea. Astringents and absorbents are no longer supported in guidelines. Oral rehydration systems have a part to play in pediatric treatment.

  16. Epidemiological and clinical studies of rotavirus-induced diarrhea in China from1994–2013

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Xiao; Jinyuan, Wu; Yan, Zhou; Maosheng, Sun; Hongjun, Li

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotavirus infections cause diarrhea in infants and primarily occur in winter. These viruses are characterized by the viral structural proteins VP7 (G subtypes) and VP4 (P subtypes). Current treatments employ vaccines combined with symptomatic treatments. Through a review of published papers from 2003–2013, which included articles, theses, dissertations and academic conference proceedings in PubMed and CNKI (China National Knowledge Infrastructure), we examined the epidemiological and clinical studies conducted in the 7 regional administrative geographical divisions of the People's Republic of China. Binning of the clinical studies provided a quantitative synthesis of the published incidences of rotavirus-positive numbers, the infection rates and the distributions of different subtypes in the provinces. In an investigation of the 32 provincial administrative regions from 1994–2013, the number of positive infections in children, primarily ≤ 5 years of age, was highest in Guangdong (187,000 cases), Zhejiang (133,000 cases) and Hubei (11,000 cases) Provinces; the provinces that displayed the highest positive rates were Henan (75.20%), Jilin (64.94%) and the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region (60.16%). Furthermore, the virus, which causes diarrhea, can also infect adults. Statistics regarding the rotavirus subtypes indicated that the top 3 G-subtypes reported were G3 (8,509 cases), G1 (6,490 cases) and G2 (1,601 cases); the top 3 P-subtypes reported were P[8] (8,483 cases), P[4] (2,017 cases) and P[6] (740 cases). The majority of clinical treatments for these infections comprised a combination of Chinese traditional and Western medicines, together with nursing and the administration of a variety of oral liquids to relieve symptoms. The top 3 positive rates were identified in provinces at higher latitude, which confirms increases in humidity and ambient temperature reduce the rotavirus infection rate and the number of rotavirus infections tends to be highest

  17. Inhibitory Effect of a Hot-Water Extract of Leaves of Japanese Big-Leaf Magnolia (Magnolia obovata) on Rotavirus-Induced Diarrhea in Mouse Pups

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Takeshi; Tomono, Takuma; Hamauzu, Yasunori; Tanaka, Katsumi; Yasui, Hisako

    2014-01-01

    The leaf of Japanese big-leaf magnolia (Magnolia obovata Thunb.) has long been used as a natural packaging material for traditional foods in Japan. However, many of the physiological functions of the leaves against oral infection and resultant illness remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a hot-water extract of the leaves of Magnolia obovata on diarrhea induced by rotavirus (RV), a major cause of acute diarrhea. RV strain SA11 was mixed with the M. obovata leaf extract and inoculated orally to neonatal BALB/c mouse pups. Simultaneous inoculation of SA11 with the extract significantly decreased the incidence of diarrhea. In addition, the extract significantly inhibited cytopathic effects and mRNA expression of viral proteins in SA11-infected MA104 cells. Two flavonoid glycosides, quercitrin and rutin, were strongly suggested to be major anti-RV agents in the extract by serial solvent extraction and reversed-phase HPLC-ESI-MS analysis. Our results suggest that the hot-water extract of M. obovata leaves can be used as a medicine or food additive to prevent and ameliorate RV-induced diarrhea in individuals that may have difficulty in benefitting from the RV vaccines. PMID:25580150

  18. Travelers' diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Barrett-Connor, E

    1973-03-01

    On the average, one-fourth of North Americans visiting developing countries experience a self-limited diarrheal illness that interferes with holiday or business activities. Recent work suggests that these episodes are caused by a small inoculum of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli which are common in the country visited and rare in the country of origin. Neither antimicrobial treatment nor anti-diarrheal agents have proven benefit once the illness has begun. Despite its frequent use, iodochlorhydroxyquin has not been shown in double blind studies to be effective as a preventive agent, and may be dangerous. The status of furazolidone for prevention of tourist diarrhea is questionable. Both neomycin sulfate and phythalylsulfathiazole have demonstrated efficacy as chemoprophylactics in Mexico. However, their use should be restricted to limited types of travel and travelers. General admonitions concerning avoidance of certain ingestibles are recommended; despite questionable value in preventing travelers' diarrhea such precautions may prevent more serious gastrointestinal illness.

  19. Essential oil of Zygophyllum album inhibits key-digestive enzymes related to diabetes and hypertension and attenuates symptoms of diarrhea in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Mnafgui, Kais; Kchaou, Mouna; Ben Salah, Hichem; Hajji, Raouf; Khabbabi, Gaddour; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Allouche, Noureddine; Gharsallah, Neji

    2016-08-01

    Zygophyllum album L. (Zygophyllaceae), commonly known as Bougriba, is widely used to treat diabetes, digestive tract spasm, and hypertension in folk medicine, in Tunisia. This study investigates the antidiabetic, antidiarrheal, and antihypertensive activities of the leaves of the essential oil from Zygophyllum album (OZA) in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. The oil was obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by GC-MS. Males rats were divided into four groups: control, diabetic-untreated group, diabetic-treated group with acarbose (10 mg/kg), and diabetic-treated rats with OZA (200 mg/kg) for 30 d. At the end of the experimental period, the OZA significantly decreased the activity of α-amylase in pancreas and serum of the diabetic rats by 43% and 38%, respectively, which led to reduce the serum glucose level by 60% and lower of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) rate by 17% as compared with untreated diabetic animals. Moreover, the OZA treatment attenuated symptoms of diarrhea, improved lipid disorders, and hypertension through inhibiting the pancreatic lipase and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activities by 47% and 25%, respectively, in serum of diabetic rats. OZA showed a good effect in the management of diabetes mellitus and exerted preventive action from related hypertension.

  20. TLR4-Dependent Claudin-1 Internalization and Secretagogue-Mediated Chloride Secretion Regulate Irinotecan-Induced Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Wardill, Hannah R; Bowen, Joanne M; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; Ball, Imogen A; Logan, Richard M; Gibson, Rachel J

    2016-11-01

    We have previously shown increased intestinal permeability, to 4-kDa FITC-dextran, in BALB/c mice treated with irinotecan. Importantly, genetic deletion of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4; Tlr4(-/-)) protected against loss of barrier function, indicating that TLR4 is critical in tight junction regulation. The current study aimed (i) to determine the molecular characteristics of intestinal tight junctions in wild-type and Tlr4(-/-) BALB/c mice and (ii) to characterize the secretory profile of the distal colon. Forty-two female wild-type and 42 Tlr4(-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g received a single 270 mg/kg [intraperitoneal (i.p.)] dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. The secretory profile of the distal colon, following carbachol and forksolin, was assessed using Ussing chambers at all time points. Tight junction integrity was assessed at 24 hours, when peak intestinal permeability and diarrhea were reported, using immunofluorescence, Western blotting, and RT-PCR. Irinotecan caused internalization of claudin-1 with focal lesions of ZO-1 and occludin proteolysis in the ileum and colon of wild-type mice. Tlr4(-/-) mice maintained phenotypically normal tight junctions. Baseline conductance, a measure of paracellular permeability, was increased in irinotecan-treated wild-type mice at 24 hours (53.19 ± 6.46 S/cm(2); P = 0.0008). No change was seen in Tlr4(-/-) mice. Increased carbachol-induced chloride secretion was seen in irinotecan-treated wild-type and Tlr4(-/-) mice at 24 hours (wild-type: 100.35 ± 18.37 μA/cm(2); P = 0.022; Tlr4(-/-): 102.72 ± 18.80 μA/cm(2); P = 0.023). Results suggest that TLR4-dependent claudin-1 internalization and secondary anion secretion contribute to irinotecan-induced diarrhea. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(11); 2767-79. ©2016 AACR.

  1. Effects of Probiotic Lactobacillus Casei DN-114 001 in Prevention of Radiation-Induced Diarrhea: Results From Multicenter, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Nutritional Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Giralt, Jordi Regadera, Jose Perez; Verges, Ramona; Romero, Jesus; Fuente, Isabel de la; Biete, Albert; Villoria, Jesus; Cobo, Jose Maria; Guarner, Francisco

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether a probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 reduces the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy (45-50 Gy, conventional fractionation) for either cervical carcinoma (radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin) or endometrial adenocarcinoma (postoperative radiotherapy) were randomly assigned to a probiotic drink or placebo, in a double-blind fashion. The probiotic drink consisted of liquid yogurt containing L. casei DN-114 001 at 10{sup 8} CFU/g. The patients recorded the daily the number of bowel movements and scored the stool consistency using the Bristol scale. Diarrhea was graded weekly according the Common Toxicity Criteria system. The primary endpoint was to reduce the incidence of diarrhea, defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade of 2 or greater or the need for loperamide. Results: A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Grade 2 or greater diarrhea and/or the use of loperamide was observed in 24 of 41 patients in the placebo group and 30 of 44 in the probiotic group (p = 0.568). No differences were found in the median time to the presentation of the primary endpoint. Probiotic intervention had a significant effect on stool consistency (p = 0.04). The median time for patients to present with Bristol scale stools of Type 6 or greater was 14 days for patients receiving the probiotic drink vs. 10 days for those receiving placebo. Conclusion: Nutritional intervention with the probiotic drink containing L. casei DN-114 001 does not reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea as defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 or greater. However, it had a significant effect on stool consistency as measured by the Bristol scale.

  2. Effects of probiotic Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 in prevention of radiation-induced diarrhea: results from multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled nutritional trial.

    PubMed

    Giralt, Jordi; Regadera, José Perez; Verges, Ramona; Romero, Jesus; de la Fuente, Isabel; Biete, Albert; Villoria, Jesús; Cobo, Jose Maria; Guarner, Francisco

    2008-07-15

    To determine whether a probiotic drink containing Lactobacillus casei DN-114 001 reduces the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea in patients with gynecologic cancer. Patients who were undergoing pelvic radiotherapy (45-50 Gy, conventional fractionation) for either cervical carcinoma (radiotherapy and weekly cisplatin) or endometrial adenocarcinoma (postoperative radiotherapy) were randomly assigned to a probiotic drink or placebo, in a double-blind fashion. The probiotic drink consisted of liquid yogurt containing L. casei DN-114 001 at 10(8) CFU/g. The patients recorded the daily the number of bowel movements and scored the stool consistency using the Bristol scale. Diarrhea was graded weekly according the Common Toxicity Criteria system. The primary endpoint was to reduce the incidence of diarrhea, defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade of 2 or greater or the need for loperamide. A total of 85 patients were enrolled. Grade 2 or greater diarrhea and/or the use of loperamide was observed in 24 of 41 patients in the placebo group and 30 of 44 in the probiotic group (p = 0.568). No differences were found in the median time to the presentation of the primary endpoint. Probiotic intervention had a significant effect on stool consistency (p = 0.04). The median time for patients to present with Bristol scale stools of Type 6 or greater was 14 days for patients receiving the probiotic drink vs. 10 days for those receiving placebo. Nutritional intervention with the probiotic drink containing L. casei DN-114 001 does not reduce the incidence of radiation-induced diarrhea as defined by a Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 2 or greater. However, it had a significant effect on stool consistency as measured by the Bristol scale.

  3. Traveler's Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Stanley L; Stevens, A Michal; Leung, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) is the most common travel-related illness, and it can have a significant impact on the traveler. Pretravel consultation provides an excellent opportunity for the clinician to counsel the traveler and discuss strategies such as food and water hygiene, vaccinations, and medications for prophylaxis or self-treatment that may decrease the incidence and impact of TD. Postinfectious sequelae, such as postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome, reactive arthritis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome, may develop weeks or months after return. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnolol and honokiol regulate the calcium-activated potassium channels signaling pathway in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea mice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yanli; Han, Xuefeng; Tang, Shaoxun; Xiao, Wenjun; Tan, Zhiliang; Zhou, Chuanshe; Wang, Min; Kang, Jinghe

    2015-05-15

    To explore the regulatory mechanisms of magnolol and honokiol on calcium-activated potassium channels signaling pathway in Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-induced diarrhea mice, the concentrations of serum chloride ion (Cl(-)), sodium ion (Na(+)), potassium ion (K(+)) and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) were measured. Additionally, the mRNA expressions of calmodulin 1 (CaM), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha subunit (CaMKIIα) and beta subunit (CaMKIIβ), ryanodine receptor 1, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3 receptors), protein kinases C (PKC), potassium intermediate/small conductance calcium-activated channels (SK) and potassium large conductance calcium-activated channels(BK)were determined. A diarrhea mouse model was established using ETEC suspensions (3.29×10(9)CFU/ml) at a dosage of 0.02ml/g live body weight (BW). Magnolol or honokiol was intragastrically administered at dosages of 100 (M100 or H100), 300 (M300 or H300) and 500 (M500 or H500) mg/kg BW according to a 3×3 factorial arrangement. Magnolol and honokiol increased the Cl(-) and K(+) concentrations, further, upregulated the CaM, BKα1 and BKβ3 mRNA levels but downregulated the IP3 receptors 1, PKC, SK1, SK2, SK3, SK4 and BKβ4 mRNA expressions. Magnolol and honokiol did not alter the CaMKIIα, CaMKIIβ, ryanodine receptor 1, IP3 receptor 2, IP3 receptor 3, BKβ1 and BKβ2 mRNA expressions. These results clarify that magnolol and honokiol, acting through Ca(2+) channel blockade, inhibit the activation of IP3 receptor 1 to regulate the IP3-Ca(2+) store release, activate CaM to inhibit SK channels, and effectively suppress PKC kinases to promote BKα1 and BKβ3 channels opening and BKβ4 channel closing, which modulates the intestinal ion secretion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. St. John's wort attenuates irinotecan-induced diarrhea via down-regulation of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibition of intestinal epithelial apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Zeping; Yang Xiaoxia; Chan Suiyung; Xu Anlong; Duan Wei; Zhu Yizhun; Sheu, F.-S.; Boelsterli, Urs Alex; Chan, Eli; Zhang Qiang; Wang, J.-C.; Ee, Pui Lai Rachel; Koh, H.L.; Huang Min; Zhou Shufeng . E-mail: phazsf@nus.edu.sg

    2006-10-15

    Diarrhea is a common dose-limiting toxicity associated with cancer chemotherapy, in particular for drugs such as irinotecan (CPT-11), 5-fluouracil, oxaliplatin, capecitabine and raltitrexed. St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) has anti-inflammatory activity, and our preliminary study in the rat and a pilot study in cancer patients found that treatment of SJW alleviated irinotecan-induced diarrhea. In the present study, we investigated whether SJW modulated various pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukins (IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6), interferon (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and intestinal epithelium apoptosis in rats. The rats were treated with irinotecan at 60 mg/kg for 4 days in combination with oral SJW or SJW-free control vehicle at 400 mg/kg for 8 days. Diarrhea, tissue damage, body weight loss, various cytokines including IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} and intestinal epithelial apoptosis were monitored over 11 days. Our studies demonstrated that combined SJW markedly reduced CPT-11-induced diarrhea and intestinal lesions. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1{beta}, IFN-{gamma} and TNF-{alpha} was significantly up-regulated in intestine. In the mean time, combined SJW significantly suppressed the intestinal epithelial apoptosis induced by CPT-11 over days 5-11. In particular, combination of SJW significantly inhibited the expression of TNF-{alpha} mRNA in the intestine over days 5-11. In conclusion, inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines and intestinal epithelium apoptosis partly explained the protective effect of SJW against the intestinal toxicities induced by irinotecan. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential for STW as an agent in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs to lower their dose-limiting toxicities.

  6. Traveler's diarrhea diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea. Function Bacteria and other substances in the water and food can cause traveler's diarrhea. People who live in ... your risk for getting traveler's diarrhea by avoiding water, ice, and food that may be contaminated. The goal of the ...

  7. Side Effects: Diarrhea

    Cancer.gov

    Diarrhea, a side effect of cancer treatment, may cause symptoms such as loose, watery stools. Diarrhea can lead to dehydration and malnutrition in cancer patients. Learn about ways to treat and manage diarrhea during cancer treatment.

  8. [Drug-induced enterocolitis. Important differential diagnosis in the investigation of diarrhea and intestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Tysk, C

    2000-05-24

    This article is a review of the side-effects of drugs affecting the small and large intestines. Pseudomembranous colitis is caused by antibiotics facilitating an overgrowth of Clostridium difficile. A hemorrhagic colitis, generally self-limiting, can be caused by penicillin, amoxycillin and ampicillin. Toxicity of NSAID may induce intestinal ulcers, diaphragm-like strictures, perforation, colitis and relapse of inflammatory bowel disease. Drug-induced lymphocytic colitis has been reported due to ticlopidine, Cyclo 3 Fort, and occasionally by ranitidine, carbamazepine, vinburnine, tardyferon, and flutamide. Sulphasalazine and 5-ASA can cause relapse of ulcerative colitis. Neutropenic enterocolitis is a severe complication to cytotoxic therapy for cancer. Ischemic colitis can be caused by drugs inducing mesenteric vasoconstriction.

  9. Pharmacophore modeling, resistant mutant isolation, docking, and MM-PBSA analysis: Combined experimental/computer-assisted approaches to identify new inhibitors of the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV).

    PubMed

    Tonelli, Michele; Boido, Vito; La Colla, Paolo; Loddo, Roberta; Posocco, Paola; Paneni, Maria Silvia; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina

    2010-03-15

    Starting from a series of our new 2-phenylbenzimidazole derivatives, shown to be selectively and potently active against the bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), we developed a hierarchical combined experimental/molecular modeling strategy to explore the drug leads for the BVDV RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase. Accordingly, a successful 3D pharmacophore model was developed, characterized by distinct chemical features that may be responsible for the activity of the inhibitors. BVDV mutants resistant to lead compounds in our series were then isolated, and the mutant residues on the viral molecular target, the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase, were identified. Docking procedures upon pharmacophoric constraints and mutational data were carried out, and the binding affinity of all active compounds for the RdRp were estimated. Given the excellent agreement between in silico and in vitro data, this procedure is currently being employed in the design a new series of more selective and potent BVDV inhibitors.

  10. Supplementing suckling rats with whey protein concentrate modulates the immune response and ameliorates rat rotavirus-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Marín-Gallén, Silvia; Castell, Margarida; Rodríguez-Palmero, María; Rivero, Montserrat; Castellote, Cristina; Franch, Angels

    2008-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RV) are the most common causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in children <2 y. The present study was designed to establish the effect of a bovine whey protein concentrate (WPC) in a RV infection model in suckling rats. From d 3 of life, suckling Lewis rats received daily supplements of WPC, WPC plus lactoferrin (LF), standard infant formula (SIF), or water (RV-infected group and an untreated, uninfected reference group). On d 8 of life, heterologous simian RV SA-11 was inoculated orally in the WPC-RV, WPC+LF-RV, SIF-RV, and RV groups. WPC and WPC+LF reduced diarrhea incidence from approximately 90% in RV group to approximately 60% in WPC-RV and WPC+LF-RV groups (P < 0.05), whereas the area under the curve (AUC) of severity along time diminished from approximately 10 AUC in the RV group to approximately 6 AUC in both supplemented groups (P < 0.05). Serum levels of anti-RV antibodies, splenocyte proliferation, and interferon-gamma secretion after specific stimulation were significantly lower in the WPC-RV and WPC+LF-RV groups than in the SIF-RV and RV groups. In the intraepithelial intestinal compartment, RV infection increased the proportion of typical mucosal T cells (IE-T CD8alphaalpha+); however, this modification was controlled by WPC and WPC+LF supplementation. In general, for most of the parameters studied, the SIF-RV and RV groups did not differ. In summary, daily supplementation with WPC or WPC+LF in early life considerably reduces the severity of RV-induced acute gastroenteritis and modulates the immune response against the pathogen.

  11. Experimental risk assessment of bovine viral diarrhea virus transmission via in vitro embryo production using somatic cell nucleus transfer.

    PubMed

    Gregg, K; Chen, S H; Sadeghieh, S; Guerra, T; Xiang, T; Meredith, J; Polejaeva, I

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to perform a comprehensive risk assessment on infectious disease transmission in the system of in vitro embryo production via somatic cell nucleus transfer (SCNT) technology using bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) as a model. The risks of BVDV transmission in each step of the SCNT embryo production procedure, from donor cells to preimplantation SCNT embryo culture, were carefully examined using a sensitive real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. The identified primary source of BVDV transmission in SCNT embryo production was donor cell infection, most likely caused by contaminated fetal bovine serum in the culture medium. The risk of disease transmission through contaminated oocytes from an abattoir was relatively low, and it can be greatly minimized by cumulus cell removal and adequate oocyte washing procedures. Of the 200 cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) and more than 1500 cumulus cell-free oocyte (CFO) samples collected from multiple sources over a course of 7 months, only 2.5% of the COCs were BVDV positive, and all of the CFOs (100%) were BVDV negative. To evaluate the risk of BVDV introduction during in vitro SCNT embryo culture, 324 SCNT embryos were produced from 18 different cell lines using oocytes from 26 different batches collected over a course of 9 months. The embryos were cultured in vitro for 7 days and then tested for BVDV. All of the 324 SCNT embryos (100%) were negative, indicating that the embryo culture system is virtually risk-free for BVDV transmission. Based on these results, a standard operational protocol (SOP) for SCNT embryo production was proposed to greatly minimize the risk of BVDV transmission through the SCNT embryo production system. This SOP could be a starting point to produce a SCNT system that is virtually risk-free for disease transmission in general.

  12. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-01-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3

  13. Lesions and distribution of viral antigen following an experimental infection of young seronegative calves with virulent bovine virus diarrhea virus-type II.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J A; West, K H; Cortese, V S; Myers, S L; Carman, S; Martin, K M; Haines, D M

    1998-07-01

    During the past several years, acute infections with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) have been causally linked to hemorrhagic and acute mucosal disease-like syndromes with high mortality. The majority of BVDVs isolated in such cases have been classified as type II on the basis of genetic and antigenic characteristics. It was our objective to examine clinical disease, lesions and potential sites of viral replication, following experimental BVDV type II infection in young calves. On approximately day 35 after birth, calves that had received BVDV-antibody-negative colostrum were infected by intranasal inoculation of 5 x 10(5) TCID50 of BVDV type II isolate 24,515 in 5 mL of tissue culture fluid (2.5 mL/nostril). Calves were monitored twice daily for signs of clinical disease. Approximately 48-72 h after infection, all calves developed transient pyrexia (39.4-40.5 degrees C) and leukopenia. Beginning on approximately day 7 after infection, all calves developed watery diarrhea, pyrexia (40.5-41.6 degrees C), marked leukopenia (> or = 75% drop from preinoculation values), variable thrombocytopenia, and moderate to severe depression. Calves were euthanized on days 10, 11, or 12 after infection due to severe disease. Gross and histological lesions consisted of multifocal bronchointerstitial pneumonia (involving 10%-25% of affected lungs), bone marrow hypoplasia and necrosis, and minimal erosive lesions in the alimentary tract. Immunohistochemical staining for BVDV revealed widespread viral antigen usually within epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells and mononuclear phagocytes in multiple organs, including lung, Peyer's patches, gastric mucosa, thymus, adrenal gland, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and skin. This BVDV type II isolate caused rapidly progressive, severe multisystemic disease in seronegative calves that was associated with widespread distribution of viral antigen and few gross or histological inflammatory lesions.

  14. Anxiety measures during induced experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Coulthard, P; Rood, J P

    1993-01-01

    Results of analgesic studies obtained using experimental pain are often not comparable with those obtained from clinical studies. This may be because anxiety, which plays an important role in the pain experience, may not be evoked by experimentally induced pain. The aim of this study is to measure the level of anxiety induced by the submaximum effort tourniquet technique, which produces pain similar in quality to clinical pain. The mean time that subjects tolerated the pain from the tourniquet was 14.94 minutes. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate increased. Visual analogue scale measures of anxiety showed an overall increase during the experiment but were highly erratic individually. This study suggests that the submaximum effort tourniquet technique is incapable of inducing the same type of anxiety experienced with clinical pain.

  15. Evaluation of Three Experimental Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Killed Vaccines Adjuvanted with Combinations of QuilA Cholesterol and Dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) Bromide

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections cause respiratory, reproductive, and enteric disease in cattle. Vaccination raises herd resistance and then limits the spread of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) among cattle. The goal of this research was to evaluate new adjuvants, consisting of c...

  16. An outbreak of late-term abortions, premature births, and congenital deformities associated with a bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 subtype b that induces thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Patricia C; Ridpath, Julia F; Walker, Jennifer B; Hietala, Sharon K

    2010-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) subtype b was isolated from premature Holstein calves from a dairy herd that experienced an outbreak of premature births, late-term abortions, brachygnathism, growth retardation, malformations of the brain and cranium, and rare extracranial skeletal malformations in calves born to first-calf heifers. Experimental inoculation of 3 colostrum-deprived calves aged 2-4 months old with this BVDV isolate resulted in thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, and leukopenia. Outbreaks of brachygnathism are rarely associated with BVDV, and thrombocytopenia is rarely associated with BVDV-1 strains.

  17. Experimentally-induced dissociation impairs visual memory.

    PubMed

    Brewin, Chris R; Mersaditabari, Niloufar

    2013-12-01

    Dissociation is a phenomenon common in a number of psychological disorders and has been frequently suggested to impair memory for traumatic events. In this study we explored the effects of dissociation on visual memory. A dissociative state was induced experimentally using a mirror-gazing task and its short-term effects on memory performance were investigated. Sixty healthy individuals took part in the experiment. Induced dissociation impaired visual memory performance relative to a control condition; however, the degree of dissociation was not associated with lower memory scores in the experimental group. The results have theoretical and practical implications for individuals who experience frequent dissociative states such as patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of horizontal transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1a from experimentally infected white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus virginianus) to colostrum-deprived calves.

    PubMed

    Negrón, María E; Pogranichniy, Roman M; Van Alstine, William; Hilton, W Mark; Lévy, Michel; Raizman, Eran A

    2012-02-01

    To assess the transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) from experimentally infected white-tailed deer fawns to colostrum-deprived calves by use of a BVDV strain isolated from hunter-harvested white-tailed deer. 5 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawns and 6 colostrum-deprived calves. Fawns were inoculated intranasally with a noncytopathic BVDV-1a isolate (2 mL containing 10(6.7) TCID(50)/mL), and 2 days after inoculation, animals were commingled until the end of the study. Blood and serum samples were obtained on days -6, 0, 7, 14, and 21 after inoculation for reverse transcriptase PCR assay, virus neutralization, and BVDV-specific antibody ELISA. Nasal, oral, and rectal swab specimens were collected on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 17, and 21 for reverse transcriptase PCR testing. By 21 days after inoculation, all animals were euthanized and necropsied and tissues were collected for histologic evaluation, immunohistochemical analysis, and virus isolation. All fawns became infected and shed the virus for up to 18 days as determined on the basis of reverse transcriptase PCR testing and virus isolation results. Evidence of BVDV infection as a result of cohabitation with acutely infected fawns was detected in 4 of the 6 calves by means of reverse transcriptase PCR testing and virus isolation. On the basis of these findings, BVDV transmission from acutely infected fawns to colostrum-deprived calves appeared possible.

  19. An orally active motilin receptor antagonist, MA-2029, inhibits motilin-induced gastrointestinal motility, increase in fundic tone, and diarrhea in conscious dogs without affecting gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Ken-ichi; Onoma, Mitsu; Muramatsu, Hiroyasu; Sudo, Hirokazu; Yoshida, Shoshin; Shiokawa, Rie; Yogo, Kenji; Kamei, Kenshi; Cynshi, Osamu; Kuromaru, Osamu; Peeters, Theo L; Takanashi, Hisanori

    2009-08-01

    The pharmacological properties of MA-2029, a selective and competitive motilin receptor antagonist, were investigated in conscious dogs after oral administration. Gastrointestinal contractile activity was recorded by chronically implanted force transducers. The proximal gastric volume was measured with a barostat under constant pressure. Gastric emptying was examined using the paracetamol absorption test. MA-2029 (0.3-10 mg/kg, p.o.) administered in the interdigestive state inhibited gastrointestinal contractions induced by motilin (3 microg/kg, i.v.) in a dose-dependent manner. MA-2029 (0.3-3 mg/kg, p.o.) also inhibited the occurrence of spontaneous phase III contractions, even though MA-2029 had no effect on basal gastrointestinal motility or basal gastric emptying even at 10 and 30 mg/kg p.o. The inhibitory effect of MA-2029 on motilin-induced gastrointestinal motility corresponded to its plasma concentration. Motilin (0.3 microg/kg/h, i.v. infusion) reduced the proximal gastric volume by about 50% of control during isobaric distension. This effect was also inhibited by MA-2029 (1-10 mg/kg, p.o.) in a dose-dependent manner. In the digestive state, injection of motilin (3 microg/kg, i.v.) induced diarrhea in 9 of 11 dogs. MA-2029 (1-30 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the incidence of diarrhea induced by motilin in a dose-dependent manner. The results indicate that MA-2029 inhibits hypermotility induced by motilin in conscious dogs without having an effect on the basal gastrointestinal tone or gastric emptying rate. MA-2029 may be useful in treating gastrointestinal disorders in which the pathogenesis involves the elevation of circulating motilin.

  20. Experimental investigation of bifurcation induced bandgap reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Brian P.; Mazzoleni, Michael J.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; Mann, Brian P.

    2014-08-01

    By applying an asymmetric on-site restoring force in a 1D chain of oscillators, we demonstrate experimentally that a morphing in the bandgap structure or passive bandgap reconfiguration can be triggered by an increase in environmental excitation amplitude. Recent studies on wave propagation have focused on new capabilities and behaviors resulting from intrinsic nonlinearities. This paper details a bistable experimental design that achieves amplitude dependent filtering through passive bandgap reconfiguration, which is triggered by a bifurcation. The system studied comprises a 1D chain of axially aligned pendulums in dimer unit cells with geometrically nonlinear nearest neighbor coupling where bistability is induced through repulsive magnets. When the bistability is asymmetric, each potential well has a different linear spectra. Though this paper uses mechanically coupled oscillators as an example, the phenomenon itself could be used in any wave propagation media where asymmetric bistability can be implemented.

  1. Zinc deficiency alters host response and pathogen virulence in a mouse model of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli-induced diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Bolick, David T; Kolling, Glynis L; Moore, John H; de Oliveira, Luís Antônio; Tung, Kenneth; Philipson, Casandra; Viladomiu, Monica; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guerrant, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is increasingly recognized as a major cause of diarrheal disease globally. In the current study, we investigated the impact of zinc deficiency on the host and pathogenesis of EAEC. Several outcomes of EAEC infection were investigated including weight loss, EAEC shedding and tissue burden, leukocyte recruitment, intestinal cytokine expression, and virulence expression of the pathogen in vivo. Mice fed a protein source defined zinc deficient diet (dZD) had an 80% reduction of serum zinc and a 50% reduction of zinc in luminal contents of the bowel compared to mice fed a protein source defined control diet (dC). When challenged with EAEC, dZD mice had significantly greater weight loss, stool shedding, mucus production, and, most notably, diarrhea compared to dC mice. Zinc deficient mice had reduced infiltration of leukocytes into the ileum in response to infection suggesting an impaired immune response. Interestingly, expression of several EAEC virulence factors were increased in luminal contents of dZD mice. These data show a dual effect of dietary zinc in benefitting the host while impairing virulence of the pathogen. The study demonstrates the critical importance of zinc and may help elucidate the benefits of zinc supplementation in cases of childhood diarrhea and malnutrition.

  2. Effects of an alanyl-glutamine-based oral rehydration and nutrition therapy solution on electrolyte and water absorption in a rat model of secretory diarrhea induced by cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Lima, Aldo A M; Carvalho, Graça H P; Figueiredo, Aline A; Gifoni, Angela R; Soares, Alberto M; Silva, Eduardo A T; Guerrant, Richard L

    2002-06-01

    Recurring diarrhea and persistent diarrhea are commonly associated with malnutrition and long-term functional deficits. A beneficial approach would be to develop an alanyl-glutamine (AlaGln)-based oral rehydration and nutrition therapy (ORNT). We investigated the effect of an AlaGln-ORNT solution on electrolyte and water absorption in a rat model of secretory diarrhea induced by cholera toxin. Phenolsulfonphthalein (50 microg/mL) was used as a non-absorbable marker for calculation of net water and electrolyte transport. Solutions tested were Ringer's solution, a glutamine-based ORNT (Gln-ORNT) solution, and an AlaGln-ORNT solution. Cholera toxin (1 microg/mL) was injected into lumen of rat small intestinal segments and incubated for 18 h before the initiation of the perfusion. Cholera toxin induced significant secretion of electrolyte and water in the control Ringer's solution. AlaGln-ORNT and Gln-ORNT solutions reduced the sodium secretory effect of cholera toxin by 128% and 36%, respectively. The net water secretion also was reduced by 95% and 60%, respectively, with the AlaGln-ORNT and Gln-ORTN solutions. These results showed that AlaGln-ORNT solution can enhance water and electrolyte intestinal absorption even better than glutamine or glucose and thus provide a potential novel approach for ORNT to break the vicious cycle of diarrhea and malnutrition. Clinical trials are now needed in children and adults with diarrhea and malnutrition.

  3. Experimental Bacterial and Viral Diarrhea (Experimental Viral Diarrhea in Pigs).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    sucrose, thehalose, isomaltose, and cellubiose as substrate All enzymes were greatly reduced at 24 and 48 hrs. after oral infection. Lactase activity...greatly reduced at 24 and 48 hrs. after oral infection. Lactase activity was reduced to less than 25,percent of control levels. Jejunum was the region of...than from the controls (Fig. 1). Lactase activity was sharply reduced at 24 hrs. Maltase was moderately reduced at 24 hrs., but the effect was very

  4. L-arginine-induced experimental pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Péter; Jr, Zoltán Rakonczay; Sári, Réka; Góg, Csaba; Lonovics, János; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László

    2004-01-01

    Despite medical treatment, the lethality of severe acute pancreatitis is still high (20%-30%). Therefore, it is very important to find good animal models to characterise the events of this severe disease. In 1984, Mizunuma et al[1] developed a new type of experimental necrotizing pancreatitis by intraperitoneal administration of a high dose of L-arginine in rats. This non-invasive model is highly reproducible and produces selective, dose-dependent acinar cell necrosis. Not only is this a good model to study the pathomechanisms of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, but it is also excellent to observe and influence the time course changes of the disease. By writing this review we iluminate some new aspects of cell physiology and pathology of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Unfortunately, the reviews about acute experimental pancreatitis usually did not discuss this model. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to summarise the observations and address some challenges for the future in L-arginine-induced pancreatitis. PMID:15237423

  5. Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch.

    PubMed

    Lundeberg, T; Bondesson, L; Thomas, M

    1987-12-01

    The effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch was studied in 10 healthy volunteers. Itching was induced by intradermal injections of histamine on the upper arm. 'Placebo-acupuncture', acupuncture and electro-acupuncture at 2 Hz or 80 Hz were applied over the injection site, proximal to the injection site (in the same dermatome) or extrasegmentally (ipsilateral to the injected arm) for a period of 5 min following induction of itch. In addition, the effect of a 5 min period and a 20 min period of stimulation of the skin area prior to the induction of itch were studied. The same periods of stimulation were also applied to extrasegmental points prior to the induction of itch on the arm. Acupuncture and 2 Hz and 80 Hz electro-acupuncture significantly reduced subjective itch intensity when applied intrasegmentally. No significant effects were obtained when stimulation was applied extrasegmentally. The results suggest that acupuncture or electro-acupuncture could be tried in clinical conditions associated with pruritus.

  6. Effect of acupuncture on experimentally induced itch.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J; Solomon, L M; Lichter, E A

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of acupuncture on histamine-induced itch and flare in healthy volunteers (n = 25) and compared it with the effect of a pseudo-acupuncture procedure and of no-intervention in a single-blind randomized cross-over study. A cumulative itch index is defined and was found to be smaller with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.02) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.005). The duration of itching was shorter with acupuncture than with either pseudo-acupuncture (p = 0.006) or with no-intervention (p less than 0.001). In addition, maximal flare area was decreased with acupuncture compared with pseudo-acupuncture (p less than 0.04) and with no intervention (p = 0.003). Acupuncture had little or no effect on the itch onset time or on the maximal itch intensity after intradermal injection of histamine. Measurements of itching correlated poorly with measurements of flare size in all three experimental groups. Acupuncture appears to be an effective inhibitor of histamine-induced itch and flare. Moreover, acupuncture points displayed specificity in that needling near-by, non-acupuncture sites resulted in greater itching and larger flares.

  7. THE ETIOLOGY OF INFECTIOUS DIARRHEA (WINTER SCOURS) IN CATTLE

    PubMed Central

    Jones, F. S.; Little, Ralph B.

    1931-01-01

    A disease of cows manifested by severe diarrhea has been described. The condition is characterized by the frequent passage of dark brown or black feces, often containing mucus and blood. The principal lesions are catarrhal inflammation of the small intestine and liver degeneration. By feeding feces from spontaneous cases to calves a similar but milder disease characterized by the same type of enteritis was produced. Vibrios were cultivated from the inflamed intestinal tract of such experimentally induced cases. Pure cultures of the vibrios when fed to other calves, in certain instances, produced diarrhea and a well marked enteritis similar to that observed in both the spontaneous disease and in calves following the feeding of feces from naturally affected cows. Vibrios were recovered from the inflamed small intestine of three out of four animals fed such cultures. PMID:19869885

  8. Characterization of clinical and immune response in a rotavirus diarrhea model in suckling Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cano, Francisco J; Castell, Margarida; Castellote, Cristina; Franch, Angels

    2007-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are the leading pathogens causing diarrhea in children and animals. The present study was designed to establish an experimental model of RV infection and immune response in suckling rats. Wistar (W) and Lewis (L) suckling rats were inoculated orally with two different doses of a simian RV SA-11 strain. RV infection was evaluated by growth rate and clinical indexes. Virus-shedding and serum anti-RV antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mucosal interferon-gamma (IFN gamma), specific splenocyte proliferation, and spleen and intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) phenotype were analyzed. No diarrhea was observed in any inoculated Ws. All Ls developed acute moderate diarrhea, and a high score and incidence of diarrhea were found in rats infected with higher titers of RV. Specific humoral and cell systemic immune response was confirmed by splenocyte proliferation and by the presence of serum anti-RV antibodies. Moreover, RV infection induced changes in IEL composition, which showed an increase in the proportion of innate immune cells with respect to cells involved in acquired immunity. This acute moderate diarrhea process constitutes a good experimental model that also provides some immune biomarkers that may allow establishing modulation by drugs or diet components.

  9. Endogenous prion protein attenuates experimentally induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary R; Keenan, Catherine M; Sharkey, Keith A; Jirik, Frank R

    2011-11-01

    Although the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is expressed in the enteric nervous system and lamina propria, its function(s) in the gut is unknown. Because PrP(C) may exert a cytoprotective effect in response to various physiologic stressors, we hypothesized that PrP(C) expression levels might modulate the severity of experimental colitis. We evaluated the course of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in hemizygous Tga20 transgenic mice (approximately sevenfold overexpression of PrP(C)), Prnp(-/-) mice, and wild-type mice. On day 7, colon length, disease severity, and histologic activity indices were determined. Unlike DSS-treated wild-type and Prnp(-/-) animals, PrP(C) overexpressing mice were resistant to colitis induction, exhibited much milder histopathologic features, and did not exhibit weight loss or colonic shortening. In keeping with these results, pro-survival molecule expression and/or phosphorylation levels were elevated in DSS-treated Tga20 mice, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokine production and pSTAT3 levels were reduced. In contrast, DSS-treated Prnp(-/-) mice exhibited increased BAD protein expression and a cytokine expression profile predicted to favor inflammation and differentiation. PrP(C) expression from both the endogenous Prnp locus or the Tga20 transgene was increased in the colons of DSS-treated mice. Considered together, these findings demonstrate that PrP(C) has a previously unrecognized cytoprotective and/or anti-inflammatory function within the murine colon.

  10. Quillaja brasiliensis saponins induce robust humoral and cellular responses in a bovine viral diarrhea virus vaccine in mice.

    PubMed

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Silveira, Fernando; Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; Yendo, Anna Carolina; de Costa, Fernanda; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano; Gosmann, Grace; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2016-04-01

    A saponin fraction extracted from Quillaja brasiliensis leaves (QB-90) and a semi-purified aqueous extract (AE) were evaluated as adjuvants in a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccine in mice. Animals were immunized on days 0 and 14 with antigen plus either QB-90 or AE or an oil-adjuvanted vaccine. Two-weeks after boosting, antibodies were measured by ELISA; cellular immunity was evaluated by DTH, lymphoproliferation, cytokine release and single cell IFN-γ production. Serum anti-BVDV IgG, IgG1 and IgG2b were significantly increased in QB-90- and AE-adjuvanted vaccines. A robust DTH response, increased splenocyte proliferation, Th1-type cytokines and enhanced production of IFN-γ by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were detected in mice that received QB-90-adjuvanted vaccine. The AE-adjuvanted preparation stimulated humoral responses but not cellular immune responses. These findings reveal that QB-90 is capable of stimulating both cellular and humoral immune responses when used as adjuvant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page An Experimental Contact Lens to Prevent Glaucoma-Induced Blindness By Sharon Reynolds Posted January 23, 2014 An experimental contact lens design releases a glaucoma medicine at a ...

  12. Serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity in experimentally induced and naturally occurring canine monocytic ehrlichiosis (Ehrlichia canis).

    PubMed

    Mylonakis, Mathios E; Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Theodorou, Konstantina; Siarkou, Victoria I; Steiner, Jörg M; Harrus, Shimon; Leontides, Leonidas; Rallis, Timoleon; Suchodolski, Jan S; Koutinas, Christos K; Koutinas, Alexander F

    2014-03-14

    Ehrlichia canis infection causes multisystemic disease in dogs (canine monocytic ehrlichiosis, CME) which is associated with variable morbidity and mortality. Atypical clinical manifestations, including gastrointestinal signs, may occasionally occur in CME and approximately 10-15% of dogs are presented with historical or clinical evidence of vomiting, diarrhea, and/or abdominal discomfort. The objective of this study was to investigate if there are any alterations in serum canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) in dogs with experimentally induced or naturally occurring monocytic ehrlichiosis. Serum samples from 10 Beagle dogs experimentally infected with E. canis and two healthy uninfected Beagles were serially examined; samples from 20 naturally infected dogs (10 with non-myelosuppressive [NME] and 10 with myelosuppressive [ME] ehrlichiosis) were also examined at a given point in time (cross-sectional sampling). None of the experimentally infected Beagles showed gastrointestinal signs or increased cPLI concentrations prior to or following the artificial infection. Three naturally infected dogs with NME and one with ME demonstrated serum cPLI concentrations in the diagnostic range for pancreatitis (>400 μg/L) without showing gastrointestinal signs. The results of the present study indicated that 4/20 (20%) of dogs naturally infected with E. canis demonstrated increased serum cPLI concentrations consistent with mild and clinically inapparent pancreatitis.

  13. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... in and drinking water from contaminated streams or lakes can lead to an infection and chronic diarrhea. ... or camping, never drink from streams, springs, or lakes unless local health authorities have certified the water ...

  14. Milk supplemented with immune colostrum: protection against rotavirus diarrhea and modulatory effect on the systemic and mucosal antibody responses in calves experimentally challenged with bovine rotavirus.

    PubMed

    Parreño, V; Marcoppido, G; Vega, C; Garaicoechea, L; Rodriguez, D; Saif, L; Fernández, F

    2010-07-01

    Group A bovine rotavirus (BRV) is the major cause of neonatal calf diarrhea worldwide. As a preventive strategy, we evaluated the protection and immunomodulation in two groups of BRV-inoculated calves. All calves received control colostrum (CC; VN=65,536; IgG(1)=16,384) prior to gut closure followed by the milk supplemented with immune colostrum (VN=1,048,576; IgG(1)=262,144), twice a day, for 14 days. Calves received milk supplemented with 0.8% immune colostrum [(Gp 1) VN=16,384; IgG(1)=4096] or milk supplemented with 0.4% immune colostrum [(Gp 2) VN=1024; IgG(1)=1024]. Calves receiving CC or colostrum deprived calves (CD) fed antibody (Ab) free milk served as controls (Gp 3 and 4). Calves were inoculated with virulent BRV IND at 2 days of age. Group 1 calves (milk IgG(1) 4096) showed 80% protection against BRV diarrhea and significantly reduced virus shedding. At 21 post-inoculation days (PID), the antibody secreting cell (ASC) responses of Gp 1 calves were limited mainly to duodenal and jejunal lamina propria (LP) with limited or no responses in systemic sites (spleen and PBL) and mesenteric lymph nodes. The profile of serum and fecal Ab responses as well as the ASC responses was also modulated by the presence of passive IgG(1) Abs and probably other colostrum components, toward higher titers of IgA Ab in serum and feces and a greater number of IgA ASC in the proximal intestine, reflecting positive modulation by colostrum toward this isotype associated with optimal protection of the intestinal mucosa. After challenge, at PID 21, all calves in Gp 1 and 2 were fully protected against diarrhea and only 1 of 5 calves in Gp 1 shed virus asymptomatically, indicating that the passive Ab treatment for 14 days was effective in protecting most of the animals after a first and a second virus exposure. The final outcome was a positive modulation of the mucosal immune responses and a high protection rate against diarrhea and virus shedding during the period of peak

  15. [Effects of shugan jianpi recipe on the ion transport of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome rat colon mucosa induced by 5-HT].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-Sheng; Wang, Zheng-Fang; Guo, Qian-Kun

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the mechanism of Shugan Jianpi Recipe (SJR) on the ion transportation of diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) colon mucosa induced by 5-HT. Totally 36 male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups, i. e., the normal group, the model group, and the SJR group, 12 in each group. IBS-D Rat model was induced by intracolonic instillation of acetic acid and restraint stress. After successful modeling, normal saline was given to rats in the normal group and the model group, while SJR was given to those in the SJR group by gastrogavage for 14 days. The short circuit current (lsc) technology was used to measure 5-HT induced lsc changes of the colon mucosa under the actions of drugs and specific blocking agents. There was no difference in basal current (BC), the potential difference (PD), and transmembrane resistance (TR) of the distal colon among the 3 groups (all P > 0.05). The 5-HT induced short circuit current change (delta lsc) was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P < 0.05), and it was higher in the SJR group than in the model group (P < 0.05). When 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS, 500 micromol/L), an Ca(+)-dependent Cl- channel blocker, was added from the epiphragm of the colonic mucosa, the 5-HT induced delta lsc was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P < 0.05), and it was higher in the SJR group than in the model group (P < 0.05). When Na+ was substituted in the epiphragm solution (Na+ free) or amiloride (100 micromol/L) was added from the epiphragm of the colonic mucosa, an epithelial Na+ channel blocker, the 5-HT induced delta lsc was lower in the model group than in the normal group (P < 0.05), and it was higher in the SJR group than in the model group (P < 0.05). SJR could affect the transmembrane electrolyte transportation of IBS-D rat induced by 5-HT through regulating the secretion of Cl- and HCO3-. The effects might be achieved by the coordination of apical Cl

  16. Virus-specific intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cell responses induced by human rotavirus infection and vaccines are correlated with protection against rotavirus diarrhea in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Wen, Ke; Azevedo, Marli S P; Gonzalez, Ana M; Zhang, Wei; Saif, Linda J

    2008-06-19

    We examined rotavirus-specific IFN-gamma producing CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ T cell responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with a virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) or vaccinated with an attenuated (Att) HRV vaccine (AttHRV3x or AttHRV2x) or an AttHRV oral priming and 2/6-virus-like particle (VLP) intranasal boosting (AttHRV-2/6VLP) regimen. In VirHRV infected pigs, HRV-specific IFN-gamma producing T cells reside primarily in ileum. AttHRV-2/6VLP induced similar frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells as the VirHRV, whereas AttHRV3x or 2x vaccines were less effective. Protection rates against rotavirus diarrhea upon VirHRV challenge significantly correlated (r=0.97-1.0, p<0.005) with frequencies of intestinal IFN-gamma producing T cells, suggesting their role in protective immunity.

  17. Gluten-induced symptoms in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome are associated with increased myosin light chain kinase activity and claudin-15 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard Licheng; Vazquez-Roque, Maria; Carlson, Paula; Burton, Duane; Grover, Madhusudan; Camilleri, Michael; Turner, Jerrold R.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) are poorly understood, but increased intestinal permeability is thought to contribute to symptoms. A recent clinical trial of gluten-free diet (GFD) demonstrated symptomatic improvement, relative to gluten-containing diet (GCD), that was associated with reduced intestinal permeability in non-celiac disease IBS-D patients. The aim of this study was to characterize intestinal epithelial tight junction composition in IBS-D before and after dietary gluten challenge. Biopsies from 27 IBS-D patients (13 GFD; 14 GCD) were examined by H&E staining and semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC), MLC kinase, claudin-2, claudin-8, and claudin-15. Diet-induced changes were assessed and correlated with urinary mannitol excretion (after oral administration). In the small intestine, epithelial MLC phosphorylation was increased or decreased by GCD or GFD, respectively, and this correlated with increased intestinal permeability (P < 0.03). Colonocyte expression of the paracellular Na+ channel claudin-15 was also markedly augmented following GCD challenge (P < 0.05). Conversely, colonic claudin-2 expression correlated with reduced intestinal permeability (P < 0.03). Claudin-8 expression was not affected by dietary challenge. These data show that alterations in MLC phosphorylation and claudin-15 and claudin-2 expression are associated with gluten-induced symptomatology and intestinal permeability changes in IBS-D. The results provide new insight into IBS-D mechanisms and can explain permeability responses to gluten challenge in these patients. PMID:27869798

  18. Gluten-induced symptoms in diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome are associated with increased myosin light chain kinase activity and claudin-15 expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Richard L; Vazquez-Roque, Maria I; Carlson, Paula; Burton, Duane; Grover, Madhusudan; Camilleri, Michael; Turner, Jerrold R

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) are poorly understood, but increased intestinal permeability is thought to contribute to symptoms. A recent clinical trial of gluten-free diet (GFD) demonstrated symptomatic improvement, relative to gluten-containing diet (GCD), which was associated with reduced intestinal permeability in non-celiac disease IBS-D patients. The aim of this study was to characterize intestinal epithelial tight junction composition in IBS-D before and after dietary gluten challenge. Biopsies from 27 IBS-D patients (13 GFD and 14 GCD) were examined by H&E staining and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry for phosphorylated myosin II regulatory light chain (MLC), MLC kinase, claudin-2, claudin-8 and claudin-15. Diet-induced changes were assessed and correlated with urinary mannitol excretion (after oral administration). In the small intestine, epithelial MLC phosphorylation was increased or decreased by GCD or GFD, respectively, and this correlated with increased intestinal permeability (P<0.03). Colonocyte expression of the paracellular Na(+) channel claudin-15 was also markedly augmented following GCD challenge (P<0.05). Conversely, colonic claudin-2 expression correlated with reduced intestinal permeability (P<0.03). Claudin-8 expression was not affected by dietary challenge. These data show that alterations in MLC phosphorylation and claudin-15 and claudin-2 expression are associated with gluten-induced symptomatology and intestinal permeability changes in IBS-D. The results provide new insight into IBS-D mechanisms and can explain permeability responses to gluten challenge in these patients.

