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Sample records for diego california usa

  1. American Diabetes Association - 77th Scientific Sessions (June 9-13, 2017 - San Diego, California, USA).

    PubMed

    Lam, S

    2017-07-01

    The 77th American Diabetes Association (ADA) Sci-entific Sessions took place in San Diego, California. The meeting brought together scientists and professionals from a wide range of disciplines in the field of diabetes and provided a platform for networking, allowing experts and researchers to share ideas and learn about the significant advances in diabetes research, treatment and care. Over the course of the 5 days, participants received exclusive access to more than 2,500 original research presentations.

  2. A retrospective and prospective study of megaesophagus in the parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at the San Diego Zoo, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Pye, Geoffrey W; Smith, Joseph A; Papendick, Rebecca; Ivy, Jamie A; Hamlin-Andrus, Chris

    2012-03-01

    At the San Diego Zoo (California, USA), 22 cases of megaesophagus were diagnosed in the parma wallaby (Macropus parma); a prevalence of 21.1%. Parma wallabies often have no clinical signs until severe and chronic dilation of the esophagus is present. Clinical signs of advanced disease include weight loss, swelling of the cervical region, regurgitation without reswallowing of ingesta, short flight distance, depression, collapse, dyspnea, and sudden death. Retrospective and prospective studies at the San Diego Zoo and a multi-institutional survey in the United States were used to try to determine the cause of megaesophagus. The retrospective study did not identify an etiology. The prospective study revealed megaesophagus and severely delayed esophageal transit time in eight of eight animals. Myasthenia gravis, lead toxicosis, toxoplasmosis, and thyroid disease were eliminated as possible causes. Of 286 living and dead parma wallabies surveyed at other institutions, three cases of esophageal diverticulum and one case of megaesophagus were reported. The cause of megaesophagus in parma wallabies was not determined.

  3. A retrospective and prospective study of megaesophagus in the parma wallaby (Macropus parma) at the San Diego Zoo, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Pye, Geoffrey W; Smith, Joseph A; Papendick, Rebecca; Ivy, Jamie A; Hamlin-Andrus, Chris

    2012-06-01

    At the San Diego Zoo (California, USA), 22 cases of megaesophagus were diagnosed in the parma wallaby (Macropus parma), yielding a prevalence of 21.1%. Parma wallabies often have no clinical signs until severe and chronic dilation of the esophagus is present. Clinical signs of advanced disease include weight loss, swelling of the cervical region, regurgitation without reswallowing of ingesta, short flight distance, depression, collapse, dyspnea, and sudden death. Retrospective and prospective studies at the San Diego Zoo and a multi-institutional survey in the United States were used to try to determine the cause of megaesophagus. The retrospective study did not identify an etiology. The prospective study revealed megaesophagus and severely delayed esophageal transit time in eight of eight animals. Myasthenia gravis, lead toxicosis, toxoplasmosis, and thyroid disease were eliminated as possible causes. Of 286 living and dead parma wallabies surveyed at other institutions, three cases of esophageal diverticulum and one case of megaesophagus were reported. The cause of megaesophagus in parma wallabies was not determined.

  4. Gaining the necessary geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical understanding for additional brackish groundwater development, coastal San Diego, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danskin, Wesley R.

    2012-01-01

    Local water agencies and the United States Geological Survey are using a combination of techniques to better understand the scant freshwater resources and the much more abundant brackish resources in coastal San Diego, California, USA. Techniques include installation of multiple-depth monitoring well sites; geologic and paleontological analysis of drill cuttings; geophysical logging to identify formations and possible seawater intrusion; sampling of pore-water obtained from cores; analysis of chemical constituents including trace elements and isotopes; and use of scoping models including a three-dimensional geologic framework model, rainfall-runoff model, regional groundwater flow model, and coastal density-dependent groundwater flow model. Results show that most fresh groundwater was recharged during the last glacial period and that the coastal aquifer has had recurring intrusions of fresh and saline water. These intrusions disguise the source, flowpaths, and history of ground water near the coast. The flow system includes a freshwater lens resting on brackish water; a 100-meter-thick flowtube of freshwater discharging under brackish estuarine water and above highly saline water; and broad areas of fine-grained coastal sediment filled with fairly uniform brackish water. Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen indicate the recharged water flows through many kilometers of fractured crystalline rock before entering the narrow coastal aquifer.

  5. Comparative Fluid Inclusion Chemistry of Miarolitic Pegmatites from San Diego County, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nymberg, D.; Sirbescu, M. L. C.

    2014-12-01

    Miarolitic Li-Cs-Ta pegmatites are an important source of gemstones such as tourmaline var. elbaite and spodumene var. kunzite, but the distribution of gem-bearing pegmatites within a pegmatite field is not understood. This microthermometry, LA-ICP-MS, Raman spectroscopy, and crush-leach study of fluid inclusions in pegmatite quartz aims to discern the chemical variations of late-stage pegmatite fluids in relation to gem mineralization. We studied five mines from three San Diego Co. districts: Chihuahua Valley (C), Jacumba (J), and Pala (P). The ~100 Ma old, 1-10 m thick, subparallel magma sheets intruded plutons of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith or prebatholitic metasediments at an estimated pressure of 200-300 MPa. The pegmatites formed sequentially, from outer zones with comb, layered, and graphic quartz-feldspar textures at the magmatic stage to massive cores and miarolitic pockets at a late, fluid-saturated stage. Pocket quartz was analyzed from pegmatites of variable host rock, magmatic mineral assemblages, and known gem production. The inclusions contained two-phase aqueous fluids and no CO2 or other gases. Fluid salinity ranged from 0.5 to 8.6 wt.% NaCl eq. and correlated positively with inclusion homogenization temperature. Isochoric T at 250 MPa calculated for primary and pseudosecondary inclusions in pocket quartz ranged from 280 to 500 °C in district P, 310-420°C in J, and 230-290°C in C. We attribute the higher T of pocket formation in districts P and J to higher surrounding T at emplacement caused by proximity to other dikes. This preliminary study suggests that gem elbaite and/or kunzite occurrence correlates to Li and B contents in the pocket fluid, which, in turn, are a function of consumption by early, magmatic minerals. The P district has a simple leucogranite mineralogy at the magmatic stage; has as much as 5760 ppm B and 4950 ppm Li in the pocket fluid; and produced both elbaite and kunzite. The J district has abundant magmatic tourmaline

  6. A report from the American College of Rheumatology 2013 Meeting (October 26-30, 2013 - San Diego, California, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2013-11-01

    The American College of Rheumatology annual meeting opened in San Diego, California, with a poster session in which prominent clinical and preclinical research into experimental and putative novel therapies for rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions were discussed. The meeting continued through 2 more days of poster presentations and 4 days of very active oral sessions, in which information was discussed on therapeutics and candidate drugs for managing rheumatological diseases ranging from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus to many other conditions frequently seen in the rheumatology ward. The following report summarizes a selection of oral and poster presentations that reflect the state of the art of current rheumatology pharmacotherapy and what is arising as novel investigational therapy.

  7. Population Effects of Influenza A(H1N1) Pandemic among Health Plan Members, San Diego, California, USA, October-December 2009.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Roger A

    2016-02-01

    Lacking population-specific data, activity of seasonal and pandemic influenza is usually tracked by counting the number of diagnoses and visits to medical facilities above a baseline. This type of data does not address the delivery of services in a specific population. To provide population-specific data, this retrospective study of patients with influenza-like illness, influenza, and pneumonia among members of a Kaiser Permanente health plan in San Diego, California, USA, during October-December 2009 was initiated. Population data included the number of outpatients accessing healthcare; the number of patients diagnosed with pneumonia; antimicrobial therapy administered; number of patients hospitalized with influenza, influenza-like illness, or pneumonia; level of care provided; and number of patients requiring specialized treatments (e.g., oxygen, ventilation, vasopressors). The rate of admissions specific to weeks and predictions of 2 epidemiologic models shows the strengths and weaknesses of those tools. Data collected in this study may improve planning for influenza pandemics.

  8. Can private land conservation reduce wildfire risk to homes? A case study in San Diego County, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butsic, Van; Syphard, Alexandra D.; Keeley, Jon E.; Bar-Massada, Avi

    2017-01-01

    The purchase of private land for conservation purposes is a common way to prevent the exploitation of sensitive ecological areas. However, private land conservation can also provide other benefits, one of these being natural hazard reduction. Here, we investigated the impacts of private land conservation on fire risk to homes in San Diego County, California. We coupled an econometric land use change model with a model that estimates the probability of house loss due to fire in order to compare fire risk at the county and municipality scale under alternative private land purchasing schemes and over a 20 year time horizon. We found that conservation purchases could reduce fire risk on this landscape, and the amount of risk reduction was related to the targeting approach used to choose which parcels were conserved. Conservation land purchases that targeted parcels designated as high fire hazard resulted in lower fire risk to homes than purchases that targeted low costs or high likelihood to subdivide. This result was driven by (1) preventing home placement in fire prone areas and (2) taking land off the market, and hence increasing development densities in other areas. These results raise the possibility that resource conservation and fire hazard reduction may benefit from combining efforts. With adequate planning, future conservation purchases could have synergistic effects beyond just protecting ecologically sensitive areas.

  9. Sources and Sinks of Se, As, Si, P and N in an Urban Stream, San Diego Creek, Irvine, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, T.; Hibbs, B.; Moller, J.; Walker, J.

    2006-05-01

    Continuing concern about arsenic and selenium in the environment has encouraged many studies of the origins and fate of these trace elements in the environment. Few studies have focused on the fate of selenium and arsenic in streams in general and none to our knowledge have focused on urban streams. In this study we integrate field measurements of surface water and groundwater chemical composition, measurements of stream oxidation and reduction conditions with end-member mixture analysis (EMMA) of stream water sources. EMMA was conducted for San Diego Creek at Campus Drive in Irvine California. This creek is heavily impacted by a groundwater nitrogen, selenium and arsenic source. The contaminants are of environmental interest in the basin, nitrogen for eutrophication impacts in the stream and in the receiving water body, Newport Bay, selenium for its ecological impact, and arsenic for its potential impact on drinking water supplies. The potential sources of streamwater to San Diego Creek were urban runoff, agricultural runoff, dilute groundwaters, moderately saline groundwaters and saline groundwaters. Each source water had different chemical compositions in selenium, arsenic, nitrogen species as well as a suite of hydrologically conservative chemical constituents. We used the EMMA results and the estimated end-member contributions to determine potential in-stream losses of non-conservative dissolved chemicals such as selenium, arsenic, silica, nitrogen and phosphorus. The results of this analysis indicate a seasonal pattern of in-stream loss for nitrogen, phosphorus, selenium and silica with greater losses during the summer and smaller losses during the winter. Notably arsenic was not lost during in-stream transport. Additionally while nitrogen showed loss from streamflow throughout the year selenium showed a net input of selenium from in-stream sources during winter months. This result indicates that nitrogen loss in the stream was a true loss while selenium loss

  10. 33 CFR 165.1107 - San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Bay, California. 165... Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District § 165.1107 San Diego Bay, California... docking/undocking operations at the U.S. Naval Submarine Base on Ballast Point, San Diego Bay, California...

  11. Bismuth ochers from San Diego Co., California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaller, W.T.

    1911-01-01

    The chief points brought out in this paper may be briefly summarized as follows: (1) The existence of natural Bi2O3 has not been established. (2) Natural bismite or bismuth ocher, when pure, is more probably a bismuth hydroxide. (3) The bismuth ochers from San Diego County, California, are either a bismuth hydroxide or bismuth vanadate, pucherite, or mixtures of these two. (4) Pucherite has been found noncrystallin and determined for the first time in the United States.

  12. Marine terrace deformation, san diego county, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrory, P.A.; Lajoie, K.R.

    1979-01-01

    The NW-SE trending southern California coastline between the Palos Verdes Peninsula and San Diego roughly parallels the southern part and off-shore extension of the dominantly right-lateral, strike-slip, Newport-Inglewood fault zone. Emergent marine terraces between Newport Bay and San Diego record general uplift and gentle warping on the northeast side of the fault zone throughout Pleistocene time. Marine terraces on Soledad Mt. and Point Loma record local differential uplift (maximum 0.17 m/ka) during middle to late Pleistocene time on the southwest side of the fault (Rose Canyon fault) near San Diego. The broad Linda Vista Mesa (elev. 70-120 m) in the central part of coastal San Diego County, previously thought to be a single, relatively undeformed marine terrace of Plio-Pleistocene age, is a series of marine terraces and associated beach ridges most likely formed during sea-level highstands throughout Pleistocene time. The elevations of the terraces in this sequence gradually increase northwestward to the vicinity of San Onofre, indicating minor differential uplift along the central and northern San Diego coast during Pleistocene time. The highest, oldest terraces in the sequence are obliterated by erosional dissection to the northwest where uplift is greatest. Broad, closely spaced (vertically) terraces with extensive beach ridges were the dominant Pleistocene coastal landforms in central San Diego County where the coastal slope is less than 1% and uplift is lowest. The beach ridges die out to the northwest as the broad low terraces grade laterally into narrower, higher, and more widely spaced (vertically) terraces on the high bluffs above San Onofre where the coastal slope is 20-30% and uplift is greatest. At San Onofre the terraces slope progressively more steeply toward the ocean with increasing elevation, indicating continuous southwest tilt accompanying uplift from middle to late Pleistocene time. This southwest tilt is also recorded in the asymmetrical

  13. Navigation Improvement Design Memorandum Number 1, General Design for San Diego Harbor, San Diego County, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-02-28

    half of Arizona, New Mexico (less the eight northernmost counties), West Texas and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Sonora and Baja California Norte...DESIGN MEMORANDUM NO. 1 GENERAL DESIGN FOR SAN DIEGO HARBOR ~3AN -DIEGO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA -- 4 U.S. ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT, LOS ANGELES CORPS OF... CALIFORNIA S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 1 £,’ru~*,~ ta. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUME=") - ’ US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS LOS ANGELES DISTRICT P.O. BOX 2711

  14. Twelve-year proximity relationships in a captive group of western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Masayuki; Onishi, Kenji; Silldorf, April; Sexton, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Proximity data were collected in a captive breeding group of gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at the San Diego Wild Animal Park (currently called the San Diego Zoo Safari Park) twice a year (spring and fall periods) for over 12 years, by using a convenient method in which individuals less than 5 m from each animal in the group were recorded by scan sampling, approximately once per hour. Immature females from infancy to young adulthood maintained relatively frequent proximity to both their mothers and the silverback male and spent little time alone (no animals within 10 m), with relatively large individual differences. On the other hand, immature males decreased the time spent near their mothers and the silverback male and increased the time spent alone with increasing age. Therefore, sex differences in proximity to mothers and the silverback male became apparent after late juvenility. Some adult females maintained increased frequency of proximity to the silverback male than that by other females over the 12-year period, indicating the presence of long-term, stable proximity relationships between the silverback male and the adult females. Such long-term, stable proximity relationships were also observed among adult females. Some association patterns reported in wild gorillas, such as frequent proximity between adult females with dependent offspring and the silverback male and close relationships between related females, were not observed in the present study. The idiosyncratic or individual factors influencing some association patterns were easily reflected in captive situations. © 2014 The Authors. Zoo Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. San Diego, California: Solar in Action (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This brochure provides an overview of the challenges and successes of San Diego, CA, a 2007 Solar America City awardee, on the path toward becoming a solar-powered community. Accomplishments, case studies, key lessons learned, and local resource information are given.

  16. 33 CFR 165.1107 - San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... along the shoreline to the point of origin. Datum: NAD 1983. (b) Regulations. (1) During submarine docking/undocking operations at the U.S. Naval Submarine Base on Ballast Point, San Diego Bay, California... Local Notice to Mariners, to inform the maritime community of the dates and times of the...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1107 - San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... along the shoreline to the point of origin. Datum: NAD 1983. (b) Regulations. (1) During submarine docking/undocking operations at the U.S. Naval Submarine Base on Ballast Point, San Diego Bay, California... Local Notice to Mariners, to inform the maritime community of the dates and times of the...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1107 - San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... along the shoreline to the point of origin. Datum: NAD 1983. (b) Regulations. (1) During submarine docking/undocking operations at the U.S. Naval Submarine Base on Ballast Point, San Diego Bay, California... Local Notice to Mariners, to inform the maritime community of the dates and times of the...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1107 - San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... along the shoreline to the point of origin. Datum: NAD 1983. (b) Regulations. (1) During submarine docking/undocking operations at the U.S. Naval Submarine Base on Ballast Point, San Diego Bay, California... Local Notice to Mariners, to inform the maritime community of the dates and times of the...

  20. 77 FR 66910 - Environmental Impact Statement, San Diego County, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... environmental impacts associated with the proposed highway project. The SR-75/282 Transportation Corridor... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement, San Diego County, California AGENCY... this notice to advise the public that the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement...

  1. Examination of spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) pollutant bioaccumulation in San Diego Bay, San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) is an important recreational sport and subsistence food fish within San Diego Bay, a large industrialized harbor in San Diego, California. Despite this importance, few studies examining the species life history relative to pollutant tissue concentrations and the consumptive fishery exist. This study utilized data from three independent spotted sand bass studies from 1989 to 2002 to investigate PCB, DDT, and mercury tissue concentrations relative to spotted sand bass age and growth in San Diego Bay, with subsequent comparisons to published pollutant advisory levels and fishery regulations for recreational and subsistence consumption of the species. Subsequent analysis focused on examining temporal and spatial differences for different regions of San Diego Bay. Study results for growth confirmed previous work, finding the species to exhibit highly asymptotic growth, making tissue pollutant concentrations at initial take size difficult if not impossible to predict. This was corroborated by independent tissue concentration results for mercury, which found no relationship between fish size and pollutant bioaccumulation observed. However, a positive though highly variable relationship was observed between fish size and PCB tissue concentration. Despite these findings, a significant proportion of fish exhibited pollutant levels above recommended state recreational angler consumption advisory levels for PCBs and mercury, especially for fish above the minimum take size, making the necessity of at-size predictions less critical. Lastly, no difference in tissue concentration was found temporally or spatially within San Diego Bay. PMID:24282672

  2. Examination of spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) pollutant bioaccumulation in San Diego Bay, San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Loflen, Chad L

    2013-01-01

    The spotted sand bass (Paralabrax maculatofasciatus) is an important recreational sport and subsistence food fish within San Diego Bay, a large industrialized harbor in San Diego, California. Despite this importance, few studies examining the species life history relative to pollutant tissue concentrations and the consumptive fishery exist. This study utilized data from three independent spotted sand bass studies from 1989 to 2002 to investigate PCB, DDT, and mercury tissue concentrations relative to spotted sand bass age and growth in San Diego Bay, with subsequent comparisons to published pollutant advisory levels and fishery regulations for recreational and subsistence consumption of the species. Subsequent analysis focused on examining temporal and spatial differences for different regions of San Diego Bay. Study results for growth confirmed previous work, finding the species to exhibit highly asymptotic growth, making tissue pollutant concentrations at initial take size difficult if not impossible to predict. This was corroborated by independent tissue concentration results for mercury, which found no relationship between fish size and pollutant bioaccumulation observed. However, a positive though highly variable relationship was observed between fish size and PCB tissue concentration. Despite these findings, a significant proportion of fish exhibited pollutant levels above recommended state recreational angler consumption advisory levels for PCBs and mercury, especially for fish above the minimum take size, making the necessity of at-size predictions less critical. Lastly, no difference in tissue concentration was found temporally or spatially within San Diego Bay.

  3. Solar water-heating performance evaluation-San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes energy saved by replacing domestic, conventional natural gas heater with solar-energy subsystem in single-family residence near San Diego, California. Energy savings for 6 month test period averaged 1.089 million Btu. Collector array covered 65 square feet and supplied hot water to both 66-gallon solar storage tank and 40-gallon tank for domestic use. Natural gas supplied house's auxiliary energy.

  4. Solar water-heating performance evaluation-San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Report describes energy saved by replacing domestic, conventional natural gas heater with solar-energy subsystem in single-family residence near San Diego, California. Energy savings for 6 month test period averaged 1.089 million Btu. Collector array covered 65 square feet and supplied hot water to both 66-gallon solar storage tank and 40-gallon tank for domestic use. Natural gas supplied house's auxiliary energy.

  5. Sea Floor off San Diego, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Gibbons, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Ocean-floor image generated from multibeam-bathymetry data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; California State University, Monterey Bay; and Fugro Pelagos. To learn more, visit http://pubs.usgs.gov/sim/2007/2959/.

  6. 77 FR 58352 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County, Antelope Valley and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County, Antelope... Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD) portions of the California State...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1106 - San Diego Bay, California-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Bay, California-safety... Diego Bay, California—safety zone. (a) The waters of San Diego Bay enclosed by the following boundaries..., California at latitude 32°43′37.2″ N, longitude 117°10′45.0″ W (point A), for a point of beginning;...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1106 - San Diego Bay, California-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Diego Bay, California-safety... Diego Bay, California—safety zone. (a) The waters of San Diego Bay enclosed by the following boundaries..., California at latitude 32°43′37.2″ N, longitude 117°10′45.0″ W (point A), for a point of beginning;...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1106 - San Diego Bay, California-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Diego Bay, California-safety... Diego Bay, California—safety zone. (a) The waters of San Diego Bay enclosed by the following boundaries..., California at latitude 32°43′37.2″ N, longitude 117°10′45.0″ W (point A), for a point of beginning;...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1108 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California. 165.1108 Section 165.1108 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1108 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1108 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California. 165.1108 Section 165.1108 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.1108 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California. (a) Definition. “Cruise ship” as...

  12. Solar energy system performance evaluation-seasonal report for Elcam San Diego, San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system, Elcam San Diego, was designed to supply domestic hot water heating for a single family residence located in Encinitas, California. System description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, maintenance, and conclusions are presented. The system is a 'Sunspot' two tank cascade type, where solar energy is supplied to either a 66 gallon preheat tank (solar storage) or a 40 gallon domestic hot water tank. Water is pumped directly from one of the two tanks, through the 65 square feet collector array and back into the same tank. Freeze protection is provided by automatically circulating hot water from the hot water tank through the collectors and exposed plumbing when freezing conditions exist. Auxiliary energy is supplied by natural gas. Analysis is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for one full season of operation.

  13. Solar energy system performance evaluation-seasonal report for Elcam San Diego, San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The solar energy system, Elcam San Diego, was designed to supply domestic hot water heating for a single family residence located in Encinitas, California. System description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, maintenance, and conclusions are presented. The system is a 'Sunspot' two tank cascade type, where solar energy is supplied to either a 66 gallon preheat tank (solar storage) or a 40 gallon domestic hot water tank. Water is pumped directly from one of the two tanks, through the 65 square feet collector array and back into the same tank. Freeze protection is provided by automatically circulating hot water from the hot water tank through the collectors and exposed plumbing when freezing conditions exist. Auxiliary energy is supplied by natural gas. Analysis is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for one full season of operation.

  14. California Clean Air Act: A compliance strategy for the City of San Diego`s non-emergency fleet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Historically, parts of California have had the worst air quality in the nation. The California Energy Commission began experimenting with alternate fuels in the 1970`s in an effort to reduce harmful automobile emissions and hence, improve air quality. It is recognized that the costs to California which result from our air quality problems are immense. Ten to twenty billion dollars each year is the estimated damage in terms of health impacts, materials damages, lost agricultural crop output and forest damages. As the California population increases and health care costs escalate, the total monetary damages from air pollution will increase. The California Energy Commission goal to improve air quality became a mandate in 1988 with the passage of the California Clean Air Act (CCAA). The CCAA requires a revised air quality strategy for the San Diego district since we do not meet State air quality standards for smog, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. Smog remains San Diego`s major air quality problem, even though the annual number of days each year over the Federal standard has been reduced by 55 percent in the past ten years. Ten years ago about two-thirds of San Diego`s smog was transported from Los Angeles. Today more than 60 per cent of the days San Diego exceeds the State standard are from locally generated smog. It is estimated that 57% of the reactive hydrocarbon emissions (which react with nitrogen dioxide in the presence of sunlight to form smog) is from cars, trucks and buses. The Air Pollution Control District (part of the County of San Diego) is the office that the Air Resources Board has put in charge of creating regulations and designing strategy to reduce polluting emissions. The purpose of this project is to determine the full cost of acquiring and operating a municipal fleet which meets the mandates of the California Clean Air Act. With that information, a plan to meet the Clear Air Act (CCAA) requirements can be formulated by local government.

  15. Paleogeography and sedimentology of Upper Cretaceous turbidites, San Diego, California.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsen, T.H.; Abbott, P.L.

    1981-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous (Campanian and Maestrichtian) marine strata of the Rosario Group in the San Diego area include the Point Loma Formation and overlying Cabrillo Formation. Thes units contain 6 facies associations which define a deep-sea fan deposited by westward-flowing sediment gravity flows that transported sediments derived chiefly from batholithic and pre-batholithic metamorphic rocks of the Peninsular Ranges. The sedimentary basin initially deepened abruptly. The fan then prograded westward into the basin, with a retrogradational phase recorded in the uppermost part of the sequence. The fan was deposited along the eastern edge of a forearc basin similar to that of the Great Valley sequence in northern California. The western part of the fan appears to have been truncated by late Cenozoic strike-slip faulting.-from Authors

  16. 78 FR 37176 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego Air Pollution... proposing to approve a revision to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD) portion of the... sources under the Clean Air Act (CAA or the Act). DATES: Any comments on this proposal must arrive by...

  17. 75 FR 56942 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District...

  18. 78 FR 37130 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego Air Pollution Control District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego Air Pollution... taking direct final action to approve a revision to the San Diego Air Pollution Control District (SDAPCD... Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference,...

  19. 75 FR 28604 - Southern California Edison Company; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; San Diego Gas & Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Southern California Edison Company; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; San Diego Gas & Electric Company; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order May 13, 2010. Take notice that on... and Electric Company, and San Diego Gas & Electric Company filed a Petition for Declaratory Order...

  20. 76 FR 9348 - Southern California Edison Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Diego Gas & Electric...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Southern California Edison Company, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, San Diego Gas & Electric Company; Notice of Petition Take notice that on January 31, 2011, pursuant to... Edison Company (SCE), Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), and San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG...

  1. Multibeam bathymetry and selected perspective views offshore San Diego, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Peter; Normark, William R.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Babcock, Jeffrey M.; Gardner, James V.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Iampietro, Pat J.

    2007-01-01

    This set of two posters consists of a map on one sheet and a set of seven perspective views on the other. The ocean floor image was generated from multibeam-bathymetry data acquired by Federal and local agencies as well as academic institutions including: - U.S. Geological Survey mapped from the La Jolla Canyon south to the US-Mexico border using a Kongsberg Simrad multibeam echosounder system (MBES) (March - April 1998). Data and metadata available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1221/. - Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and SCRIPPS Institution of Oceanography mapped the majority of the La Jolla Fan Valley including the sea floor to the north and south of the valley using a Seabeam 2100 MBES. Data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/multibeam.html. Survey ID, AT07L09, Chief Scientists, Barrie Walden and Joseph Coburn (April 2002). - California State University, Monterey Bay, mapped Scripps Canyon and the head of La Jolla Canyon using a Reson 8101 MBES (October 2001). Data and metadata available at http://seafloor.csumb.edu/SFMLwebDATA.htm. This work was funded by the California Department of Fish and Game California Coastal Conservancy, San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), California Department of Fish and Game, and Fugro Pelagos mapped the nearshore region out to about 35-40 m. - The sea floor within this image that has not been mapped with MBES is filled in with interpreted bathymetry gridded from single-beam data available at http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/bathymetry/hydro.html. Depths are in meters below sea level, which is referenced to Mean Lower Low Water.

  2. Groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    More than 40 percent of California's drinking water is from groundwater. To protect this vital resource, the State of California created the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State's groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter referred to as San Diego) is one of the study units being evaluated. The San Diego study unit is approximately 3,900 square miles and consists of the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and 12 other alluvial basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003). The study unit also consists of all areas outside defined groundwater basins that are within 3 kilometers of a public-supply well. The study unit was separated, based primarily on hydrogeologic settings, into four study areas: Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, Alluvial Basins, and Hard Rock (Wright and others, 2005). The sampling density for the Hard Rock study area, which consists of areas outside of groundwater basins, was much lower than for the other study areas. Consequently, aquifer proportions for the Hard Rock study area are not used to calculate the aquifer proportions shown by the pie charts. An assessment of groundwater quality for the Hard Rock study area can be found in Wright and Belitz, 2011. The temperatures in the coastal part of the study unit are mild with dry summers, moist winters, and an average annual rainfall of about 10 inches. The temperatures in the mountainous eastern part of the study unit are cooler than in the coastal part, with an annual precipitation of about 45 inches that occurs mostly in the winter. The primary aquifers consist of Quaternary-age alluvium and weathered bedrock in the Temecula Valley, Warner Valley, and Alluvial Basins study areas, whereas in the Hard Rock study area the primary aquifers consist mainly of fractured and

  3. 33 CFR 165.1105 - Security Zone: San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., California. 165.1105 Section 165.1105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Security Zone: San Diego Bay, California. (a) Location. (1) The following area is a security zone: The water area adjacent to Naval Air Station North Island, Coronado, California, and within 100 yards...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1105 - Security Zone: San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., California. 165.1105 Section 165.1105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Security Zone: San Diego Bay, California. (a) Location. (1) The following area is a security zone: The water area adjacent to Naval Air Station North Island, Coronado, California, and within 100 yards...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1105 - Security Zone: San Diego Bay, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., California. 165.1105 Section 165.1105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Security Zone: San Diego Bay, California. (a) Location. (1) The following area is a security zone: The water area adjacent to Naval Air Station North Island, Coronado, California, and within 100 yards...

  6. 33 CFR 334.866 - Pacific Ocean at Naval Base Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Coronado, in the City of Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. 334.866 Section 334.866... Coronado, San Diego County, California; naval danger zone. (a) The area. A fan-shaped area extending..., California beginning at latitude 32°41′13″ N, longitude 117°12′45″ W; thence easterly, along the mean high...

  7. 77 FR 58313 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County, Antelope Valley and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County, Antelope... District (MBUAPCD) and Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District (AVAQMD) portions of the California..., ``Graphic Arts Operations,'' adopted on November 9, 2011 and effective on May 9, 2012. (D) Antelope...

  8. 33 CFR 100.1101 - Southern California annual marine events for the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Southern California annual marine... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.1101 Southern California annual marine events for the San Diego Captain of the Port... Diego Rowing Club. Event Description Competitive rowing race. Date Sunday in November Location Mission...

  9. Incorporating genetic sampling in long-term monitoring and adaptive management in the San Diego County Management Strategic Plan Area, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, Amy G.

    2017-06-02

    Habitat and species conservation plans usually rely on monitoring to assess progress towards conservation goals. Southern California, USA, is a hotspot of biodiversity and home to many federally endangered and threatened species. Here, several regional multi-species conservation plans have been implemented to balance development and conservation goals, including in San Diego County. In the San Diego County Management Strategic Plan Area (MSPA), a monitoring framework for the preserve system has been developed with a focus on species monitoring, vegetation monitoring, threats monitoring and abiotic monitoring. Genetic sampling over time (genetic monitoring) has proven useful in gathering species presence and abundance data and detecting population trends, particularly related to species and threats monitoring objectives. This report reviews genetic concepts and techniques of genetics that relate to monitoring goals and outlines components of a genetic monitoring scheme that could be applied in San Diego or in other monitoring frameworks throughout the Nation.

  10. SPUR: Moving San Diego, California Schools toward Integrated Pest Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sharon

    1991-01-01

    The preparation of a report, slide show, and brochure to promote awareness of the hazards of toxic pest control for school pest management personnel in the San Diego Unified School District is discussed. The future plans of the coalition are proposed. (CW)

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among persons who inject drugs in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Armenta, R F; Collins, K M; Strathdee, S A; Bulterys, M A; Munoz, F; Cuevas-Mota, J; Chiles, P; Garfein, R S

    2017-04-01

    Persons who inject drugs (PWID) might be at increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and reactivation of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) due to their injection drug use. To determine prevalence and correlates of M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in San Diego, California, USA. PWID aged 18 years underwent standardized interviews and serologic testing using an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) for LTBI and rapid point-of-care assays for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Independent correlates of M. tuberculosis infection were identified using multivariable log-binomial regression. A total of 500 participants met the eligibility criteria. The mean age was 43.2 years (standard deviation 11.6); most subjects were White (52%) or Hispanic (30.8%), and male (75%). Overall, 86.7% reported having ever traveled to Mexico. Prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was 23.6%; 0.8% were co-infected with HIV and 81.7% were co-infected with HCV. Almost all participants (95%) had been previously tested for M. tuberculosis; 7.6% had been previously told they were infected. M. tuberculosis infection was independently associated with being Hispanic, having longer injection histories, testing HCV-positive, and correctly reporting that people with 'sleeping' TB cannot infect others. Strategies are needed to increase awareness about and treatment for M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in the US/Mexico border region.

  12. Long Range Development Plan, University of California, San Diego, October 1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Robert E.

    The academic and physical development plans of the University of California at San Diego are outlined. Facilities for 27,500 anticipated students are divided into twelve colleges of about 2300 students each. The twelve colleges are arranged into three clusters of four each, grouped around the central academic and administrative facilities, in…

  13. GPO Gate: University of California, San Diego's New Gateway to Electronic Government Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruse, Patricia; Jahns, Cynthia

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development of a new interface called GPO Gate for accessing the Government Printing Office (GPO) WAIS (wide area information server) databases, GPO Access. Highlights include development and use of GPO Gate at the University of California, San Diego, and implications for public service. (Author/LRW)

  14. 75 FR 15429 - San Diego Gas & Electric Co.; California Independent System Operator; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission San Diego Gas & Electric Co.; California Independent System Operator; Notice of Filing March 22, 2010. Take notice that on July 20, 2009, Avista Energy, Inc. pursuant to the...

  15. San Diego, California (with sunglint) as seen by Expedition Two crew

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-04-16

    ISS002-E-5661 (16 April 2001) --- As the International Space Station (ISS) recently passed over the Pacific Ocean, one of the Expedition Two crew members, using an 800mm lens on a digital still camera, photographed this high oblique image of the coastal metropolitan area of San Diego, California. The angle of the view allows one to see quite a distance inland.

  16. Modeling tidal hydrodynamics of San Diego Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, P.-F.; Cheng, R.T.; Richter, K.; Gross, E.S.; Sutton, D.; Gartner, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    In 1983, current data were collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration using mechanical current meters. During 1992 through 1996, acoustic Doppler current profilers as well as mechanical current meters and tide gauges were used. These measurements not only document tides and tidal currents in San Diego Bay, but also provide independent data sets for model calibration and verification. A high resolution (100-m grid), depth-averaged, numerical hydrodynamic model has been implemented for San Diego Bay to describe essential tidal hydrodynamic processes in the bay. The model is calibrated using the 1983 data set and verified using the more recent 1992-1996 data. Discrepancies between model predictions and field data in beth model calibration and verification are on the order of the magnitude of uncertainties in the field data. The calibrated and verified numerical model has been used to quantify residence time and dilution and flushing of contaminant effluent into San Diego Bay. Furthermore, the numerical model has become an important research tool in ongoing hydrodynamic and water quality studies and in guiding future field data collection programs.

  17. 76 FR 75908 - Notice of Inventory Completion: The University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... in consultation with representatives of the Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians of the Barona Reservation, California; Campo Band of Diegueno Mission Indians of the Campo Indian...

  18. The 2007 San Diego Wildfire impact on the Emergency Department of the University of California, San Diego Hospital System.