  19. The bovine viral diarrhea virus E2 protein formulated with a novel adjuvant induces strong, balanced immune responses and provides protection from viral challenge in cattle.

    PubMed

    Snider, Marlene; Garg, Ravendra; Brownlie, Robert; van den Hurk, Jan V; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2014-11-28

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is still one of the most serious pathogens in cattle, meriting the development of improved vaccines. Recently, we developed a new adjuvant consisting of poly[di(sodium carboxylatoethylphenoxy)]-phosphazene (PCEP), either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), and an immune defense regulator (IDR) peptide. As this adjuvant has been shown to mediate the induction of robust, balanced immune responses, it was evaluated in an E2 subunit vaccine against BVDV in lambs and calves. The BVDV type 2 E2 protein was produced at high levels in a mammalian expression system and purified. When formulated with either CpG ODN or poly(I:C), together with IDR and PCEP, the E2 protein elicited high antibody titers and production of IFN-γ secreting cells in lambs. As the immune responses were stronger when poly(I:C) was used, the E2 protein with poly(I:C), IDR and PCEP was subsequently tested in cattle. Robust virus neutralizing antibodies as well as cell-mediated immune responses, including CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses, were induced. The fact that CTL responses were demonstrated in calves vaccinated with an E2 protein subunit vaccine indicates that this adjuvant formulation promotes cross-presentation. Furthermore, upon challenge with a high dose of virulent BVDV-2, the vaccinated calves showed almost no temperature response, weight loss, leukopenia or virus replication, in contrast to the control animals, which had severe clinical disease. These data suggest that this E2 subunit formulation induces significant protection from BVDV-2 challenge, and thus is a promising BVDV vaccine candidate; in addition, the adjuvant platform has applications in bovine vaccines in general.

  20. Infectious diarrhea: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon; Surawicz, Christina M

    2014-08-01

    Diarrheal disease, which is most often caused by infectious pathogens, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in children. This is particularly true in developing countries. Recent outbreaks of infectious diarrhea in developed countries, including the USA, are often attributed to food handling and distribution practices and highlight the need for continued vigilance in this area. Another common cause of infectious diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), has historically been associated with the use of antibiotics and exposure to a health-care setting but is now increasingly common in the community in persons who lack the typical risk factors. Recent scientific advances have also led to new and proposed new therapies for infectious diarrhea, including fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for recurrent C. difficile infection (RCDI), probiotics for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and CDI, and the use of zinc supplementation in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. Other therapies that have been in use for decades, such as the oral rehydration solution (ORS), continue to be the targets of scientific advancement in an effort to improve delivery and efficacy. Finally, post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is an increasingly recognized occurrence. Attempts to understand the mechanism behind this phenomenon are underway and may provide insight into potential treatment options.

  1. Protective effects of Aegle marmelos fruit pulp on 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ghatule, Rohit R.; Gautam, Manish K.; Goel, Shalini; Singh, Amit; Joshi, Vinod K.; Goel, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aegle marmelos (AM) fruit has been advocated in indigenous system of medicine for the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders, fever, asthma, inflammations, febrile delirium, acute bronchitis, snakebite, epilepsy, leprosy, myalgia, smallpox, leucoderma, mental illnesses, sores, swelling, thirst, thyroid disorders, tumours and upper respiratory tract infections. Objective: The objective of this study was to study the curative effect of 50% ethanol extract of dried fruit pulp of AM (AME) against 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced experimental colitis. Materials and Methods: AME (200 mg/kg) was administered orally, once daily for 14 days after TNBS-induced colitis. Rats were given intracolonic normal saline or TNBS alone or TNBS plus oral AME. AME was studied for its in vitro antibacterial activity against Gram-negative intestinal bacteria and on TNBS-induced changes in colonic damage, weight and adhesions (macroscopic and microscopic), diarrhea, body weight and colonic levels of free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation), antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione) and pro-inflammatory marker (myeloperoxidase [MPO]) in rats. Results: AME showed antibacterial activity against intestinal pathogens and decreased colonic mucosal damage and inflammation, diarrhea, colonic free radicals and MPO and enhanced body weight and colonic antioxidants level affected by TNBS. The effects of AME on the above parameters were comparable with sulfasalazine, a known colitis protective drug (100 mg/kg, oral). Conclusion: AME shows curative effects against TNBS-induced colitis by its antibacterial activity and promoting colonic antioxidants and reducing free radicals and MPO-induced colonic damage. PMID:24914296

  2. [Congenital chloride diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Contreras, Mónica; Rocca, Ana; Benedetti, Laura; Kakisu, Hisae; Delgado, Sabrina; Ruiz, José Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CCD) is a rare hereditary disease, with a prenatal onset, secondary to a deficit in the intestinal chloride transport. In the present study, we describe the clinical characteristics of three patients with congenital watery diarrhea, two of them females, aged between 9 and 14 months at the first visit. All patients presented perinatal antecedents of polyhydramnios and prematurity, watery stools since birth and growth failure. Metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia and hypochloremia were found. Stool ionogram with elevated doses of chloride, exceeding both sodium and potassium, confirmed the diagnosis of CCD. Substitute treatment with sodium and potassium chloride was started with good results. CCD should be considered as a differential diagnosis to congenital watery diarrhea, since early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are mandatory for the normal development of the child, avoiding severe complications such as neurological sequelae and even death.

  3. [Parasitic diarrhea in eutrophic and malnourished children].

    PubMed

    Gendrel, D

    2003-01-01

    Almost all children living in endemic zones are infected by gastrointestinal parasites. However only 3 to 5% develop diarrhea directly related to parasite infection. Entamoeba hystolytica and Entamoeba dispar coexist in many areas. In the past Entamoeba dispar was called non-pathogenic ameba. The vegetating forms are microscopically identical and detection of wall differences using biochemical tests is unreliable. Thus since it is rarely possible to determine whether or not a vegetating ameba found in stools is hematophagous treatment using metronidazole is the only alternative. Failure of such treatment indicates that dysentery is probably due to a cause other than amibiasis, e.g., bacterial infection in most cases. Another protozoan commonly found in endemic areas is Giardia. Giardia can cause diarrhea and this is frequently the case in undernourished children. Giardia infection leads to severe atrophic villosity requiring appropriate specific treatment. In children cryptosporidioses may be asymptomatic or lead to diarrhea especially in cases associated with malnutrition or immunodeficiency related in particular to AIDS. Helminths are a rare cause of significant diarrhea except Anguillula in undernourished children. In children presenting severe malnutrition, anguilluliasis can lead to serious consequences and requires immediate treatment using ivermectin. To avoid severe diarrhea in children presenting immunodeficiency induced by corticotherapy or chemotherapy for cancer, prophylaxis is mandatory against anguilluliasis using ivermectin and usually against giardiasis using metronidazole.

  4. Global challenges in acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Das, Jai K; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    Childhood diarrhea is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in the low and middle-income countries. The burden of child mortality because of diarrhea has declined, but still a lot is desired not only to reduce diarrhea-specific mortality but reduce the overall incidence, and hence the morbidity associated with childhood diarrhea. A recent Lancet series on diarrhea suggests that amplification of the current interventions can eliminate virtually all preventable diarrhea deaths. A refocused attention and strategy and collective effort from the multilateral entities to promote water sanitation and hygiene, rotavirus vaccination, nutrition, and improved case management can bridge gaps and tackle the existing undue burden of deaths because of diarrhea. Investment toward preventing and controlling childhood diarrhea should be a priority, especially when the existing solution is plausible for implementation at scale and in underprivileged settings.

  5. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Diarrhea “I was afraid to go places without a ... now take when I need to.” What is diarrhea? Do you have bowel movements more often than ...

  6. Experimental and analytical investigation of flow through rocket pump inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of a rocket pump inducer are discussed. The effect of the pumping requirements on the blade configuration is analyzed. The effects of viscosity on blade design were determined by tests of a four bladed inducer operated in air at a flow coefficient of 0.065. The fluid properties were measured at the exit of the inducer using conventional and hot wire probes. The experimental results and the method of predicting the outlet tangential velocity and head rise are discussed.

  7. Ionic changes during experimentally induced seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Lux, H D; Heinemann, U

    1978-01-01

    Changes in intra- and extracellular ionic activity and their relation to generation and termination of seizure phenomena can be studied with the help of ion-selective microelectrodes. Transient changes in extracellular potassium activity (aK) of the cortex regularly accompany paroxysmal activity induced by electrical stimulation and pentylenetetrazol injections or occur within active penicillin and aluminum foci. A rise of aK from baseline levels of about 3 mmoles/l up to ceiling levels of 8--12 mmoles/l, followed by subnormal K activity, is typically found during seizure discharge. Extracellular K accumulation during seizures facilitates the spread into extrafocal regions. Ceiling levels of extracellular aK are characterized by pronounced K reabsorption which is probably a limiting mechanism for the rise in extracellular aK. It may be a consequence of a simultaneous rise in intracellular Na activity that an electrogenic Na--K exchange process is involved in the termination of ictal activity. Seizures are also accompanied by significant reductions in extracellular Ca2+ activity (aCa) to as low as 0.7 mmoles/l (resting aCa 1.25 mmoles/l). There is no critical level of lowered aCa at which a seizure ultimately results. However, unlike changes in aK reductions in aCa can precede ictal activity. Thus, a fall of aCa occurs before the onset of paroxysmal periods during cyclical spike driving in a penicillin focus and before seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol. Ca2+-dependent mechanisms may contribute to seizure generation. In addition to changes in aK and aCa, intracellular chloride activity (aCl) can increase during seizure activity, as a result of an impaired chloride extrusion mechanism, which would lead to a reduced efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission and, therefore, to facilitation of seizure generation.

  8. Effect of Lactobacillus Strains on Intestinal Microflora and Mucosa Immunity in Escherichia coli O157:H7-Induced Diarrhea in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin; Wang, Ting-Ting; Xu, Min; Evivie, Smith Etareri; Luo, Guang-Wen; Liang, Hong-Zhang; Yu, Shang-Fu; Huo, Gui-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 administrations by gavage on intestinal microflora and mucosal immunity in diarrhea mice infected by Escherichia coli O157:H7 compared to normal mice. The levels of E. coli, Enterobacteria, and Enterococcus decreased significantly (P < 0.05), while viable counts of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium increased in diarrhea mice. Moreover, KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 improved secretion of secretory immunoglobulin A and enhanced the levels of interferon-γ and interleukin. Results indicate that KLDS 1.8701 and AD1 could effectively alleviate diarrhea in mice via modulation of intestinal microflora and improve the function of immune system. The study on the effect of KLDS1.8701 and AD1 supplementation in human flora-associated animal models was recommended.

  9. Alterations in the Colonic Microbiota in Response to Osmotic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Trajanoski, Slave; Lackner, Stefan; Stocker, Gernot; Hinterleitner, Thomas; Gülly, Christian; Högenauer, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Diseases of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract are often accompanied by diarrhea with profound alterations in the GI microbiota termed dysbiosis. Whether dysbiosis is due to the disease itself or to the accompanying diarrhea remains elusive. With this study we characterized the net effects of osmotic diarrhea on the composition of the GI microbiota in the absence of disease. Methods We induced osmotic diarrhea in four healthy adults by oral administration of polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG). Stool as well as mucosa specimens were collected before, during and after diarrhea and 16S rDNA-based microbial community profiling was used to assess the microbial community structure. Results Stool and mucosal microbiotas were strikingly different, with Firmicutes dominating the mucosa and Bacteroidetes the stools. Osmotic diarrhea decreased phylotype richness and showed a strong tendency to equalize the otherwise individualized microbiotas on the mucosa. Moreover, diarrhea led to significant relative shifts in the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes and to a relative increase in the abundance of Proteobacteria on the mucosa, a phenomenon also noted in several inflammatory and diarrheal GI diseases. Conclusions Changes in microbial community structure induced by osmotic diarrhea are profound and show similarities to changes observed in other GI diseases including IBD. These effects so must be considered when specimens from diarrheal diseases (i.e. obtained by stratification of samples according to diarrheal status) or conditions wherein bowel preparations like PEG (i.e. specimens obtained during endoscopy) are used. PMID:23409050

  10. Mechanisms for inducing nasal mucosal tolerance in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Calder, Claudia J; Nicholson, Lindsay B; Dick, Andrew D

    2006-02-01

    Delivering soluble (auto) antigenic peptides via the naso-respiratory route induces tolerance to that peptide and suppression of experimental models of autoimmune disease. In the normal lung, respiratory tract dendritic cells (RTDCs) efficiently endocytose soluble antigens, migrate to regional lymph nodes and present peptide to T cells that subsequently become tolerant. This article describes protocols for inducing tolerance via the naso-respiratory tract in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU); for the isolation of RTDCs to facilitate definition of, and conditions for, maturation and activation of cells; and to test RTDC ability to induce tolerance in murine EAU when adoptively transferred.

  11. Pulmonary emphysema induced by methylphenidate: experimental study.

    PubMed

    Rapello, Gabriel Victor Guimarães; Antoniolli, Andréia; Pereira, Daniel Martins; Facco, Gilberto; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel; Pazetti, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate is the most widely used drug for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. However, it has important side effects, such as abdominal pain, insomnia, anorexia and loss of appetite, and also some cases of early severe emphysema after drug abuse have been reported. Our aim was to investigate the development of pulmonary emphysema in rats that were subjected to different doses of methylphenidate. Experimental study carried out at the laboratory of a public university. Eighteen male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (0.9% saline solution); MP 0.8 (methylphenidate, 0.8 mg/kg); MP 1.2 (methylphenidate, 1.2 mg/kg). After 90 days of daily gavage, the animals were sacrificed and lung tissue samples were prepared for analysis on the mean alveolar diameter (Lm). The Lm was greater in MP 0.8 (47.91 ± 3.13; P < 0.01) and MP 1.2 (46.36 ± 4.39; P < 0.05) than in the control group (40.00 ± 3.48). Methylphenidate caused an increase in the alveolar diameter of rats, which was compatible with human pulmonary emphysema.

  12. Diarrhea (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old ... > For Parents > Diarrhea Print A A A What's in this ...

  13. Evaluation of three experimental bovine viral diarrhea virus killed vaccines adjuvanted with combinations of Quil A cholesterol and dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide.

    PubMed

    Ridpath, Julia F; Dominowski, Paul; Mannan, Ramasany; Yancey, Robert; Jackson, James A; Taylor, Lucas; Mediratta, Sangita; Eversole, Robert; Mackenzie, Charles D; Neill, John D

    2010-12-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections cause respiratory, reproductive, and enteric disease in cattle. Vaccination raises herd resistance and limits the spread of BVDV among cattle. Both killed and modified live vaccines against BVDV are available. While modified live vaccines elicit an immune response with a broader range and a longer duration of immunity, killed vaccines are considered to be safer. One way to improve the performance of killed vaccines is to develop new adjuvants. The goal of this research was evaluate new adjuvants, consisting of combinations of Quil A cholesterol and dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide, for use in killed vaccines. Responses to three novel killed vaccines, using combinations of Quil A and DDA as adjuvants, were compared to responses to a commercial modified live and a commercial killed vaccine. Vaccination response was monitored by measuring viral neutralizing antibodies (VN) levels and by response to challenge. All three novel vaccines were efficacious based on reduction in virus isolation, pyrexia, and depression. Compared to a commercial killed vaccine, the three novel vaccines elicited higher VN levels and reduced injection site inflammation.

  14. Clostridium butyricum, a probiotic derivative, suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshio; Andoh, Akira; Takizawa, Jyou; Takizawa, Wataru; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2004-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that probiotics or short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) exert a therapeutic effect on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. In a previous study, we demonstrated that Clostridium butyricum produces high levels of SCFAs in culture. In addition, a yogurt-based additive effectively masked, completely eliminating the unpleasant odor derived from the SCFAs. We recently reported that the oral administration of both high and low dose diets (50% w/w for 17 days and 5% w/w for 16 months, respectively) of the Clostridium butyricum derivative did not cause pathological abnormalities in rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of this product against dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental colitis in rats. Five-week-old male Wistar Hannover GALAS rats were given a mixture of a standard diet containing 3% (w/w) of DSS for 8 days. In the derivative-fed group, Clostridium butyricum derivative (20% w/w) with 0.1% (w/w) additive was also added to their diet. The control-fed group was given tap water (20% w/w) with 0.1% (w/w) additive. After 8 days, a laparotomy was performed, and macroscopic and microscopic inflammation scoring was determined. The Clostridium butyricum derivative effectively prevented bloody diarrhea. In addition, mucosal damage to the derivative-fed group was significantly reduced macroscopically compared to that of the control-fed group. The potential clinical efficacy of the Clostridium butyricum derivative in IBD patients is also discussed.

  15. EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED CHROMOSOME ABERRATIONS IN PLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Kihlman, B. A.

    1957-01-01

    of these enzymes were found to be totally inhibited only by potassium cyanide. In the other cases, little correlation was found between ability to inhibit the activities of these enzymes and ability to produce chromosome aberrations. In a number of experiments, hydrogen peroxide was found to be without radiomimetic effect, whether alone or in combination with potassium cyanide. t-Butyl hydroperoxide proved to be active. The effect of t-butyl hydroperoxide was substantially increased by pretreatments with 2.4.-dinitrophenol. The results are discussed, and it is concluded that the observations made do not support the hypothesis that hydrogen peroxide is involved in the production of chromosome aberrations by potassium cyanide. The possibility that organic peroxides are involved cannot be excluded on the bases of the experimental results. As an alternative hypothesis, it is suggested that iron or other heavy metals are present in the chromosomes and that cyanide and other heavy metal complexing agents produce chromosome aberrations by reacting with these metals. PMID:13438921

  16. Limited efficacy of Fever Tag® temperature sensing ear tags in calves with naturally occurring bovine respiratory disease or induced bovine viral diarrhea virus infection

    PubMed Central

    McCorkell, Robert; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; Windeyer, Claire; Schaefer, Al

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensing ear tags were tested in 1) auction-derived calves with 50% incidence of bovine respiratory disease, and 2) specific pathogen-free calves infected with bovine virus diarrhea virus. There were no false positives, but tag placement, probe displacement, and a high threshold for activation all contributed to failure to reliably detect sick calves. PMID:24982523

  17. Mutations induced in the NS5B gene of bovine viral diarrhea virus by antiviral treatment convey resistance to the compound

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a widespread bovine pathogen for which there is no specific therapeutic agent. A previous study using 2-(2-benzimidazolyl)-5-[4-(2-imidazolino)phenyl]furan dihydrochloride (DB772) to treat calves persistently infected with BVDV resulted in a decrease in the vira...

  18. An experimental model of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium from acute progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6: correlation between conditions of mice and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Taghipour, Niloofar; Molaei, Mahsa; Mosaffa, Nariman; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Anissian, Ali; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To induce acute colitis progresses to chronicity in C57BL/6 mice by dextran sulfate sodium. Background: Murine models are essential tools to understand IBD pathogenesis. Among different types of chemically induced colitis models, the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model is the most common model of IBD, due to its simplicity. Patients and methods: Male C57BL/6 mice 6–8 weeks old, were collected and matched by age with controls. C57BL/6 mice treated with 2 cycles of 3.5% DSS for 4 days and 4 days of pure water between each cycle. After that, mice were sacrificed and the entire colon was removed. Small sections of the colon were fixed in formaldehyde, embedded in paraffin and sectioned with a microtome. Sections were stained with hematoxylin eosin to analyses the degree of inflammation. Results: After the first cycle oral administration of DSS, mice with severe and visible rectal bleeding and diarrhea entered into the acute phase. After day 4-5, bleeding and diarrhea were improved and mice entered into the chronic phase with peak levels of weight loss. Macroscopically, the inflammation was predominantly located in the distal colon. Microscopically, examination of the distal colon sections showed a decrease number of goblet cells, loss of crypts, signs of surface epithelial regeneration and moderate to severe infiltration of inflammatory cells in the mucosa. Conclusion: In order to achieve an experimental colitis model, our protocol is recommended for future therapies in IBD experimental modeling. PMID:26744614

  19. Early weaning stress induces chronic functional diarrhea, intestinal barrier defects, and increased mast cell activity in a porcine model of early life adversity.

    PubMed

    Pohl, C S; Medland, J E; Mackey, E; Edwards, L L; Bagley, K D; DeWilde, M P; Williams, K J; Moeser, A J

    2017-06-01

    Early life adversity (ELA) is a risk factor for development of gastrointestinal disorders later in life. The underlying mechanisms through which ELA and sex interact to influence disease susceptibility remains poorly understood. Utilizing a porcine early weaning stress (EWS) model to mimic ELA, we investigated the long-term effects of EWS on functional diarrhea, ileal permeability, mast cell activity and mast cell relationship with enteric ganglia. Juvenile and adult EWS pigs exhibited chronic, functional diarrhea (EWS 43.6% vs late wean control(LWC) 4.8%, P<.0001), increased intestinal permeability (2 fold increase EWS vs LWC, P<.0001), and mast cell numbers (at 7 weeks and 20 weeks ~1.6 fold increase EWS vs LWC, P<.05). Compared with EWS male castrates (Male-C), females EWS pigs exhibited more frequent diarrhea (58.8% vs 29.9%, P=.0016), and increased intestinal permeability (1-2 fold higher in EWS females, P<.001). Increased mast cell numbers and their enhanced co-localization with neuronal ganglia were observed in both Male-C and female EWS pigs; however, female pigs exhibited greater release of mast cell tryptase upon activation with c48/80 (~1.5 fold increase, P<.05), compared with Male-C pigs. These data demonstrate that pigs exposed to ELA exhibit increased vulnerability to functional diarrhea, intestinal permeability and mast cell activity. Further, these studies also showed that EWS female and Male-C pigs exhibited dimorphic responses to EWS with female piglets exhibited greater susceptibility and severity of diarrhea, intestinal permeability and mast cell tryptase release. Together, these findings mimic some of the key pathophysiologic findings in human functional GI disorders functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) suggesting that the EWS porcine model could be a valuable preclinical translational model for FGID research associated with ELA. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Enteroendocrine and Neuronal Mechanisms in Pathophysiology of Acute Infectious Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nullens, Sara; Nelsen, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Background While enterocyte secretion is the predominant mechanism considered responsible for secretory diarrhea in response to acute enteric infections, there are several lines of evidence that support alternative mechanisms controlling fluid and electrolyte secretion in diarrhea. Aim To review enteroendocrine and neuronal mechanisms that participate in the development of acute infectious diarrhea. Recent Advances Acute infectious diarrheas due to bacterial toxins (e.g., cholera, E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin, C. difficile) and rotavirus are all associated with secretion of transmitters from enteroendocrine cells (e.g., 5-HT) and activation of afferent neurons that stimulate submucosal secretomotor neurons. The latter secrete acetylcholine (which binds to muscarinic receptors on epithelial cells) and VIP. Involvement of nerves was demonstrated by inhibition of bacterial toxin-induced secretion by hexamethonium (nicotinic), tetrodotoxin (Na+ channel blocker), and lidocaine (visceral/mucosal afferents). Nicotinic receptors are present on secretomotoneurons and these are activated by release of acetylcholine from enteric interneurons or extrinsic efferent fibers. Specific organisms also modify other mechanisms that may contribute to development of acute diarrhea. Thus, mucin secretion, activation of motor mechanisms, increased mucosal permeability and inhibition of bile acid absorption have been reported in specific types of acute infectious diarrhea. Conclusion New therapies targeting neural and transmitter mediation including 5-HT, VIP, NPY, as well as toxin receptors and channels activated during acute infectious diarrhea could usher in a novel approach to enhancing glucose–electrolyte solutions used in the treatment of acute diarrhea. PMID:22001941

  1. Enteroendocrine and neuronal mechanisms in pathophysiology of acute infectious diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Nullens, Sara; Nelsen, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    While enterocyte secretion is the predominant mechanism considered responsible for secretory diarrhea in response to acute enteric infections, there are several lines of evidence that support alternative mechanisms controlling fluid and electrolyte secretion in diarrhea. To review enteroendocrine and neuronal mechanisms that participate in the development of acute infectious diarrhea. Acute infectious diarrheas due to bacterial toxins (e.g., cholera, E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin, C. difficile) and rotavirus are all associated with secretion of transmitters from enteroendocrine cells (e.g., 5-HT) and activation of afferent neurons that stimulate submucosal secretomotor neurons. The latter secrete acetylcholine (which binds to muscarinic receptors on epithelial cells) and VIP. Involvement of nerves was demonstrated by inhibition of bacterial toxin-induced secretion by hexamethonium (nicotinic), tetrodotoxin (Na(+) channel blocker), and lidocaine (visceral/mucosal afferents). Nicotinic receptors are present on secretomotoneurons and these are activated by release of acetylcholine from enteric interneurons or extrinsic efferent fibers. Specific organisms also modify other mechanisms that may contribute to development of acute diarrhea. Thus, mucin secretion, activation of motor mechanisms, increased mucosal permeability and inhibition of bile acid absorption have been reported in specific types of acute infectious diarrhea. New therapies targeting neural and transmitter mediation including 5-HT, VIP, NPY, as well as toxin receptors and channels activated during acute infectious diarrhea could usher in a novel approach to enhancing glucose-electrolyte solutions used in the treatment of acute diarrhea.

  2. Biosafety evaluation of bacteriophages for treatment of diarrhea due to intestinal pathogen Escherichia coli 3-2 infection of chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Ma, Man-Li; Xie, Hui-Jun; Kong, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal Escherichia coli caused diarrhea in chicken makes serious damage directly to the chicken culture industry. Bacteriophage therapy is able to control the diarrhea in chickens effectively. In this study, the biosafety of bacteriophages was evaluated for treating intestinal pathogenic E. coli, which induced diarrhea in chickens. Ten bacteriophages were isolated from feces of chickens with diarrhea using the ill-chicken intestinal pathogenic E. coli 3-2 as target organism. Three bacteriophages propagated on E. coli 3-2 with relative big and clear plaques were selected and used together for toxicity experiment and evaluating the effect of therapy on chicken weight gain. In 3 weeks of trial, no mice given with or without mixed bacteriophages died, and the weight of mice of the experimental group did not show significant difference to the control group after 3 weeks infection. Besides remarkable decreasing the death rate of chickens with diarrhea, treatment of mixed bacteriophages also promoted the weight gain and saved the diet consumption as the utilize rate of diet increased 11% compared with the control group. These observations indicated that a mixture of three bacteriophages would be biosafe for rapid and effective preventing pathogenic E. coli infections.

  3. Experimental background due to particle induced gas desorption in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    2008-08-10

    Beam-gas collision created experimental background, i.e., singles, has affected heavy ion and polarized proton operations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The gas molecules in interaction region are mainly caused by the electron induced gas desorption. and the electrons are produced from the beam induced electron multipacting, or called electron cloud. The background has a dependence on the usual electron cloud related parameters, such as the bunch intensity, bunch spacing, and the solenoid field. With the RHIC upgrade plan, the experimental background may become a luminosity limiting factor. Mitigations are discussed.

  4. Experimental study of plate buckling induced by spatial temperature gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Coyle, Marshall F.; Mcleod, Rory N.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study of plate buckling induced by spatial temperature gradients is described. A rectangular Hastelloy-X panel is subjected to local line heating by a focused quartz heat lamp. Two parallel panel edges are maintained at constant temperature by coolant flow. Point supports provide well-defined thermal-structural boundary conditions. Test results from transient elastic and inelastic tests demonstrate that substantial panel bending occurs due to initial panel warpage and thermally induced membrane compressive stresses.

  5. Viral causes of diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Goodgame, R W

    2001-09-01

    Viruses are important causes of diarrhea. In healthy adults, the main clinical manifestation is acute, self-limited gastroenteritis. Advances in molecular diagnostics have shown that epidemics of acute gastroenteritis most frequently are due to caliciviruses spread through contaminated food or through person-to-person contact. Application of similar technology is needed to make a definitive statement about the role of such candidate viruses as rotavirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus as the cause of nonepidemic acute gastroenteritis in adults. Rarely a previously healthy adult gets acute CMV colitis. CMV and EBV mainly cause diarrhea in immunocompromised patients, however. Advances in prophylaxis and treatment have reduced the frequency and severity of these diseases. Acute infantile gastroenteritis is caused by rotavirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus. These viral diseases of the gut are seen by the physician as routine and rare clinical problems.

  6. Update on traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Strum, W B

    1988-07-01

    Traveler's diarrhea affects a substantial number of travelers to high-risk areas of the world. The key to controlling this troublesome disease is prevention. The most important preventive measures depend on educating patients to consume only safe foods and pure water. Physicians cannot overemphasize the importance of avoiding high-risk foods and of boiling water if a safe water supply is not available. Prophylactic medications are a secondary consideration and should be prescribed with discretion. In most cases, diarrhea is mild and self-limited, requiring only fluid and electrolyte replacement and perhaps an antidiarrheal agent. In moderate to severe cases, the addition of an antimicrobial agent may be of benefit. Until an efficacious polyvalent vaccine is developed, caution and common sense, together with discretionary dietary and hygienic practices, are the best defenses against traveler's diarrhea. The ultimate solution is greatly improved sanitation and personal hygiene, especially in high-risk countries. However, only dreamers will consider waiting for this transformation to occur.

  7. Experimentally induced otitis and audiogenic seizure in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Niaussat, M M

    1977-04-15

    Audiogenic seizures can be induced in genetically non-susceptible 17-day-old mice (Rb/3 strain) with various results. Priming only induces 9% of seizures, auditory insulation 3,8%, while experimental otitis leads to 79%. The hypothesis concerning disuse supersensitivity subsequent to acoustic deprivation was not confirmed by the experiment. However, modification of acoustic transmission at middle ear level induced by otitis or ear physical damage during the maturation period, exposes the upper nervous centers to intense stimulation to which the reaction is a recruiting response.

  8. Experimental infection of white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus virginianus) with bovine viral diarrhea virus type-1 isolated from free-ranging white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Raizman, E A; Pogranichniy, R; Lévy, M; Negron, M; Langohr, I; Van Alstine, W

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to elucidate the within-host dynamics of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type-1 infection to better understand how this virus could be maintained in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, WTD) populations. The BVDV type-1 used in this study was originally isolated from a free-ranging WTD in Indiana. Four fawns were intranasally inoculated with 2 ml BVDV type-1 strain 544 WTD at a 10(6) tissue culture infectious dose (TCID(50))/ml. Two fawns were inoculated with sham inoculum (negative controls). Animals were bled on days -7, 0, 1, 7, and 14 postinoculation (PID) for a complete blood count, chemistry panel, buffy coat (BC), real-time RT-PCR, and virus neutralization (VN). On days 7 and 14 PID, nasal and rectal swabs were obtained for RT-PCR and two of the virus-inoculated fawns and one of the negative controls fawns were euthanized. At necropsy, multiple samples were obtained for histopathology and in situ hybridization (ISH). Quantitative RT-PCR was performed on serum, BC, nasal, and rectal swabs. All animals tested negative for BVDV type 1 neutralizing antibodies on day 0 and animals in the control group remained seronegative throughout the study. No gross lesions were observed at necropsy. BVDV was isolated from lung and pooled lymph nodes from all BVDV-inoculated fawns on days 7 and 14 PID. Infected deer had lymphoid depletion, apoptosis, and lymphoid necrosis in the Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. BVDV was detected in lymphoid tissues of infected animals by ISH. No lesions or virus were identified in control fawns. On day 7 PID, samples from two virus-inoculated fawns were positive for BVDV by virus isolation and RT-PCR from BC and nasal swab samples. One fawn was also positive on a rectal swab. Nasal and rectal swabs from all animals were negative on day 14. Results indicate that infection of WTD with BVDV is possible, and leads to histologic lesions in variety of tissues. In addition, virus shedding

  9. Blood oxygen binding in calves with naturally occurring diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cambie, C; Clerbaux, T; Moreaux, B; Detry, B; Beerens, D; Frans, A; Gustin, P

    2001-05-01

    To assess blood oxygen binding in calves with diarrhea. 22 dairy and 26 double-muscled calves with diarrhea, 31 healthy dairy calves and 37 healthy double-muscled calves. Severity of disease, including the ability of affected calves to stand, was evaluated. Hydration and signs of depression were scored. Venous and arterial blood samples were collected, and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, ATP, chloride, inorganic phosphate, lactate, pyruvate, total protein, albumin, and hemoglobin concentrations, and Hct, pH, Pco2, and PO2 were determined. Oxygen equilibrium curves (OEC) were constructed under standard conditions, and oxygen extraction ratios were calculated. Recumbent calves of both breed-types were more dehydrated and had more severe signs of depression than ambulatory affected calves. In both breed-types, hemoglobin oxygen affinity was increased in calves with diarrhea, compared with healthy calves, as indicated by a decrease in standard partial oxygen pressure (P50). Diarrhea induced hypocapnia and hypothermia in the most severely affected calves, which counteracted the acidosis-induced right shift in arterial and venous OEC. Arterial and venous P50 were significantly less in double-muscled calves with diarrhea than healthy calves, whereas P50 for affected dairy calves were similar to those of healthy calves. Except in the most severely affected dairy calves, oxygen extraction ratio was significantly less in calves with diarrhea, compared with healthy calves. Release of oxygen from blood may be impaired in calves with diarrhea, depending on the effect of the disease on certain blood biochemical variables.

  10. Experimental Investigation of the Induced Airflow of Corona Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Xun-Nian; Wang, Wan-Bo; Huang, Zong-Bo; Li, Hua-Xing

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve the acceleration effect of corona discharge acting on air, we present an experimental study on the induced airflow produced by corona discharge between two parallel electrodes. The parameters investigated are the type of electrodes, actuation voltage and the distance in the absence of free airflow. The induced flow velocity is measured directly in the accelerated region using the particle image velocimetry technology. The results show that if corona discharge is not developed into arc discharge, the induced airflow velocity increases nearly linearly with the applied voltage and the maximum induced airflow velocity near the needle electrode reaches 36 m/s. It is expected that in the future, the result can be referred to in the research about effect of active flow control to reach much higher induced airflow speed.

  11. Gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Taha, Mona M; Younis, Nahla N; Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Hamouda, Hamdi A; Eldosouky, Mohamed A; Soliman, Hala

    2010-10-01

    Gastritis, an inflammation of gastric mucosa, may be due to many pathological factors and infection, such as with Helicobacter pylori. The use of experimental models of gastritis is important to evaluate the biochemical changes and study chemotherapeutic intervention. In a previous study we demonstrated an acute gastritis model induced by iodoacetamide. Our objective in this study was to evaluate a new gastritis model induced by H. pylori infection in experimental rats in terms of certain biomarkers in serum and mucosal tissues in addition to histopathological examination. Gastritis was induced in 20 albino Wistar rats by H. pylori isolated from antral biopsy taken from a 49-year-old male patient endoscopically diagnosed as having H. pylori infection. Another ten rats were used as controls. Serum gastrin, pepsinogen I activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were measured. Immunostaining for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation were used to further evaluate H. pylori-induced gastritis. Serum gastrin, IL-6, mucosal MPO activity, and PGE(2) demonstrated significant increases joined with a decreased serum pepsinogen I activity (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positive reaction for iNOS, nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis models demonstrated massive oxidative stress and pronounced injury in mucosal tissue. Since our model in rats reflected the clinical picture of H. pylori infection, it can be considered as a consistent model to study chemotherapeutic intervention for this type of gastritis.

  12. [Trial chemoprophylaxis of traveler's diarrhea using nifuroxazide].

    PubMed

    Bourée, P; Kouchner, G

    1986-06-01

    Traveler's diarrhea is a very common condition that affects approximately 12 million subjects each year. This disorder is benign but nevertheless interferes with the traveler's plans in 40% of cases. Several drugs have been used for prophylaxis, in association with appropriate precautions concerning food and drink. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and cyclines are effective but may induce adverse effects. Nifuroxazide in a dose of 400 mg each day throughout the trip has proved effective. Tolerance was outstanding with no adverse effects.

  13. Neuroendocrine mechanisms of development of experimental hyperandrogen-induced anovulation.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, A G; Sinitsyn, P V; Tarasenko, L V; Polyakova, L I

    2003-10-01

    An experimental model of hyperandrogen-induced anovulatory infertility (s.c. implantation of Silastic capsules containing testosterone into adult female rats) was used to study morphological, hormonal, and biochemical measures characterizing the state of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-ovarian system. Impairments in functional androgen metabolism in the hypothalamus were seen, with decreases in the Luliberin sensitivity of the hypophysis, changes in the structure of estral cycles, and morphological changes in the ovaries; these findings are evidence for neuroendocrine disturbances in the control of ovulation. Flutamide, an experimental antiandrogen, led to partial normalization of the hormonal, biochemical, and morphological characteristics, as well as to recovery of fertility in females with anovulatory infertility.

  14. Straight Poop on Kids and Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates How to Treat Diarrhea in Infants and Young Children Share Tweet Linkedin ... that is occurring. back to top Causes of Diarrhea Acute diarrhea (comes on rapidly, is severe, but ...

  15. Tetracycline induced esophageal ulcers. a clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Carlborg, B; Densert, O; Lindqvist, C

    1983-02-01

    Medication with oral drugs has not been considered as a cause of esophageal lesions in the general literature of esophageal disease. This study demonstrates 40 patients with complaints of sudden onset of intense retrosternal pains and odynophagia during treatment with oral tetracyclines. All patients had distinct circumferential ulcers in the esophagus. Medical history, barium swallows, esophagoscopy, biopsies and esophageal manometry revealed no other apparent etiology but a local corrosive effect of the tetracyclines. Experimental tests on the esophagus of the cat verified a severe local corrosive effect of the tetracyclines. Another tetracycline, lymecycline, not reported previously to induce esophageal lesions in man, was significantly less ulcerogenic than doxycycline and oxytetracycline. Drug induced esophageal ulcerations are likely to be more numerous than previously suspected. The experimental model used appears to be sound for investigating ulcerogenic potentials of orally administered drugs.

  16. The application of 1,8-cineole, a terpenoid oxide present in medicinal plants, inhibits castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats.

    PubMed

    Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader; Maham, Massoud

    2015-04-01

    1,8-Cineole, a terpene, characterized as a major constituent occurring in the essential oils of several aromatic plants. It is widely used in pharmaceutical industry, as a food additive and for culinary purposes. This study investigates the inhibitory effect of 1,8-cineole on transit time and diarrhea in animal models. Acute toxicity and lethality of 1-8-cineole was determined by Lork's guidelines. The antidiarrheal effect of 1,8-cineole was investigated by determining the intestinal transit and enterpooling in rats. In all experiments, different doses of 1,8-cineole (20-120 mg/kg), atropine, and loperamide were administered orally. The LD50 of 1,8-cineole for oral administration was estimated to be 1280 mg/kg. 1,8-Cineole (20-120 mg/kg) did not show a significant decrease in small intestine transit (p > 0.05); however, the highest dose displayed a significant decrease in comparison with atropine (p < 0.05). This substance decreased the peristaltic index value to 68 ± 0.36% at a dose of 120 mg/kg compared with the control group (85.22 ± 4.31%) in the castor oil transit test. 1,8-Cineole significantly delayed the onset of diarrhea to -142.33 ± 6.08 min at 120 mg/kg, while the time was 103.66 ± 20.73 min for the control and >240 min for the loperamide. Moreover, 1,8-cineole significantly decreased intestinal fluid accumulation (p < 0.05). This study demonstrated antispasmodic and antisecretory activities of 1,8-cineole and rationalized the traditional use of the plant containing various levels of this terpene in the treatment of gastrointestinal complains such as diarrhea.

  17. Acute Diarrhea in Children.

    PubMed

    Radlović, Nedeljko; Leković, Zoran; Vuletić, Biljana; Radlović, Vladimir; Simić, Dušica

    2015-01-01

    Acute diarrhea (AD) is the most frequent gastroenterological disorder, and the main cause of dehydration in childhood. It is manifested by a sudden occurrence of three or more watery or loose stools per day lasting for seven to 10 days, 14 days at most. It mainly occurs in children until five years of age and particularly in neonates in the second half-year and children until the age of three years. Its primary causes are gastrointestinal infections, viral and bacterial, and more rarely alimentary intoxications and other factors. As dehydration and negative nutritive balance are the main complications of AD, it is clear that the compensation of lost body fluids and adequate diet form the basis of the child's treatment. Other therapeutic measures, except antipyretics in high febrility, antiparasitic drugs for intestinal lambliasis, anti-amebiasis and probiotics are rarely necessary. This primarily regards uncritical use of antibiotics and intestinal antiseptics in the therapy of bacterial diarrhea.The use of antiemetics, antidiarrhetics and spasmolytics is unnecessary and potentially risky, so that it is not recommended for children with AD.

  18. Acute infectious diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Cheney, C P; Wong, R K

    1993-09-01

    Diarrhea continues to be a major cause of mortality and morbidity in third world countries as well as a major symptomatic complaint in the primary care setting in the United States. The etiologic pathogen depends on an exposure history to include recent travel to foreign countries, consuming fecally contaminated water or food, prior use of antibiotics, or homosexual behavior. A careful history from patients directed at attempting to identify particular risk factors may help in making a diagnosis. Not all patients require a diagnostic workup. A large number of patients may only require oral rehydration, careful observation over time with or without use of antimotility agents. In toxic appearing patients or patients with fever, however, bloody stools, abdominal pain or tenesmus, a selective diagnostic workup is indicated. Antimicrobial treatments are not always required, some pathogens clearly call for treatment while some have less clear indications and other pathogens are not responsive to antimicrobial agents at all. Finally, one needs to remember that the differential diagnosis of acute diarrhea includes many noninfectious origins.

  19. PHARMACOLOGIC TREATMENT OF HYPERALGESIA EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED BY NUCLEUS PULPOSUS

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Grava, André Luiz; Ferrari, Luiz Fernando; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of anti-inflammatory drugs (dexamethasone, indomethacin, atenolol and indomethacin plus atenolol) and analgesic drugs (morphine) on hyperalgesia experimentally induced by the nucleus pulposus (NP) in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats of weights ranging from 220 to 250 g were used in the study. Hyperalgesia was induced by means of a fragment of NP removed from the sacrococcygeal region that was placed in contact with the L5 dorsal root ganglion. The 30 animals were divided into experimental groups according to the drug used. The drugs were administered for two weeks after the surgical procedure to induce hyperalgesia. Mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated using the paw pressure test, von Frey electronic test and Hargreaves test, over a seven-week period. Results: The greatest reduction of hyperalgesia was observed in the group of animals treated with morphine, followed by dexamethasone, indomethacin and atenolol. Reductions in hyperalgesia were observed after drug administration ceased, except for the group of animals treated with morphine, in which there was an increase in hyperalgesia after discontinuation of the treatment. Conclusion: Hyperalgesia induced by NP contact with the DRG can be reduced through administration of anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs, but a greater reduction was observed with the administration of dexamethasone. PMID:27026966

  20. Insulin reverses ammonia-induced anorexia and experimental cancer anorexia.

    PubMed

    Chance, W T; Thomas, I; Fischer, J E

    1994-01-01

    Previous experiments suggest that experimental cancer-induced anorexia is associated with hyperammonemia and that daily injections of insulin may attenuate the anorexia for several days. In the present study, we determined whether similar daily insulin treatments would correct anorexia induced by the infusion of ammonium salts and compared this feeding response with that of insulin-treated tumor-bearing (TB) rats. Daily treatment of control and anorectic TB rats with systemically administered insulin for six days increased feeding in all control rats and 40% of the TB rats. All insulin-treated groups exhibited equal degrees of hypoglycemia irrespective of anorexia. Basal concentrations of lactate and glucagon were elevated in saline-treated TB rats. Plasma lactate levels were normalized by insulin treatment, whereas glucagon was normalized only in the TB rats that fed to insulin and increased further in TB rats that did not feed to insulin. Elevated hypothalamic tyrosine was reduced in insulin-treated TB rats that ate, and 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid was increased further when the rats did not eat. Insulin also blocked anorexia resulting from the intravenous infusion of ammonium salts. Hypothalamic concentrations of tyrosine and tryptophan were increased by the ammonia infusion and reduced significantly in insulin-treated infused rats. These results indicate that insulin treatment can reverse experimental cancer-induced anorexia and hyperammonemia-induced anorexia. Neurochemical changes associated with these treatments are also similar, but not identical.

  1. Effects of Caffeine and Lycopene in Experimentally Induced Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Ozlem; Topsakal, Senay; Haligur, Mehmet; Aydogan, Ahmet; Dincoglu, Dilnur

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a global epidemic with increasing prevalence. The disease is chronic in nature, and patients must use antidiabetic drugs or insulin during their lifespan. Because of the difficulty of using injectable insulin preparations, patients and practitioners prefer to use oral antidiabetic drugs for prophylaxis and treatment. There are, however, numerous adverse effects of antidiabetic drugs and rapidly increasing attention is being paid to new nutraceutical drugs with fewer adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine and lycopene on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DM in rats. Caffeine and lycopene were administered to the study groups by oral gavages for 1 month whereafter experimental diabetes was induced in 90 rats in 6 groups. There were no pathological effects of lycopene and caffeine on the pancreas. Marked vacuolization and degeneration were observed in STZ-treated groups. Caffeine and lycopene decreased the pathological findings and lowered the blood and urine glucose levels in the rats with STZ-induced DM, whereas these compounds increased serum insulin levels. This study showed that caffeine and lycopene provided protective effects against experimentally induced DM. The protective effects of lycopene were observed to be much greater than those of caffeine.

  2. In a methotrexate-induced model of intestinal mucositis, olmesartan reduced inflammation and induced enteropathy characterized by severe diarrhea, weight loss, and reduced sucrose activity.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Borba, Pedro Brito; de Souza, Fernando Henrique Destefani; Nogueira, Anália Cristina; Saldanha, Taís Suassuna; Araújo, Thayse Emanuele Franklin; da Silva, Aldemara Ingrid; de Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of olmesartan (OLME), an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, on an intestinal mucositis model. Briefly, daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of methotrexate (MTX) 7 mg/kg were administered to rats on 3 consecutive days. A subset of these rats was also pretreated with oral administration of OLME (0.5, 1.0, or 5.0 mg/kg) or vehicle as a control 30 min prior to MTX injection. Body weight, feces scoring, and death were recorded daily. On day 4, the rats were killed, and intestinal tissues were assayed for levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, myeloperoxidase and sucrose activity, and histopathological findings. A significant reduction in body weight was observed in the MTX+1.0 mg/kg OLME group (p<0.01). The feces scores for the MTX+0.5 mg/kg OLME and MTX+5.0 mg/kg OLME groups were also significantly higher (p<0.001). Sucrose activity was reduced in all groups treated with OLME (p<0.05). Treatment with MTX+OLM at all doses resulted in reduced inflammatory infiltration, ulcerations, vasodilation, and hemorrhagic areas (p<0.05), as well as reduced concentrations of myeloperoxidase (p<0.001). The IL-1β and TNF-α levels were decreased in the MTX+OLME 5.0 mg/kg (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively) compared with the MTX-alone group. Overall, antiinflammatory activity was observed in rats with MTX-induced intestinal mucositis that were administered OLME. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the adverse effects of OLME.

  3. Analysis of mRNA expression for genes associated with regulatory T lymphocytes (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO) after experimental infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence in beef calves.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Roberto A; Hurley, David J; Woolums, Amelia R; Parrish, Jacqueline E; Brock, Kenny V

    2014-12-01

    Immunosuppression caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been associated with lymphocyte depletion, leukopenia and impairment of leukocyte function; however, no work has been done on the relationship between BVDV and regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs). The objective of this study was to compare the mRNA expression of genes associated with Tregs (CD25, FoxP3, CTLA4, and IDO), after experimental infection of beef calves with low (LV) or high (HV) virulence BVDV. Thirty BVDV-naïve calves were randomly assigned to three groups. Calves were intra-nasally inoculated with LV (n=10, strain SD-1) or HV (n=10, strain 1373) BVDV or BVDV-free cell culture medium (control, n=10). Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of target genes in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes and spleen on day 5 post-infection. The mRNA expression of CD25 was up-regulated in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not in HV compared to the control group. The expression of FoxP3 and CTLA4 was not increased in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of either of the BVDV-inoculated groups. A dramatic up-regulation of IDO mRNA was observed in tracheo-bronchial lymph nodes of LV (P<0.05), but not HV compared to the control calves. In conclusion, experimental infection with BVDV did not provide evidence of Treg activation based on expression of FoxP3 and CTL4. Differential expression of CD25 and IDO mRNA on day 5 post-infection with HV or LV BVDV might reflect temporal differences in transcription occurring during the immune response elicited by these viral strains, or differences in viral infectivity of the host cells.

  4. Microcirculation alterations in experimentally induced gingivitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Masato; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Takahashi, Shun-Suke; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Maeda, Shingo; Iimura, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to morphologically examine the gingival microvascular network using a microvascular resin cast (MRC) technique, and to investigate how inflammatory disease functionally affects gingival microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). We used four beagle dogs with healthy periodontal tissue as experimental animals. To cause periodontal inflammation, dental floss was placed around the cervical neck portions of the right premolars. The unmanipulated left premolars served as controls, and received plaque control every 7 days. After 90 days, gingivitis was induced in the experimental side, while the control side maintained healthy gingiva. To perform morphological examinations, we used an MRC method involving the injection of low-viscosity synthetic resin into the blood vessels, leading to peripheral soft-tissue dissolution and permitting observation of the bone, teeth, and vascular cast. Gingival blood flow was estimated using an LDF meter. The control gingival vasculature showed hairpin-loop-like networks along the tooth surface. The blood vessels had diameters of 20-40 μm and were regularly arranged around the cervical portion. On the other hand, the vasculature in the experimental group was twisted and gathered into spiral forms, with blood vessels that had uneven surfaces and smaller diameters of 8-10 μm. LDF revealed reduced gingival blood flow in the group with experimentally induced gingivitis compared to controls. The actual measurements of gingival blood flow by LDF were in agreement with the alterations that would be expected based on the gingivitis-induced morphological alterations observed with the MRC technique.

  5. Zinc treatment ameliorates diarrhea and intestinal inflammation in undernourished rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background WHO guidelines recommend zinc supplementation as a key adjunct therapy for childhood diarrhea in developing countries, however zinc’s anti-diarrheal effects remain only partially understood. Recently, it has been recognized that low-grade inflammation may influence stunting. In this study, we examined whether oral zinc supplementation could improve weight, intestinal inflammation, and diarrhea in undernourished weanling rats. Methods Rats were undernourished using a northeastern Brazil regional diet (RBD) for two weeks, followed by oral gavage with a saturated lactose solution (30 g/kg) in the last 7 days to induce osmotic diarrhea. Animals were checked for diarrhea daily after lactose intake. Blood was drawn in order to measure serum zinc levels by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Rats were euthanized to harvest jejunal tissue for histology and cytokine profiles by ELISA. In a subset of animals, spleen samples were harvested under aseptic conditions to quantify bacterial translocation. Results Oral zinc supplementation increased serum zinc levels following lactose-induced osmotic diarrhea. In undernourished rats, zinc improved weight gain following osmotic diarrhea and significantly reduced diarrheal scores by the third day of lactose intake (p < 0.05), with improved jejunum histology (p < 0.0001). Zinc supplementation diminished bacterial translocation only in lactose-challenged undernourished rats (p = 0.03) compared with the untreated challenged controls and reduced intestinal IL-1β and TNF-α cytokines to control levels. Conclusion Altogether our findings provide novel mechanisms of zinc action in the setting of diarrhea and undernutrition and support the use of zinc to prevent the vicious cycle of malnutrition and diarrhea. PMID:25095704

  6. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    PubMed

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema: insights from experimental models.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Mariana A; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2011-12-01

    Several distinct stimuli can be used to reproduce histological and functional features of human emphysema, a leading cause of disability and death. Since cigarette smoke is the main cause of emphysema in humans, experimental researches have attempted to reproduce this situation. However, this is an expensive and cumbersome method of emphysema induction, and simpler, more efficacious alternatives have been sought. Among these approaches, elastolytic enzymes have been widely used to reproduce some characteristics of human cigarette smoke-induced disease, such as: augmentation of airspaces, inflammatory cell influx into the lungs, and systemic inflammation. Nevertheless, the use of elastase-induced emphysema models is still controversial, since the disease pathways involved in elastase induction may differ from those occurring in smoke-induced emphysema. This indicates that the choice of an emphysema model may impact the results of new therapies or drugs being tested. The aim of this review is to compare the mechanisms of disease induction in smoke and elastase emphysema models, to describe the differences among various elastase models, and to establish the advantages and disadvantages of elastase-induced emphysema models. More studies are required to shed light on the mechanisms of elastase-induced emphysema.

  8. Opsin-induced experimental autoimmune retinitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Broekhuyse, R M; Winkens, H J; Kuhlmann, E D; van Vugt, A H

    1984-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune retinitis has been induced in Lewis rats by injection of opsin in mycobacterial adjuvant and Hemophilus pertussis adjuvant. Clinical, histopathological and immunological parameters of the disease are reported. Two types of opsin were prepared from purified bovine retina outer segments, one type in Triton X-100 and the other in lithium dodecyl sulfate. Both preparations were free from S-antigen. Dodecyl sulfate-denaturated-opsin displayed lower antigenicity and pathogenicity than Triton-opsin. Triton-opsin (250 micrograms) induced moderate to severe non-granulomatous uveitis (predominantly retinitis) in 70% of the Lewis rats at the end of the second week after injection. The photoreceptor cell layer was destructed within a few days. This group displayed high responses to opsin in the lymphocyte transformation test. In view of observed histological features, the possible early involvement of vasoactive factors is discussed. Low opsin doses (50 or 100 micrograms) seldomly induced severe retinitis, while the incidence of mild pathology was low. Lewis rats appeared to be more susceptible for the development of experimental autoimmune retinitis than Wistar rats.

  9. Affective and cardiovascular effects of experimentally-induced social status.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Tamar; Thurston, Rebecca C; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2008-07-01

    Observational research suggests subordinate social status is associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes. However, observational studies have limitations, including confounding of social status with other factors, limited ability to infer causality, and difficulty of obtaining detailed affective and physiologic data. This study used experimental methods to test the hypothesis that subordinate social status per se causes psychological distress and cardiovascular arousal. Forty-four women were randomly assigned to an induced subordinate or dominant status condition. Social status was manipulated using a procedure derived from status construction theory. Affective responses were assessed via self-report. Cardiovascular responses were assessed by measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressures obtained with an automated blood pressure machine. Participants in the subordinate condition perceived themselves as lower in status; the reverse was true for dominant condition participants. Compared with induced dominant status, induced subordinate status produced increased negative affect and systolic blood pressure over the course of the study. Findings suggest social status can be experimentally manipulated and short-term induction of subordinate status can have adverse effects on affect and stress-related physiological systems. Results have implications for understanding how socioeconomic status "gets under the skin" to influence health. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Local and Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Experimentally Induced Gingivitis

    PubMed Central

    Leishman, Shaneen J.; Seymour, Gregory J.; Ford, Pauline J.

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P < 0.001). These results support the concept that gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual. PMID:24227893

  11. Local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Leishman, Shaneen J; Seymour, Gregory J; Ford, Pauline J

    2013-01-01

    This study profiled the local and systemic inflammatory responses to experimentally induced gingivitis. Eight females participated in a 21-day experimental gingivitis model followed by a 14-day resolution phase. Bleeding on probing and plaque index scores were assessed before, during, and after resolution of gingival inflammation, and samples of saliva, GCF, and plasma were collected. Samples were assessed for biomarkers of inflammation using the BioPlex platform and ELISA. There were no significant changes in GCF levels of cytokines during the experimental phase; however, individual variability in cytokine profiles was noted. During resolution, mean GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased and were significantly lower than baseline levels (P = 0.003, P = 0.025, and P = 0.007, resp.). Furthermore, changes in GCF levels of IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α during resolution correlated with changes in plaque index scores (r = 0.88, P = 0.004; r = 0.72, P = 0.042; r = 0.79, P = 0.019, resp.). Plasma levels of sICAM-1 increased significantly during the experimental phase (P = 0.002) and remained elevated and significantly higher than baseline levels during resolution (P < 0.001). These results support the concept that gingivitis adds to the systemic inflammatory burden of an individual.

  12. Pellicle-induced reticle distortion: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Carroll, James A.; Storm, Glenn; Ivancich, Ronald G.; Maloney, John P.; Maurin, Olivier; Souleillet, Eric

    1999-04-01

    As semiconductor design rules decrease in size, total overlay performance requires a higher standard of the stepper and the photomask which affords a smaller error budget to each. Currently, photomask overlay assessment is done prior to pellicle attachment. However, the physical act of attaching a pellicle to a photomask imparts mechanical stress that distorts the reticle plane and changes the actual pattern placement from the design intent. With the advent of metrology tools capable of through-pellicle registration measurement, we are now able to assess and better characterize the effect pellicalization has on reticle distortion. The focus of this experimental investigation has been to quantify the incremental reticle distortion attributed to attaching the pellicle. To assess pellicle-induced distortion, both pattern registration and reticle flatness were evaluated. Two pellicle gasket materials were evaluated and one of the two materials was found to produce less reticle distortion. Relaxation of pellicle-induced reticle distortion after the pellicle is attached is also discussed.

  13. Pellicle-induced reticle distortion: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Carroll, James A.; Storm, Glenn; Ivancich, Ronald G.; Maloney, John P.; Maurin, Olivier; Souleillet, Eric

    1998-12-01

    As semiconductor design rules decrease in size, total overlay performance requires a higher standard of the stepper and the photomask which affords a smaller error budget to each. Currently, photomask overlay assessment is done prior to pellicle attachment. However, the physical act of attaching a pellicle to a photomask imparts mechanical stress that distorts the reticle plane and changes the actual pattern placement from the design intent. With the advent of metrology tools capable of through-pellicle registration measurement, we are now able to assess and better characterize the effect pelliclization has on reticle distortion. The focus of this experimental investigation has been to quantify the incremental reticle distortion attributed to attaching the pellicle. To assess pellicle-induced distortion, both pattern registration and reticle flatness were evaluated. Two pellicle gasket materials were evaluated and one of the two materials was found to produce less reticle distortion. Relaxation of pellicle-induced reticle distortion after the pellicle is attached is also discussed.

  14. Experimental realization of optomechanically induced non-reciprocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zhen; Zhang, Yan-Lei; Chen, Yuan; Zou, Chang-Ling; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Zou, Xu-Bo; Sun, Fang-Wen; Guo, Guang-Can; Dong, Chun-Hua

    2016-10-01

    Non-reciprocal devices, such as circulators and isolators, are indispensable components in classical and quantum information processing in integrated photonic circuits. Aside from these applications, the non-reciprocal phase shift is of fundamental interest for exploring exotic topological photonics, such as the realization of chiral edge states and topological protection. However, incorporating low-optical-loss magnetic materials into a photonic chip is technically challenging. In this study we experimentally demonstrate non-magnetic non-reciprocity using optomechanical interactions in a whispering gallery microresonator, as proposed in a previous work. Optomechanically induced non-reciprocal transparency and amplification are observed and a non-reciprocal phase shift of up to 40° is also demonstrated. The underlying mechanism of optomechanically induced non-reciprocity has great potential for all-optical controllable isolators and circulators, as well as non-reciprocal phase shifters in integrated photonic chips.

  15. Ichnocarpus frutescens Ameliorates Experimentally Induced Convulsion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Narendra Kumar; Laloo, Damiki; Garabadu, Debapriya; Singh, Tryambak Deo; Singh, Virendra Pratap

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticonvulsant activity and probable mechanism of action of the methanol root extract from I. frutescens (MEIF) using different experimental animal models. Anticonvulsant activity of the single dose of MEIF (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated in maximal electroshock- (MES-), pentylenetetrazole- (PTZ-), and isoniazid- (INH-) induced convulsions models in rats. The levels of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA), glutamate, GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) activity and oxidative stress markers were measured in pretreated rat's brain homogenate to corroborate the mechanism of observed anticonvulsant activity. MEIF (200–400 mg/kg, p.o.) protected the animals in all the behavioral models used. Pretreatment of MEIF (200–400 mg/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) to the animals in INH-induced convulsion model showed 100% and 80% protection, respectively, as well as significant restoration of GABA and glutamate level in the rat's brain. MEIF and vigabatrin (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the PTZ-induced increase in the activity of GABA-T (46%) in the brain. Further, MEIF reversed the PTZ-induced increase in lipid peroxidase (LPO) and decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. The findings of this study validate the anticonvulsant activity of I. frutescens. PMID:27379268

  16. Interaction between histamine-induced itch and experimental muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Wasner, G; Schwarz, K; Schattschneider, J; Binder, A; Jensen, T S; Baron, R

    2004-06-01

    Itch sensation can be inhibited by simultaneously applied cutaneous pain at the same skin site via a central mechanism. Deep muscle pain is often associated with sensory changes in the corresponding dermatome. We investigated whether experimentally induced muscle pain has any influence on histamine-induced itch and vice versa in a double blind placebo-controlled study. Experiments were performed in 18 healthy subjects. In nine individuals control iontophoresis of histamine into the forearm produced a distinct itch sensation. Another nine individuals participated in an additional experiment in which histamine and saline were iontophoresed on the forearm in a randomized double-blinded two-way crossover design after intramuscular injection of capsaicin into the ipsilateral brachioradial muscle. Capsaicin-induced muscle pain reduced itch sensation significantly. In contrast, capsaicin-induced muscle pain increased significantly after cutaneous histamine application compared to muscle pain after iontophoresis of saline (placebo). These novel data indicate that muscle pain inhibits itch and histamine increases muscle pain. A bi-directional interaction between cutaneous histamine-sensitive afferents and nociceptive muscle afferents via central mechanisms is suggested.

  17. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Antonio; Yáñez, Antonio; León-Tello, Gloria; Gil, Constantino; Giono, Silvia; Barba, Eduardo; Cedillo, Lilia

    2002-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients. PMID:12057023

  18. Immediate effects of chocolate on experimentally induced mood states.

    PubMed

    Macht, Michael; Mueller, Jochen

    2007-11-01

    In this work two hypotheses were tested: (1) that eating a piece of chocolate immediately affects negative, but not positive or neutral mood, and (2) that this effect is due to palatability. Experiment 1 (48 normal-weight and healthy women and men) examined the effects of eating a piece of chocolate and drinking water on negative, positive and neutral mood states induced by film clips. Eating chocolate reduced negative mood compared to drinking water, whereas no or only marginal effects were found on neutral and positive moods. Experiment 2 (113 normal-weight and healthy women and men) compared effects of eating palatable and unpalatable chocolate on negative mood, and examined the duration of chocolate-induced mood change. Negative mood was improved after eating palatable chocolate as compared to unpalatable chocolate or nothing. This effect was short lived, i.e., it disappeared after 3 min. In both experiments, chocolate-induced mood improvement was associated with emotional eating. The present studies demonstrate that eating a small amount of sweet food improves an experimentally induced negative mood state immediately and selectively and that this effect of chocolate is due to palatability. It is hypothesized that immediate mood effects of palatable food contribute to the habit of eating to cope with stress.

  19. Mechanisms of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity: evidence from experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, João B. T.; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Neurological disorders are common, costly, and can cause enduring disability. Although mostly unknown, a few environmental toxicants are recognized causes of neurological disorders and subclinical brain dysfunction. One of the best known neurotoxins is methylmercury (MeHg), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. In the aquatic environment, MeHg is accumulated in fish, which represent a major source of human exposure. Although several episodes of MeHg poisoning have contributed to the understanding of the clinical symptoms and histological changes elicited by this neurotoxicant in humans, experimental studies have been pivotal in elucidating the molecular mechanisms that mediate MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The objective of this mini-review is to summarize data from experimental studies on molecular mechanisms of MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. While the full picture has yet to be unmasked, in vitro approaches based on cultured cells, isolated mitochondria and tissue slices, as well as in vivo studies based mainly on the use of rodents, point to impairment in intracellular calcium homeostasis, alteration of glutamate homeostasis and oxidative stress as important events in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The potential relationship among these events is discussed, with particular emphasis on the neurotoxic cycle triggered by MeHg-induced excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. The particular sensitivity of the developing brain to MeHg toxicity, the critical role of selenoproteins and the potential protective role of selenocompounds are also discussed. These concepts provide the biochemical bases to the understanding of MeHg neurotoxicity, contributing to the discovery of endogenous and exogenous molecules that counteract such toxicity and provide efficacious means for ablating this vicious cycle. PMID:21683713

  20. Morphologic lesions in type 2 BVDV infections experimentally induced by strain BVDV2-1373 recovered from a field case.

    PubMed

    Stoffregen, B; Bolin, S R; Ridpath, J F; Pohlenz, J

    2000-11-15

    Widespread outbreaks of severe acute BVDV, some associated with hemorrhagic syndrome (HS), were reported in Quebec and Ontario in 1993. These outbreaks caused significant economic hardship in infected herds. In the Ontario outbreak 150 dairy, 600 beef and 100 milk and grain fed veal herds were affected with losses estimated at $40000-$10000 per herd in lost animals, milk production, abortions and genetics. Fever, pneumonia, diarrhea, and sudden death occurred in all age groups of cattle. Abortions were frequently observed in pregnant cattle. The viruses associated with this outbreak were determined to be noncytopathic BVDV from the type 2 genotype. All BVDV2 associated with these outbreaks were noncytopathic. One of the viruses isolated from the Ontario outbreak, BVDV2-1373, was used to experimentally induce HS in 5-6 weeks old colostrum deprived, seronegative calves. All animals developed leukopenia and thrombocytopenia within 6-10 days with some developing bloody diarrhea and becoming moribund. Animals were killed for necropsy between 6 and 11 days postinfection. Histopathologically lesions were similar, but more severe, to those seen early on (within first 9 days after superinfection) in animals with experimentally induced mucosal disease (MD). There were no erosions and ulcerations present in the upper digestive tract. In hemorrhages in the mucosa, virus antigen (VA) was present in macrophages of both the lamina propria and the submucosa and in basal epithelial cells. Cells containing VA were vacuolated and separated from each other. The most severe lesions observed in the digestive tract were in the Peyers patches and were characterized by depletion of lymphocytes and proliferation of crypt cells resulting in crypthyperplasia. Apoptotic cells were present in crypts and areas of lymph follicles where viral antigen was detected. Out of the six animals, VA was present in four animals in the pancreas, three animals in the pituitary and in two animals in the

  1. Bile Acid diarrhea: prevalence, pathogenesis, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-05-23

    Bile acid diarrhea (BAD) is usually seen in patients with ileal Crohn's disease or ileal resection. However, 25% to 50% of patients with functional diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) also have evidence of BAD. It is estimated that 1% of the population may have BAD. The causes of BAD include a deficiency in fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF-19), a hormone produced in enterocytes that regulates hepatic bile acid (BA) synthesis. Other potential causes include genetic variations that affect the proteins involved in BA enterohepatic circulation and synthesis or in the TGR5 receptor that mediates the actions of BA in colonic secretion and motility. BAs enhance mucosal permeability, induce water and electrolyte secretion, and accelerate colonic transit partly by stimulating propulsive high-amplitude colonic contractions. There is an increased proportion of primary BAs in the stool of patients with IBS-D, and some changes in the fecal microbiome have been described. There are several methods of diagnosing BAD, such as (75)selenium homotaurocholic acid test retention, serum C4, FGF-19, and fecal BA measurement; presently, therapeutic trials with BA sequestrants are most commonly used for diagnosis. Management involves the use of BA sequestrants including cholestyramine, colestipol, and colesevelam. FXR agonists such as obeticholic acid constitute a promising new approach to treating BAD.

  2. Calcium ameliorates diarrhea in immune compromised children

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Sam X.; Bai, Harrison X.; Gonzalez-Peralta, Regino; Mistry, Pramod K.; Gorelick, Fred S.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of infectious diarrheas remains a challenge, particularly in immunocompromised patients in whom infections usually persist and resultant diarrhea is often severe and protracted. Children with infectious diarrhea who become dehydrated are normally treated with oral or intravenous rehydration therapy. Although rehydration therapy can replace the loss of fluid, it does not ameliorate diarrhea. Thus, over the past decades, there has been continuous effort to search for ways to safely stop diarrhea. Herein, we report three cases of immunocompromised children who developed severe and/or protracted infectious diarrhea. Their diarrheas were successfully “halted” within 1-2 days following the administration of calcium. PMID:23343935

  3. Duodenal villous atrophy: a cause of chronic diarrhea after solid-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weclawiak, H; Ould-Mohamed, A; Bournet, B; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Fortenfant, F; Muscari, F; Sallusto, F; Dambrin, C; Esposito, L; Guitard, J; Abbal, M; Rostaing, L; Kamar, N

    2011-03-01

    Persistent diarrhea is commonly observed after solid organ transplantation (SOT). A few cases of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)-induced duodenal villous atrophy (DVA) have been previously reported in kidney-transplant patients with chronic diarrhea. Herein, we report on the incidence and characteristics of DVA in SOT patients with chronic diarrhea. One hundred thirty-two SOT patients with chronic diarrhea underwent an oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and a duodenal biopsy after classical causes of diarrhea have been ruled out. DVA was diagnosed in 21 patients (15.9%). It was attributed to mycophenolic acid (MPA) therapy in 18 patients (85.7%) (MMF [n = 14] and enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium [n = 4]). MPA withdrawal or dose reduction resulted in diarrhea cessation. The incidence of DVA was significantly higher in patients with chronic diarrhea receiving MPA compared to those who did not (24.6% vs. 5.1%, p = 0.003). DVA was attributed to a Giardia lamblia parasitic infection in two patients (9.5%) and the remaining case was attributed to azathioprine. In these three patients, diarrhea ceased after metronidazole therapy or azathioprine dose reduction. In conclusion, DVA is a frequent cause of chronic diarrhea in SOT recipients. MPA therapy is the most frequent cause of DVA. An OGD should be proposed to all transplant recipients who present with persistent diarrhea. ©2011 The Authors Journal compilation©2011 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-05-10

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain.

  5. Experimental identification of pedestrian-induced lateral forces on footbridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingólfsson, E. T.; Georgakis, C. T.; Ricciardelli, F.; Jönsson, J.

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive experimental analysis of lateral forces generated by single pedestrians during continuous walking on a treadmill. Two different conditions are investigated; initially the treadmill is fixed and then it is laterally driven in a sinusoidal motion at varying combinations of frequencies (0.33-1.07 Hz) and amplitudes (4.5-48 mm). The experimental campaign involved 71 male and female human adults and covered approximately 55 km of walking distributed between 4954 individual tests. When walking on a laterally moving surface, motion-induced forces develop at the frequency of the movement and are herewith quantified through equivalent velocity and acceleration proportional coefficients. Their dependency on the vibration frequency and amplitude is presented, both in terms of mean values and probabilistically to illustrate the randomness associated with intra- and inter-subject variability. It is shown that the motion-induced portion of the pedestrian load (on average) inputs energy into the structure in the frequency range (normalised by the mean walking frequency) between approximately 0.6 and 1.2. Furthermore, it is shown that the load component in phase with the acceleration of the treadmill depends on the frequency of the movement, such that pedestrians (on average) subtract from the overall modal mass for low frequency motion and add to the overall modal mass at higher frequencies.

  6. Experimental microembolism induces localized neuritic pathology in guinea pig cerebrum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Ming; Cai, Yan; Liu, Fei; Yang, La; Hu, Xia; Patrylo, Peter R.; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Xiao, Dong; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Microbleeds are a common finding in aged human brains. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), neuritic plaques composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits and dystrophic neurites occur frequently around cerebral vasculature, raising a compelling question as to whether, and if so, how, microvascular abnormality and amyloid/neuritic pathology might be causally related. Here we used a guinea pig model of cerebral microembolism to explore a potential inductive effect of vascular injury on neuritic and amyloid pathogenesis. Brains were examined 7-30 days after experimental microvascular embolization occupying ~0.5% of total cortical area. Compared to sham-operated controls, glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity was increased in the embolized cerebrum, evidently around intracortical vasculature. Swollen/sprouting neurites exhibiting increased reactivity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase, parvalbumin, vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and choline acetyltransferase appeared locally in the embolized brains in proximity to intracortical vasculature. The embolization-induced swollen/sprouting neurites were also robustly immunoreactive for β-amyloid precursor protein and β-secretase-1, the substrate and initiating enzyme for Aβ genesis. These experimental data suggest that microvascular injury can induce multisystem neuritic pathology associated with an enhanced amyloidogenic potential in wild-type mammalian brain. PMID:25871402

  7. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in experimentally infected conventional piglets.

    PubMed

    Poutahidis, T; Tsangaris, T; Kanakoudis, G; Vlemmas, I; Iliadis, N; Sofianou, D

    2001-11-01

    A conventional nonmutant animal that could be experimentally infected with Helicobacter pylori isolates would be a useful animal model for human H. pylori-associated gastritis. Gnotobiotic and barrier-born pigs are susceptible to H. pylori infection, but attempts to infect conventional pigs with this bacterium have been unsuccessful. In the present study, a litter of eight 20-day-old crossbreed piglets were purchased from a commercial farm. Six of them were orally challenged two to five times at different ages, between 29 and 49 days, with doses of H. pylori inoculum containing approximately 10(9) bacterial cells. Two animals served as controls. The inoculation program began 2 days postweaning when the piglets were 29 days of age. Prior to every inoculation, the piglets were fasted and pretreated with cimetidine, and prior to the first and second inoculation each piglet also was pretreated with dexamethasone. The challenged piglets were euthanasized between 36 and 76 days of age. H. pylori colonized all six inoculated piglets. The pathology of the experimentally induced gastritis was examined macroscopically and by light and electron microscopy. H. pylori induced a severe lymphocytic gastritis in the conventional piglets and reproduced the large majority of the pathologic features of the human disease. Therefore, the conventional piglet represents a promising new model for study of the various pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of lesions of the human H. pylori-associated gastritis.

  8. Hypolipidemic effect of arborium plus in experimentally induced hypercholestermic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Murty, Devarakonda; Rajesh, Enjamoori; Raghava, Doonaboina; Raghavan, Tangaraj Vijaya; Surulivel, Mukanthan Karupiah Munirajan

    2010-06-01

    Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors for coronary artery disease. The present study highlights the efficacy of the ayurvedic herbal formulation Arborium Plus [Hyppophae ramnoides L. fruit juice (S) and Rhododendron arboreum Sm. Linn flower juice (R) in a 1:4 ratio] on triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), atherogenic index (AI), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and high-sensitivity c-reactive protein (hs CRP) in experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Four groups of rabbits were subjected to different treatments for 8 weeks: control group, CHOL group (1% w/w cholesterol for 8 weeks), S+R group (1% w/w cholesterol and Arborium Plus for 8 weeks), and A group (1% w/w cholesterol and atorvastatin for 8 weeks). The results showed significant increases in TG, TC, LDL, AI, and hs CRP in hypercholesterolemic rabbits which was significantly reduced in Arborium Plus-treated hypercholesterolemic rabbits. The data demonstrated that the Arborium Plus formulation was associated with hypolipidemic effects in experimentally induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

  9. Foot-pad dermatitis and experimentally induced coccidiosis in young turkeys fed a diet without anticoccidia.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Wahab, A; Visscher, C F; Wolken, S; Reperant, J-M; Beineke, A; Beyerbach, M; Kamphues, J

    2012-03-01

    , respectively). The results suggest that induced diarrhea caused by coccidial infection led to poor litter quality, and hence, increased the severity of FPD, which can be overcome by using floor heating.

  10. Past Pain Experience and Experimentally induced Pain Perception.

    PubMed

    Paquet, Aude; Plansont, Brigitte; Labrunie, Anaïs; Malauzat, Dominique; Girard, Murielle

    2017-08-02

    Many intercurrent factors may be involved in the modulation of the pain message and its expression, such as the previous experience of pain built along the life. In this study, we aimed to determine whether susceptibility to experimentally induced pain is differentially influenced by the individual previous painful experience in subjects with schizophrenia (SC) major depression (MD), and controls (C). The SC (30), MD (32) and C (30) groups participated in experimental pain tests (application of pressure and induction of ischemia) after a semi-structured interview to make an inventory of the previous painful experiences, and the evaluation of anxiety either with autonomic (heart rate, blood pressure) or psychological (Hospital Anxiety Depression scale HAD) measures, and catastrophism. The reported pain intensities, severities, duration, of the previous pain events, and the number of previous painful events were equivalent in the three groups, except for the number of painful events experimented before the last six months which was lower in the MD group. Experimental pain sensitivity was influenced by the diagnosis, the HAD scores or the number and intensities of previous lived painful events. The lack of a past experience of pain was comparable for the different groups, suggesting that psychiatric disorders do not affect the experience of pain associated with daily life or past events. For each subject, the reported previous experience of pain influences the present feeling of pain.

  11. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  12. [The microbiota and infectious diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Surawicz, C-M

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the importance of the fecal microbiota has been key in understanding the pathophysiology of some infectious diarrheas. In addition to normal protective measures of bile, gastric acid, and immune response, among others, we now know that the healthy gut flora protects us from some infectious diarrheas. Antibiotic associated diarrhea (AAD) is an excellent example, as antibiotics perturb the normal flora; the resulting diarrhea may be due to changes in short chain fatty acid metabolism. A severe form of AAD is due to Clostridium difficile, a pathogen that can cause severe diarrhea, colitis and even death. Recurrent Clostridium difficile diarrhea is a difficult clinical problem to treat successfully because one recurrence makes further recurrences more likely, probably because antibiotics are still needed to treat and thus the fecal flora remains abnormal. There is no single effective treatment but therapies include pulsed and tapered antibiotics, the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii as an adjunct to antibiotics, and even fecal flora reconstitution. It is likely that we will learn even more in the future about the beneficial effect of our microbiota. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Persistent Diarrhea: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Herbert L

    2016-06-28

    Diarrheal disease is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Persistent diarrhea (≥14 days) can be caused by pathogens that differ from those commonly seen in acute illness; proper etiologic diagnosis is important for appropriate therapeutic management. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and management of persistent diarrhea caused by infectious agents in immunocompetent individuals worldwide. Much of the data on persistent diarrhea comes from studies of residents in or expatriates of developing countries and travelers to these regions where follow-up studies have been performed. Persistent diarrhea occurs in approximately 3% of individuals traveling to developing countries. Schistosoma mansoni (and rarely Schistosoma haematobium) intestinal infection is also not very common and is found only in endemic areas. The microbiologic causes of protracted diarrhea include detectable parasitic (eg, Giardia, Cryptosporidium) and bacterial (eg, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli, Shigella) pathogens. Available diagnostic tests include culture-dependent for bacterial pathogens and culture-independent methods for bacterial, viral, and protozoal infections (eg, polymerase chain reaction [PCR]), including multiplex PCR, as well as and microscopy for protozoal infections. Antimicrobial therapy can be given empirically to patients returning from the undeveloped to the developed world. Otherwise, antibiotics should be given based on the results of laboratory testing. Persistent diarrhea is a poorly recognized syndrome in all populations that requires proper assessment and diagnosis to ensure that affected individuals receive the treatment needed to experience improvement of clinical symptoms.

  14. Changes in articular cartilage in experimentally induced patellar subluxation

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, J.; Saito, S.; Yamamoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Patellar subluxation was experimentally induced in young rabbits and the resulting cartilaginous changes were observed over a prolonged period of time to determine histological changes in the subluxated patellar cartilage.
METHODS—The tibial tuberosity in 12 week old rabbits was laterally displaced and fixed to the tibia with wire to induce lateral patellar subluxation. Pathological changes in patellar cartilage were examined for 120 weeks after surgery using computed tomography and stereoscopic microscopy.
RESULTS—Eight weeks after surgery, changes in articular cartilage consisting of horizontal splitting of the matrix were observed in the intermediate zone and were presumed to have been caused by shearing stress applied to the patellar cartilage. The cartilaginous changes caused by patellar subluxation progressed very little over the 120 weeks. Very few rabbits presented with osteoarthritic changes in the patellofemoral joint, most probably because the stress resulting from the malalignment of the patellofemoral joint was mild enough to permit recovery.
CONCLUSION—The mild, non-progressive pathological changes, in particular, basal degeneration, induced in this experiment in patellar cartilage were quite similar to the changes in articular cartilage seen in human chondromalacia patellae.

 PMID:9462171

  15. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  16. Resveratrol protects from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in the uterus and prevents experimental preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Leishman, Emma; Domínguez Rubio, Ana Paula; Arias, Andreína; Stern, Aníbal; Bradshaw, Heather B; Franchi, Ana María

    2017-08-01

    Is resveratrol able to prevent the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced preterm labor in 15-day pregnant BALB/c mice? Resveratrol prevented the LPS-induced onset of preterm labor in 64% of the cases and showed anti-inflammatory and tocolytic effects by downregulating COX-2 and iNOS expression and NOS activity, and by changing the uterine prostaglandin and endocannabinoid profiling. Genital tract infections by Gram-negative bacteria are a common complication in human pregnancy and have been shown to increase risk of preterm delivery. Bacterial LPS elicits a strong maternal inflammatory response that results in preterm delivery and fetal death in a murine model endotoxin-induced preterm labor. An in vivo animal study was conducted. On Day 15 of pregnancy, mice received at 8:00 h a dose of vehicle (40% ethanol in saline solution) or resveratrol (3 mg/kg in vehicle) via oral gavage followed by two doses of LPS or vehicle administered intraperitoneally (i.p.), the first one at 10:00 h (0.17 mg/kg in 0.1 ml of sterile saline solution) and the second at 13:00 h (0.5 mg/kg in 0.1 ml of sterile saline solution). The mice were closely observed for any signs of morbidity (piloerection, decreased movement, and diarrhea), vaginal bleeding or preterm delivery. The beginning of preterm delivery was defined by early delivery of the first pup. Normal term labor occurs on Day 19 of gestation. Time of labor, pregnancy outcome and morphological features were evaluated after LPS and/or resveratrol administration. Uterine stripes were collected 5 h after the last LPS injection and prostaglandin and endocannabinoid profiling was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was measured by radioconversion assay. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-Pgdh) mRNA levels were analyzed by RT-PCR whilst the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), COX-1 and COX-2 were studied by western blot. In vivo treatment of 15-day

  17. Microbicidal effect of medicinal plant extracts (Psidium guajava Linn. and Carica papaya Linn.) upon bacteria isolated from fish muscle and known to induce diarrhea in children.

    PubMed

    Vieira, R H; Rodrigues, D P; Gonçalves, F A; Menezes, F G; Aragão, J S; Sousa, O V

    2001-01-01

    Out of the twenty-four samples of shrimp and fish muscle used for this study, twelve were collected near a large marine sewer for waste disposal, 3 km off the coast of Fortaleza (Brazil) and used for the isolation of E. coli. Other twelve were collected at the Mucuripe fresh fish market (Fortaleza, Brazil) and used for the isolation of Staphylococcus aureus. Ethanol, water and acetone-diluted extracts of guava and papaya leaf sprouts were tested on the bacteria in order to verify their microbicidal potential. The E. coli strains used in the trials were rated LT positive. The papaya leaf extracts (Carica papaya Linn) showed no microbicidal activity while the guava sprout extracts (Psidium guajava Linn) displayed halos exceeding 13 mm for both species, an effect considered to be inhibitory by the method employed. Guava sprout extracts by 50% diluted ethanol most effectively inhibited E. coli (EPEC), while those in 50% acetone were less effective. It may be concluded that guava sprout extracts constitute a feasible treatment option for diarrhea caused by E. coli or by S. aureus-produced toxins, due to their quick curative action, easy availability in tropical countries and low cost to the consumer.

  18. An Epizootic of Diarrhea in a Rabbit Colony. Pathology and Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    Savage, N. L.; Sheldon, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    Thirteen adult rabbits and 15 weanling rabbits exhibiting signs of diarrhea were subjected to pathological and bacteriological examination. The lesions in 11 of the adult rabbits consisted of a cecocolitis that was characterized by edema of the gut wall, necrosis of the mucosa, and serosal hemorrhages. Also, five of these 11 rabbits exhibited liver lesions consistent with Tyzzer's disease. Lesions in the weanling rabbits were minimal with only two animals exhibiting focal necrosis of the mucosa and one animal exibiting necrosis of the mesenteric lymph nodes. All animals of each age group exhibited pneumonitis. Escherichia coli was present in high numbers (approximately 1012 organisms per g dry wt contents) in the cecum of eight of 13 adult and 12 of 15 weanling rabbits. Thirteen of these isolates were serotype O128:B12. Preliminary attempts to reproduce the disease in young adult rabbits by a series of per os inoculations of an isolate of E. coli (serotype O128:B12) plus intramuscular inoculation of prednisone resulted in the induction of diarrhea in two of four rabbits. The gross and histological lesions in these two animals were similar to those of the spontaneously occurring cases, consisting of edema of the cecal wall, necrosis of the mucosa, and serosal hemorrhages. Numerous white spots of focal necrosis occurred in the liver. No intracellular organisms resembling Tyzzer's disease agent were evident in any sections examined. Inoculation of either E. coli or prednisone alone did not induce diarrhea. Subsequent attempts to reproduce the disease by these methods were unsuccessful. In spite of this inability to repeat the experimental results, it was felt that this study indicated a possible role of E. coli in rabbit diarrhea, either as an etiological agent or as a secondary invader. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:4270439

  19. Neurogenic cardiomyopathy in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies.

    PubMed

    Kesdangsakonwut, S; Sunden, Y; Yamada, K; Nishizono, A; Sawa, H; Umemura, T

    2015-05-01

    Cardiomyopathies have been rarely described in rabbits. Here we report myocardial necrosis of the ventricular wall in rabbits with experimentally induced rabies. Myocardial lesions were found only in rabbits with brain lesions, and the severity of the cardiac lesions was proportional to that of the brain lesions. Neither the frequency nor the cumulative dose of anesthesia was related to the incidence or the severity of the myocardial lesions. The myocardial lesions were characterized by degeneration and/or necrosis of myocardial cells and were accompanied by contraction band necrosis, interstitial fibrosis, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. The brain lesions due to rabies virus infection were most prominent in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, brainstem, and medulla. Rabies virus antigen was not found in the hearts of any rabbits. Based on these findings, the myocardial lesions were classified as neurogenic cardiomyopathy.

  20. Experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are presented of the development tests performed on the experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections. Tests were performed on the portable clean room to demonstrate assembly, collapsability, portability and storage. Collapsing, relocating and storing within the surgery room can be accomplished in 12 minutes. The storage envelope dimensions are 1.64 m x 4.24 m x 2.62 m high. The disassembly transfer to another room, and reassembly were demonstrated. The laminar air flow velocity profile within the enclosure was measured. In the undisturbed area of the enclosure the air flow met the Federal Standard 209a requirements of 27.45 meters per minute + or - 6.10 meters per minute. Smoke tests with simulated surgery equipment and personnel in the enclosure did not indicate any detrimental air flow patterns. It is concluded that the system as designed will perform the functions required for its intended use.

  1. Complementary foods associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Mini; Dwivedi, Reeta

    2006-01-01

    The World Health Organization regards illness due to contaminated food as one of the most widespread health problems in the contemporary world. Food safety especially in the weaning groups is one of the major concerns that have posed a threat to health of the children. Millions of children in the world die each year from diarrheal diseases; hundreds of millions suffer from frequent episodes of diarrhea and consequent impairment of nutritional status. Contaminated foods play a major role in the occurrence of diarrheal diseases. Apart from food contamination, transmission of infection occurs by direct contact, highly favored by the habits and customs of the people. Improper storage and handling of cooked food is equally responsible for food-borne illnesses, as during storage especially at ambient temperature (28-38 degrees C) there is the risks of multiplication of pathogenic organisms increase. Food safety education is a critical prerequisite and is an essential element in control and prevention of diarrheal diseases. However, no preventive measures can ever be successful without the acute involvement of the caretakers, other family members and the community. To sensitize the community in a catalytic manner, health workers, community leaders and community volunteers can act as effective change agent, to bring about a behavior that can lead to improvement in their real life practices, thereby reducing the prevalence of diarrheal episodes in young children. Food Safety Education Programs that involve volunteers are cost effective as they can be reached to a maximum number of people through limited health personnels, and by this, the community can be made responsible for its own health problems.

  2. The epidemiological and clinical characteristics of diarrhea associated with enteropathogenic, enteroaggregative and diffuse-adherent Escherichia coli in Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salwa F; Shaheen, Hind I; Abdel-Messih, Ibrahim Adib; Mostafa, Manal; Putnam, Shannon D; Kamal, Karim A; Sayed, Abdel Nasser El; Frenck, Robert W; Sanders, John W; Klena, John D; Wierzba, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    A total of 220 enteroadherent Escherichia coli were identified from 729 Egyptian children with diarrhea using the HEp-2 adherence assay. Enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC = 38) was common among children <6 months old and provoked vomiting, while diffuse-adhering E.coli (DAEC = 109) induced diarrheal episodes of short duration, and enteroaggregative E.coli (EAEC = 73) induced mild non-persistent diarrhea. These results suggest that EPEC is associated with infantile diarrhea in Egyptian children.

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of Chang-An-Shuan on TNBS-induced experimental colitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Mi, Hong; Liu, Feng-Bin; Li, Hai-Wen; Hou, Jiang-Tao; Li, Pei-Wu

    2017-06-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), denominated by Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, is often associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea and bloody stool. The standard protocols for treating colitis conditions are not satisfactory; thus, complementary and alternative medicines have been increasingly accepted by IBD sufferers worldwide. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the anti-inflammatory effect of Chang-An-Shuan (CAS), a 6-herb Chinese medicinal formula, on 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats and the underlying mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with rectal gavage of 2.5% TNBS in 50% ethanol for the induction of experimental colitis which is considered as a model for Crohn's disease. Upon the TNBS induction, rats were given CAS at 0.5 g/kg/day or 5 g/kg/day for 10 days. The application of salicylazosulfapyridine (0.5 g/kg/day) was served as a positive reference drug for the colitis condition. The efficacy and mechanistic action of CAS were evaluated by means of histopathological and biochemical approaches such as histological staining, real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Oral administration of CAS at 5 g/kg/day, but not 0.5 g/kg/day, significantly ameliorated the severity of TNBS-induced colitis as evidenced by the reduced loss of body weight, alleviated diarrhea and decreased bloody stool. While lowering the disease activity index, the administration of CAS lessened mucosal lesions thus mucosal integrity of the colitis rats was notably improved. Further, the CAS treatment also significantly suppressed the mRNA and protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α while enhancing the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the TNBS-treated rats. Importantly, the ameliorative effect of CAS was related to an inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway by downregulating

  4. Inflammation-induced preterm lung maturation: lessons from animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Moss, Timothy J M; Westover, Alana J

    2017-06-01

    Intrauterine inflammation, or chorioamnionitis, is a major contributor to preterm birth. Prematurity per se is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality resulting from lung immaturity but exposure to chorioamnionitis reduces the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in preterm infants. Animal experiments have identified that an increase in pulmonary surfactant production by the preterm lungs likely underlies this decreased risk of RDS in infants exposed to chorioamnionitis. Further animal experimentation has shown that infectious or inflammatory agents in amniotic fluid exert their effects on lung development by direct effects within the developing respiratory tract, and probably not by systemic pathways. Differences in the effects of intrauterine inflammation and glucocorticoids demonstrate that canonical glucocorticoid-mediated lung maturation is not responsible for inflammation-induced changes in lung development. Animal experimentation is identifying alternative lung maturational pathways, and transgenic animals and cell culture techniques will allow identification of novel mechanisms of lung maturation that may lead to new treatments for the prevention of RDS. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Experimental pleurodesis induced by antibiotics (macrolides or quinolones).

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Lisete R; Vargas, Francisco S; Acencio, Milena M P; Bumlai, Renan U M; Antonangelo, Leila; Marchi, Evaldo

    2006-12-01

    Chemical pleurodesis is a therapeutic tool for the treatment of recurrent pleural effusions, mainly those of neoplastic etiology. In the past, tetracycline was the sclerosant agent of choice in clinical practice, but presently, there is no consensus about an ideal agent. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of macrolides (azithromycin and clarithromycin) or quinolones (levofloxacin and gatifloxacin) in inducing experimental pleurodesis in rabbits. Forty New Zealand rabbits randomized into groups of 10 received (at a total volume of 2 mL for each animal) 1 of the 4 drugs by intrapleural injection. After 28 days, the animals were euthanized and the pleural cavity was evaluated macroscopically and microscopically. The intensity of the macroscopic adhesions was mild in all groups. On microscopic analysis, minimal pleural fibrosis and inflammation were observed in all animals. The macrolides (azithromycin or clarithromycin) and the quinolones (levofloxacin or gatifloxacin) when injected into the normal pleural space of rabbits are not effective in promoting pleurodesis. Additional research is required to identify sclerosing agents capable of inducing pleurodesis.

  6. Experimental germanium dioxide-induced neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsumuro, K; Izumo, S; Higuchi, I; Ronquillo, A T; Takahashi, K; Osame, M

    1993-01-01

    We report an experimental model of germanium dioxide (GeO2)-induced neuropathy in rats. More than 6 months administration of GeO2 to young rats produced neuropathy characterized by segmental demyelination/remyelination and nerve edema. Electron microscopic studies demonstrated that changes in Schwann cells, such as an increased cytoplasmic volume or disintegration of the cytoplasm, were the earliest pathological findings. Schwann cell mitochondria contained high electron-dense materials. Subsequent removal of necrotic Schwann cell debris and myelin by invading macrophages was evident. These findings suggested that the Schwann cells themselves are the primary target of the toxin. The deposition of electron-dense granules in the intra-axonal vesicles, which was suggestive of glycogen granules in mitochondria, was observed in the advanced stage of the neuropathy. The findings of endoneurial edema with splitting of myelin lamellae were noted at the early stage of demyelination. Nerve edema may be the result of GeO2-induced endothelial cell injury.

  7. Experimental lung mycotoxicosis in mice induced by Stachybotrys atra

    PubMed Central

    Nikulin, Marjo; Reijula, Kari; Jarvis, Bruce B.; Hintikka, Eeva-Liisa

    1996-01-01

    Stachybotrys atra is often isolated from building materials in houses with moisture problems. Spores of S. atra can contain mycotoxins which may lead to various symptoms in exposed residents in damp houses. The pathogenesis of S. atra-induced lung diseases has not been elucidated. The purpose of the present study was to investigate lung mycotoxicosis experimentally in mice after an intranasal exposure to spores of S. atra-fungus. One group of mice received one intranasal injection of spores of a toxic strain of S. atra (1 × 106 spores) and the other group spores of a less toxic strain. Spores of both strains contained spirolactones and spirolactams while the highly toxic strain contained also trichothecene mycotoxins, satratoxins. The spores containing satratoxins caused severe intra-alveolar, bronchiolar and interstitial inflammation with haemorrhagic exudative processes in the alveolar and bronchiolar lumen. A significant difference was observed in the severity of the lung damage caused by the two strains of S. atra. The spores without satratoxins induced a milder inflammation, so that the toxic compounds of S. atra-spores are most likely responsible for the severity of the lung injury. PMID:8977373

  8. [CHRONIC DIARRHEA OF INFECTIOUS ETIOLOGY

    PubMed

    Farfán F G, Gustavo

    1997-01-01

    Chronic Diarrhea syndrome is due to several causes. In LatinAmericen countries, infectious and parasitic etiology is frequent. Withinthese infections, the following has been determined: parasitic and enterobacterial agents, overpopulation of bacteria syndrome in the upper small bowel (SOBIA, abbreviation for Síndrome de Sobrepoblación Bacteriana del Intestino Delgado Alto), intestinal TBC, and AIDS. In these processes, the precipitating factor may be unique or multifactor; or there could also exist a tendency towards pathologies for these infections. There has been evidence of SOBIA cases without associated factor in Latin American countries. A study made in Peru shows SOBIA cases in 30 percent of chronic diarrhea.In chronic diarrhea cases, and even more, in those diarrheas of infectiousetiology, a complete study should be made, considering the several factorsthat generate diarrhea in a same one case, such as the mechanisms ofimmunodeficiency, neurological, endocrinemetabolic, and others associated with intestinal infections. This approach will be helpful to make a complete diagnosis and apply timely treatment.

  9. [Clostridium-difficile-associated diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bujanda, Luis; Cosme, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea and is a significant cause of morbidity among hospitalized patients. The inflammation is produced as a result of a non-specific response to toxins. In the last few years, a hypervirulent strain, NAP1/BI/027, has been reported. Symptoms usually consist of abdominal pain and diarrhea. The diagnosis should be suspected in any patient who develops diarrhea during antibiotic therapy or 6-8 weeks after treatment. Diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of CD toxin in stool and by colonoscopy in special situations. The treatment of choice is metronidazole or vancomycin. In some patients who do not respond to this therapy or who have complications, subtotal colectomy may be required. Relapse is frequent and must be distinguished from reinfection. Prevention and control in healthcare settings requires careful attention.

  10. Experimental chaotic quantification in bistable vortex induced vibration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, B. H.; Tjahjowidodo, T.

    2017-02-01

    The study of energy harvesting by means of vortex induced vibration systems has been initiated a few years ago and it is considered to be potential as a low water current energy source. The energy harvester is realized by exposing an elastically supported blunt structure under water flow. However, it is realized that the system will only perform at a limited operating range (water flow) that is attributed to the resonance phenomenon that occurs only at a frequency that corresponds to the fluid flow. An introduction of nonlinear elements seems to be a prominent solution to overcome the problem. Among many nonlinear elements, a bistable spring is known to be able to improve the harvested power by a vortex induced vibrations (VIV) based energy converter at the low velocity water flows. However, it is also observed that chaotic vibrations will occur at different operating ranges that will erratically diminish the harvested power and cause a difficulty in controlling the system that is due to the unpredictability in motions of the VIV structure. In order to design a bistable VIV energy converter with improved harvested power and minimum negative effect of chaotic vibrations, the bifurcation map of the system for varying governing parameters is highly on demand. In this study, chaotic vibrations of a VIV energy converter enhanced by a bistable stiffness element are quantified in a wide range of the governing parameters, i.e. damping and bistable gap. Chaotic vibrations of the bistable VIV energy converter are simulated by utilization of a wake oscillator model and quantified based on the calculation of the Lyapunov exponent. Ultimately, a series of experiments of the system in a water tunnel, facilitated by a computer-based force-feedback testing platform, is carried out to validate the existence of chaotic responses. The main challenge in dealing with experimental data is in distinguishing chaotic response from noise-contaminated periodic responses as noise will smear

  11. Experimental model of arthritis induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in rats.

    PubMed

    Loth, Eduardo Alexandre; Biazin, Samia Khalil; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues; Simão, Rita de Cássia Garcia; de Franco, Marcello Fabiano; Puccia, Rosana; Gandra, Rinaldo Ferreira

    2012-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a disease caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), is highly prevalent in Brazil, where it is the principal cause of death by systemic mycoses. The disease primarily affects men aged 30-50 year old and usually starts as a pulmonary focus and then may spread to other organs and systems, including the joints. The present study aimed to develop an experimental model of paracoccidioidomycotic arthritis. Two-month-old male Wistar rats (n = 48) were used, divided in 6 groups: test groups EG/15 and EG/45 (received one dose of 100 μl of saline containing 10(5) Pb viable yeasts in the knee); heat killed Pb-group HK/15 and HK/45 (received a suspension of 10(5) Pb nonviable yeasts in the knee) and control groups CG/15 and CG/45 (received only sterile saline in the knee). The rats were killed 15 and 45 days postinoculation. In contrast with the control rats, the histopathology of the joints of rats of the test groups (EG/15 and EG/45) revealed a picture of well-established PCM arthritis characterized by extensive sclerosing granulomatous inflammation with numerous multiple budding fungal cells. The X-ray examination revealed joint alterations in these groups. Only metabolic active fungi evoked inflammation. The experimental model was able to induce fungal arthritis in the knees of the rats infected with metabolic active P. brasiliensis. The disease tended to be regressive and restrained by the immune system. No evidence of fungal dissemination to the lungs was observed.