    PubMed

    Schranz, Craig I; Castillo, Edward M; Vilke, Gary M

    2010-01-01

    In October 2007, San Diego County experienced a severe firestorm resulting in the burning of more than 368,000 acres, the destruction of more than 1,700 homes, and the evacuation of more than 500,000 people. The goal of this study was to assess the impact of the 2007 San Diego Wildfires, and the acute change in air quality that followed, on the patient volume and types of complaints in the emergency department. A retrospective review was performed of a database of all patients presenting to the Emergency Departments of University of California, San Diego (UCSD) hospitals for a six-day period both before (14-19 October 2007) and after (21-26 October 2007) the start of the 2007 firestorm. Charts were abstracted for data, including demographics, chief complaints, past medical history, fire-related injuries and disposition status. As a measure of pollution, levels of 2.5 micron Particulate Matter (PM 2.5) also were calculated from data provided by the San Diego Air Pollution Control District. Emergency department volume decreased by 5.8% for the period following the fire. A rapid rise in PM2.5 levels coincided with the onset of the fires. The admission rate was higher in the period following the fires (19.8% vs. 15.2%) from the baseline period. Additionally, the Left Without Being Seen (LWBS) rate doubled to 4.6% from 2.3%. There was a statistically significant increase in patients presenting with a chief complaint of shortness of breath (6.5% vs. 4.2% p = 0.028) and smoke exposure (1.1% vs. 0% p = 0.001) following the fires. Patients with significant cardiac or pulmonary histories were no more likely to present to the emergency department during the fires. Despite the decreased volume, the admission and LWBS rate did increase following the onset of the firestorm. The cause of this increase is unclear. Despite a sudden decline in air quality, patients with significant cardiac and pulmonary morbidity did not vary their emergency department utilization rate. Based on the

  19. University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Sky Imager Cloud Position Study Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kleissl, J.; Urquhart, B.; Ghonima, M.; Dahlin, E.; Nguyen, A.; Kurtz, B.; Chow, C. W.; Mejia, F. A.

    2016-04-01

    During the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Sky Imager Cloud Position Study, two University of California, San Diego Sky Imagers (USI) (Figure 1) were deployed the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains SGP) research facility. The UCSD Sky Imagers were placed 1.7 km apart to allow for stereographic determination of the cloud height for clouds over approximately 1.5 km. Images with a 180-degree field of view were captured from both systems during daylight hours every 30 seconds beginning on March 11, 2013 and ending on November 4, 2013. The spatial resolution of the images was 1,748 × 1,748, and the intensity resolution was 16 bits using a high-dynamic-range capture process. The cameras use a fisheye lens, so the images are distorted following an equisolid angle projection.

  20. VLF (Very Low Frequency) Workshop: Held at San Diego, California on 24-25 January 1985.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT . TASK AREA 0 WORK UNiT NUMBERS University of California, San Diego, Marine Physical...which will be Implemented Sona first step to the localization procedure.-- I. INTRODUCTION GEO s• - l NE PROJECT at the Marine Physical Laboratory (MPL...float.’.. The approach taken in this project is to develop an auton- omous buoy capable of recording the components of particle I. THE INFRASONIC

  1. Paleohydrology of the eocene ballena gravels, San Diego County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Bradley L.; Abbott, Patrick L.

    1984-03-01

    The Ballena Gravels are remnants of a river system that flowed westward across the ancestral Peninsular Ranges during medial and late Eocene time. The Gravels (actually conglomerate) are channelized fluvial deposits that built westward as alluvial fan (Poway Group), submarine canyon (Scripps Formation) and submarine fan (Jolla Vieja Formation) depositional systems. Because the integrated sedimentary system contains distinctive Poway rhyolite clasts of limited geographic and temporal extent the now separated component formations are recognizable on the San Diego coastal plain and on the Channel Islands. Paleogeographic reconstructions suggest a transport distance of about 315 km. Multiple techniques analysis suggests the channel gradient in the San Diego area was 12-18 m km -1. Stream velocity, based on a competent particle size of 52 cm, ranges from 2.5 to 4 m s -1. Eight equations based on slope and velocity generated estimates of channel depth at food stage that vary from 2.5 to 4.5 m. Paleodischarge can be estimated from regime-type engineering equations that are based on gradient, depth, and grain size. Paleodischarge also is calculated using a technique based on stream length and drainage area. Values generated by multiple techniques suggest 2.33-yr flood discharges of about 275 m 3 s -1. Extrapolation based on a logarithmic curve indicates 100-yr flood discharges around 27,500 m 3 s -1. Channel-width estimates for 1 to 2.33 yr floods range from 25 to 75 m. Calculations of seasonally dominant rainfall, based on runoff and temperature, vary between 50-75 cm annually. Runoff is estimated from discharge values and paleotemperatures are based on caliche type, salt-fractured clasts, and the immature clay mineral suite. The Nueces River of Texas shares some of the same characteristics of the Eocene Ballena river. The Nueces has a highly varied discharge due to seasonally intense rainfall similar to that interpreted for the Ballena river. Several rivers flowing to

  2. A Proximate Biological Survey of San Diego Bay, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    Speocareinus californiensis (inudllat crab) Spirontucaris sp. ( shrimp ) Stomatopods Pseudosquilla sp. ( mantis slirimp) Squilla polita ( mantis ...rock crab) llemigrapsus orcgonensis (mudllat crab» Mpployie californiensis (grass shrimp ) Liphopaniipeussp (xanthid crab) Panulirus...interruplus (California spiny lobster) Prucvssa canaliculata (crangonid shrimp ) Pugetlia producta (kelp crab) Pyromaia luherculaia (spider crab

  3. Degradation of tributyltin in San Diego Bay, California, waters

    SciTech Connect

    Seligman, P.F.; Valkirs, A.O.; Lee, R.F.

    1986-12-01

    Several experiments were carried out to determine the degradation rate of tributyltin (TBT) in microcosms containing harbor water. Unlabeled or /sup 14/C-labeled tributyltin was added to water samples collected from two stations in San Diego Bay, CA. Degradation rates were determined by calculating the rate of loss of the added parent TBT compound. Calculated half-lives in water collected from a yacht harbor (ambient concentration was 0.5 ..mu..g of TBT/L) were 6 and 7 days for light and dark treatments, respectively. Half-lives from a clean-water site (< 0.03 ..mu..g of TBT/L) were 9 and 19 days for light and dark treatments, respectively. The principal degradation product in all experiments was dibutyltin with lesser amounts of monobutyltin. Complete mineralization, measured by the formation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/, proceeded slowly with a half-life of 50-75 days. Tributyltin at high concentrations (744 ..mu..g/L) was not degraded in sunlight, indicating that photolysis was not taking place and that biological degradation was the primary degradative process for TBT at low ambient concentrations.

  4. Solar energy system economic evaluation for Elcam-Tempe, Tempe, Arizona and Elcam-San Diego, San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The long term economic performance of the solar energy system at its installation site is analyzed and four additional locations selected to demonstrate the viability of the design over a broad range of environmental and economic conditions. The economic analysis of the solar energy systems that were installed at Tempe, Arizona and San Diego, California, is developed for these and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings; year of positive savings; and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainites in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  5. 77 FR 72957 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the special local regulations during the Mission Bay Parade of Lights, on the waters of Mission Bay, San Diego, California from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on 08 December... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for...

  6. 78 FR 17598 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... located in the regulated area encompasses that portion of Mission Bay, San Diego, California bounded by... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for...

  7. 33 CFR 100.1101 - Southern California annual marine events for the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Southern California annual marine... Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.1101 Southern California annual marine events for the San Diego Captain of the...

  8. Border crossing to inject drugs in Mexico among injection drug users in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Volkmann, Tyson; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Garfein, Richard S; Patterson, Thomas L; Pollini, Robin A; Wagner, Karla D; Artamanova, Irina; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2012-04-01

    We examined correlates of ever injecting drugs in Mexico among residents of San Diego, California. From 2007 to 2010, injecting drug users (IDUs) in San Diego underwent an interviewer-administered survey. Logistic regression identified correlates of injection drug use in Mexico. Of 302 IDUs, 38% were Hispanic, 72% male and median age was 37; 27% ever injected in Mexico; 43% reported distributive syringe sharing there. Factors independently associated with ever injecting drugs in Mexico included being younger at first injection, injecting heroin, distributive syringe sharing at least half of the time, and transporting drugs over the last 6 months. One-quarter of IDUs reported ever injecting drugs in Mexico, among whom syringe sharing was common, suggesting possible mixing between IDUs in the Mexico-US border region. Prospective studies should monitor trends in cross-border drug use in light of recent Mexican drug policy reforms partially decriminalizing drug possession.

  9. Pacific Coast of Southern California including Los Angeles and San Diego

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-02-01

    SL4-142-4542 (November 1973-February 1974) --- An oblique view of the Pacific Coast of Southern California, including the Los Angeles and San Diego areas, as seen from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. This picture was taken by one of the Skylab 4 crewmen using a hand-held 70mm Hasselblad camera with a 100mm lens and SO-368 medium-speed Ektachrome film. The visible coastline extends from San Diego northwesterly to Santa Barbara. The Mojave Desert occupies much of the photograph. This view also includes the Channel Islands off the coast. Note that the higher elevations of the mountains are covered with snow. Photo credit: NASA

  10. Range and Frequency of Africanized Honey Bees in California (USA).

    PubMed

    Kono, Yoshiaki; Kohn, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    Africanized honey bees entered California in 1994 but few accounts of their northward expansion or their frequency relative to European honey bees have been published. We used mitochondrial markers and morphometric analyses to determine the prevalence of Africanized honeybees in San Diego County and their current northward progress in California west of the Sierra Nevada crest. The northernmost African mitotypes detected were approximately 40 km south of Sacramento in California's central valley. In San Diego County, 65% of foraging honey bee workers carry African mitochondria and the estimated percentage of Africanized workers using morphological measurements is similar (61%). There was no correlation between mitotype and morphology in San Diego County suggesting Africanized bees result from bidirectional hybridization. Seventy percent of feral hives, but only 13% of managed hives, sampled in San Diego County carried the African mitotype indicating that a large fraction of foraging workers in both urban and rural San Diego County are feral. We also found a single nucleotide polymorphism at the DNA barcode locus COI that distinguishes European and African mitotypes. The utility of this marker was confirmed using 401 georeferenced honey bee sequences from the worldwide Barcode of Life Database. Future censuses can determine whether the current range of the Africanized form is stable, patterns of introgression at nuclear loci, and the environmental factors that may limit the northern range of the Africanized honey bee.

  11. Promotion of water consumption in elementary school children in San Diego, USA and Tlaltizapan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Elder, John P; Holub, Christina K; Arredondo, Elva M; Sánchez-Romero, Luz María; Moreno-Saracho, Jessica E; Barquera, Simón; Rivera, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of water may help promote health and prevent obesity in children by decreasing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. This study used evidence-based strategies to increase water consumption in Mexican-American and Mexican children. In 2012, two schools in San Diego, USA and two other in Tlaltizapan, Mexico were recruited to Agua para Niños (Water for Kids), a program designed to promote water consumption among elementary grade students. Guided by operant psychology, the intervention focused on school and classroom activities to encourage water consumption. One control and one intervention school in each country were included. Agua para Niños resulted in increases in observed water consumption and bottle possession among US and Mexican students. Teacher receptivity to the program was very positive in both countries. Agua para Niños yielded sufficiently positive behavioral changes to be used in a future fully randomized design, and to contribute to school nutrition policy changes.

  12. Electric Demand Reduction for the U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2000-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigated the profitability of operating a Navy ship's generators (in San Diego) during high electricity price periods rather than the ships hooking up to the Base electrical system for power. Profitability is predicated on the trade-off between the operating and maintenance cost incurred by the Navy for operating the ship generators and the net profit associated with the sale of the electric power on the spot market. In addition, PNNL assessed the use of the ship's generators as a means to achieve predicted load curtailments, which can then be marketed to the California Independent System Operator.

  13. Indicators of Methamphetamine Use and Abuse in San Diego County, California: 2001–2005†

    PubMed Central

    Pollini, Robin A.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2013-01-01

    San Diego County, California, is a major distribution center for methamphetamine entering the U.S. from Mexico. All available indicators suggest that the use and abuse of methamphetamine increased between 2001 and 2005. Drug treatment admissions for primary methamphetamine use accounted for 49% of all drug treatment admissions in 2005, up from 37% in 2001, with trends showing smaller proportions of female and Hispanic users and a larger proportion of methamphetamine smokers (vs. inhalation or injection). Increases in prevalence of methamphetamine use were documented among arrestees as well; by 2005, 51% of female and 21% of juvenile arrestees tested positive for methamphetamine The proportion of emergency department visits involving illicit drugs in which methamphetamine was reported increased from 32% in 2004 to 40% in 2005, although this change was not statistically significant, and methamphetamine-related deaths increased 48% between 2001 and 2005. Data from non-federal drug seizures in San Diego County documented an increase from 21 % of all drug items analyzed in 2001 to 32% in 2005 In summary, methamphetamine remains the drug of utmost concern in San Diego. The availability of multiple data sources is imperative for constructing valid characterizations of trends in methamphetamine use and abuse and its affect on health. PMID:18284098

  14. Water-balance and groundwater-flow estimation for an arid environment: San Diego region, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, L. E.; Flint, A. L.; Stolp, B. J.; Danskin, W. R.

    2012-03-01

    The coastal-plain aquifer that underlies the San Diego City metropolitan area in southern California is a groundwater resource. The understanding of the region-wide water balance and the recharge of water from the high elevation mountains to the east needs to be improved to quantify the subsurface inflows to the coastal plain in order to develop the groundwater as a long term resource. This study is intended to enhance the conceptual understanding of the water balance and related recharge processes in this arid environment by developing a regional model of the San Diego region and all watersheds adjacent or draining to the coastal plain, including the Tijuana River basin. This model was used to quantify the various components of the water balance, including semi-quantitative estimates of subsurface groundwater flow to the coastal plain. Other approaches relying on independent data were used to test or constrain the scoping estimates of recharge and runoff, including a reconnaissance-level groundwater model of the San Diego River basin, one of three main rivers draining to the coastal plain. Estimates of subsurface flow delivered to the coastal plain from the river basins ranged from 12.3 to 28.8 million m3 yr-1 from the San Diego River basin for the calibration period (1982-2009) to 48.8 million m3 yr-1 from all major river basins for the entire coastal plain for the long-term period 1940-2009. This range of scoping estimates represents the impact of climatic variability and realistically bounds the likely groundwater availability, while falling well within the variable estimates of regional recharge. However, the scarcity of physical and hydrologic data in this region hinders the exercise to narrow the range and reduce the uncertainty.

  15. Range and Frequency of Africanized Honey Bees in California (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yoshiaki; Kohn, Joshua R.

    2015-01-01

    Africanized honey bees entered California in 1994 but few accounts of their northward expansion or their frequency relative to European honey bees have been published. We used mitochondrial markers and morphometric analyses to determine the prevalence of Africanized honeybees in San Diego County and their current northward progress in California west of the Sierra Nevada crest. The northernmost African mitotypes detected were approximately 40 km south of Sacramento in California’s central valley. In San Diego County, 65% of foraging honey bee workers carry African mitochondria and the estimated percentage of Africanized workers using morphological measurements is similar (61%). There was no correlation between mitotype and morphology in San Diego County suggesting Africanized bees result from bidirectional hybridization. Seventy percent of feral hives, but only 13% of managed hives, sampled in San Diego County carried the African mitotype indicating that a large fraction of foraging workers in both urban and rural San Diego County are feral. We also found a single nucleotide polymorphism at the DNA barcode locus COI that distinguishes European and African mitotypes. The utility of this marker was confirmed using 401 georeferenced honey bee sequences from the worldwide Barcode of Life Database. Future censuses can determine whether the current range of the Africanized form is stable, patterns of introgression at nuclear loci, and the environmental factors that may limit the northern range of the Africanized honey bee. PMID:26361047

  16. Decadal to centennial oscillations in the upper and lower boundaries of the San Diego, California margin Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myhre, S. E.; Hill, T. M.; Frieder, C.; Grupe, B.

    2016-02-01

    Here we present two new marine sediment archives from the continental margin of San Diego, California, USA, which record decadal to centennial oscillations in the hydrographic structure of the Eastern Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ). The two cores, located at 528 and 1,180 m water depth, record oceanographic history across overlapping timescales. Biotic communities, including Foraminifera, Echinodermata, Brachiopoda, Mollusca and Ostrocoda, were examined in subsurface (>10 cm sediment core depth) samples. Chronologies for both cores were developed with reservoir-corrected 14C dates of mixed planktonic Foraminifera and linearly interpolated sedimentation rates. Sediment ages for the cores range from 400-1,800 years before present. Indices of foraminiferal community density, diversity and evenness are applied as biotic proxies to track the intensification of the continental margin OMZ. Biotic communities at the shallower site reveal multi-decadal to centennial timescales of OMZ intensification, whereas the deeper site exhibits decadal to multi-decadal scales of hydrographic variability. Hypoxia-associated foraminiferal genera Uvigerina and Bolivina were compositionally dominant during intervals of peak foraminiferal density. Invertebrate assemblages often co-occurred across taxa groups, and thereby provide a broad trophic context for interpreting changes in the margin seafloor. Variability in the advection of Pacific Equatorial Water may mechanistically contribute to this described hydrographic variability. This investigation reconstructs historical timescales of OMZ intensification, seafloor ecological variability, and synchrony between open-ocean processes and regional climate.

  17. Proceedings of the second symposium on social aspects and recreation research, February 23-25, 1994, San Diego, California

    Treesearch

    Deborah J. Chavez

    1995-01-01

    Examination of natural resources often leaves out one important component-the human element. To enable resource managers and researchers to exchange information and ideas about the human dimensions of natural resources, the second Symposium on Social Aspects and Recreation Research was held February 23-25, 1994, in San Diego, California. The format of the symposium...

  18. 33 CFR 165.T11-304 - Safety zone; Sea World Summer Nights Fireworks; Mission Bay, San Diego, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety zone; Sea World Summer Nights Fireworks; Mission Bay, San Diego, California. 165.T11-304 Section 165.T11-304 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREA...

  19. Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced susceptibility to azithromycin--San Diego County, California, 2009.

    PubMed

    2011-05-13

    A single 2 g dose of azithromycin effectively treats genitourinary infections caused by susceptible Neisseria gonorrhoeae and has been used to treat uncomplicated gonorrhea in persons with cephalosporin allergy. However, azithromycin is not recommended as monotherapy because of concern over the emergence of resistance. Instead, a 1 g dose of azithromycin is recommended as a component of dual therapy for gonorrhea, in conjunction with a cephalosporin (i.e., 250 mg of ceftriaxone or 400 mg of cefixime, if ceftriaxone is not an option). During January 1992--July 2009, of 87,566 N. gonorrhoeae isolates tested for azithromycin susceptibility by CDC's national Gonoccoccal Isolate Surveillance Project (GISP), only 39 (0.04%) had minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ≥8 µg/mL (including 25 with 8 µg/mL and 14 with 16 µg/mL), indicating reduced susceptibility; none of the isolates were collected in San Diego County, California (CDC, unpublished data, 2011). During August--October 2009, five of 55 (9.1%) N. gonorrhoeae isolates obtained from men with symptomatic urethritis tested at San Diego County's main municipal sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic had high azithromycin MICs: three with 8µg/mL and two with 16 µg/mL. This report summarizes the laboratory and epidemiologic findings associated with this reduced susceptibility to azithromycin. In San Diego County, clinicians treating cephalosporin-allergic patients with a 2 g dose of azithromycin for uncomplicated gonorrhea are advised to obtain tests of cure 3 weeks after treatment and to recommend sexual abstinence until a negative test result for gonorrhea is achieved. Continued surveillance for antibiotic resistance and effective control efforts are critical for gonorrhea prevention.

  20. Thermal modeling of flow in the San Diego Aqueduct, California, and its relation to evaporation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal balance of the 26-kilometer long concrete-lined San Diego Aqueduct, a canal in southern California, was studied to determine the coefficients in a Dalton type evaporation formula. Meteorologic and hydraulic variables, as well as water temperature, were monitored continuously for a 1-year period. A thermal model was calibrated by use of data obtained during a 28-day period to determine the coefficients which best described the thermal balance of the canal. The coefficients applicable to the San Diego Aqueduct are similar to those commonly obtained from lake evaporation studies except that a greater evaporation at low windspeeds is indicated. The model was verified by use of data obtained during 113 days which did not include the calibration data. These data verified that the derived wind function realistically represents the canal evaporation. An annual evaporation of 2.08 meters was computed which is about 91 percent of the amount of water evaporated annually from nearby class A evaporation pans. (Kosco-USGS)

  1. Under- and over-nutrition among refugees in San Diego County, California.

    PubMed

    Rondinelli, Amanda J; Morris, Meghan D; Rodwell, Timothy C; Moser, Kathleen S; Paida, Paulino; Popper, Steve T; Brouwer, Kimberly C

    2011-02-01

    Resettled refugees often arrive in their host country with little knowledge of nutrition or available food choices. We explored nutrition-related issues of recent refugee arrivals to San Diego County-the second largest California resettlement site. In-depth interviews (n = 40) were conducted with refugees, health care practitioners, and refugee service organizations. Content analysis identified nutrition-related themes. Unhealthy weight gain after arrival was the most common concern and was attributed to social pressures among adolescents, food choices and a more sedentary lifestyle. Conversely, undernutrition remained a concern due to poor diets. Factors influencing nutritional problems included continuation of past habits, acculturation, unfamiliarity with available foods and socio-economic influences. The nutritional concerns encountered by resettled refugees in San Diego are not unique to this group but are aggravated by their past experiences, and abrupt changes to food choices and behavior. Addressing contextual factors of poor food choices may prevent some of the long term health consequences of poor nutrition.

  2. Fire risk in San Diego County, California: A weighted Bayesian model approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolden, Crystal A.; Weigel, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Fire risk models are widely utilized to mitigate wildfire hazards, but models are often based on expert opinions of less understood fire-ignition and spread processes. In this study, we used an empirically derived weights-of-evidence model to assess what factors produce fire ignitions east of San Diego, California. We created and validated a dynamic model of fire-ignition risk based on land characteristics and existing fire-ignition history data, and predicted ignition risk for a future urbanization scenario. We then combined our empirical ignition-risk model with a fuzzy fire behavior-risk model developed by wildfire experts to create a hybrid model of overall fire risk. We found that roads influence fire ignitions and that future growth will increase risk in new rural development areas. We conclude that empirically derived risk models and hybrid models offer an alternative method to assess current and future fire risk based on management actions.

  3. Physical activity promotion among churchgoing Latinas in San Diego, California: does neighborhood cohesion matter?

    PubMed

    Martinez, Suzanna M; Arredondo, Elva M; Roesch, Scott

    2013-10-01

    This study examined the reciprocal relationship between Latinas' leisure-time physical activity and neighborhood cohesion following the implementation of a 6-month promotora-delivered pilot intervention. A one-group study design was used to promote leisure-time physical activity and build neighborhood cohesion among 143 churchgoing Latinas in San Diego, California. Using a three-wave autoregressive cross-lagged panel model, leisure-time physical activity and neighborhood cohesion (assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 months) were analyzed. Leisure-time physical activity and neighborhood cohesion increased across time. Neighborhood cohesion at 3 months predicted leisure-time physical activity at 6 months. A promotora model in the context of a faith-based setting may be appropriate to promote Latinas' leisure-time physical activity and make socioenvironmental improvements.

  4. Comprehensive monitoring of meteorology, hydraulics, and thermal regime of the San Diego Aqueduct, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Sturrock, Alex M.

    1976-01-01

    Water temperature, as well as meteorologic and hydraulic variables which influence the energy budget of the San Diego Aqueduct in southern California, were continuously monitored for a 1-year period beginning July 24, 1973. Incoming solar and atmospheric radiation, windspeed and direction, water temperature, and wet- and dry-bulb air temperatures were recorded at 10-minute intervals at each end of the 26-km concrete-lined canal, while flow rates and stages were determined at hourly intervals for five locations. Although only daily averaged values are presented in this report, all information necessary for the use and interpretation of these data are presented. Windspeeds were minimum during the early morning hours and maximum during the late afternoon; however, they were variable spatially. On the other hand, incoming radiation and absolute vapor pressure varied little from point to point. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Comprehensive monitoring of meteorology, hydraulics, and thermal regime of the San Diego Aqueduct, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Sturrock, Alex M.

    1979-01-01

    Water temperature, as well as meteorologic and hydraulic variables which influence the energy budget of the San Diego Aqueduct in southern California, were continuously monitored for a 1-year period beginning July 24, 1973. Incoming solar and atmospheric radiation, windspeed and direction, water temperature, and wet- and dry-bulb air temperatures were recorded at 10-minute intervals at each end of the 26-kilometer concrete-lined canal, while flow-rates and stages were determined at hourly intervals for five locations. Although only daily averaged values are presented in this report, all information necessary for the use and interpretation of these data are presented. Windspeeds were minimum during the early morning hours and maximum during the late afternoon; however, they were variable spatially. On the other hand, incoming radiation and absolute vapor pressure varied little from point to point. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. 75 FR 56889 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, San Diego County Air Pollution Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...: EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the San Diego County Air Pollution Control... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by reference, Intergovernmental relations.... * * * * * (c) * * * (379) * * * (i) * * * (B) San Diego County Air Pollution Control District. (1) Rule...

  7. California: Environmental Health Coalition Clean Ports, Healthy Communities in San Diego (A Former EPA CARE Project)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Health Coalition (EHC) is a recipient of a CARE Level II cooperative agreement grant. The Clean Ports, Healthy Communities in San Diego targets the Barrio Logan and Old Town National City areas located along San Diego Bay.

  8. Institutional Profile: University of California San Diego Pharmacogenomics Education Program (PharmGenEd™): bridging the gap between science and practice.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Grace M; Ma, Joseph D; Lee, Kelly C; Halpert, James R; Bourne, Philip E; Ganiats, Theodore G; Taylor, Palmer

    2011-02-01

    Clinical application of evidence-based pharmacogenomics information has the potential to help healthcare professionals provide safe and effective medication management to patients. However, there is a gap between the advances of pharmacogenomics discovery and the health professionals' knowledge regarding pharmacogenomics testing and therapeutic uses. Furthermore, pharmacogenomics education materials for healthcare professionals have not been readily available or accessible. Pharmacogenomics Education Program (PharmGenEd™) is an evidence-based pharmacogenomics education program developed at the University of California San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and the School of Medicine (CA, USA), with funding support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Program components include continuing education modules, train-the-trainer materials and shared curriculum modules based on therapeutic topics, and virtual communities with online resources.

  9. A Tale of Two Cities: San Diego (USA) and Tijuana (Mexico) El Niño Readiness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, C.; Kinoshita, A. M.; Nishikawa, T.; Briones-Gamboa, F.

    2016-12-01

    This research seeks to define the characteristics of an El Niño Ready City (ENRC) by comparing two neighboring cities, San Diego, United States and Tijuana, Mexico, with diverse management and social conditions, yet similar climatology. Notable El Niño years, 1982-83 and 1997-98, brought heavy precipitation and consequently significant flooding in southern California and northwest Mexico. Using the 2015-16 El Niño, we were able to investigate both Cities' historical and current preparation for hazardous events and identify lessons learned from previous events. Preparation activities include steps taken to prepare storm-related infrastructure, develop emergency protocols, establish communication and coordination efforts, and encourage public outreach and awareness. Literature, media searches, and interviews with local and regional agencies such as the San Diego Department of Transportation and Storm Water, San Diego Lifeguard Services and River Rescue Team, Tijuana State Civil Protection, and Mexican Meteorological Service Departments provided insight into the current and ongoing management for these urban Cities during the 2015-2016 El Niño. Both San Diego and Tijuana were cognizant of the 2015-2016 El Niño and anticipated above-average precipitation and had public agencies that were concerned with potential El Niño related impacts. Common challenges of inter-agency communication and coordination were noted for both Cities. By tracking the electronic media in Tijuana, we observed that local institutions respond proactively, but in a specific period of time. While, in the case of San Diego, the media analysis indicated a focus on El Niño related weather and its implications for the City as evidenced by the total number of articles related to weather across four decades. A challenge for both Cities will be to develop readiness capacities for long-term periods even if El Niño signals are weak or not present.

  10. Cooling rates and crystallization dynamics of shallow level pegmatite-aplite dikes, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webber, Karen L.; Simmons, William B.; Falster, Alexander U.; Foord, Eugene E.

    1999-01-01

    Pegmatites of the Pala and Mesa Grande Pegmatite Districts, San Diego County, California are typically thin, sheet-like composite pegmatite-aplite dikes. Aplitic portions of many dikes display pronounced mineralogical layering referred to as "line rock," characterized by fine-grained, garnet-rich bands alternating with albite- and quartz-rich bands. Thermal modeling was performed for four dikes in San Diego County including the 1 m thick Himalaya dike, the 2 m thick Mission dike, the 8 m thick George Ashley dike, and the 25 m thick Stewart dike. Calculations were based on conductive cooling equations accounting for latent heat of crystallization, a melt emplacement temperature of 650 °C into 150 °C fractured, gabbroic country rock at a depth of 5 km, and an estimated 3 wt% initial H2O content in the melt. Cooling to -5 cm/s. Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies of garnet from layered aplites suggest growth rates of about 10-6 cm/s. These results indicate that the dikes cooled and crystallized rapidly, with variable nucleation rates but high overall crystal-growth rates. Initial high nucleation rates coincident with emplacement and strong undercooling can account for the millimeter-size aplite grains. Lower nucleation rates coupled with high growth rates can explain the decimeter-size minerals in the hanging walls, cores, and miarolitic cavities of the pegmatites. The presence of tourmaline and/or lepidolite throughout these dikes suggests that although the melts were initially H2O-undersaturated, high melt concentrations of incompatible (or fluxing) components such as B, F, and Li (±H2O), aided in the development of large pegmatitic crystals that grew rapidly in the short times suggested by the conductive cooling models.

  11. Flow meter evaluation for U.S. Navy Public Works Center, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Chvala, W.D. Jr.; McMordie, K.L.; Szydlowski, R.F.

    1995-06-01

    The U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego (PWCSD) was concerned about the accuracy of various flow meters on steam and compressed air lines serving Naval facilities in San Diego, California. The flow meters had experienced various inconsistencies that had not been resolved prior to July 1993. Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington, evaluated the operation of 10 out of 79 steam and compressed air flow meters at PWCSD. The evaluation was limited to analysis of historical information and review of existing operating procedures. On-site investigation of the flow meters was limited to external observations of the flow-sensing equipment and a check of the flow computer program. PNL did not remove installed sensing equipment (i.e., flow meters or temperature or pressure sensors) to evaluate existing condition or check calibration. Although many of the flow meter errors can be traced to improperly normalized readings and to meters improperly compensated for temperature and pressure, lack of regular maintenance, including proper calibration, was evidenced throughout this study. A strict calibration schedule should be established for all steam and air flow meters, including calibration of the temperature sensor, pressure sensor, and flow turbine. It is recommended that the most crucial flow meters (such as the 10 evaluated in this study) be calibrated yearly. The remaining 69 flow meters could be placed on a staggered, biyearly calibration schedule. Calibration should be done by qualified personnel only. Improper calibration is often worse than no calibration at all. An outside firm is recommended to be contracted with to perform all maintenance and calibration on flow meters at the Naval facilities. Use of an outside firm would better facilitate regular, reliable calibration while removing liability for damaged parts.

  12. The California Pertussis Epidemic 2010: A Review of 986 Pediatric Case Reports From San Diego County.

    PubMed

    Chan, M H; Ma, L; Sidelinger, D; Bethel, L; Yen, J; Inveiss, A; Sawyer, M H; Waters-Montijo, K; Johnson, J M; Hicks, L; McDonald, E C; Ginsberg, M M; Bradley, J S

    2012-03-01

    The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) declared a pertussis epidemic on 23 June 2010. More cases were reported in 2010 (9146) than in any year since 1947. We describe the characteristics of pertussis epidemiology and disease from 986 reported cases in children in San Diego County (population 3.2 million). Descriptive statistics were abstracted from CDPH pertussis case report forms that were completed by public health nurses investigating reports of positive laboratory results for pertussis and reports of illnesses compatible with pertussis. Of 1144 reported adult and pediatric cases, 753 (66%) were confirmed and 391 were probable/suspect. Children aged <19 years comprised 86% of all reported cases in San Diego County; of these, 22% were aged 11-18 years, 29% were aged 6-10 years, 27% were aged 1-5 years, and 22% were aged <1 year (with 70% aged <6 months). Case rates were highest in infants aged <6 months (651 per 100 000 population). Of those aged >1 year, the highest attack rates were in preschool children aged 1-5 years (114 per 100 000) and elementary school children aged 6-10 years (141 per 100 000). Of 51 children hospitalized, 82% were aged <6 months; 2 deaths occurred in these young infants. Paroxysmal cough was noted in over 70% of children in all age groups; post-tussive vomiting occurred in 36% (aged 11-18 years) to 57% (aged <6 months) of children. Pertussis vaccine efficacy may decrease more rapidly than previously believed, facilitating spread of pertussis in elementary school-aged children. The highest case rates and the only mortality occurred in infants aged <6 months. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Wildfires alter rodent community structure across four vegetation types in southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brehme, Cheryl S.; Clark, Denise R.; Rochester, Carlton J.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2011-01-01

    We surveyed burned and unburned plots across four habitat reserves in San Diego County, California, USA, in 2005 and 2006, to assess the effects of the 2003 wildfires on the community structure and relative abundance of rodent species. The reserves each contained multiple vegetation types (coastal sage scrub, chaparral, woodland, and grassland) and spanned from 250 m to 1078 m in elevation. Multivariate analyses revealed a more simplified rodent community structure in all burned habitats in comparison to unburned habitats. Reduction in shrub and tree cover was highly predictive of changes in post-fire rodent community structure in the burned coastal sage scrub and chaparral habitats. Reduction in cover was not predictive for the less substantially burned woodlands and grasslands, for which we hypothesized that interspecific competition played a greater role in post-fire community structure. Across vegetation types, generalists and open habitat specialists typically increased in relative abundance, whereas closed habitat specialists decreased. We documented significant increases in relative abundance of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus Wagner) and Dulzura kangaroo rat (Dipodomys simulans Merriam). In contrast, we found significant decreases in relative abundance for the California mouse (Peromyscus californicus Gambel), San Diego pocket mouse (Chaetodipus fallax Merriam), desert woodrat (Neotoma lepida Thomas), and brush mouse (Peromyscus boylii Baird). Currently, our research program involves assessment of whether habitat conservation plans (HCPs) in southern California provide long-term protection to HCP covered species, as well as preserve ecosystem function. The scenario of increased wildfires needs to be incorporated into this assessment. We discuss our results in relation to management and conservation planning under a future scenario of larger and more frequent wildfires in southern California.

  14. Solar Energy System Economic Evaluation. Final report for Elam-Tempe, Tempe, Arizona and Elcam-San Diego, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy systems that were installed at Tempe, Arizona and San Diego, California, is developed for these and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  15. Persistent organic pollutants in plastic marine debris found on beaches in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Van, Almira; Rochman, Chelsea M; Flores, Elisa M; Hill, Kish L; Vargas, Erica; Vargas, Serena A; Hoh, Euhna

    2012-01-01

    Plastic debris were collected from eight beaches around San Diego County, California. Debris collected include: pre-production pellets and post-consumer plastics including fragments, polystyrene (PS) foam, and rubber. A total of n = 2453 pieces were collected ranging from <5 mm to 50 mm in size. The plastic pieces were separated by type, location, and appearance and analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its breakdown products, and chlordanes. PAH concentrations ranged from 30 ng g(-1) to 1900 ng g(-1), PCBs from non-detect to 47 ng g(-1), chlordanes from 1.8 ng g(-1) to 60 ng g(-1), and DDTs from non-detect to 76 ng g(-1). Consistently higher PAH concentrations found in PS foam samples (300-1900 ng g(-1)) led us to examine unexposed PS foam packaging materials and PS virgin pellets. Unexposed PS foam contained higher concentrations of PAHs (240-1700 ng g(-1)) than PS virgin pellets (12-15 ng g(-1)), suggesting that PAHs may be produced during manufacturing. Temporal trends of debris were investigated at one site, Ocean Beach, where storm events and beach maintenance were found to be important variables influencing debris present at a given time.

  16. Gene Flow Patterns of the Mayfly Fallceon quilleri in San Diego County, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zickovich, J.; Bohonak, A. J.