  12. The effects of experimentally induced adelphophagy in gastropod embryos.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Olaf; Collin, Rachel; Carrillo-Baltodano, Allan

    2014-01-01

    Adelphophagy, development where embryos grow large by consuming morphologically distinct nutritive embryos or their own normal siblings is widespread but uncommon among animal phyla. Among invertebrates it is particularly common in some families of marine gastropods and segmented worms, but rare or unknown in other closely related families. In calyptraeid gastropods phylogenetic analysis indicates that adelphophagy has arisen at least 9 times from species with planktotrophic larval development. This pattern of frequent parallel evolution of adelphophagy suggests that the embryos of planktotrophic species might be predisposed to evolve adelphophagy. Here we used embryos of three species of planktotrophic calyptraeids, one from each of three major genera in the family (Bostrycapulus, Crucibulum, and Crepidula), to answer the following 3 questions: (1) Can embryos of species with planktotrophic development benefit, in terms of pre-hatching growth, from the ingestion of yolk and tissue from experimentally damaged siblings? (2) Does ingestion of this material from damaged siblings increase variation in pre-hatching size? and (3) Does this experimentally induced adelphophagy alter the allometry between the velum and the shell, increasing morphological similarity to embryos of normally adelphophagic species? We found an overall increase in shell length and velum diameter when embryos feed on damaged siblings within their capsules. There was no detectable increase in variation in shell length or velum diameter, or changes in allometry. The overall effect of our treatment was small compared to the embryonic growth observed in naturally adelphophagic development. However each embryo in our experiment probably consumed less than one sibling on average, whereas natural adelphophages often each consume 10-30 or more siblings. These results suggest that the ability to consume, assimilate, and benefit from yolk and tissue of their siblings is widespread across calyptraeids.

  13. Antioxidant Effects of Probiotics in Experimentally Induced Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Erginel, Basak; Aydin, Fatih A; Erginel, Turgay; Tanik, Canan; Abbasoglu, Semra D; Soysal, Feryal G; Keskin, Erbug; Celik, Alaaddin; Salman, Tansu

    2016-02-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate the protective effects of probiotics on gut mucosa in peritonitis through antioxidant mechanisms. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were divided equally into four groups. The rats in Group 1 (control group) underwent laparotomy only. In group 2 (peritonitis group), peritonitis was induced in the rats by the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model. In group 3, the rats were treated with probiotics for five days after CLP-induced peritonitis. The last group of rats (group 4) were fed probiotics for five days before the CLP procedure and five days after the surgery. On the fifth day after surgery, all rats were killed, and tissue samples from the terminal ileum were obtained to evaluate the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH). Histopathologic examinations were also performed to evaluate the grade of intestinal injury. Myeloperoxidase and MDA activities were increased, GSH concentrations were decreased in group 2, compared with group 1. Intestinal MPO activities in group 4 were decreased compared with group 1 and group 2, indicating a reduction in oxidant activity. Malondialdehyde decreased in group 3 and decreased even more in group 4, compared with the peritonitis group (group 2). Glutathione concentrations were increased in group 4 compared with group 2 and group 3 (p < 0.05). The Chiu scores of the probiotics groups, groups 3 and 4, were lower than those in group 2, indicating reduced mucosal damage in the probiotically fed groups. Probiotics have protective effects in peritonitis, which may be related to antioxidant mechanisms. This antioxidant effect of probiotics might occur when pre-conditioning with probiotics before peritonitis because there is sufficient time to prepare the tissues for oxidative damage.

  14. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis induces microglial activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Larry; Done, Joseph D.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is unknown and factors including the host’s immune response and the nervous system have been attributed to the development of CP/CPPS. We previously demonstrated that mast cells and chemokines such as CCL2 and CCL3 play an important role in mediating prostatitis. Here, we examined the role of neuroinflammation and microglia in the CNS in the development of chronic pelvic pain. Methods Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was induced using a subcutaneous injection of rat prostate antigen. Sacral spinal cord tissue (segments S4–S5) was isolated and utilized for immunofluorescence or QRT-PCR analysis. Tactile allodynia was measured at baseline and at various points during EAP using Von Frey fibers as a function for pelvic pain. EAP mice were treated with minocycline after 30 days of prostatitis to test the efficacy of microglial inhibition on pelvic pain. Results Prostatitis induced the expansion and activation of microglia and the development of inflammation in the spinal cord as determined by increased expression levels of CCL3, IL-1β, Iba1, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Microglial activation in mice with prostatitis resulted in increased expression of P2X4R and elevated levels of BDNF, two molecular markers associated with chronic pain. Pharmacological inhibition of microglia alleviated pain in mice with prostatitis and resulted in decreased expression of IL-1β, P2X4R, and BDNF. Conclusion Our data shows that prostatitis leads to inflammation in the spinal cord and the activation and expansion of microglia, mechanisms that may contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:25263093

  15. Colestipol hydrochloride prophylaxis of diarrhea during pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Chung, C.K.; Layser, J.D.

    1983-02-01

    Thirty-three patients were randomized prior to pelvic radiotherapy to receive the bile acid-sequestering resin colestipol hydrochloride, 5 grams qid, during the entire time of their therapy or diphenoxylate hydrochloride and atropine sulfate 2.5-20 mg per day (control) if they experienced diarrhea. The colestipol patients also took diphenoxylate if they had diarrhea. The patients in the colestipol group often experienced nausea, vomiting, and abdominal cramps and 8 were forced to discontinue the drug. There was no difference in the weekly stool frequency between the colestipol and the control patients but the colestipol patients who took at least 50% of the prescribed dose required fewer diphenoxylate tablets than the controls. The data suggest that colestipol hydrochloride is not of value in preventing radiation-induced diarrhea because of the side effects associated with the drug, but the theory on which the use of bile acid-sequestering agents is based may be correct.

  16. Chronic Diarrhea: A Concern After Gallbladder Removal?

    MedlinePlus

    ... six months ago, and I'm still having diarrhea. Is this normal? Answers from Michael F. Picco, ... develop the frequent loose, watery stools that characterize diarrhea after surgery to remove their gallbladders (cholecystectomy). Studies ...

  17. The Cell Nucleus in Physiological and Experimentally Induced Hypometabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malatesta, M.

    The main problem for manned space mission is, at present, represented by the mass penalty associated to the human presence. An efficient approach could be the induction of a hypometabolic stasis in the astronauts, thus drastically reducing the physical and psychological requirements of the crew. On the other hand, in the wild, a reduction in resource consumptions physiologi- cally occurs in certain animals which periodically enter hibernation, a hypometabolic state in which both the energy need and energy offer are kept at a minimum. During the last twelve years, we have been studying different tissues of hibernating dormice, with the aim of analyzing their features during the euthermia -hibernation-arousal cycle as well as getting insight into the mechanisms allowing adaptation to hypometabolism. We paid particular attention to the cell nucleus, as it is the site of chief metabolic functions, such as DNA replication and RNA transcription. Our observations revealed no significant modification in the basic features of cell nuclei during hibernation; however, the cell nuclei of hibernating dormice showed unusual nuclear bodies containing molecules involved in RNA pathways. Therefore, we supposed that they could represent storage/assembly sites of several factors for processing some RNA which could be slowly synthesised during hibernation and rapidly and abundantly released in early arousal in order to meet the increased metabolic needs of the cell. The nucleolus also underwent structural and molecular modifications during hibernation, maybe to continue important nucleolar functions, or, alternatively, permit a most efficient reactivation upon arousal. On the basis of the observations made in vivo , we recently tried to experimentally induce a reversible hypometabolic state in in vitro models, using cell lines derived from hibernating and non-hibernating species. By administering the synthetic opioid DADLE, we could significantly reduce both RNA transcrip- tion and

  18. Confabulation versus experimentally induced false memories in Korsakoff patients.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Ilse; d'Ydewalle, Géry

    2010-09-01

    The present study focuses on both the clinical symptom of confabulation and experimentally induced false memories in patients suffering from Korsakoff's syndrome. Despite the vast amount of case studies of confabulating patients and studies investigating false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, the nature of Korsakoff patients' confabulatory behaviour and its association with DRM false memories have been rarely examined. Hence, the first aim of the present study was to evaluate confabulatory responses in a large sample of chronic Korsakoff patients and matched controls by means of the Dalla Barba Confabulation Battery. Second, the association between (provoked) confabulation and the patients' DRM false recognition performance was investigated. Korsakoff patients mainly confabulated in response to questions about episodic memory and questions to which the answer was unknown. A positive association was obtained between confabulation and the tendency to accept unstudied distractor words as being old in the DRM paradigm. On the other hand, there was a negative association between confabulation and false recognition of critical lures. The latter could be attributed to the importance of strategic retrieval at delayed memory testing.

  19. Early corticosteroid administration in experimental radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Stryker, J.A.; Abt, A.A.; Chung, C.K.; Whitesell, L.; Zelis, R.

    1980-02-01

    The ability of dexamethasone (DEX) to reduce the severity of the late stage of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) was assessed in 25 New Zealand white rabbits. Ten rabbits served as unirradiated controls (CONT). In Group A, seven rabbits received intravenous DEX prior to irradiation and every 24 hours for three consecutive days. DEX was not administered to the eight rabbits in Group B. At 100 days postirradiation, the severity of the late state was determined by microscopic examination (MICRO) for myocardial fibrosis and determination of myocardial hydroxyproline content (MHP). Myocardial fibrosis was evident in groups A (40%) and B (80%) while none was present in CONT by MICRO. One rabbit in Group B with no fibrosis by MICRO had abnormally increased MHP. MHP was significantly increased in Groups A and B, as compared to CONT (p < 0.01). In addition to less fibrosis by MICRO, Group A demonstrated a significant reduction of MHP when compared to Group B (p < 0.05). Determination of MHP may be superior to MICRO in the detection of the late stage of RIHD. Also, early DEX administration appears to reduce myocardial collagen content (fibrosis) in this experimental model.

  20. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration Induced Droplet Atomization*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1999-11-01

    The atomization of a millimeter-scale liquid droplet placed on a vibrating diaphragm is investigated experimentally using high-speed imaging and particle-tracking techniques. Atomization is the result of the rapid ejection of small secondary droplets from the wave crests of a hierarchy of forced surface waves on the primary droplet. The evolution and rate of ejection depend on the coupled dynamics of the primary droplet and the vibrating diaphragm. The present data indicate that secondary droplet ejection results from the collapse of surface craters formed during the evolution of capillary surface waves on the primary droplet. The collapse of the crater and the ensuing ejection of a momentary liquid jet are similar to ejection processes at free surfaces that are induced by the bursting of gas bubbles or the impingement of liquid droplets. The spray characteristics of the ejected droplets are investigated over a broad range of vibrating frequencies (up to 14 kHz) using particle-tracking velocimetry. * Supported by NASA Microgravity Res. Div., Grant NAG3-1949.

  1. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... diarrhea? What is the best way to take these? What is the best way to take these products? Which ones can I take every day? Which ones should I not take every day? Can any of these products make my diarrhea worse? Should I ... What to ask your health care provider about diarrhea - ...

  2. The Day Care Center Diarrhea Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Larry K.

    1986-01-01

    Prevention and control of diarrhea in day care settings depends on: maintenance of hygienic standards; disease surveillance; adhering to a policy for exclusion of children with diarrhea; and education of staff. When diarrhea afflicts several children, isolating together can stop the spread of disease without interrupting normal operation. (KH)

  3. Diarrhea in Children: Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ian; Johnson, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common pediatric problem. Careful attention to hygiene in diapered children in group settings can help prevent the problem. The proper presentation of stool specimens to the lab will facilitate the diagnosis. Correct electrolyte, glucose, and water solutions, followed by appropriate introduction of solid foods, will speed recovery. PMID:21253170

  4. Diarrhea in children: two cases.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I; Johnson, P

    1988-05-01

    Diarrhea is a common pediatric problem. Careful attention to hygiene in diapered children in group settings can help prevent the problem. The proper presentation of stool specimens to the lab will facilitate the diagnosis. Correct electrolyte, glucose, and water solutions, followed by appropriate introduction of solid foods, will speed recovery.

  5. [Rotavirus and other viruses of diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Bajolet, O; Chippaux-Hyppolite, C

    1998-01-01

    Rotaviruses represent 80% of recognized viral etiologies and 140 million cases of diarrhea per year. They strike young children with similar frequency throughout the world, but the mortality rate is high in developing countries only, with some 870,000 deaths per year (WHO, 1997). Rotaviruses belong to the family of Reoviridae; they are segmented bicatenary RNA viruses, which explains their genetic variability, the presence of mixed infections, the establishment for some time already of a molecular epidemiology by electrophore types. The viruses are "naked" and thus resistant to the outside environment; their massive elimination, 10(8) to 10(10)viral particles per gram of faeces, begins with the first day of diarrhea. They are found in used water and can also be concentrated by shellfish; the environment thus constitutes a notable reservoir for the virus. Oral-faecal transmission is facilitated by deficient sanitary conditions. The 11 fragments of the genome each codify for 1 viral protein; 2 surface proteins, VP4 and VP7, bring about the formation of neutralizing antibodies, which are important for the protection and determination of different serotypes. A non structural protein--NSP4--would seem to intervene in the cytopathogenic effect and may act as a veritable viral enterotoxine. Numerous animal species are infected by rotaviruses which are district from the human ones. The pathology as it affects animals is of economic importance and of interest as an experimental and vaccinal model. Between human and animal rotaviruses there can be genetic rematchings and the VP6 protein is an antigen common to the group. The description of the other viruses responsible for diarrhea has benefited from widespread use of electronic microscopes from the very first years of study of rotaviruses. These other viruses belong to 6 different types: adenovirus, calcivirus, astrovirus, Norwalk agent and related viruses, coronavirus, enterovirus. They therefore have a structural and

  6. Experimental validation of a numerical model for subway induced vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental validation of a coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model for the prediction of subway induced vibrations. The model fully accounts for the dynamic interaction between the train, the track, the tunnel and the soil. The periodicity or invariance of the tunnel and the soil in the longitudinal direction is exploited using the Floquet transformation, which allows for an efficient formulation in the frequency-wavenumber domain. A general analytical formulation is used to compute the response of three-dimensional invariant or periodic media that are excited by moving loads. The numerical model is validated by means of several experiments that have been performed at a site in Regent's Park on the Bakerloo line of London Underground. Vibration measurements have been performed on the axle boxes of the train, on the rail, the tunnel invert and the tunnel wall, and in the free field, both at the surface and at a depth of 15 m. Prior to these vibration measurements, the dynamic soil characteristics and the track characteristics have been determined. The Bakerloo line tunnel of London Underground has been modelled using the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element approach and free field vibrations due to the passage of a train at different speeds have been predicted and compared to the measurements. The correspondence between the predicted and measured response in the tunnel is reasonably good, although some differences are observed in the free field. The discrepancies are explained on the basis of various uncertainties involved in the problem. The variation in the response with train speed is similar for the measurements as well as the predictions. This study demonstrates the applicability of the coupled periodic finite element-boundary element model to make realistic predictions of the vibrations from underground railways.

  7. Anticoccidial effect of mananoligosacharide against experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler.

    PubMed

    Chand, Naila; Faheem, Hassan; Khan, Rifat Ullah; Qureshi, Muhammad Subhan; Alhidary, Ibrahim A; Abudabos, Alaeldein M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to find the effect of mananoligosacharide (MOS) in comparison with amprolium hydrochloride on performance and integrity of gut in experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler. A total of 300, day-old male broiler chickens (Ross 308) was randomly allocated to four treatments. Each group was further divided into five replicates of 15 birds each. Group A was kept as control; group B was contaminated with Eimeria tenella, while groups C and D were infected with E. tenella and treated with MOS (0.8 g/kg feed) and anticoccidial drug, amprolium hydrochloride (12 g/100 l water), respectively. The results showed that weight gain, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in infected + MOS-treated group compared to the other groups. The result of oocyte per gram (OPG) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the group infected with coccidiosis during 5th, 7th, 10th, and 12th day post infection (dpi). Furthermore, the OPG was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in infected groups treated with MOS and amprolium at the studied periods (5, 7, and 10 dpi). At 12 dpi, the infected group treated with MOS showed significantly lower OPG compared to the other groups suggesting the effectiveness of MOS in comparison to amprolium. The result of pinpoint hemorrhages, thickness of cecal wall, bloody fecal contents, and mucoid contents in the cecum were significant highly (P < 0.05) in birds fed with infected oocytes. It was also noted that the differences were not significant in these parameters between amprolium and MOS-treated birds showing the effectiveness of the prebiotic agent. It was concluded from the results of the present study that MOS improved growth performance and reversed the lesions of E. tenella.

  8. TENS attenuates repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain following experimentally induced muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Mankovsky-Arnold, Tsipora; Wideman, Timothy H; Larivière, Christian; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2013-11-01

    This study sought to determine whether repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain (RISP) could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain. This study also assessed the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on RISP. The relation between the index of RISP and psychological factors such as catastrophizing and fear of pain was also explored. The sample consisted of 56 healthy (35 women, 21 men) participants who underwent 2 testing sessions, separated by 24 hours. In the first session, musculoskeletal pain was induced with a delayed-onset muscle soreness protocol. During the second session, participants were randomly assigned to the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or placebo condition and were asked to rate their pain as they lifted a series of 18 weighted canisters. An index of RISP was derived as the change in pain ratings across repeated lifts. Approximately 25% of participants showed evidence of RISP. Results also revealed that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuated the RISP effect. Psychological measures (fear of pain, catastrophizing) were not significantly correlated with the index of RISP, but the index of RISP was significantly correlated with a measure of physical tolerance. Discussion addresses the clinical implications of the findings as well as the potential mechanisms underlying RISP. This study showed that RISP could be demonstrated in healthy individuals in response to experimentally induced musculoskeletal pain with delayed-onset muscle soreness. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation led to a significant reduction in RISP. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental investigation on the pathogenesis of tartrazine-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Y; Kitamura, S

    1979-11-01

    The effects of tartrazine on the synthesis of prostaglandin-like substances (PGLS) from arachidonic acid in isolated perfused guinea pig lung, and on the contractile responses of guinea pig tracheal tissues induced by histamine, acetylcholine, bradykinin, serotonin and prostaglandin F2 alpha were studied. The synthesis of PGLS from arachidonic acid was not inhibited by tartrazine. The contractile responses of guinea pig tracheal tissues induced by various bronchoconstrictors were potentiated in the presence of tartrazine. These results may suggest that tartrazine-induced asthma is not induced by inhibition of PGLS synthesis, but induced by potentiation of bronchoconstrictor responses.

  10. Diarrhea among children in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nataro, James P

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhea continues to stand among the most important causes of global morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age. Although the introduction of oral rehydration and other case-management strategies have reduced acute diarrhea fatalities, many of the survivors develop persistent diarrhea and/or deficiencies of growth and cognition. Thus understanding the true global burden of diarrhea requires attention to acute diarrhea as well is its sequelae. To understand the etiology of moderate to severe diarrhea among children in high mortality areas of sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia we performed a comprehensive case-control study of children under 5 years of age at seven sites. Each site employed an identical case-control study design and each utilized a uniform comprehensive set of microbiological assays to identify the likely bacterial, viral and protozoal etiologies. Results of the studies will inform diarrhea prevention and management efforts worldwide.

  11. Role of FODMAP content in enteral nutrition-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Halmos, Emma P

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea are common complications of enteral nutrition (EN); however, the cause is unclear. Mode of EN delivery that alters digestion and possibly absorption is suggested to contribute to the high incidence of diarrhea; however, enteral formula is frequently blamed. Most research has focused on fiber-supplemented EN, with a meta-analysis showing that fiber reduces the incidence of diarrhea in non-intensive care unit studies. Other hypotheses include formula osmolality and FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) content. FODMAPs are poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates that exert an osmotic effect. Dietary FODMAPs have been shown to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, in those with irritable bowel syndrome and, given a high-enough dose, will induce a laxative effect in most people. As FODMAPs are commonly added to enteral formula and EN is frequently used as the main source of nutrition, it is reasonable to hypothesize that EN provides more FODMAPs than usual dietary intake and increases risk for developing diarrhea. This hypothesis was assessed through a retrospective study showing that the standard-use enteral formula Isosource 1.5 had a protective effect of developing diarrhea. The only characteristic unique to Isosource 1.5 was the lower FODMAP content as determined through methodologies previously validated for food analysis. Methodologies for application to enteral formulas are currently undergoing formal validation. Once confirmed for application in enteral formula, future directions include FODMAP analysis of specific ingredients to increase understanding of potential problems associated with enteral formula and a randomized, controlled trial investigating the role of formula FODMAP content. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Comparison of endogenous and radiolabeled bile acid excretion in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    SciTech Connect

    Schiller, L.R.; Bilhartz, L.E.; Santa Ana, C.A. )

    1990-04-01

    Fecal recovery of radioactivity after ingestion of a bolus of radiolabeled bile acid is abnormally high in most patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. To evaluate the significance of this malabsorption, concurrent fecal excretion of both exogenous radiolabeled bile acid and endogenous (unlabeled) bile acid were measured in patients with idiopathic chronic diarrhea. Subjects received a 2.5-microCi oral dose of taurocholic acid labeled with 14C in the 24th position of the steroid moiety. Endogenous bile acid excretion was measured by a hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase assay on a concurrent 72-h stool collection. Both radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion were abnormally high in most patients with chronic diarrhea compared with normal subjects, even when equivoluminous diarrhea was induced in normal subjects by ingestion of osmotically active solutions. The correlation between radiolabeled and endogenous bile acid excretion was good. However, neither radiolabeled nor endogenous bile acid excretion was as abnormal as is typically seen in patients with ileal resection, and none of these diarrhea patients responded to treatment with cholestyramine with stool weights less than 200 g. These results suggest (a) that this radiolabeled bile acid excretion test accurately reflects excess endogenous bile acid excretion; (b) that excess endogenous bile acid excretion is not caused by diarrhea per se; (c) that spontaneously occurring idiopathic chronic diarrhea is often associated with increased endogenous bile acid excretion; and (d) that bile acid malabsorption is not likely to be the primary cause of diarrhea in most of these patients.

  13. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dietary sugar beet fiber ameliorates diarrhea as an acute gamma-radiation injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, S; Ito, S; Kasai, T; Hara, H

    2000-09-01

    Gamma radiation induces diarrhea as an acute injury. We have studied whether ingestion of sugar beet fiber influences radiation-induced diarrhea. Abdominal irradiation with gamma rays induced diarrhea in male Wistar/ST rats from 2 to 7 days after a single sublethal dose. The body weight of the irradiated rats was decreased temporarily at 4 days after irradiation regardless of the ingestion of sugar beet fiber. At day 8, it returned to almost the same level as that of unirradiated rats. A change in daily food intake resulted in a pattern similar to that for body weight. Dietary sugar beet fiber had little significant effect on the changes in body weight and daily food intake, and its ingestion significantly decreased gamma-ray-induced diarrhea. Changes in biochemical and histological parameters in intestinal mucosa (small intestine, cecum and colon) were not greatly influenced by the ingestion of sugar beet fiber through the periods of diarrhea. It was concluded that dietary sugar beet fiber ameliorated the diarrhea induced by abdominal irradiation. We suggest that the inhibitory effect of the ingestion of sugar beet fiber is due to its effects on the luminal environment, such as support for bacterial function in the luminal contents in the colon of animals that ingest sugar beet fiber.

  15. Experimentally Induced Sandfly Fever Virus Infection in Man: Effects on Physical Performance,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-23

    REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Experimentally Induced Sandfly Fever Virus Infec- tion in Man: Effects on Physical Performance 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER...7 experimentals, 2 controls) were studied before, during and after an experimentally induced episode of sandfly fever. During the fever, experi...subjects were unable to complete a submaximal exercise walk during the fever. Rectal temperature was elevated throughout the walk but no other

  16. Tylosin-responsive chronic diarrhea in dogs.

    PubMed

    Westermarck, Elias; Skrzypczak, Teresa; Harmoinen, Jaana; Steiner, Jõrg M; Ruaux, Craig G; Williams, David A; Eerola, Erkki; Sundbäck, Pernilla; Rinkinen, Minna

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen dogs had shown chronic or intermittent diarrhea for more than 1 year. Diarrhea had been successfully treated with tylosin for at least 6 months but recurred when treatment was withdrawn on at least 2 occasions. Tylosin-responsive diarrhea (TRD) affects typically middle-aged, large-breed dogs and clinical signs indicate that TRD affects both the small and large intestine. Treatment with tylosin eliminated diarrhea in all dogs within 3 days and in most dogs within 24 hours. Tylosin administration controlled diarrhea in all dogs, but after it was discontinued, diarrhea reappeared in 12 (85.7%) of 14 dogs within 30 days. Prednisone given for 3 days did not completely resolve diarrhea. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG did not prevent the relapse of diarrhea in any of 9 dogs so treated. The etiology of TRD, a likely form of antibiotic-responsive diarrhea (ARD) is unclear. The following reasons for chronic diarrhea were excluded or found to be unlikely: parasites, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, inflammatory bowel disease, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, enteropathogenic bacteria (Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Yersinia spp., or Lawsoni intracellularis), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin and Clostridium difficile A toxin. A possible etiologic factor is a specific enteropathogenic organism that is a common resident in the canine gastrointestinal tract and is sensitive to tylosin but difficult to eradicate. Additional studies are required to identify the specific cause of TRD.

  17. Azadirachta indica Attenuates Colonic Mucosal Damage in Experimental Colitis Induced by Trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, M. K.; Goel, Shalini; Ghatule, R. R.; Singh, A.; Joshi, V. K.; Goel, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    Azadirachta indica leaves indicated the presence of active principles with proven antioxidants, antiinflammatory, immunomodulatory, free radical scavenging and healing properties. In the present study we evaluated the healing effects of 50% ethanol extract of dried leaves of Azadirachta indica on trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats. Azadirachta indica extract (500 mg/kg) was administered orally, once daily for 14 days and studied for its effects on diarrhoea, food and water intake, body weight changes, colonic damage and inflammation, histology, antibacterial activity and free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation), antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase and reduced glutathione) and myeloperoxidase activities in colonic tissue. Intracolonic trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid increased colonic mucosal damage and inflammation, diarrhea, but decreased body weight which were reversed by Azadirachta indica extract and sulfasalazine (positive control) treatments. Azadirachta indica extract showed antibacterial activity. Azadirachta indica extract and sulfasalazine enhanced the antioxidants but decreased free radicals and myeloperoxidase activities affected in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis. Azadirachta indica extract, thus seemed to be effective in healing trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis in rats. PMID:24403663

  18. Observational Study of Travelers' Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Meuris

    1995-03-01

    Background: European air travelers returning from Algeria, Egypt, Mexico, Morocco, and Tunisia were interviewed about their experience of travelers' diseases upon arrival in Brussels. Diarrhea was mentioned by 37% of the adults and 27% of the children. These subjects were questioned about the types of measures taken, type and duration of drug treatment (if any), and about duration of diarrhea and side effects experienced. Methods: Final analysis was performed based on 2160 interviews. The largest proportion of diarrhea was reported in the age group 15-24 years (46%). Results: The majority of the 2160 subjects had opted for drug treatment (81%): 927 subjects for loperamide alone, 235 for loperamide in combination with nifuroxazide, and 178 for nifuroxazide alone. Other drugs had been used less frequently. The median time to recovery was 2.4 days with loperamide compared to 3.2 days with nifuroxazide and to 3.4 days for the no-treatment group. Conclusions: A stratification of the results by severity of the diarrhea suggests a rank of antidiarrheal potency as follows: loperamide > nifuroxazide > no-drug treatment. The side effect with the highest incidence was constipation (2.4% with loperamide). (J Travel Med 2:11-15, 1995) Travelers' diarrhea is usually defined as the passage of at least three unformed stools per day or any number of such stools when accompanied by fever, abdominal cramping, or vomiting. The definition may be broadened to include more trivial bowel disturbance.1,2 The duration of this self-limited disease generally is 3 to 5 days. Medical intervention aims at shortening the duration of disease, thus allowing the sufferer to resume his or her usual activities at an early stage. A shortened period of recovery to physical well-being has obvious favorable economic implications if the traveler is on business and may help the maintenance of a desired level of quality of life while a traveler is on holiday. An observational study of various medical

  19. Some infectious causes of diarrhea in young farm animals.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, R E

    1990-01-01

    Escherichia coli, rotaviruses, and Cryptosporidium parvum are discussed in this review as they relate to enteric disease in calves, lambs, and pigs. These microorganisms are frequently incriminated as causative agents in diarrheas among neonatal food animals, and in some cases different strains or serotypes of the same organism cause diarrhea in humans. E. coli causes diarrhea by mechanisms that include production of heat-labile or heat-stable enterotoxins and synthesis of potent cytotoxins, and some strains cause diarrhea by yet undetermined mechanisms. Rotaviruses and C. parvum induce various degrees of villous atrophy. Rotaviruses infect and replicate within the cytoplasm of enterocytes, whereas C. parvum resides in an intracellular, extracytoplasmic location. E. coli, rotavirus, and C. parvum infections are of concern to producers, veterinarians, and public health officials. These agents are a major cause of economic loss to the producer because of costs associated with therapy, reduced performance, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Moreover, diarrheic animals may harbor, incubate, and act as a source to healthy animals and humans of some of these agents. Images PMID:2224836

  20. Hyperkalemia with concomitant watery diarrhea: an unusual association.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jeremy G C; Zwillich, Clifford W; Kaehny, William D; Levi, Moshe; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2003-08-01

    Four patients presented to the emergency room with life-threatening hyperkalemia and concomitant watery diarrhea. Hypovolemia, acidosis, and renal insufficiency were present in all 4 cases. In 2 patients, hyperkalemia followed initiation of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy, whereas 1 patient experienced hyperkalemia after a dose increase of an ACE inhibitor, and the fourth patient was on continuous ACE-inhibitor therapy at the time of the hyperkalemia episode. Two of the 3 patients with functioning kidneys required hemodialysis to correct the hyperkalemia, whereas the other patient was on long-term hemodialysis therapy. In the 2 patients in whom transtubular potassium (K+) gradients were available, their values ranged far below normal, indicating tubular failure to secrete K+. This abnormality was attributed to decreased distal delivery of sodium and water and to renin/angiotensin II/aldosterone blockade. It has been proposed that aldosterone blockade impairs the capacity of the colonic epithelial cells to secrete K+. In all 4 patients the watery diarrhea ceased in parallel with the correction of serum K+ to normal values. It is suggested that hyperkalemia, most likely by stimulating intestinal motility, induced the watery diarrhea in all 4 patients. The watery diarrhea, however, failed to compensate for the renal tubular failure to secrete K+.

  1. Does Childhood Diarrhea Influence Cognition Beyond the Diarrhea-Stunting Pathway?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-31

    Does Childhood Diarrhea Influence Cognition Beyond the Diarrhea -Stunting Pathway? Christa L. Fischer Walker1*, Laura Lamberti1, Linda Adair2, Richard...States of America Abstract Background: Diarrhea is a leading cause of morbidity among children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries...yet the additional effects and sequelae, such as cognitive impairment associated with diarrhea , have not been quantified. Methods: We quantified the

  2. Beyond immunization: travelers' infectious diseases. 1--Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Travelers' diarrhea is the most common illness in persons traveling from resource-rich to resource-poor regions of the world. The fear of developing diarrhea while traveling is common among travelers to any part of the developing world. This concern is realistic; 40 to 60% of travelers to these countries may develop diarrhea. Diarrheal diseases represent one of the five leading causes of death worldwide. Morbidity and mortality are significant even in the United States where diarrhea is more often than not a "nuisance disease" in the normally healthy individual.

  3. Diarrhea caused by viruses in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lee, L Y; Ison, M G

    2014-06-01

    Diarrhea is a common complication after solid organ transplantation, and viruses are emerging as important but underestimated causative agents. Viral infections in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients can result in severe and prolonged diarrhea with significant patient morbidity and graft complications. Cytomegalovirus remains the most common of the viruses to cause diarrhea, but other viruses are being increasingly recognized, including norovirus, rotavirus, and adenovirus. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management, and outcomes of these viral causes of diarrhea in SOT patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevebaugh, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    The development tests to be performed on the experimental system are described in detail. The test equipment, conditions, and procedures are given. The portable clean room tests include assembly, collapsability, portability, and storage; laminar flow rate; static pressure; air flow pattern; and electrostatic buildup. The other tests are on the ventilation system, human factors evaluation, electrical subsystem, and material compatibility.

  5. Experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The experimental system is described, and the procedures for surgery usage and maintenance are outlined. Basically the system consists of the following: (1) a portable clean room comprised of a horizontal laminar flow filter system and a transparent walled enclosure, (2) a helmet-shoulder pad assembly, (3) a communications system, (4) a helmet ventilation system, and (5) surgical gowns.

  6. Gut microbial dysbiosis may predict diarrhea and fatigue in patients undergoing pelvic cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiping; Ling, Zongxin; Yang, Zhixiang; Kiela, Pawel R; Wang, Tao; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Le; Geng, Fang; Shen, Mingqiang; Ran, Xinze; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Wang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and diarrhea are the most frequent adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy, while their etiologies are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlations between fatigue, diarrhea, and alterations in gut microbiota induced by pelvic radiotherapy. During the 5-week treatment of pelvic radiotherapy in 11 cancer patients, the general fatigue score significantly increased and was more prominent in the patients with diarrhea. The fatigue score was closely correlated with the decrease of serum citrulline (an indicator of the functional enterocyte mass) and the increases of systemic inflammatory proteins, including haptoglobin, orosomuoid, α1-antitrypsin and TNF-α. Serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also elevated, especially in the patients with diarrhea indicating epithelial barrier breach and endotoxemia. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that microbial diversity, richness, and the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio were significantly altered prior to radiotherapy in patients who later developed diarrhea. Pelvic radiotherapy induced further changes in fecal microbial ecology, some of which were specific to the patients with or without diarrhea. Our results indicate that gut microbial dysbiosis prior to radiation therapy may be exploited to predict development of diarrhea and to guide preventive treatment options. Radiation-induced dysbiosis may contribute to pelvic radiation disease, including mucositis, diarrhea, systemic inflammatory response, and pelvic radiotherapy-associated fatigue in cancer patients.

  7. Hepatoprotective effect of acetone semicarbazone on Ehrlich ascites carcinoma induced carcinogenesis in experimental mice

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Farhadul; Ali, Shaikh Mohummad Mohsin; Khanam, Jahan Ara

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the hepatoprotective effect of acetone semicarbazone (ASC) in vivo in normal and Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) bearing male Swiss albino mice. Methods Drug-induced changes in biochemical and behavioral parameters at dose of 2.0 mg/kg body weight for 14 d and nullifying the toxicity induced by EAC cells were studied. The histopathology studies of the protective effects of ASC on vital organs were also assessed. Results The administration of ASC made insignificant changes in body weight and behavioral (salivation, diarrhea, muscular numbness) changes during treatment period due to minor toxicity were minimized after the treatment in normal mice. The biochemical parameters, including serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase, glutamate oxaloactate transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, serum glucose, cholesterol, urea, triglyceride and billirubin changed modestly in normal mice receiving ASC. Though the treatment continued, these values gradually decreased to normal level after the treatment. In EAC bearing mice, the toxic effects due to EAC cells in all cases were nullified by treatment with the ASC. Significant abnormalities were not detected in histology of the various organs of the normal mice treated with ASC. Conclusions ASC can, therefore, be considered safe in formulating novel anticancer drug, as it exhibits strong protective effect against EAC cell bearing mice. PMID:23593588

  8. Induced thermoluminescence study of experimentally shock-loaded oligoclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivliev, A. I.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Badjukov, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Artificially induced thermoluminescence (TL) in oligoclase samples which were shock-loaded up to 27 GPa was measured. The essential increase of the TL sensitivity in relation to the total gamma-ray irradiation dose was observed only in samples at the 27 GPa pressure. This result can be explained by the initiation of additional radiation damages in the shocked oligoclace crystal lattice.

  9. Pellagra: dermatitis, dementia, and diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Juraj; Schwartz, Robert A; Hegyi, Vladimír

    2004-01-01

    Pellagra defines systemic disease as resulting from a marked cellular deficiency of niacin. It is characterized by 4 "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, dementia, and death. Diagnosis of pellagra is difficult in the absence of the skin lesions, and is often facilitated by the presence of characteristic ones. The dermatitis begins as an erythema. Acute pellagra resembles sunburn in its first stages, but tanning occurs more slowly than typically in sunburn. Exacerbation follows re-exposure to sunlight. In this work we review the findings of this once mysterious disorder, one that still challenges clinicians world-wide.

  10. Feeding sodium arsanilate for exciting diarrhea and identifying carriers of swine dysentery.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, L D; Rodabaugh, D E

    1986-01-01

    Sodium arsanilate was fed to nondiarrhetic swine, previously exposed to and treated for swine dysentery, for the purpose of inducing them into developing a swine dysentery diarrhea. From 40 to 100% of these swine in each pen had previously had a swine dysentery diarrhea. The isolate of Treponema hyodysenteriae in the diced colon which was used to expose the swine was resistant to sodium arsanilate. After an interim of no treatment for swine dysentery, sodium arsanilate was fed at a level of 220 parts per million for 21 days. Of the 14 pens containing swine fed sodium arsanilate, ten pens had one or more swine that developed a swine dysentery diarrhea while being fed sodium arsanilate. This was significantly (P less than 0.05) greater than the three pens that each had one pig that developed a swine dysentery diarrhea of 13 pens containing similar swine not fed sodium arsanilate during a comparable period. In the 14 pens containing swine fed sodium arsanilate, 14 swine were the first to develop a swine dysentery diarrhea since in four pens, two swine in each pen developed diarrhea within 24 hours of each other. This also was significantly (P less than 0.01) greater than the three swine in the ten pens not fed sodium arsanilate. From these results, it was theorized that sodium arsanilate excited the nondiarrhetic carrier into developing a swine dysentery diarrhea and that this phenomenon may have potential in identifying the carrier state. PMID:3742372

  11. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental study of the application of discrete-time, linear quadratic control design methods to the cavity tone problem is described. State space models of the dynamics from a synthetic jet actuator at the leading edge of the cavity to two pressure sensors in the cavity were computed from experimental data. Variations in model order, control order, control bandwidth, and properties of a Kalman state estimator were studied. Feedback control reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. Closed loop performance was often limited by excitation of sidebands of cavity tones, and creation of new tones in the spectrum. State space models were useful for explaining some of these limitations, but were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  12. Field experimental study of traffic-induced turbulence on highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Estébanez, A.; Pascual-Muñoz, P.; Yagüe, C.; Laina, R.; Castro-Fresno, D.

    2012-12-01

    This paper is focused on traffic-induced turbulence (TIT) analysis from a field campaign performed in 2011, using ultrasonic anemometers deployed in the M-12 Highways, Madrid (Spain). The study attempts to improve knowledge about the influence of traffic-related parameters on turbulence. Linear relationships between vehicle speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) values are found with coefficients of determination (R2) of 0.75 and 0.55 for the lorry and van respectively. The vehicle-induced fluctuations in the wind components (u‧, v‧ and w‧) showed the highest values for the longitudinal component (v) because of the wake-passing effect. In the analysis of wake produced by moving vehicles it is indicated how the turbulence dissipates in relation to a distance d and height h. The TKE values were found to be higher at the measuring points closer to the surface during the wake analysis.

  13. Chemopreventive potential of zinc in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dani, Vijayta; Goel, Ajay; Vaiphei, K; Dhawan, D K

    2007-06-15

    The present study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of zinc treatment on colonic antioxidant defense system and histoarchitecture in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine- (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, zinc treated, DMH+zinc treated. Colon carcinogenesis was induced through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Zinc (in the form of zinc sulphate) was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in drinking water, ad libitum for the entire duration of the study. Increased tumor incidence, tumor size and number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were accompanied by a decrease in lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. On the contrary, significantly increased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione reductase (GR) were observed in DMH treated rats. Administration of zinc to DMH treated rats significantly decreased the tumor incidence, tumor size and aberrant crypt foci number with simultaneous enhancement of lipid peroxidation, SOD, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase. Further, the levels of GSH and GR were also decreased following zinc supplementation to DMH treated rats. Well-differentiated signs of dysplasia were evident in colonic tissue sections by DMH administration alone. However, zinc treatment to DMH treated rats greatly restored normalcy in the colonic histoarchitecture, with no apparent signs of neoplasia. EDXRF studies revealed a significant decrease in tissue concentrations of zinc in the colon following DMH treatment, which upon zinc supplementation were recovered to near normal levels. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that zinc has a positive beneficial effect against chemically induced colonic preneoplastic progression in rats induced by DMH.

  14. Experimental approach of the single pedestrian-induced excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kala, J.; Bajer, M.; Barnat, J.; Smutný, J.

    2010-12-01

    Pedestrian-induced vibrations are a criterion for serviceability. This loading is significant for light-weight footbridge structures, but was established as a basic loading for the ceilings of various ordinary buildings. Wide variations of this action exist. To verify the different conclusions of various authors, vertical pressure measurements invoked during walking were performed. In the article the approaches of different design codes are also shown.

  15. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor ameliorates DSS induced experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Sainathan, Satheesh K.; Hanna, Eyad M.; Gong, Qingqing; Bishnupuri, Kumar S.; Luo, Qizhi; Colonna, Marco; White, Frances V.; Croze, Ed; Houchen, Courtney; Anant, Shrikant; Dieckgraefe, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sargramostim, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor, stimulates cells of the intestinal innate immune system. Clinical trials show that Sargramostim induces clinical response and remission in patients with active Crohn's disease. To study the mechanism, we examined the effects of GM-CSF in the dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) induced acute colitis model. We hypothesized that GM-CSF may work through effects on dendritic cells (DCs). Methods Acute colitis was induced in Balb/c mice by administration of DSS in drinking water. Mice were treated with daily GM-CSF or PBS. To probe the role of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in the response to GM-CSF, we further examine the effects of monoclonal antibody 440c, which is specific for a sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectin expressed on pDCs. Results GM-CSF ameliorates acute DSS-induced colitis; resulting in significantly improved clinical parameters and histology. Microarray analysis showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory genes including TNFα and IL1β; results further confirmed by real-time RT-PCR and serum Bio-plex analysis. GM-CSF treatment significantly expands pDCs and type 1 IFN production. Administration of mAb 440c completely blocked the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF. GM-CSF is also effective in RAG1−/− mice, demonstrating activity independent effects on T and B cells. IFN-β administration mimics the therapeutic effect of GM-CSF in DSS-treated mice. GM-CSF increases systemic and mucosal type 1 IFN expression and exhibits synergy with pDC activators, such as microbial CpG DNA. Conclusions GM-CSF is effective in the treatment of DSS colitis in a mechanism involving the 440c+ plasmacytoid DC population. PMID:17932977

  16. Interleukin 19 reduces inflammation in chemically induced experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yukiko; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Nishiyama, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Natsuho; Ikeda, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease results from chronic dysregulation of the mucosal immune system and aberrant activation of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Interleukin (IL)-19, a member of the IL-10 family, functions as an anti-inflammatory cytokine. Here, we investigated the contribution of IL-19 to intestinal inflammation in a model of T cell-mediated colitis in mice. Inflammatory responses in IL-19-deficient mice were assessed using the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis. IL-19 deficiency aggravated TNBS-induced colitis and compromised intestinal recovery in mice. Additionally, the exacerbation of TNBS-induced colonic inflammation following genetic ablation of IL-19 was accompanied by increased production of interferon-gamma, IL-12 (p40), IL-17, IL-22, and IL-33, and decreased production of IL-4. Moreover, the exacerbation of colitis following IL-19 knockout was also accompanied by increased production of CXCL1, G-CSF and CCL5. Using this model of induced colitis, our results revealed the immunopathological relevance of IL-19 as an anti-inflammatory cytokine in intestinal inflammation in mice.

  17. Experimental study of microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Ryan T.

    Microwave-Induced Thermoacoustic Imaging (TAI) is a noninvasive hybrid modality which improves contrast by using thermoelastic wave generation induced by microwave absorption. Ultrasonography is widely used in medical practice as a low-cost alternative and supplement to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Although ultrasonography has relatively high image resolution (depending on the ultrasonic wavelength at diagnostic frequencies), it suffers from low image contrast of soft tissues. In this work samples are irradiated with sub-microsecond electromagnetic pulses inducing acoustic waves in the sample that are then detected with an unfocused transducer. The advantage of this hybrid modality is the ability to take advantage of the microwave absorption coefficients which provide high contrast in tissue samples. This in combination with the superior spatial resolution of ultrasound waves is important to providing a low-cost alternative to MRI and early breast cancer detection methods. This work describes the implementation of a thermoacoustic experiment using a 5 kW peak power microwave source.

  18. Acute phase proteins in experimentally induced pregnancy toxemia in goats.

    PubMed

    González, Félix H D; Hernández, Fuensanta; Madrid, Josefa; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Cerón, José J; Tecles, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    The present work aimed to study the behavior of acute phase proteins (haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, acid soluble glycoprotein, fibrinogen, and albumin) in fasting-induced pregnancy toxemia in goats and their relationship with classical indicators of this disorder such as beta-hydroxybutyrate and nonesterified fatty acids in the blood and decreased urine pH and ketonuria. Twelve adult Murciano-Granadina goats at the final stage of gestation were used in this experiment. Pregnancy toxemia was induced in 6 goats by fasting for 72 hr. The other 6 animals were used as control group. Ketonuria was present in 4 out of 5 fasting animals at 24 hr and in all fasting animals at 48 hr of fasting. Serum nonesterified fatty acids were significantly increased at 24, 48, and 72 hr of fasting. Beta-hydroxybutyrate and haptoglobin achieved significantly increased concentrations at 48 hr and 72 hr, respectively, remaining increased during the entire study. Serum amyloid A, acid soluble glycoprotein, fibrinogen, and albumin were not affected by fasting. In conclusion, acute phase proteins (including haptoglobin) seemed not to have an advantage over traditional markers in diagnosis of fasting-induced pregnancy toxemia in goats.

  19. Comparison of methods for evaluation of experimentally induced emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.H.; Buschbom, R.L.; Smith, L.G.

    1984-04-01

    Four methods to quantify induced emphysema, in a manner economically applicable to large numbers of animals, are compared by correlation analyses. Lung tissue used was from rats pretreated intratracheally with elastase or saline prior to exposure to air or (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or NH/sub 4/NO/sub 3/ aerosols. The most sensitive quantitative evaluation was from mean chord length (MCL) measurements on scanning electron micrographs (SEM). Four-corner and parallel-line grids provided similar results, and reducing sample size to one selected field per lobe yielded a high degree of reliability for MCL measurements. Alveolar-pore perimeter and area (also measured on SEM photographs) were increased by induced emphysema, but were not reliable indicators for degree of pulmonary involvement. Both subjective score (grading the degree of emphysema) and percentage-area-affected determinations indicated the presence of emphysema, but with less sensitivity than MCL measurements. However, these two subgross methods (performed with a dissecting microscope) provided valuable information on the distribution of pulmonary lesions; emphysema was induced in a nonuniform but consistent and progressive pattern in the two lobes of the lung studied. 23 studied.

  20. Corilagin Attenuates Aerosol Bleomycin-Induced Experimental Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Guo, Qiong-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Xiao; Li, Wen-Ting; Ma, Xi-Tao; Ma, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressing lethal disease with few clinically effective therapies. Corilagin is a tannin derivative which shows anti-inflammatory and antifibrotics properties and is potentiated in treating IPF. Here, we investigated the effect of corilagin on lung injury following bleomycin exposure in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis. Corilagin abrogated bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis as assessed by H&E; Masson’s trichrome staining and lung hydroxyproline content in lung tissue. Corilagin reduced the number of apoptotic lung cells and prevented lung epithelial cells from membrane breakdown, effluence of lamellar bodies and thickening of the respiratory membrane. Bleomycin exposure induced expression of MDA, IKKα, phosphorylated IKKα (p-IKKα), NF-κB P65, TNF-α and IL-1β, and reduced I-κB expression in mice lung tissue or in BALF. These changes were reversed by high-dose corilagin (100 mg/kg i.p) more dramatically than by low dose (10 mg/kg i.p). Last, corilagin inhibits TGF-β1 production and α-SMA expression in lung tissue samples. Taken together, these findings confirmed that corilagin attenuates bleomycin-induced epithelial injury and fibrosis via inactivation of oxidative stress, proinflammatory cytokine release and NF-κB and TGF-β1 signaling. Corilagin may serve as a promising therapeutic agent for pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:24886817

  1. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

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  2. Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

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  3. New Developments in Traveler's Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    de la Cabada Bauche, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Traveler's diarrhea (TD) is a crucial area for research, as it affects millions of tourists each year and creates a large economic burden. More than 60% of TD cases are caused by a variety of bacterial enteropathogens: diarrhea-producing Escherichia coli, Shigella, Campylobacter, Salmonella, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, and noncholera Vibrios. Noroviruses are also an important cause of morbidity among travelers. Recent studies have identified host genetic risk factors associated with susceptibility to pathogen-specific TD. Prevention strategies should be emphasized, as all individuals with TD experience approximately 24 hours of disability and 5-10% experience chronic functional bowel disease. Poorly absorbed rifaximin provides protection for trips lasting 2 weeks or less. TD vaccines are also currently in development. All individuals planning trips to developing regions should be armed with 1 of the 3 agents that have shown efficacy for self-treatment of TD: ciprofloxacin (or levofloxacin), rifaximin, or azithromycin, depending upon the location of the trip. Although global epidemiologic changes in etiologic agents as well as antibiotic resistance patterns have been better understood recently, changes should be expected during the next decade due to new prevention and treatment approaches. PMID:21475415

  4. Dietary clays alleviate diarrhea of weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Song, M; Liu, Y; Soares, J A; Che, T M; Osuna, O; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine whether 3 different clays in the nursery diet reduce diarrhea of weaned pigs experimentally infected with a pathogenic Escherichia coli. Weaned pigs (21 d old) were housed in individual pens of disease containment chambers for 16 d [4 d before and 12 d after the first challenge (d 0)]. The treatments were in a factorial arrangement: 1) with or without an E. coli challenge (F-18 E. coli strain; heat-labile, heat-stable, and Shiga-like toxins; 10(10) cfu/3 mL oral dose daily for 3 d from d 0) and 2) dietary treatments. The ADG, ADFI, and G:F were measured for each interval (d 0 to 6, 6 to 12, and 0 to 12). Diarrhea score (DS; 1 = normal; 5 = watery diarrhea) was recorded for each pig daily. Feces were collected on d 0, 3, 6, 9, and 12 and plated on blood agar to differentiate β-hemolytic coliforms (HC) from total coliforms (TC) and on MacConkey agar to verify E. coli. Their populations on blood agar were assessed visually using a score (0 = no growth; 8 = very heavy bacterial growth) and expressed as a ratio of HC to TC scores (RHT). Blood was collected on d 0, 6, and 12 to measure total and differential white blood cell (WBC) counts, packed cell volume (PCV), and total protein (TP). In Exp. 1 (8 treatments; 6 replicates), 48 pigs (6.9 ± 1.0 kg of BW) and 4 diets [a nursery control diet (CON), CON + 0.3% smectite (SM), CON + 0.6% SM, and CON until d 0 and then CON + 0.3% SM] were used. The SM treatments did not affect growth rate of the pigs for the overall period. In the E. coli challenged group, the SM treatments reduced DS for the overall period (1.77 vs. 2.01; P < 0.05) and RHT on d 6 (0.60 vs. 0.87; P < 0.05) and d 9 (0.14 vs. 0.28; P = 0.083), and altered differential WBC on d 6 (neutrophils, 48 vs. 39%, P = 0.092; lymphocytes, 49 vs. 58%, P = 0.082) compared with the CON treatment. In Exp. 2 (16 treatments; 8 replicates), 128 pigs (6.7 ± 0.8 kg of BW) and 8 diets [CON and 7 clay treatments (CON + 0.3% SM

  5. Experimental Protocol for Manipulating Plant-induced Soil Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Angela J.; del Pino, Gaston A.; Burns, Jean H.