    2005-05-01

    Management decisions and conservation strategies for freshwater invertebrates critically depend on an understanding of gene flow and genetic structure. We collected the mayfly Fallceon quilleri (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) from 15 streams across three geographically distinct watersheds in San Diego County, California (San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, and Tijuana) and one site in Anza-Borrego desert. We sequenced a 667 base pair region of the mitochondrial DNA (COI) to assess genetic structure and gene flow. We found eight haplotypes across all populations. San Dieguito and Santa Margarita each contained six haplotypes. Tijuana and Anza Borrego each contained four haplotypes. The expected heterozygosity for San Dieguito, Santa Margarita, Tijuana, and Anza Borrego was 0.81, 0.83, 0.75, and 1.0, respectively. A hierarchical AMOVA analysis indicated restricted gene flow and a pairwise comparison indicated that Tijuana watershed differs significantly from San Dieguito and Anza Borrego. A haplotype cladogram revealed two internal ancestral haplotypes and six derived tip haplotypes that are unique to particular watersheds. These results suggest that Tijuana (the southernmost and the most impacted watershed) is more genetically distinct and isolated than the other watersheds sampled.

  17. Modeling of Selenium for the San Diego Creek Watershed and Newport Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2009-01-01

    The San Diego Creek watershed and Newport Bay in southern California are contaminated with selenium (Se) as a result of groundwater associated with urban development overlying a historical wetland, the Swamp of the Frogs. The primary Se source is drainage from surrounding seleniferous marine sedimentary formations. An ecosystem-scale model was employed as a tool to assist development of a site-specific Se objective for the region. The model visualizes outcomes of different exposure scenarios in terms of bioaccumulation in predators using partitioning coefficients, trophic transfer factors, and site-specific data for food-web inhabitants and particulate phases. Predicted Se concentrations agreed well with field observations, validating the use of the model as realistic tool for testing exposure scenarios. Using the fish tissue and bird egg guidelines suggested by regulatory agencies, allowable water concentrations were determined for different conditions and locations in the watershed and the bay. The model thus facilitated development of a site-specific Se objective that was locally relevant and provided a basis for step-by-step implementation of source control.

  18. Associations Between Phylogenetic Clustering and HLA Profile Among HIV-Infected Individuals in San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjay R.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Young, Jason A.; Richman, Douglas; Little, Susan; Smith, Davey M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Specific sequence changes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the presence of specific HLA molecules may alter the composition and processing of viral peptides, leading to immune escape. Persistence of these mutations after transmission may leave the genetic fingerprint of the transmitter's HLA profile. Here, we evaluated the associations between HLA profiles and the phylogenetic relationships of HIV sequences sampled from a cohort of recently infected individuals in San Diego, California. Methods We identified transmission clusters within the study cohort, using phylogenetic analysis of sampled HIV pol genotypes at a genetic distance of <1.5%. We then evaluated the association of specific HLA alleles, HLA homozygosity, HLA concordance, race and ethnicity, and mutational patterns within the clustering and nonclustering groups. Results From 350 cohort participants, we identified 162 clustering individuals and 188 nonclustering individuals. We identified trends for enrichment of particular alleles within individual clusters and evidence of viral escape within those clusters. We also found that discordance of HLA alleles was significantly associated with clustering individuals. Conclusions Some transmission clusters demonstrate HLA enrichment, and viruses in these HLA-associated clusters often show evidence of escape to enriched alleles. Interestingly, HLA discordance was associated with clustering in our predominantly MSM population. PMID:22448013

  19. Drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in the Baja California-San Diego County border population.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, C R; Schultz, E; Moser, K; Cox, M; Freeman, R; Ramirez-Zetina, M; Lomeli, M R

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the frequency of, and risk factors for, drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among Baja California (BC) and San Diego County (SDC) residents. Another purpose was to document the amount of contact between pulmonary TB patients and residents of the opposite side of the the border. During the period from February 1995 to May 1996, pulmonary TB patients from BC (n = 427) and SDC (n = 331) were evaluated with cultures, drug susceptibility tests, and questionnaires. Drug resistance was found in 41% of the BC Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB) isolates and 20% of the SDC isolates. Resistance to both isoniazid (INH) and rifampin (RIF) varied from 1% of isolates from SDC patients to 17% of isolates from BC patients. Patients with a history of previous treatment had increased odds of drug-resistant disease. Older BC patients were more likely to have INH- or RIF-resistant TB. Although 42% of Tijuana TB patients reported recent contact with residents from SDC, travel to Mexico and contact with residents from Mexico were not significant risk factors for drug-resistant TB among SDC residents. However, the demonstrated contact between TB patients and residents on opposite sides of the border indicates the importance of coordinating efforts internationally to control TB. PMID:9795580

  20. (De)constructing literacy: Education inequalities and the production of space in San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangeman, Andrew Gerrit

    Since its inception, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) and recent additions to the U.S. Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) have elicited a broad swath of responses from the educational community. These responses include critical discussions of how standardized testing requirements proliferate a "teach for the test" mentality that transforms how reading, writing, and mathematics are taught in public schools. This thesis focused specifically on "literacy" in relation to the policies that challenge its status as a subjective form of communication, knowledge sharing, and story-telling. Embedded within the term "literacy" are sets of socially-constructed dualisms such as "good school" vs. "bad school," "literate" vs. "illiterate," and "reader" vs. "test-taker" that are propagated under education reform. Investigating these dualisms involved a mixed methods approach, which included the use of critical theory, geovisualization, and geographic analysis. The resulting data allows for a comprehensive look into the economic, political, social, and cultural forces involved in the production of literate space(s) in San Diego, California.

  1. California GAMA program: ground-water quality data in the San Diego drainages hydrogeologic province, California, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burton, Carmen A.

    2005-01-01

    Because of concerns over ground-water quality, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB), in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has implemented the Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. A primary objective of the program is to provide a current assessment of ground-water quality in areas where public supply wells are an important source of drinking water. The San Diego GAMA study unit was the first region of the state where an assessment of ground-water quality was implemented under the GAMA program. The San Diego GAMA study unit covers the entire San Diego Drainages hydrogeologic province, and is broken down into four distinct hydrogeologic study areas: the Temecula Valley study area, the Warner Valley study area, the Alluvial Basins study area, and the Hard Rock study area. A total of 58 ground-water samples were collected from public supply wells in the San Diego GAMA study unit: 19 wells were sampled in the Temecula Valley study area, 9 in the Warner Valley study area, 17 in the Alluvial Basins study area, and 13 in the Hard Rock study area. Over 350 chemical and microbial constituents and water-quality indicators were analyzed for in this study. However, only select wells were measured for all constituents and water-quality indicators. Results of analyses were calculated as detection frequencies by constituent classification and by individual constituents for the entire San Diego GAMA study unit and for the individual study areas. Additionally, concentrations of constituents that are routinely monitored were compared to maximum contaminant levels (MCL) and secondary maximum contaminant levels (SMCL). Concentrations of constituents classified as 'unregulated chemicals for which monitoring is required' (UCMR) were compared to the 'detection level for the purposes of reporting' (DLR). Eighteen of the 88 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and gasoline oxygenates

  2. Can genomics clarify the origins of Boreioglycaspis melaleucae in California, USA?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Australian psyllid Boreioglycaspis melaleucae is a biological control agent of Melaleuca quinquenervia in Florida (USA) but was observed attacking M. quinquenervia trees in southern California (USA). Genotyping revealed the California population matched three of eight Australian haplotypes and ...

  3. Organochlorines and mercury in eggs of coastal terns and herons in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Custer, T.W.; Lowe, Roy W.; Rigney, M.; Cromartie, E.

    1988-01-01

    In San Franciso Bay, California, USA, concentrations of DDE and mercury in eggs differed among Caspian Tern, Forster's Tern, Black-crowned Night-Heron, and Snowy Egret in 1982. Geometric mean DDE concentrations were higher (P < 0.05) in Caspian Tern eggs (6.93 ppm, wet weight) than in eggs of other species (1.92-2.84 ppm). Mean mercury concentrations were significantly greater in Caspian Tern (1.25 ppm) and forster's Tern (0.90 ppm) eggs than in night-herons (0.41 ppm), but night-heron eggs contained higher concentrations of mercury than did the eggs of Snowy Egrets (0.21 ppm). There were no significant differences among species for mean concentrations of trans-nonachlor or PCBs; other organochlorines occurred in fewer than half of the samples, so means were not compared. Caspian Tern eggs from San Francisco Bay had higher PCB concentrations (4.85 ppm) than did eggs of this species from San Diego Bay, California (1.70 ppm) or Elkhorn Slough, California (1.83 ppm), but we detected no significant differences in mean concentrations of other organochlorines. DDE concentrations in 5 of 47 (10.6%) night-heron eggs from San Francisco Bay exceeded 8 ppm, a level associated with impaired reproduction in this species. DDE concentrations were negatively correlated with eggshell thickness in night-herons and egrets.

  4. A Programmatic Approach to Determine Eligibility of Prehistoric Sites in the San Diego Subregion, Southern Coast Archeological Region, California, for the National Register of Historic Places

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    recovered from the island was obtained from eastern California , particularly from Coso Volcanic Field (Rick et al. 2001). Obsidian hydration , however, has...1981 Exchange and Production Systems in California Prehistory: The Results of Hydration Dating and Chemical Characterization of Obsidian Sources. BAR...Sea-Level Curves for Santa Monica Shelf, California Continental Borderland . Science 213:331–333. Noah, Anna 1998 Prehistoric Fishing on the San Diego

  5. Evaluation of the San Dieguito, San Elijo, and San Pasqual hydrologic subareas for reclaimed water use, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made to determine the suitability of three small hydrologic subareas in San Diego County, California, for reuse of municipal wastewater. Ground-water quality has been impacted by agricultural water use, imported water use, changes in natural recharge patterns, seawater intrusion, and intrusion of ground water from surrounding marine sediments; therefore, ground water is of limited value as a water-supply source. Reclaimed water use is feasible and expected to improve ground-water quality, creating a new source of water for agricultural use. (USGS)

  6. Evaluation of the Mission, Santee, and Tijuana hydrologic subareas for reclaimed-water use, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made to determine the suitability of three small hydrologic subareas in San Diego County, California, for reuse of treated municipal wastewater (reclaimed water). Groundwater quality has been impacted by agricultural water use, changes in natural recharge patterns, seawater intrusion, and groundwater movement from surrounding marine sediments. Groundwater levels near land surface may limit artificial recharge of reclaimed water or may require pumping of groundwater from the aquifer prior to recharge with reclaimed water. Reclaimed water may be used for irrigated water in upland areas. (USGS)

  7. Burkholderia pseudomallei isolates in 2 pet iguanas, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Zehnder, Ashley M; Hawkins, Michelle G; Koski, Marilyn A; Lifland, Barry; Byrne, Barbara A; Swanson, Alexandra A; Rood, Michael P; Gee, Jay E; Elrod, Mindy Glass; Beesley, Cari A; Blaney, David D; Ventura, Jean; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Beeler, Emily S

    2014-02-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was isolated from abscesses of 2 pet green iguanas in California, USA. The international trade in iguanas may contribute to importation of this pathogen into countries where it is not endemic and put persons exposed to these animals at risk for infection.

  8. "Hydrologic effects of forest harvest in northwestern California, USA"

    Treesearch

    Robert Ziemer

    2000-01-01

    Streamflow, suspended sediment, and bedload have been monitored since 1962 in the 473-ha North Fork and 424-ha South Fork of Caspar Creek. These watersheds are about 7 km from the Pacific Ocean, on the Jackson Demonstation State Forest, 10 km south of Fort Bragg, California, USA

  9. "Streamflow and sediment response to logging, California, USA"

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer; Jack Lewis; Elizabeth T. Keppeler

    1998-01-01

    Streamflow, suspended sediment, and bedload have been monitored since 1962 in the 473-ha North Fork and the 424-ha South Fork of Caspar Creek. These watersheds are about 7 km from the Pacific Ocean, on the Jackson Demonstration State Forest, 10 km south of Fort Bragg, California, USA (Ziemer et al. 1996)

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei Isolates in 2 Pet Iguanas, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zehnder, Ashley M.; Hawkins, Michelle G.; Koski, Marilyn A.; Lifland, Barry; Byrne, Barbara A.; Swanson, Alexandra A.; Rood, Michael P.; Elrod, Mindy Glass; Beesley, Cari A.; Blaney, David D.; Ventura, Jean; Hoffmaster, Alex R.; Beeler, Emily S.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was isolated from abscesses of 2 pet green iguanas in California, USA. The international trade in iguanas may contribute to importation of this pathogen into countries where it is not endemic and put persons exposed to these animals at risk for infection. PMID:24447394

  11. Knemidocoptic Mange in Wild Golden Eagles, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Nicole; Rogers, Krysta; Hawkins, Michelle G.; Sadar, Miranda; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Bell, Douglas A.; Smallwood, Kenneth S.; Wells, Amy; Shipman, Jessica; Foley, Janet

    2014-01-01

    During 2012–2013 in California, USA, 3 wild golden eagles were found with severe skin disease; 2 died. The cause was a rare mite, most closely related to Knemidocoptes derooi mites. Cautionary monitoring of eagle populations, habitats, and diseases is warranted. PMID:25271842

  12. Multifamily recycling programs: Program data and implementation guidelines. Multifamily recycling in San Diego, California, and Portland, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Portland, Oregon, and San Diego, California worked independently, but on similar tracks to implement and study multi-family recycling systems. This report examines the implementation and lessons learned from these programs. Each city adapted the program to fit their local environment. San Diego focussed their outreach on garbage haulers as well as property managers. San Diego worked to promote the participation of the private sector in multifamily recycling and to encourage haulers to duplicate the program with their other multifamily customers. Portland focussed its outreach on the property owners and managers because a new Oregon law requires that landlords provide recycling service and education to all their tenants. The end product in each city was onsite recycling systems and tenant education serving nearly 9,000 multi-family units combined. Newspapers comprised the largest material by volume and weight collected in each city and accounted for the majority of the estimated energy savings in each program. Although recycling is often thought of as being good from an environmental and resource perspective, results from the energy savings analyses show that there is also a considerable energy savings potential from multifamily recycling.

  13. Holocene activity of the Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvall, Scott C.; Rockwell, Thomas K.

    1995-12-01

    The Rose Canyon fault zone in San Diego, California, has many well-expressed geomorphic characteristics of an active strike-slip fault, including scarps, offset and deflected drainages and channel walls, pressure ridges, a closed depression, and vegetation lineaments. Geomorphic expression of the fault zone from Mount Soledad south to Mission Bay indicates that the Mount Soledad strand is the most active. A network of trenches excavated across the Mount Soledad strand in Rose Creek demonstrate a minimum of 8.7 m of dextral slip in a distinctive early to middle Holocene gravel-filled channel that crosses the fault zone. The gravel-filled channel was preserved within and east of the fault but was removed west of the fault zone by erosion or possibly grading during development. Consequently, the actual displacement of the channel could be greater than 8.7 m. Radiocarbon dates on detrital charcoal recovered from the sediments beneath the channel yield a maximum calibrated age of about 8.1±0.2 kyr. The minimum amount of slip along with the maximum age yield a minimum slip rate of 1.07±0.03 mm/yr on this strand of the Rose Canyon fault zone for much of Holocene time. Other strands of the Rose Canyon fault zone, which are east and west of our site, may also have Holocene activity. Based on an analysis of the geomorphology of fault traces within the Rose Canyon fault zone, along with the results of our trenching study, we estimate the maximum likely slip rate at about 2 mm/yr and a best estimate of about 1.5 mm/yr. Stratigraphie evidence of at least three events is present during the past 8.1 kyr. The most recent surface rupture displaces the modern A horizon (topsoil), suggesting that this event probably occurred within the past 500 years. Stratigraphie and structural relationships also indicate the occurrence of a scarp-forming event at about 8.1 kyr, prior to deposition of the gravel-filled channel that was used as a piercing line. A third event is indicated by the

  14. Use of synthetic cathinones and cannabimimetics among injection drug users in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Karla D; Armenta, Richard F; Roth, Alexis M; Maxwell, Jane C; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S

    2014-08-01

    Use of synthetic cathinones (SC) and cannabimimetics (i.e., "THC homologues" [TH]) is associated with adverse health effects. We investigated the epidemiology of synthetic drug use among a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Diego, California. We used logistic regression analysis to identify correlates of SC and TH use among 485 IDUs enrolled from June 2012 to September 2013. Seven percent of participants reported ever using SC and 30% reported ever using TH. In multivariate logistic regression, age and recent hospitalization were significantly associated with odds of SC use (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 0.93, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 0.90, 0.97; and AOR 2.34 95% C.I. 1.00, 5.49, respectively) and TH use (AOR 0.96, 95% C.I. 0.94, 0.98; and AOR 2.62, 95% C.I. 1.47, 4.68, respectively). Use of methamphetamine (AOR 9.35, 95% C.I. 1.20, 72.79) and club drugs in the past six months (AOR 3.38, 95% C.I. 1.17, 9.76) were significantly associated with SC use. Being on probation/parole (AOR 2.42, 95% C.I. 1.44, 4.07), initiating injection drug use with stimulants (AOR 1.89 95% C.I. 1.13, 3.16), and past six-month marijuana (AOR 9.22, 95% C.I. 4.49, 18.96) and prescription drug use (AOR 1.98, 95% C.I. 1.20, 3.27) were significantly associated with TH use. A considerable proportion of IDU use synthetic drugs and may experience harms associated with their use. Findings have implications for criminal justice system management. Prevention efforts should emphasize the risks associated with rapidly changing synthetic formulations, and the potential harms associated with polydrug use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of synthetic cathinones and cannabimimetics among injection drug users in San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karla D.; Armenta, Richard F.; Roth, Alexis M.; Maxwell, Jane C.; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Use of synthetic cathinones (SC) and cannabimimetics (i.e., “THC homologues” [TH]) is associated with adverse health effects. We investigated the epidemiology of synthetic drug use among a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Diego, California. Methods We used logistic regression analysis to identify correlates of SC and TH use among 485 IDUs enrolled from June 2012 to September 2013. Results Seven percent of participants reported ever using SC and 30% reported ever using TH. In multivariate logistic regression, age and recent hospitalization were significantly associated with odds of SC use (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 0.93, 95% Confidence Interval [C.I.] 0.90, 0.97; and AOR 2.34 95% C.I. 1.00, 5.49, respectively) and TH use (AOR 0.96, 95% C.I. 0.94, 0.98; and AOR 2.62, 95% C.I. 1.47, 4.68, respectively). Use of methamphetamine (AOR 9.35, 95% C.I. 1.20, 72.79) and club drugs in the past six months (AOR 3.38, 95% C.I. 1.17, 9.76) were significantly associated with SC use. Being on probation/parole (AOR 2.42, 95% C.I. 1.44,4.07), initiating injection drug use with stimulants (AOR 1.89 95% C.I. 1.13, 3.16), and past six-month marijuana (AOR 9.22, 95% C.I. 4.49, 18.96) and prescription drug use (AOR 1.98, 95% C.I. 1.20, 3.27) were significantly associated with TH use. Conclusions A considerable proportion of IDU use synthetic drugs and may experience harms associated with their use. Findings have implications for criminal justice system management. Prevention efforts should emphasize the risks associated with rapidly changing synthetic formulations, and the potential harms associated with polydrug use. PMID:24916748

  16. Use of Neo-melubrina, a banned antipyretic drug, in San Diego, California: a survey of patients and providers

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lori; Abarca, Sergio; Henry, Bonnie; Friedman, Lawrence

    2001-01-01

    Background Dipyrone is an antipyretic drug that has been associated with agranulocytosis. It is banned in the United States but is available in Mexico under the name Neo-melubrina. Objectives To define the use of Neo-melubrina in the Hispanic population of 2 San Diego, California, community clinics and to determine local physicians' and nurse practitioners' awareness of the drug and its risks. Design Patient survey and provider survey. Participants Patients: 200 parents of Hispanic pediatric patients. Providers: members of San Diego chapters of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the California Coalition of Nurse Practitioners. Main outcome measures Self-reported use of Neo-melubrina by patients, and provider awareness of Neo-melubrina and its most significant side effects. Results Of the 200 patients, 76 (38.0%) reported a lifetime use of Neo-melubrina. Most (56%) used it for both pain and fever. Most providers were unable to correctly identify why Neo-melubrina might be used or its adverse effects. Physicians answered correctly more often than nurse practitioners and pediatric providers more often than family medicine providers. Providers who trained within 75 miles of the US-Mexico border, who reported a patient population of more than 50% Hispanic, and who were resident physicians at the time of the survey were most likely to answer correctly. Conclusions Neo-melubrina has been used by a substantial percentage of Hispanic patients in the community clinics surveyed. Many San Diego health care providers are unaware of this medication and may, therefore, miss opportunities to educate patients about safer alternatives. PMID:11527837

  17. Marine protected area networks in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Botsford, Louis W; White, J Wilson; Carr, Mark H; Caselle, Jennifer E

    2014-01-01

    California responded to concerns about overfishing in the 1990s by implementing a network of marine protected areas (MPAs) through two science-based decision-making processes. The first process focused on the Channel Islands, and the second addressed California's entire coastline, pursuant to the state's Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA). We review the interaction between science and policy in both processes, and lessons learned. For the Channel Islands, scientists controversially recommended setting aside 30-50% of coastline to protect marine ecosystems. For the MLPA, MPAs were intended to be ecologically connected in a network, so design guidelines included minimum size and maximum spacing of MPAs (based roughly on fish movement rates), an approach that also implicitly specified a minimum fraction of the coastline to be protected. As MPA science developed during the California processes, spatial population models were constructed to quantify how MPAs were affected by adult fish movement and larval dispersal, i.e., how population persistence within MPA networks depended on fishing outside the MPAs, and how fishery yields could either increase or decrease with MPA implementation, depending on fishery management. These newer quantitative methods added to, but did not supplant, the initial rule-of-thumb guidelines. In the future, similar spatial population models will allow more comprehensive evaluation of the integrated effects of MPAs and conventional fisheries management. By 2011, California had implemented 132 MPAs covering more than 15% of its coastline, and now stands on the threshold of the most challenging step in this effort: monitoring and adaptive management to ensure ecosystem sustainability.

  18. Wind energy development in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilshire, H.; Prose, D.

    1987-01-01

    Windfarms have been developed rapidly in California in the last few years. The impetus has been a legislated goal to generate 10% of California's electricity by windpower by the year 2000, and generous state and federal tax incentives. Windpower is promoted as environmentally benign, which it is in traditional uses. The California program, however, is not traditional: it calls for centralized development of a magnitude sufficient to offset significant amounts of fossil fuels now used to generate electricity. Centralized windfarm development, as exemplified by the Altamont Pass, Tehachapi Mountains, and San Gorgonio Pass developments, involves major road building projects in erosion-sensitive terrain, effective closure of public lands, and other detrimental effects. A windfarm consisting of 200 turbines with 17-m rotors located in steep terrain 16 km from an existing corridor might occupy 235 ha and physically disturb 86 ha. With average annual wind speeds of 22.5 km/h, the farm would generate about 10??106 kWh/year at present levels of capacity. This annual production would offset 1% of one day's consumption of oil in California. To supply 10% of the state's electricity (at 1984 production rates) would require about 600,000 turbines of the type in common use today and would occupy more than 685,000 ha. It is likely that indirect effects would be felt in much larger areas and would include increased air and water pollution resulting from accelerated erosion, degradation of habitat of domestic and wild animals, damage to archaeological sites, and reduction of scenic quality of now-remote areas of the state. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  19. 33 CFR 165.1108 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District... or at a port of call in the San Diego port. (b) Location. The following areas are security zones: All...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1108 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Eleventh Coast Guard District... or at a port of call in the San Diego port. (b) Location. The following areas are security zones: All...

  1. Measurement of radon gas on major faults in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, W.; King, C.-Y.

    1994-01-01

    Abundant data have been gathered through measurements of radon gas emission in the soil on several major active faults, such as San Andreas and Calaveras, in California, U.S.A.. They show radon emissions and their spatial variations at the unlocked, locked, and creeping sections of faults with different tectonic movements. The characteristics of these variations and the role of fault gases in the research on earthquake prediction are discussed in this paper. ?? 1994 Acta Seismologica Sinica.

  2. Changing Patterns of Professional Preparation and Services in Special Education. Selected Papers of a Working Conference (San Diego, California, March 9-11, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Gene, Ed.; Patterson , Virginia W., Ed.

    Selected papers from the conference on changing patterns of professional preparation and services in special education held in San Diego, California (March 9-11, 1970), contain topics of teacher assessment of students, by Wayne Lance, and educational services based on learning characteristics of pupils, by William Hall. Also included are Joseph…

  3. Summer Bridge Program: A Dropout Intervention Program for Minority and Low-Income Students at the University of California, San Diego.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Carmel; Drevlow, Susan

    Results of participation in a Summer Bridge Program at the University of California, San Diego, in 1978 for 30 high-risk, minority group, and low-income students are discussed. The program is based on Tinto's (1975) theoretical synthesis of research on dropouts from higher education and is designed to increase a student's integration and…

  4. Fronteras 1976: A View of the Border from Mexico. Proceedings of a Conference (San Diego, California, May 7-8, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    Fronteras 1976 is a bicentennial project, coordinated by two cities that share a common geographic region--San Diego, California, and Tijuana, Mexico. The project, developed from the need for structured binational cooperation in this region, focuses on the quality of life for the next century, especially the mutual opportunities and mutual…

  5. From Paper to Practice: Challenges Facing a California Charter School. A Report Presented to the San Diego Unified School Board. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WestEd, San Francisco, CA.

    Signed into law on September 2, 1992, California's charter-school law has led to the approval of over 100 charter schools. San Diego City Schools (SDCS) was one of the first districts to sponsor charter schools, including the Harriet Tubman School, 1 year after the law became effective. This report provides a brief overview and summary of a case…

  6. From Paper to Practice: Challenges Facing a California Charter School. A Report Presented to the San Diego Unified School Board. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WestEd, San Francisco, CA.

    Signed into law on September 2, 1992, California's charter-school law has led to the approval of over 100 charter schools. San Diego City Schools (SDCS) was one of the first districts to sponsor charter schools, including the Harriet Tubman School, 1 year after the law became effective. This document provides a brief overview and summary of a case…

  7. Reconstructing Equality on New Political Ground: The Politics of Representation in the Charter School Debate at the University of California, San Diego

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Lisa; Mehan, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    Attacks on the legitimacy of affirmative action pose new challenges for public universities committed to creating a diverse student population without considering race or ethnicity as factors in admissions. On the basis of a case study of the controversy surrounding the building of a charter school at the University of California, San Diego, in…

  8. Monitoring Local and Teleseismic Earthquakes Off--Shore San Diego(California) During an OBSIP Test Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, G.; Babcock, J.; Hollinshead, C.; Georgieff, P.; Allmann, B.; Orcutt, J.

    2004-12-01

    The Scripps OBS (Ocean Bottom Seismometer) team is one of three groups that provide instrumentation for the US National OBS Instrument Pool (OBSIP). The compact active source LC2000 instruments are being used successfully in numerous experiments, with excellent data quality and return rates. A set of five new passive seismic instruments was test--deployed from November 6th, 2003 through January 8th, 2004 in the San Diego Trough, about 1km below the sea surface, about 40km off--shore San Diego, California. These instruments are equipped with a Nanometrics Trillium 40s 3--component seismometer and a Cox--Webb differential pressure gauge. We recorded more than 30 teleseismic earthquakes suitable for a long-period surface wave study. The vertical--component seismometer recordings are of excellent quality and are often superior to those from similar sensors on land (Guralp CMG-40T). The signal--to--noise ratio on the DPGs depend strongly on the water depth and was expected to be low for the test deployment. Nevertheless, the December 22, 2003 San Simeon/ California earthquake was recorded with high fidelity and non--seismogenic signals are extremely coherent down to very long periods. We also recorded numerous local earthquakes. Many of these occurred off-shore and the OBSs were the closest stations by many tens of kilometers. For example, a magnitude 3.0 earthquake on the Coronado Banks Fault was recorded at station SOL in La Jolla at about 30km distance, with a signal-to-noise ratio too poor to pick the first arrival. The next closest stations were 60km and 80km away, while one of the OBSs was only 20km away. The co-deployment of DPGs allowed us to observe the first P arrival very clearly. We also recorded numerous events that were not recorded on land. About six months later, on June 15, 2004 the greater San Diego area was struck by a magnitude 5.2 earthquake on the San Clemente Fault, about 40km southwest of the OBS test deployment. Though no structural damage was

  9. Community BMI Surveillance Using an Existing Immunization Registry in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Ratigan, Amanda R; Lindsay, Suzanne; Lemus, Hector; Chambers, Christina D; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Cronan, Terry A; Browner, Deirdre K; Wooten, Wilma J

    2017-06-01

    This study examines the demographic representativeness of the County of San Diego Body Mass Index (BMI) Surveillance System to determine if the BMI estimates being obtained from this convenience sample of individuals who visited their healthcare provider for outpatient services can be generalized to the general population of San Diego. Height and weight were transmitted from electronic health records systems to the San Diego Immunization Registry (SDIR). Age, gender, and race/ethnicity of this sample are compared to general population estimates by sub-regional area (SRA) (n = 41) to account for regional demographic differences. A < 10% difference (calculated as the ratio of the differences between the frequencies of a sub-group in this sample and general population estimates obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau) was used to determine representativeness. In 2011, the sample consisted of 352,924 residents aged 2-100 years. The younger age groups (2-11, 12-17 years) and the oldest age group (≥65 years) were representative in 90, 75, and 85% of SRAs, respectively. Furthermore, at least one of the five racial/ethnic groups was represented in 71% of SRAs. This BMI Surveillance System was found to demographically represent some SRAs well, suggesting that this registry-based surveillance system may be useful in estimating and monitoring neighborhood-level BMI data.

  10. VLF Radio Field Strength Measurement of power line carrier system in San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertel, H. K.

    1981-01-01

    The radio frequency interference (RFI) potential was evaluated for a Powerline Carriet (PLC) installed in San Diego which monitors the performance of an electrical power system. The PLC system generated 30 amperes at 5.79 kHz. The RF radiations were measured to be (typically) 120 dBuV/m at the beginning of the 12 kV powerline and 60 dBuV/m at the end of the powerline. The RF fields varied inversely as the distance squared. Measurements were also performed with a 45 kHz PLC system. The RF fields were of similar amplitude.

  11. Verification survey of the hot cell facility site, General Atomics, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, W. C.

    2000-06-30

    From 1958, General Atomics maintain a hot cell facility in support of government-funded research into reactor fuels. As the use of the facility declined, General Atomics entered into an agreement with DOE to dismantle the facility and decontaminate and decommission (D&D) the site so that it could made available for unrestricted use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) was requested to verify the final radiological status of the D&D effort. This is the report of ESSAP survey and verification activities conducted at the San Diego site from November 1999 through March 2000.

  12. 78 FR 66844 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... San Diego Fall Classic, held on November 10, 2013. This event occurs on Mission Bay in San Diego, CA... you have questions on this notice, call or email Petty Officer Bryan Gollogly, Waterways Management, U... CFR 100.1101 in support of the San Diego Fall Classic (Item 1 on Table 1 of 33 CFR 100.1101). The...

  13. 77 FR 66713 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    .... to 11:30 a.m. on November 11, 2012 on Mission Bay, CA in support of the San Diego Fall Classic. This... Bryan Gollogly, Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector San Diego, CA; telephone (619) 278-7656... the annual San Diego Fall Classic (Item 1 on Table 1 of 33 CFR 100.1101). The Coast Guard will enforce...

  14. Slip rate on the San Diego trough fault zone, inner California Borderland, and the 1986 Oceanside earthquake swarm revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, Holly F.; Conrad, James E.; Paull, C.K.; McGann, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The San Diego trough fault zone (SDTFZ) is part of a 90-km-wide zone of faults within the inner California Borderland that accommodates motion between the Pacific and North American plates. Along with most faults offshore southern California, the slip rate and paleoseismic history of the SDTFZ are unknown. We present new seismic reflection data that show that the fault zone steps across a 5-km-wide stepover to continue for an additional 60 km north of its previously mapped extent. The 1986 Oceanside earthquake swarm is located within the 20-km-long restraining stepover. Farther north, at the latitude of Santa Catalina Island, the SDTFZ bends 20° to the west and may be linked via a complex zone of folds with the San Pedro basin fault zone (SPBFZ). In a cooperative program between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), we measure and date the coseismic offset of a submarine channel that intersects the fault zone near the SDTFZ–SPBFZ junction. We estimate a horizontal slip rate of about 1:5 0:3 mm=yr over the past 12,270 yr.

  15. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province, 2004: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Michael T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 3,900-square-mile (mi2) San Diego Drainages Hydrogeologic Province (hereinafter San Diego) study unit was investigated from May through July 2004 as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in southwestern California in the counties of San Diego, Riverside, and Orange. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA San Diego study was designed to provide a statistically robust assessment of untreated-groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems. The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 58 wells in 2004 and water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as the primary aquifers) were defined by the depth interval of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the San Diego study unit. The San Diego study unit consisted of four study areas: Temecula Valley (140 mi2), Warner Valley (34 mi2), Alluvial Basins (166 mi2), and Hard Rock (850 mi2). The quality of groundwater in shallow or deep water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers. For example, shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination than groundwater in deep water-bearing zones. This study had two components: the status assessment and the understanding assessment. The first component of this study-the status assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource-was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. The status assessment is intended to

  16. Water resources of Soledad, Poway, and Moosa basins, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evenson, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    Reclaimed water is being considered as as supplemental water supply in the Soledad, Poway, and Moosa basins, San Diego County. This report describes the geology, soils, hydrology, and cultural factors in each of the basins as they relate to use of reclaimed water. Imported water is currently the major water-supply source in the basins. Groundwater supplies are used to a limited extent for both agricultural and domestic needs. Surface water flows are intermittent and, therefore, have not been developed for use in the basins. All three of the basins have the potential for use of reclaimed water, but only the Moosa basin is currently implementing a plan for such use. Concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, and sulfate in both ground and surface water commonly exceed local basin objectives. As of 1985, plans for use of reclaimed water are oriented toward improving the quality of the groundwater. (USGS)

  17. Vascular extravasation of contrast medium in radiological examinations: University of California San Diego Health System Experience.

    PubMed

    Niv, Galia; Costa, Matthew; Kicak, Patricia; Richman, Katherine

    2014-06-01

    Extravasation is a well-recognized complication estimated to be between 0.1% and 0.9% of contrast medium administrations. According to the UC San Diego (UCSD) health system policy, all contrast medium extravasation (CME) reports are reviewed by the department of Risk Management, and the appropriate action is taken. Despite this strategy, a decrease in the incidence of CME could not be demonstrated. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency, management, and outcome of CME in UC San Diego patients and to assess the knowledge regarding CME among radiology technologists based on policy and guidelines. The secondary aim was to assess the manual ability of the radiology technologists in the performance of the procedure. The study has 2 parts; the first was retrospective, including data collection and interpretation of all radiology procedures using intravenous contrast medium injection between January 1, 2010, and September 30, 2011, and the second was prospective, including proactive observations and knowledge questionnaire. There were 83 (0.48%) cases of CME of 17,200 patients, 54 women (0.64%) and 29 men (0.33%), P = 0.005. The patients with CME were older, and their cannula was inserted in other departments than Radiology Department, P < 0.000. There was a gap between the high theoretical knowledge that was found in the knowledge questionnaire and its implementation that was demonstrated in the proactive observation. Our data demonstrate that sex, age, and where the cannula was inserted are predictive factors for CME. We believe that CME could be prevented by proper educational program and establishment of efficient strategy.

  18. A survey of recreational sun exposure of residents of San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Newman, W G; Agro, A D; Woodruff, S I; Mayer, J A

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of skin cancer in San Diego is one of the highest in the nation. Research has documented that excessive unprotected exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation over time significantly increases a person's risk for developing various types of skin cancer. Our study investigated the amount of sun exposure and the practice of sun protection among San Diegans and examined factors thought to be associated with these behaviors. In April 1994, a random sample of 864 San Diego residents was surveyed by telephone. Because most survey questions specifically asked about sun exposure and sun protection when tanning versus recreating, the analyses were presented separately for recreators (i.e., those who spent time in the sun during the hours of 8:00 am and 6:00 pm for recreation last summer; n = 786) and tanners (i.e., those who spent at least 10% of their time in the sun to get a tan last summer; n = 464), a subset of recreators. Study results indicated that on average, 27% of the tanners' time in the sun last summer was spent getting a tan, and tanners reported using sunscreen about 50% of the time on both their face and body. In terms of sun protection while recreating, survey respondents reported using sunscreen on their face approximately 40% of the time compared to approximately 30% of the time on their body. Correlates of sun exposure and sun protection for both tanners and recreators included demographic characteristics, susceptibility factors, attitudes, and knowledge. The findings from this study support the need for education on skin cancer prevention. The practical implications of these findings are discussed in terms of appropriate community skin cancer prevention interventions. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): skin cancer, sunlight, behavior.

  19. Factors associated with continued participation in a matched monetary incentive programme at local farmers' markets in low-income neighbourhoods in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Ratigan, Amanda R; Lindsay, Suzanne; Lemus, Hector; Chambers, Christina D; Anderson, Cheryl Am; Cronan, Terry A; Browner, Deirdre K; Wooten, Wilma J

    2017-10-01

    The Farmers' Market Fresh Fund Incentive Program is a policy, systems and environmental intervention to improve access to fresh produce for participants on governmental assistance in the USA. The current study examined factors associated with ongoing participation in this matched monetary incentive programme. Relationship of baseline factors with number of Fresh Fund visits was assessed using Poisson regression. Mixed-effects modelling was used to explore changes in consumption of fruits and vegetables and diet quality. San Diego, California. Recipients of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) who attended participating farmers' markets from 2010 to 2012 (n 7298). Among those with participation for ≤6 months, factors associated with increased visits included reporting more daily servings of fruits and vegetables (F&V) at baseline, being Vietnamese or Asian/Pacific Islander, and eligibility because of SNAP/CalFresh or SSI (v. WIC). Among those who came for 6-12 months, being Asian/Pacific Islander, eligibility because of SNAP/CalFresh and enrolling in the autumn, winter or spring were associated with a greater number of Fresh Fund visits. Among those who came for >12 months, being male and eligibility because of SSI were associated with a greater number of visits. Overall, the odds of increasing number of servings of F&V consumed increased by 2 % per month, and the odds of improved perception of diet quality increased by 10 % per month. Sustaining and increasing Fresh Fund-type programme operations should be a top priority for future policy decisions concerning farmers' market use in low-income neighbourhoods.

  20. Collaborative Problem-Solving Environments; Proceedings for the Workshop CPSEs for Scientific Research, San Diego, California, June 20 to July 1, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George

    1999-01-11

    A workshop on collaborative problem-solving environments (CPSEs) was held June 29 through July 1, 1999, in San Diego, California. The workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the High Performance Network Applications Team of the Large Scale Networking Working Group. The workshop brought together researchers and developers from industry, academia, and government to identify, define, and discuss future directions in collaboration and problem-solving technologies in support of scientific research.

  1. The impact of retail beverage service training and social host laws on adolescents' DUI rates in San Diego County, California.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Michael; Romano, Eduardo; Caldwell, Susan; Taylor, Eileen

    2017-07-11

    Driving under the influence (DUI) citations are still a serious concern among drivers aged 16-20 years and have been shown to be related to increased risk of fatal and nonfatal crashes. A battery of laws and policies has been enacted to address this concern. Though numerous studies have evaluated these policies, there is still a need for comprehensive policy evaluations that take into account a variety of contextual factors. Previous effort by this research team examined the impact of 20 minimum legal drinking age-21 laws in the state of California, as they impacted alcohol-related crash rates among drivers under 21 years of age while at the same time accounting for alcohol and gas taxes, unemployment rates, sex distribution among drivers, and sobriety checkpoints. The current research seeks to expand this evaluation to the county level (San Diego County). More specifically, we evaluate the impact of measures subject to county control such as retail beverage service (RBS) laws and social host (SH) laws, as well as media coverage, city employment, alcohol outlet density, number of sworn officers, alcohol consumption, and taxation policies, to determine the most effective point of intervention for communities seeking to reduce underage DUI citations. Annual DUI citation data (2000 to 2013), RBS and SH policies, and city-wide demographic, economic, and environmental information were collected and applied to each of the 20 cities in San Diego County, California. A structural equation model was fit to estimate the relative contribution of the variables of interest to DUI citation rates. Alcohol consumption and alcohol outlet density both demonstrated a significant increase in DUI rates, whereas RBS laws, SH laws, alcohol tax rates, media clusters, gas tax rates, and unemployment rates demonstrated significant decreases in DUI rates. At the county level, although RBS laws, SH laws, and media efforts were found to contribute to a significant reduction in DUI rates, the

  2. Quality of urban runoff, Tecolote Creek drainage area, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Setmire, James G.; Bradford, Wesley L.

    1980-01-01

    The quality of storm runoff from a 9.2-square-mile urbanized watershed, Tecolote Creek, San Diego County, Calif., was studied during nine storms from September 1976 through May 1977. Specific conductance reached 2,100 micromhos and total residue concentrations reached 2,770 milligrams per liter. The chemical oxygen demand concentration in 95% of the samples exceeded 50 milligrams per liter, a concentration that may be sufficient to cause severe oxygen depletion in areas of the receiving water, Mission Bay. Lead concentrations in all samples exceeded concentrations thought to affect some aquatic organisms. Median total nitrogen and total orthophosphorus concentrations were far in excess of concentrations known to cause nuisance growth of algae in lakes. Fecal coliform bacteria concentrations greatly exceeded recommended levels for primary contact recreation water. Concentrations of pesticides--heptachlor, malathion, chlordane, DDT, diazinon, and dieldrin--frequently exceeded the recommended maximums for marine or freshwater aquatic systems. Total loads of selected constituents are calculated and may be used to estimate the impact of runoff on the receiving water. (USGS)

  3. Implementation of a food insecurity screening and referral program in student-run free clinics in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sunny; Malinak, David; Chang, Jinnie; Perez, Maria; Perez, Sandra; Settlecowski, Erica; Rodriggs, Timothy; Hsu, Ming; Abrew, Alexandra; Aedo, Sofia

    2017-03-01

    Food insecurity is associated with many poor health outcomes yet is not routinely addressed in clinical settings. The purpose of this study was to implement a food insecurity screening and referral program in Student-run Free Clinics (SRFC) and to document the prevalence of food insecurity screening in this low-income patient population. All patients seen in three SRFC sites affiliated with one institution in San Diego, California were screened for food insecurity using the 6-item United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Security Survey between January and July 2015 and referred to appropriate resources. The percentage of patients who were food insecure was calculated. The screening rate was 92.5% (430/463 patients), 74.0% (318/430) were food insecure, including 30.7% (132/430) with very low food security. A food insecurity registry and referral tracking system revealed that by January 2016, 201 participants were receiving monthly boxes of food onsite, 66 used an off-site food pantry, and 64 were enrolled in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). It is possible to implement a food insecurity screening and referral program into SRFCs. The prevalence of food insecurity in this population was remarkably high yet remained largely unknown until this program was implemented. Other health care settings, particularly those with underserved patient populations, should consider implementing food insecurity screening and referral programs.

  4. The Korean Version of the University of California San Diego Performance-based Skills Assessment: Reliability and Validity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Kim, Jung-Min; Shim, Joo-Cheol; Seo, Beom-Joo; Jung, Sung-Soo; Ryu, Jeoung-Whan; Seo, Young-Soo; Lee, Yu-Cheol; Moon, Jung-Joon; Jeon, Dong-Wook; Park, Kyoung-Duck; Jung, Do-Un

    2017-08-31

    The study's aim was to develop and standardize a Korean version of the University of California San Diego Performance-based Skills Assessment (K-UPSA), which is used to evaluate the daily living function of patients with schizophrenia. Study participants were 78 patients with schizophrenia and 27 demographically matched healthy controls. We evaluated the clinical states and cognitive functions to verify K-UPSA's reliability and validity. For clinical states, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia scale, and Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale and Schizophrenia Quality of Life Scale-fourth revision were used. The Schizophrenia Cognition Rating Scale, Short-form of Korean-Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test were used to assess cognitive function. The K-UPSA had statistically significant reliability and validity. The K-UPSA has high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, 0.837) and test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient, 0.381-0.792; p<0.001). The K-UPSA had significant discriminant validity (p<0.001). Significant correlations between the K-UPSA's scores and most of the scales and tests listed above demonstrated K-UPSA's concurrent validity (p<0.001). The K-UPSA is useful to evaluate the daily living function in Korean patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Welfare and immigration reform and use of prenatal care among women of Mexican ethnicity in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Loue, Sana; Cooper, Marlene; Lloyd, Linda S

    2005-01-01

    Foreign-born women and, in particular, Hispanic foreign-born women, are less likely to have insurance, are less likely to have insurance that covers prenatal care, and are less likely to utilize prenatal care compared with US-born Hispanic women. Significant concern has been raised regarding the ability of immigrant women to access prenatal care services because of severe restrictions imposed on immigrants' eligibility for Medicaid-funded services following the passage in 1996 of the federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reform Act (PRWORA) and the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRAIRA). We conducted an interview-based study of prenatal care utilization with women of Mexican ethnicity and diverse immigration statuses in San Diego County, California. Our findings indicate that, despite increased levels of fear associated with recent immigration and with undocumented status, there were no statistically significant differences across immigration statuses in length of time to receipt of medical care for gynecological events and for prenatal care.

  6. Sexuality and HIV Education in Charter Schools: An Exploratory Study With Principals in San Diego County, California.

    PubMed

    Walsh-Buhi, Eric R; Dao, Brandon; Salgin, Linda; Marshall, James; Miller, Rachel; Fisher, Doug; Walsh-Buhi, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    Schools can address critical sexual and reproductive health (SRH) issues among youth. However, little is known about SRH education being implemented in charter schools. Thus, our purpose was to explore implementation of SRH education in charter schools. Using purposive sampling, semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with 20 charter school principals in San Diego County, California. Questions were guided by the Kaiser Family Foundation National Survey of Public Secondary School Principals. Analyses followed a case-oriented approach, examining aspects within each case (ie, a principal), and then a comparative analysis of a small number of cases (ie, all principals). Overall, 17 principals acknowledged offering sexuality education in the previous 2 years. Over half of these schools had provided content on: sexually transmitted diseases/human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (STDs/HIV/AIDS), reproduction/pregnancy/birth, pregnancy prevention methods, delaying sex, and managing sexual pressure. Condom use, sexual assault, sexual orientation, talking with partners about STD/pregnancy prevention, talking with parents about relationships/sex, and using/where to get contraception were less commonly taught. Abortion was not addressed. When asked the grade they would assign to their schools' sexuality/HIV instruction, principals assigned 1 A, 7 Bs, 7 Cs, and 1 D. Consistency between our findings and what has been reported elsewhere varies. As charter schools often have greater curricular flexibility than traditional schools, this study provides unique preliminary data to inform future innovative, or strengthen existing, SRH programming. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  7. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Witch Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Witch Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  8. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Ammo Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Ammo Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  9. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Rice Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Rice Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  10. Emergency assessment of debris-flow hazards from basins burned by the 2007 Harris Fire, San Diego County, southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    IntroductionThe objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Harris Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 1.75 inches (44.45 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  11. Emergency Assessment of Debris-Flow Hazards from Basins Burned by the 2007 Poomacha Fire, San Diego County, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Susan H.; Gartner, Joseph E.; Michael, John A.; Bauer, Mark A.; Stitt, Susan C.; Knifong, Donna L.; McNamara, Bernard J.; Roque, Yvonne M.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objective of this report is to present a preliminary emergency assessment of the potential for debris-flow generation from basins burned by the Poomacha Fire in San Diego County, southern California in 2007. Debris flows are among the most hazardous geologic phenomena; debris flows that followed wildfires in southern California in 2003 killed 16 people and caused tens of millions of dollars of property damage. A short period of even moderate rainfall on a burned watershed can lead to debris flows. Rainfall that is normally absorbed into hillslope soils can run off almost instantly after vegetation has been removed by wildfire. This causes much greater and more rapid runoff than is normal from creeks and drainage areas. Highly erodible soils in a burn scar allow flood waters to entrain large amounts of ash, mud, boulders, and unburned vegetation. Within the burned area and downstream, the force of rushing water, soil, and rock can destroy culverts, bridges, roadways, and buildings, potentially causing injury or death. This emergency debris-flow hazard assessment is presented as relative ranking of the predicted median volume of debris flows that can issue from basin outlets in response to 2.25 inches (57.15 mm) of rainfall over a 3-hour period. Such a storm has a 10-year return period. The calculation of debris flow volume is based on a multiple-regression statistical model that describes the median volume of material that can be expected from a recently burned basin as a function of the area burned at high and moderate severity, the basin area with slopes greater than or equal to 30 percent, and triggering storm rainfall. Cannon and others (2007) describe the methods used to generate the hazard maps. Identification of potential debris-flow hazards from burned drainage basins is necessary to issue warnings for specific basins, to make effective mitigation decisions, and to help plan evacuation timing and routes.

  12. Microplastic contamination in the San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Rebecca; Mason, Sherri A; Stanek, Shavonne K; Willis-Norton, Ellen; Wren, Ian F; Box, Carolynn

    2016-08-15

    Despite widespread detection of microplastic pollution in marine environments, data describing microplastic abundance in urban estuaries and microplastic discharge via treated municipal wastewater are limited. This study presents information on abundance, distribution, and composition of microplastic at nine sites in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Also presented are characterizations of microplastic in final effluent from eight wastewater treatment plants, employing varying treatment technologies, that discharge to the Bay. With an average microplastic abundance of 700,000particles/km(2), Bay surface water appears to have higher microplastic levels than other urban waterbodies sampled in North America. Moreover, treated wastewater from facilities that discharge into the Bay contains considerable microplastic contamination. Facilities employing tertiary filtration did not show lower levels of contamination than those using secondary treatment. As textile-derived fibers were more abundant in wastewater, higher levels of fragments in surface water suggest additional pathways of microplastic pollution, such as stormwater runoff.

  13. Patterns of mortality in a montane mixed-conifer forest in San Diego County, California.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Mary Pyott; Stow, Douglas A; An, Li

    2017-07-17

    We examine spatial patterns of conifer tree mortality and their changes over time for the montane mixed-conifer forests of San Diego County. These forest areas have recently experienced extensive tree mortality due to multiple factors. A spatial contextual image processing approach was utilized with high spatial resolution digital airborne imagery to map dead trees for the years 1997, 2000, 2002, and 2005 for three study areas: Palomar, Volcan, and Laguna mountains. Plot-based fieldwork was conducted to further assess mortality patterns. Mean mortality remained static from 1997 to 2002 (4, 2.2, and 4.2 trees ha(-1) for Palomar, Volcan, and Laguna) and then increased by 2005 to 10.3, 9.7 and 5.2 trees ha(-1) , respectively. The increase in mortality between 2002 and 2005 represents the temporal pattern of a discrete disturbance event, attributable to the 2002-2003 drought. Dead trees are significantly clustered for all dates, based on spatial cluster analysis, indicating that they form distinct groups, as opposed to spatially random single dead trees. Other tests indicate no directional shift or spread of mortality over time, but rather an increase in density. While general temporal and spatial mortality processes are uniform across all study areas, the plot-based species and quantity distribution of mortality, and diameter distributions of dead versus living trees, vary by study area. The results of this study improve our understanding of stand- to landscape-level forest structure and dynamics, particularly by examining them from the multiple perspectives of field and remotely sensed data. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Voluntarily Reported Immunization Registry Data: Reliability and Feasibility to Predict Immunization Rates, San Diego, California, 2013.

    PubMed

    Madewell, Zachary J; Wester, Robert B; Wang, Wendy W; Smith, Tyler C; Peddecord, K Michael; Morris, Jessica; DeGuzman, Heidi; Sawyer, Mark H; McDonald, Eric C

    Accurate data on immunization coverage levels are essential to public health program planning. Reliability of coverage estimates derived from immunization information systems (IISs) in states where immunization reporting by medical providers is not mandated by the state may be compromised by low rates of participation. To overcome this problem, data on coverage rates are often acquired through random-digit-dial telephone surveys, which require substantial time and resources. This project tested both the reliability of voluntarily reported IIS data and the feasibility of using these data to estimate regional immunization rates. We matched telephone survey records for 553 patients aged 19-35 months obtained in 2013 to 430 records in the San Diego County IIS. We assessed concordance between survey data and IIS data using κ to measure the degree of nonrandom agreement. We used multivariable logistic regression models to investigate differences among demographic variables between the 2 data sets. These models were used to construct weights that enabled us to predict immunization rates in areas where reporting is not mandated. We found moderate agreement between the telephone survey and the IIS for the diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (κ = 0.49), pneumococcal conjugate (κ = 0.49), and Haemophilus influenzae type b (κ = 0.46) vaccines; fair agreement for the varicella (κ = 0.39), polio (κ = 0.39), and measles, mumps, and rubella (κ = 0.35) vaccines; and slight agreement for the hepatitis B vaccine (κ = 0.17). Consistency in factors predicting immunization coverage levels in a telephone survey and IIS data confirmed the feasibility of using voluntarily reported IIS data to assess immunization rates in children aged 19-35 months.

  15. Policy challenges in the fight against childhood obesity: low adherence in San Diego area schools to the California Education Code regulating physical education.

    PubMed

    Consiglieri, G; Leon-Chi, L; Newfield, R S

    2013-01-01

    Assess the adherence to the Physical Education (PE) requirements per California Education Code in San Diego area schools. Surveys were administered anonymously to children and adolescents capable of physical activity, visiting a specialty clinic at Rady Children's Hospital San Diego. The main questions asked were their gender, grade, PE classes per week, and time spent doing PE. 324 surveys were filled, with 36 charter-school students not having to abide by state code excluded. We report on 288 students (59% females), mostly Hispanic (43%) or Caucasian (34%). In grades 1-6, 66.7% reported under the 200 min per 10 school days required by the PE code. Only 20.7% had daily PE. Average PE days/week was 2.6. In grades 7-12, 42.2% had reported under the 400 min per 10 school days required. Daily PE was noted in 47.8%. Average PE days/week was 3.4. Almost 17% had no PE, more so in the final two grades of high school (45.7%). There is low adherence to the California Physical Education mandate in the San Diego area, contributing to poor fitness and obesity. Lack of adequate PE is most evident in grades 1-6 and grades 11-12. Better resources, awareness, and enforcement are crucial.

  16. 33 CFR 165.1106 - San Diego Bay, California-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., California at latitude 32°43′37.2″ N, longitude 117°10′45.0″ W (point A), for a point of beginning; thence southeasterly to latitude 32°43′36.2″ N, longitude 117°10′41.5″ W (point B); thence southwesterly to latitude 32°43′20.2″ N, longitude 117°10′49.5″ W (point C); thence northwesterly to latitude 32°43′25.7″...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1106 - San Diego Bay, California-safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., California at latitude 32°43′37.2″ N, longitude 117°10′45.0″ W (point A), for a point of beginning; thence southeasterly to latitude 32°43′36.2″ N, longitude 117°10′41.5″ W (point B); thence southwesterly to latitude 32°43′20.2″ N, longitude 117°10′49.5″ W (point C); thence northwesterly to latitude 32°43′25.7″...

  18. National Weather Service, Emergency Medical Services, Scripps Institution of Oceanography/UCSD and California EPA Collaboration on Heat Health Impact and Public Notification for San Diego County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardy, A. O.; Corcus, I.; Guirguis, K.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued official heat alerts in the form of either a heat advisory or excessive heat warning product to the public and core partners for many years. This information has traditionally been developed through the use of triggers for heat indices which combine humidity and temperature. The criteria typically used numeric thresholds and did not consider impact from a particular heat episode, nor did it factor seasonality or population acclimation. In 2013, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego in collaboration with the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, of the California Environmental Protection Agency and the NWS completed a study of heat health impact in California, while the NWS San Diego office began modifying their criteria towards departure from climatological normal with much less dependence on humidity or heat index. The NWS changes were based on initial findings from the California Department of Public Health, EpiCenter California Injury Data Online system which documents heat health impacts. Results from the UCSD study were finalized and published in 2014; they supported the need for significant modification of the traditional criteria. In order to better understand the impacts of heat on community health, medical outcome data were provided by the County of San Diego Emergency Medical Services Branch, which is charged by the County's Public Health Officer to monitor heat-related illness and injury daily from June through September. The data were combined with UCSD research to inform the modification of local NWS heat criteria and establish trigger points to pilot new procedures for the issuance of heat alerts. Finally, practices and procedures were customized for each of the county health departments in the NWS area of responsibility across extreme southwest California counties in collaboration with their Office of Emergency Services. The end result of the

  19. A Potential Paleotsunami Shell-Hash layer from the Los Penasquitos Marsh, San Diego County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, B. P.; Cordova, J.; Kirby, M. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Bonuso, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Los Penasquitos Marsh is one of a series of coastal wetlands between San Diego and Orange County that formed within stream valleys that were flooded and filled with sediment during early Holocene sea-level rise. In order to test the hypothesis that these wetlands contain a record of prehistoric tsunamis, 21 reconnaissance gouge cores between 48 and 321 cm in length were collected and described in the field. Nearly all of the cores contained a single peaty layer in the top 20-40 cm, underlain by interbedded fine-medium gray sand and mud. The stratigraphy in the cores is generally consistent with the complete infilling of a lagoon behind a baymouth bar during the mid-late Holocene. Five of the cores, ranging from 1.0-1.4 km inland from the present beach, intersect a distinctive 0.5 - 12.0 cm-thick shell-hash layer at a depth of between 233 and 280 cm beneath the modern surface. Based on this discovery, we collected a 285 cm long 5-cm diameter core using a Livingstone Piston corer. In this core the 10 cm-thick shell hash layer consists of angular fragments up to 1 cm of broken shells in a coarse sandy matrix that include the following genera: Mitrella, Venus, Spirotropis, Pecten, and Nassarius. This assemblage suggests a quiet water, marine source - from the lagoon and/or offshore. The core was also analyzed for loss on ignition (LOI) at both 550° and 950°C and magnetic susceptibility (ms). The LOI550 data are unremarkable throughout the core, and the LOI950 data show an expected spike within the shell-hash layer. The ms data show very low values for the lagoonal muds and sands, but a pronounced spike within the shell hash layer. We hypothesize that the anomalously high ms value for the shell hash layer indicates a substantial component from an offshore source, where heavier magnetic minerals may have accumulated seaward of the baymouth bar. If correct, this layer may represent a large-wave event, either a storm or tsunami. Three C-14 dates (uncorrected for the

  20. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Otay Mesa Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  1. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Warners Ranch Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  2. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Valley Center Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  3. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Rice Fire Perimeter, Bonsall Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  4. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Morena Reservoir Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  5. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Boucher Hill Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  6. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Dulzura Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  7. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Potrero Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  8. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Santa Ysabel Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  9. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Tule Springs Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  10. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ammo Fire Perimeter, Margarita Peak Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  11. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Ramona Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  12. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Tecate Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  13. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Escondido Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Barrett Lake Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Palomar Observatory Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, San Pasqual Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  17. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Jamul Mountains Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Harris Fire Perimeter, Otay Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Pala Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  20. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Poway Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  1. Water resources of the Barona, Capitan Grande, and Sycuan Indian Reservations, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, W.R.; Blazs, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Barona and Capitan Grande Indian Reservations, California, have sufficient water to satisfy present (1976) domestic and stock needs; however, the Sycuan Indian Reservation is experiencing a shortage of water for domestic supply because of the decline of the water table beneath the reservation well field and a general decline of the water table surrounding the reservation. The water quality on the three reservations is generally good; however, the water is at or near land surface in several areas. This shallow water could be subject to contamination by animal waste, septic tanks, or farming operations. Historical hydrologic data were obtained from government agencies and private individuals, and all wells and springs on the reservations were visited. This report summarizes the data collected and the findings of the study. (Woodard-USGS)

  2. Crystallization of pegmatites: Insights from chemistry of garnet, Jacumba pegmatites, San Diego County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, M.; Sirbescu, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Systematic mineral and textural variations from the border zone to the core of a zoned pegmatite sheet may reflect the kinetic or equilibrium fractionation processes that occurred during sequential crystallization of the pegmatite magma. Rhythmic layering, also named 'line rock', is a salient textural feature of world famous San Diego Co. pegmatites, that consists of alternating garnet × tourmaline layers and albite - quartz layers, mm's to cm's thick. Slowly diffusing, incompatible elements in the felsic magma including B, Fe, and Mn may become enriched in boundary layers formed ahead of rapidly crystallized quartzo-felspathic assemblages. This study explores whether the chemistry of garnet concentrated in the border and foot-wall zones and dispersed in the graphic feldspar, core, and pocket zones of Garnet Ledge pegmatite, Jacumba district, might fingerprint the diffusion-controlled oscillatory boundary layers. The lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) Jacumba pegmatite district, late product of the Eastern Peninsular Ranges Batholith, consists of numerous subparallel dikes, 3 to 7 m thick, intruding pre-batholitic metasedimentary rocks. The composite aplite-pegmatite dikes are texturally diverse. Comb-textured tourmaline, other unidirectional textures, garnet × tourmaline 'line rock', and coarse graphic K-feldspar crystals occur in the outer zones, followed by massive feldspar-quartz cores, vuggy cleavlandite- euhedral garnet, and miarolitic cavities. The Jacumba pegmatites have produced gem spodumene, beryl, and garnet from several open cuts such as the Beebe Hole and Pack Rat - Garnet Ledge workings. Systematic mineralogical and textural variations, and SEM-EDS garnet compositions were recorded from border to core at Garnet Ledge outcrop and thin section scale, focusing on continuous traverses across the line rock. Garnet from Garnet Ledge belongs to the spessartine-almandine series (Sp42 to Sp65) with minor contents of Mg, Ca, and Ti, consistent with garnet

  3. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones.

  4. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  5. Diffusion sampler testing at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego County, California, November 1999 to January 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peters, Brian C.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compound concentrations in water from diffusion samplers were compared to concentrations in water obtained by low-flow purging at 15 observation wells at the Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California. Multiple diffusion samplers were installed in the wells. In general, comparisons using bladder pumps and diffusion samplers showed similar volatile organic carbon concentrations. In some wells, sharp concentration gradients were observed, such as an increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene concentration from 100 to 2,600 micrograms per liter over a vertical distance of only 3.4 feet. In areas where such sharp gradients were observed, concentrations in water obtained by low-flow sampling at times reflected an average concentration over the area of influence; however, concentrations obtained by using the diffusion sampler seemed to represent the immediate vicinity of the sampler. When peristaltic pumps were used to collect ground-water samples by low-flow purging, the volatile organic compound concentrations commonly were lower than concentrations obtained by using diffusion samplers. This difference may be due to loss of volatiles by degassing under negative pressures in the sampling lines induced while using the peristaltic pump, mixing in the well screen, or possible short-circuiting of water from an adjacent depth. Diffusion samplers placed in buckets of freephase jet fuel (JP-5) and Stoddard solvent from observation wells did not show evidence of structural integrity loss during the 2 months of equilibration, and volatile organic compounds detected in the free-phase fuel also were detected in the water from the diffusion samplers.

  6. Seasonal Variation in Coastal Air-Sea CO2 Exchange from the Scripps Pier in San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M.; Oechel, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    The world's oceans absorb approximately one-third of anthropogenic CO2 emissions and coastal waters could be responsible for 30% of this absorption. Consequently, there has been significant effort over the last few decades to understand the patterns and controls on air-sea exchange of CO2 (flux). CO2 fluxes can differ dramatically with changes in ambient meteorological and oceanographic conditions. As such, carbon exchange in coastal waters remains poorly understood due to their highly dynamic, heterogeneous nature. The analysis presented here measured CO2 fluxes over coastal waters from the Scripps Pier in San Diego, California continuously for 12 months using eddy covariance. These data show that the 2.5 km area of coastal sea represented by the eddy covariance tower act as a strong CO2 sink on an annual basis, but that this CO2 flux is highly temporally variable. Specifically, the summer and spring months act as strong sinks, while the winter months act as weak sinks to weak sources of CO2. This variation in CO2 exchange was explored by measuring a large number of physical and biological parameters for correlation comparisons. Among these parameters, wind speed and photosynthetically active radiation both demonstrated control over the CO2 flux to varying levels of significance over different temporal scales. While seasonal and monthly trends are apparent from the current data, further investigation is necessary to understand flux controls under shorter temporal periods (e.g., daily, hourly). Nonetheless, this study provides insight on the amount of carbon absorbed annually by productive coastal waters. Furthermore, understanding the regulatory mechanisms behind these fluxes can ultimately improve our global carbon models and future climate change projections.

  7. Endosymbiont interference and microbial diversity of the Pacific coast tick, Dermacentor occidentalis, in San Diego County, California.

    PubMed

    Gurfield, Nikos; Grewal, Saran; Cua, Lynnie S; Torres, Pedro J; Kelley, Scott T

    2017-01-01

    The Pacific coast tick, Dermacentor occidentalis Marx, is found throughout California and can harbor agents that cause human diseases such as anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, tularemia, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and rickettsiosis 364D. Previous studies have demonstrated that nonpathogenic endosymbiotic bacteria can interfere with Rickettsia co-infections in other tick species. We hypothesized that within D. occidentalis ticks, interference may exist between different nonpathogenic endosymbiotic or nonendosymbiotic bacteria and Spotted Fever group Rickettsia (SFGR). Using PCR amplification and sequencing of the rompA gene and intergenic region we identified a cohort of SFGR-infected and non-infected D. occidentalis ticks collected from San Diego County. We then amplified a partial segment of the 16S rRNA gene and used next-generation sequencing to elucidate the microbiomes and levels of co-infection in the ticks. The SFGR R. philipii str. 364D and R. rhipicephali were detected in 2.3% and 8.2% of the ticks, respectively, via rompA sequencing. Interestingly, next generation sequencing revealed an inverse relationship between the number of Francisella-like endosymbiont (FLE) 16S rRNA sequences and Rickettsia 16S rRNA sequences within individual ticks that is consistent with partial interference between FLE and SFGR infecting ticks. After excluding the Rickettsia and FLE endosymbionts from the analysis, there was a small but significant difference in microbial community diversity and a pattern of geographic isolation by distance between collection locales. In addition, male ticks had a greater diversity of bacteria than female ticks and ticks that weren't infected with SFGR had similar microbiomes to canine skin microbiomes. Although experimental studies are required for confirmation, our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that FLEs and, to a lesser extent, other bacteria, interfere with the ability of D. occidentalis to be infected with certain SFGR. The

  8. AMS analyses of I-129 from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in the Pacific Ocean waters of the Coast La Jolla--San Diego, USA.

    PubMed

    Stan-Sion, C; Enachescu, M; Petre, A R

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study we performed by using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) method with iodine 129 (T1/2 = 15.7 My), to determine the increase of the radionuclide content in the USA West Pacific Coast waters, two years after the March 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. The collection of the water samples took place between April and July 2013 at regular intervals of time, from the Pacific Ocean, at the cove of La Jolla, San Diego, USA. The results of the experiments showed a significant increase of the radionuclide concentration during the late spring of 2013. Compared to the isotopic ratio (129)I/(127)I, measured at a 40 km distance, offshore of Fukushima and immediately after the accident, our results show an increase on the USA West Coast that was more than a 2.5 factor higher. Also, compared with the pre-Fukushima background values, our results show an isotopic ratio of about two orders of magnitude higher. A distinct feature of the reconstructed radioactive plume was that it traveled with a speed of 12 cm s(-1), which we estimated and is consistent with the zonal speed in the Pacific. We coupled our (129)I results with the measurements from the June 2011 KOK cruise and we derived the levels of activity for (3)H and (137)Cs. On the USA West Coast, they did not exceed the international regulatory limits.

  9. First report of the biological control agent Boreioglycaspis melaleucae (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in California, USA.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Australian psyllid Boreioglycaspis melaleucae is a specialized herbivore of Melaleuca quinquenervia and other closely related congeners. Boreioglycaspis melaleucae was discovered in Los Angeles County (California, USA) in late 2009, feeding on ornamentally planted M. quinquenervia trees. The ps...

  10. 77 FR 72956 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... between the northern portion of the San Diego Bay ship channel from Seaport Village to the Shelter Island... Shelter Island, proceed to the Coronado Bay Bridge, cross the main shipping channel, and finish in...

  11. Geomorphic response to minor cyclic climate changes, San Diego County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig Kochel, R.; Miller, Jerry R.; Ritter, Dale F.

    1997-07-01

    Short-term episodic cycles of wet and dry patterns of climate are common in southern California. Wet intervals, like the one in 1978-83, are often characterized by more than double the average annual precipitation. The impact of these episodic climatic fluctuations on landforms and surficial processes has not been well documented for areas inland of the coast. The response to these cycles may be significant in the evolution of hillslopes and fluvial landforms, and may have significant implications for geologic hazards in this rapidly developing region. Using aerial photographs and field investigations we found little response to the 1978-1983 wet interval on upland hillslopes, but documented significant response on alluvial fans and in channels in desert piedmont areas. These observations may lend support to the Langbein-Schumm (1958) model relating sediment yield to precipitation. A variety of techniques, including dendrogeomorphology, studies of the weathering of clasts, soil stratigraphy, and aerial photo mapping were used to discern at least six units on alluvial fans ranging from Late Pleistocene to present. Terraces along active fan channels and the San Felipe River record a geomorphic record of the most recent wet intervals (ca. 1940 and 1980) as a significant depositional event. Geomorphic responses to the wet interval along the San Felipe River were complex, varying locally according to controls on sediment storage and downstream transfer through a recently integrated drainage system. Additional complex responses to the wet period were experienced in selected sites where antecedence and response times may be measured in months or even years.

  12. Reclaiming agricultural drainage water with nanofiltration membranes: Imperial Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Schroeder, R.A.; Setmire, J.G.; ,

    2003-01-01

    We conducted pilot-scale field experiments using nanofiltration membranes to lower the salinity and remove Se, As and other toxic contaminants from saline agricultural wastewater in the Imperial Valley, California, USA. Farmlands in the desert climate (rainfall - 7.4 cm/a) of Imperial Valley cover -200,000 ha that are irrigated with water (-1.7 km3 annually) imported from the Colorado River. The salinity (-850 mg/L) and concentration of Se (-2.5 ??g/L) in the Colorado River water are high and evapotranpiration further concentrates salts in irrigation drainage water, reaching salinities of 3,000-15,000 mg/L TDS and a median Se value of -30 ??g/L. Experiments were conducted with two commercially available nanofiltration membranes, using drainage water of varying composition, and with or without the addition of organic precipitation inhibitors. Results show that these membranes selectively remove more than 95% of Se, SO4, Mo, U and DOC, and -30% of As from this wastewater. Low percentages of Cl, NO3 and HCO3, with enough cations to maintain electrical neutrality also were removed. The product water treated by these membranes comprised more than 90% of the wastewater tested. Results indicate that the treated product water from the Alamo River likely will have less than 0.2 ??g/L Se, salinity of 300-500 mg/L TDS and other chemical concentrations that meet the water quality criteria for irrigation and potable use. Because acceptability is a major issue for providing treated wastewater to urban centers, it may be prudent to use the reclaimed water for irrigation and creation of lower salinity wetlands near the Salton Sea; an equivalent volume of Colorado River water can then be diverted for the use of increasing populations of San Diego and other urban centers in southern California. Nanofiltration membranes yield greater reclaimed-water output and require lower pressure and less pretreatment, and therefore are generally more cost effective than traditional reverse

  13. Integrating with users is one thing, but living with them? a case study on loss of space from the Medical Center Library, University of California, San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center is the primary hospital for the UCSD School of Medicine. The UCSD Medical Center Library (MCL), a branch of the campus's biomedical library, is located on the medical center campus. In 2007, the medical center administration made a request to MCL for space in its facility to relocate pharmacy administration from the hospital tower. The university librarian brought together a team of library managers to deliberate and develop a proposal, which ultimately accommodated the medical center's request and enhanced some of MCL's public services. PMID:20098651

  14. What influences Latino grocery shopping behavior? Perspectives on the small food store environment from managers and employees in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Flack, Jennifer C; Baquero, Barbara; Linnan, Laura A; Gittelsohn, Joel; Pickrel, Julie L; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2016-01-01

    To inform the design of a multilevel in-store intervention, this qualitative study utilized in-depth semistructured interviews with 28 managers and 10 employees of small-to-medium-sized Latino food stores (tiendas) in San Diego, California, to identify factors within the tienda that may influence Latino customers' grocery-shopping experiences and behaviors. Qualitative data analysis, guided by grounded theory, was performed using open coding. Results suggest that future interventions should focus on the physical (i.e., built structures) and social (i.e., economic and sociocultural) dimensions of store environments, including areas where the two dimensions interact, to promote the purchase of healthy food among customers.