    2014-01-01

    Coexistence theory has often treated environmental heterogeneity as being independent of the community composition; however biotic feedbacks such as plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) have large effects on plant performance, and create environmental heterogeneity that depends on the community composition. Understanding the importance of PSF for plant community assembly necessitates understanding of the role of heterogeneity in PSF, in addition to mean PSF effects. Here, we describe a protocol for manipulating plant-induced soil heterogeneity. Two example experiments are presented: (1) a field experiment with a 6-patch grid of soils to measure plant population responses and (2) a greenhouse experiment with 2-patch soils to measure individual plant responses. Soils can be collected from the zone of root influence (soils from the rhizosphere and directly adjacent to the rhizosphere) of plants in the field from conspecific and heterospecific plant species. Replicate collections are used to avoid pseudoreplicating soil samples. These soils are then placed into separate patches for heterogeneous treatments or mixed for a homogenized treatment. Care should be taken to ensure that heterogeneous and homogenized treatments experience the same degree of soil disturbance. Plants can then be placed in these soil treatments to determine the effect of plant-induced soil heterogeneity on plant performance. We demonstrate that plant-induced heterogeneity results in different outcomes than predicted by traditional coexistence models, perhaps because of the dynamic nature of these feedbacks. Theory that incorporates environmental heterogeneity influenced by the assembling community and additional empirical work is needed to determine when heterogeneity intrinsic to the assembling community will result in different assembly outcomes compared with heterogeneity extrinsic to the community composition. PMID:24686854

  6. Experimental protocol for manipulating plant-induced soil heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Angela J; del Pino, Gaston A; Burns, Jean H

    2014-03-13

    Coexistence theory has often treated environmental heterogeneity as being independent of the community composition; however biotic feedbacks such as plant-soil feedbacks (PSF) have large effects on plant performance, and create environmental heterogeneity that depends on the community composition. Understanding the importance of PSF for plant community assembly necessitates understanding of the role of heterogeneity in PSF, in addition to mean PSF effects. Here, we describe a protocol for manipulating plant-induced soil heterogeneity. Two example experiments are presented: (1) a field experiment with a 6-patch grid of soils to measure plant population responses and (2) a greenhouse experiment with 2-patch soils to measure individual plant responses. Soils can be collected from the zone of root influence (soils from the rhizosphere and directly adjacent to the rhizosphere) of plants in the field from conspecific and heterospecific plant species. Replicate collections are used to avoid pseudoreplicating soil samples. These soils are then placed into separate patches for heterogeneous treatments or mixed for a homogenized treatment. Care should be taken to ensure that heterogeneous and homogenized treatments experience the same degree of soil disturbance. Plants can then be placed in these soil treatments to determine the effect of plant-induced soil heterogeneity on plant performance. We demonstrate that plant-induced heterogeneity results in different outcomes than predicted by traditional coexistence models, perhaps because of the dynamic nature of these feedbacks. Theory that incorporates environmental heterogeneity influenced by the assembling community and additional empirical work is needed to determine when heterogeneity intrinsic to the assembling community will result in different assembly outcomes compared with heterogeneity extrinsic to the community composition.

  7. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  8. Experimental Feedback Control of Flow Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-time, linear quadratic methods were used to design feedback controllers for reducing tones generated by flow over a cavity. The dynamics of a synthetic jet actuator mounted at the leading edge of the cavity as observed by two microphones in the cavity were modeled over a broad frequency range using state space models computed from experimental data. Variations in closed loop performance as a function of model order, control order, control bandwidth, and state estimator design were studied using a cavity in the Probe Calibration Tunnel at NASA Langley. The controller successfully reduced the levels of multiple cavity tones at the tested flow speeds of Mach 0.275, 0.35, and 0.45. In some cases, the closed loop results were limited by excitation of sidebands of the cavity tones, or the creation of new tones at frequencies away from the cavity tones. Nonetheless, the results validate the combination of optimal control and experimentally-generated state space models, and suggest this approach may be useful for other flow control problems. The models were not able to account for non-linear dynamics, such as interactions between tones at different frequencies.

  9. Laparoscopic correction of experimentally induced diaphragmatic rupture in dogs.

    PubMed

    Souza, Diogo Benchimol de; Mariano, Carlos Magno Anselmo; Andrade, Paulo Sérgio Cruz de; Coelho, Gabriela Correa; Abílio, Edmundo Jorge

    2015-08-01

    To describe the dog as a model for studying laparoscopic correction of experimental diaphragmatic ruptures. Five male dogs were used in this study. Under laparoscopic approach, a defect of 7 cm was created on the left ventral insertion of the diaphragm. Fourteen days after this procedure, the abdomen was explored using laparoscopic access and the diaphragmatic defect was corrected with intracorporeal suture. The dislocated organs, surgical time, and suturing time were recorded. Analgesia and clinical condition were monitored during the postoperative period. All animals recovered well from the diaphragmatic rupture creation. After 14 days, abdominal organs (liver, spleen, omentum and/or intestine) were found inside the thoracic cavity in all animals. It was possible to reposition the organs and suture the defect by laparoscopic access in three animals. These animals showed excellent postoperative recovery. It was not possible to reposition the liver safely when it was friable. Laparoscopic creation of diaphragmatic rupture in dogs is feasible. Dogs are a good model for training and studying the correction of experimentally created diaphragmatic rupture by the laparoscopic approach. A friable liver is a complicating factor that should be taken into account. Animals submitted to laparoscopic correction showed excellent postoperative recovery.

  10. Appraisal of experimental and commercial Marek's disease vaccines to induce bursal and thymic atrophy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, several experimental Marek’s disease (MD) vaccines were developed that appear to protect equally or better than the best commercial vaccines. However, some of the experimental vaccines were reported to induce transient bursal and thymic atrophies. We will report on two promising experiment...

  11. Experimental distinction of Autler-Townes splitting from electromagnetically induced transparency using coupled mechanical oscillators system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingliang; Yang, Hujiang; Wang, Chuan; Xu, Kun; Xiao, Jinghua

    2016-01-01

    Here we experimentally demonstrated the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Autler-Townes splitting (ATS) effects in mechanical coupled pendulums. The analogue of EIT and ATS has been studied in mechanical systems and the intrinsic physics between these two phenomena are also been discussed. Exploiting the Akaike Information Criterion, we discern the ATS effect from EIT effect in our experimental results. PMID:26751738

  12. The role of nitric oxide in experimental cerulein induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Um, Soon Ho; Kwon, Yong Dae; Kim, Chang Duck; Lee, Hong Sik; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jae Hyun; Ryu, Ho Sang; Hyun, Jin Hai

    2003-08-01

    An enhanced formation of nitric oxide (NO), due to the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of shock and inflammation, but its role in acute pancreatitis still remains controversial. To clarify the role of NO in acute pancreatitis, the present experiment investigated the expression of iNOS and the effect of NOS inhibition on cerulein-induced pancreatitis in rats. Group I received intraperitoneal (ip) injection of normal saline. Group II received two ip injections of cerulein (20 microgram/kg). Group III received injections of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (30 mg/kg) with cerulein. Group IV received L-arginine (250 mg/kg) with cerulein and L-NAME. The expression of iNOS in the pancreas was examined by western blot analysis. The plasma concentration of NO metabolites was measured. The severity of pancreatitis was assessed by measuring serum amylase, pancreas water content and histopathological examination. Compared with controls, the cerulein group displayed significantly increased expression of iNOS and raised plasma NO metabolites. Treatment with L-NAME significantly decreased hyperamylasemia, plasma NO level, and the extent of pancreatic injury. Treatment with L-arginine reversed the effects of L-NAME. These findings suggest that an enhanced formation of NO by iNOS plays an important role in the development of acute pancreatitis, and inhibition of NO production has the beneficial effects in reducing pancreas injury.

  13. [Fetal experimentation, transplantations, cosmetics and their connection with induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Redondo Calderón, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    The increase in induced abortion produces large numbers of cells, tissues and organs, which are used in several fields of Medicine, either in research or in treatment. The main uses are in Cardiology, Hematology, Metabolism, Embryology, Neurology, Immunology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and Transplantations. Flavor enhancers and cosmetics also benefit. Utilitarianism has led to an increase in abortion-originated cell and tissue banks. Abortion is justified through the manipulation of language. Vested interests give rise to complicity in researchers and society as a whole. Abortion and tissue 'donation' cannot be split; since fresh tissues are involved there is a symbiotic relationship between them. Valid consent is not possible. A contradiction emerges, the nasciturus is not desired or valued but fetal organs are. When someone is deprived of his rights it is because another wants to enslave them. Research must have a moral base. Knowledge should not be increased at any price. Something that is legal and well intentioned is not always morally acceptable. The duty of omission is applicable. Means to achieve a goal must be ethical means. Educational efforts to restore respect for the human embryo and fetus must be promoted. Technical advances are not always in accordance with human nature and dignity. Research and treatment that do not resort to cells, tissues and organs obtained from induced abortions should be promoted.

  14. Experimental acute pancreatitis induced by platelet activating factor in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Emanuelli, G.; Montrucchio, G.; Gaia, E.; Dughera, L.; Corvetti, G.; Gubetta, L.

    1989-01-01

    This study indicates that a single injection of platelet activating factor (PAF, 50-500 ng) into the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery of rabbits induces dose-dependent morphologic alterations of pancreatic tissue and increases serum amylase levels, both consistent with the development of an acute pancreatitis. The main histologic findings observed by light microscopy 24-72 hours after the injection of PAF were edema, polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration, cell vacuolization, and acinar cell necrosis. Fat cell necrosis was present in 30% of animals. By electron microscopy an increase of the number of zymogen granules in the apical region of acinar cells was observed 3 hours after PAF challenge. At 24-72 hours, many acinar cells showed vacuoles containing myelinlike figures, zymogen granules, and cellular debris. Pancreatic lesions developed in the area supplied by the artery injected with PAF and they were completely antagonized by the pretreatment of rabbits with CV 3988, a specific antagonist of PAF. In addition, the significant protective effect of atropine suggests a potential role for cholinergic mechanisms in the pancreatic alterations induced by PAF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2464939

  15. Diarrhea: applying research to bedside practice.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Valerie K; Carlson, Karen K

    2007-01-01

    Diarrhea is one of many symptoms that may complicate the hospitalization of a critically ill patient. Diarrhea is caused by a variety of etiologies; identifying the etiology aids in the appropriate selection of interventions. Care of the patient with diarrhea should be guided by the evidence and best practices available in the literature. This article defines and describes diarrhea and its pathophysiology. An evidence-based plan of care for the assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation of the patient with diarrhea is presented, using levels of recommendation based on the strength of the available evidence. A case study is presented to illustrate application to clinical practice. Commentary about the case is provided to review salient points of care.

  16. Experimental characterization of yield induced by surface flaws.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. H.; Davidson, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Recent experimental findings related to the surface deformation and plastic zones associated with a deep surface flaw in Mode I tension loading are surveyed. Results of front and back surface dimpling, as determined by replica profiling and interferometry, are presented. The stresses required to initiate back surface dimpling are inversely related both to the crack depth and to the crack length. The plastic zone at the crack tip is described using results obtained from Fe-3Si specimens which have been studied with the electrolytic etching technique. It is shown that the plastic zone may be identified with a state of plane strain around the entire crack perimeter, except for the very thin layer near the crack tips on the front surface, where the deformation state approximates plane stress.

  17. Experimentation and numerical modeling of forging induced bending (FIB) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, S.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the final shape using numerical modeling has been a top priority in the field of sheet and bulk forming. Better shape prediction is the result of a better estimation of the physical stress and strain state. For experimental and numerical investigations of such estimations, simple benchmark processes are used. In this paper a benchmark process involving forging (flattening) of sheet metal between punch and die with negative clearance is proposed. The introduced material flow results in bending. Easy measurability of the angle of this bend makes this process suitable for validation purpose. Physical experiments are performed to characterize this bending angle due to flattening. Furthermore a numerical model is developed to capture this phenomenon. The main focus of this paper is the validation of the numerical model in terms of accurate prediction of the physical results.

  18. Dietary oregano essential oil alleviates experimentally induced coccidiosis in broilers.

    PubMed

    Mohiti-Asli, M; Ghanaatparast-Rashti, M

    2015-06-15

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of oregano essential oil on growth performance and coccidiosis prevention in mild challenged broilers. A total of 250 1-d-old chicks were used in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments and 5 replicates with 10 birds in each replication. Experimental treatments included: (1) negative control (NC; unchallenged), (2) positive control (PC; challenged with sporulated oocysts of Eimeria), (3) PC fed 200 ppm Diclazuril in diet, (4) PC fed 300 ppm oregano oil in diet, and (5) PC fed 500 ppm oregano oil in diet. At 22 d of age, all the experimental groups except for NC were challenged with 50-fold dose of Livacox T as a trivalent live attenuated coccidiosis vaccine. On d 28, two birds were slaughtered and intestinal coccidiosis lesions were scored 0-4. Moreover, dropping was scored in the scale of 0-3, and oocysts per gram feces (OPG) were measured. Oregano oil at either supplementation rate increased body weight gain (P=0.039) and improved feed conversion ratio (P=0.010) from d 22 to 28, when compared with PC group. Using 500 ppm oregano oil in challenged broilers diet increased European efficiency factor than PC group (P=0.020). Moreover, challenged broilers fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets displayed lower coccidiosis lesions scores in upper (P=0.003) and middle (P=0.018) regions of intestine than PC group, with the effect being similar to unchallenged birds. In general, challenged birds fed 500 ppm oregano oil or Diclazuril in diets had lower OPG (P=0.001), dropping scores (P=0.001), litter scores (P=0.001), and pH of litter (P=0.001) than PC group. It could be concluded that supplementation of oregano oil at the dose of 500 ppm in diet may have beneficial effect on prevention of coccidiosis in broilers.

  19. Involution of the rat thymus in experimentally induced hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abou-Rabia, N; Kendall, M D

    1994-09-01

    The thymus, as part of the immune-neuroendocrine axis, is greatly influenced by factors from most endocrine glands, especially the thyroid. Antithyroid drugs (carbimazole and methimazole) were used to induce hypothyroidism in rats. Histological and ultrastructural examination of the thymus showed progressive thymic involution after 4 weeks of drug treatment to the end of observations (7 weeks). The involution was characterised by increased thymocyte apoptosis and thymocyte phagocytosis by macrophages. This resulted in thymocyte depopulation, increases in numbers of interdigitating cells, alterations to mainly subcapsular and medullary epithelial cells, an apparent increase of mast cells and collagen in the capsule and septa, and increased numbers of B cells and plasma cells. Lymphoid cells immuno-reactive with MRC OX12 (which detects B cells) were observed within blood vessel walls, suggesting that they may have been moving in and out of the thymus. The administration of drugs causing hypothyroidism, therefore, also caused marked involution of the thymus.

  20. Postmortem biochemical markers of experimentally induced hypomagnesaemic tetany in cattle.

    PubMed

    McCoy, M A; Hutchinson, T; Davison, G; Fitzpatrick, D A; Rice, D A; Kennedy, D G

    2001-03-03

    Severe hypomagnesaemia and tetany were induced in 10 lactating cows by feeding them semi-synthetic low magnesium diets and the animals were used to study the stability of postmortem markers of hypomagnesaemic tetany. There were significant relationships between the concentrations of magnesium in either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or plasma and either aqueous or vitreous humour. The onset of hypomagnesamic tetany was also associated with low magnesium concentrations in plasma, CSF and aqueous and vitreous humour. Magnesium concentrations less than 0.25 mmol/litre in fresh aqueous humour may be indicative of severe hypomagnesaemia and possible tetany in lactating cows, but the concentration of magnesium in aqueous humour was unstable postmortem. The concentration of magnesium in vitreous humour was relatively stable and a concentration of less than 0.55 mmol/litre could be used as a diagnostic marker of tetany in cattle for up to at least 48 hours postmortem, at ambient temperatures typical of Northern Ireland.

  1. Experimental Investigation of High-Pressure Steam Induced Stall of a Transonic Rotor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    engine, so the steam -induced stall characteristic of its compressor must be well understood to help prevent any catastrophic failures of the aircraft...INVESTIGATION OF HIGH-PRESSURE STEAM INDUCED STALL OF A TRANSONIC ROTOR by Joesph J. Koessler June 2007 Thesis Advisor: Garth V. Hobson...2007 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Experimental Investigation of High-Pressure Steam Induced Stall of a

  2. Experimental Studies of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Transparent Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Christopher Wren

    2003-09-23

    The mechanisms by which transparent dielectrics damage when exposed to high power laser radiation has been of scientific and technological interest since the invention of the laser. In this work, a set of three experiments are presented which provide insight into the damage initiation mechanisms and the processes involved in laser-induced damage. Using an OPO (optical parametric oscillator) laser, we have measured the damage thresholds of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) from the near ultraviolet into the visible. Distinct steps, whose width is of order KbT, are observed in the damage threshold at photon energies associated with the number of photons (3→2 or 4→3) needed to promote a ground state electron across the energy gap. The wavelength dependence of the damage threshold suggests that a primary mechanism for damage initiation in DKDP is a multi-photon process in which the order is reduced through excited defect state absorption. In-situ fluorescence microscopy, in conjunction with theoretical calculations by Liu et al., has been used to establish that hydrogen displacement defects are potentially responsible for the reduction in the multi-photon cross-section. During the damage process, the material absorbs energy from the laser pulse and produces an ionized region that gives rise to broadband emission. By performing a time-resolved investigation of this emission, we demonstrate both that it is blackbody in nature, and we provide the first direct measurement of the localized temperature during and following laser damage initiation for various optical materials. For excitation using nanosecond laser pulses, the plasma, when confined in the bulk, is in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. These results allow for a detailed characterization of temperature, pressure, and electron densities occurring during laser-induced damage.

  3. Mechanisms of Murine Lacrimal Gland Repair after Experimentally Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zoukhri, Driss; Fix, Amanda; Alroy, Joseph; Kublin, Claire L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The authors recently reported that a severe inflammatory response resulting in substantial loss of acinar cells was induced by a single injection of interleukin-1α into the lacrimal gland and that this effect was reversible. The purpose of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in lacrimal gland injury and repair. Methods Inflammation was induced by direct injection of recombinant human interleukin-1α (IL-1α, 1 μg in 2 μL) into the exorbital lacrimal glands of anesthetized female BALB/c mice. Animals were killed 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 days after injection. Exorbital lacrimal glands were then removed and processed for measurement of protein secretion, histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Results The results show that lacrimal gland acinar cells are lost through programmed cell death (apoptosis) and autophagy. They also show that the number of nestin (a stem cell marker)–positive cells increased 2 to 3 days after injury and that some of these cells were also positive for Ki67 (a cell proliferation marker) and α-smooth muscle actin (a marker of myoepithelial cells). Finally, they show that the amount of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 (effector molecules of bone morphogenetic protein 7 [BMP7]) increased 2 to 3 days after injury and could also be detected in nestin-positive cells. Conclusions The lacrimal gland contains stem/progenitor cells capable of tissue repair after injury. Programmed cell death after injury triggers proliferation and differentiation of these cells, presumably through activation of the BMP7 pathway. PMID:18586880

  4. Experimental diet-induced atherosclerosis in Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, H; Nevarez, J G; Wakamatsu, N; Clubb, S; Cray, C; Tully, T N

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous atherosclerosis is common in psittaciformes, and clinical signs associated with flow-limiting stenosis are encountered in pet birds. Nevertheless, a psittacine model of atherosclerosis has not been developed for research investigations. Sixteen captive-bred Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) were used in this study. While 4 control birds were fed a maintenance diet, 12 other birds were fed an atherogenic diet composed of 1% cholesterol controlling for a calorie-to-protein ratio for periods ranging from 2 to 8 months. The birds were euthanized at the end of their respective food trial period. Histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and cholesterol measurement were performed on the ascending aorta and brachiocephalic and pulmonary arteries. Plasma lipoproteins, cholesterol, and triglycerides were also measured on a monthly basis. Significant atherosclerotic lesions were induced within 2 months and advanced atherosclerotic lesions within 4 to 6 months. The advanced lesions were histologically similar to naturally occurring lesions identified in the same parrot species with a lipid core and a fibrous cap. Ultrastructurally, there were extracellular lipid, foam cell, and endothelial changes. Arterial cholesterol content increased linearly over time. Plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) significantly increased over time by an average of 5- and 15-fold, respectively, with a shift from high-density lipoprotein to LDL as the main plasma lipoprotein. Quaker parrots also exhibited high plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity that increased, although not significantly, over time. This experiment demonstrates that in Quaker parrots fed 1% cholesterol, advanced atherosclerosis can be induced relatively quickly, and lesions resemble those found in other avian models and humans.

  5. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-09-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders.

  6. Experimental Studies of Mitigation Materials for Blast Induced Tbi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.; Christou, G.; Goel, R.; Young, L.

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods of energy transfer in blast wave flows are expected including: material interfaces with impedance mismatches, density changes in a given material, internal shearing, and particle fracture. Our hypothesis is that the greatest energy transfer within the obstructing material will yield the greatest mitigation effects to the blast. Sample configurations of foam were varied to introduce material interfaces and filler materials with varying densities and impedances (liquids and powders). The samples were dynamically loaded using a small scale blast produced by an explosive driven shock tube housing gram-scale explosive charges. The transmitted blast profiles were analyzed for variations in impulse characteristics and frequency components as compared to standard free field profiles. The results showed a rounding effect of the transmitted blast profile for all samples with the effects of the high density fillers surpassing all others tested. These results lead to a conclusion that low porosity, high density materials offer superior attenuation by reducing air blast features and spatially distributing the transmitted wave.

  7. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration-Induced Droplet Atomization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukasinovic, Bojan; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    The atomization process in a mm-scale liquid droplet placed on a vibrating membrane is investigated experimentally. When the wavelength of the Faraday surface waves is smaller than the characteristic dimension of the droplet, the waves grow in amplitude as the excitation amplitude increases and ultimately begin to eject small secondary droplets from the wave crests. The high membrane acceleration needed to attain ejection (typically 300g) is achieved by driving a light-weight membrane near its resonant frequencies (nominally 1000-6000 Hz). The evolution and rate of the droplet-ejection process depend on a coupled system dynamic between the liquid droplet and the vibrating membrane. Depending on the excitation frequency and amplitude, various types of droplet-ejection processes can occur. For example, when step forcing (with prescribed frequency and amplitude) is applied, rapid atomization occurs. This event is triggered along the circumference of the droplet near the contact line by a strong azimuthal instability. In the present experiments, the droplet-ejection process and the resulting spray characteristics are investigated using high-speed video and two-frame particle tracking velocimetry.

  8. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment

    PubMed Central

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson’s disease dementia and Alzheimer’s disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders. PMID:27598124

  9. Epileptogenesis following experimentally induced traumatic brain injury - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chandel, Shammy; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Medhi, Bikash

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a complex neurotrauma in civilian life and the battlefield with a broad spectrum of symptoms, long-term neuropsychological disability, as well as mortality worldwide. Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is a common outcome of TBI with unknown mechanisms, followed by posttraumatic epileptogenesis. There are numerous rodent models of TBI available with varying pathomechanisms of head injury similar to human TBI, but there is no evidence for an adequate TBI model that can properly mimic all aspects of clinical TBI and the first successive spontaneous focal seizures follow a single episode of neurotrauma with respect to epileptogenesis. This review aims to provide current information regarding the various experimental animal models of TBI relevant to clinical TBI. Mossy fiber sprouting, loss of dentate hilar neurons along with recurrent seizures, and epileptic discharge similar to human PTE have been studied in fluid percussion injury, weight-drop injury, and cortical impact models, but further refinement of animal models and functional test is warranted to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of posttraumatic epileptogenesis. A multifaceted research approach in TBI model may lead to exploration of the potential treatment measures, which are a major challenge to the research community and drug developers. With respect to clinical setting, proper patient data collection, improved clinical trials with advancement in drug delivery strategies, blood-brain barrier permeability, and proper monitoring of level and effects of target drug are also important.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  11. Kampo Extract of Shinbuto Improved Refractory Diarrhea in Milroy's Disease.

    PubMed

    Horiba, Yuko; Yoshino, Tetsuhiro; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Milroy's disease is a hereditary congenital lymphedema caused by lymphatic obstruction. The legs are most commonly affected, but impaired intestinal lymphatic flow can cause loose bowel movements. Here, we report the use of the Kampo extract of shinbuto for successful treatment of and abdominal pain in a patient with Milroy's disease. Milroy's disease was diagnosed because of left leg lymph-edema with onset at birth. Conservative therapy with a compression bandage was applied. However, when the patient moved to Manila at 35 years of age, she was exposed to drastic temperature changes between the air-conditioned cold environment in her room and the hot and humid environment outside. She developed a constitutional state of coldness as in hiesho (え). Then sudden lower abdominal pain and diarrhea began to occur 3 times per week and lasted at least 1 hour, sometimes accompanied by vomiting. It happened particularly when she was exposed to the cold environment and was not related to meals. Conventional anti-cholinergic or antidiarrhetic drugs had no therapeutic effect. These attacks continued in the same frequency for 3 years, so the patient visited a Kampo (traditional Japanese medicine) clinic, where her diagnosis of Milroy's disease-associated diarrhea and abdominal pain was augmented by the Kampo diagnosis of hiesho, suitai (body fluid retention). She was prescribed 7.5 g of shinbuto extract per day (TJ-30; Tsumura Co, Tokyo, Japan). The shinbuto extract significantly reduced abdominal pain and refractory diarrhea to about 2 days per month, and it tapered off completely in 3 months. Shinbuto is usually used against cold-induced diarrhea. Rewarming and water movement by shinbuto resulted in significant improvement in symptoms induced by hiesho and suitai triggered by the cold environment, though the patient's leg swelling did not change.

  12. Kampo Extract of Shinbuto Improved Refractory Diarrhea in Milroy's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Horiba, Yuko; Yoshino, Tetsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Milroy's disease is a hereditary congenital lymphedema caused by lymphatic obstruction. The legs are most commonly affected, but impaired intestinal lymphatic flow can cause loose bowel movements. Here, we report the use of the Kampo extract of shinbuto for successful treatment of and abdominal pain in a patient with Milroy's disease. Milroy's disease was diagnosed because of left leg lymph-edema with onset at birth. Conservative therapy with a compression bandage was applied. However, when the patient moved to Manila at 35 years of age, she was exposed to drastic temperature changes between the air-conditioned cold environment in her room and the hot and humid environment outside. She developed a constitutional state of coldness as in hiesho (冷え症). Then sudden lower abdominal pain and diarrhea began to occur 3 times per week and lasted at least 1 hour, sometimes accompanied by vomiting. It happened particularly when she was exposed to the cold environment and was not related to meals. Conventional anti-cholinergic or antidiarrhetic drugs had no therapeutic effect. These attacks continued in the same frequency for 3 years, so the patient visited a Kampo (traditional Japanese medicine) clinic, where her diagnosis of Milroy's disease–associated diarrhea and abdominal pain was augmented by the Kampo diagnosis of hiesho, suitai (body fluid retention). She was prescribed 7.5 g of shinbuto extract per day (TJ-30; Tsumura Co, Tokyo, Japan). The shinbuto extract significantly reduced abdominal pain and refractory diarrhea to about 2 days per month, and it tapered off completely in 3 months. Shinbuto is usually used against cold-induced diarrhea. Rewarming and water movement by shinbuto resulted in significant improvement in symptoms induced by hiesho and suitai triggered by the cold environment, though the patient's leg swelling did not change. PMID:24278839

  13. Experimentally induced metamorphosis in axolotls reduces regenerative rate and fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Stier, Adrian C.; Michonneau, François; Smith, Matthew D.; Pasch, Bret; Maden, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Abstract While most tetrapods are unable to regenerate severed body parts, amphibians display a remarkable ability to regenerate an array of structures. Frogs can regenerate appendages as larva, but they lose this ability around metamorphosis. In contrast, salamanders regenerate appendages as larva, juveniles, and adults. However, the extent to which fundamental traits (e.g., metamorphosis, body size, aging, etc.) restrict regenerative ability remains contentious. Here we utilize the ability of normally paedomorphic adult axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) to undergo induced metamorphosis by thyroxine exposure to test how metamorphosis and body size affects regeneration in age‐matched paedomorphic and metamorphic individuals. We show that body size does not affect regeneration in adult axolotls, but metamorphosis causes a twofold reduction in regeneration rate, and lead to carpal and digit malformations. Furthermore, we find evidence that metamorphic blastemal cells may take longer to traverse the cell cycle and display a lower proliferative rate. This study identifies the axolotl as a powerful system to study how metamorphosis restricts regeneration independently of developmental stage, body size, and age; and more broadly how metamorphosis affects tissue‐specific changes. PMID:27499857

  14. An Experimental Investigation of Vibration-Induced Single Droplet Ejection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Range, Kai; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1998-11-01

    Vibration-induced droplet atomization occurs when small secondary droplets are ejected from the free surface of a larger droplet placed on a vibrating membrane. To model a single ejection event, a liquid droplet is placed on a small piston and vibrated using an electromagnetic driver. The droplet oscillates in a characteristic mode shape that depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the properties of the liquid, and the size of the droplet. When the excitation amplitude is large enough, a small secondary droplet is ejected from the primary droplet. Observations of this process using high-speed digital video imaging show that droplet ejection occurs when a small liquid column or jet appears on the primary droplet and a secondary droplet forms on the column by a capillary-pinching mechanism. The liquid column or jet emanates from a crater in the primary droplet. As the driving frequency increases, this crater becomes smaller and the diameter of the ejected droplet decreases. We shall present results showing how the ejected droplet diameter and speed depends on the driving frequency and amplitude, the liquid properties, and the primary droplet volume.

  15. Predictions of experimentally observed stochastic ground vibrations induced by blasting.

    PubMed

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry "Suva Vrela" near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions.

  16. Flagella-induced immunity against experimental cholera in adult rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Yancey, R J; Willis, D L; Berry, L J

    1979-01-01

    The adult rabbit ligated ileal loop model was used to evaluate the prophylactic potential of a crude flagellar (CF) vaccine produced from the classical. Inaba strain CA401. A greater than 1,000-fold increase in the challenge inoculum was required to induce an intestinal fluid response in actively immunized adult rabbits equivalent to that produced in unimmunized animals. Similar protection was afforded against challenge with classical and El Tor biotypes of both Inaba and Ogawa serotypes. Highly virulent 35S-labeled vibrios were inhibited in their ability to associated with the intestinal mucosa of CF-immunized rabbits. The protection conferred by CF immunization was found to be superior to that of a commercial bivalent vaccine and also to that of glutaraldehyde-treated cholera toxoid. The critical immunogenic component of CF appears to be a flagella-derived protein. The immunogenicity of CF was destroyed by heat treatment, and absorption of CF-immune serum with aflagellated mutant vibrios did not diminish its ability to confer a high level of passive protection. The intestinal protection of CF-immunized rabbits was completely reversed by the introduction of both goat anti-rabbit immunoglobulins A and G, but by neither alone. PMID:478635

  17. Experimental study on shock-induced doping of titania photocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Liu, Jianjun; Chen, Pengwan

    2009-06-01

    Titania is a most effective photo-functional material and is widely used. But since the band gap of titania is large (Eg=3.2 eV), it is only active in the ultraviolet region, which accouts only 3%-5% of the overall solar intensity. Therefore, it is very important to enhance the visible light activity of the titania photocatalyst. In this study, the nitrogen-doping of titania photocatalysts were induced by shock waves, which were generated through detonation-driven flyer impact. The samples were shocked at different flyer impact velocities and recovered successfully. Two nitrogen resources containing hexamethylene tetramine(HMT) and dicyandiamide were considered. The phase composition, light absorption spectra and N doping status of the recovered samples under different shock conditions were characterized. The absorption edge of the N-doped titania photocatalysts by shock wave was extended to 450nm corresponding to visible light region. The photocatalytic degradation to rhodamine B of the samples doped with dicyandiamide increased with the increase of the flyer velocity due to the higher N doping concentration and wider response to visible light.

  18. Experimental treatment of antipsychotic-induced movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shireen, Erum

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are extensively prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia and other related psychiatric disorders. These drugs produced their action by blocking dopamine (DA) receptors, and these receptors are widely present throughout the brain. Therefore, extended antipsychotic use also leads to severe extrapyramidal side effects. The short-term effects include parkinsonism and the later appearing tardive dyskinesia. Currently available treatments for these disorders are mostly symptomatic and insufficient, and are often linked with a number of detrimental side effects. Antipsychotic-drug-induced tardive dyskinesia prompted researchers to explore novel drugs with fewer undesirable extrapyramidal side effects. Preclinical studies suggest a role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin)-1A and 2A/2C receptors in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission and motivating a search for better therapeutic strategies for schizophrenia and related disorders. In addition, adjunctive treatment with antioxidants such as vitamin E, red rice bran oil, and curcumin in the early phases of illness may prevent additional oxidative injury, and thus improve and prevent further possible worsening of related neurological and behavioral deficits in schizophrenia. This review explains the role of serotonergic receptors and oxidative stress, with the aim of providing principles for prospect development of compounds to improve therapeutic effects of antischizophrenic drugs. PMID:27540314

  19. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  20. Pristane-induced lupus: considerations on this experimental model.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Eduarda Correa; de Oliveira, Mayara Souza; Monticielo, Odirlei André

    2017-09-06

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifactorial, autoimmune inflammatory disease with pleomorphic clinical manifestations involving different organs and tissues. The etiology of this disease has been associated with a dysfunctional response of B and T lymphocytes against environmental stimuli in individuals genetically susceptible to SLE, which determines an immune response against different autoantigens and, consequently, tissue damage. The study of different murine models has provided a better understanding of these autoimmune phenomena. This review primarily focuses on that has been learned from the pristane-induced lupus (PIL) model and how this model can be used to supplement recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of SLE. We also consider both current and future therapies for this disease. The PubMed, SciELO, and Embase databases were searched for relevant articles published from 1950 to 2016. PIL has been shown to be a useful tool for understanding the multiple mechanisms involved in systemic autoimmunity. In addition, it can be considered an efficient model to evaluate the environmental contributions and interferon signatures present in patients with SLE.

  1. Serum transaminase levels after experimental paracetamol-induced hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, M F; Fulker, M J; Walker, B E; Kelleher, J; Losowsky, M S

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between serum transaminase levels and the extent of paracetamol-induced liver necrosis has been investigated in the rat. Three methods of histological quantitation were used to assess of necrosis--arbitrary grading, point counting, and the image-analysis computer. Highly significant correlations were obtained between the three methods and all were found to be reproducible. A close correlation was found between the extent of hepatic necrosis and the serum ASAT and ALAT 24 hours after a large dose (4 g/kg) of paracetamol. Likewise, the mean grade of necrosis correlated reasonably well with the serum enzyme levels in the recovery phase at 36 and 72 hours, although the transaminase level for a given degree of necrosis was considerably lower at 72 hours than at 24 hours. These findings suggest that serum transaminase levels gives a reliable indication of the severity of hepatic necrosis if the time of ingestion of the paracetamol is known and taken into account. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:1205274

  2. Photodynamic therapy induced vascular damage: an overview of experimental PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Moriyama, L. T.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2013-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been developed as one of the most important therapeutic options in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. By resorting to the photosensitizer and light, which convert oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), PDT will induce vascular damage and direct tumor cell killing. Another consequence of PDT is the microvascular stasis, which results in hypoxia and further produces tumor regression. To improve the treatment with PDT, three promising strategies are currently attracting much interest: (1) the combination of PDT and anti-angiogenesis agents, which more effectively prevent the proliferation of endothelial cells and the formation of new blood vessels; (2) the nanoparticle-assisted delivery of photosensitizer, which makes the photosensitizer more localized in tumor sites and thus renders minimal damage to the normal tissues; (3) the application of intravascular PDT, which can avoid the loss of energy during the transmission and expose the target area directly. Here we aim to review the important findings on vascular damage by PDT on mice. The combination of PDT with other approaches as well as its effect on cancer photomedicine are also reviewed.

  3. Experimentally induced anxiety attenuates alcohol-related aggression in men.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua P; Giancola, Peter R

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that state anxiety operates as moderator of the alcohol-aggression relation. Participants were 80 healthy male social drinkers between 21 and 33 years of age. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: (a) alcohol + anxiety induction (n = 20), (b) placebo + anxiety induction (n = 20), (c) alcohol + no anxiety induction (n = 20), and (d) placebo + no anxiety induction (n = 20). Anxiety was induced by informing participants that they had to deliver a speech about what they liked and disliked about their body in front of a video camera. A modified version of the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (S. Taylor, 1967) was then used to measure aggressive behavior in a situation where electric shocks were administered to, and received from, a fictitious opponent under the guise of a competitive reaction time task. Results indicated that the anxiety induction was successful in suppressing aggression for participants who received alcohol equal to levels seen in placebo controls. Findings are discussed within the context of a number of theories of alcohol's anxiolytic effects in relation to intoxicated aggression.

  4. Postmortem biochemical markers of experimentally induced hypomagnesaemic tetany in sheep.

    PubMed

    McCoy, M A; Bingham, V; Hudson, A J; Cantley, L; Hutchinson, T; Davison, G; Fitzpatrick, D A; Kennedy, D G

    2001-02-24

    Hypomagnesaemic tetany was induced in non-lactating and lactating ewes by feeding them semi-synthetic low magnesium diets containing additional potassium chloride and citric acid. Aqueous and vitreous humour were sampled from one eye at the time of death (fresh) and from the second eye after the head had been stored at ambient temperature for 24 hours (24-hour). There were significant relationships between the concentrations of magnesium in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma and its concentrations in fresh aqueous humour and fresh vitreous humour. Magnesium concentrations of < 0.33 mmol/litre in fresh aqueous humour and < 0.50 mmol/litre in 24-hour aqueous humour were associated with severe hypomagnesaemia and tetany. However, the concentration of magnesium in aqueous humour is relatively unstable and, unless the time of death was known accurately, its interpretation would be difficult. Magnesium concentrations of < 0.60 mmol/litre in fresh vitreous humour and < 0.65 mmol/litre in 24-hour vitreous humour were associated with severe hypomagnesaemia and tetany in adult sheep. The concentration of magnesium in vitreous humour was relatively stable for up to 48 hours postmortem.

  5. Pediatric Norovirus Diarrhea in Nicaragua▿

    PubMed Central

    Bucardo, Filemon; Nordgren, Johan; Carlsson, Beatrice; Paniagua, Margarita; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Espinoza, Felix; Svensson, Lennart

    2008-01-01

    Information about norovirus (NoV) infections in Central America is limited. Through a passive community and hospital pediatric diarrhea surveillance program, a total of 542 stool samples were collected between March 2005 and February 2006 in León, Nicaragua. NoV was detected in 12% (65/542) of the children; of these, 11% (45/409) were in the community and 15% (20/133) were in the hospital, with most strains (88%) belonging to genogroup II. NoV infections were age and gender associated, with children of <2 years of age (P < 0.05) and girls (P < 0.05) being most affected. Breast-feeding did not reduce the number of NoV infections. An important proportion (57%) of NoV-infected children were coinfected with diarrheagenic Escherichia coli. A significant proportion (18/31) of NoV-positive children with dehydration required intravenous rehydration. Nucleotide sequence analysis (38/65) of the N-terminal and shell region in the capsid gene revealed that at least six genotypes (GI.4, GII.2, GII.4, GII.7, GII.17, and a potentially novel cluster termed “GII.18-Nica”) circulated during the study period, with GII.4 virus being predominant (26/38). The majority (20/26) of those GII.4 strains shared high nucleotide homology (99%) with the globally emerging Hunter strain. The mean viral load was approximately 15-fold higher in children infected with GII.4 virus than in those infected with other G.II viruses, with the highest viral load observed for the group of children infected with GII.4 and requiring intravenous rehydration. This study, the first of its type from a Central American country, suggests that NoV is an important etiological agent of acute diarrhea among children of <2 years of age in Nicaragua. PMID:18562593

  6. Attenuation by daptomycin of gentamicin-induced experimental nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, N; Grenier, L; Simard, M; Bergeron, M G; Beauchamp, D

    1994-01-01

    Previously, daptomycin was shown to reduce tobramycin nephrotoxicity in vivo (D. Beauchamp, M. Pellerin, P. Gourde, M. Pettigrew, and M. G. Bergeron, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 34:139-147, 1990; C. A. Wood, H. C. Finkbeiner, S. J. Kohlhepp, P. W. Kohnen, and D. C. Gilbert, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 33:1280-1285, 1989). Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with saline (NaCl, 0.9%), daptomycin (10 mg/kg of body weight every 12 h, subcutaneously), gentamicin (30 mg/kg/12 h, intraperitoneally) or with a combination of daptomycin plus gentamicin over a 10-day period. Animals were killed 4, 10, and 20 days after the end of treatment. Four days after the end of drug administration, gentamicin and daptomycin levels in the renal cortices of animals treated with the combination of daptomycin and gentamicin were significantly higher than in those of rats given gentamicin or daptomycin alone (P < 0.01). Despite the higher cortical concentrations of gentamicin, rats given the combination of gentamicin and daptomycin had less reduction in renal cortex sphingomyelinase activity, less evidence of regeneration of cellular cortical cells ([3H]thymidine incorporation into cortex DNA), lower creatinine concentration in serum, and less histopathologic evidence of injury than rats given gentamicin alone. By immunogold technique, both daptomycin and gentamicin were localized to the lysosomes of proximal tubular cells, regardless of whether animals received the drugs alone or in combination. Interestingly, myeloid body formation occurred in both those animals given gentamicin alone and those given daptomycin plus gentamicin. No significant changes were observed for all groups between 10 and 20 days after the end of therapy, suggesting that the toxicity of gentamicin was not delayed by the concomitant injection of daptomycin. The results confirm that daptomycin can attenuate experimental gentamicin nephrotoxicity. Images PMID:8067733

  7. Skin colour changes during experimentally-induced sickness.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Audrey J; Lasselin, Julie; Lekander, Mats; Olsson, Mats J; Powis, Simon J; Axelsson, John; Perrett, David I

    2017-02-01

    Skin colour may be an important cue to detect sickness in humans but how skin colour changes with acute sickness is currently unknown. To determine possible colour changes, 22 healthy Caucasian participants were injected twice, once with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, at a dose of 2ng/kg body weight) and once with placebo (saline), in a randomised cross-over design study. Skin colour across 3 arm and 3 face locations was recorded spectrophotometrically over a period of 8h in terms of lightness (L(∗)), redness (a(∗)) and yellowness (b(∗)) in a manner that is consistent with human colour perception. In addition, carotenoid status was assessed as we predicted that a decrease it skin yellowness would reflect a drop in skin carotenoids. We found an early change in skin colouration 1-3h post LPS injection with facial skin becoming lighter and less red whilst arm skin become darker but also less red and less yellow. The LPS injection also caused a drop in plasma carotenoids from 3h onwards. However, the timing of the carotenoid changes was not consistent with the skin colour changes suggesting that other mechanisms, such as a reduction of blood perfusion, oxygenation or composition. This is the first experimental study characterising skin colour associated with acute illness, and shows that changes occur early in the development of the sickness response. Colour changes may serve as a cue to health, prompting actions from others in terms of care-giving or disease avoidance. Specific mechanisms underlying these colour changes require further investigation.

  8. Experimental particle acceleration by water evaporation induced by shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Alatorre Ibarguengoitia, M.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.; Cimarelli, C.

    2010-12-01

    Shock waves are commonly generated during volcanic eruptions. They induce sudden changes in pressure and temperature causing phase changes. Nevertheless, their effects on flowfield properties are not well understood. Here we investigate the role of gas expansion generated by shock wave propagation in the acceleration of ash particles. We used a shock tube facility consisting of a high-pressure (HP) steel autoclave (450 mm long, 28 mm in internal diameter), pressurized with Ar gas, and a low-pressure tank at atmospheric conditions (LP). A copper diaphragm separated the HP autoclave from a 180 mm tube (PVC or acrylic glass) at ambient P, with the same internal diameter of the HP reservoir. Around the tube, a 30 cm-high acrylic glass cylinder, with the same section of the LP tank (40 cm), allowed the observation of the processes occurring downstream from the nozzle throat, and was large enough to act as an unconfined volume in which the initial diffracting shock and gas jet expand. All experiments were performed at Pres/Pamb ratios of 150:1. Two ambient conditions were used: dry air and air saturated with steam. Carbon fibers and glass spheres in a size range between 150 and 210 μm, were placed on a metal wire at the exit of the PVC tube. The sudden decompression of the Ar gas, due to the failure of the diaphragm, generated an initial air shock wave. A high-speed camera recorded the processes between the first 100 μsec and several ms after the diaphragm failure at frame rates ranging between 30,000 and 50,000 fps. In the experiments with ambient air saturated with steam, the high-speed camera allowed to visualize the condensation front associated with the initial air shock; a maximum velocity of 788 m/s was recorded, which decreases to 524 m/s at distance of 0.5 ±0.2 cm, 1.1 ms after the diaphragm rupture. The condensation front preceded the Ar jet front exhausting from the reservoir, by 0.2-0.5 ms. In all experiments particles velocities following the initial

  9. Predictions of Experimentally Observed Stochastic Ground Vibrations Induced by Blasting

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry “Suva Vrela” near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions. PMID:24358140

  10. Experimental investigation of the flow induced by artificial cilia.

    PubMed

    Hussong, J; Schorr, N; Belardi, J; Prucker, O; Rühe, J; Westerweel, J

    2011-06-21

    The fluid transport produced by rectangular shaped, magnetically actuated artificial cilia of 70 μm length and 20 μm width was determined by means of phase-locked Micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) measurements in a closed microfluidic chamber. The phase-averaged flow produced by the artificial cilia reached up to 130 μm s(-1) with an actuation cycle frequency of 10 Hz. Analysis of the measured flow data indicate that the present system is capable of achieving volume flow rates of V[combining dot above](cilia) = 14 ± 4 μl min(-1) in a micro channel of 0.5 × 5 mm(2) cross-sectional area when no back pressure is built up. This corresponds to an effective pressure gradient of 6 ± 1 Pa m(-1), which equals a pressure difference of 0.6 ± 0.1 mPa over a distance of 100 μm between two rows of cilia. These results were derived analytically from the measured velocity profile by treating the cilia as a thin boundary layer. While the cilia produce phase-averaged velocities of the order of O(10(2)μm s(-1)), time-resolved measurements showed that the flow field reverses two times during one actuation cycle inducing instantaneous velocities of up to approximately 2 mm s(-1). This shows that the flow field is dominated by fluid oscillations and flow rates are expected to increase if the beating motion of the cilia is further improved.

  11. The potential role of amlodipine on experimentally induced bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Korkmaz, Mukadder; Yayla, Muhammed; Polat, Elif; Uslu, Hakan; Halici, Zekai; Parlak, Secil N

    2016-09-28

    For the treatment of rhinosinusitis antibiotics are used frequently. Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse effects of antibiotics and growing resistance. The lack of discovery of new antibiotic compounds has increased the necessity for exploration of non-antibiotic compounds that have antibacterial activity. Amlodipine is a non-antibiotic compound with anti-inflammatory activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the potential role of amlodipine in treatment of rhinosinusitis by evaluating its effects on tissue oxidative status, mucosal histology and inflammation. Fifteen adult albino guinea pigs were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with saline, cefazolin sodium, or amlodipine for 7 days. The control group was five healthy guinea pigs. Animals were sacrificed after the treatment. Histopathological changes were identified using Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. Inflammation was assessed by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte (PMNL) infiltration density. Tissue levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione) and an oxidative product (malondialdehyde) were determined. In rhinosinusitis induced animals, amlodipine reduced loss of cilia, lamina propria edema and collagen deposition compared to placebo (saline) and although not superior to cefazolin, amlodipine decreased PMNL infiltration. The superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were reduced, whereas the malondialdehyde levels were increased significantly in all three-treatment groups compared to the control group. Amlodipine treated group showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels and decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to all treatment groups. The non-antibiotic compound amlodipine may have a role in acute rhinosinusitis treatment through tissue protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All

  12. Generation of hydroxyl radicals during ascites experimentally induced in broilers.

    PubMed

    Arab, H A; Jamshidi, R; Rassouli, A; Shams, G; Hassanzadeh, M H

    2006-04-01

    Increased metabolic rates, pulmonary hypertension and cardiac dysfunction are the most important features of the ascites syndrome in broiler chickens. However, the mechanism of cell injury causing the pathogenesis of the syndrome is not clearly understood. Our study aimed to examine the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH*) in broiler chickens experiencing ascites. The hundred and fifty 1-d-old chickens were purchased from a local hatchery and reared in an open poultry house for 46 d. They were divided at random into three groups and ascites was induced in two groups by exposing them to low temperature or administration of triiodothyronine (T(3)). The third group served as control and was reared normally. Haematological, biochemical and pathological tests were used to determine the incidence of ascites: including total red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), release of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) and ratio of right ventricular weight to total ventricular weight (RV/TV). A salicylate hydroxylation method was used to examine the generation of hydroxyl radicals (OH*) in treated groups. TWo hydroxylated salicylic acid metabolites, 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (2,3- and 2,5-DHBA), were measured by HPLC to detect the generation of OH*. An ascites syndrome was observed in T(3) and low-temperature treated groups, as shown by necropsy changes and increases in f RBC, PCV, ALT, AST and the ratio of RV/TV. Concentrations of 2,3- and 2,5-DHBA were increased in groups experiencing ascites compared to control group. It is suggested that reactive oxygen species that is OH* ions, may be involved in the pathogenesis of the ascites syndrome in broiler chickens.