  15. Integrating with users is one thing, but living with them? A case study on loss of space from the Medical Center Library, University of California, San Diego.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center is the primary hospital for the UCSD School of Medicine. The UCSD Medical Center Library (MCL), a branch of the campus's biomedical library, is located on the medical center campus. In 2007, the medical center administration made a request to MCL for space in its facility to relocate pharmacy administration from the hospital tower. The university librarian brought together a team of library managers to deliberate and develop a proposal, which ultimately accommodated the medical center's request and enhanced some of MCL's public services.

  16. Residential Mobility and Breast Cancer in Marin County, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Barlow, Janice; Rommel, Robert; Kaufmann, Andy; Rienti, Michael; AvRuskin, Gillian; Rasul, Jawaid

    2013-01-01

    Marin County (California, USA) has among the highest incidences of breast cancer in the U.S. A previously conducted case-control study found eight significant risk factors in participants enrolled from 1997–1999. These included being premenopausal, never using birth control pills, lower highest lifetime body mass index, having four or more mammograms from 1990–1994, beginning drinking alcohol after age 21, drinking an average two or more alcoholic drinks per day, being in the highest quartile of pack-years of cigarette smoking, and being raised in an organized religion. Previously conducted surveys provided residential histories; while Ǫ statistic accounted for participants’ residential mobility, and assessed clustering of breast cancer cases relative to controls based on the known risk factors. These identified specific cases, places, and times of excess breast cancer risk. Analysis found significant global clustering of cases localized to specific residential histories and times. Much of the observed clustering occurred among participants who immigrated to Marin County. However, persistent case-clustering of greater than fifteen years duration was also detected. Significant case-clustering among long-term residents may indicate geographically localized risk factors not accounted for in the study design, as well as uncertainty and incompleteness in the acquired addresses. Other plausible explanations include environmental risk factors and cases tending to settle in specific areas. A biologically plausible exposure or risk factor has yet to be identified. PMID:24366047

  17. Novel Picornavirus in Turkey Poults with Hepatitis, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Honkavuori, Kirsi S.; Shivaprasad, H. L.; Street, Craig; Hirschberg, David L.; Hutchison, Stephen K.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2011-01-01

    To identify a candidate etiologic agent for turkey viral hepatitis, we analyzed samples from diseased turkey poults from 8 commercial flocks in California, USA, that were collected during 2008–2010. High-throughput pyrosequencing of RNA from livers of poults with turkey viral hepatitis (TVH) revealed picornavirus sequences. Subsequent cloning of the ≈9-kb genome showed an organization similar to that of picornaviruses with conservation of motifs within the P1, P2, and P3 genome regions, but also unique features, including a 1.2-kb sequence of unknown function at the junction of P1 and P2 regions. Real-time PCR confirmed viral RNA in liver, bile, intestine, serum, and cloacal swab specimens from diseased poults. Analysis of liver by in situ hybridization with viral probes and immunohistochemical testing of serum demonstrated viral nucleic acid and protein in livers of diseased poults. Molecular, anatomic, and immunologic evidence suggests that TVH is caused by a novel picornavirus, tentatively named turkey hepatitis virus. PMID:21392440

  18. 78 FR 25740 - Meridian Energy USA, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Meridian Energy USA, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 24, 2013, Meridian Energy USA, Inc....

  19. Water-quality data from storm runoff after the 2007 fires, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, Gregory O.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected water-quality samples during the first two storms after the Witch and Harris Fires (October 2007) in southern California. The sampling locations represent an urban area (two residential sites in Rancho Bernardo that were affected by the Witch Fire; a drainage ditch and a storm drain) and a rural area (Cotton-wood Creek, which was downstream of a mobile home park destroyed by the Harris Fire). Fires produce ash and solid residues that contain soluble chemicals that can contaminant runoff. The contaminants, whether sorbed to soil and ash or dissolved, can seriously affect the quality of water supplies and sensitive ecosystems. Stormflow water samples were analyzed for field parameters, optical properties, and for a variety of constituents, including nutrients, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), suspended sediment, and metals. pH values for storm runoff from the urban areas (7.6 to 8.5) were less than pH values for ash and burned soil from previous studies (12.5 to 13). pH values for storm runoff from the rural area (about 7.7) also were less than pH values for ash and burned soil collected from the rural area (8.6 to 11.8), but were similar to pH values for wildland burned soil from previous studies. Turbidity values were much lower for the urban area than for the rural area. Nitrate concentrations in stormflow samples from all sites were less than a quarter of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (2006) maximum allowable contaminant level of 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (as nitrogen). Phosphorus concentrations were half as much in filtered samples and two orders of magnitude smaller in unfiltered samples at the urban sites than at the rural site. DOC concentrations in stormflow samples were one order of magnitude lower at the urban sites than at the rural site. Ultraviolet (UV) absorbance at 254 nanometers (UV254) in samples ranged from 0.145 to 0.782 per centimeter (cm-1). UV-absorbance data at the urban sites indicate that

  20. A basin-scale approach for assessing water resources in a semiarid environment: San Diego region, California and Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flint, L.E.; Flint, A.L.; Stolp, B.J.; Danskin, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    Many basins throughout the world have sparse hydrologic and geologic data, but have increasing demands for water and a commensurate need for integrated understanding of surface and groundwater resources. This paper demonstrates a methodology for using a distributed parameter water-balance model, gaged surface-water flow, and a reconnaissance-level groundwater flow model to develop a first-order water balance. Flow amounts are rounded to the nearest 5 million cubic meters per year. The San Diego River basin is 1 of 5 major drainage basins that drain to the San Diego coastal plain, the source of public water supply for the San Diego area. The distributed parameter water-balance model (Basin Characterization Model) was run at a monthly timestep for 1940–2009 to determine a median annual total water inflow of 120 million cubic meters per year for the San Diego region. The model was also run specifically for the San Diego River basin for 1982–2009 to provide constraints to model calibration and to evaluate the proportion of inflow that becomes groundwater discharge, resulting in a median annual total water inflow of 50 million cubic meters per year. On the basis of flow records for the San Diego River at Fashion Valley (US Geological Survey gaging station 11023000), when corrected for upper basin reservoir storage and imported water, the total is 30 million cubic meters per year. The difference between these two flow quantities defines the annual groundwater outflow from the San Diego River basin at 20 million cubic meters per year. These three flow components constitute a first-order water budget estimate for the San Diego River basin. The ratio of surface-water outflow and groundwater outflow to total water inflow are 0.6 and 0.4, respectively. Using total water inflow determined using the Basin Characterization Model for the entire San Diego region and the 0.4 partitioning factor, groundwater outflow from the San Diego region, through the coastal plain aquifer to

  1. Arc-rift transition volcanism in the Volcanic Hills, Jacumba and Coyote Mountains, San Diego and Imperial Counties, california

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisch, Gregory Zane

    Neogene volcanism associated with the subduction of the Farallon-Pacific spreading center and the transition from a subduction zone to a rift zone has been studied extensively in Baja, California, Mexico. One of the main goals of these studies was to find a geochemical correlation with slab windows that may have formed during that complicated transition. While workers have been able to find distinct geochemical signatures in samples from Baja California, none have shown statistically significant correlation with samples from southern California that are thought to be related to the same arc-rift transition events. All of the basaltic samples from this study of southern California rocks have prominent Nb depletions typical of island-arc subduction-related volcanism, in contrast to the chemistry of Baja California volcanics that have trace element patterns typical of synrift related volcanism. The work done by previous investigators has been additionally complicated due to each investigator's choice of important ratios or patterns, which bears little, if any, correlation with work done by others working in the same area. For example, Martin-Barajas et al. (1995) use K/Rb ratios in their study of the Puertocitos Volcanic Province, while Castillo (2008) argues that Sr/Y vs. Y is a better indicator of petrogenetic processes. Little petrologic work has been done on Neogene volcanic rocks in the Imperial Valley and eastern San Diego County region of Southern California. This thesis combines new research with that of previous workers and attempts to establish a better understanding of the processes involved with the transition volcanism. Prior work documents significant differences in the geochemistry between some of these areas, especially those in close proximity to each other (e.g. the Volcanic Hills and Coyote Mountains). These differences were thought to be largely the result different magmatic sources. The potential of finding two differing magma types in close

  2. Non-invasive genetic sampling of Southern Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus fuliginatus) reveals limited movement across California State Route 67 in San Diego County

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitelberg, Anna; Vandergast, Amy

    2016-01-01

    —The Southern Mule Deer is a mobile but non-migratory large mammal found throughout southern California and is a covered species in the San Diego Multi-Species Conservation Plan. We assessed deer movement and population connectivity across California State Route 67 and two smaller roads in eastern San Diego County using non-invasive genetic sampling. We collected deer scat pellets between April and November 2015, and genotyped pellets at 15 microsatellites and a sex determination marker. We successfully genotyped 71 unique individuals from throughout the study area and detected nine recapture events. Recaptures were generally found close to original capture locations (within 1.5 km). We did not detect recaptures across roads; however, pedigree analysis detected 21 first order relative pairs, of which approximately 20% were found across State Route 67. Exact tests comparing allele frequencies between groups of individuals in pre-defined geographic clusters detected significant genetic differentiation across State Route 67. In contrast, the assignment-based algorithm of STRUCTURE supported a single genetic cluster across the study area. Our data suggest that State Route 67 may reduce, but does not preclude, movement and gene flow of Southern Mule Deer.

  3. Highlights from the 58th meeting of the American Society of Haematology, 1-6 December 2016, San Diego, USA.

    PubMed

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The recent 58th Annual American Society of Haematology (ASH) meeting held in San Diego shed light on the usual mixture of groundbreaking basic and translational science and the recent practice-changing clinical trials. Recurrent themes this year were the use of recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques to perfect prognostic stratification and disease monitoring. Newer prospects on the role of metabolism in normal and malignant haemopoiesis and mature data on long-awaited trials on immunotherapy and CAR-T cells in lymphoid neoplasms were also discussed.

  4. Highlights from the 58th meeting of the American Society of Haematology, 1–6 December 2016, San Diego, USA

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarella, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The recent 58th Annual American Society of Haematology (ASH) meeting held in San Diego shed light on the usual mixture of groundbreaking basic and translational science and the recent practice-changing clinical trials. Recurrent themes this year were the use of recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques to perfect prognostic stratification and disease monitoring. Newer prospects on the role of metabolism in normal and malignant haemopoiesis and mature data on long-awaited trials on immunotherapy and CAR-T cells in lymphoid neoplasms were also discussed. PMID:28386295

  5. Competition and Cooperation in the Pacific: The Challenge for Education. Proceedings from the Inaugural Ceremonies of the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of San Diego (San Diego, California, March 10, 1988). Corporate Council on the Liberal Arts Working Paper 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporate Council on the Liberal Arts, New York, NY.

    Proceedings of the inaugural ceremonies of the University of San Diego's Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies are presented. These include the inaugural introduction by David Pierpont Gardner, opening remarks by Frank Stanton, the keynote address by California Governor George Deukmejian, further remarks by David Pierpont…

  6. Competition and Cooperation in the Pacific: The Challenge for Education. Proceedings from the Inaugural Ceremonies of the Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of San Diego (San Diego, California, March 10, 1988). Corporate Council on the Liberal Arts Working Paper 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporate Council on the Liberal Arts, New York, NY.

    Proceedings of the inaugural ceremonies of the University of San Diego's Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies are presented. These include the inaugural introduction by David Pierpont Gardner, opening remarks by Frank Stanton, the keynote address by California Governor George Deukmejian, further remarks by David Pierpont…

  7. 75 FR 71179 - Environmental Impact Statement: San Diego County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: San Diego County, CA AGENCY: Federal... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will be prepared ] for a proposed highway project in San Diego County... Hovey, Environmental Analysis Branch Chief, California Department of Transportation, District 11...

  8. 33 CFR 165.1123 - Southern California Annual Firework Events for the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...″ W. 2. Fourth of July Fireworks, Mission Bay Sponsor Mission Bay Yacht Club Event Description Fireworks Display. Date One evening; the first week in July. Location Mission Bay, San Diego, CA. Regulated...°14′45″ W. 3. Coronado Glorietta Bay Fourth of July Fireworks Sponsor Coronado, CA. Event Description...

  9. 78 FR 68995 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard will enforce the special local regulations in 33 CFR 100.1101 during the... will enforce the special local regulations in 33 CFR 100.1101 in support of the annual marine event, the San Diego Parade of Lights (Item 5 on Table 1 of 33 CFR 100.1101), held over two Sunday nights in...

  10. Rare alluvial sands of El Monte Valley, California (San Diego County), support high herpetofaunal species richness and diversity, despite severe habitat disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richmond, Jonathan Q.; Rochester, Carlton J.; Smith, Nathan W.; Nordland, Jeffrey A.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    We characterized the species richness, diversity, and distribution of amphibians and reptiles inhabiting El Monte Valley, a heavily disturbed, alluvium-filled basin within the lower San Diego River in Lakeside, California. This rare habitat type in coastal southern California is designated as a critical sand resource by the state of California and is currently under consideration for a large-scale sand mining operation with subsequent habitat restoration. We conducted field surveys from June 2015 to May 2016 using drift fence lines with funnel traps, coverboard arrays, walking transects, and road driving. We recorded 1,208 total captures, revealing high species richness and diversity, but with marked unevenness in species' abundances. Snakes were the most species-rich taxonomic group (13 species representing 11 genera), followed by lizards (11 species representing 9 genera). After the southern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus helleri), the California glossy snake (Arizona elegans occidentalis) was the second most frequently detected snake species (n = 23 captures). Amphibian species richness was limited to only three species in three genera. Despite the relatively limited 12-month sampling period, a longstanding drought, and severe habitat disturbance, our study demonstrates that El Monte Valley harbors a rich herpetofauna that includes many sensitive species.

  11. Prevalence and Correlates of Heroin-Methamphetamine Co-Injection Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in San Diego, California, and Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Meacham, Meredith C; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Rangel, Gudelia; Armenta, Richard F; Gaines, Tommi L; Garfein, Richard S

    2016-09-01

    Although persons who inject drugs (PWID) in the western United States-Mexico border region are known to inject both heroin and methamphetamine, little is known about the prevalence and risks associated with co-injection of this depressant-stimulant combination (also known as "goofball" and "Mexican speedball"). Baseline data from parallel cohort studies of PWID conducted concurrently in San Diego, CA, and Tijuana, Mexico, were used to estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of heroin-methamphetamine co-injection. PWID older than 18 years of age who reported injecting illicit drugs in the past month (N = 1,311; 32.7% female) were recruited in San Diego (n = 576) and Tijuana (n = 735) and completed interviewer-administered questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify correlates of heroin-meth-amphetamine co-injection. The prevalence of co-injection in the past 6 months was 39.9% overall and was higher in Tijuana (55.8%) than in San Diego (19.8%). In multivariable analyses adjusting for study cohort, distributive syringe sharing, purchasing syringes prefilled with drugs, finding it hard to get new syringes, reporting great or urgent need for treatment, and younger age were independently associated with co-injection. Past-6-month overdose was significantly associated with higher odds of co-injection in San Diego than in Tijuana. These findings indicate that heroin-methamphetamine co-injection is more common in Tijuana than in San Diego, yet this practice was only associated with overdose in San Diego. Heroin-methamphetamine coinjection was also independently associated with HIV-associated injection risk behaviors. Overdose-prevention interventions should address co-injection of depressants and stimulants.

  12. Prevalence and Correlates of Heroin–Methamphetamine Co-Injection Among Persons Who Inject Drugs in San Diego, California, and Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, Meredith C.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Rangel, Gudelia; Armenta, Richard F.; Gaines, Tommi L.; Garfein, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although persons who inject drugs (PWID) in the western United States–Mexico border region are known to inject both heroin and methamphetamine, little is known about the prevalence and risks associated with co-injection of this depressant–stimulant combination (also known as “goofball” and “Mexican speedball”). Method: Baseline data from parallel cohort studies of PWID conducted concurrently in San Diego, CA, and Tijuana, Mexico, were used to estimate the prevalence and identify correlates of heroin–methamphetamine co-injection. PWID older than 18 years of age who reported injecting illicit drugs in the past month (N = 1,311; 32.7% female) were recruited in San Diego (n = 576) and Tijuana (n = 735) and completed interviewer-administered questionnaires. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify correlates of heroin–methamphetamine co-injection. Results: The prevalence of co-injection in the past 6 months was 39.9% overall and was higher in Tijuana (55.8%) than in San Diego (19.8%). In multivariable analyses adjusting for study cohort, distributive syringe sharing, purchasing syringes prefilled with drugs, finding it hard to get new syringes, reporting great or urgent need for treatment, and younger age were independently associated with co-injection. Past-6-month overdose was significantly associated with higher odds of co-injection in San Diego than in Tijuana. Conclusions: These findings indicate that heroin–methamphetamine co-injection is more common in Tijuana than in San Diego, yet this practice was only associated with overdose in San Diego. Heroin–methamphetamine co-injection was also independently associated with HIV-associated injection risk behaviors. Overdose-prevention interventions should address co-injection of depressants and stimulants. PMID:27588536

  13. Telegraph Canyon Creek, City of Chula Vista, San Diego County, California. Detailed Report for Flood Control. Volume 1. Main Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    social , and historical information concerning the Telegraph Canyon area is very limited. For that reason, and because the economy of the study area is...Diego Department of Sanitation and Flood Control by letter dated November 10, 1978 also reaffirmed its support of such solution. Such reaffirmation...marsh and tidal habitats predominate. This area, known as the J Street Marsh, is a valuable and productive habitat that supports many species of

  14. Annual National Small Business Conference (5th) Held in San Diego, California on May 19-21, 2008

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-21

    kick-off event of the conference. Network with government and industry over beverages and hors d’oeuvres while you walk the display floor. monDay mAy...Diego NDIA Membership Oshkosh Corporation Ralphs-Pugh Co., Inc. Raytheon Company Referentia SAIC Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command Sullivan...Tactical and Survival Specialties, Inc. (TSSI), Bill established his company in 1990 with a very modest budget and a basic purpose to provide the best

  15. Copper toxicity to larval stages of three marine invertebrates and copper complexation capacity in San Diego Bay, California.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Rosen, Gunther; Lapota, David; Chadwick, David B; Kear-Padilla, Lora; Zirino, Alberto

    2005-03-15

    Temporal and spatial measurements of the toxicity (EC50), chemical speciation, and complexation capacity (Cu-CC) of copper in waters from San Diego Bay suggest control of the Cu-CC over copper bioavailability. While spatial distributions of total copper (CuT) indicate an increase in concentration from the mouth toward the head of San Diego Bay, the distribution of aqueous free copper ion (Cu(II)aq) shows the opposite trend. This suggests that the bioavailability of copper to organisms decreases toward the head of the bay, and is corroborated by the increase in the amount of copper needed to reach an EC50, observed for larval stages of three marine invertebrates (Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, sand dollar, Dendraster excentricus, and purple sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), and by the increase in Cu-CC heading into the head of the bay. The amount of Cu(II)aq required to produce a 50% reduction in normal larval development (referred to here as pCuTox,) of the mussel, the most sensitive of the three marine invertebrates, was generally at or above approximately 1 x 10(-11) mol L(-1) equivalents of Cu (i.e., pCuTox approximately 11 = -(log [Cu(II)aq])). These results suggest that the copper complexation capacity in San Diego Bay controls copper toxicity by keeping the concentration of Cu(II)aq at nontoxic levels.

  16. What influences Latino grocery shopping behavior? Perspectives on the small food store environment from managers and employees in San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Flack, Jennifer C.; Baquero, Barbara; Linnan, Laura A.; Gittelsohn, Joel; Pickrel, Julie L.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.

    2016-01-01

    To inform the design of a multilevel in-store intervention, this qualitative study utilized in-depth semistructured interviews with 28 managers and 10 employees of small-to-medium-sized Latino food stores (tiendas) in San Diego, California, to identify factors within the tienda that may influence Latino customers’ grocery-shopping experiences and behaviors. Qualitative data analysis, guided by grounded theory, was performed using open coding. Results suggest that future interventions should focus on the physical (i.e., built structures) and social (i.e., economic and socio-cultural) dimensions of store environments, including areas where the two dimensions interact, to promote the purchase of healthy food among customers. PMID:26800243

  17. Air-sea CO2 exchange from kelp forests (Macrocystis) in San Diego, Southern California - CO2 flux measurements by the boat based eddy covariance technique -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikawa, H.; Oechel, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    The California Bight near San Diego in Southern California is characterized by extensive kelp forests (Macrocystis). To quantify air-sea CO2 exchange (CO2 flux) on the kelp forest, we set up an eddy covariance system on a boat together with a gyro sensor for the motion correction. We also measured pCO2 and estimated CO2 flux by using the bulk method. The measurements were taken on May 19th (15-17 PST), December 9th (12-16 PST) and December 23rd (13-16 PST) in 2009 over the kelp forest (N32.6°, W 117.2°) near Point Loma, San Diego. Both CO2 flux measured by the eddy covariance system and estimated by the bulk method showed a consistent sink of CO2. However, there were some discrepancies between the two methods in the flux estimation. The lowest dpCO2 (pCO2 - atmospheric CO2) of -152 ppm with the highest wind speed was observed on May 19th resulting in the highest CO2 sink of -0.26 gCm-2day-1 estimated by the bulk method. On the other hand, the eddy covariance technique recorded the highest CO2 sink of -1.34 gCm-2day-1 on December 9th, although dpCO2 of -50.6 ppm recorded on December 9th was higher than that on May 19th. CO2 flux calculated by the bulk method was overall smaller than CO2 flux measured by the eddy covariance technique. The discrepancy in between the two methods was relatively less on May 19th when higher wind speeds were observed compared to the other two cruises.

  18. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries.

  19. Cruise report: RV Ocean Alert Cruise A2-98-SC: mapping the southern California continental margin; March 26 through April 11, 1998; San Diego to Long Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Mayer, Larry A.

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of cruise A2-98 was to map portions of the southern California continental margin, including mapping in detail US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) ocean dumping sites. Mapping was accomplished using a high-resolution multibeam mapping system. The cruise was a jointly funded project between the USEPA and the US Geological Survey (USGS). The USEPA is specifically interested in a series of ocean dump sites off San Diego, Newport Beach, and Long Beach (see Fig. 1 in report) that require high-resolution base maps for site monitoring purposes. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program has several on-going projects off southern California that lack high-precision base maps for a variety of ongoing geological studies. The cruise was conducted under a Cooperative Agreement between the USGS and the Ocean Mapping Group, University of New Brunswick, Canada.

  20. Shoulder dysplasia in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) at San Diego Zoo.

    PubMed

    Pye, Geoffrey W

    2009-09-01

    A radiographic study documented shoulder dysplasia (n = 43), with varying degrees of malformation of the supraglenoid and infraglenoid tubercles and the coracoid process, shallowing or loss of the glenoid cavity, flattening or loss of the humeral head, malformation of the greater and lesser tubercles, loss of the intertubercle groove, and humeral diaphyseal abnormalities, in northern koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in the San Diego Zoo (San Diego, California, USA) colony. Retrospectively, historic radiographs (n = 38) were examined where available. Prospectively, three standard views (lateral extended arm, ventrodorsal cranially positioned arms, and ventrodorsal caudally positioned arms) were imaged (n = 25). In all radiographs, shoulders were graded as normal, or mildly, moderately, or severely dysplastic. Although affected koalas typically do not exhibit clinical signs, degenerative joint disease may develop and clinical signs treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Where shoulder and hip radiographs were both available (n = 60), 92% of individuals had correlation between the degree of shoulder and hip dysplasia.

  1. Seroprevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis infection among humans, Santa Barbara County, California, USA, 2014–2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weinstein, Sara B.; Lake, Camille M.; Chastain, Holly M.; Fisk, David; Handali, Sukwan; Kahn, Philip L.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis (raccoon roundworm) infection is common in raccoons and can cause devastating pathology in other animals, including humans. Limited information is available on the frequency of asymptomatic human infection. We tested 150 adults from California, USA, for B. procyonis antibodies; 11 were seropositive, suggesting that subclinical infection does occur.

  2. Habitat Effects on Population Density and Movement of Insect Vectors of Xylella fastidiosa in California, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium that causes disease in grapevines, almonds, citrus, pear, alfalfa, and many other economically important plants. In California, USA, the bacteria are transmitted by several species of leafhoppers including the cicadellids Draeculacephala minerva Ball a...

  3. Emissions calculated from particulate matter and gaseous ammonia measurements from a commercial dairy in California, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emission rates and factors for particulate matter (PM) and gaseous ammonia (NH3) were estimated from measurements taken at a dairy in California, USA in June 2008. Concentration measurements were made using both point and remote sensors. Filter-based PM samplers and OPCs characterized aerodynamic an...

  4. A draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” from California, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The draft genome sequence of “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” strain HHCA, collected from a lemon tree in California, USA, is reported. The HHCA strain has a genome size of 1,118,244 bp, with G+C content of 36.6%. The HHCA genome encodes 1,191 predicted open reading frames and 51 RNA genes....

  5. Seroprevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis Infection among Humans, Santa Barbara County, California, USA, 2014-2016.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Sara B; Lake, Camille M; Chastain, Holly M; Fisk, David; Handali, Sukwan; Kahn, Philip L; Montgomery, Susan P; Wilkins, Patricia P; Kuris, Armand M; Lafferty, Kevin D

    2017-08-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis (raccoon roundworm) infection is common in raccoons and can cause devastating pathology in other animals, including humans. Limited information is available on the frequency of asymptomatic human infection. We tested 150 adults from California, USA, for B. procyonis antibodies; 11 were seropositive, suggesting that subclinical infection does occur.

  6. Seroprevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis Infection among Humans, Santa Barbara County, California, USA, 2014–2016

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Camille M.; Chastain, Holly M.; Fisk, David; Handali, Sukwan; Kahn, Philip L.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis (raccoon roundworm) infection is common in raccoons and can cause devastating pathology in other animals, including humans. Limited information is available on the frequency of asymptomatic human infection. We tested 150 adults from California, USA, for B. procyonis antibodies; 11 were seropositive, suggesting that subclinical infection does occur. PMID:28726612

  7. Effect of logging on subsurface pipeflow and erosion: coastal northern California, USA

    Treesearch

    R. R. Ziemer

    1992-01-01

    Abstract - Three zero-order swales, each with a contributing drainage area of about 1 ha, were instrumented to measure pipeflows within the Caspar Creek Experimental Watershed in northwestern California, USA. After two winters of data collection, the second-growth forest on two of the swales was clearcut logged. The third swale remained as an uncut control. After...

  8. Description of the larvae of Nothotrichia shasta Harris and Armitage (Trichoptera: Hydroptilidae) from California, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nothotrichia Flint is a small genus of infrequently collected microcaddisflies that are amphitropical in distribution. Previously only known from adult specimens, the first description and illustration of larvae in the genus, N. shasta from California, USA is presented. We provide characters to sepa...

  9. Holocene forest development and maintenance on different substrates in the Klamath mountains, northern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Christy E. Briles; Cathy Whitlock; Carl N. Skinner; Jerry Mohr

    2011-01-01

    The influence of substrate on long-term vegetation dynamics has received little attention, and yet nutrient-limited ecosystems have some of the highest levels of endemism in the world. The diverse geology of the Klamath Mountains of northern California (USA) allows examination of the long-term influence of edaphic constraints in subalpine forests through a comparison...

  10. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  11. Prevalence of transmitted HIV drug resistance among recently infected persons in San Diego, California 1996-2013

    PubMed Central

    Panichsillapakit, Theppharit; Smith, Davey M.; Wertheim, Joel O.; Richman, Douglas D.; Little, Susan J.; Mehta, Sanjay R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transmitted drug resistance (TDR) remains an important concern when initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Here we describe the prevalence and phylogenetic relationships of TDR among ART-naïve, HIV-infected individuals in San Diego from 1996-2013. Methods Data were analyzed from 496 participants of the San Diego Primary Infection Cohort who underwent genotypic resistance testing before initiating therapy. Mutations associated with drug resistance were identified according to the WHO-2009 surveillance list. Network and phylogenetic analyses of the HIV-1 pol sequences were used to evaluate the relationships of TDR within the context of the entire cohort. Results The overall prevalence of TDR was 13.5% (67/496), with an increasing trend over the study period (p=0.005). TDR was predominantly toward non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) [8.5% (42/496)], also increasing over the study period (p=0.005). In contrast, TDR to protease inhibitors and nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors were 4.4% (22/496) and 3.8% (19/496) respectively, and did not vary with time. TDR prevalence did not differ by age, gender, race/ethnicity or risk factor. Using phylogenetic analysis, we identified 52 transmission clusters, including eight with at least two individuals sharing the same mutation, accounting for 23.8% (16/67) of the individuals with TDR. Conclusions Between 1996 and 2013, the prevalence of TDR significantly increased among recently infected ART-naïve individuals in San Diego. Around one-fourth of TDR occurred within clusters of recently infected individuals. These findings highlight the importance of baseline resistance testing to guide selection of ART and for public health monitoring. PMID:26413846

  12. Speech Recognition: Proceedings of a Workshop Held in San Diego, California on March 24-26, 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    following count as single "words": HONG-KONG, SAN-DIEGO, ICE-NINE, PAC-ALERT, LAT -LON, FUGET- 1 , M -RATING, C- CODE, SQO-23, etc. However, BQ’ING...baseline isolsted-aord HHM systsa sre depicted in Tig. 1 , «hile Pig. 2 indicates ths robustness snhsnceaents «hich hsvs been developed end tsstsd...the United States Government. .>\\S .^Vv .vW 87 8 A3 023 £ 1 -•.v.v.-.." v v ■-•’.- ".• •.- •. • , • «* * • ■ "^ • i TADI.K OP

  13. Postglacial vegetation and fire history, eastern Klamath Mountains, California, USA

    Treesearch

    Jerry A. Mohr; Cathy Whitlock; Carl N. Skinner

    2000-01-01

    Pollen and high-resolution charcoal data from Bluff Lake and Crater Lake, California, indicate simi lar changes in climate, vegetation and fire history during the last 15 500 years. Pollen data at Bluff Lake suggest that the vegetation betweenc. 15 500 and 13 100 cal. BP consisted of subalpine parkland with scattered Pinus...

  14. Cross-border injection drug use and HIV and hepatitis C virus seropositivity among people who inject drugs in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Horyniak, Danielle; Wagner, Karla D; Armenta, Richard F; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Hendrickson, Erik; Garfein, Richard S

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence of HIV and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are significantly lower among people who inject drugs (PWID) in San Diego, CA, USA compared with PWID in Tijuana, Mexico, located directly across the border. We investigated associations between cross-border injection drug use (IDU), HIV and HCV seroprevalence and engagement in injecting risk behaviours while on each side of the border. Using baseline interviews and serologic testing data from STAHR II, a longitudinal cohort study of PWID in San Diego, bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses examined associations between recent (past six months) cross-border IDU and HIV and HCV antibody seropositivity, socio-demographics, drug use characteristics, and participants' connections to, and perceptions about Mexico. Chi-squared tests and McNemar tests examined associations between cross-border IDU and injecting risk behaviours. Of the 567 participants (93% U.S.-born, 73% male, median age 45 years), 86 (15%) reported recent cross-border IDU. Cross-border IDU was not associated with HIV (OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.37-1.95) or HCV seropositivity (OR: 1.01, 95% CI: 0.62-1.65). Age, identifying as Hispanic or Latino/a, and being concerned about risk of violence when travelling to Mexico were independently associated with decreased odds of recent cross-border IDU. Injecting cocaine at least weekly, having ever lived in Mexico and knowing PWID who reside in Mexico were associated with increased odds of recent cross-border IDU. PWID who reported cross-border IDU were significantly less likely to engage in receptive needle sharing, equipment sharing, and public injection while in Mexico compared with in San Diego (all p<0.001). Prevalence of HIV and HCV infection was similar among PWID who had and had not injected in Mexico, possibly due to practising safer injecting while in Mexico. Research is needed to elucidate contextual factors enabling U.S. PWID to inject safely while in Mexico. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  15. Possible Connections Between the Coronado Bank Fault Zone and the Newport-Inglewood, Rose Canyon, and Palos Verdes Fault Zones Offshore San Diego County, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliter, R. W.; Ryan, H. F.

    2003-12-01

    High-resolution multichannel seismic-reflection and deep-tow Huntec data collected by the USGS were interpreted to map the Coronado Bank fault zone (CBFZ) offshore San Diego County, California. The CBFZ is comprised of several major strands (eastern, central, western) that change in both orientation and degree of deformation along strike. Between Coronado Bank and San Diego, the CBFZ trends N25W and occupies a narrow 7 km zone. Immediately north of La Jolla submarine canyon (LJSC), the easternmost strand changes orientation to almost due north and appears to be offset in a right-lateral sense across the canyon axis. The strand merges with a prominent fault that follows the base of the continental slope in about 600 m water depth. The central portion of the CBFZ is mapped as a negative flower structure and deforms seafloor sediment as far north as 15 km north of LJSC. Farther north, this structure is buried by more than 400 m of basin sediment. Along the eastern edge of the Coronado Bank, the western portion of the CBFZ is characterized by high angle normal faults that dip to the east. North of the Coronado Bank, the western segment follows the western edge of a basement high; it cuts through horizontal basin reflectors and in places deforms the seafloor. We mapped an additional splay of the CBFZ that trends N40W; it is only observed north and west of LJSC. Although the predominant trend of the CBFZ is about N40W, along strike deviations from this orientation of some of the strands indicate that these strands connect with other offshore fault zones in the area. Based on the limited data available, the trend of the CBFZ south of Coronado Bank suggests that it might connect with the Rose Canyon fault zone (RCFZ) that has been mapped in San Diego Bay. North of Coronado Bank, the CBFZ is a much broader fault zone (about 25 km wide) composed of diverging fault strands. The westernmost strand may merge with the western strand of the Palos Verdes fault zone (PVFZ) south of

  16. Effects of groundwater development on uranium: Central Valley, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Jurgens, Bryant C; Fram, Miranda S; Belitz, Kenneth; Burow, Karen R; Landon, Matthew K

    2010-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco(2) concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential long-term effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world.

  17. Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Burow, Karen R.; Landon, Matthew K.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco2 concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential longterm effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world.

  18. Coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations, California, USA, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Sondermeyer, Gail; Lee, Lauren; Gilliss, Debra; Tabnak, Farzaneh; Vugia, Duc

    2013-10-01

    In the past decade, state-specific increases in the number of reported cases of coccidioidomycosis have been observed in areas of California and Arizona where the disease is endemic. Although most coccidioidomycosis is asymptomatic or mild, infection can lead to severe pulmonary or disseminated disease requiring hospitalization and costly disease management. To determine the epidemiology of cases and toll of coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations in California, we reviewed hospital discharge data for 2000-2011. During this period, there were 25,217 coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations for 15,747 patients and >$2 billion US in total hospital charges. Annual initial hospitalization rates increased from 2.3 initial hospitalizations/100,000 population in 2000 to 5.0 initial hospitalizations/100,000 population in 2011. During this period, initial hospitalization rates were higher for men than women, African Americans and Hispanics than Whites, and older persons than younger persons. In California, the increasing health- and cost-related effects of coccidioidomycosis-associated hospitalizations are a major public health challenge.

  19. Rates and risk factors for Coccidioidomycosis among prison inmates, California, USA, 2011.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Charlotte; Lucas, Kimberley D; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C

    2015-01-01

    In California, coccidioidomycosis is a disease acquired by inhaling spores of Coccidioides immitis, a fungus found in certain arid regions, including the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, where 8 state prisons are located. During 2011, we reviewed coccidioidomycosis rates at 2 of the prisons that consistently report >80% of California's inmate cases and determined inmate risk factors for primary, severe (defined as pulmonary coccidioidomycosis requiring >10 hospital days), and disseminated coccidioidomycosis (defined by hospital discharge International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision code). Inmates of African American ethnicity who were >40 years of age were at significantly higher risk for primary coccidioidomycosis than their white counterparts (odds ratio = 2.0, 95% CI 1.5-2.8). Diabetes was a risk factor for severe pulmonary coccidioidomycosis, and black race a risk factor for disseminated disease. These findings contributed to a court decision mandating exclusion of black inmates and inmates with diabetes from the 2 California prisons with the highest rates of coccidioidomycosis.

  20. 33 CFR 100.1101 - Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 2. California Half Ironman Triathlon Sponsor World Triathlon Corporation. Event Description Swimming... Triathlon Sponsor Lagardere Unlimited Upsolut USAT LLC. Event Description Swimming Portion of Triathlon Race.... Event Description Swimming Portion of Triathlon Race. Date Weekend in March. Location Mission Bay,...

  1. San Diego Rediscovers Economic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Harvey L.

    1985-01-01

    The new K-12 economics education program being implemented by the San Diego City (California) schools is described. A brief historical background, a rationale, what constitutes the program for grades 9-12, and how the program is being implemented are discussed. (RM)

  2. Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, B.C.; Fram, M.S.; Belitz, K.; Burow, K.R.; Landon, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley, California, have exceeded federal and state drinking water standards during the last 20 years. The San Joaquin Valley is located within the Central Valley of California and is one of the most productive agricultural areas in the world. Increased irrigation and pumping associated with agricultural and urban development during the last 100 years have changed the chemistry and magnitude of groundwater recharge, and increased the rate of downward groundwater movement. Strong correlations between U and bicarbonate suggest that U is leached from shallow sediments by high bicarbonate water, consistent with findings of previous work in Modesto, California. Summer irrigation of crops in agricultural areas and, to lesser extent, of landscape plants and grasses in urban areas, has increased Pco2 concentrations in the soil zone and caused higher temperature and salinity of groundwater recharge. Coupled with groundwater pumping, this process, as evidenced by increasing bicarbonate concentrations in groundwater over the last 100 years, has caused shallow, young groundwater with high U concentrations to migrate to deeper parts of the groundwater system that are tapped by public-supply wells. Continued downward migration of U-affected groundwater and expansion of urban centers into agricultural areas will likely be associated with increased U concentrations in public-supply wells. The results from this study illustrate the potential long-term effects of groundwater development and irrigation-supported agriculture on water quality in arid and semiarid regions around the world. Journal compilation ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association. No claim to original US government works.

  3. Analysis of chlorpyrifos agricultural use in regions of frequent surface water detections in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuyang; Starner, Keith; Spurlock, Frank

    2012-11-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a common surface water contaminant in California, USA. We evaluated five years of chlorpyrifos use and surface water monitoring data in California's principal agricultural regions. Imperial County and three central coastal regions accounted for only 10% of chlorpyrifos statewide use, but displayed consistently high aquatic benchmark exceedances (13.2%-57.1%). In contrast, 90% of use occurred in Central Valley regions where only 0.6%-6.5% of samples exceeded aquatic benchmarks. Differences among regions are attributable to crop type, use intensity, irrigation practices and monthly application patterns. Application method did not appear to be a factor.

  4. Recent deformation on the San Diego Trough and San Pedro Basin fault systems, offshore Southern California: Assessing evidence for fault system connectivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, J. M.; Kent, G. M.; Driscoll, N. W.; Harding, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    The seismic hazard posed by offshore faults for coastal communities in Southern California is poorly understood and may be considerable, especially when these communities are located near long faults that have the ability to produce large earthquakes. The San Diego Trough fault (SDTF) and San Pedro Basin fault (SPBF) systems are active northwest striking, right-lateral faults in the Inner California Borderland that extend offshore between San Diego and Los Angeles. Recent work shows that the SDTF slip rate accounts for 25% of the 6-8 mm/yr of deformation accommodated by the offshore fault network, and seismic reflection data suggest that these two fault zones may be one continuous structure. Here, we use recently acquired CHIRP, high-resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection, and multibeam bathymetric data in combination with USGS and industry MCS profiles to characterize recent deformation on the SDTF and SPBF zones and to evaluate the potential for an end-to-end rupture that spans both fault systems. The SDTF offsets young sediments at the seafloor for 130 km between the US/Mexico border and Avalon Knoll. The northern SPBF has robust geomorphic expression and offsets the seafloor in the Santa Monica Basin. The southern SPBF lies within a 25-km gap between high-resolution MCS surveys. Although there does appear to be a through-going fault at depth in industry MCS profiles, the low vertical resolution of these data inhibits our ability to confirm recent slip on the southern SPBF. Empirical scaling relationships indicate that a 200-km-long rupture of the SDTF and its southern extension, the Bahia Soledad fault, could produce a M7.7 earthquake. If the SDTF and the SPBF are linked, the length of the combined fault increases to >270 km. This may allow ruptures initiating on the SDTF to propagate within 25 km of the Los Angeles Basin. At present, the paleoseismic histories of the faults are unknown. We present new observations from CHIRP and coring surveys at

  5. Staphylococcal infections in children, California, USA, 1985-2009.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Kathleen; Halpern, Meira S; Sarnquist, Clea; Soni, Shila; Arroyo, Anna Chen; Maldonado, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective, observational, population-based study to investigate the effect of staphylococcal infections on the hospitalization of children in California during 1985-2009. Hospitalized children with staphylococcal infections were identified through the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database. Infections were categorized as community onset, community onset health care-associated, or hospital onset. Infection incidence was calculated relative to all children and to those hospitalized in acute-care facilities. A total of 140,265 records were analyzed. Overall incidence increased from 49/100,000 population in 1985 to a peak of 83/100,000 in 2006 and dropped to 73/100,000 in 2009. Staphylococcal infections were associated with longer hospital stays and higher risk for death relative to all-cause hospitalizations of children. The number of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections increased, and the number of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus infections remained unchanged. Children <3 years of age, Blacks, and those without private insurance were at higher risk for hospitalization.

  6. Temporal and Spatial Variation of Atmospherically Deposited Organic Contaminants at High Elevation in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospherically deposited organic contaminants in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, USA, have exceeded some thresholds of concern, but the spatial and temporal distributions of contaminants in the mountains are not well known. The present study evaluated (1) whether the...

  7. Temporal and Spatial Variation of Atmospherically Deposited Organic Contaminants at High Elevation in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospherically deposited organic contaminants in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, USA, have exceeded some thresholds of concern, but the spatial and temporal distributions of contaminants in the mountains are not well known. The present study evaluated (1) whether the...

  8. Bouse Formation in the Bristol basin near Amboy, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David M.; Reynolds, Robert E.; Bright, Jordan E.; Starratt, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Limestone beds underlain and overlain by alluvial fan conglomerate near Amboy, California, are very similar in many respects to parts of the Bouse Formation, suggesting that an arm of the Pliocene Bouse water body extended across a wide part of the southern Mojave Desert. The deposits are north of the town of Amboy at and below an elevation of 290 m, along the northern piedmont of the Bristol “dry” Lake basin. The Amboy outcrops contain the Lawlor Tuff (4.83 Ma), which is also found in an outcrop of the Bouse Formation in the Blythe basin near Buzzards Peak in the Chocolate Mountains, 180 km southeast of Amboy. Bouse exposures near Amboy are ∼3.4 m thick, white, distinctly bedded, with limestone and calcareous sandstone as well as stromatolite mounds; we interpret these as nearshore deposits. The Bouse at Amboy contains ostracodes, diatoms, and mollusks that indicate saline lake or estuarine environments with an admixture of fresh-water forms. Along with wading bird tracks and a spine from a marine fish, these fossils suggest that the deposits formed in saline waters near a fresh-water source such as a perennial stream. Beds of the outcrop dip southward and are 113 m above the surface of Bristol Playa, where similar age sediments are buried 270+ m deep, indicating significant faulting and vertical tectonics in this part of the Eastern California Shear Zone during the past 5 m.y. Confirmation of the Bouse Formation at Amboy strengthens previous assignments to the Bouse Formation for mudstones in driller logs at Danby “dry” Lake, California, and suggests that areally extensive arms of the Bouse water body were west of the Blythe basin. The Bristol basin arm of the lower Bouse basin probably was restricted from the main water body by narrow passages, but Bouse sediment there is similar to that in the Blythe basin, suggesting generally similar water chemistry and environmental conditions. Examining the degree to which Bouse deposits in the western arms

  9. Pesticides in amphibian habitats of Central and Northern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fellers, Gary M.; Sparling, W; McConnell, Laura; Kleeman, Patrick M.; Drakeford, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that toxicity from pesticide exposure may be contributing to amphibian declines in California and that atmospheric deposition could be a primary pathway for pesticides to enter amphibian habitats. We report on a survey of California wetlands sampled along transects associated with Lassen Volcanic National Park, Lake Tahoe, Yosemite National Park, and Sequoia National Park. Each transect ran from the Pacific coast to the Cascades or Sierra Nevada mountains. Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla), water, and sediment were collected from wetlands in 2001 and 2002. Twenty-three pesticides were found in frog, water, or sediment samples. Six contaminants including trifluralin, α-endosulfan, chlordanes, and trans-nonachlor were found in adult P. regilla. Seventeen contaminants were found in sediments, including endosulfan sulfate, chlordanes, 1-chloro-4-[2,2-dichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethenyl]benzene (4,4′-DDE), and chlorpyrifos. The mean number of chemicals detected per pond in sediments was 2.4 (2.5, standard deviation). In water, 17 chemicals were detected, with β-endosulfan being present in almost all samples. Trifluralin, chlordanes, and chlorpyrifos were the next most common. The mean number of chemicals in water per pond was 7.8 (2.9). With the possible exception of chlorpyrifos oxon in sediments and total endosulfans, none of the contaminants exceeded known lethal or sublethal concentrations in P. regilla tissue. Endosulfans, chlorpyrifos, and trifluralin were associated with historic and present day population status of amphibians. Cholinesterase, an essential neurological enzyme that can be depressed by certain pesticides, was reduced in tadpoles from areas with the greatest population declines.

  10. Sea-level rise and coastal groundwater inundation and shoaling at select sites in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoover, Daniel J.; Odigie, Kingsley; Swarzenski, Peter W.; Barnard, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Study regionThe study region spans coastal California, USA, and focuses on three primary sites: Arcata, Stinson Beach, and Malibu Lagoon.Study focus1 m and 2 m sea-level rise (SLR) projections were used to assess vulnerability to SLR-driven groundwater emergence and shoaling at select low-lying, coastal sites in California. Separate and combined inundation scenarios for SLR and groundwater emergence were developed using digital elevation models of study site topography and groundwater surfaces constructed from well data or published groundwater level contours.New hydrological insights for the regionSLR impacts are a serious concern in coastal California which has a long (∼1800 km) and populous coastline. Information on the possible importance of SLR-driven groundwater inundation in California is limited. In this study, the potential for SLR-driven groundwater inundation at three sites (Arcata, Stinson Beach, and Malibu Lagoon) was investigated under 1 m and 2 m SLR scenarios. These sites provide insight into the vulnerability of Northern California coastal plains, coastal developments built on beach sand or sand spits, and developed areas around coastal lagoons associated with seasonal streams and berms. Northern California coastal plains with abundant shallow groundwater likely will see significant and widespread groundwater emergence, while impacts along the much drier central and southern California coast may be less severe due to the absence of shallow groundwater in many areas. Vulnerability analysis is hampered by the lack of data on shallow coastal aquifers, which commonly are not studied because they are not suitable for domestic or agricultural use. Shallow saline aquifers may be present in many areas along coastal California, which would dramatically increase vulnerability to SLR-driven groundwater emergence and shoaling. Improved understanding of the extent and response of California coastal aquifers to SLR will help in preparing for mitigation

  11. Status and habitat use of the California black rail in the Southwestern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conway, C.J.; Sulzman, C.

    2007-01-01

    California black rails (Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus) occur in two disjunct regions: the southwestern USA (western Arizona and southern California) and northern California (Sacramento Valley and the San Francisco Bay area). We examined current status of black rails in the southwestern USA by repeating survey efforts first conducted in 1973-1974 and again in 1989, and also examined wetland plant species associated with black rail distribution and abundance. We detected 136 black rails in Arizona and southern California. Black rail numbers detected during past survey efforts were much higher than the numbers detected during our more intensive survey effort, and hence, populations have obviously declined. Plants that were more common at points with black rails included common threesquare (Schoenoplectus pungens), arrowweed (Pluchea sericea), Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii), seepwillow (Baccharis salicifolia), and mixed shrubs, with common threesquare showing the strongest association with black rail presence. Plant species and non-vegetative communities that were less common at points with black rails included California bulrush (Schoenoplectus californicus), southern cattail (Typha domingensis), upland vegetation, and open water. Black rails were often present at sites that had some saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima), but were rarely detected in areas dominated by saltcedar. We recommend that a standardized black rail survey effort be repeated annually to obtain estimates of black rail population trends. Management of existing emergent marshes with black rails is needed to maintain stands of common threesquare in early successional stages. Moreover, wetland restoration efforts that produce diverse wetland vegetation including common threesquare should be implemented to ensure that black rail populations persist in the southwestern USA. ?? 2007, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  12. Notes from the field: fatal rat-bite fever in a child - San Diego County, California, 2013.

    PubMed

    Adam, Jessica K; Varan, Aiden K; Pong, Alice L; McDonald, Eric C

    2014-12-19

    In August 2013, the County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency was notified of a fatal case of rat-bite fever (RBF) in a previously healthy male, aged 10 years, who owned pet rats. Two days before his death, the patient experienced rigors, fevers, vomiting, headaches, and leg pains. His physician noted a fever of 102.6°F (39.2ºC), documented a normal examination, diagnosed viral gastroenteritis, and prescribed anti-nausea medication. During the next 24 hours, the patient experienced vomiting and persistent fever. He was confused and weak before collapsing at home. Paramedics reported the patient was unresponsive and had dilated pupils; resuscitation was initiated in the field and was continued for >1 hour after arrival at the emergency department but was unsuccessful. A complete blood count performed during resuscitation revealed anemia (hemoglobin 10.0 g/dL [normal = 13.5-18.0 g/dL], thrombocytopenia (platelets 40,000/µL [normal = 140,000-440,000/µL]), leukocytosis (white blood cells 17,900 cells/µL [normal = 4,000-10,500/µL]) with 16% band neutrophils; the patient also had evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation. No rash or skin breakdown was noted. Lung, liver, and epiglottis tissue collected postmortem was positive for Streptobacillus moniliformis DNA by polymerase chain reaction.

  13. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Los Angeles quadrangle, San Bernardino quadrangle, Santa Ana quadrangle, San Diego quadrangle, California. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the San Diego, Santa Ana, San Bernardino, and Los Angeles, California 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle maps. The survey was a part of DOE's National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance (ARR) program, which in turn is a part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer having a large crystal volume, and high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test range. Data quality was ensured throughout the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geologic units. These maps were interpreted and an anomaly interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data processing procedures, the data display format, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results.

  14. Energy-water nexus analysis of enhanced water supply scenarios: a regional comparison of Tampa Bay, Florida, and San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Mo, Weiwei; Wang, Ranran; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2014-05-20

    Increased water demand and scarce freshwater resources have forced communities to seek nontraditional water sources. These challenges are exacerbated in coastal communities, where population growth rates and densities in the United States are the highest. To understand the current management dilemma between constrained surface and groundwater sources and potential new water sources, Tampa Bay, Florida (TB), and San Diego, California (SD), were studied through 2030 accounting for changes in population, water demand, and electricity grid mix. These locations were chosen on the basis of their similar populations, land areas, economies, and water consumption characters as well as their coastal locations and rising contradictions between water demand and supply. Three scenarios were evaluated for each study area: (1) maximization of traditional supplies; (2) maximization of seawater desalination; and (3) maximization of nonpotable water reclamation. Three types of impacts were assessed: embodied energy, greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and energy cost. SD was found to have higher embodied energy and energy cost but lower GHG emission than TB in most of its water infrastructure systems because of the differences between the electricity grid mixes and water resources of the two regions. Maximizing water reclamation was found to be better than increasing either traditional supplies or seawater desalination in both regions in terms of the three impact categories. The results further imply the importance of assessing the energy-water nexus when pursuing demand-side control targets or goals as well to ensure that the potentially most economical options are considered.

  15. The Interaction of Sexual Identity With Sexual Behavior and Its Influence on HIV Risk Among Latino Men: Results of a Community Survey in Northern San Diego County, California

    PubMed Central

    Zellner, Jennifer A.; Sañudo, Fernando; Fernández-Cerdeño, Araceli; Sipan, Carol L.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Carrillo, Héctor

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the sexual behavior, sexual identities, and HIV risk factors of a community sample of Latino men to inform efforts to reduce Latinos' HIV risk. Methods. In 2005 and 2006, 680 Latino men in San Diego County, California, in randomly selected, targeted community venues, completed an anonymous, self-administered survey. Results. Most (92.3%) respondents self-identified as heterosexual, with 2.2%, 4.9%, and 0.6% self-identifying as bisexual, gay, or other orientation, respectively. Overall, 4.8% of heterosexually identified men had a lifetime history of anal intercourse with other men. Compared with behaviorally heterosexual men, heterosexually identified men who had sex with both men and women were more likely to have had a sexually transmitted infection, to have unprotected sexual intercourse with female partners, and to report having sex while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. Bisexually identified men who had sex with men and women did not differ from behaviorally heterosexual men in these risk factors. Conclusions. Latino men who have a heterosexual identity and bisexual practices are at greater risk of HIV infection, and efforts to reduce HIV risk among Latinos should target this group. PMID:19008512

  16. Integrated Science Investigations of the Salton Sea, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, D.

    2006-12-01

    The Salton Sea is the latest waterbody to be formed by Colorado River floodwaters within the Salton Trough. Over the past 100 years, floodwaters have been replaced by agricultural drainage water and municipal discharges so that today, most of the water reaching the Salton Sea is agricultural drainwater flowing down the New, Alamo and Whitewater Rivers. An evaporation of about 6 feet per year and inputs of more than 4 million tons of salt per year have increased salinity of the waters of the Salton Sea. The current salinity level of approximately 46 parts per thousand is about 25% more saline than ocean water. Diverting water from the Imperial Valley agricultural lands to urban Southern California, and anticipated loss of inflows from Mexico and increasing water conservation activities will result in less water flowing into the Salton Sea. A Restoration Program is being conducted to evaluate the effects of diminished inflows on the Salton Sea Ecosystem and recommend alternatives to avoid or minimize those effects. The Salton Sea has become increasingly important as habitat for migratory birds because of wetland losses. California has lost approximately 91% of interior wetland acreage from pre-settlement until the mid-1980's. The Salton Sea provides critical habitat linking distant wetlands of Pacific and Central Flyways to wintering habitats in Mexico and Central and South America. More than 400 species of birds have been observed in the Salton Sea Ecosystem. Large percentages of the populations for several bird species such as the endangered Yuma Clapper Rail, the Eared Grebe, Snowy Plover and American White Pelican utilize the Salton Sea. Approximately 20 species of conservation concern utilize the Salton Sea ecosystem. Fish-eating birds such as Great Blue Herons, California Brown Pelicans, Double-crested Cormorants and several species of egrets are highly dependent upon the fishery of the Salton Sea. The Salton Sea fishery is now primarily comprised of tilapia

  17. Pesticides and amphibian population declines in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, Donald W.; Fellers, Gary M.; McConnell, Laura L.

    2001-01-01

    Several species of anuran amphibians have undergone drastic population declines in the western United States over the last 10 to 15 years. In California, the most severe declines are in the Sierra Mountains east of the Central Valley and downwind of the intensely agricultural San Joaquin Valley. In contrast, coastal and more northern populations across from the less agrarian Sacramento Valley are stable or declining less precipitously. In this article, we provide evidence that pesticides are instrumental in declines of these species. Using Hyla regilla as a sentinel species, we found that cholinesterase (ChE) activity in tadpoles was depressed in mountainous areas east of the Central Valley compared with sites along the coast or north of the Valley. Cholinesterase was also lower in areas where ranid population status was poor or moderate compared with areas with good ranid status. Up to 50% of the sampled population in areas with reduced ChE had detectable organophosphorus residues, with concentrations as high as 190 ppb wet weight. In addition, up to 86% of some populations had measurable endosulfan concentrations and 40% had detectable 4,4'- dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene, 4,4'-DDT, and 2,4'-DDT residues.

  18. Spatial Distribution of Lead in Sacramento, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Solt, Michael J.; Deocampo, Daniel M.; Norris, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exposure to lead remains a health concern in many urban areas; Sacramento, California is one example, with state surveillance data showing nearly 3% of screened children reported with blood lead levels over 4.5 μg/dL in 2009. To investigate the environmental exposure, 91 soil samples were collected and analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS for 14 elements. An additional 28 samples were collected from areas of focus and analyzed by hand-held X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for Pb and Zn. Analysis of the metals data revealed non-normal distributions and positive skewness, consistent with anthropogenic input. In addition, high correlation coefficients (≥0.75) of metal concentrations in Cd-Pb, Cd-Zn, Pb-Zn, and Sb-Sn pairs suggest similarities in the input mechanisms. Semivariograms generated from Pb and associated metals reveal these metals to exhibit spatial correlation. A prediction map of lead concentrations in soil was generated by ordinary kriging, showing elevated concentrations in soil located in the central, older area of Sacramento where historic traffic density and industrial activity have been historically concentrated. XRF analysis of Pb and Zn from additional samples verifies elevated concentrations in the central areas of Sacramento as predicted. PMID:25789455

  19. 78 FR 10523 - Special Local Regulation; Southern California Annual Marine Events for the San Diego Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... 33 CFR 100.1101 will be enforced from 6:40 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. on March 30, 2013. FOR FURTHER... Regulation for the 2013 California Ironman Triathlon in 33 CFR 100.1101 (Item 2 on Table 1) from 6:40 a.m. through 9:30 a.m. on March 30, 2013. Under provisions of 33 CFR 100.1101, a vessel may not enter the...

  20. Establishment Failure in Biological Invasions: A Case History of Littorina littorea in California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Andrew L.; Blakeslee, April M. H.; Miller, A. Whitman; Ruiz, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    Background The early stages of biological invasions are rarely observed, but can provide significant insight into the invasion process as well as the influence vectors have on invasion success or failure. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized three newly discovered populations of an introduced gastropod, Littorina littorea (Linné, 1758), in California, USA, comparing them to potential source populations in native Europe and the North American East Coast, where the snail is also introduced. Demographic surveys were used to assess spatial distribution and sizes of the snail in San Francisco and Anaheim Bays, California. Mitochondrial DNA was sequenced and compared among these nascent populations, and various populations from the North American East Coast and Europe, to characterize the California populations and ascertain their likely source. Demographic and genetic data were considered together to deduce likely vectors for the California populations. We found that the three large California L. littorea populations contained only adult snails and had unexpectedly high genetic diversity rather than showing an extreme bottleneck as typically expected in recent introductions. Haplotype diversity in Californian populations was significantly reduced compared to European populations, but not compared to East Coast populations. Genetic analyses clearly suggested the East Coast as the source region for the California introductions. Conclusions and Significance The California L. littorea populations were at an early, non-established phase of invasion with no evidence of recruitment. The live seafood trade is the most likely invasion vector for these populations, as it preferentially transports large numbers of adult L. littorea, matching the demographic structure of the introduced California L. littorea populations. Our results highlight continued operation of live seafood trade vectors and the influence of vectors on the demographic and genetic structure of the

  1. Establishment failure in biological invasions: a case history of Littorina littorea in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Chang, Andrew L; Blakeslee, April M H; Miller, A Whitman; Ruiz, Gregory M

    2011-01-10

    The early stages of biological invasions are rarely observed, but can provide significant insight into the invasion process as well as the influence vectors have on invasion success or failure. We characterized three newly discovered populations of an introduced gastropod, Littorina littorea (Linné, 1758), in California, USA, comparing them to potential source populations in native Europe and the North American East Coast, where the snail is also introduced. Demographic surveys were used to assess spatial distribution and sizes of the snail in San Francisco and Anaheim Bays, California. Mitochondrial DNA was sequenced and compared among these nascent populations, and various populations from the North American East Coast and Europe, to characterize the California populations and ascertain their likely source. Demographic and genetic data were considered together to deduce likely vectors for the California populations. We found that the three large California L. littorea populations contained only adult snails and had unexpectedly high genetic diversity rather than showing an extreme bottleneck as typically expected in recent introductions. Haplotype diversity in Californian populations was significantly reduced compared to European populations, but not compared to East Coast populations. Genetic analyses clearly suggested the East Coast as the source region for the California introductions. The California L. littorea populations were at an early, non-established phase of invasion with no evidence of recruitment. The live seafood trade is the most likely invasion vector for these populations, as it preferentially transports large numbers of adult L. littorea, matching the demographic structure of the introduced California L. littorea populations. Our results highlight continued operation of live seafood trade vectors and the influence of vectors on the demographic and genetic structure of the resulting populations, especially early stages of the invasion process.

  2. Diatoms in Historical Tsunami Deposits, Northern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemphill-Haley, E.; Loofbourrow, C.

    2013-12-01

    A fundamental challenge in using microfossils to differentiate paleotsunami deposits from those of other sources (storms, floods) is to identify characteristics that favor one mode of deposition over the other. The silt- to sand-size siliceous hard parts (valves) of diatoms are commonly found as transported particles in tsunami deposits, but logically, may also be found in other types of coastal deposits of the same grain size. To date, observations on diatom preservation and provenance have been invoked as supporting evidence for paleotsunami deposits. These observations can be tested and refined by detailed observations of diatom assemblages in recent, well-documented tsunami deposits. As a component of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) project, diatoms were examined in two historical tsunami deposits on the central and northern California coast: the 1946 deposit on the north end of Half Moon Bay (37.5°N) and the 1964 deposit about 10 km south of Crescent City (41.7°N). Both tsunamis were the result of distant-source events across the Pacific Ocean from California: the M 8.1 Eastern Aleutians Islands earthquake (1946) and the M 9.2 Alaska earthquake (1964). At both localities tsunami inundation was documented by eyewitness accounts. The deposits are now preserved in the shallow subsurface as ~1-10 cm thick layers of silt and sand intercalated in peaty marsh or clay-rich lagoon deposits. These historical tsunami deposits are particularly useful for documenting characteristics of entrained diatom assemblages for comparison to paleotsunami deposits. First, the deposits consist of mostly fine sand and silt, and therefore are an appropriate particle size for containing diatoms. Second, although they are recent enough to have been documented by eyewitness accounts, they are also old enough to have been altered by natural geological processes (e.g., burial, compaction, taphonomic affects on diatom valves) as would be found in

  3. Processed meats and risk of childhood leukemia (California, USA).

    PubMed

    Peters, J M; Preston-Martin, S; London, S J; Bowman, J D; Buckley, J D; Thomas, D C

    1994-03-01

    The relation between the intake of certain food items thought to be precursors or inhibitors of N-nitroso compounds (NOC) and risk of leukemia was investigated in a case-control study among children from birth to age 10 years in Los Angeles County, California (United States). Cases were ascertained through a population-based tumor registry from 1980 to 1987. Controls were drawn from friends and by random-digit dialing. Interviews were obtained from 232 cases and 232 controls. Food items of principal interest were: breakfast meats (bacon, sausage, ham); luncheon meats (salami, pastrami, lunch meat, corned beef, bologna); hot dogs; oranges and orange juice; and grapefruit and grapefruit juice. We also asked about intake of apples and apple juice, regular and charcoal broiled meats, milk, coffee, and coke or cola drinks. Usual consumption frequencies were determined for both parents and the child. When the risks were adjusted for each other and other risk factors, the only persistent significant associations were for children's intake of hot dogs (odds ratio [OR] = 9.5, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.6-57.6 for 12 or more hot dogs per month, trend P = 0.01), and fathers' intake of hot dogs (OR = 11.0, CI = 1.2-98.7 for highest intake category, trend P = 0.01). There was no evidence that fruit intake provided protection. While these results are compatible with the experimental animal literature and the hypothesis that human NOC intake is associated with leukemia risk, given potential biases in the data, further study of this hypothesis with more focused and comprehensive epidemiologic studies is warranted.

  4. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in flatfishes from the Southern California, USA, Bight

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, K.; Allen, M.J.

    2000-06-01

    Although inputs of chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds to the Southern California Bight (SCB) are presently low, historical deposits represent a source of bioaccumulation potential to sediment-associated fauna. To assess this bioaccumulation potential, 14 chlorinated hydrocarbon classes were measured in livers of three species of flatfish collected from 63 randomly selected sites on the coastal shelf between Point Conception and the United States-Mexico international border. Tissue contamination was widespread throughout the SCB, but was limited to just two chlorinated hydrocarbon classes. Virtually 100% of Pacific sanddab (Citharichthys sordidus) and longfin sanddab (Citharichthys xanthostigma) populations were estimated to be contaminated with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (total DDT = sum of o.p{prime} and p,p{prime} isomers of DDT + dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene [DDE] + dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane [DDD]) and/or polychlorinated biphenyls (total PCBs). Total DDT also contaminated the majority (64%) of the Dover sole (Microstomus pacificus) population in the SCB. Total PCB measurements in tissues of SCB flatfish were dominated by 12 congeners (52, 66, 87, 101, 105, 118, 128, 138, 153, 170, 180, and 187), which averaged 95% of the combined mass of the 27 congeners analyzed. Sediment concentrations accounted for most of the variability observed in tissue concentrations for 8 of these 12 congeners and total PCBs. Normalized sediment concentrations were also significantly correlated to normalized tissue concentrations for total DDT and p,p{prime}-DDE. Tissue concentrations measured in this study from reference areas of the SCB were compared to tissue concentrations measured form reference areas in studies conducted in 1977 and 1985. Total DDT and total PCB liver concentrations were found to have decreased one to two orders of magnitude in pacific and longfin sanddabs between 1985 and 1994. Total DDT and total PCB liver concentrations decreased 5- to 35-fold in

  5. Broadband seismological observations at The Geysers geothermal area, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Gritto, Roland; Haberland, Christian; Hartline, Craig

    2013-04-01

    The understanding of structure and dynamics of geothermal reservoirs for geothermal exploration and sustainable use of the resource requires an assessment using a multidisciplinary approach. The Geysers geothermal reservoir in northern California is the largest producing geothermal field in the world and has been exploited for over 50 years. Among other geophysical surveys, numerous seismic studies have been conducted based on data acquired by the LBNL seismic monitoring network over the past 20 years. However, thus far, no continuous seismic data have been recorded at the Geysers, which prevents detailed continuous monitoring in relation to reservoir operation. In February 2012, we deployed a temporary network of 33 broadband seismic stations, including Guralp and Trillium sensors (0.008 - 100 Hz). At present the network is still in operation. Twenty-six stations are located within the perimeter of the geothermal reservoir, while 7 are located on a perimeter around the reservoir at greater distances. While the recordings of larger magnitude events (M>3.5) may be saturated on the local stations, the outer stations are intended to record these events without interruption. We present analyses of a larger magnitude event (M~3.5) as well as correlations of continuous observations to geothermal operations. Thanks to the high density of instrumentation and the high dynamic range of the broadband sensors, smaller events (microseismicity) can be detected more easily, allowing for better precision in locations and more accuracy in the determination of magnitudes. The increased dynamic range offers an important improvement in the analysis of seismicity as the majority of events at The Geysers have magnitudes of M<2.0.

  6. California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) have lower chlorinated hydrocarbon contents in northern Baja California, México, than in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Ligeia; Heckel, Gisela; Camacho-Ibar, Víctor F; Schramm, Yolanda

    2006-07-01

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) were determined in blubber samples of 18 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus californianus) that stranded dead along Todos Santos Bay, Ensenada, Baja California, México, January 2000-November 2001. Summation operatorDDTs were the dominant group (geometric mean 3.8 microg/g lipid weight), followed by polychlorinated biphenyls ( summation operatorPCBs, 2.96 microg/g), chlordanes (0.12 microg/g) and hexachlorocyclohexanes (0.06 microg/g). The summation operatorDDTs/ summation operatorPCBs ratio was 1.3. We found CH levels more than one order of magnitude lower than those reported for California sea lion samples collected along the California coast, USA, during the same period as our study. This sharp north-south gradient suggests that Z. californianus stranded in Ensenada (most of them males) would probably have foraged during the summer near rookeries 500-1000 km south of Ensenada and the rest of the year migrate northwards, foraging along the Baja California peninsula, including Ensenada, and probably farther north.

  7. Earthquakes, Tsunamis, and Storms Recorded at Crescent City, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelsey, H. M.; Hemphill-Haley, E.; Loofbourrow, C.; Caldwell, D. J.; Graehl, N. A.; Robinson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Stratigraphic evidence for coseismic land-level change, tsunamis, and storms is found beneath freshwater marshes in coastal northern California at Crescent City (CC). Previous studies at CC have focused on tsunamis, including the 1964 farfield tsunami from the Alaska earthquake, and nearfield tsunamis from earthquakes in the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ). In addition to new data on tsunami inundation and coseismic land-level change, evidence for deposition by large storms shows another significant coastal hazard for the area. Our results are from three freshwater wetland sites at CC: Marhoffer Creek, Elk Creek, and Sand Mine. Marhoffer Creek marsh is adjacent to the coast about 5 km north of CC, and at an elevation of > 3.4 m above NAVD88 (>1 m above highest tides). C-14 and diatom data show it has been a freshwater wetland for at least the past 1,800 yr. We identify tsunami deposits associated with two CSZ earthquakes (1700 C.E. and 1,650 yr BP) at Marhoffer Creek. Diatom data show that coseismic subsidence accompanied the 1700 C.E. earthquake; the tsunami deposit from that event extends 550 m inland from the beach. Cs-137 data show that thin sand layers about 70 m from the beach and 20 cm below the marsh surface were deposited by the farfield tsunami in 1964. Intercalated between the 1964 and 1700 tsunami deposits, and extending as far inland as the 1964 deposit, are storm deposits consisting of discontinuous layers of sand and detrital peat. The deposits are found in an interval about 0.5 m thick, and are perched at elevations above the highest winter tides. We surmise that at least some of these deposits record the catastrophic ARkStorm of 1861-1862. At Elk Creek wetland, diatom data confirm coseismic subsidence in 1700 in addition to tsunami deposition. The 1964 tsunami deposit is thin and found only proximal to the Elk Creek channel. At Sand Mine marsh, association with coseismic subsidence is used to differentiate CSZ tsunamis in a complex ~100 m wide

  8. Hydro-economic analysis of groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture in California's Central Valley, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medellín-Azuara, Josué; MacEwan, Duncan; Howitt, Richard E.; Koruakos, George; Dogrul, Emin C.; Brush, Charles F.; Kadir, Tariq N.; Harter, Thomas; Melton, Forrest; Lund, Jay R.

    2015-09-01

    As in many places, groundwater in California (USA) is the major alternative water source for agriculture during drought, so groundwater's availability will drive some inevitable changes in the state's water management. Currently, agricultural, environmental, and urban uses compete for groundwater, resulting in substantial overdraft in dry years with lowering of water tables, which in turn increases pumping costs and reduces groundwater pumping capacity. In this study, SWAP (an economic model of agricultural production and water use in California) and C2VISim (the California Department of Water Resources groundwater model for California's Central Valley) are connected. This paper examines the economic costs of pumping replacement groundwater during drought and the potential loss of pumping capacity as groundwater levels drop. A scenario of three additional drought years continuing from 2014 show lower water tables in California's Central Valley and loss of pumping capacity. Places without access to groundwater and with uncertain surface-water deliveries during drought are the most economically vulnerable in terms of crop revenues, employment and household income. This is particularly true for Tulare Lake Basin, which relies heavily on water imported from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Remote-sensing estimates of idle agricultural land between 2012 and 2014 confirm this finding. Results also point to the potential of a portfolio approach for agriculture, in which crop mixing and conservation practices have substantial roles.

  9. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Vail Lake Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  10. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch and Poomacha Fire Perimeters, Mesa Grande Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  11. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ammo Fire Perimeter, San Onofre Bluff Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  12. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ammo Fire Perimeter, San Clemente Quadrangle, Orange and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  13. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Temecula Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  14. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Ammo Fire Perimeter, Las Pulgas Canyon Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  15. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, San Vicente Reservoir Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  16. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch and Poomacha Fire Perimeters, Rodriguez Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  17. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, Rancho Santa Fe Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  18. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Poomacha Fire Perimeter, Pechanga Quadrangle, Riverside and San Diego Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  19. Preliminary Image Map of the 2007 Witch Fire Perimeter, El Cajon Mountain Quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Perry S.; Scratch, Wendy S.; Bias, Gaylord W.; Stander, Gregory B.; Sexton, Jenne L.; Krawczak, Bridgette J.