  13. Experimentally induced thiamine deficiency in beagle dogs: clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Read, D H; Harrington, D D

    1981-06-01

    Twenty-three 2- to 5-month-old Beagle dogs were fed a purified thiamine-deficient ration (2 to 3 micrograms of thiamine/100 g of ration) at a rate of 40 to 70 g/kg of body weight/day depending on age. Eleven dogs were used as principles, 6 as pair-fed controls, and 6 as ad libitum-fed controls. Controls were treated once a week with an IM dose of 300 micrograms of thiamine hydrochloride/kg of body weight. Three stages of clinical disease occurred in the principals: (i) an initial short (18.0 +/- 7.9 days) stage of induction, during which the dogs usually grew suboptimally, but were otherwise healthy, (ii) an intermediate stage of preliminary clinical signs of deficiency, characterized by a variable period (58.5 +/- 37.0 days) of progressive inappetance, failure to grow, loss of body weight, and coprophagia, and (iii) a terminal stage, which, in most dogs, was abrupt in onset and short (7.6 +/- 6.0 days) and consisted of either a neurologic syndrome or sudden unexpected death syndrome. Eight of the principals developed the neurologic syndrome characterized by anorexia, emesis, CNS depression, paraparesis, sensory ataxia, torticollis, circling, exophthalmos, tonic-clonic convulsions, profound muscular weakness, recumbency, and then died. Common reflex abnormalities included exaggerated patella reflex, proprioceptive and supporting reflex deficits, induced torticollis and ventroflexion of head, and absent eye menace (blink) reflex. Three other principals developed the sudden unexpected death syndrome. Common signs of deficiency were inappetance and paresis. Two were found dead and 1, with severe ECG abnormalities (including elevation of ST segment and tall or deeply inverted T waves), was killed.

  14. Plant-induced weathering of a basaltic rock: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsinger, Philippe; Fernandes Barros, Omar Neto; Benedetti, Marc F.; Noack, Yves; Callot, Gabriel

    2001-01-01

    The active role of higher plants in the weathering of silicate minerals and rocks is still a question for debate. The present work aimed at providing experimental evidence of the important role of a range of crop plants in such processes. In order to quantitatively assess the possible effect of these diverse plant species on the weathering of a basaltic rock, two laboratory experiments were carried out at room temperature. These compared the amounts of elements released from basalt when leached with a dilute salt solution in the presence or absence of crop plants grown for up to 36 days. For Si, Ca, Mg, and Na, plants resulted in an increase in the release rate by a factor ranging from 1 to 5 in most cases. Ca and Na seemed to be preferentially released relative to other elements, suggesting that plagioclase dissolved faster than the other constituents of the studied basalt. Negligible amounts of Fe were released in the absence of plants as a consequence of the neutral pH and atmospheric pO 2 that were maintained in the leaching solution. However, the amounts of Fe released from basalt in the presence of plants were up to 100- to 500-fold larger than in the absence of plants, for banana and maize. The kinetics of dissolution of basalt in the absence of plants showed a constantly decreasing release rate over the whole duration of the experiment (36 days). No steady state value was reached both in the absence and presence of banana plants. However, in the latter case, the rates remained at a high initial level over a longer period of time (up to 15 days) before starting to decrease. For Fe, the maximum rate of release was reached beyond 4 days and this rate remained high up to 22 days of growth of banana. The possible mechanisms responsible for this enhanced release of elements from basalt in the presence of plants are discussed. Although these mechanisms need to be elucidated, the present results clearly show that higher plants can considerably affect the kinetics

  15. Experimental demonstration of population inversion driven by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Alvaro Peralta; Yatsenko, Leonid P.; Klein, Jens; Oberst, Martin; Halfmann, Thomas

    2005-11-15

    We present experimental data to demonstrate coherently driven population inversion by retroreflection-induced bichromatic adiabatic passage in metastable helium atoms. Complete and robust population transfer from an initial to a target state is induced by coherent interaction of the atoms in a supersonic beam with two counterpropagating and temporally delayed laser pulses of different intensities. The radiation fields intersect the atomic beam slightly tilted away from normal incidence, thereby inducing Doppler shifts of the atomic resonance between the initial and the target state. Thus the laser pulses produce a bichromatic field in the rest frame of each atom, which induces complete coherent population transfer by an adiabatic passage process.

  16. Toxigenic Escherichia Coli and Childhood Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Mundell, Dave H.; Anselmo, Carl R.; Thrupp, Lauri D.; Wishnow, Rodney M.

    1976-01-01

    Stool specimens were examined from 40 children with diarrhea who were under three years of age to determine the incidence of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in endemic diarrhea. Heat-labile E. coli enterotoxin was assayed in the very sensitive and reproducible cultured adrenal tumor cell system. Toxigenic E. coli were isolated from only one stool specimen and in this case infection with Shigella dysenteriae was also present. None of the eight classic enteropathogenic E. coli isolates were positive in the adrenal assay. This study suggests that heat-labile enterotoxin-producing E. coli are not an important cause of endemic childhood diarrhea in Southern California. PMID:775792

  17. Probiotics and Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea and Clostridium difficile Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surawicz, Christina M.

    Diarrhea is a common side effect of antibiotics. Antibiotics can cause diarrhea in 5-25% of individuals who take them but its occurrence is unpredictable. Diarrhea due to antibiotics is called antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). Diarrhea may be mild and resolve when antibiotics are discontinued, or it may be more severe. The most severe form of AAD is caused by overgrowth of Clostridium difficile which can cause severe diarrhea, colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, or even fatal toxic megacolon. Rates of diarrhea vary with the specific antibiotic as well as with the individual susceptibility.

  18. Rotavirus Infection Increases Intestinal Motility but Not Permeability at the Onset of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Claudia; Hagbom, Marie; Vikström, Elena; Magnusson, Karl-Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disease mechanisms associated with onset and secondary effects of rotavirus (RV) diarrhea remain to be determined and may not be identical. In this study, we investigated whether onset of RV diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal permeability and/or motility. To study the transit time, fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was given to RV-infected adult and infant mice. Intestinal motility was also studied with an opioid receptor agonist (loperamide) and a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine). To investigate whether RV increases permeability at the onset of diarrhea, fluorescent 4- and 10-kDa dextran doses were given to infected and noninfected mice, and fluorescence intensity was measured subsequently in serum. RV increased transit time in infant mice. Increased motility was detected at 24 h postinfection (h p.i.) and persisted up to 72 h p.i in pups. Both loperamide and atropine decreased intestinal motility and attenuated diarrhea. Analysis of passage of fluorescent dextran from the intestine into serum indicated unaffected intestinal permeability at the onset of diarrhea (24 to 48 h p.i.). We show that RV-induced diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal motility via an activation of the myenteric nerve plexus, which in turn stimulates muscarinic receptors on intestinal smooth muscles. IMPORTANCE We show that RV-infected mice have increased intestinal motility at the onset of diarrhea, and that this is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. These new observations will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in RV diarrhea. PMID:24371070

  19. Parasitic diarrhea in normal and malnourished children.

    PubMed

    Gendrel, D; Treluyer, J M; Richard-Lenoble, D

    2003-04-01

    Diarrhea is only one of the many manifestations of intestinal parasites. Environmental influences are inescapable, regardless of an individual's state of health: in a highly endemic region, intestinal parasitic colonization is almost the rule. The clinical expression of the parasitoses, however, is largely determined by host defenses; and when they are weakened, parasitic diarrhea is frequent and severe. Protein-energy malnutrition is by far the most important cause of immune deficiency in developing countries. Diarrhea caused by Strongyloides or Giardia is common and severe in malnourished children, while well-nourished children remain healthy carriers. These parasites require specific treatment in the malnourished; and the well-nourished should have preventive treatment when they are to receive corticosteroids or immunosuppressive agents. Diarrhea caused by Cryptosporidium spp. may be severe in malnourished or immunodeficient children, and recovery is achieved only after renutrition or treatment of the immunodeficiency.

  20. [Medication in infectious acute diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Cézard, J-P; Bellaiche, M; Viala, J; Hugot, J-P

    2007-10-01

    Acute infectious diarrhea in children remain still a frequent cause of morbidity. 50 % of them are due to rotavirus. Oral rehydration therapy and early realimentation have drastically reduced their mortality and morbidity. Beside oral or eventually IV rehydration therapy no medication has proven its efficacy based on the main HMO criteria (reduction of over 30 % of the stool output) except racecadotril and loperamide which is contre-indicated for the last one in children less than 2 years old. Other medications such as silicates or some probiotics have shown efficacy on diarrhea duration or stool consistency but not on stool output. They have so no formal indication in infectious diarrhea and should be considered as "comfort" treatment. Antibiotics, beside their indication in shigella, cholera and amibiasis could be used in invasive diarrhea in some debilating conditions or infants less than 3 months.

  1. Experimental gastric ulcers induced by immobilization and electric shock of rats and their pharmacotherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabrodin, O. N.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of development of experimental gastric ulcers, induced in rats by combined immobilization and electric shock, was analyzed pharmacologically with peripheral neurotropic agents. It is concluded that: (1) The most marked preventive effect in the development of the experimentally induced gastric ulcers was displayed by agents capable of blocking the ascending activation system of the reticular formation. (2) Sympathetic fibers, which disrupt the trophism of the gastric wall, form the efferent portion of the reflex arc. (3) Gastric secretion does not appear to be the primary cause of ulceration.

  2. Management of children with prolonged diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Antonietta; Guarino, Alfredo; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged diarrhea is usually defined as acute-onset diarrhea lasting 7 days or more, but less than 14 days. Its trend has been declining in recent years because of improvement in the management of acute diarrhea, which represents the ideal strategy to prevent prolonged diarrhea. The pathogenesis of prolonged diarrhea is multifactorial and essentially based on persistent mucosal damage due to specific infections or sequential infections with different pathogens, host-related factors including micronutrient and/or vitamin deficiency, undernutrition and immunodeficiency, high mucosal permeability due to previous infectious processes and nutrient deficiency with consequential malabsorption, and microbiota disruption. Infections seem to play a major role in causing prolonged diarrhea in both developing and developed areas. However, single etiologic pathogens have not been identified, and the pattern of agents varies according to settings, host risk factors, and previous use of antibiotics and other drugs. The management of prolonged diarrhea is complex. Because of the wide etiologic spectrum, diagnostic algorithms should take into consideration the age of the patient, clinical and epidemiological factors, and the nutritional status and should always include a search for enteric pathogens. Often, expensive laboratory evaluations are of little benefit in guiding therapy, and an empirical approach may be effective in the majority of cases. The presence or absence of weight loss is crucial for driving the initial management of prolonged diarrhea. If there is no weight loss, generally there is no need for further evaluation. If weight loss is present, empiric anti-infectious therapy or elimination diet may be considered once specific etiologies have been excluded. PMID:26962439

  3. Colloid-induced kidney injury: experimental evidence may help to understand mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schortgen, Frédérique; Brochard, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is widely used, and many patients are therefore exposed to plasma volume expanders. Among these, colloids, particularly hydroxyethyl starches, have been shown in recent experiments and clinical studies to induce acute kidney injury. The mechanisms of colloid-induced acute kidney injury remain incompletely elucidated. The risks associated with colloid osmotic pressure elevation in vivo and the high incidence of osmotic nephrosis lesions in experimental models and clinical studies indicate that hydroxyethyl starches can no longer be considered safe. PMID:19435473

  4. The use of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea with special interest in Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Cynthia L; Bartolini, Vickie; Jones, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobials are effective agents used to combat virulent bacterial, yeast, and fungal infections that may otherwise cause rampant disease leading to skyrocketing social/economic costs and possible epidemic morbidity and mortality rates. Antibiotics are designed to attack specific bacterial pathogens but, in the process, indiscreetly reduce the number of beneficial human microbiota that is part of the gut-associated lymphatic tissue. Broad-spectrum antibiotics can upset this uniquely balanced gut ratio, allowing pathogens to propagate in a largely unrestrained environment, which may result in antibiotic-induced diarrhea. Critical illness, age, immunosuppression, exposure to nosocomial microorganisms, and the length of hospitalization are additional factors that contribute to the overgrowth of opportunistic pathogens. In mild to moderate cases of diarrhea, absorptive impairment may occur, thereby reducing micro/macronutrient assimilation, resulting in malnutrition and growth issues in children. In severe cases, infectious diarrhea can have devastating complications. Of particular interest is the bacterium Clostridium difficile, which has the potential to cause a host of symptoms ranging from mild diarrhea to severe life-threatening conditions. C. difficile infection can increase mortality rates by 10%-30%. Probiotic supplementation may prevent and treat antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Specific probiotics may modulate the intestinal mucosa by antagonizing pathogens through the production of antimicrobial compounds and chemicals, thereby reducing the rate of nosocomial infection and recurrence of C. difficile.

  5. Cholestyramine improves tropical-related diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Balagani, Rajesh; Wills, Brandon; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2006-01-01

    Patients exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria develop an illness characterized by secretory diarrhea, conjunctival irritation, skin lesions, and varying degrees of neurologic manifestations. The anion-exchange resin, cholestyramine has been reported in one small case series to be an effective treatment of severe diarrhea associated with Pfiesteria intoxication. A 54-year-old man traveled to the Dominican Republic where he went swimming in what he describes as "dirty ocean water". Within an hour, he noted a generalized burning and itching of his skin. Later on, he noted pruritic vesicular skin lesions, intense frontal headache, and conjunctivitis. A few days later, he complained of abdominal cramping, nausea, and hourly episodes of watery, non-bloody diarrhea. Due to the constellation of symptoms, Pfiesteria intoxication was suspected. On arrival in the United States, he sought medical care for continued symptoms. Physical examination was remarkable for conjunctival injection, linear vesicular lesions (5 cm in length) over his right ankle and left orbit as well as erythema over foreskin of his penis. Mental status and memory were normal. Laboratory studies revealed an elevated serum creatinine, which eventually normalized, and stool studies were negative for leukocytes, blood, and enteric pathogens. Intense diarrhea persisted until he was started on cholestyramine (4 g PO tid). The diarrhea resolved within 2 hours of starting treatment. The headache was initially treated with narcotic agents but only resolved with IV diphenhydramine (25 mg q 4 h). Cholestyramine and diphenhydramine appear to be effective therapeutic agents for tropical-related diarrhea and headache, respectively.

  6. Histometric assessment of the effect of diabetes mellitus on experimentally induced periodontitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Pepelassi, Eudoxie; Xynogala, Ioanna; Perrea, Despina; Agrogiannis, George; Pantopoulou, Alkistis; Patsouris, Efstratios; Vrotsos, Ioannis

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this interventional animal study was to assess histologically the effect of experimental diabetes in rats with experimental periodontitis in terms of alveolar bone loss and the effect of experimental periodontitis on glucose levels in diabetes. Forty-seven Wistar rats were studied: 12 healthy controls (C), 10 with experimental diabetes (D), 12 with experimental diabetes and experimental periodontitis (DP) and 13 with experimental periodontitis (P). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin injection and periodontitis was induced at the right second maxillary molar by ligation. Serum glucose levels were measured at specific time points. Sixty-one days after ligation, the rats were sacrificed. Histometric analysis assessed alveolar crest level. For ligated groups, alveolar bone loss was expressed as the difference in alveolar crest level between right and left maxillary molars. Diabetes alone did not statistically significantly affect alveolar crest level. The combination of diabetes and periodontitis caused greater alveolar bone loss (946.1 +/- 719.9 microm) than periodontitis alone (639.7 +/- 294.2 microm); however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. Periodontitis did not significantly increase glucose levels in diabetic rats. The average glucose levels were 545.4 (499 - 563) and 504.5 (445 - 560) mg/dL for diabetic and diabetic ligated rats, respectively. Within its limits, this study demonstrated that the severity of alveolar bone loss in periodontitis was not significantly aggravated by diabetes and the serum glucose levels in diabetes were not affected by periodontitis.

  7. Experimental coronary sclerosis induced by immobilization of rabbits: A new model of arteriosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyavokin, V. V.; Tjawokin, W. W.

    1980-01-01

    A new method for producing arteriosclerosis with coronary insufficiency in rabbits by means of immobilization is described and discussed. The experimentally induced atherosclerosis develops due to hypodynamics imposed by the reduced muscular activity without overloading with exogenous cholesterol. The atherosclerosis and coronary insufficiency are associated. With variations in the duration and extent of immobilization, coronary insufficiency alone or with atherosclerosis can be produced.

  8. Experimental investigation of chirp properties induced by signal amplification in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Motoharu; Ohta, Hiroaki; Seki, Ryota

    2015-03-15

    We experimentally show the dynamic frequency chirp properties induced by signal amplification in a quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA) for the first time. We also compare the red and blue chirp peak values and temporal chirp changes while changing the gain and injected signal powers of the QD-SOA with those of a common SOA.

  9. Hepatoprotective activity of chitosan against isoniazid and rifampicin-induced toxicity in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sethumadhavan; Sini, Theruvathil K; Anandan, Rangasamy; Mathew, Paruthapara T

    2007-10-15

    Tuberculosis is a dangerous disease and its death toll is increasing year by year. Intake of isoniazid and rifampicin, the most common antitubercular drugs, lead to fatal hepatotoxic condition. We have studied the protective effect of chitosan supplementation against the hepatotoxicity induced by antitubercular drugs with respect to the changes in the levels of protein, albumin-globulin ratio, urea and bilirubin in the serum and diagnostic marker enzymes (alanine amino transferase, aspartate amino transferase, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase), protein, glycoprotein conjugates (hexose, hexosamine and sialic acid), lipid peroxidation and reduced glutathione in the liver tissue of normal and experimental groups of rats. Co-administration of chitosan was found to significantly prevent the antitubercular drugs-induced alterations in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes, bilirubin and albumin/globulin ratio in experimental groups of rats. Isoniazid and rifampicin-induced lipid peroxidation was also found to be prevented by the administration of chitosan. Further, chitosan administration increased the levels of urea and protein (in serum and liver) in experimental groups compared to hepatotoxicity-induced group of rats. Levels of glycoconjugates were also maintained to near normal level by chitosan co-administration. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that chitosan is beneficial against antitubercualr drugs-induced hepatoxicity.

  10. Controlling Rotavirus-associated diarrhea: Could single-domain antibody fragments make the difference?

    PubMed

    Maffey, Lucia; Vega, Celina G; Parreño, Viviana; Garaicoechea, Lorena

    2015-01-01

    Group A Rotavirus (RVA) remains a leading cause of severe diarrhea and child mortality. The variable domain of camelid heavy chain antibodies (VHH) display potent antigen-binding capacity, have low production costs and are suitable for oral therapies. Two sets of anti-RVA VHHs have been developed: ARP1-ARP3; 2KD1-3B2. Here, we explore the potential of both sets as a prevention strategy complementary to vaccination and a treatment option against RVA-associated diarrhea in endangered populations. Both sets have been expressed in multiple production systems, showing extensive neutralizing capacity against strains of RVA in vitro. They were also tested in the neonatal mouse model with various degrees of success in preventing or treating RVA-induced diarrhea. Interestingly, mitigation of the symptoms was also achieved with freeze-dried ARP1, so that it could be applied in areas where cold chains are difficult to maintain. 3B2 was tested in a pre-clinical trial involving gnotobiotic piglets where it conferred complete protection against RVA-induced diarrhea. ARP1 was used in the first clinical trial for anti-RVA VHHs, successfully reducing stool output in infants with RVA diarrhea, with no detected side effects.

  11. Experimental investigations of radial loads induced by partial cavitation with the LH2 Vulcain inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goirand, B.; Mertz, A. L.; Joussellin, F.; Rebattet, C.

    Radial forces generated by partial cavitation were investigated both in water and liquid hydrogen (LH2) with the four bladed inducer of the Vulcain liquid hydrogen turbopump. A specific shaft mounted six component balance was developed for inducer water tests, in which force measurements were completed by unsteady pressure measurements and high speed flow visualizations. From water results, a good qualitative agreement with previous experiences was obtained but the influence of blade number was demonstrated. Characteristic frequencies of unsteady cavitation phenomena were identified at different operating points. The force measurements in hydrogen gave promising results about thermodynamics delay, in the scope of establishing transposition rules.

  12. Maternal knowledge, attitudes and practice in diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, P; Rajput, V J

    1993-01-01

    In developing countries where diarrhea is a major health problem, mothers are often ignorant about the cause and management of the disease and tend to restrict fluid intake instead of taking steps to prevent dehydration. 300 mothers of children hospitalized in Rewa, India, were interviewed with a pretested questionnaire on their diarrhea knowledge. 74.3% were rural and 80.6% were aged 20-30 years. 70% were illiterate and belonged to the upper lower or lower middle class. Causes of diarrhea cited by the mothers included teething (64.3%), evil eye (46%), contact with another case (36.6%), malnutrition (28.3), worm infestation (22.6%), eating mud (18.6%), mother's food habits (17.6%), eating sweets (17.3%), dirty water (15.3%), hot/cold foods (10.6%), change of food (8.3), and dirty environment (6%). During diarrhea, 266 mothers allowed breast milk, 118 pulses and rice gruel, 104 diluted cow's milk, 57 undiluted cow's milk, 25 boiled pulses water, 23 boiled rice water, 16 banana, 13 oral rehydration solution, 10 a whole diet, 8 tea, and 7 curd. Half of the mothers considered passage of liquid stools 3-5 times a day as diarrhea. Only 3% of the mothers listed dehydration as an important complication of the disease. Of the mothers using oral rehydration therapy, the fluid was often not reconstituted properly, and inadequate amounts were administered. Improved health education for mothers, with information on general hygiene, adequate diet during illness, and the use of oral rehydration solution in diarrhea would reduce diarrhea deaths.

  13. Probiotics for Infectious Diarrhea and Traveler's Diarrhea - What Do We Really Know?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibberd, Patricia L.

    Worldwide, diarrhea is the sixth leading cause of premature death (Lopez et al., 2006), accounting for more than two million deaths each year. The majority of the burden is borne in lower and middle income countries, and in children under age 5 (Kosek et al., 2003). Even in the United States where there is easy access to “safe” food and water, there are an estimated 211-375 million episodes of acute diarrhea each year, resulting in 900,000 hospitalizations and 6,000 deaths (Herikstad et al., 2002; Mead et al., 1999). While mortality from diarrhea has decreased over the last 30 years, the incidence and morbidity associated with diarrhea has not improved (Kosek et al., 2003). During the same time period an ever increasing number of enteric pathogens as well as non-infectious conditions have been recognized as causes of acute diarrhea (Guerrant et al., 2001).

  14. [Probiotics for the treating acute diarrhea and preventing antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Carlos

    2015-02-07

    Probiotics are helpful in the treatment of acute diarrhea. Several systematic reviews show that the use of probiotics shortens the duration of diarrhea in one day and reduces by 59% the risk of diarrhea lasting longer than 4 days. Hospital stay is 24 hours shorter in children treated with probiotics. The benefitial effect of probiotics is species-specific; Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Saccharomyces boulardii are the two species with proven efficacy in the treatment of acute diarrhea. The use of probiotics reduces by 50% the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. No significant side effects were found in the clinical trials but rare cases of invasive infections have been reported in immunosuppressed children or those with indwelling central venous catheters.

  15. Exploring geographic distributions of high-risk water, sanitation, and hygiene practices and their association with child diarrhea in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Mitsuaki; Roess, Amira; Huang, Cheng; Graham, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Background High-risk water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) practices are still prevalent in most low-income countries. Because of limited access to WASH, children may be put at an increased risk of diarrheal diseases. Objectives This study aims to 1) develop a new measure of WASH-induced burden, the WASH Resource Index (WRI), and estimate its correlation with child diarrhea and an additive index of high-risk WASH practices; 2) explore the geographic distribution of high-risk WASH practices, child diarrhea, and summary indices at the cluster level; and 3) examine the association between the WRI and child diarrhea at the individual level. Design A sample of 7,019 children from the Uganda Demographic and Health Survey 2011 were included in this study. Principal component analysis was used to develop a WRI, and households were classified as WASH poorest, poorer, middle, richer, and richest. A hot spot analysis was conducted to assess whether and how high-risk WASH practices and child diarrhea were geographically clustered. A potential association between the WRI and child diarrhea was examined through a nested regression analysis. Results High-risk WASH practices were clustered at geographically distant regions from Kampala. The 2-week prevalence of child diarrhea, however, was concentrated in Eastern and East Central regions where high-risk WASH practices were not prevalent. At the individual level, none of the high-risk WASH practices were significantly associated with child diarrhea. Being in the highest WASH quintile was, however, significantly associated with 24.9% lower prevalence of child diarrhea compared to being in the lowest quintile (p<0.05). Conclusions Only a weak association was found between the WRI and child diarrhea in this study. Future research should explore the potential utility of the WRI to examine WASH-induced burden. PMID:27790971

  16. Aggressive verbal behaviour as a function of experimentally induced anger in persons with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Niemeier, V; Fritz, J; Kupfer, J; Gieler, U

    1999-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial factors on the etiology and fluctuating disease activity of psoriasis has been discussed in recent years. The present experiment investigated whether psoriatics in an anger-inducing situation show less aggressive verbal behaviour than average person. Twenty-six psoriatics and 26 matched healthy controls were randomly assigned to either an anger-inducing or a non-anger-inducing social situation. The experimental conditions were arranged so that the persons were confronted with either negative, derogatory, or positive, favorable feedback on eight characteristics (intelligence, appearance, maturity, tolerance, honesty, friendliness, humor, and helpfulness). Standardized feedback was given by a confederate of the experimenter. Immediately after the feedback was received by the subjects the photo hand test (PHT) was applied. The PHT is an item-analyzed, validated projective test for aggression. Two independent raters categorized the subjects' responses into six mutually exclusive categories, including a category for responses with aggressive content. 2 x 2 analysis of variance (psoriatics vs controls; anger-induced vs non-anger induced) were calculated for the aggressive responses and the acting-out score (AOS). The results showed a significant interaction, suggesting that psoriatics did indeed exhibit fewer verbal aggression responses under anger-inducing circumstances than the controls.

  17. Syndromic (phenotypic) diarrhea in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Vinson, Christine; Roquelaure, Bertrand; Brousse, Nicole; Bodemer, Christine; Cézard, Jean-Pierre

    2008-02-28

    Syndromic diarrhea (SD), also known as phenotypic diarrhea (PD) or tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (THE), is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset of severe diarrhea requiring parenteral nutrition (PN). To date, no epidemiological data are available. The estimated prevalence is approximately 1/300,000-400,000 live births in Western Europe. Ethnic origin does not appear to be associated with SD. Infants are born small for gestational age and present with facial dysmorphism including prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism. Hairs are woolly, easily removed and poorly pigmented. Severe and persistent diarrhea starts within the first 6 months of life (

  18. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biotypes and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Deregt, D; Loewen, K G

    1995-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus continues to produce significant economic losses for the cattle industry and challenges investigators with the complexity of diseases it produces and the mechanisms by which it causes disease. This paper updates and attempts to clarify information regarding the roles of noncytopathic and cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses in persistent infections and mucosal disease. It also covers, in brief, what is known of the new diseases: thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic disease, and a disease resembling mucosal disease that is apparently caused solely by noncytopathic virus. Although a good understanding of the roles of the 2 biotypes in the production of persistent infections and the precipitation of mucosal disease has been obtained, there are still unanswered questions regarding the origin of cytopathic viruses and the mechanism by which they cause pathological changes in cells. It is apparent, however, that cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses arise by mutation of noncytopathic viruses, and it is known that p80 is the marker protein for cytopathic viruses. The previous distinction between mild bovine viral diarrhea and fatal mucosal disease has been eroded with the emergence of new virulent bovine viral diarrhea viruses. The new diseases pose a threat to the cattle industry and present a new challenge for investigators. Index Veterinarius (1984-1994) and Medline (1985-1994) databases and personal files updated since 1987 from BIOSIS Previews and Biosciences Information Services were used to search the literature. Images Figure 1. PMID:7648541

  19. Gene Therapy Induces Antigen-Specific Tolerance in Experimental Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jirholt, Pernilla; Turesson, Olof; Wing, Kajsa; Holmdahl, Rikard; Kihlberg, Jan; Stern, Anna; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill; Henningsson, Louise; Gustafsson, Kenth; Gjertsson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigate induction of immunological tolerance by lentiviral based gene therapy in a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, collagen II-induced arthritis (CIA). Targeting the expression of the collagen type II (CII) to antigen presenting cells (APCs) induced antigen-specific tolerance, where only 5% of the mice developed arthritis as compared with 95% of the control mice. In the CII-tolerized mice, the proportion of Tregs as well as mRNA expression of SOCS1 (suppressors of cytokine signaling 1) increased at day 3 after CII immunization. Transfer of B cells or non-B cell APC, as well as T cells, from tolerized to naïve mice all mediated a certain degree of tolerance. Thus, sustainable tolerance is established very early during the course of arthritis and is mediated by both B and non-B cells as APCs. This novel approach for inducing tolerance to disease specific antigens can be used for studying tolerance mechanisms, not only in CIA but also in other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27159398

  20. The Chemopreventive Peptide Lunasin Inhibits d-Galactose- Induced Experimental Cataract in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guangzhi; Zhang, Ping; Ye, Pei; Zhang, Miaoqing; Han, Ning; Shuai, Haoyue; Tan, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative damage to the constituents of the eye lens is a major mechanism in the initiation and development of cataract. Lunasin, a 43-amino acids chemoprevention peptide, has been proved to possess potent anti-oxidative activity other than its established anticancer activities. Herein, we explored whether lunasin has preventative effects on d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rat. After modeling, SD rats were administrated by instillation, 80 µM of lunasin eye drops to each eye thrice daily and consecutively for 30 days. As a result, lunasin treatment effectively inhibited the progression of d-galactose-induced experimental cataract, and protected the lenses of rats from oxidative damage and attenuated the lipid peroxidation through up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and inhibited the activation of polyol pathway by decreasing AR activity. Additionally, in vitro studies proved that lunasin treatment could protect human lens epithelial cells (hLECs) against d-galactose induced cell damage and apoptosis, and up-regulate antioxidant enzymes. This is the first demonstration that lunasin could inhibit d-galactose-induced experimental cataract in rats by protecting against oxidative damage and inhibiting the activation of polyol pathway.

  1. Peripheral site of action of levodropropizine in experimentally-induced cough: role of sensory neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Lavezzo, A; Melillo, G; Clavenna, G; Omini, C

    1992-06-01

    The mechanism of action of levodropropizine has been investigated in different models of experimentally-induced cough in guinea-pigs. In particular it has been demonstrated that the antitussive drug has a peripheral site of action by injecting the drug intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). In these experiments levodropropizine (40 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) did not prevent electrically-induced cough. On the other hand, codeine (5 micrograms/50 microliters i.c.v.) markedly prevented coughing. A difference in the potency ratio of levodropropizine and codeine has been demonstrated in capsaicin-induced cough; after oral administration, codeine was about two to three times more potent than levodropropizine. However, after aerosol administration the two compounds were equipotent. These data might suggest a peripheral site of action for levodropropizine which is related to sensory neuropeptides. Further support for the role of sensory neuropeptides in the mechanism of action of levodropropizine comes from the results obtained in capsaicin-desensitized animals. In this experimental model levodropropizine failed to prevent the vagally elicited cough in neuropeptide-depleted animals, whereas codeine did not differentiate between control and capsaicin-treated animals. In conclusion, our results support the suggestion that levodropropizine has a peripheral site of action. In addition, the interference with the sensory neuropeptide system may explain, at least in part, its activity in experimentally-induced cough.

  2. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Equivalent properties of single event burnout induced by different sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi-Yu; Cao, Zhou; Da, Dao-An; Xue, Yu-Xiong

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results of single event burnout induced by heavy ions and 252Cf fission fragments in power MOSFET devices have been investigated. It is concluded that the characteristics of single event burnout induced by 252Cf fission fragments is consistent to that in heavy ions. The power MOSFET in the “turn-off" state is more susceptible to single event burnout than it is in the “turn-on" state. The thresholds of the drain-source voltage for single event burnout induced by 173 MeV bromine ions and 252Cf fission fragments are close to each other, and the burnout cross section is sensitive to variation of the drain-source voltage above the threshold of single event burnout. In addition, the current waveforms of single event burnouts induced by different sources are similar. Different power MOSFET devices may have different probabilities for the occurrence of single event burnout.

  3. Neuroprotective effect of lycopene against MPTP induced experimental Parkinson's disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Prema, Asokan; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin

    2015-07-10

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder that mainly affects the movement of the aged populations. Lycopene is a carotenoid with unique pharmacological properties and its efficacy on experimental Hunginton's disease and brain ischemia has shown intense neuroprotective effects. The present study was aimed to explore the neuroprotective effect of lycopene against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced PD mice. Administration of lycopene (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day orally) protected MPTP induced depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and its metabolites in a dose dependent manner. It also attenuated MPTP-induced oxidative stress and motor abnormalities seen in PD mice. Our western blot studies showed that treatment with lycopene reversed MPTP induced apoptosis may be due to its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties. As to conclude, lycopene reverses neurochemical deficts, oxidative stress, apoptosis and physiological abnormalities in PD mice and offer promise strategy in the treatment of this neurodegenerative disease.

  4. A novel experimental setup for simultaneous adsorption and induced deformation measurements in microporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, L.; Plantier, F.; Grégoire, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new experimental setup is presented allowing the simultaneous measurement of adsorption isotherms and adsorption-induced deformations. It is composed of a manometric technique coupled with a digital image correlation setup for full-field displacement measurements. The manometric part is validated by comparing adsorption isotherms with those obtained by a gravimetric method. The principles and methods of both adsorption isotherm and induced deformation measurements are presented in detail. As a first application of this new apparatus, the coupling between adsorption and induced deformation is characterised for a microporous media (activated carbon) saturated by pure CO2 (318.15 K, [0-60] bars) and pure CH4 (303.15 K, [0-130] bars). For this very homogeneous porous material, the induced deformation is characteristic of a pure volumetric swelling but the full-field setup may allow the characterisation of the localised pattern of deformation for heterogenous or cracked microporous media.

  5. Microbiological profile and calprotectin expression in naturally occurring and experimentally induced gingivitis.

    PubMed

    Farina, Roberto; Guarnelli, Maria Elena; Figuero, Elena; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the microbiological profile and the calprotectin expression in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) in spontaneous and experimentally induced gingival inflammation. Thirty-seven periodontally healthy subjects were evaluated in real life conditions (N-O gingivitis) as well as after 21 days of experimental gingivitis trial (E-I gingivitis). During the experimental gingivitis trial, in one maxillary quadrant (test quadrant), gingival inflammation was induced by oral hygiene abstention, while in the contralateral (control) quadrant, oral hygiene was routinely continued. The results of the study showed that (1) the microbiological profile of quadrants where gingival inflammation was experimentally induced (i.e., E-I test quadrants) differed significantly from that of either quadrants where gingival inflammation was controlled by proper plaque control (i.e., E-I control quadrants) or quadrants with N-O gingivitis, and (2) GCF calprotectin was significantly higher at E-I test quadrants compared to either E-I control quadrants or quadrants with N-O gingivitis. A positive intrasubject correlation was found between GCF concentration of calprotectin at sites presenting N-O and E-I gingivitis. N-O and E-I gingivitis showed a different microbiological profile of the subgingival environment. GCF calprotectin is a reliable marker of gingival inflammation, and its concentration in N-O gingivitis is correlated with its expression in E-I gingivitis. The modality of plaque accumulation seems to affect the subgingival microbiological profile associated with a gingivitis condition. Calprotectin levels in GCF may be regarded as a promising marker of the individual susceptibility to develop gingival inflammation in response to experimentally induced plaque accumulation.

  6. Herbal and dietary supplements related to diarrhea and acute kidney injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wanitsriphinyo, Suphamat; Tangkiatkumjai, Mayuree

    2017-03-01

    Background There is very little evidence relating to the association of herbal medicine with diarrhea and the development of acute kidney injury (AKI). This study reports a case of diarrhea-induced AKI, possibly related to an individual ingesting copious amounts of homemade mixed fruit and herb puree. Case presentation A 45-year-old Thai man with diabetes had diarrhea for 2 days, as a result of taking high amounts of a puree made up of eight mixed fruits and herbs over a 3-day period. He developed dehydration and stage 2 AKI, with a doubling of his serum creatinine. He had been receiving enalapril, as a prescribed medication, over one year. After he stopped taking both the puree and enalapril, and received fluid replacement therapy, within a week his serum creatinine had gradually decreased. The combination of puree, enalapril and AKI may also have induced hyperkalemia in this patient. Furthermore, the patient developed hyperphosphatemia due to his worsening kidney function, exacerbated by regularly taking some dietary supplements containing high levels of phosphate. His serum levels of potassium and phosphate returned to normal within a week, once the patient stopped both the puree and all dietary supplements, and had begun receiving treatment for hyperkalemia. Results The mixed fruit and herb puree taken by this man may have led to his diarrhea due to its effect; particularly if the patient was taking a high concentration of such a drink. Both the puree and enalapril are likely to attenuate the progression of kidney function. The causal relationship between the puree and AKI was probable (5 scores) assessed by the modified Naranjo algorithm. This is the first case report, as far as the authors are aware, relating the drinking of a mixed fruit and herbal puree to diarrhea and AKI in a patient with diabetes. Conclusions This case can alert health care providers to the possibility that herbal medicine could induce diarrhea and develop acute kidney injury.

  7. Four different synthetic peptides of proteolipid protein induce a distinct antibody response in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Recks, Mascha S; Grether, Nicolai B; van der Broeck, Franziska; Ganscher, Alla; Wagner, Nicole; Henke, Erik; Ergün, Süleyman; Schroeter, Michael; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-07-01

    Here we studied the autoantibody specificity elicited by proteolipid protein (PLP) in MP4-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS). In C57BL/6 (B6) mice, antibodies were induced by immunization with one of the two extracellular and by the intracellular PLP domain. Antibodies against extracellular PLP were myelin-reactive in oligodendrocyte cultures and induced mild spinal cord demyelination upon transfer into B cell-deficient J(H)T mice. Remarkably, also antibodies against intracellular PLP showed binding to intact oligodendrocytes and were capable of inducing myelin pathology upon transfer into J(H)T mice. In MP4-immunized mice peptide-specific T(H)1/T(H)17 responses were mainly directed against the extracellular PLP domains, but also involved the intracellular epitopes. These data suggest that both extracellular and intracellular epitopes of PLP contribute to the pathogenesis of MP4-induced EAE already in the setting of intact myelin. It remains to be elucidated if this concept also applies to MS itself.

  8. Role of the Enteric Nervous System in the Fluid and Electrolyte Secretion of Rotavirus Diarrhea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Ove; Peregrin, Attila Timar; Persson, Kjell; Kordasti, Shirin; Uhnoo, Ingrid; Svensson, Lennart

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the intestinal fluid loss in rotavirus diarrhea, which often afflicts children in developing countries, is not known. One hypothesis is that the rotavirus evokes intestinal fluid and electrolyte secretion by activation of the nervous system in the intestinal wall, the enteric nervous system (ENS). Four different drugs that inhibit ENS functions were used to obtain experimental evidence for this hypothesis in mice in vitro and in vivo. The involvement of the ENS in rotavirus diarrhea indicates potential sites of action for drugs in the treatment of the disease.

  9. Experimental Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Induces Upstream Pericyte Loss and Vascular Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Elisa; Raoul, William; Calippe, Bertrand; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier; Paques, Michel; Sennlaub, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Aims Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) leads to extensive vascular remodeling and is important cause of visual impairment. Although the vascular morphological changes following experimental vein occlusion have been described in a variety of models using angiography, the underlying cellular events are ill defined. Methods and Results We here show that laser-induced experimental BRVO in mice leads to a wave of TUNEL-positive endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis in the upstream vascular network associated with a transient edema and hemorrhages. Subsequently, we observe an induction of EC proliferation within the dilated vein and capillaries, detected by EdU incorporation, and the edema resolves. However, the pericytes of the upstream capillaries are severely reduced, which was associated with continuing EC apoptosis and proliferation. The vascular remodeling was associated with increased expression of TGFβ, TSP-1, but also FGF2 expression. Exposure of the experimental animals to hypoxia, when pericyte (PC) dropout had occurred, led to a dramatic increase in endothelial cell proliferation, confirming the vascular instability induced by the experimental BRVO. Conclusion Experimental BRVO leads to acute endothelial cells apoptosis and increased permeability. Subsequently the upstream vascular network remains destabilized, characterized by pericyte dropout, un-physiologically high endothelial cells turnover and sensitivity to hypoxia. These early changes might pave the way for capillary loss and subsequent chronic ischemia and edema that characterize the late stage disease. PMID:26208283

  10. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  11. Induced membrane for treatment of critical sized bone defect: a review of experimental and clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Aurégan, Jean-Charles; Bégué, Thierry

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to review experimental and clinical experiences about the use of an induced membrane to address critical bone size defect of the limbs. From a review of published experimental and clinical data and from our clinical experience, we present the key data about the use of an induced membrane to address critical bone size defect of the limbs. After reviewing the concept of critical sized bone defect, we present the different indications of an induced membrane, the key points of the surgical technique and the strategy of bone grafting given the indication, localization and importance of the critical sized bone defect. Finally, we discuss the perspective of the use of an induced membrane with various bone substitutes. The use of an induced membrane to treat critical sized bone defects of the limbs is a simple, reliable and reproducible technique. Certain technical steps should be pointed out and observed with great caution in order to avoid any pitfalls. This technique will probably be a key step for facilitating bone inclusion of new bone substitutes proposed by recent bioengineering.

  12. Etiology of childhood diarrhea in Beijing, China.

    PubMed Central

    Kain, K C; Barteluk, R L; Kelly, M T; He, X; de Hua, G; Ge, Y A; Proctor, E M; Byrne, S; Stiver, H G

    1991-01-01

    To determine the role of recently recognized enteropathogens in childhood diarrhea in China, 221 children with diarrhea and 108 controls seen at the Beijing Children's Hospital were studied during April and May 1989. Stools were examined for ova, parasites, and rotavirus, cultured for bacterial pathogens, and probed for enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), and enteropathogenic adherence factor-positive (EAF+) E. coli. Pathogens were identified in 56.5% of children with diarrhea and 43.5% of controls (P = 0.04). Detection of enteropathogens was significantly greater in patients examined within 1 week of symptom onset (65%) than in patients examined later (39%; P = 0.01). ETEC was the most frequently detected pathogen in children with diarrhea, accounting for 20% of the cases. Other agents identified in patients included the following: salmonellae, 12%; rotavirus, 7%; EIEC, 7%; EHEC, 7%; members of the Aeromonas hydrophila group, 6%; EAF+ E. coli, 5%; Ascaris lumbricoides, 3%; shigellae, 3%; campylobacters, 2%; and Vibrio spp., 0.5%. The isolation rates of salmonellae (P = 0.02), EAF+ E. coli (P = 0.04), and mixed pathogens (P = 0.05) were significantly greater for diarrhea patients than for controls. Resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents occurred in 39% of the Salmonella isolates, 22% of the Aeromonas isolates, and 17% of the Shigella isolates. Multiresistant salmonellae (P = 0.05) and shigellae were recovered from diarrheal stools only. Ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, and imipenem were the only agents tested to which all bacterial isolates were susceptible in vitro. These results suggest that both traditional and newly recognized agents are important causes of childhood diarrhea in Beijing and that therapy may be complicated by indigenous antimicrobial resistance. PMID:1993771

  13. Diarrhea - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/languages/diarrhea.html Other topics A-Z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Diarrhea - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ...

  14. Microbiological diagnosis of severe diarrhea in kidney transplant recipients by use of multiplex PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Coste, Jean-François; Vuiblet, Vincent; Moustapha, Betoul; Bouin, Alexis; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; de Rougemont, Alexis; Benejat, Lucie; Megraud, Francis; Wolak-Thierry, Aurore; Villena, Isabelle; Chemla, Cathy; Le Magrex, Elisabeth; de Champs, Christophe; Andreoletti, Laurent; Rieu, Philippe; Leveque, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Diarrhea is a frequent complication after kidney transplantation, ascribed to adverse effects of the immunosuppressive therapy in case of negative microbiological examination of the stools. The aim of this study was to improve the microbiological diagnosis by implementing molecular tests. Fifty-four severe diarrhea events that occurred in 49 adult kidney transplant recipients from September 2010 to November 2011 were investigated. One or several enteric pathogens were detected in 13 (23%) stool samples using classical microbiological methods versus 39 (72%) for the seven commercially available multiplex PCR assays used retrospectively (P = 0.006). Interestingly, molecular diagnosis identified 15 multiple infections compared to none using classical techniques. The primary pathogens detected were enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) (n = 15; 38%), Campylobacter spp. (n = 15; 38%), and Norovirus (n = 14; 36%). Specificities for Campylobacter and Norovirus infection diagnosis were 75 and 100%, respectively, by comparison to reference methods. Based on molecular findings, a cyclosporine-mycophenolate mofetil combination was identified as a risk factor for developing Norovirus-induced diarrhea. Norovirus infections were also responsible for higher weight loss than all the other causes of diarrhea. In samples from asymptomatic immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, EPEC but not Norovirus and Campylobacter infections were detected at a frequency similar to that observed in symptomatic kidney transplant recipients. In conclusion, molecular tools significantly improved the detection of single and multiple enteric infections by comparison to classical techniques and could quickly become the key element in the management of severe acute diarrhea in transplant recipients.

  15. The maximum single dose of resistant maltodextrin that does not cause diarrhea in humans.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yuka; Kanahori, Sumiko; Sakano, Katsuhisa; Ebihara, Shukuko

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the maximum dose of resistant maltodextrin (Fibersol)-2, a non-viscous water-soluble dietary fiber), that does not induce transitory diarrhea. Ten healthy adult subjects (5 men and 5 women) ingested Fibersol-2 at increasing dose levels of 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, 1.0, and 1.1 g/kg body weight (bw). Each administration was separated from the previous dose by an interval of 1 wk. The highest dose level that did not cause diarrhea in any subject was regarded as the maximum non-effective level for a single dose. The results showed that no subject of either sex experienced diarrhea at dose levels of 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, or 1.0 g/kg bw. At the highest dose level of 1.1 g/kg bw, no female subject experienced diarrhea, whereas 1 male subject developed diarrhea with muddy stools 2 h after ingestion of the test substance. Consequently, the maximum non-effective level for a single dose of the resistant maltodextrin Fibersol-2 is 1.0 g/kg bw for men and >1.1 g/kg bw for women. Gastrointestinal symptoms were gurgling sounds in 4 subjects (7 events) and flatus in 5 subjects (9 events), although no association with dose level was observed. These symptoms were mild and transient and resolved without treatment.

  16. Induced decay of 178Hfm2: Theoretical analysis of experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkalya, Eugene V.

    2005-02-01

    This article reviews experimental results obtained recently on the x-ray-induced acceleration of the decay of the long-lived isomer 178Hfm2. Two basic mechanisms for the induced decay are considered: (1) direct interaction of the incident x rays with the nucleus and (2) the nucleus-ray interaction proceeding via atomic shells. We establish that the absence of K forbiddenness for all transitions to a hypothetical “mixedK“ level cannot explain the measured cross sections even if collective nuclear matrix elements, resonant conditions, and so on, are assumed. We also tested, and rejected, the hypothesis that the enhancement is due to normal nuclear transitions in the inverse nuclear excitation by electron transition process. The possibility to make measurements with intense laser radiation is considered too. Thus, there appears to be no explanation of these experimental results within quantum electrodynamics and the contemporary concepts of atomic nuclei.

  17. Experimental study of the spectral characteristics of laser-induced air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Zhaoxiang; Wu Jinquan; Sun Fenglou; Gong Shunsheng

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of laser-induced air, N2, and O2 plasma spectra are investigated spectroscopically. The study concentrates mainly on the temporal behavior of laser-induced plasma after breakdown. We used delayed spectra and spectra evolution for this study. Except for the general one-beam laser-induced breakdown experiment, a second laser beam was added to further probe the behavior of plasma during its decay. We report the experimental results of spectra composition, spectra time evolution, and spectra affected by a second laser beam. We determined that all the laser-induced air plasma spectra are from a continuous spectrum and some line spectra superposed on the continuous spectrum. The stronger short wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by bremsstrahlung radiation of electrons in the plasma, and the weaker long wavelength continuous spectrum is caused by electron and ion recombination. Line spectra originate from excited molecules, atoms, and their first-order ions, but no line spectra form higher-order ions. The results show that the temporal behavior of some spectra is a decay-rise-redecay pattern. With the two laser beam experiment we found that all the spectra intensities are enhanced by the second laser beam, but the response of various spectra to the delay of the second laser beam is quite different, in particular, the intensity increments of some spectra increase with the delay of the second laser beam. Some microscopic processes of laser-induced plasma obtained from the experimental results are discussed. These results are useful for a better understanding of some laser-induced air plasma related applications, such as laser-guided lightning and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Upstream Boundary Layer Acceleration on Unsteadiness of Shock-Induced Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Experimental Study of the Driving Mechanism and Control of the Unsteady Shock Induced Turbulent Separation in a Mach 5 compression Corner Flow...University of Tokyo, Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113, Japan, Oct. 25-29, 1987. 12 Figure 1. Schematic diagram of the test section with compression...ramp. Seeding System Optics FLOW CCD Cameras Dual-Cavity Nd: Yag Laser Photodiode Beam Splitter Timing Electronics ``` FLC Shutter Controller

  19. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Plunging Liquid Jet - The Air Entrainment Process". It is intended that this paper will be finalized and...the fifth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion" (Lahey...Drew - CoPI). rhis report period has been concerned with performing an analysis of the air entrainment process associated with a plunging liquid

  20. The effect of various drugs on experimentally induced ulcers in immobilized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, H.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments related to the importance of functional disorders in the central nervous system in connection with stomach diseases were performed on Wistar rats. Assuming that severe mental strains may be triggering factors for such disorders, testing of the effects of different drugs on experimentally induced ulcers in these rats was done. The immobilization method described by Bonfils was used. Particular importance was placed on the sex related difference which appeared.

  1. Experimental realization of an on-chip all-optical analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianfan; Sandhu, Sunil; Povinelli, Michelle L; Shakya, Jagat; Fan, Shanhui; Lipson, Michal

    2006-03-31

    We provide the first experimental observation of structure tuning of the electromagnetically induced transparency-like spectrum in integrated on-chip optical resonator systems. The system consists of coupled silicon ring resonators with 10 microm diameter on silicon, where the coherent interference between the two coupled resonators is tuned. We measured a transparency-resonance mode with a quality factor of 11,800.

  2. Cardioprotective effect of ammonium glycyrrhizinate against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Munish; Singhal, Tinku; Sharma, Hitender

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the cardioprotective effect of herbal bioactive compound ammonium glycyrrhizinate against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy, in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: Ammonium glycyrrhizinate (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for four weeks in albino rats. Cardiomyopathy was induced with a dose of 2.5 mg/kg i.p. of doxorubicin on 1th, 7th, 14th, 21th, 28th day in the experimental animals. At the end of the experiment, on 29th day, serum and heart tissues were collected and hemodynamic, biochemical and histopathological studies were carried out. Results: Administration of doxorubicin in normal rats showed significant (P < 0.001) changes in body weight, feed intake, urine output, hemodynamic parameters like (blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output) and in lipid profile (cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein) indicating cardiomyopathy symptoms. Animals treated with ammonium glycyrrhizinate significantly (P < 0.05) decreased triglyceride, cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels. Moreover, high density lipoprotein (HDL) levels increased in rats treated with ammonium glycyrrhizinate as compared with the normal group. Conclusion: Ammonium glycyrrhizinate is effective in controlling serum lipid profile and cardiac complications in experimentally induced cardiomyopathy in animals. PMID:25298583

  3. Gallic acid attenuates dextran sulfate sodium-induced experimental colitis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Pandurangan, Ashok Kumar; Mohebali, Nooshin; Norhaizan, Mohd Esa; Looi, Chung Yeng

    2015-01-01

    Gallic acid (GA) is a polyhydroxy phenolic compound that has been detected in various natural products, such as green tea, strawberries, grapes, bananas, and many other fruits. In inflammatory bowel disease, inflammation is promoted by oxidative stress. GA is a strong antioxidant; thus, we evaluated the cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory role of GA in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse colitis model. Experimental acute colitis was induced in male BALB/c mice by administering 2.5% DSS in the drinking water for 7 days. The disease activity index; colon weight/length ratio; histopathological analysis; mRNA expressions of IL-21 and IL-23; and protein expression of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) were compared between the control and experimental mice. The colonic content of malondialdehyde and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase activity were examined as parameters of the redox state. We determined that GA significantly attenuated the disease activity index and colon shortening, and reduced the histopathological evidence of injury. GA also significantly (P<0.05) reduced the expressions of IL-21 and IL-23. Furthermore, GA activates/upregulates the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream targets, including UDP-GT and NQO1, in DSS-induced mice. The findings of this study demonstrate the protective effect of GA on experimental colitis, which is probably due to an antioxidant nature of GA. PMID:26251571

  4. Evaluation of the efficacy of curcumin in experimentally induced acute otitis media in rats.

    PubMed

    Birdane, Leman; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal; Burukoglu, Dilek; Fidan, Vural; Incesulu, Armagan

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the effect of curcumin (CMN) in the treatment of experimentally induced acute otitis media (AOM) in rats. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley female rats were used, yielding 64 temporal bones. Group 1 was the control group. For groups 2 to 4, AOM was induced experimentally, and saline, antibiotics (sulbactam-ampicillin), or CMN were administered for 14 days to groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. During the histological examination, thickening of the tympanic membrane, damage to the epithelium, inflammation, and sclerosis were evaluated. The AOM+antibiotic and AOM+CMN groups exhibited reduced histological damage compared with the AOM+saline group. No significant differences in thickening of the tympanic membrane or damage to the epithelium or inflammation were observed between the AOM+antibiotic and the AOM+CMN groups. However, the sclerosis values of the AOM+CMN group were significantly lower than those of the AOM+antibiotic group. CMN treatment resulted in similar effects on the experimentally induced AOM model as did the antibiotic treatment. The efficacy of this treatment may be related to its effects on the production of various inflammatory cytokines. In light of the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance and the mild side effects of CMN, we suggest that CMN therapy may be a promising option in AOM treatment.

  5. Effect of transdermal opioids in experimentally induced superficial, deep and hyperalgesic pain.

    PubMed

    Andresen, T; Staahl, C; Oksche, A; Mansikka, H; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Drewes, A M

    2011-10-01

    Chronic pain and hyperalgesia can be difficult to treat with classical opioids acting predominately at the µ-opioid receptor. Buprenorphine and its active metabolite are believed to act through µ-, κ- and δ-receptors and may therefore possess different analgesic and anti-hyperalgesic effects compared with pure µ-receptor agonists, for example, fentanyl. Here, we have compared the analgesic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of buprenorphine and fentanyl. Twenty-two healthy volunteers were randomized to treatment with transdermal buprenorphine (20 µg·h(-1), 144 h), fentanyl (25 µg·h(-1), 72 h) or placebo patches in a double-blind, cross-over experimental pain study. The experimental pain tests (phasic pain, sensitization) involved pressure at the tibial bone, cutaneous electrical and thermal stimulation, intramuscular nerve growth factor, UVB light burn injury model and intradermal capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia. Pain testing was carried out at baseline, 24, 48, 72 and 144 h after application of the drugs. Compared with placebo, buprenorphine, but not fentanyl, significantly attenuated pressure at the tibial bone as well as pressure pain in the primary hyperalgesic area induced by UVB light The two drugs were equipotent and better than placebo against cutaneous thermal pain stimulation), but failed to show significant analgesic effect to cutaneous electrical stimulation, nerve growth factor-induced muscle soreness and to capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia. Buprenorphine, but not fentanyl, showed analgesic effects against experimentally induced, bone-associated pain and primary hyperalgesia compared with placebo. These tissue- and modality-differentiated properties may reflect the variable effects of opioid drugs observed in individual patients. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Zinc: Role in the management of diarrhea and cholera.

    PubMed

    Qadir, M Imran; Arshad, Arfa; Ahmad, Bashir

    2013-07-16

    Diarrhea and cholera are major health problems. Vibrio cholera, the causative agent of cholera, infects the small intestine, resulting in vomiting, massive watery diarrhea and dehydration. Reduced water and electrolyte absorption is also due to zinc deficiency. Zinc has an important role in recovery from the disease. The combination of zinc with cholera vaccine and oral rehydration solutions has a positive impact on cholera and diarrhea. It has led to a decrease in the mortality and morbidity associated with diarrhea.

  7. Clinical characteristics of rotavirus diarrhea in hospitalized Romanian infants.

    PubMed

    Lesanu, Gabriela; Becheanu, Cristina Adriana; Vlad, Raluca Maria; Pacurar, Daniela; Tincu, Iulia Florentina; Smadeanu, Roxana Elena

    2013-01-01

    Clinical characteristics of rotavirus enteritis were evaluated by comparison with acute diarrhea of other etiologies. We reviewed the medical records of children (aged 0-12 months) admitted with acute diarrhea in our hospital between January and December 2011. Of the 839 patients, 49.3% had rotavirus diarrhea. The incidence of severe disease was significantly higher for rotavirus diarrhea (65.2%, P < 0.01) than for other types of diarrheal disease.

  8. Experimental investigation of flow induced limit cycle oscillations in a tensioned ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Punnag; Mazzoleni, Nicholas; Bryant, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Researchers have performed theoretical investigations of flow induced limit cycle oscillations (LCOs) of tensioned ribbons. Furthermore, attempts have been made to tap into the energy harvesting capability of such ribbons, owing to its structural simplicity, low weight and ease of fabrication. However, in order to tune the ribbon to perform optimally at a given location, a robust, reliable model of the ribbon is essential to predict the limit cycle behavior. The model needs validation across a broad spectrum of its operating envelope based on experimentally obtained results. This paper seeks to provide experimental data for a sample tensioned ribbon in cross flow to serve as basis for validation of an aeroelastic model. This paper experimentally characterizes a PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) ribbon of aspect ratio 18 across a range of applied axial preload tension and wind speeds.

  9. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    PubMed

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology.

  10. [Experimental choroidal neovascularization induced by laser in the eyes of rhesus monkeys].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Yan, Mi; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jun-jun; Liu, Bin; Meng, Dan; Du, Cai-feng

    2008-07-01

    To establish an experimental model of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) through perimacular laser treatment in the eyes of rhesus Monkey. The experimental CNV was induced by perimacular laser injury in the eyes of 8 rhesus monkeys and confirmed by a comparison before and after the laser treatment (20 d, 34 d, 48 d) with fluorescence fundus angiography (FFA) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Classic CNV similar to human CNV appeared in 68.8% of the laser spots. Hypofluorescence in the early phase and fluorescence leakage in the late phase were detected by the FFA. High reflect light echogenic mass and retina edema were detected by the OCT. The histopathologic examinations found proliferated fiber-vasculosa membranes in the laser burnt spots. The pathological changes lasted 48 days until the monkeys were killed. The laser induced experimental CNV in rhesus monkey has a high prevalence and stability, which maintains a long period. It is an ideal experimental model for studying the pathologic mechanism of CNV and effective treatment for CNV.

  11. Chemokine ligand 2 in the trigeminal ganglion regulates pain induced by experimental tooth movement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Luo, Wei; Wang, Jing; Tan, Yu; Fu, Runqing; Fang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that the chemokine ligand 2/chemokine receptor 2 (CCL2/CCR2) signaling pathway plays an important role in pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Expression of CCL2/CCR2 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) was determined by Western blotting 0 hours, 4 hours, 1 day, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after tooth movement. CCL2 localization and cell size distribution were revealed by immunohistochemistry. The effects of increasing force on CCL2 expression and behavioral changes were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of CCL2/CCR2 antagonists on these changes in pain behaviors were all evaluated. Exogenous CCL2 was injected into periodontal tissues and cultured TG neurons with different concentrations, and then the pain responses or c-fos expression were assessed. Experimental tooth movement led to a statistically significant increase in CCL2/CCR2 expression from day 3 to day 7, especially in small to medium-sized TG neurons. It also triggered an increase in the time spent on directed face-grooming behaviors in a force magnitude-dependent and CCL2 dose-dependent manner. Pain induced by experimental tooth movement was effectively blocked by a CCR2 antagonist and by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. Also, exogenous CCL2 led to an increase in c-fos expression in cultured TG neurons, which was blocked by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. The peripheral CCL2/CCR2 axis is modulated by experimental tooth movement and involved in the development of tooth movement pain.

  12. Treatment of gastric ulcers and diarrhea with the Amazonian herbal medicine sangre de grado.

    PubMed

    Miller, M J; MacNaughton, W K; Zhang, X J; Thompson, J H; Charbonnet, R M; Bobrowski, P; Lao, J; Trentacosti, A M; Sandoval, M

    2000-07-01

    Sangre de grado is an Amazonian herbal medicine used to facilitate the healing of gastric ulcers and to treat gastritis, diarrhea, skin lesions, and insect stings. This study was designed to evaluate the gastrointestinal applications. Gastric ulcers were induced in rats by brief serosal exposure of the fundus to acetic acid (80%). Sangre de grado was administered in drinking water at 1:1,000 and 1:10,000 dilutions from the postoperative period to day 7. Guinea pig ileum secretory responses to capsaicin, electrical field stimulation, and the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) agonist [Sar(9),Met(O(2))(11)]substance P were examined in Ussing chambers. Sangre de grado facilitated the healing of experimental gastric ulcer, reducing myeloperoxidase activity, ulcer size, and bacterial content of the ulcer. The expression of proinflammatory genes tumor necrosis factor-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 was upregulated by ulcer induction but reduced by sangre de grado treatment, particularly iNOS and IL-6. In Ussing chambers, sangre de grado impaired the secretory response to capsaicin but not to electrical field stimulation or the NK-1 agonist. We conclude that sangre de grado is a potent, cost-effective treatment for gastrointestinal ulcers and distress via antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and sensory afferent-dependent actions.

  13. Suppressive effect of berberine on experimental dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tie; Yang, Zhen; Lv, Chuan-Feng; Zhang, Yu

    2012-06-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect of berberine was evaluated in murine model of acute experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Berberine, given orally at 40, 20, 10 mg/kg for 10 days, ameliorated all the supposed inflammatory symptoms of the induced colitis, such as body weightloss, blood hemoglobin reduction, high myeloperoxidase levels, and malondialdehyde content-inflamed mucosa. Furthermore, the cytokine production of splenic lymphocytes was analyzed. The results showed the IFN-γ and IL-12 were increased, but IL-4 and IL-10 were decreased in DSS-induced colitis,when those were compared with the normal control. But the administration of berberine to DSS-induced colitis mice showed lower production of IFN-γ and IL-12 and higher production of IL-4 and IL-10 than the DSS-induced colitis mice. The results suggest that the protective effects of berberine against the DSS-induced colitis may be associated with the regulation of cytokine production.

  14. Analytical and experimental study of flow phenomena in noncavitating rocket pump inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1981-01-01

    The flow processes in rocket pump inducers are summarized. The experimental investigations were carried out with air as the test medium. The major characteristics features of the rocket pump inducers are low flow coefficient (0.05 to 0.2) large stagger angle (70 deg to 85 deg) and high solidity blades of little or no camber. The investigations are concerned with the effect of viscosity not the effects of cavitation. Flow visualization, conventional and hot wire probe measurement inside and at the exit of the blade passage, were the analytical methods used. The experiment was carried out using four three and two bladed inducers with cambered blades. Both the passage and the exit flow were measured. The basic research and boundary layer investigation was carried out using a helical flat plate (of some dimensions as the inducer blades tested), and flat plate helical inducer (four bladed). Detailed mean and turbulence flow field inside the passage as well as the exit of the rotor were derived from these measurement. The boundary layer, endwall, and other passage data reveal extremely complex nature of the flow, with major effects of viscosity present across the entire passage. Several analyses were carried out to predict the flow field in inducers. These included an approximate analysis, the shear pumping analysis, and a numerical solution of exact viscous equations with approximate modeling for the viscous terms.

  15. Allergen-induced Interleukin-18 promotes experimental eosinophilic esophagitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dutt, Parmesh; Shukla, Jai Shankar; Ventateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Mariswamy, Siddesha Jalahalli.; Mattner, Jochen; Shukla, Anshi; Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of IL-18 have been reported in a number of allergic diseases. We recently reported that IL-18 in the blood and IL-18Rα mRNA in the oesophagus are induced during human eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE). Additionally, we earlier showed that iNKT cells are critical to EoE pathogenesis; however, the mechanism of iNKT cell activation in EoE is not well understood. Therefore, the current study focused on the hypothesis that allergen-induced IL-18 may have an important role in iNKT cell-mediated EoE pathogenesis. We first validated the human EoE findings of IL-18 in experimental EoE by examining blood levels of IL-18 and oesophageal IL-18Rα mRNA levels in aeroallergen- and food allergen-induced experimental mouse models of EoE. We demonstrate that blood IL-18 protein and oesophageal IL-18Rα mRNA are induced in the mouse model of EoE and that IL-18Rα is expressed by iNKT cells in the oesophagus. Intranasal delivery of rIL-18 induced both mast cells and eosinophilic inflammation in the oesophagus in a time- and dose-dependent manner. To establish the significance of IL-18 in EoE pathogenesis, we examined DOX-inducible rtTA-CC10-IL-18 bitransgenic mice that induce IL-18 protein expression in the oesophagus. Our analysis indicated that induction of IL-18 in these mice resulted in the development of many of the characteristics of EoE, including oesophageal intraepithelial eosinophilia, increased mast cells, oesophageal remodelling and fibrosis. The current study provides evidence that IL-18 may induce iNKT cell activation to release the eosinophil activating cytokine IL-5, as IL-5-deficient mice and iNKT cell-deficient (CD1d null) mice do not induce EoE in response to intranasal IL-18 challenge. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that allergen-induced IL-18 has a significant role in promoting IL-5- and iNKT-dependent EoE pathogenesis. PMID:25801352

  16. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33.

    PubMed

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-08-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m(3)) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m(3)) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10.

  17. Ambient particulate matter induces an exacerbation of airway inflammation in experimental asthma: role of interleukin-33

    PubMed Central

    Shadie, A M; Herbert, C; Kumar, R K

    2014-01-01

    High levels of ambient environmental particulate matter (PM10 i.e. < 10 μm median aerodynamic diameter) have been linked to acute exacerbations of asthma. We examined the effects of delivering a single dose of Sydney PM10 by intranasal instillation to BALB/c mice that had been sensitized to ovalbumin and challenged repeatedly with a low (≈3 mg/m3) mass concentration of aerosolized ovalbumin for 4 weeks. Responses were compared to animals administered carbon black as a negative control, or a moderate (≈30 mg/m3) concentration of ovalbumin to simulate an allergen-induced acute exacerbation of airway inflammation. Delivery of PM10 to mice, in which experimental mild chronic asthma had previously been established, elicited characteristic features of enhanced allergic inflammation of the airways, including eosinophil and neutrophil recruitment, similar to that in the allergen-induced exacerbation. In parallel, there was increased expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-33 in airway tissues and an increased concentration of IL-33 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Administration of a monoclonal neutralizing anti-mouse IL-33 antibody prior to delivery of particulates significantly suppressed the inflammatory response induced by Sydney PM10, as well as the levels of associated proinflammatory cytokines in lavage fluid. We conclude that IL-33 plays a key role in driving airway inflammation in this novel experimental model of an acute exacerbation of chronic allergic asthma induced by exposure to PM10. PMID:24730559

  18. Effects of nabumetone and dipyrone on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Engin; Sağıroğlu, Oya; Kılıç, Fatma S; Erol, Kevser

    2013-04-01

    Nabumetone and dipyrone are non-acidic, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Both of them are known to have weak inhibitory effects of cyclooxygenases. Gastric side effects represent the most common adverse drug effects of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The gastric effects of these drugs may be comparable in experimental ulcer models. In the present study, the gastric ulcerogenic activity of nabumetone and dipyrone were investigated on stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced experimental ulcer models by determining the ulcer index and gastric mucus secretion in rats. It was found that diethyldithiocarbamate increased both ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited dose-dependently the increase of diethyldithiocarbamate-induced mucus secretion. Dipyrone inhibited both stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited stress-induced ulcer index at 25-mg/kg dose but stimulated dose-dependently mucus secretion. These effects may be attributed to their non-acidic structures and weak inhibitory effects on gastric mucosal cyclooxygenases.

  19. Effect of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard against experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mamta B; Goswami, S S; Santani, D D

    2004-10-01

    Effects of the flavonoid rich fraction of the stem bark of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard, have been studied on ethanol, ethanol-indomethacin and pylorus ligated gastric ulcers in experimental animals. Oral administration of the ethyl acetate extract (extract A3) inhibited the formation of gastric lesions induced by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. The protective effect of extract A3 against ethanol induced gastric lesions was not abolished by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg(-1)). Further, extract A3 inhibited increase in vascular permeability due to ethanol administration. Extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in animals treated with extract. Extract A3 also inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers induced by pylorus ligation, when administered both orally and intraperitoneally. Moreover, pretreatment with extract A3 increased mucus production and glycoprotein content, which was evident from the rise in mucin activity and TC: PR ratio.

  20. The role of periodontal ASIC3 in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meiya; Long, Hu; Ma, Wenqiang; Liao, Lina; Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yang; Shan, Di; Huang, Renhuan; Jian, Fan; Wang, Yan; Lai, Wenli

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify the roles of Acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) in orofacial pain following experimental tooth movement. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into the experimental group (40g, n = 30) and the sham group (0g, n = 30). Closed coil springs were ligated between maxillary incisor and molars to achieve experimental tooth movement. Rat grimace scale (RGS) scores were assessed at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days after the placement of the springs. ASIC3 immunostaining was performed and the expression levels of ASIC3 were measured through integrated optical density/area in Image-Pro Plus 6.0. Moreover, 18 rats were divided into APETx2 group (n = 6), amiloride group (n = 6), and vehicle group (n = 6), and RGS scores were obtained compared among them to verify the roles of ASIC3 in orofacial pain following tooth movement. ASIC3 expression levels became significantly higher in the experimental group than in sham group on 1, 3, and 5 days and became similar on 7 and 14 days. Pain levels (RGS scores) increased in both groups and were significantly higher in the experimental group on 1, 3, 5, and 7 days and were similar on 14 days. Periodontal ASIC3 expression levels were correlated with orofacial pain levels following experimental tooth movement. Periodontal administrations of ASIC3 antagonists (APETx2 and amiloride) could alleviate pain. This study needs to be better evidenced by RNA interference of ASIC3 in periodontal tissues in rats following experimental tooth movement. Moreover, we hope further studies would concentrate on the pain perception of ASIC3 knockout (ASIC3(-/-)) mice. Our results suggest that periodontal ASIC3 plays an important role in orofacial pain induced by experimental tooth movement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Antidiarrheal potential of standardized extract of Rhododendron arboreum Smith flowers in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Verma, Neeraj; Singh, Anil P; Gupta, Amresh; Sahu, P K; Rao, Ch V

    2011-11-01

    To investigate standardized ethyl acetate fraction of Rhododendron arboreum (EFRA) flowers for antidiarrheal activity in experimental animals. A simple sensitive high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method was used for the determination of hyperin in EFRA. The standardized fraction was investigated for castor oil, magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea, measurement of gastrointestinal transit using charcoal and castor oil-induced enteropooling. The concentration of hyperin in flowers of R. arboreum was found to be 0.148% by HPTLC. Oral administration of EFRA at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg exhibited dose-dependent and significant (P<0.05-0.001) antidiarrheal potential in castor oil and magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea. EFRA at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg also produced significant (P<0.05-0.001) dose-dependent reduction in propulsive movement in castor oil-induced gastrointestinal transit using charcoal meal in rats. EFRA was found to possess an antienteropooling in castor oil-induced experimental animals by reducing both weight and volume of intestinal content significantly. These findings demonstrate that standardized ethyl acetate fraction of R. arboreum flowers has potent antidiarrheal activity thus justifying its traditional use in diarrhea and have great potential as a source for natural health products.

  2. Antidiarrheal potential of standardized extract of Rhododendron arboreum Smith flowers in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Neeraj; Singh, Anil P.; Gupta, Amresh; Sahu, P.K.; Rao, Ch V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate standardized ethyl acetate fraction of Rhododendron arboreum (EFRA) flowers for antidiarrheal activity in experimental animals. Materials and Methods: A simple sensitive high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method was used for the determination of hyperin in EFRA. The standardized fraction was investigated for castor oil, magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea, measurement of gastrointestinal transit using charcoal and castor oil-induced enteropooling. Results: The concentration of hyperin in flowers of R. arboreum was found to be 0.148% by HPTLC. Oral administration of EFRA at 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg exhibited dose-dependent and significant (P<0.05-0.001) antidiarrheal potential in castor oil and magnesium sulfate-induced diarrhea. EFRA at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg also produced significant (P<0.05-0.001) dose-dependent reduction in propulsive movement in castor oil-induced gastrointestinal transit using charcoal meal in rats. EFRA was found to possess an antienteropooling in castor oil-induced experimental animals by reducing both weight and volume of intestinal content significantly. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that standardized ethyl acetate fraction of R. arboreum flowers has potent antidiarrheal activity thus justifying its traditional use in diarrhea and have great potential as a source for natural health products. PMID:22144775

  3. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  4. Nutritional Management of Acute Diarrhea in Infants and Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Food and Nutrition Board.

    Written primarily for health professionals advising on programs and policy related to nutrition and diarrhea therapy, this report is aimed at management of diarrhea in less-developed countries, but its information and technical insights are relevant to an understanding of diarrhea and its management throughout the world. Technical in orientation…

  5. [Epidemiology and etiology of infectious diarrheas. The case of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gomez, J L; García-Garcia, M L; Del Rio-Zolezzi, A; Giono-Cerezo, S; Salcedo-Alvarez, R A; Sepúlveda-Amor, J

    1994-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections represent a health problem. It is estimated that 1647 million cases of diarrhea and 3.2 million deaths due to this cause occur among children less than five years of age per year. Those belonging to this age group have 15 times more risk of dying because of diarrhea. Cases of liquid acute diarrhea with blood represent 80% of cases, diarrhea with blood represent 10%. Most frequent causes of liquid diarrhea are enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and rotaviruses and most frequent causes of bloody diarrhea are Shigella, E. coli (EHEC and EPEC). Campylobacter jejuni and Entamoeba histolytica. Annually 15,000 cases of typhoid fever are reported that continue being a public health problem. A negative correlation has been observed between the use of oral rehydration and infant mortality due to diarrhea. After prevention and control measures for cholera, a decrease in morbidity and mortality due to diarrhea has been observed. However, to reduce mortality due to this cause, it is necessary to treat the cases of acute dysentery and persistent diarrhea as well as to increase coverage of health care, to standardize the studies of etiology of diarrhea in Mexico, to establish surveillance centers for the study of diarrhea that give information on the distribution, frequency and trends of microbial agents and to achieve standardized microbiological and parasitological studies of etiology of diarrhea that support public health interventions as vaccination and selective administration of antibiotics.

  6. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes. PMID:26058036

  7. Inflammation-induced pain sensitization in men and women: does sex matter in experimental endotoxemia?

    PubMed

    Wegner, Alexander; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Rebernik, Laura; Roderigo, Till; Engelbrecht, Elisa; Jäger, Marcus; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Benson, Sven

    2015-10-01

    A role of the innate immune system is increasingly recognized as a mechanism contributing to pain sensitization. Experimental administration of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constitutes a model to study inflammation-induced pain sensitization, but all existing human evidence comes from male participants. We assessed visceral and musculoskeletal pain sensitivity after low-dose LPS administration in healthy men and women to test the hypothesis that women show greater LPS-induced hyperalgesia compared with men. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, healthy men (n = 20) and healthy women using oral contraceptives (n = 20) received an intravenous injection of 0.4 ng/kg body weight LPS or placebo. Pain sensitivity was assessed with established visceral and musculoskeletal pain models (ie, rectal pain thresholds; pressure pain thresholds for different muscle groups), together with a heartbeat perception (interoceptive accuracy) task. Plasma cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6) were measured along with state anxiety at baseline and up to 6-hour postinjection. Lipopolysaccharide application led to significant increases in plasma cytokines and state anxiety and decreased interoceptive awareness in men and women (P < 0.001, condition effects), with more pronounced LPS-induced cytokine increases in women (P < 0.05, interaction effects). Although both rectal and pressure pain thresholds were significantly decreased in the LPS condition (all P < 0.05, condition effect), no sex differences in endotoxin-induced sensitization were observed. In summary, LPS-induced systemic immune activation leads to visceral and musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, irrespective of biological sex. These findings support the broad applicability of experimental endotoxin administration as a translational preclinical model of inflammation-induced pain sensitization in both sexes.

  8. Travelers' diarrhea: Risk reduction and management.

    PubMed

    Moore, Karen S

    2015-11-15

    Travelers' diarrhea is a common complaint for patients traveling abroad. Onset of illness, symptoms experienced, and the duration of symptoms are greatly impacted by the causative agent. This article explores the causes, prevention recommendations, and treatment methodologies recommended for this common condition.

  9. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  10. Diarrhea Management Training in Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnail, Scott D.; Artz, Lynn M.; Geiger, Brian F.; Petri, Cynthia J.; Bailey, Rebecca; Mason, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the health of young children and how to safely and effectively care for children with diarrhea in the home and in early child care settings. Discusses specific intervention and program activities, including specially designed materials for mixing homemade oral rehydration usage. (Author/SD)

  11. Refractory diarrhea: A paraneoplastic syndrome of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Wang, Huan-Min

    2015-07-07

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. Diarrheal NB is quite rare and is not easy to diagnose in the early stage. Six cases of diarrheal NB in our hospital treated from 1996 to 2006 were retrospectively analyzed, including characteristics such as electrolyte imbalance, pathologic features, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) immunohistochemical staining results, treatment, and prognosis. All patients were boys with 3-8 loose or watery stools each day and routine fecal tests were normal. Abdominal tumors were identified by B-ultrasound. Drugs were ineffective. Three patients underwent surgery, and the remaining three patients received surgery and chemotherapy. Diarrhea stopped after treatment in five patients. Two patients died due to intractable hypokalemia. The tumor was located in the adrenal gland in four patients, in the upper retroperitoneum in one patient, and in the presacral area in one patient. Pathologic findings were NB and ganglioneuroblastoma. Five patients were at clinical stage I-II, and one was at stage III. Four patients survived (followed-up for 6 mo to 4 years). Immunohistochemical staining for VIP was positive. Refractory diarrhea is a paraneoplastic syndrome of NB and is rare. Patients aged 1-3 years who present with chronic intractable diarrhea should be followed closely. Intractable diarrhea, hypokalemia, and dysplasia are the initial clinical manifestations. Increased VIP is characteristic of this disease. Potassium supplementation plays a vital role in the treatment procedure, especially preoperatively. The prognosis of diarrheal NB is good following appropriate treatment.

  12. Review: Management of postprandial diarrhea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Money, Mary E; Camilleri, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Unexpected, urgent, sometimes painful bowel movements after eating are common complaints among adults. Without a clear etiology, if pain is present and resolves with the movements, this is usually labeled "irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea" based solely on symptoms. If this symptom-based approach is applied exclusively, it may lead physicians not to consider treatable conditions: celiac disease, or maldigestion due to bile acid malabsorption, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or an a-glucosidase (sucrase, glucoamylase, maltase, or isomaltase) deficiency. These conditions can be misdiagnosed as irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (or functional diarrhea, if pain is not present). Limited testing is currently available to confirm these conditions (antibody screens for celiac disease; fecal fat as a surrogate marker for pancreatic function). Therefore, empirical treatment with alpha amylase, pancreatic enzymes, or a bile acid-binding agent may simultaneously treat these patients and serve as a surrogate diagnostic test. This review will summarize the current evidence for bile acid malabsorption, and deficiencies of pancreatic enzymes or a-glucosidases as potential causes for postprandial diarrhea, and provide an algorithm for treatment options.

  13. Travelers' diarrhea in children visiting tropical countries.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filipe Glória; Figueiredo, António; Varandas, Luis

    2009-01-01

    We studied a group of 174 Portuguese children (aged 2 mo-16 y) who mostly traveled to tropical Portuguese-speaking countries and found an attack rate of 21.8% for travelers' diarrhea, much lower than previously described. We also showed that African rate analysis by region may hide significant differences between countries.

  14. Travelers' diarrhea and toxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, S L; Kean, B H; Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Bessudo, D

    1975-05-01

    In a group of 133 United States students studied for 18 days after arriving in Mexico, diarrhea developed in 38 (29 per cent). Diarrhea rarely began before the fourth day, and the mean onset was 13 days after arrival. Symptoms lasted an average of 3.4 days but persisted in 21 per cent of sick students. Heat-labile enterotoxin-producing Escheria coli was found in the stools of 72 per cent of sick and 15 per cent of healthy students. None had heat-labile Esch. coli when they entered Mexico. The incubation period was short, generally 24 to 48 hours, and the carrier state was five days or less in 82 per cent of students surveyed. Entamoeba histolytica was found in 6 per cent of cases of diarrhea, but not salmonella, shigella or penetrating Esch. coli. These studies suggest that approximately 70 per cent of travelers' diarrhea in Mexico is associated with heat-labile toxigenic strains of Esch. coli.

  15. [Diarrhea from the infectologist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Nemes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-02-22

    Gastroenteritis is a nonspecific term for various pathologic states of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastroenteritis causing pathogens are the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the developed countries diarrhea is the most common reason for missing work, while in the developing world, it is a leading cause of death. Internationally, the mortality rate is 5-10 million deaths each year. "Traveller's diarrhea" is a polyetiologic common health problem of international travellers which affects travellers generally for days, but it can result in chronic postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome as well. Infectious agents usually cause acute gastroenteritis either by adherence of the intestinal mucosa, or by mucosal invasion, enterotoxin production, and/or cytotoxin production. The incubation period can often suggest the cause of etiology. When symptoms occur within 6 hours of eating, ingestion of preformed toxin of S. aureus or Bacillus cereus should be suspected. The incidence of hypervirulent C. difficile associated colitis is an emerging problem as a healthcare system associated infection. While infectious agents do not commonly cause chronic diarrhea, those that do include C. difficile, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium, Aeromonas and Yersinia . Amoebiasis is the second to malaria as a protozoal cause of death. Infection with HIV is also a common cause of diarrhea.

  16. Infectious diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, P D; Janoff, E N

    1988-09-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly diarrhea, are common in patients with AIDS. Recent evidence indicates that enteric pathogens can be identified in most of these cases. Appreciating the clinical features caused by protozoal, fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens will assist the clinician in effectively evaluating the gastrointestinal symptoms. Antimicrobial agents now are available for many of these pathogens.

  17. Diarrhea Management Training in Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winnail, Scott D.; Artz, Lynn M.; Geiger, Brian F.; Petri, Cynthia J.; Bailey, Rebecca; Mason, J.W.

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the health of young children and how to safely and effectively care for children with diarrhea in the home and in early child care settings. Discusses specific intervention and program activities, including specially designed materials for mixing homemade oral rehydration usage. (Author/SD)

  18. Novel norovirus in dogs with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, João Rodrigo; Barclay, Leslie; Nascimento, Maria São José; Vinjé, Jan

    2010-06-01

    To identify the prevalence and genetic variability of noroviruses in dogs, we tested fecal samples by using reverse transcription-PCR. We found canine norovirus in 40% and 9% of dogs with and without diarrhea, respectively. The virus was genetically unrelated to other noroviruses and constitutes a tentative new genogroup.

  19. Acupuncture for chronic diarrhea in adults

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Zongshi; Li, Bo; Wu, Jiani; Tian, Jinhui; Xie, Shang; Mao, Zhi; Zhou, Jing; Kim, Tae-Hun; Liu, Zhishun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: As 2 major common types of chronic diarrhea, functional diarrhea (FD) and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) affect 1.54% to 1.72% of people in China. Acupuncture is commonly used in clinical practice for patients with chronic diarrhea. Here, we present a protocol of systematic review aimed at systematically review all the clinical evidence on the effectiveness of acupuncture for treating FD and IBS-D in adults. Methods: The review will be performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. We will search the following databases from their inception to January 2017: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, China Biology Medicine disc, Wan-Fang Data, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Citation Information by National Institute of Informatics, Oriental Medicine Advanced Searching Integrated System by Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, and Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator (J-stage). Clinical trial registrations will also be searched. Primary outcome measures are the change of bowel movements. The secondary outcomes include stool consistency, quality of life scales, other standardized rating scales, patient satisfaction, and acupuncture-related adverse effects assessment. Ethics and dissemination: This review does not require ethical approval and will be disseminated electronically or in print. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015017574. PMID:28121941

  20. [Treatment of choleriform diarrhea during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Grados, P; Battilana, C A

    1994-03-01

    A retrospective review was conducted of the clinical histories of 43 pregnant women treated for acute diarrheal disease in the emergency ward of the María Auxiliadora Departmental Hospital (HADMA) in Lima, Peru, and 32 of the histories were selected for this study. These 32 patients had been admitted to the cholera treatment unit (CTU) of the HADMA for acute choleraic diarrhea with moderate or severe dehydration. The objective was to analyze the clinical evolution of the patients, their response to isotonic rehydration therapy (0.9% saline solution), and the consequences for their pregnancies. The following variables were examined: age; trimester of pregnancy; heart rate and mean blood pressure (MBP) at admission; number of hours since last normal urination; duration of diarrhea; degree of dehydration; volume of diarrhea and vomiting; volume of saline solution administered in the first 2 hours and in total; volume of multi-electrolyte solution (MES) or oral rehydration salts (ORS) administered from the second to the sixth hour and in total; and hours between admission to the emergency ward and transfer to the cholera treatment unit (EME/CTU). Logistic regression analysis revealed a direct and statistically significant correlation between the time of recovery of diuresis and the EME/CTU (P = 0.001; r = 0.65), as well as between time of recovery of diuresis and the volume of diarrhea in the first 4 hours.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Experimental Diabetes Induces Structural, Inflammatory and Vascular Changes of Achilles Tendons

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo R.; Martins, Conceição S.; Rocha, Yuri R.; Braga, Allysson B. R.; Mattos, Rômulo M.; Hecht, Fábio; Brito, Gerly A. C.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g) of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98) vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68) vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18) vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99) vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy. PMID:24130676

  2. Experimental diabetes induces structural, inflammatory and vascular changes of Achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo R; Martins, Conceição S; Rocha, Yuri R; Braga, Allysson B R; Mattos, Rômulo M; Hecht, Fábio; Brito, Gerly A C; Nasciutti, Luiz E

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g) of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98) vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68) vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18) vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99) vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy.

  3. Experimental investigations of phase error caused by electrode impedance in laboratory spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L. D.; Seleznev, N. V.

    2016-12-01

    High frequency phase errors that plague spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements are partly due to the effects of electrode impedance. Others have recently proposed an experimental correction procedure based on a simplified electrical model of the system under test. The application of the method is limited due to the dependence of the correction on the input capacitance (Ci) of SIP instruments. With this study, we evaluated the correction procedure with a new experimental set up, confirming the improved phase accuracy at high frequency. In addition, we propose an experimental method to calculate Ci based on the experimental set up used for each measurement. The method utilizes well characterized fluids, with known electrical properties, for the accurate estimation of Ci. Following this new procedure, Ci of the used set up was determined to be 6.30 ± 0.29 pF. High frequency errors were further suppressed when the calculated, versus the estimated, Ci was used. Correction results suggest that Ci is weakly dependent on sample properties. The correction procedure with the experimental determination of Ci significantly improves the quality of SIP measurements on unconsolidated sediments and rock cores.

  4. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, P<0.0001). This local inflammation was associated with a systemic increase in hsCRP (0.24 mg/L, P = 0.038), IL-6 (12.52 ng/L, P = 0.0002) and MCP-1 (9.10 ng/l, P = 0.124) in peripheral blood samples between baseline and day 21, which decreased at day 42. Monocytes showed an enhanced adherence to endothelial cells and increased foam cell formation after oxLDL uptake (P<0.050) at day 21 of gingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  5. Entamoeba moshkovskii Is Associated With Diarrhea in Infants and Causes Diarrhea and Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Chikako; Kabir, Mamun; Taniuchi, Mami; Mondal, Dinesh; Kobayashi, Seiki; Ali, Ibne Karim M.; Sobuz, Shihab U.; Senba, Masachika; Houpt, Eric; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.; Hamano, Shinjiro

    2012-01-01

    Background.Entamoeba moshkovskii is prevalent in developing countries and morphologically indistinguishable from pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica and nonpathogenic Entamoeba dispar. It is not known if E. moshkovskii is pathogenic. Methods.Mice were intracecally challenged with the trophozoites of each Entamoeba spp. to test the ability to cause diarrhea, and infants in Bangladesh were prospectively observed to see if newly acquired E. moshkovskii infection was associated with diarrhea. Results.E. moshkovskii and E. histolytica caused diarrhea and weight loss in susceptible mice. E. dispar infected none of the mouse strains tested. In Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh, E. moshkovskii, E. histolytica, and E. dispar were identified in 42 (2.95%), 66 (4.63%), and 5 (0.35%), respectively, of 1426 diarrheal episodes in 385 children followed prospectively from birth to one year of age. Diarrhea occurred temporally with acquisition of a new E. moshkovskii infection: in the 2 months preceding E. moshkvskii-associated diarrhea, 86% (36 of 42) of monthly surveillance stool samples were negative for E. moshkovskii. Conclusions.E. moshkovskii was found to be pathogenic in mice. In children, the acquisition of E. moshkovskii infection was associated with diarrhea. These data are consistent with E. moshkovskii causing disease, indicating that it is important to reexamine its pathogenicity. PMID:22723640

  6. Effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism on crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Skandali, Nikolina; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2014-06-01

    Hypothyroidism is known to exert significant structural and functional changes to the developing central nervous system, and can lead to the establishment of serious mental retardation and neurological problems. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil-induced experimental hypothyroidism on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, at two time-points of their lives: at birth (day-1) and at 21 days of age (end of lactation). Under all studied experimental conditions, offspring brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was found to be significantly decreased due to maternal hypothyroidism, in contrast to the two studied adenosinetriphosphatase (Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activities that were only found to be significantly altered right after birth (increased and decreased, respectively, following an exposure to gestational maternal hypothyroidism) and were restored to control levels by the end of lactation. As our findings regarding the pattern of effects that maternal hypothyroidism has on the above-mentioned crucial offspring brain enzyme activities are compared to those reported in the literature, several differences are revealed that could be attributed to both the mode of the experimental simulation approach followed as well as to the time-frames examined. These findings could provide the basis for a debate on the need of a more consistent experimental approach to hypothyroidism during neurodevelopment as well as for a further evaluation of the herein presented and discussed neurochemical (and, ultimately, neurodevelopmental) effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism, in a brain region-specific manner.

  7. Acute experimental tabun-induced intoxication and its therapy in rats.

    PubMed

    Krejcová, G; Kassa, J

    2004-03-01

    Pharmacological pretreatment and antidotal treatment on tabun-induced neurotoxicity were studied in male albino rats that were poisoned with a lethal dose of tabun (280 microg/kg i.m.; 100% of LD50 value) and observed at 24 hours and 7 days following tabun challenge. The neurotoxicity of tabun was evaluated using a Functional observational battery and an automatic measurement of motor activity. Pharmacological pretreatment as well as antidotal treatment were able to reverse most of tabun-induced neurotoxic signs observed at 24 hours following tabun poisoning. However, there was not significant difference between the efficacy of profylaxis and antidotal treatment to eliminate tabun-induced neurotoxicity. The combination of profylactic pretreatment and antidotal treatment seems to be slightly more effective in the elimination of tabun-induced neurotoxicity in rats at 24 hours following tabun challenge in comparison with the administration of profylactic pretreatment or antidotal treatment alone. At 7 days following tabun poisoning, very few neurotoxic signs in tabun-poisoned rats were observed regardless of administration of pharmacological pretreatment or antidotal treatment. Thus, our findings confirm that the combination of pharmacological pretreatment and antidotal treatment is not only able to protect the experimental animals from the lethal effects of tabun but also to eliminate most of tabun-induced signs of neurotoxicity in tabun-poisoned rats.

  8. Effects of Guchang Capsule on Dextran Sulphate Sodium-Induced Experimental Ulcerative Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoshan; Liu, Tong; Wang, Xiaohong; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Hong; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Guchang capsule (GC) is a Chinese materia medica standardized product extracted from 15 Chinese traditional medical herbs and it has been clinically used in the treatment of intestinal disease. In this study, in order to extend the research of GC in intestinal disease, we were aiming to evaluate potential effects of GC on dextran sulphate sodium- (DSS-) induced murine experimental colitis and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. GC treatment attenuated DSS-induced body weight loss and reduced the mortality. Moreover, GC treatment prevented DSS-induced colonic pathological damage; meanwhile it inhibited proinflammatory cytokines production in colon tissues. In vitro, GC significantly reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines production via inhibiting the activation of NF-κB in macrophage cells, and the expressions of several long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) which were reported in regulating NF-κB signaling pathway were obviously affected by adding GC into culture medium. In conclusion, our data suggested that administration of GC exhibits therapeutic effects on DSS-induced colitis partially through regulating the expression of NF-κB related lncRNAs in infiltrating immune cells. PMID:27313642

  9. Experimental Study of the Unsteady Actuation Effect on Induced Flow Characteristics in DBD Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab Gholamhosein, Pouryoussefi; Masoud, Mirzaei

    2015-05-01

    The main aim of this paper is to investigate unsteady actuation effects on the operation of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators and to study induced flow characteristics of steady and unsteady actuators in quiescent air. The parameters affecting the operation of unsteady plasma actuators were experimentally measured and compared with the ones for steady actuators. The effects of excitation frequency and duty cycle on the induced flow pattern properties were studied by means of hot-wire anemometers, and the smoke visualization method was also used. It was observed that the current and the mean induced velocity linearly increase with increasing duty cycle while they are not sensitive to excitation frequency. Furthermore, with increasing excitation frequency, the magnitude of vortices shedding from the actuator decreases while their frequency increases. Nevertheless, when the excitation frequency grows beyond a certain level, the induced flow downstream of the actuator behaves as a steady flow. However, the results for steady actuators show that by increasing the applied voltage and carrier frequency, the velocity of the induced flow first increases and then decreases with actuator saturation and the onset of the emission of streaky glow discharge.

  10. RAE-1 expression is induced during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is correlated with microglia cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Djelloul, Mehdi; Popa, Natalia; Pelletier, Florence; Raguénez, Gilda; Boucraut, José

    2016-11-01

    Retinoic acid early induced transcript-1 (RAE-1) glycoproteins are ligands of the activating immune receptor NKG2D. They are known as stress molecules induced in pathological conditions. We previously reported that progenitor cells express RAE-1 in physiological conditions and we described a correlation between RAE-1 expression and cell proliferation. In addition, we showed that Raet1 transcripts are induced in the spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. EAE is a model for multiple sclerosis which is accompanied by microglia proliferation and activation, recruitment of immune cells and neurogenesis. We herein studied the time course expression of the two members of the Raet1 gene family present in C57BL/6 mice, namely Raet1d and Raet1e, in the spinal cord during EAE. We report that Raet1d and Raet1e genes are induced early upon EAE onset and reach a maximal expression at the peak of the pathology. We show that myeloid cells, i.e. macrophages as well as microglia, are cellular sources of Raet1 transcripts. We also demonstrate that only Raet1d expression is induced in microglia, whereas macrophages expressed both Raet1d and Raet1e. Furthermore, we investigated the dynamics of RAE-1 expression in microglia cultures. RAE-1 induction correlated with cell proliferation but not with M1/M2 phenotypic orientation. We finally demonstrate that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) is a major factor controlling RAE-1 expression in microglia.

  11. Etanercept attenuates TNBS-induced experimental colitis: role of TNF-α expression.

    PubMed

    Paiotti, Ana Paula Ribeiro; Miszputen, Sender Jankiel; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fujiyama; Artigiani Neto, Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Franco, Marcello

    2011-10-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is associated with gut barrier dysfunction. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role into the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases because its expression is increased in inflamed mucosa of CD patients. Anti-TNF therapy improves significantly mucosal inflammation. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of Etanercept (ETC), a tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antagonist on the 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced experimental colitis. A total of 18 Wistar rats were randomized into four groups, as follows: (1) Sham: sham induced-colitis; (2) TNBS: non-treated induced-colitis; (3) ETC control; (4) ETC-treated induced-colitis. Rats from group 4 presented significant improvement either of macroscopic or of histopathological damage in the distal colon. The gene expression of TNF-α mRNA, decreased significantly in this group compared to the TNBS non-treated group. The treatment with etanercept attenuated the colonic damages and reduced the inflammation caused by TNBS. Taken together, our results suggest that ETC attenuates intestinal colitis induced by TNBS in Wistar rats by TNF-α downregulation.

  12. Marginal biotin deficiency can be induced experimentally in humans using a cost-effective outpatient design.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Shawna L; Henrich, Cindy L; Matthews, Nell I; Bogusiewicz, Anna; Dawson, Amanda M; Horvath, Thomas D; Owen, Suzanne N; Boysen, Gunnar; Moran, Jeffery H; Mock, Donald M

    2012-01-01

    To date, marginal, asymptomatic biotin deficiency has been successfully induced experimentally by the use of labor-intensive inpatient designs requiring rigorous dietary control. We sought to determine if marginal biotin deficiency could be induced in humans in a less expensive outpatient design incorporating a self-selected, mixed general diet. We sought to examine the efficacy of three outpatient study designs: two based on oral avidin dosing and one based on a diet high in undenatured egg white for a period of 28 d. In study design 1, participants (n = 4; 3 women) received avidin in capsules with a biotin binding capacity of 7 times the estimated dietary biotin intake of a typical self-selected diet. In study design 2, participants (n = 2; 2 women) received double the amount of avidin capsules (14 times the estimated dietary biotin intake). In study design 3, participants (n = 5; 3 women) consumed egg-white beverages containing avidin with a biotin binding capacity of 7 times the estimated dietary biotin intake. Established indices of biotin status [lymphocyte propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity; urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid, 3-hydroxyisovaleryl carnitine (3HIA-carnitine), and biotin; and plasma concentration of 3HIA-carnitine] indicated that study designs 1 and 2 were not effective in inducing marginal biotin deficiency, but study design 3 was as effective as previous inpatient study designs that induced deficiency by egg-white beverage. Marginal biotin deficiency can be induced experimentally by using a cost-effective outpatient design by avidin delivery in egg-white beverages. This design should be useful to the broader nutritional research community.