    2008-01-01

    In the fall of 2007, wildfires burned out of control in southern California. The extent of these fires encompassed large geographic areas that included a variety of landscapes from urban to wilderness. The U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) is currently (2008) developing a quadrangle-based 1:24,000-scale image map product. One of the concepts behind the image map product is to provide an updated map in electronic format to assist with emergency response. This image map is one of 55 preliminary image map quadrangles covering the areas burned by the southern California wildfires. Each map is a layered, geo-registered Portable Document Format (.pdf) file. For more information about the layered geo-registered .pdf, see the readme file (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_Agua_Dulce_of2008-1029_README.txt). To view the areas affected and the quadrangles mapped in this preliminary project, see the map index (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2008/1029/downloads/CA_of2008_1029-1083_index.pdf) provided with this report.

  20. San Diego's High School Dropout Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James C.

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights San Diego's dropout problem and how much it's costing the city and the state. Most San Diegans do not realize the enormous impact high school dropouts on their city. The California Dropout Research Project, located at the University of California at Santa Barbara, has estimated the lifetime cost of one class or cohort of…

  1. San Diego's High School Dropout Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James C.

    2012-01-01

    This article highlights San Diego's dropout problem and how much it's costing the city and the state. Most San Diegans do not realize the enormous impact high school dropouts on their city. The California Dropout Research Project, located at the University of California at Santa Barbara, has estimated the lifetime cost of one class or cohort of…

  2. Monitoring avian productivity and survivorship (MAPS) 5-year summary, Naval Outlying Landing Field, Imperial Beach, southwestern San Diego County, California, 2009-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynn, Suellen; Madden, Melanie C.; Houston, Alexandra; Kus, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    During 2009–13, a Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) banding station was operated at the Naval Outlying Landing Field (NOLF), Imperial Beach, in southwestern San Diego County, California. The station was established as part of a long-term monitoring program of Neotropical migratory bird populations on NOLF and helps Naval Base Coronado (NOLF is a component) meet the goals and objectives of Department of Defense Partners in Flight program and the Birds and Migratory Birds Management Strategies of the Naval Base Coronado Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan. During 2009–13, captures averaged 644 ±155 per year. Fifty-seven species were captured, of which 44 are Neotropical migratory species and 33 breed at the MAPS station. Twenty-two sensitive species were detected, including Least Bell’s Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus), Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) and Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia). Local population trends varied among species and years, as did annual productivity (number of young per adult). We found no significant relationship between productivity and the observed population size in the subsequent year for any species, nor did we find an association between productivity and precipitation for the current bio-year. Similarly, survivorship varied across species and years, and there was no obvious relationship between adult survivorship and observed population size for any species except Wrentit (Chamaea fasciata), for which the relationship was positive. Adult survivorship was unrelated to precipitation at the MAPS station. Additional years of data will be required to generate sample sizes adequate for more rigorous analyses of survivorship and productivity as predictors of population growth.

  3. Adolescents' Self-Reported Recall of Anticipatory Guidance Provided During Well-Visits at Nine Medical Clinics in San Diego, California, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Peddecord, K Michael; Wang, Wendy; Wang, Lawrence; Ralston, Kimberly; Ly, Evelyn; Friedman, Lawrence; Curtis, C Robinette; Sawyer, Mark H

    2016-03-01

    Anticipatory guidance (AG) is recommended for adolescent well care. AG recall is important in the event sequence that might lead to behavioral change, reduced health risk, and improved health. We assessed factors influencing adolescents' self-reported recall of specific AG topics. Through convenience sampling of nine clinics in San Diego, California, 872 adolescents (429 aged 11-13 years; 443 aged 14-17 years) who had received well visits completed standardized surveys between 2009 and 2011. Adolescents were asked to report recall of either 17 or 23 age-appropriate AG topics that were analyzed in five categories (health maintenance; social/emotional, safety/violence; smoking/substance abuse, and puberty/sexual health); a summary score for all categories was developed. Summary scores' associations with demographic variables, visit characteristics (including having time without parents present [private time]), clinic procedures, and lead physician attitudes were assessed. AG recall was independently associated with adolescents having private time with clinicians, completing previsit questionnaires, reporting the well visit was helpful, and the well visit lasting at least 10 minutes. Higher summary recall scores were observed among adolescents who received care in clinics providing AG at both sick and well visits and having policies encouraging private time. Clinic electronic medical record use for AG prompts was associated with recall of fewer topics. To increase adolescents' AG recall and potentially foster behavior change, our results suggest medical providers should adopt procedures advocated by professional societies, including assuring adolescents receive private time during visits, increasing visit time during well visits, using patient-completed questionnaires, and providing AG during all visits. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. The impact of evolving current rheology on multi-scale heterogeneity in submarine lobe strata: an example from the Upper Cretaceous Point Loma Formation, San Diego, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlown, A.; Mohrig, D. C.; Perillo, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing recognition of transitional flow deposits in submarine fans has shown that the evolution of flow rheology in sediment-gravity currents can have a significant impact on the heterogeneity of deepwater sediment accumulations. Sea-cliff exposure of the Cretaceous Point Loma Formation in San Diego, California, provides a unique opportunity to document the internal variability and spatial distribution of thin, fine-grained event beds. Upper portions of beds which commonly appear as featureless mud in exposures of typical quality are revealed as thin, clast-rich debrites in areas where sea cliffs are polished by waves. The ubiquity of these deposits in distal lobe strata suggests complex rheological evolution for nearly all currents that were able to run out to lobe margins. Here we supplement qualitative outcrop characterization with statistical analysis to quantify relationships between deposit thickness, grain size, and the spatial distribution of sedimentary facies. Intervals dominated by transitional flow deposits are shown to occur vertically near the base of coarsening-upward successions and laterally toward lobe margins, reflecting a combination of dynamic processes during individual events and the spatial distribution of consecutive deposits. We show that the ability to distinguish patterns of bed-scale variability reflecting flow evolution from patterns associated with larger-scale processes, such as distributary channel avulsion and compensational stacking, is critical if one is to accurately model heterogeneity within submarine fan systems. Furthermore, the observation that thin, fine-grained debrites can be nearly impossible to distinguish from featureless mud intervals unless exceptionally well-exposed may cast doubt on existing interpretations where outcrop quality is less than remarkable.

  5. Toward meeting the challenge of physician competence assessment: the University of California, San Diego Physician Assessment and Clinical Education (PACE) Program.

    PubMed

    Norcross, William A; Henzel, Thomas R; Freeman, Karen; Milner-Mares, Jane; Hawkins, Richard E

    2009-08-01

    Physician competence and performance problems contribute to medical errors and substandard health care quality. Assessment of the clinical competence of practicing physicians, however, is challenging. Although physician competence assessment undoubtedly does take place at the local level (e.g., hospital, medical group), it is difficult to objectively assess a partner, colleague, or friend. Moreover, the methodologies used and the outcomes are necessarily veiled by peer review statutes. Consequently, there is a need for regional or national assessment centers with the knowledge, skill, and experience to perform clinical competence assessments on individual physicians and provide or direct remediation, when appropriate. The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Physician Assessment and Clinical Education (PACE) Program was founded at the UCSD School of Medicine in 1996 for this purpose. From inception in 1996 through the first quarter of 2009, 867 physicians have participated in the UCSD PACE Program. The PACE Program is divided into two components. Phase I includes two days of multilevel, multimodal testing, and Phase II is a five-day, preceptor-based formative assessment program taking place in the residency program of the physician's specialty. From July 2002 through December 2005, a study of 298 physician participants of the UCSD PACE Program was conducted.The future of the comprehensive assessment of practicing physicians depends on (1) development and standardization of instruments, techniques, and procedures for measuring competence and performance, including in-practice measures, (2) collaborative networking of assessment programs, (3) cost control, and (4) continued development of remedial measures that correspond to assessment findings.

  6. Bartonella quintana in body lice and head lice from homeless persons, San Francisco, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Denise L; Kabeya, Hidenori; Henn, Jennifer; Kramer, Vicki L; Kosoy, Michael Y

    2009-06-01

    Bartonella quintana is a bacterium that causes trench fever in humans. Past reports have shown Bartonella spp. infections in homeless populations in San Francisco, California, USA. The California Department of Public Health in collaboration with San Francisco Project Homeless Connect initiated a program in 2007 to collect lice from the homeless to test for B. quintana and to educate the homeless and their caregivers on prevention and control of louse-borne disease. During 2007-2008, 33.3% of body lice-infested persons and 25% of head lice-infested persons had lice pools infected with B. quintana strain Fuller. Further work is needed to examine how homeless persons acquire lice and determine the risk for illness to persons infested with B. quintana-infected lice.

  7. Proceedings of DoD Database Colloquium, Emerging Technology for Database Interoperability and Data Administration, Held in San Diego, California, 28-30 August 1995.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-08-30

    This is the proceedings from the DoD database colloquium 󈨣. The theme of the colloquium was ’ Emerging Technology for Database Interoperability and Data Administration’. It was held August 28-30, 1995, in San Diego, Ca.

  8. Canine demodicosis: a retrospective study of a veterinary hospital population in California, USA (2000-2016).

    PubMed

    Bowden, Daniel G; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Kissel, Marguerite B; Baron, Jerome N; White, Stephen D

    2017-09-03

    Demodex spp. are cutaneous mites that cause clinical disease when present in increased numbers. There is an association in some dogs with underlying systemic disease or immunosuppressive medications. Retrospective study to document breed predisposition, identify any concurrent diseases or underlying immunosuppressive conditions, and to determine the frequency of demodicosis recurrence after treatment completion. There were 431 dogs with demodicosis presented to a veterinary teaching hospital in California, USA, from 2000 to 2016. Inclusion in this study required a diagnosis of demodicosis based on direct demonstration of the mite. Records were reviewed for signalment, disease history, potential underlying aetiologies, diagnosed concurrent diseases, medications and demodicosis treatment. Analyses were performed to evaluate for potential breed predispositions and because of the large number of dogs with allergic dermatoses, analyses for this diagnosis as a disease associated with demodicosis was also performed. E-mailed surveys and follow-up telephone calls were used to assess for information about disease recurrence. The pit bull terrier group and West Highland white terrier, based on calculated odds ratio, were breeds predisposed to developing demodicosis. For dogs with demodicosis, allergic dermatoses was an associated disease. Relapse or recurrence of disease after treatment was uncommon, affecting 11% of the dogs with long-term follow-up. This study identified, in dogs attending the institution based in California, USA, breed predilections for canine demodicosis and associated concomitant diseases. It also revealed a low occurrence of disease relapse, recurrence or persistence. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  9. Rates and Risk Factors for Coccidioidomycosis among Prison Inmates, California, USA, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Kimberley D.; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C.

    2015-01-01

    In California, coccidioidomycosis is a disease acquired by inhaling spores of Coccidioides immitis, a fungus found in certain arid regions, including the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA, where 8 state prisons are located. During 2011, we reviewed coccidioidomycosis rates at 2 of the prisons that consistently report >80% of California’s inmate cases and determined inmate risk factors for primary, severe (defined as pulmonary coccidioidomycosis requiring >10 hospital days), and disseminated coccidioidomycosis (defined by hospital discharge International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision code). Inmates of African American ethnicity who were >40 years of age were at significantly higher risk for primary coccidioidomycosis than their white counterparts (odds ratio = 2.0, 95% CI 1.5–2.8). Diabetes was a risk factor for severe pulmonary coccidioidomycosis, and black race a risk factor for disseminated disease. These findings contributed to a court decision mandating exclusion of black inmates and inmates with diabetes from the 2 California prisons with the highest rates of coccidioidomycosis. PMID:25533149

  10. California Fires

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wildfires Rage in Southern California     ... Image Large plumes of smoke rising from devastating wildfires burning near Los Angeles and San Diego on Sunday, October 26, 2003, ... at JPL October 26, 2003 - Smoke from wildfires near Los Angeles and San Diego. project:  MISR ...

  11. Water- and Air-Quality Monitoring of Sweetwater Reservoir Watershed, San Diego County, California - Phase One Results Continued, 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Foreman, William T.; Morita, Andrew; Majewski, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sweetwater Authority, began a study to monitor water, air, and sediment at the Sweetwater and Loveland Reservoirs in San Diego County, California. The study includes regular sampling of water and air at Sweetwater Reservoir for chemical constituents, including volatile organic compounds (VOC), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and major and trace elements. The purpose of this study is to monitor changes in contaminant composition and concentration during the construction and operation of State Route 125. To accomplish this, the study was divided into two phases. Phase One sampling (water years 1998-2004) determined baseline conditions for the detection frequency and the concentrations of target compounds in air and water. Phase Two sampling (starting water year 2005) continues at selected monitoring sites during and after construction of State Route 125 to assess the chemical impact this roadway alignment may have on water quality in the reservoir. Water samples were collected for VOCs and pesticides at Loveland Reservoir during Phase One and will be collected during Phase Two for comparison purposes. Air samples collected to monitor changes in VOCs, PAHs, and pesticides were analyzed by adapting methods used to analyze water samples. Bed-sediment samples have been and will be collected three times during the study; at the beginning of Phase One, at the start of Phase Two, and near the end of the study. In addition to the ongoing data collection, several special studies were initiated to assess the occurrence of specific chemicals of concern, such as trace metals, anthropogenic indicator compounds, and pharmaceuticals. This report describes the study design, and the sampling and analytical methods, and presents data from water and air samples collected during the fourth and fifth years of Phase One of the study (October 2001 to September 2003). Data collected during the first three

  12. Water- and air-quality monitoring of the Sweetwater Reservoir Watershed, San Diego County, California - Phase One results, continued, 2001-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Foreman, William T.; Morita, Andrew; Majewski, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Sweetwater Authority, began a study to monitor water, air, and sediment at the Sweetwater and Loveland Reservoirs in San Diego County, California. The study includes regular sampling of water and air at Sweetwater Reservoir for chemical constituents, including volatile organic compounds (VOC), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and major and trace elements. The purpose of this study is to monitor changes in contaminant composition and concentration during the construction and operation of State Route 125. To accomplish this, the study was divided into two phases. Phase One sampling (water years 1998–2004) determined baseline conditions for the detection frequency and the concentrations of target compounds in air and water. Phase Two sampling (starting water year 2005) continues at selected monitoring sites during and after construction of State Route 125 to assess the chemical impact this roadway alignment may have on water quality in the reservoir. Water samples were collected for VOCs and pesticides at Loveland Reservoir during Phase One and will be collected during Phase Two for comparison purposes. Air samples collected to monitor changes in VOCs, PAHs, and pesticides were analyzed by adapting methods used to analyze water samples. Bed-sediment samples have been and will be collected three times during the study; at the beginning of Phase One, at the start of Phase Two, and near the end of the study. In addition to the ongoing data collection, several special studies were initiated to assess the occurrence of specific chemicals of concern, such as trace metals, anthropogenic indicator compounds, and pharmaceuticals. This report describes the study design, and the sampling and analytical methods, and presents data from water and air samples collected during the fourth and fifth years of Phase One of the study (October 2001 to September 2003). Data collected during the first three

  13. Changes in population attitudes about where smoking should not be allowed: California versus the rest of the USA.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, E A; Lee, L; Pierce, J P

    2004-03-01

    The decade long California Tobacco Control Program is unique to the nation in its duration, emphasis, and level of funding. Programme emphasis is on changing social norms about smoking as a means to discourage smoking and thus reduce the harmful health effects of tobacco to the population. Data from the 1992-93, 1995-96, and 1998-99 Tobacco Use Supplements to the national Current Population Survey (n > 175 000 each period) were used to examine changes in norms regarding where smoking should "not be allowed at all" in both California and in the rest of the USA. Venues queried were restaurants, hospitals, work areas, bars, indoor sports venues, and indoor shopping malls. There were substantial increases in the percentages of the adult population (18+ years) stating that smoking should not be allowed in the venues queried in California by 1998-99 compared to 1992-93; only modest increases were observed in the rest of the USA. In fact, for most venues, the percentages for the rest of the USA were lower in 1998-99 than in California in 1992-93. Further, the percentage increase over this period in respondents stating that smoking should not be allowed in four or more of the six venues was 30% in California and 23% in the rest of the USA. The most dramatic percentage increase in California occurred among current smokers (93%). A strong, comprehensive tobacco control programme such as California's can influence population norms, including those of smokers, with respect to where smoking should not be allowed.

  14. The San Diego State University Liberal Studies Assessment Portfolio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeder, Phoebe

    The Liberal Studies Assessment Portfolio program was instituted at San Diego State University in July 1992 in response to California's requirement that prospective elementary school teachers demonstrate subject matter competency. Since many liberal studies majors transfer to San Diego State University at the beginning of their junior year, most of…

  15. From Blueprint to Reality: San Diego's Education Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Julian R.; Zau, Andrew C.; King, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    In 2000, the Public Policy of Institute of California entered into an agreement with the San Diego Unified School District to provide the research and financial support to collect, format, and analyze student, teacher, and classroom data needed to create an accurate portrait of what affects student achievement in San Diego. This report is the…

  16. Monitoring breeding and migration of neotropical migratory birds at Point Loma, San Diego County, California, 5-year summary, 2011–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynn, Suellen; Madden, Melanie C.; Kus, Barbara E.

    2017-04-27

    Executive SummaryWe operated a bird banding station on the Point Loma peninsula in western San Diego County, California, during spring and summer from 2011 to 2015. The station was established in 2010 as part of a long-term monitoring program for neotropical migratory birds during spring migration and for breeding birds as part of the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program.During spring migration (April and May), 2011–15, we captured 1,760 individual birds of 54 species, 91 percent (1,595) of which were newly banded, fewer than 1 percent (3) of which were recaptures that were banded in previous years, and 9 percent (143 hummingbirds, 2 hawks, and 17 other birds) of which we released unbanded. We observed an additional 22 species that were not captured. Thirty-four individuals were captured more than once. Bird capture rate averaged 0.49 ± 0.07 captures per net-hour (range 0.41–0.56). Species richness per day averaged 6.87 ± 0.33. Cardellina pusilla (Wilson’s warbler) was the most abundant spring migrant captured, followed by Empidonax difficilis (Pacific-slope flycatcher), Vireo gilvus (warbling vireo), Zonotrichia leucophrys (white-crowned sparrow), and Selasphorus rufus (rufous hummingbird). Captures of white-crowned sparrow decreased, and captures of Pacific-slope flycatcher increased, over the 5 years of our study. Fifty-six percent of known-sex individuals were male and 44 percent were female. The peak number of new species arriving per day ranged from April 1 (2013-six species) to April 16 (2012-five species). A significant correlation was determined between the number of migrants captured each day per net-hour and the density of echoes on the Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) images across all 5 years, and in each year except 2014. NEXRAD radar imagery appears to be a useful tool for detecting pulses in migration.Our results indicate that Point Loma provides stopover habitat during migration for 76 migratory species, including 20

  17. Climate, rain shadow, and human-use influences on fire regimes in the eastern Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    Treesearch

    M.P. North; K.M. van de Water; S.L. Stephens; B.M. Collins

    2009-01-01

    There have been few fire history studies of eastern Sierra Nevada forests in California, USA, where a steep elevation gradient, rain shadow conditions, and forest stand isolation may produce different fire regimes than those found on the range’s western slope. We investigated historic fire regimes and potential climate influences on four forest types ranging in...

  18. Temporal and spatial variation of atmospherically deposited organic contaminants at high elevation in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Atmospherically deposited organic contaminants in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, USA, have exceeded some thresholds of concern, yet the distributions of contaminants in the mountains are not well known and there is little knowledge of temporal variation. The present study, (1) evaluated...

  19. 76 FR 15216 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA... Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California, by providing a common description of all... any cruise ship that is located within the San Diego port area landward of the sea buoys bounding the...

  20. Hantavirus Infections among Overnight Visitors to Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Jonathan J.; Fritz, Curtis L.; Knust, Barbara; Buttke, Danielle; Enge, Barryett; Novak, Mark G.; Kramer, Vicki; Osadebe, Lynda; Messenger, Sharon; Albariño, César G.; Ströher, Ute; Niemela, Michael; Amman, Brian R.; Wong, David; Manning, Craig R.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Xia, Dongxiang; Watt, James P.

    2014-01-01

    In summer 2012, an outbreak of hantavirus infections occurred among overnight visitors to Yosemite National Park in California, USA. An investigation encompassing clinical, epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental factors identified 10 cases among residents of 3 states. Eight case-patients experienced hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, of whom 5 required intensive care with ventilatory support and 3 died. Staying overnight in a signature tent cabin (9 case-patients) was significantly associated with becoming infected with hantavirus (p<0.001). Rodent nests and tunnels were observed in the foam insulation of the cabin walls. Rodent trapping in the implicated area resulted in high trap success rate (51%), and antibodies reactive to Sin Nombre virus were detected in 10 (14%) of 73 captured deer mice. All signature tent cabins were closed and subsequently dismantled. Continuous public awareness and rodent control and exclusion are key measures in minimizing the risk for hantavirus infection in areas inhabited by deer mice. PMID:24565589

  1. Investigation of and Response to 2 Plague Cases, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Danforth, Mary; Novak, Mark; Petersen, Jeannine; Mead, Paul; Kingry, Luke; Weinburke, Matthew; Buttke, Danielle; Hacker, Gregory; Tucker, James; Niemela, Michael; Jackson, Bryan; Padgett, Kerry; Liebman, Kelly; Vugia, Duc

    2016-01-01

    In August 2015, plague was diagnosed for 2 persons who had visited Yosemite National Park in California, USA. One case was septicemic and the other bubonic. Subsequent environmental investigation identified probable locations of exposure for each patient and evidence of epizootic plague in other areas of the park. Transmission of Yersinia pestis was detected by testing rodent serum, fleas, and rodent carcasses. The environmental investigation and whole-genome multilocus sequence typing of Y. pestis isolates from the patients and environmental samples indicated that the patients had been exposed in different locations and that at least 2 distinct strains of Y. pestis were circulating among vector–host populations in the area. Public education efforts and insecticide applications in select areas to control rodent fleas probably reduced the risk for plague transmission to park visitors and staff. PMID:27870634

  2. Hantavirus infections among overnight visitors to Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2012.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Jonathan J; Fritz, Curtis L; Knust, Barbara; Buttke, Danielle; Enge, Barryett; Novak, Mark G; Kramer, Vicki; Osadebe, Lynda; Messenger, Sharon; Albariño, César G; Ströher, Ute; Niemela, Michael; Amman, Brian R; Wong, David; Manning, Craig R; Nichol, Stuart T; Rollin, Pierre E; Xia, Dongxiang; Watt, James P; Vugia, Duc J

    2014-03-01

    In summer 2012, an outbreak of hantavirus infections occurred among overnight visitors to Yosemite National Park in California, USA. An investigation encompassing clinical, epidemiologic, laboratory, and environmental factors identified 10 cases among residents of 3 states. Eight case-patients experienced hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, of whom 5 required intensive care with ventilatory support and 3 died. Staying overnight in a signature tent cabin (9 case-patients) was significantly associated with becoming infected with hantavirus (p<0.001). Rodent nests and tunnels were observed in the foam insulation of the cabin walls. Rodent trapping in the implicated area resulted in high trap success rate (51%), and antibodies reactive to Sin Nombre virus were detected in 10 (14%) of 73 captured deer mice. All signature tent cabins were closed and subsequently dismantled. Continuous public awareness and rodent control and exclusion are key measures in minimizing the risk for hantavirus infection in areas inhabited by deer mice.

  3. Liquefaction caused by the 2009 Olancha, California (USA), M5.2 earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Jayko, A.S.; Hauksson, E.; Fletcher, J.P.B.; Noce, T.E.; Bennett, M.J.; Dietel, C.M.; Hudnut, K.W.

    2010-01-01

    The October 3, 2009 (01:16:00 UTC), Olancha M5.2 earthquake caused extensive liquefaction as well as permanent horizontal ground deformation within a 1.2 km2area earthquake in Owens Valley in eastern California (USA). Such liquefaction is rarely observed during earthquakes of M ≤ 5.2. We conclude that subsurface conditions, not unusual ground motion, were the primary factors contributing to the liquefaction. The liquefaction occurred in very liquefiable sands at shallow depth (< 2 m) in an area where the water table was near the land surface. Our investigation is relevant to both geotechnical engineering and geology. The standard engineering method for assessing liquefaction potential, the Seed–Idriss simplified procedure, successfully predicted the liquefaction despite the small earthquake magnitude. The field observations of liquefaction effects highlight a need for caution by earthquake geologists when inferring prehistoric earthquake magnitudes from paleoliquefaction features because small magnitude events may cause such features.

  4. Tick-borne Relapsing Fever and Borrelia hermsii, Los Angeles County, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Raffel, Sandra J.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Webster, Larry S.; Marques, Adriana R.; Spano, Robyn; Rood, Michael; Burns, Joe; Hu, Renjie

    2009-01-01

    The primary cause of tick-borne relapsing fever in western North America is Borrelia hermsii, a rodent-associated spirochete transmitted by the fast-feeding soft tick Ornithodoros hermsi. We describe a patient who had an illness consistent with relapsing fever after exposure in the mountains near Los Angeles, California, USA. The patient’s convalescent-phase serum was seropositive for B. hermsii but negative for several other vector-borne bacterial pathogens. Investigations at the exposure site showed the presence of O. hermsi ticks infected with B. hermsii and the presence of rodents that were seropositive for the spirochete. We determined that this tick-borne disease is endemic to the San Gabriel Mountains near the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area. PMID:19624916

  5. Earliest record of the invasive Foraminifera Trochammina hadai in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGann, Mary

    2014-01-01

    In 1995, Trochammina hadai, a benthic Foraminifera prevalent in Japanese estuaries, was found in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Subsequent field investigations determined that the species was also present in nearly all of the major ports and estuaries along the western United States. Because of its widespread colonization, it is of interest to determine when T. hadai first appeared as an invasive in the coastal regions of the North Pacific. In San Francisco Bay, the species was not found in 404 surface samples collected between 1930 and 1981. In 1983, however, a grab sediment sample from one of four sites in the southern portion of the bay contained T. hadai. This site was the most northern of the four and contained 12 specimens of the invasive, comprising 1.5% of the assemblage. This is the earliest appearance on record of T. hadai in San Francisco Bay.

  6. Investigation of and Response to 2 Plague Cases, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2015.

    PubMed

    Danforth, Mary; Novak, Mark; Petersen, Jeannine; Mead, Paul; Kingry, Luke; Weinburke, Matthew; Buttke, Danielle; Hacker, Gregory; Tucker, James; Niemela, Michael; Jackson, Bryan; Padgett, Kerry; Liebman, Kelly; Vugia, Duc; Kramer, Vicki

    2016-12-01

    In August 2015, plague was diagnosed for 2 persons who had visited Yosemite National Park in California, USA. One case was septicemic and the other bubonic. Subsequent environmental investigation identified probable locations of exposure for each patient and evidence of epizootic plague in other areas of the park. Transmission of Yersinia pestis was detected by testing rodent serum, fleas, and rodent carcasses. The environmental investigation and whole-genome multilocus sequence typing of Y. pestis isolates from the patients and environmental samples indicated that the patients had been exposed in different locations and that at least 2 distinct strains of Y. pestis were circulating among vector-host populations in the area. Public education efforts and insecticide applications in select areas to control rodent fleas probably reduced the risk for plague transmission to park visitors and staff.

  7. Burn severity and non-native species in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaczynski, Kristen M.; Beatty, Susan W.; van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Marshall, Kristin N.

    2011-01-01

    We examined non-native species density three years after the Tuolumne Fire, which burned 1540 ha in upper montane forest in California, USA. We sampled 60 plots, stratified by burn severity (low, moderate, or high severity) and landscape position (lowland or upland). We detected non-native species in 8 of 11 (73 %) of high severity lowland sites and in 5 of 10 (50 %) of moderate severity lowland sites but, overall, richness and abundance was low. We detected only five non-native species, of which bull thistle (Cirsium vulgare [Savi] Ten.) was the most common. Although non-native abundance is currently low, we recommend continued low intensity monitoring, especially on high severity burned lowland sites.

  8. Eremidrilus n. gen. (Annelida, Clitellata, Lumbriculidae) and new species from California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fend, S.V.; Rodriguez, P.

    2003-01-01

    A new Nearctic lumbriculid genus, Eremidrilus, includes four new California species (E. elegans, E. coyote, E. ritocsi, and E. felini) plus the new combination of Trichodrilus allegheniensis Cook, 1971 from the eastern U.S.A. Eremidrilus has the Trichodrilus arrangement of reproductive organs, but is distinguished by a filiform proboscis and male pores on folded porophores. A combination of other characters distinguishes most Eremidrilus species from most Trichodrilus species: (i) elongate-tubular thin-walled atria, (ii) posterior vasa deferentia forming a loop in XI, (iii) no posterior blood vessels, (iv) nephridia not present in VII. Spermathecae restricted to the first postatrial segment and laterally displaced spermathecal pores differentiate the western Eremidrilus species from the single eastern species. ?? 2003 NRC.

  9. University of California, San Diego

    Cancer.gov

    Provides trainees with a balanced combination comprehensive cancer biology, engineering, and entrepreneurship didactic training, including cancer researcher, clinical/translational cancer faculty, and practical skills in small business environments.

  10. An Assessment of Climate Change Impacts on Los Angeles (California USA) Hospitals, Wildfires Highest Priority.

    PubMed

    Adelaine, Sabrina A; Sato, Mizuki; Jin, Yufang; Godwin, Hilary

    2017-10-01

    Introduction Although many studies have delineated the variety and magnitude of impacts that climate change is likely to have on health, very little is known about how well hospitals are poised to respond to these impacts. Hypothesis/Problem The hypothesis is that most modern hospitals in urban areas in the United States need to augment their current disaster planning to include climate-related impacts. Using Los Angeles County (California USA) as a case study, historical data for emergency department (ED) visits and projections for extreme-heat events were used to determine how much climate change is likely to increase ED visits by mid-century for each hospital. In addition, historical data about the location of wildfires in Los Angeles County and projections for increased frequency of both wildfires and flooding related to sea-level rise were used to identify which area hospitals will have an increased risk of climate-related wildfires or flooding at mid-century. Only a small fraction of the total number of predicted ED visits at mid-century would likely to be due to climate change. By contrast, a significant portion of hospitals in Los Angeles County are in close proximity to very high fire hazard severity zones (VHFHSZs) and would be at greater risk to wildfire impacts as a result of climate change by mid-century. One hospital in Los Angeles County was anticipated to be at greater risk due to flooding by mid-century as a result of climate-related sea-level rise. This analysis suggests that several Los Angeles County hospitals should focus their climate-change-related planning on building resiliency to wildfires. Adelaine SA , Sato M , Jin Y , Godwin H . An assessment of climate change impacts on Los Angeles (California USA) hospitals, wildfires highest priority. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):556-562.

  11. 78 FR 53243 - Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego... Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The limits of the safety zone...

  12. Using HIV Sequence and Epidemiologic Data to Assess the Effect of Self-referral Testing for Acute HIV Infection on Incident Diagnoses in San Diego, California.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sanjay R; Murrell, Ben; Anderson, Christy M; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Wertheim, Joel O; Young, Jason A; Freitas, Lorri; Richman, Douglas D; Mathews, W Chris; Scheffler, Konrad; Little, Susan J; Smith, Davey M

    2016-07-01

    Because recently infected individuals disproportionately contribute to the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we evaluated the impact of a primary HIV screening program (the Early Test) implemented in San Diego. The Early Test program used combined nucleic acid and serology testing to screen for primary infection targeting local high-risk individuals. Epidemiologic, HIV sequence, and geographic data were obtained from the San Diego County Department of Public Health and the Early Test program. Poisson regression analysis was performed to determine whether the Early Test program was temporally and geographically associated with changes in incident HIV diagnoses. Transmission chains were inferred by phylogenetic analysis of sequence data. Over time, a decrease in incident HIV diagnoses was observed proportional to the number primary HIV infections diagnosed in each San Diego region (P < .001). Molecular network analyses also showed that transmission chains were more likely to terminate in regions where the program was marketed (P = .002). Although, individuals in these zip codes had infection diagnosed earlier (P = .08), they were not treated earlier (P = .83). These findings suggests that early HIV diagnoses by this primary infection screening program probably contributed to the observed decrease in new HIV diagnoses in San Diego, and they support the expansion and evaluation of similar programs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Using HIV Sequence and Epidemiologic Data to Assess the Effect of Self-referral Testing for Acute HIV Infection on Incident Diagnoses in San Diego, California

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Sanjay R.; Murrell, Ben; Anderson, Christy M.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Wertheim, Joel O.; Young, Jason A.; Freitas, Lorri; Richman, Douglas D.; Mathews, W. Chris; Scheffler, Konrad; Little, Susan J.; Smith, Davey M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Because recently infected individuals disproportionately contribute to the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we evaluated the impact of a primary HIV screening program (the Early Test) implemented in San Diego. Methods. The Early Test program used combined nucleic acid and serology testing to screen for primary infection targeting local high-risk individuals. Epidemiologic, HIV sequence, and geographic data were obtained from the San Diego County Department of Public Health and the Early Test program. Poisson regression analysis was performed to determine whether the Early Test program was temporally and geographically associated with changes in incident HIV diagnoses. Transmission chains were inferred by phylogenetic analysis of sequence data. Results. Over time, a decrease in incident HIV diagnoses was observed proportional to the number primary HIV infections diagnosed in each San Diego region (P < .001). Molecular network analyses also showed that transmission chains were more likely to terminate in regions where the program was marketed (P = .002). Although, individuals in these zip codes had infection diagnosed earlier (P = .08), they were not treated earlier (P = .83). Conclusions. These findings suggests that early HIV diagnoses by this primary infection screening program probably contributed to the observed decrease in new HIV diagnoses in San Diego, and they support the expansion and evaluation of similar programs. PMID:27174704

  14. Results of the Multi-Jurisdictional Conference on the Farmworker and Day Laborer Housing Crisis (San Diego, California, February 21, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego City Council, CA.

    In February 1991, policymakers and representatives of resource agencies and nonprofit organizations met to find solutions to a major regional crisis--the lack of housing for farmworkers and day laborers in San Diego County. The region contains about 200 worker camps, usually situated in undeveloped canyons and fields near suburban residential…

  15. Evidence of pesticide impacts in the Santa Maria River watershed, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian S; Phillips, Bryn M; Hunt, John W; Worcester, Karen; Adams, Mary; Kapellas, Nancy; Tjeerdema, Ron S

    2006-04-01

    The Santa Maria River provides significant freshwater and coastal habitat in a semiarid region of central California, USA. We conducted a water and sediment quality assessment consisting of chemical analyses, toxicity tests, toxicity identification evaluations, and macroinvertebrate bioassessments of samples from six stations collected during four surveys conducted between July 2002 and May 2003. Santa Maria River water samples collected downstream of Orcutt Creek (Santa Maria, Santa Barbara County, CA, USA), which conveys agriculture drain water, were acutely toxic to cladocera (Ceriodaphnia dubia), as were samples from Orcutt Creek. Toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs) suggested that toxicity to C. dubia in Orcutt Creek and the Santa Maria River was due to chlorpyrifos. Sediments from these two stations also were acutely toxic to the amphipod Hyalella azteca, a resident invertebrate. The TIEs conducted on sediment suggested that toxicity to amphipods, in part, was due to organophosphate pesticides. Concentrations of chlorpyrifos in pore water sometimes exceeded the 10-d median lethal concentration for H. azteca. Additional TIE and chemical evidence suggested sediment toxicity also partly could be due to pyrethroid pesticides. Relative to an upstream reference station, macroinvertebrate community structure was impacted in Orcutt Creek and in the Santa Maria River downstream of the Creek input. This study suggests that pesticide pollution likely is the cause of ecological damage in the Santa Maria River.