  13. Experimental investigations on flow induced vibration of an externally excited flexible plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Ashish; Darpe, Ashish K.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    Flow-induced vibration of a harmonically actuated flexible plate in the wake of an upstream bluff body is experimentally investigated. The experiments are performed in an open-ended wind tunnel. A flexible plate trailing a bluff body is under fluid induced excitation due to the flowing fluid. The additional external excitation to the trailing plate is applied using an electro-magnetic exciter. The frequency and amplitude of the external harmonic excitation are selected as variable parameters in the experiments and their effect on the plate vibration and is investigated. To know the nature of acoustic pressure wave generated from the vibrating system, near-field acoustic pressure is also measured. A laser vibrometer, a pressure microphone and a high-speed camera are employed to measure the plate vibration, pressure signal, and instantaneous images of the plate motion respectively. The results obtained indicate that the dynamics of the plate is influenced by both the flow-induced excitation and external harmonic excitation. When frequency of the two excitations is close enough, a large vibration level and a high tonal sound pressure are observed. At higher amplitude of external excitation, the frequency component corresponding to the flow-induced excitation is found to reduce significantly in the frequency spectrum of the vibration signal. It is observed that, for certain range of excitation frequency, the plate vibration first reduces, reaches a minimum value and then increases with increase in the level of external excitation. A fair qualitative agreement of the experimental results with numerical simulation result of the past study has been noted. In addition to the experiments, the role of phase difference between the flow-induced excitation generated from the front obstacle and externally applied harmonic excitation is investigated through numerical simulations. The result obtained reveals that the final steady state vibration of the coupled system is

  14. Eszopiclone Prevents Excitotoxicity and Neurodegeneration in the Hippocampus Induced by Experimental Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Xi, Ming-Chu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Yamuy, Jack; Sampogna, Sharon; Tsai, Kevin L.; Lim, Vincent; Morales, Francisco R.; Chase, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: This study was designed to determine the effects of eszopiclone on apnea-induced excitotoxic synaptic processes and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Design: Recurrent periods of apnea, which consisted of a sequence of apnea (75% SpO2), followed by ventilation with recovery to normoxia (> 95% SpO2), were induced for a period of three hours in anesthetized guinea pigs. The CA3 Schaffer collateral pathway in the hippocampus was stimulated and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) response was recorded in CA1. Animals in the experimental group received an intravenous injection of eszopiclone (3 mg/kg) 10 min prior to the initiation of the periods of recurrent apnea, and once every 60 min thereafter; control animals received comparable injections of vehicle. At the end of the 3-h period of recurrent apnea, the animals were perfused, and hippocampal sections were immunostained in order to determine the presence of apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Analyses and Results: Apnea resulted in a persistent increase in synaptic responsiveness of CA1 neurons as determined by analyses of the fEPSP. Eszopiclone antagonized the apnea-induced increase in the fEPSP. Morphological analyses revealed significant apoptosis of CA1 neurons in control animals; however, there was no significant apoptosis in eszopiclone-treated animals. Conclusions: Eszopiclone was determined to suppress the apnea-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons, thereby reducing/eliminating neurotoxicity. These data lend credence to our hypothesis that eszopiclone, exclusive of its hypnotic actions, has the capacity to function as a potent neuroprotective agent. Citation: Fung SJ; Xi MC; Zhang JH; Yamuy J; Sampogna S; Tsai KL; Lim V; Morales FR; Chase MH. Eszopiclone prevents excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus induced by experimental apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(12):1593-1601. PMID:20041595

  15. Muscarinic receptors involved in airway vascular leakage induced by experimental gastro-oesophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong-Yao; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Hao; Advenier, Charles; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Devillier, Philippe

    2008-04-23

    Gastro-oesophageal acid reflux may cause airway responses such as cough, bronchoconstriction and inflammation in asthmatic patients. Studies in humans or in animals have suggested that these responses involve cholinergic nerves. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the efferent vagal component on airway microvascular leakage induced by instillation of hydrochloric acid (HCl) into the oesophagus of guinea-pigs and the subtype of muscarinic receptors involved. Airway microvascular leakage induced by intra-oesophageal HCl instillation was abolished by bilateral vagotomy or by the nicotinic receptor antagonist, hexamethonium. HCl-induced leakage was inhibited by pretreatment with atropine, a non-specific muscarinic receptor antagonist, and also by pretreatment with either pirenzepine, a muscarinic M(1) receptor antagonist, or 4-DAMP, a muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonist. Pirenzepine was more potent than atropine and 4-DAMP. These antagonists were also studied on airway microvascular leakage or bronchoconstriction induced by intravenous administration of acetylcholine (ACh). Atropine, pirenzepine and 4-DAMP inhibited ACh-induced airway microvascular leakage with similar potencies. In sharp contrast, 4-DAMP and atropine were more potent inhibitors of ACh-induced bronchoconstriction than pirenzepine. Methoctramine, a muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonist, was ineffective in all experimental conditions. These results suggest that airway microvascular leakage caused by HCl intra-oesophageal instillation involves ACh release from vagus nerve terminals and that M(1) and M(3) receptors play a major role in cholinergic-mediated microvascular leakage, whereas M(3) receptors are mainly involved in ACh-induced bronchoconstriction.

  16. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-song; Li, Guo-xiu; Jia, Tao-ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results. PMID:28054555

  17. The effect of experimentally induced sedentariness on mood and psychobiological responses to mental stress

    PubMed Central

    Endrighi, Romano; Steptoe, Andrew; Hamer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests a link between sedentary behaviours and depressive symptoms. Mechanisms underlying this relationship are not understood, but inflammatory processes may be involved. Autonomic and inflammatory responses to stress may be heightened in sedentary individuals contributing to risk, but no study has experimentally investigated this. Aims To examine the effect of sedentary time on mood and stress responses using an experimental design. Method Forty-three individuals were assigned to a free-living sedentary condition and to a control condition (usual activity) in a cross-over, randomised fashion and were tested in a psychophysiology laboratory after spending 2 weeks in each condition. Participants completed mood questionnaires (General Health Questionnaire and Profile of Mood States) and wore a motion sensor for 4 weeks. Results Sedentary time increased by an average of 32 min/day (P = 0.01) during the experimental condition compared with control. Being sedentary resulted in increases in negative mood independent of changes in moderate to vigorous physical activity (ΔGHQ = 6.23, ΔPOMS = 2.80). Mood disturbances were associated with greater stress-induced inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) responses (β = 0.37). Conclusions Two weeks of exposure to greater free-living sedentary time resulted in mood disturbances independent of reduction in physical activity. Stress-induced IL-6 responses were associated with changes in mood. PMID:26294364

  18. Experimental investigation on the characteristics of supersonic fuel spray and configurations of induced shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Yu, Yu-Song; Li, Guo-Xiu; Jia, Tao-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The macro characteristics and configurations of induced shock waves of the supersonic sprays are investigated by experimental methods. Visualization study of spray shape is carried out with the high-speed camera. The macro characteristics including spray tip penetration, velocity of spray tip and spray angle are analyzed. The configurations of shock waves are investigated by Schlieren technique. For supersonic sprays, the concept of spray front angle is presented. Effects of Mach number of spray on the spray front angle are investigated. The results show that the shape of spray tip is similar to blunt body when fuel spray is at transonic region. If spray entered the supersonic region, the oblique shock waves are induced instead of normal shock wave. With the velocity of spray increasing, the spray front angle and shock wave angle are increased. The tip region of the supersonic fuel spray is commonly formed a cone. Mean droplet diameter of fuel spray is measured using Malvern’s Spraytec. Then the mean droplet diameter results are compared with three popular empirical models (Hiroyasu’s, Varde’s and Merrigton’s model). It is found that the Merrigton’s model shows a relative good correlation between models and experimental results. Finally, exponent of injection velocity in the Merrigton’s model is fitted with experimental results.

  19. New and safe experimental model of radiation-induced neurovascular histological changes for microsurgical research.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Ochoa, Sergi; Gallardo-Calero, Irene; Sallent, Andrea; López-Fernández, Alba; Vergés, Ramona; Giralt, Jordi; Aguirre-Canyadell, Marius; Velez, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The aim is to create a new and safe experimental model of radiation-induced neurovascular histological changes with reduced morbidity and mortality for use with experimental microsurgical techniques. Seventy-two Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were divided as follows: Group I: control group, 24 rats clinically evaluated during six weeks; Group II: evaluation of acute side-effects (two-week follow-up period), 24 irradiated (20 Gy) rats; and Group III: evaluation of subacute side-effects (six-week follow-up period), 24 irradiated (20 Gy) rats. Variables included clinical assessments, weight, vascular permeability (arterial and venous), mortality and histological studies. No significant differences were observed between groups with respect to the variables studied. Significant differences were observed between groups I vs II-III regarding survival rates and histological changes to arteries, veins and nerves. Rat body weights showed progressive increases in all groups, and the mortality rate of the present model is 10.4% compared with 30-40% in the previous models. In conclusion, the designed model induces selective changes by radiotherapy in the neurovascular bundle without histological changes affecting the surrounding tissues. This model allows therapeutic experimental studies to be conducted, including the viability of microvascular and microneural sutures post radiotherapy in the cervical neurovascular bundle.

  20. Experimental study to explore the 8Be-induced nuclear reaction via the Trojan horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qun-Gang; Li, Cheng-Bo; Zhou, Shu-Hua; Irgaziev, Bakhadir; Fu, Yuan-Yong; Spitaleri, Claudio; La Cognata, Marco; Zhou, Jing; Meng, Qiu-Ying; Lamia, Livio; Lattuada, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    To explore a possible indirect method for 8Be induced astrophysical reactions, the 8Be=(8Be+n ) cluster structure has been studied via the Trojan horse method. For the first time a 8Be nucleus having an ultrashort lifetime is studied by the Trojan horse method and a 9Be nucleus in the ground state is used for this purpose. The 9Be nucleus is assumed to have a (8Be+n ) cluster structure and used as a Trojan horse nucleus. The 8Be nucleus acts as a participant, while the neutron is a spectator to the virtual 8Be+d →α +6Li reaction via the 3-body reaction 8Be+d →α +6Li+n . The experimental neutron momentum distribution inside 9Be has been reconstructed. The agreement between the experimental momentum distribution and the theoretical one indicates that a (8Be+n ) cluster structure inside 9Be is very likely. Therefore, the experimental study of 8Be induced reactions, for example, the measurement of the 8Be+α →12C reaction proceeding through the Hoyle state, is possible.

  1. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid induces antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    González-Cuevas, J; Navarro-Partida, J; Marquez-Aguirre, A L; Bueno-Topete, M R; Beas-Zarate, C; Armendáriz-Borunda, J

    2011-01-01

    Experimental liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) is associated with oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammation. This work was focused on elucidating the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in this model of hepatotoxicity. Wistar male rats were treated with CCl(4) and EDTA (60, 120, or 240 mg/kg). Morphometric analyses were carried out in Masson's stained liver sections to determine fibrosis index. Coagulation tests prothrombin time (PT) and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) were also determined. Gene expression for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1), alpha1(I) procollagen gene (alpha1 Col I), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was monitored by real-time PCR. Antioxidant effect of EDTA was measured by its effects on lipid peroxidation; biological activity of ceruloplasmin (Cp), SOD, and catalase (Cat) were analyzed by zymography assays. Animals with CCl(4)-hepatic injury that received EDTA showed a decrement in fibrosis (20%) and lipid peroxidation (22%). The mRNA expression for TNF-alpha (55%), TGF-beta1 (50%), IL-6 (52%), and alpha1 Col I (60%) was also decreased. This group of animals showed increased Cp (62%) and SOD (25%) biological activities. Coagulation blood tests, Cat activity, and gene expression for SOD were not modified by EDTA treatment. This study demonstrates that EDTA treatment induces the activity of antioxidant enzymes, decreases lipid peroxidation, hepatic inflammation, and fibrosis in experimental liver fibrosis induced by CCl(4).

  2. Looking for evidence that personal hygiene precautions prevent traveler's diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Shlim, David R

    2005-12-01

    In the 50 years during which traveler's diarrhea has been studied, it has always been assumed that personal hygiene precautions can prevent or reduce the likelihood of developing traveler's diarrhea. However, 7 of 8 studies that specifically addressed this issue showed no correlation between the types of food selected and the risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea. The eighth study showed a correlation between a few dietary mistakes and a decreased risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea. A further increase in the number of dietary mistakes, however, did not continue to increase the risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea. Personal hygiene precautions, when performed under the direct supervision of an expatriate operating his or her own kitchen, can prevent traveler's diarrhea, but poor restaurant hygiene in most developing countries continues to create an insurmountable risk of acquiring traveler's diarrhea.

  3. Uncertainties Associated with Quantifying Climate Change Impacts on Human Health: A Case Study for Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Kolstad, Erik W.; Johansson, Kjell Arne

    2011-01-01

    Background Climate change is expected to have large impacts on health at low latitudes where droughts and malnutrition, diarrhea, and malaria are projected to increase. Objectives The main objective of this study was to indicate a method to assess a range of plausible health impacts of climate change while handling uncertainties in a unambiguous manner. We illustrate this method by quantifying the impacts of projected regional warming on diarrhea in this century. Methods We combined a range of linear regression coefficients to compute projections of future climate change-induced increases in diarrhea using the results from five empirical studies and a 19-member climate model ensemble for which future greenhouse gas emissions were prescribed. Six geographical regions were analyzed. Results The model ensemble projected temperature increases of up to 4°C over land in the tropics and subtropics by the end of this century. The associated mean projected increases of relative risk of diarrhea in the six study regions were 8–11% (with SDs of 3–5%) by 2010–2039 and 22–29% (SDs of 9–12%) by 2070–2099. Conclusions Even our most conservative estimates indicate substantial impacts from climate change on the incidence of diarrhea. Nevertheless, our main conclusion is that large uncertainties are associated with future projections of diarrhea and climate change. We believe that these uncertainties can be attributed primarily to the sparsity of empirical climate–health data. Our results therefore highlight the need for empirical data in the cross section between climate and human health. PMID:20929684

  4. Structural modulation of gut microbiota during alleviation of antibiotic-associated diarrhea with herbal formula.

    PubMed

    Lv, Weijie; Liu, Cui; Ye, Chunxin; Sun, Jiaqi; Tan, Xiaowen; Zhang, Chao; Qu, Qian; Shi, Dayou; Guo, Shining

    2017-02-21

    The gut microbiome is hypothesized to play a critical role in gastrointestinal diseases, including antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). To determine whether the traditional Chinese herbal formula of Shen Ling Bai Zhu San (SLBZS) modulates the composition of the gut microbiome during AAD treatment, an AAD diarrhea model was prepared in rats by gastric gavage with lincomycin for 7 successive days, followed by administration of SLBZS for one week. At all time points after the SLBZS treatment, the diarrhea rates were significantly or at least numerically lower than that of the untreated model group. Overall structural modulation of the gut microbiome occurred after SLBZS treatment, with reverting effects on the AAD-induced structural variations. At the genus level, the relative abundance of Sutterella was negatively correlated with SLBZS treatment and positively correlated with a lack of treatment, suggesting that Sutterella might be a pivotal phylotype associated with the improvement of AAD. The key phylotypes of the gut microbiome that responded to SLBZS indicated enrichment of beneficial bacteria, and particularly Bacteroides spp. These data therefore demonstrated that structural changes of the gut microbiome are induced by the Chinese herbal formula SLBZS. In conclusion, changes in the gut microbiome are associated with the diarrhea-controlling effect of SLBZS.

  5. A Phosphorylatable Sphingosine Analog Induces Airway Smooth Muscle Cytostasis and Reverses Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Experimental Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, David R.; Lecours, Pascale B.; Lemay, Anne-Marie; Beaulieu, Marie-Josée; Huppé, Carole-Ann; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Flamand, Nicolas; Don, Anthony S.; Bissonnette, Élyse; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laplante, Mathieu; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.; Bossé, Ynuk; Marsolais, David

    2017-01-01

    In asthma, excessive bronchial narrowing associated with thickening of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) causes respiratory distress. Numerous pharmacological agents prevent experimental airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) when delivered prophylactically. However, most fail to resolve this feature after disease is instated. Although sphingosine analogs are primarily perceived as immune modulators with the ability to prevent experimental asthma, they also influence processes associated with tissue atrophy, supporting the hypothesis that they could interfere with mechanisms sustaining pre-established AHR. We thus assessed the ability of a sphingosine analog (AAL-R) to reverse AHR in a chronic model of asthma. We dissected the pharmacological mechanism of this class of agents using the non-phosphorylatable chiral isomer AAL-S and the pre-phosphorylated form of AAL-R (AFD-R) in vivo and in human ASM cells. We found that a therapeutic course of AAL-R reversed experimental AHR in the methacholine challenge test, which was not replicated by dexamethasone or the non-phosphorylatable isomer AAL-S. AAL-R efficiently interfered with ASM cell proliferation in vitro, supporting the concept that immunomodulation is not necessary to interfere with cellular mechanisms sustaining AHR. Moreover, the sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase inhibitor SM4 and the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor antagonist VPC23019 failed to inhibit proliferation, indicating that intracellular accumulation of sphingosine-1-phosphate or interference with cell surface S1P1/S1P3 activation, are not sufficient to induce cytostasis. Potent AAL-R-induced cytostasis specifically related to its ability to induce intracellular AFD-R accumulation. Thus, a sphingosine analog that possesses the ability to be phosphorylated in situ interferes with cellular mechanisms that beget AHR. PMID:28270767

  6. Experimental invalidation of phase-transition-induced elastic softening in CrN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanmin; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianzhong; Chen, Miao; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Liping; He, Duanwei; Lin, Zhijun; Zhang, Ruifeng; Leinenweber, Kurt; Zhao, Yusheng

    2012-08-01

    We report experimental results of phase stability and incompressibility of CrN. The obtained bulk moduli for cubic and orthorhombic CrN are 257 and 262 GPa, respectively. These results invalidate the conclusion of phase-transition-induced elastic softening recently reported based on nonmagnetic simulations for cubic CrN [Nature Mater.NMAACR1476-112210.1038/nmat2549 8, 947 (2009)]. On the other hand, they provide the only experimental evidence to support the computational models involving the local magnetic moment of Cr atoms [Nature Mater.NMAACR1476-112210.1038/nmat2722 9, 283 (2010)], indicating that atomic spin has a profound influence on the material's elastic properties. We also demonstrate that nonstoichiometry in CrNx has strong effects on its structural stability.

  7. Theoretical modeling and experimental demonstration of Raman probe induced spectral dip for realizing a superluminal laser.

    PubMed

    Yablon, Joshua; Zhou, Zifan; Zhou, Minchuan; Wang, Ye; Tseng, S; Shahriar, M S

    2016-11-28

    We have demonstrated experimentally a Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) with a Raman resonance induced dip in the center of the gain profile, in order to produce an anomalous dispersion, necessary for making the laser superluminal. Numerical calculations match closely with experimental results, and indicate that the laser is operating superluminally, with the group index far below unity (~0.00526) at the center of the dip. The estimated factor of enhancement in the sensitivity to cavity length perturbation is ~190, approximately equaling the inverse of the group index. This enhancement factor can be made much higher via optimal tuning of parameters. Such a laser has the potential to advance significantly the field of high-precision metrology, with applications such as vibrometry, accelerometry, and rotation sensing.

  8. Antidiarrhoeal activity of leaf extract of celosia argentea in experimentally induced diarrhoea in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Praveen; Vidyasagar, Gali; Singh, Sunder; Ghule, Santosh; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2010-01-01

    In order to scientifically apprise some of the anecdotal, folkloric, ethno medical uses of celosia argentea, the present study was undertaken to examine the antidiarrhoeal properties of alcoholic extract of leaves of Celosia argentea on diarrhoea by using different experimental models. Anti-diarrhoeal effect was evaluated by castor oil induced diarrhoea, charcoal meal test and PGE(2) induced diarrhoea. Loperamide (2 mg/kg) and atropine (0.1mg/kg) were used as standard drugs. Extract was used in 100 and 200 mg/kg dose. It produced dose related anti-diarrhoeal effect. Results suggest that it may act centrally and may inhibit the PGE(2) to give anti-diarrhoeal effects. Result of charcoal meal test also suggests its anti-muscarinic activity.

  9. ANTIDIARRHOEAL ACTIVITY OF LEAF EXTRACT OF CELOSIA ARGENTEA IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED DIARRHOEA IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Praveen; Vidyasagar, Gali; Singh, Sunder; Ghule, Santosh; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2010-01-01

    In order to scientifically apprise some of the anecdotal, folkloric, ethno medical uses of celosia argentea, the present study was undertaken to examine the antidiarrhoeal properties of alcoholic extract of leaves of Celosia argentea on diarrhoea by using different experimental models. Anti-diarrhoeal effect was evaluated by castor oil induced diarrhoea, charcoal meal test and PGE2 induced diarrhoea. Loperamide (2 mg/kg) and atropine (0.1mg/kg) were used as standard drugs. Extract was used in 100 and 200 mg/kg dose. It produced dose related anti-diarrhoeal effect. Results suggest that it may act centrally and may inhibit the PGE2 to give anti-diarrhoeal effects. Result of charcoal meal test also suggests its anti-muscarinic activity. PMID:22247831

  10. Study of haemostatic disorders in experimentally induced leishmaniasis in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Valladares, J E; Ruiz De Gopegui, R; Riera, C; Alberola, J; Gállego, M; Espada, Y; Portús, M; Arboix, M

    1998-01-01

    Haemostatic alterations in dogs experimentally infected with Leishmania infantum were studied before and after therapy with meglumine antimonate. Haemostatic function tests including platelet count, collagen-induced platelet aggregation, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, plasma fibrinogen determination, and serum fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products concentration were performed. In the course of infection and before treatment, moderate thrombocytopenia (P<0.00001), decreased collagen induced platelet aggregation (P=0.0003), prolonged thrombin time (P=0.0117) and increased fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products were observed. Statistically significant differences of plasma fibrinogen concentration, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time were not encountered. Haemostatic parameters returned to normal values after therapy. The results indicate that Leishmania infection may impair haemostasis suggesting induction of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and that treating dogs in an early stage of infection may potentially avoid the possibility of developing an uncompensated DIC.

  11. Echinococcus granulosus: different cytokine profiles are induced by single versus multiple experimental infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Marqués, Juan M; Gavidia, Cesar M; Gonzalez, Armando E; Carmona, Carlos; García, Hector H; Chabalgoity, José A

    2012-02-01

    Modulation of host responses is an important strategy by which parasites ensure successful establishment and persistence. Host counteraction against this modulation may be required for the host to develop resistance to infection. In this pilot study, experimental infection of dogs with Echinococcus granulosus induced a strong polarization of the cytokine response towards a Th2 phenotype. Consecutive rounds of infection and cure induced resistance to infection resulting in a dramatically lower parasite burden. Repeatedly-infected resistant dogs also lost immune polarization and developed a balanced Th1/Th2 response. No major differences were observed in the production of regulatory cytokines (IL-10, TGF-β) between dogs with high parasite load and dogs with only few intestinal parasites. These results suggest that E. granulosus-driven immunomodulation contributes to successful infection in the definitive host. This information might be relevant for the development of more effective vaccines against this stage of the parasite. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. The antioxidant response induced by Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts in animals bearing experimental solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Gruia, Maria Iuliana; Oprea, Eliza; Gruia, Ion; Negoita, Valentina; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2008-03-27

    Lonicera caerulea is a species of bush native to the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russian Far East) whose berries have been extensively studied due to their potential high antioxidant activity. The aim of our work was to investigate the in vivo effects of the antioxidant action of Lonicera caerulea berry extracts on the dynamics of experimentally-induced tumors. Our data showed that aqueous Lonicera caerulaea extracts reduced the tumor volume when administered continuously during the tumor growth and development stages, but augmented the tumor growth when the administration of extracts started three weeks before tumor grafting. Prolonged administration of Lonicera caerulaea berry extracts induced the antioxidant defense mechanism in the tumor tissues, while surprisingly amplifying the peripheral oxidative stress.

  13. Prophylactic efficacy of buparvaquone in experimentally induced Theileria annulata infection in calves.

    PubMed

    Bansal, G C; Sharma, N N

    1989-10-01

    The antitheilerial activity of buparvaquone (BW 720C) was evaluated in experimentally induced Theileria annulata infections in cross-bred male calves. T. annulata infections were induced by injecting a suspension of infected ground tick tissue suspension (GUTTS) equivalent to two ticks subcutaneously into each calf. Buparvaquone at a dose of 2.5 mg kg-1 body weight was given as a single injection (intramuscularly) on Day 0 (Group 1), Day 8 (Group 2) and Day 12 (Group 3) post-infection. The animals in Groups 4 and 5 were untreated and challenged controls, respectively. All of the recovered animals from Groups 1-4 were challenged with a lethal dose of T. annulata at 6 weeks post-infection. The immunized animals were resistant to the homologous challenge, which killed three of four control animals (Group 5); the controls showed typical antemortem and post-mortem lesions of theileriosis.

  14. An experimental investigation of airflow-induced vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Bosze, E.; Boissevain, J.; Simon-Gillo, J.

    1997-07-01

    This report summarizes an experimental investigation of vibrations within the multiplicity and vertex detector (MVD). In particular, the maximum displacements of several MVD components were determined from accelerometer measurements of vibrations induced by an electronics air-cooling system. For an MVD inlet air volumetric flow rate of 0.022 m{sup 3}/s, maximum displacements of several MVD components including a multi-chip module, the Rohacell inlet air plenum, and an aluminum structural cross support, were found to be on the order of 1.5 {mu}m. Consequently, it was concluded that air induced vibrations will not significantly interfere with the MVD`s long-term structural integrity or operating performance. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Microparticles bearing encephalitogenic peptides induce T-cell tolerance and ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R; Martin, Aaron J; McCarthy, Derrick P; Terry, Rachael L; Hunter, Zoe N; Yap, Woon Teck; Getts, Meghann Teague; Pleiss, Michael; Luo, Xunrong; King, Nicholas JC; Shea, Lonnie D; Miller, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant T-cell activation underlies many autoimmune disorders, yet most attempts to induce T-cell tolerance have failed. Building on previous strategies for tolerance induction that exploited natural mechanisms for clearing apoptotic debris, we show that antigen-decorated microparticles (500-nm diameter) induce long-term T-cell tolerance in mice with relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Specifically, intravenous infusion of either polystyrene or biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles bearing encephalitogenic peptides prevents the onset and modifies the course of the disease. These beneficial effects require microparticle uptake by marginal zone macrophages expressing the scavenger receptor MARCO and are mediated in part by the activity of regulatory T cells, abortive T-cell activation and T-cell anergy. Together these data highlight the potential for using microparticles to target natural apoptotic clearance pathways to inactivate pathogenic T cells and halt the disease process in autoimmunity. PMID:23159881

  16. Antifungal activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. and thymol on experimentally induced dermatomycoses.

    PubMed

    Soković, M; Glamoclija, J; Cirić, A; Kataranovski, D; Marin, P D; Vukojević, J; Brkić, D

    2008-12-01

    The in vivo evaluation of the toxicological and antifungal activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. and its main component thymol was made on 2-month-old male Wistar rats. We examined the therapeutic potency against experimentally induced dermatomycoses in rats, using the most frequent dermatomycetes, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, and T. tonsurans. The therapeutic efficacy of a 1% solution of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris and thymol as well as the commercial preparation bifonazole was evaluated. During the 37-day observation period the oil-treated animals were cured.

  17. [Protective Activity of Prion Protein Fragments after Immunization of Annimals with Experimentally Induced Alzheimer's Disease].

    PubMed

    Volpina, O M; Volkova, T D; Medvinskaya, N I; Kamynina, A V; Zaporozhskaya, Y V; Aleksandrova, I J; Koroev, D O; Samokhin, A N; Nesterova, I V; Deygin, V I; Bobkova, N V

    2015-01-01

    The prion protein is considered as one of the membrane targets of neurotoxic beta-amyloid during Alzheimer's disease development. We have chosen and synthesized 17-33, 23-33, 95-110 and 101-115 prion fragments involved in beta-amyloid binding. The effect of immunization with the peptides on the features of Alzheimer's disease was investigated in animals with an experimentally induced form of the disease. It was shown that immunization either with peptide 17-33 or with protein conjugates of peptides 23-33 and 101-115 increases the level of brain beta-amyloid and improves morfofunctional state of the brain.

  18. Experimentally induced fatty liver and kidney syndrome in the young turkey.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, C C; Siller, W G

    1983-01-01

    Turkeys were fed up to four weeks of age on diets of low biotin content and then fasted for 18 hours. Three birds developed clinical signs of fatty liver and kidney syndrome (FLKS) and on autopsy had pale and swollen livers and kidneys. Morphological studies showed fatty accumulations in liver, kidney, heart and proventriculus but no signs of inflammatory or degenerative changes. The infiltrated lipid had an abnormal fatty acid composition, with an increased proportion of monounsaturated fatty acids. Affected birds suffered from severe hypoglycaemia and hepatic glycogen was depleted. These findings demonstrate that FLKS can be induced experimentally in turkeys.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin E on experimental lens-induced uveitis.

    PubMed

    Cid, L; Pararajasegaram, G; Sevanian, A; Gauderman, W; Romero, J L; Marak, G E; Rao, N A

    1992-01-01

    The anti-phlogistic effect of dietary vitamin E supplementation on the acute inflammation observed in experimental lens-induced uveitis in Brown Norway rats was studied. The effects of vitamin E were examined using histopathologic parameters as well as by measuring the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites. Histologic examination of the eyes revealed that the vitamin E-deficient animals had the most severe destruction of the retina, while those animals receiving the vitamin E-supplemented diet exhibited the best preservation of the retinal architecture. Levels of arachidonic acid metabolites, as determined by radioimmunoassay, were significantly higher in vitamin E deficient rats as compared with rats on a normal diet.

  20. Experimental Studies of Noise-Induced Phenomena in a Tunnel Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantegna, Rosario N.; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    Noise induced phenomena are investigated in a physical system based on a tunnel diode. The stochastic differential equation describing this physical system is analog to the Langevin equation of an overdamped Brownian particle diffusing in a nonlinear potential. This simple and versatile physical system allows a series of experiments testing and clarifying the role of the noise and of its correlation in the stochastic dynamics of bistable or metastable Systems. Experimental investigatio ns of stochastic resonance, resonant activation and noise enhanced stability are discussed.

  1. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of {alpha}-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    SciTech Connect

    Hermanne, A.; Tarkanyi, F.; Takacs, S.; Szucs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to E{alpha}=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi({alpha},2n)211At, 209Bi({alpha},3n)210At, 209Bi({alpha},x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  2. Experimental Study of the Cross Sections of α-Particle Induced Reactions on 209Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanne, A.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Szúcs, Z.

    2005-05-01

    Alpha particle induced reactions for generation of 211At used in therapeutic nuclear medicine and possible contaminants were investigated with the stacked foil activation technique on natural bismuth targets up to Eα=39 MeV. Excitation functions for the reactions 209Bi(α,2n)211At, 209Bi(α,3n)210At, 209Bi(α,x) 210Po obtained from direct alpha emission measurements and gamma spectra from decay products are compared with earlier literature values. Thick target yields have been deduced from the experimental cross sections.

  3. Experimental studies of excitations in a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Niffenegger, Robert; Chen, Yong P.

    2014-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of various excitation processes in a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields. We have systematically studied controllable inter-band excitations by modulating the strength of the Raman coupling, and probed the resultant decay from the upper dressed bands and heating of the BEC. We also present preliminary results probing the effects of synthetic spin-orbit coupling and gauge fields on collective excitations as well as photoassociation processes in the BEC.

  4. Experimental and computational investigation of confined laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Yuan, Hao; Fu, Yangting; Wang, Zhe

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an experimental and computational study on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for both unconfined flat surface and confined cavity cases. An integrated LIBS system is employed to acquire the shockwave and plasma plume images. The computational model consists of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, which are necessary to describe shockwave behaviors. The numerical predictions are validated against shadowgraphic images in terms of shockwave expansion and reflection. The three-dimensional (3D) shockwave morphology and velocity fields are displayed and discussed.

  5. Theoretical and experimental optical studies of cholesteric liquid crystal films with thermally induced pitch gradients.

    PubMed

    Zografopoulos, Dimitrios C; Kriezis, Emmanouil E; Mitov, Michel; Binet, Corinne

    2006-06-01

    The reflection properties of cholesteric films with thermally induced pitch gradients are theoretically and experimentally studied. It is shown that the optical behavior of such films corresponds to the averaged contribution of a number of stochastic pitch variation profiles, due to the transversal and longitudinal nonuniformities that develop in the helical structure of such samples. Depending on the annealing time, both narrow-band and broadband behavior can be selectively achieved. The influence of the pitch profile gradient on the broadband reflection performance of cholesteric samples is theoretically analyzed, and a multi-slab structure for achieving optimum efficiency is proposed.

  6. Clinical trial evaluating cholestyramine to prevent diarrhea in patients maintained on low-fat diets during pelvic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chary, S.; Thomson, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A prospective randomized trial to determine the value of a low fat diet with or without cholestyramine in the treatment of acute intestinal complications of pelvic irradiation is presented. A total of 35 patients receiving pelvic irradiation were entered in the study and all patients had received a 40 gm fat diet. The group was then randomized to receive either placebo (17 patients) or cholestyramine (18 patients). Diarrhea occurred in six out of 16 evaluable patients in the control group and only one of the 17 evaluable patients in the cholestyramine group. The frequency of diarrhea and the diarrhea scale remained high in the placebo group in the entire observation period. Statistical analysis had revealed better diarrhea control in the cholestyramine group. In this report mechanism by which diarrhea occurs following pelvic irradiation is discussed. The adverse effects associated with the use of cholestyramine have been presented. It was concluded that cholestyramine is effective in preventing acute diarrhea induced by pelvic irradiation in patients receiving a low fat diet but is associated with side effects.

  7. Catechin averts experimental diabetes mellitus-induced vascular endothelial structural and functional abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Pooja; Khanna, Deepa; Balakumar, Pitchai

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an induction of vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), an initial event that could lead to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and hypertension. Previous studies showed that catechin, a key component of green tea, possesses vascular beneficial effects. We investigated the effect of catechin hydrate in diabetes mellitus-induced experimental vascular endothelial abnormalities (VEA). Streptozotocin (50 mg/kg, i.p., once) administration to rats produced diabetes mellitus, which subsequently induced VEA in 8 weeks by markedly attenuating acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation in the isolated aortic ring preparation, decreasing aortic and serum nitrite/nitrate concentrations and impairing aortic endothelial integrity. These abnormalities in diabetic rats were accompanied with elevated aortic superoxide anion generation and serum lipid peroxidation in addition to hyperglycemia. Catechin hydrate treatment (50 mg/kg/day p.o., 3 weeks) markedly prevented diabetes mellitus-induced VEA and vascular oxidative stress. Intriguingly, in vitro incubation of L-NAME (100 μM), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, or Wortmannin (100 nM), a selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), markedly prevented catechin hydrate-induced improvement in acetylcholine-provoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in the diabetic rat aorta. Moreover, catechin hydrate treatment considerably reduced the elevated level of serum glucose in diabetic rats. In conclusion, catechin hydrate treatment prevents diabetes mellitus-induced VED through the activation of endothelial PI3K signal and subsequent activation of eNOS and generation of nitric oxide. In addition, reduction in high glucose, vascular oxidative stress, and lipid peroxidation might additionally contribute to catechin hydrate-associated prevention of diabetic VEA.

  8. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats (“EAE” group). 2- “N. sativa + EAE” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- “EAE + N. sativa” group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE. PMID:26261504

  9. Nigella sativa amliorates inflammation and demyelination in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Noor, Neveen A; Fahmy, Heba M; Mohammed, Faten F; Elsayed, Anwar A; Radwan, Nasr M

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the major, immune-mediated, demyelinating neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established animal model of MS. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective and ameliorative effects of N. sativa seeds (2.8 g/kg body weight) in EAE-induced Wistar rats. EAE-induced rats were divided into: 1- EAE-induced rats ("EAE" group). 2- "N. sativa + EAE" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa 2 weeks prior EAE induction until the end of the experiment. 3- "EAE + N. sativa" group received daily oral administration of N. sativa after the appearance of first clinical signs until the end of the experiment. All animals were decapitated at the 28th day post EAE-induction. EAE was investigated using histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examinations in addition to determination of some oxidative stress parameters in the cerebellum and medulla. N. sativa suppressed inflammation observed in EAE-induced rats. In addition, N. sativa enhanced remyelination in the cerebellum. Moreover, N. sativa reduced the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β1). N. sativa seeds could provide a promising agent effective in both the protection and treatment of EAE.

  10. Experimental febrile seizures induce age-dependent structural plasticity and improve memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, K; Ichikawa, J; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y; Koyama, R

    2016-03-24

    Population-based studies have demonstrated that children with a history of febrile seizure (FS) perform better than age-matched controls at hippocampus-dependent memory tasks. Here, we report that FSs induce two distinct structural reorganizations in the hippocampus and bidirectionally modify future learning abilities in an age-dependent manner. Compared with age-matched controls, adult mice that had experienced experimental FSs induced by hyperthermia (HT) on postnatal day 14 (P14-HT) performed better in a cognitive task that requires dentate granule cells (DGCs). The enhanced memory performance correlated with an FS-induced persistent increase in the density of large mossy fiber terminals (LMTs) of the DGCs. The memory enhancement was not observed in mice that had experienced HT-induced seizures at P11 which exhibited abnormally located DGCs in addition to the increased LMT density. The ectopic DGCs of the P11-HT mice were abolished by the diuretic bumetanide, and this pharmacological treatment unveiled the masked memory enhancement. Thus, this work provides a novel basis for age-dependent structural plasticity in which FSs influence future brain function. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology. PMID:25563619

  12. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology.

  13. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela Petiti, Juan Pablo; Valle Sosa, Liliana del; Gutierrez, Silvina; Paul, Ana Lucia de; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Ines

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC{delta} in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC{delta} in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC{delta}, ERK1/2 and p38.

  14. Modeling Chemotherapy-Induced Hair Loss: From Experimental Propositions toward Clinical Reality.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Sharov, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss is one of the most devastating side effects of cancer treatment. To study the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the hair follicle, a number of experimental models have been proposed. Yoon et al. report that transplantation of human scalp hair follicles onto chemotherapy-treated immunodeficient mice serves as an excellent in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss. Yoon et al. demonstrate that (i) the response of human hair follicles grafted onto immunodeficient mice to cyclophosphamide resembles the key features of the chemotherapy-induced hair loss seen in patients with cancer and (ii) this human in vivo model for chemotherapy-induced hair loss is closer to clinical reality than to any earlier models. Undoubtedly, this model will serve as a valuable tool for analyses of the mechanisms that underlie this devastating side effect of anti-cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A proposal for the experimental detection of CSL induced random walk.

    PubMed

    Bera, Sayantani; Motwani, Bhawna; Singh, Tejinder P; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2015-01-07

    Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) is one possible explanation for dynamically induced collapse of the wave-function during a quantum measurement. The collapse is mediated by a stochastic non-linear modification of the Schrödinger equation. A consequence of the CSL mechanism is an extremely tiny violation of energy-momentum conservation, which can, in principle, be detected in the laboratory via the random diffusion of a particle induced by the stochastic collapse mechanism. In a paper in 2003, Collett and Pearle investigated the translational CSL diffusion of a sphere, and the rotational CSL diffusion of a disc, and showed that this effect dominates over the ambient environmental noise at low temperatures and extremely low pressures (about ten-thousandth of a pico-Torr). In the present paper, we revisit their analysis and argue that this stringent condition on pressure can be relaxed, and that the CSL effect can be seen at the pressure of about a pico-Torr. A similar analysis is provided for diffusion produced by gravity-induced decoherence, where the effect is typically much weaker than CSL. We also discuss the CSL induced random displacement of a quantum oscillator. Lastly, we propose possible experimental set-ups justifying that CSL diffusion is indeed measurable with the current technology.

  16. Ameliorative potential of fluoxetine/raloxifene combination on experimentally induced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kabel, Ahmed M; Elkhoely, Abeer A

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common types of malignancies in females worldwide. Targeting the estrogen receptors alone with raloxifene (RAL) reduces the incidence of estrogen receptor positive tumors. Fluoxetine (FLX) is one of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors that was proven to have anticancer properties. Our aim was to detect the effects of RAL/FLX combination on experimentally induced breast cancer. Eighty female Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups: 7,12-Dimethyl Benzanthracene (DMBA) induced breast cancer group, DMBA+RAL, DMBA+FLX and DMBA+RAL+FLX. Tumor volume, tissue malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) were determined in the tumor tissues. Parts of the tumor were subjected to histopathological examination. RAL or FLX alone or in combination induced significant increase in tumor CAT and SOD with significant decrease in tumor volume, tissue MDA, TNF-α, IL-6 and TGF-β1 and alleviated the histopathological and immunohistochemical changes compared to DMBA group. In conclusion, RAL/FLX combination had a better effect than each of RAL or FLX alone against DMBA-induced breast cancer in rats which may represent a new therapeutic modality for management of breast cancer.

  17. Bromocriptine induces parapoptosis as the main type of cell death responsible for experimental pituitary tumor shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Palmeri, Claudia Mariela; Petiti, Juan Pablo; Sosa, Liliana del Valle; Gutiérrez, Silvina; De Paul, Ana Lucía; Mukdsi, Jorge Humberto; Torres, Alicia Inés

    2009-10-01

    Bromocriptine (Bc) produces pituitary tumoral mass regression which induces the cellular death that was classically described as apoptosis. However, recent works have related that other mechanisms of cell death could also be involved in the maintenance of physiological and pathological pituitary homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the different types of cell death in the involution induced by Bc in experimental rat pituitary tumors. The current study demonstrated that Bc induced an effective regression of estrogen induced pituitary tumors by a mechanism identified as parapoptosis. This alternative cell death was ultrastructurally recognized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and an increased cell electron density, represented around 25% of the total pituitary cells counted. Furthermore, the results obtained from biochemical assays did not correspond to the criteria of apoptosis or necrosis. We also investigated the participation of p38, ERK1/2 and PKC delta in the parapoptotic pathway. An important observation was the significant increase in phosphorylated forms of these MAPKs, the holoenzyme and catalytic fragments of PKC delta in nuclear fractions after Bc administration compared to control and estrogen treated rats. Furthermore, the immunolocalization at ultrastructural level of these kinases showed a similar distribution pattern, with a prevalent localization at nuclear level in lactotrophs from Bc treated rats. In summary, we determined that parapoptosis is the predominant cell death type involved in the regression of pituitary tumors in response to Bc treatment, and may cause the activation of PKC delta, ERK1/2 and p38.

  18. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF HESPERIDIN ON CARDIOVASCULAR COMPLICATION IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION IN DIABETES IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Kakadiya, Jagdish; Mulani, Haresh; Shah, Nehal

    2010-01-01

    Present study was designed to evaluate effect Hesperidin on Cardiovascular Complication in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in normal and Streptozotocin-Nicotinamide induced in diabetic rats. Hesperidin (100 mg/kg, p.o) was administered for 28 days in rats injected with single dose of Streptozotocin (65 mg/kg, i.p, STZ) and Nicotinamide (110 mg/kg, i.p, NIC) and after isoproterenol (200 mg/kg, s.c.) induced myocardial infarction in rats on 29th and 30th day. At the end of experimental period (i.e. on the day 31) serum and heart tissues sample were collected, and glucose, HbA1c and Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and High density lipoprotein (HDL) and cholesterol ester synthetase (CES), lecithin Cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), systolic and diastolic blood pressure were find out. Administration of STZ–NIC in rats showed a significant (p<0.001) increased in the levels of serum glucose, glycosylated heamoglobin (HbA1c), Total Cholesterol (TC), Triglycerides (TG) and Low density lipoprotein (LDL) whereas the levels of High density lipoprotein (HDL) were found to be non significant but significant (p<0.001) increased in the level of heart tissues CES and significant (p<0.001, p<0.01) decreased LCAT and LPL, significantly (p<0.01) increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure as compared to respective control groups. Treatment with Hesperidin significantly (P<0.05) decreased HbA1c, glucose, CES level and significantly (P<0.01) decreased LDL, TC, TG, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and significant (P<0.01) increased LCAT and LPL level but no significantly change HDL in compared to diabetic control group. We concluded that HES (100 mg/kg) is effective in controlling blood glucose levels and reduced cardiac complication in experimentally induced myocardial infarction diabetic rats. PMID:24825971

  19. Harbingers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Madonia, Phillip N; Jordan, Paul; Manas, Kenneth; Bass, Pat

    2009-01-01

    : Recent research has recognized surrogate markers for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Among the most consistently identified markers are the leukocyte count, platelet count, and albumin level. Previous investigators failed to exclude patients with hematologic disorders that may have confounded their results. Therefore, the exclusion of this subset from our study lends it a unique perspective. : We undertook a retrospective review of inpatients at our institution that were diagnosed with nosocomial diarrhea and subsequently had a stool sample sent for C. difficile toxins A and B. Patients with major hematologic disorders were excluded. : A total of 77 C. difficile-positive patients and 91 C. difficile-negative patients were studied. Patients with CDAD had a significantly higher leukocyte and platelet count but a lower albumin level compared with patients without CDAD. : Our results support the conclusion of preceding studies that leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, and hypoalbuminemia are reliable clinical predictors for CDAD even after careful exclusion of confounding factors.

  20. The effects of experimental pain and induced optimism on working memory task performance.

    PubMed

    Boselie, Jantine J L M; Vancleef, Linda M G; Peters, Madelon L

    2016-07-01

    Pain can interrupt and deteriorate executive task performance. We have previously shown that experimentally induced optimism can diminish the deteriorating effect of cold pressor pain on a subsequent working memory task (i.e., operation span task). In two successive experiments we sought further evidence for the protective role of optimism on pain-induced working memory impairments. We used another working memory task (i.e., 2-back task) that was performed either after or during pain induction. Study 1 employed a 2 (optimism vs. no-optimism)×2 (pain vs. no-pain)×2 (pre-score vs. post-score) mixed factorial design. In half of the participants optimism was induced by the Best Possible Self (BPS) manipulation, which required them to write and visualize about a life in the future where everything turned out for the best. In the control condition, participants wrote and visualized a typical day in their life (TD). Next, participants completed either the cold pressor task (CPT) or a warm water control task (WWCT). Before (baseline) and after the CPT or WWCT participants working memory performance was measured with the 2-back task. The 2-back task measures the ability to monitor and update working memory representation by asking participants to indicate whether the current stimulus corresponds to the stimulus that was presented 2 stimuli ago. Study 2 had a 2 (optimism vs. no-optimism)×2 (pain vs. no-pain) mixed factorial design. After receiving the BPS or control manipulation, participants completed the 2-back task twice: once with painful heat stimulation, and once without any stimulation (counter-balanced order). Continuous heat stimulation was used with temperatures oscillating around 1°C above and 1°C below the individual pain threshold. In study 1, the results did not show an effect of cold pressor pain on subsequent 2-back task performance. Results of study 2 indicated that heat pain impaired concurrent 2-back task performance. However, no evidence was found

  1. Probiotics for Prevention and Treatment of Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Alfredo; Guandalini, Stefano; Lo Vecchio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Probiotics are increasingly used for prevention and treatment of diarrhea more in children than in adults. Given the broad spectrum of diarrhea, this review focuses on the main etiologies: acute gastroenteritis, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). For each, we reviewed randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and guidelines. For acute gastroenteritis we found 12 guidelines: 5 recommended probiotics and 7 did not. However, the guidelines containing positive recommendations provided proof of evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Saccharomyces boulardii had the most compelling evidence of efficacy as they reduced the duration of the disease by 1 day. For AAD 4 meta-analyses were found, reporting variable efficacy of probiotics in preventing diarrhea, based on the setting, patient's age, and antibiotics. The most effective strains were LGG and S. boulardii. For NEC, we found 3 randomized controlled trials, 5 meta-analyses, and 4 position papers. Probiotics reduced the risk of NEC enterocolitis and mortality in preterm babies. Guidelines did not support a routine use of probiotics and asked for further data for such sensitive implications. In conclusion, there is strong and solid proof of efficacy of probiotics as active treatment of gastroenteritis in addition to rehydration. There is solid evidence that probiotics have some efficacy in prevention of AAD, but the number needed to treat is an issue. For both etiologies LGG and S. boulardii have the strongest evidence. In NEC the indications are more debated, yet on the basis of available data and their implications, probiotics should be carefully considered.

  2. Diarrhea and parasitosis in Salta, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Aramayo, Cristian F; Gil, José F; Cruz, Mercedes C; Poma, Hugo R; Last, Michael S; Rajal, Verónica B

    2009-03-01

    Salta city is the capital of the province with the same name located in the northwest of Argentina. Its great growth over the last decade was not organized and the population expanded to occupy places where water and sanitation were not yet available. Although the Arenales River, crossing the city, receives the impact of point and non-point source pollution, the water is used for many purposes, including domestic in the poorest areas, industrial, and recreational with children as the main users. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 24% of the global disease burden and 23% of all deaths can be attributed to environmental factors. In particular, an estimated 94% of the diarrheal burden of disease is attributable to environment, and is associated with risk factors such as unsafe drinking water and poor sanitation and hygiene. Chronic diarrhea can be caused by an infection or other etiologies; however, most of the times the etiological agent is not identified. All the cases of diarrhea and parasitosis reported during 2005 in four public health centers of the city of Salta were classified by gender and age, analyzed, and represented geographically to show areas of higher morbidity rates, which were probably related to environmental factors. Water, poor sanitation, and pollution are candidate risk factors. Diarrhea cases showed seasonality, with the highest incidence during late spring and summer, while parasitosis was persistent throughout the year. Our spatial analysis permitted us to detect the regions of higher incidence of diarrhea and parasitosis during 2005 in the area of study.

  3. [Bovine viral diarrhea control in Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Guliukin, M I; Iurov, K P; Glotov, A G; Donchenko, N A

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) is one of the greatest challenges for breeding and commercial livestock. It is characterized by lesions of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, abortion, infertility, immune deficiency, and persistence of the pathogen. In this work, a set of measures for the rehabilitation and prevention of BVD in cattle is described. It includes the data of the literature, guidance documents for the diagnosis and control of BVD adopted by OIE, EU countries, USA, as well as the results of this research.

  4. A Computational and Experimental Study of Nonlinear Aspects of Induced Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen C.

    1996-01-01

    performance of the split-tip wing was also investigated by wing tunnel experiments. Induced drag was determined from force measurements by subtracting the estimated viscous drag, and from an analytical drag-decomposition method using a wake survey. The experimental results confirm the computational prediction.

  5. Diarrhea after bariatric procedures: Diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Borbély, Yves M; Osterwalder, Alice; Kröll, Dino; Nett, Philipp C; Inglin, Roman A

    2017-07-14

    Diarrhea after bariatric procedures, mainly those with malabsorptive elements including Roux-Y Gastric Bypass and Biliopancreatic Diversion, is common and an essential determinant of quality of life and micro- and macronutrient deficiencies. Bariatric surgery is the only sustainably successful method to address morbid obesity and its comorbidities, particularly gaining more and more importance in the specific treatment of diabetic patients. Approximately half a million procedures are annually performed around the world, with numbers expected to rise drastically in the near future. A multitude of factors exert their influence on bowel habits; preoperative comorbidities and procedure-related aspects are intertwined with postoperative nutritional habits. Diagnosi