  16. Coccidioidomycosis among Workers Constructing Solar Power Farms, California, USA, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Jason A; Sondermeyer, Gail; Shusterman, Dennis; McNary, Jennifer; Vugia, Duc J; McDowell, Ann; Borenstein, Penny; Gilliss, Debra; Ancock, Benedict; Prudhomme, Janice; Gold, Deborah; Windham, Gayle C; Lee, Lauren; Materna, Barbara L

    2015-11-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is associated with soil-disruptive work in Coccidioides-endemic areas of the southwestern United States. Among 3,572 workers constructing 2 solar power-generating facilities in San Luis Obispo County, California, USA, we identified 44 patients with symptom onset during October 2011-April 2014 (attack rate 1.2 cases/100 workers). Of these 44 patients, 20 resided in California outside San Luis Obispo County and 10 resided in another state; 9 were hospitalized (median 3 days), 34 missed work (median 22 days), and 2 had disseminated disease. Of the 25 patients who frequently performed soil-disruptive work, 6 reported frequent use of respiratory protection. As solar farm construction in Coccidioides-endemic areas increases, additional workers will probably be exposed and infected unless awareness is emphasized and effective exposure reduction measures implemented, including limiting dust generation and providing respiratory protection. Medical providers, including those in non-Coccidioides-endemic areas, should suspect coccidioidomycosis in workers with compatible illness and report cases to their local health department.

  17. Community ecology and disease risk: lizards, squirrels, and the Lyme disease spirochete in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Salkeld, Daniel J; Lane, Robert S

    2010-01-01

    Vector-borne zoonotic diseases are often maintained in complex transmission cycles involving multiple vertebrate hosts and their arthropod vectors. In the state of California, U.S.A., the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, which causes Lyme disease, is transmitted between vertebrate hosts by the western black-legged tick, Ixodes pacificus. Several mammalian species serve as reservoir hosts of the spirochete, but levels of tick infestation, reservoir competence, and Borrelia-infection prevalence vary widely among such hosts. Here, we model the host (lizards, Peromyscus mice, Californian meadow voles, dusky-footed wood rats, and western gray squirrels), vector, and pathogen community of oak woodlands in northwestern California to determine the relative importance of different tick hosts. Observed infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi in host-seeking I. pacificus nymphs was 1.8-5.3%, and our host-community model estimated an infection prevalence of 1.6-2.2%. The western gray squirrel (Sciurus griseus) was the only source of infected nymphs. Lizards, which are refractory to Borrelia infection, are important in feeding subadult ticks but reduce disease risk (nymphal infection prevalence). Species identity is therefore critical in understanding and determining the local disease ecology.

  18. Quantification of pollutants emitted from very large wildland fires in Southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Nicholas E.; Gong, Peng; Scott, Klaus

    This study investigates the efficacy of the first order fire effects model (FOFEM) implemented in a geographic information system for wildland fire emissions estimation. The objective of the study was to quantify the source and composition of smoke and emissions from wildland fires that burned 235,267 ha in Southern California, USA, in October 2003. From inputs of vegetation, fuel model data, weather condition data, and fire perimeters, the model produces estimates of ten pollutant species (10 and 2.5 μm particulates, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, ammonia, nitrous oxide, oxides of nitrogen, sulfur dioxide) from ten fuel categories (duff, litter, woody debris in three size classes, herbs, shrubs, tree regeneration, live branch-wood and live foliage). From the Southern California fires, the model estimated over 5 million metric tons (megagrams) of total pollutant emissions over several days. These emissions include over 457,000 tons of carbon monoxide, over 6 million tons (approximately 6 Tg) of carbon dioxide, and over 46,000 tons of particulates. Fuels that contributed the most mass to the fire emissions were predominantly shrubs and duff.

  19. Quantifying the fire regime distributions for severity in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thode, Andrea E.; van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Miller, Jay D.; Quinn, James F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper quantifies current fire severity distributions for 19 different fire-regime types in Yosemite National Park, California, USA. Landsat Thematic Mapper remote sensing data are used to map burn severity for 99 fires (cumulatively over 97 000 ha) that burned in Yosemite over a 20-year period. These maps are used to quantify the frequency distributions of fire severity by fire-regime type. A classification is created for the resultant distributions and they are discussed within the context of four vegetation zones: the foothill shrub and woodland zone; the lower montane forest zone; the upper montane forest zone and the subalpine forest zone. The severity distributions can form a building block from which to discuss current fire regimes across the Sierra Nevada in California. This work establishes a framework for comparing the effects of current fires on our landscapes with our notions of how fires historically burned, and how current fire severity distributions differ from our desired future conditions. As this process is refined, a new set of information will be available to researchers and land managers to help understand how fire regimes have changed from the past and how we might attempt to manage them in the future.

  20. Application of environmental groundwater tracers at the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, M.A.; Goff, F.; Jewett, D.G.; Reller, G.J.; Bauman, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    Boron, chloride, sulfate, ??D, ??18O, and 3H concentrations in surface water and groundwater samples from the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine (SBMM), California, USA were used to examine geochemical processes and provide constraints on evaporation and groundwater flow. SBMM is an abandoned sulfur and mercury mine with an underlying hydrothermal system, adjacent to Clear Lake, California. Results for non-3H tracers (i.e., boron, chloride, sulfate, ??D, and ??18O) identify contributions from six water types at SBMM. Processes including evaporation, mixing, hydrothermal water input and possible isotopic exchange with hydrothermal gases are also discerned. Tritium data indicate that hydrothermal waters and other deep groundwaters are likely pre-bomb (before ???1952) in age while most other waters were recharged after ???1990. A boron-based steady-state reservoir model of the Herman Impoundment pit lake indicates that 71-79% of its input is from meteoric water with the remainder from hydrothermal contributions. Results for groundwater samples from six shallow wells over a 6-month period for ??D and ??18O suggests that water from Herman Impoundment is diluted another 3% to more than 40% by infiltrating meteoric water, as it leaves the site. Results for this investigation show that environmental tracers are an effective tool to understand the SBMM hydrogeologic regime. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  1. Coccidioidomycosis among Workers Constructing Solar Power Farms, California, USA, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Sondermeyer, Gail; Shusterman, Dennis; McNary, Jennifer; Vugia, Duc J.; McDowell, Ann; Borenstein, Penny; Gilliss, Debra; Ancock, Benedict; Prudhomme, Janice; Gold, Deborah; Windham, Gayle C.; Lee, Lauren; Materna, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is associated with soil-disruptive work in Coccidioides-endemic areas of the southwestern United States. Among 3,572 workers constructing 2 solar power–generating facilities in San Luis Obispo County, California, USA, we identified 44 patients with symptom onset during October 2011–April 2014 (attack rate 1.2 cases/100 workers). Of these 44 patients, 20 resided in California outside San Luis Obispo County and 10 resided in another state; 9 were hospitalized (median 3 days), 34 missed work (median 22 days), and 2 had disseminated disease. Of the 25 patients who frequently performed soil-disruptive work, 6 reported frequent use of respiratory protection. As solar farm construction in Coccidioides-endemic areas increases, additional workers will probably be exposed and infected unless awareness is emphasized and effective exposure reduction measures implemented, including limiting dust generation and providing respiratory protection. Medical providers, including those in non–Coccidioides-endemic areas, should suspect coccidioidomycosis in workers with compatible illness and report cases to their local health department. PMID:26484688

  2. Factors influencing the variation in capture rates of shrews in southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laakkonen, Juha; Fisher, Robert N.; Case, Ted J.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the temporal variation in capture rates of shrewsNotiosorex crawfordi (Coues, 1877) and Sorex ornatus (Merriam, 1895) in 20 sites representing fragmented and continuous habitats in southern California, USA. InN. crawfordi, the temporal variation was significantly correlated with the mean capture rates. Of the 6 landscape variables analyzed (size of the landscape, size of the sample area, altitude, edge, longitude and latitude), sample area was positively correlated with variation in capture rates ofN. crawfordi. InS. ornatus, longitude was negatively correlated with variation in capture rates. Analysis of the effect of precipitation on the short- and long-term capture rates at 2 of the sites showed no correlation between rainfall and capture rates of shrews even though peak number of shrews at both sites were reached during the year of highest amount of rainfall. A key problem confounding capture rates of shrews in southern California is the low overall abundance of both shrew species in all habitats and seasons.

  3. Toxicity of two insecticides to California, USA, anurans and its relevance to declining amphibian populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Fellers, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Contaminants have been associated with population declines of several amphibian species in California (USA). Pesticides from the Central Valley of California are transported by winds into the Sierra Nevada Mountains and precipitate into wet meadows where amphibians breed. The present study examined the chronic toxicity of two of the insecticides most commonly used in the Central Valley and found in the mountains, chlorpyrifos and endosulfan, to larval Pacific treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla) and foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii) and discusses the implications of this toxicity to declining amphibian populations. Larvae were exposed to the pesticides from Gosner stages 25 to 26 through metamorphosis. The estimated median lethal concentration (LC50) for chlorpyrifos was 365 ??g/L in P. regilla and 66.5 ??g/L for R. boylii. Time to metamorphosis increased with concentration of chlorpyrifos in both species, and cholinesterase activity declined with exposure concentration in metamorphs of both species at Gosner stages 42 to 46. For endosulfan, the estimated LC50 was 15.6 ??g/L for P. regilla and 0.55 ??g/L for R. boylii. All R. boylii exposed to concentrations of greater than 0.8 ??g/L died before they entered metamorphosis. Pseudacris regilla remains relatively abundant and is broadly distributed throughout California. In contrast, R. boylii is among the species experiencing severe population declines. The present study adds to the increasing evidence that pesticides are very harmful to amphibians living in areas that are miles from sources of pesticide application. ?? 2009 SETAC.

  4. Landscape-level connectivity in coastal southern California, USA, as assessed through carnivore habitat suitability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Richard D.; Fisher, Robert N.; Crooks, Kevin R.

    2003-01-01

    Although the fragmentation of the natural landscape of coastal southern California, USA, is accelerating, large-scale assessments of regional connectivity are lacking. Because of their large area requirements and long dispersal movements, mammalian carnivores can be effective focal species to use when evaluating landscape-level connectivity. Our goal was to make an initial assessment of the extent of landscape-level connectivity in coastal southern California using mountain lions (Felis concolor [Linnaeus]) and bobcats (Felis rufus [Shreber]) as focal species. We first characterized habitat preferences for mountain lions and bobcats from previously derived habitat relationship models for these species; the resulting maps provided a coarse view of habitat preferences for use at regional scales. We then constructed GIS models to evaluate the disturbance impact of roadways and development, major determinants of carnivore distribution and abundance in the south coast region. Finally, we combined the habitat relationship models with the disturbance impact models to characterize habitat connectivity for mountain lions and bobcats in the ecoregion. Habitat connectivity in the ecoregion appeared higher for bobcats than for mountain lions due in part to higher habitat suitability for bobcats in coastal lowland areas. Our models suggest that much of the key carnivore habitat in the coastal southern California is at risk; over 80% of high suitability habitat and over 90% of medium suitability habitat for carnivores is found in the least protected land management classes. Overall, these models allow for (1) identification of core habitat blocks for carnivores and key landscape connections between core areas, (2) evaluation of the level of protection of these areas, and (3) a regional framework within which to develop and coordinate local management and conservation plans.

  5. Landscape-level Connectivity in Coastal Southern California, USA, as Assessed through Carnivore Habitat Suitability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, R.D.; Fisher, R.N.; Crooks, K.R.

    2003-01-01

    Although the fragmentation of the natural landscape of coastal southern California, USA, is accelerating, large-scale assessments of regional connectivity are lacking. Because of their large area requirements and long dispersal movements, mammalian carnivores can be effective focal species to use when evaluating landscape-level connectivity. Our goal was to make an initial assessment of the extent of landscape-level connectivity in coastal southern California using mountain lions (Felis concolor [Linnaeusl) and bobcats (Felis rufus [Shreber]) as focal species. We first characterized habitat preferences for mountain lions and bobcats from previously derived habitat relationship models for these species; the resulting maps provided a coarse view of habitat preferences for use at regional scales. We then constructed GIS models to evaluate the disturbance impact of roadways and development, major determinants of carnivore distribution and abundance in the south coast region. Finally, we combined the habitat relationship models with the disturbance impact models to characterize habitat connectivity for mountain lions and bobcats in the ecoregion. Habitat connectivity in the ecoregion appeared higher for bobcats than for mountain lions due in part to higher habitat suitability for bobcats in coastal lowland areas. Our models suggest that much of the key carnivore habitat in the coastal southern California is at risk; over 80% of high suitability habitat and over 90% of medium suitability habitat for carnivores is found in the least protected land management classes. Overall, these models allow for (1) identification of core habitat blocks for carnivores and key landscape connections between core areas, (2) evaluation of the level of protection of these areas, and (3) a regional framework within which to develop and coordinate local management and conservation plans.

  6. Final Report for Research Conducted at The Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego from 2/2002 to 8/2003 for ''Aerosol and Cloud-Field Radiative Effects in the Tropical Western Pacific: Analyses and General Circulation Model Parameterizations''

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelmann, A. M.

    2004-01-27

    OAK-B135 Final report from the University of California San Diego for an ongoing research project that was moved to Brookhaven National Laboratory where proposed work will be completed. The research uses measurements made by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to quantify the effects of aerosols and clouds on the Earth's energy balance in the climatically important Tropical Western Pacific.

  7. 77 FR 20379 - San Diego Gas &

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission San Diego Gas & Electric Company v. Sellers of Energy and Ancillary Services Into Markets Operated by the California Independent System Operator Corporation and the...

  8. Observations and Impacts from the 2010 Chilean and 2011 Japanese Tsunamis in California (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rick I.; Admire, Amanda R.; Borrero, Jose C.; Dengler, Lori A.; Legg, Mark R.; Lynett, Patrick; McCrink, Timothy P.; Miller, Kevin M.; Ritchie, Andy; Sterling, Kara; Whitmore, Paul M.

    2013-06-01

    The coast of California was significantly impacted by two recent teletsunami events, one originating off the coast of Chile on February 27, 2010 and the other off Japan on March 11, 2011. These tsunamis caused extensive inundation and damage along the coast of their respective source regions. For the 2010 tsunami, the NOAA West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center issued a state-wide Tsunami Advisory based on forecasted tsunami amplitudes ranging from 0.18 to 1.43 m with the highest amplitudes predicted for central and southern California. For the 2011 tsunami, a Tsunami Warning was issued north of Point Conception and a Tsunami Advisory south of that location, with forecasted amplitudes ranging from 0.3 to 2.5 m, the highest expected for Crescent City. Because both teletsunamis arrived during low tide, the potential for significant inundation of dry land was greatly reduced during both events. However, both events created rapid water-level fluctuations and strong currents within harbors and along beaches, causing extensive damage in a number of harbors and challenging emergency managers in coastal jurisdictions. Field personnel were deployed prior to each tsunami to observe and measure physical effects at the coast. Post-event survey teams and questionnaires were used to gather information from both a physical effects and emergency response perspective. During the 2010 tsunami, a maximum tsunami amplitude of 1.2 m was observed at Pismo Beach, and over 3-million worth of damage to boats and docks occurred in nearly a dozen harbors, most significantly in Santa Cruz, Ventura, Mission Bay, and northern Shelter Island in San Diego Bay. During the 2011 tsunami, the maximum amplitude was measured at 2.47 m in Crescent City Harbor with over 50-million in damage to two dozen harbors. Those most significantly affected were Crescent City, Noyo River, Santa Cruz, Moss Landing, and southern Shelter Island. During both events, people on docks and near the ocean became at risk to

  9. Harry Beal Torrey (1873-1970) of California, USA, and his research on hydroids and other coelenterates.

    PubMed

    Calder, Dale R

    2013-01-10

    Harry Beal Torrey was born on 22 May 1873 in Boston, Massachusetts. Two years later his family moved to Oakland, California. Torrey earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in zoology from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1895 and 1898 respectively, a Ph.D. in zoology from Columbia University in 1903, and an M.D. from the Medical College of Cornell University in 1927. He began his academic career as a marine biologist, investigating taxonomy, reproduction, morphology, development, regeneration, and behaviour of cnidarians of the west coast of the United States, but his research interests soon shifted to experimental biology and endocrinology. He eventually entered the field of medicine, specializing in public health, and served as a physician and hospital administrator. Torrey held academic positions at the University of California, Berkeley (1895-1912), the Marine Biological Association of San Diego (1903-1912), Reed College (1912-1920), the University of Oregon (1920-1926), and Stanford University (1928-1938). Following retirement from academia, he served as Director of the Children's Hospital of the East Bay, Oakland, California, from 1938 to 1942. In retirement, he continued an association with the University of California at Berkeley, near his home. Of 84 publications by him listed herein, 31 dealt with coelenterates. This paper focuses on his early research on coelenterate biology, and especially his contributions to taxonomy of hydroids. He was author or coauthor of six genera and 48 species-group taxa of Cnidaria, and he also described one new species each of Ctenophora and Phoronida. Although he abandoned systematic work early in his career, his most widely cited publication is a taxonomic monograph on hydroids of the west coast of North America, published in 1902. He died, at age 97, on 9 September 1970.

  10. Comparison of Strong Currents and Impacts on the California (USA) Maritime Communities from the 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan Teletsunamis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. I.; Miller, K.; Davenport, C.; Nicolini, T.; Dengler, L.; Admire, A. R.; Synolakis, C.; Barberopoulou, A.; Borrero, J. C.; Lynett, P. J.; Jaffe, B. E.; Curtis, E.

    2011-12-01

    The February 27, 2010 Chile and March 11, 2011 Japan tsunamis caused dramatic loss of life and damage in the near-source region, and notable impacts in distant coastal regions like California. Comprehensive post-tsunami surveys and the availability of hundreds of videos within harbors and marinas allow for detailed documentation of these two events by the State of California Tsunami Program. Although neither event caused significant inundation of dry land in California because peak arrival occurred during low tide, damage to docks, harbor infrastructure, and boats was noteworthy. The 2010 Chile tsunami caused approximately 3-million in damage to a dozen harbors, primarily in central and southern California locations like Santa Cruz Harbor, Ventura Harbor and San Diego Bay. The 2011 Japan tsunami caused over 50-million in damage to more than two dozen harbors along the entire coast of California, most extensively to harbors/marinas in Crescent City, Noyo River, and Santa Cruz. During both events, strong tsunami currents, with some observed estimates greater than 15 knots, were generated at harbor entrances and along inside bends and narrows within harbors. Preliminary evaluations of harbor infrastructure and the interaction of boats indicate that drag along the base of large ships exacerbated the damage to docks to which the ships were tied. Evaluation of tsunami currents and damage will help in the validation/calibration of numerical tsunami model currents with the ultimate goal of developing tsunami current hazard maps for harbors statewide. These hazard maps will improve emergency response and infrastructure planning within harbors.

  11. Conference Proceedings of NASA/DoD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology Held in San Diego, California on 29 January-2 February 1989,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    Suite H 2015 Neil Avenue San Diego, CA 92024 Columbus. OH1 43210 Young H. Pak Richard S. Pappa Bus. Phor e: 714-896-4682 Bus. Phone: 804-864-4321...of the FMI was inspired by the work of Mike Shao of the Harvard Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Dr. Shao currently has in operation, on Mount...1995 to 2015 (Astronomy and Astrophysics), National Academy Press, Washington, DC, 1988. 2. NASA Office of Space Science and Applications 1988

  12. Extensive geographic and ontogenetic variation characterizes the trophic ecology of a temperate reef fish on southern California (USA) rocky reefs

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Scott L.; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Lantz, Coulson A.; Egloff, Tiana L.; Kondo, Emi; Newsome, Seth D.; Loke-Smith, Kerri; Pondella, Daniel J.; Young, Kelly A.; Lowe, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between predator and prey act to shape the structure of ecological communities, and these interactions can differ across space. California sheephead Semicossyphus pulcher are common predators of benthic invertebrates in kelp beds and rocky reefs in southern California, USA. Through gut content and stable isotope (δ13C and †15N) analyses, we investigated geographic and ontogenetic variation in trophic ecology across 9 populations located at island and mainland sites throughout southern California. We found extensive geographic variation in California sheephead diet composition over small spatial scales. Populations differed in the proportion of sessile filter/suspension feeders or mobile invertebrates in the diet. Spatial variation in diet was highly correlated with other life history and demographic traits (e.g. growth, survivorship, reproductive condition, and energy storage), in addition to proxies of prey availability from community surveys. Multivariate descriptions of the diet from gut contents roughly agreed with the spatial groupings of sites based on stable isotope analysis of both California sheephead and their prey. Ontogenetic changes in diet occurred consistently across populations, despite spatial differences in size structure. As California sheephead increase in size, diets shift from small filter feeders, like bivalves, to larger mobile invertebrates, such as sea urchins. Our results indicate that locations with large California sheephead present, such as many marine reserves, may experience increased predation pressure on sea urchins, which could ultimately affect kelp persistence. PMID:26246648

  13. Extensive geographic and ontogenetic variation characterizes the trophic ecology of a temperate reef fish on southern California (USA) rocky reefs.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Scott L; Caselle, Jennifer E; Lantz, Coulson A; Egloff, Tiana L; Kondo, Emi; Newsome, Seth D; Loke-Smith, Kerri; Pondella, Daniel J; Young, Kelly A; Lowe, Christopher G

    Interactions between predator and prey act to shape the structure of ecological communities, and these interactions can differ across space. California sheephead Semicossyphus pulcher are common predators of benthic invertebrates in kelp beds and rocky reefs in southern California, USA. Through gut content and stable isotope (δ(13)C and †(15)N) analyses, we investigated geographic and ontogenetic variation in trophic ecology across 9 populations located at island and mainland sites throughout southern California. We found extensive geographic variation in California sheephead diet composition over small spatial scales. Populations differed in the proportion of sessile filter/suspension feeders or mobile invertebrates in the diet. Spatial variation in diet was highly correlated with other life history and demographic traits (e.g. growth, survivorship, reproductive condition, and energy storage), in addition to proxies of prey availability from community surveys. Multivariate descriptions of the diet from gut contents roughly agreed with the spatial groupings of sites based on stable isotope analysis of both California sheephead and their prey. Ontogenetic changes in diet occurred consistently across populations, despite spatial differences in size structure. As California sheephead increase in size, diets shift from small filter feeders, like bivalves, to larger mobile invertebrates, such as sea urchins. Our results indicate that locations with large California sheephead present, such as many marine reserves, may experience increased predation pressure on sea urchins, which could ultimately affect kelp persistence.

  14. Organic pollutants in the coastal environment off San Diego, California. 1: Source identification and assessment by compositional indices of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, E.Y.; Vista, C.L.

    1997-02-01

    Samples collected in January and June 1994 from the Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant (PLWTP) effluent, Tijuana River runoff, and microlayer, sediment trap, and surface sediment at several locations adjacent to the PLWTP outfall, mouth of the Tijuana River, and San Diego Bay were analyzed in an attempt to identify and assess the sources of hydrocarbon inputs into the coastal marine environment off San Diego. Several compositional indices of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), for example, alkyl homologue distributions, parent compound distributions, and other individual PAH ratios, were used to identify the sources of PAHs. Partially due to the decline of PAH emission from the PLWTP outfall, PAHs found in the sea surface microlayer, sediments, and water column particulates near the PLWTP outfall were predominantly derived from nonpoint sources. The sea microlayer near the mouth of the Tijuana River appeared to accumulate enhanced amounts of PAHs and total organic carbon and total nitrogen, probably discharged from the river, although they were in extremely low abundance in the sediments at the same location. Surprisingly, PAHs detected in the microlayer and sediments in San Diego Bay were mainly derived from combustion sources rather than oil spills, despite the heavy shipping activities in the area.

  15. PREFACE: Polycrystal Modelling with Experimental Integration: A Symposium Honoring Carlos Tomé (San Diego, CA, USA, February 27-March 3 2011) Polycrystal Modelling with Experimental Integration: A Symposium Honoring Carlos Tomé (San Diego, CA, USA, February 27-March 3 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A.

    2012-03-01

    This special issue contains selected contributions from invited speakers to the 'Polycrystal Modelling with Experimental Integration: A Symposium Honoring Carlos Tomé', held as part of the 2011 TMS Annual Meeting and Exhibition, that took place on February 27-March 3, 2011 in San Diego, CA, USA. This symposium honored the remarkable contributions of Dr Carlos N Tomé to the field of mechanical behavior of polycrystalline materials, on the occasion of his 60th birthday. Throughout his career, Dr Tomé has pioneered the theoretical and numerical development of models of polycrystal mechanical behavior, with emphasis on the role played by texture and microstructure on the anisotropic behavior of engineering materials. His many contributions have been critical in establishing a strong connection between models and experiments, and in bridging different scales in the pursuit of robust multiscale models with experimental integration. Among his achievements, the numerical codes that Dr Tomé and co-workers have developed are extensively used in the materials science and engineering community as predictive tools for parameter identification, interpretation of experiments, and multiscale calculations in academia, national laboratories and industry. The symposium brought together materials scientists and engineers to address current theoretical, computational and experimental issues related to microstructure-property relationships in polycrystalline materials deforming in different regimes, including the effects of single crystal anisotropy, texture and microstructure evolution. Synergetic studies, involving different crystal plasticity-based models, including multiscale implementations of the latter, and measurements of global and local textures, internal strains, dislocation structures, twinning, phase distribution, etc, were discussed in more than 90 presentations. The papers in this issue are representative of the different length-scales, materials, and experimental and

  16. Mercury correlations among six tissues for four waterbird species breeding in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Adelsbach, T.L.; Takekawa, John Y.; Miles, A.K.; Keister, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite a large body of research concerning mercury (Hg) in birds, no single tissue has been used consistently to assess Hg exposure, and this has hampered comparisons across studies. We evaluated the relationships of Hg concentrations among tissues in four species of waterbirds (American avocets [Recurvirostra americana], black-necked stilts [Himantopus mexicanus], Caspian terns [Hydroprogne caspia; formerly Sterna caspia], and Forster's terns [Sterna forsteri]) and across three life stages (prebreeding adults, breeding adults, and chicks) in San Francisco Bay, California, USA. Across species and life stages, Hg concentrations (least square mean ?? standard error) were highest in head feathers (6.45 ?? 0.31 ??g/g dry wt) and breast feathers (5.76 ?? 0.28 ??g/g dry wt), followed by kidney (4.54 ?? 0.22 ??g/g dry wt), liver (4.43 ?? 0.21 ??g/g dry wt), blood (3.10 ?? 0.15 ??g/g dry wt), and muscle (1.67 ?? 0.08 ??g/g dry wt). Relative Hg distribution among tissues, however, differed by species and life stage. Mercury concentrations were highly correlated among internal tissues (r 2 ??? 0.89). Conversely, the relationships between Hg in feathers and internal tissues were substantially weaker (r2 ??? 0.42). Regression slopes sometimes differed among species and life stages, indicating that care must be used when predicting Hg concentrations in one tissue based on those in another. However, we found good agreement between predictions made using a general tissue-prediction equation and more specific equations developed for each species and life stage. Finally, our results suggest that blood is an excellent, nonlethal predictor of Hg concentrations in internal tissues but that feathers are relatively poor indicators of Hg concentrations in internal tissues. ?? 2008 SETAC Printed in the USA.

  17. A regional mass balance of methylmercury in San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Yee, Donald; McKee, Lester J; Oram, John J

    2011-01-01

    The San Francisco Bay (California, USA) is a water body listed as impaired because of Hg contamination in sport fish for human consumption, as well as possible effects on resident wildlife. A legacy of Hg mining in local watersheds and Hg used in Au mining in the Sierra Nevada (USA) has contributed to contamination seen in the bay, with additional more recent and ongoing inputs from various sources. Methylmercury is the species of Hg most directly responsible for contamination in biota, so better understanding of its sources, loads, and processes was sought to identify the best means to reduce impacts. A regional scale model of San Francisco Bay was developed to characterize major methylmercury inputs and processes. The model was used to evaluate the potential impact of uncertainties in estimates for methylmercury loading pathways and environmental processes, identify major data gaps, and explore management prospects for reducing methylmercury contamination. External loading pathways considered in the mass balance include methylmercury loads entering via atmospheric deposition to the bay surface, and discharges from the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, local watersheds, municipal wastewater, and fringing wetlands. Internal processes considered include exchange between bed and suspended sediments and the water column, in situ production and demethylation, biological uptake, and losses via hydrologic transport to the ocean through the Golden Gate. In situ sediment methylation and demethylation were dominant sources and losses determining ambient steady-state concentrations in the model, with changes in external loads and export causing smaller changes. Better information on methylation and demethylation is thus most critical to improving understanding of methylmercury balances and management. © 2010 SETAC.

  18. Accumulation of current-use and organochlorine pesticides in crab embryos from Northern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Morgan, Steven; Kuivila, Kathryn K.

    2010-01-01

    Invertebrates have long been used as resident sentinels for assessing ecosystem health and productivity. The shore crabs, Hemigrapsus oregonensis and Pachygrapsus crassipes, are abundant in estuaries and beaches throughout northern California, USA and have been used as indicators of habitat conditions in several salt marshes. The overall objectives of the present study were to conduct a lab-based study to test the accumulation of current-use pesticides, validate the analytical method and to analyze field-collected crabs for a suite of 74 current-use and legacy pesticides. A simple laboratory uptake study was designed to determine if embryos could bioconcentrate the herbicide molinate over a 7-d period. At the end of the experiment, embryos were removed from the crabs and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Although relatively hydrophilic (log KOW of 2.9), molinate did accumulate with an estimated bioconcentration factor (log BCF) of approximately 2.5. Following method validation, embryos were collected from two different Northern California salt marshes and analyzed. In field-collected embryos 18 current-use and eight organochlorine pesticides were detected including synthetic pyrethroids and organophosphate insecticides, as well as DDT and its degradates. Lipid-normalized concentrations of the pesticides detected in the field-collected crab embryos ranged from 0.1 to 4 ppm. Pesticide concentrations and profiles in crab embryos were site specific and could be correlated to differences in land-use practices. These preliminary results indicate that embryos are an effective sink for organic contaminants in the environment and have the potential to be good indicators of ecosystem health, especially when contaminant body burden analyses are paired with reproductive impairment assays.

  19. Bat Response to Differing Fire Severity in Mixed-Conifer Forest California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Heady, Paul A.; Hayes, John P.; Frick, Winifred F.

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife response to natural disturbances such as fire is of conservation concern to managers, policy makers, and scientists, yet information is scant beyond a few well-studied groups (e.g., birds, small mammals). We examined the effects of wildfire severity on bats, a taxon of high conservation concern, at both the stand (<1 ha) and landscape scale in response to the 2002 McNally fire in the Sierra Nevada region of California, USA. One year after fire, we conducted surveys of echolocation activity at 14 survey locations, stratified in riparian and upland habitat, in mixed-conifer forest habitats spanning three levels of burn severity: unburned, moderate, and high. Bat activity in burned areas was either equivalent or higher than in unburned stands for all six phonic groups measured, with four groups having significantly greater activity in at least one burn severity level. Evidence of differentiation between fire severities was observed with some Myotis species having higher levels of activity in stands of high-severity burn. Larger-bodied bats, typically adapted to more open habitat, showed no response to fire. We found differential use of riparian and upland habitats among the phonic groups, yet no interaction of habitat type by fire severity was found. Extent of high-severity fire damage in the landscape had no effect on activity of bats in unburned sites suggesting no landscape effect of fire on foraging site selection and emphasizing stand-scale conditions driving bat activity. Results from this fire in mixed-conifer forests of California suggest that bats are resilient to landscape-scale fire and that some species are preferentially selecting burned areas for foraging, perhaps facilitated by reduced clutter and increased post-fire availability of prey and roosts. PMID:23483936

  20. Urban sources and emissions of nitrous oxide and methane in southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Pataki, D.; Tyler, S. C.; Czimczik, C. I.; Xu, X.; Christensen, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic activities have resulted in increasing levels of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. While global and regional emissions sources of carbon dioxide are relatively well understood, methane and nitrous oxide are less constrained, particularly at regional scales. Here we present the results of an investigation of sources and emissions of methane and nitrous oxide in Los Angeles, California, USA, one of Earth's largest urban areas. The original goal of the project was to determine whether isotopes are useful tracers of agricultural versus urban nitrous oxide and methane sources. For methane, we found that stable isotopes (carbon-13 and deuterium) and radiocarbon are good tracers of biogenic versus fossil fuel sources. High altitude observations of methane concentration, measured continuously using tunable laser spectroscopy, and isotope ratios, measured on discrete flask samples using mass spectrometry, indicate that the predominant methane source in Los Angeles is from fossil fuels, likely from "fugitive" emissions from geologic formations, natural gas pipelines, oil refining, or power plants. We also measured nitrous oxide emissions and isotope ratios from urban (landscaping and wastewater treatment) and agricultural sources (corn and vegetable fields). There was no difference in nitrous oxide isotope ratios between the different types of sources, although stable isotopes did differ between nitrous oxide produced in oxic and anoxic wastewater treatment tanks. Our nitrous oxide flux data indicate that landscaped turfgrass emits nitrous oxide at rates equivalent to agricultural systems, indicating that ornamental soils should not be disregarded in regional nitrous oxide budgets. However, we also showed that wastewater treatment is a much greater source of nitrous oxide than soils regionally. This work shows that global nitrous oxide and methane budgets are not easily downscaled to regional, urban settings, which has

  1. Bat response to differing fire severity in mixed-conifer forest California, USA.

    PubMed

    Buchalski, Michael R; Fontaine, Joseph B; Heady, Paul A; Hayes, John P; Frick, Winifred F

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife response to natural disturbances such as fire is of conservation concern to managers, policy makers, and scientists, yet information is scant beyond a few well-studied groups (e.g., birds, small mammals). We examined the effects of wildfire severity on bats, a taxon of high conservation concern, at both the stand (<1 ha) and landscape scale in response to the 2002 McNally fire in the Sierra Nevada region of California, USA. One year after fire, we conducted surveys of echolocation activity at 14 survey locations, stratified in riparian and upland habitat, in mixed-conifer forest habitats spanning three levels of burn severity: unburned, moderate, and high. Bat activity in burned areas was either equivalent or higher than in unburned stands for all six phonic groups measured, with four groups having significantly greater activity in at least one burn severity level. Evidence of differentiation between fire severities was observed with some Myotis species having higher levels of activity in stands of high-severity burn. Larger-bodied bats, typically adapted to more open habitat, showed no response to fire. We found differential use of riparian and upland habitats among the phonic groups, yet no interaction of habitat type by fire severity was found. Extent of high-severity fire damage in the landscape had no effect on activity of bats in unburned sites suggesting no landscape effect of fire on foraging site selection and emphasizing stand-scale conditions driving bat activity. Results from this fire in mixed-conifer forests of California suggest that bats are resilient to landscape-scale fire and that some species are preferentially selecting burned areas for foraging, perhaps facilitated by reduced clutter and increased post-fire availability of prey and roosts.

  2. New challenges: residential pesticide exposure assessment in the California Department of Pesticide Regulation, USA.

    PubMed

    Powell, S

    2001-04-01

    Residential exposure assessment is in an early stage of development within many of the regulatory agencies responsible for pesticides. Some of the impetus for residential assessment comes from the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA), a federal law adopted in 1996 in the USA. The FQPA mandates that the aggregate and cumulative risks from all nonoccupational sources of exposure to similarly acting pesticides be assessed. The development of methods for residential exposure assessment is therefore proceeding in tandem with methods for aggregate risk assessment. The California Department of Pesticide Regulation (Cal DPR) regulates pesticides in the state of California much as the US EPA does at the national level. While Cal DPR is not explicitly bound by the federal law, it recognizes the importance of residential exposure and of cumulative risk, and tries to harmonize its methods with those of US EPA. Accordingly, Cal DPR is developing guidance for residential exposure assessment. Some factors to consider are the following: (1) although the end goal may be total exposure from all sources, in order to regulate the use of products it is necessary to have separate estimates of exposure from individual sources and routes; (2) probabilistic approaches will be used increasingly, and they must separate variability and uncertainty; (3) there is a critical need for data on residential use of pesticides, including the frequency of mishaps and improper handling; (4) data are needed on long-term activity patterns of individuals, including residential and occupational history; (5) regulatory agencies need a way to identify and screen potential exposure scenarios, in order to streamline the risk assessment process.

  3. 77 FR 54811 - Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego... Competitor Group is sponsoring the TriRock Triathlon, consisting of 2000 swimmers swimming a predetermined...: Sec. 165.T11-516 Safety Zone; TriRock Triathlon; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The...

  4. Eolian deposits in the Neoproterozoic Big Bear Group, San Bernardino Mountains, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, John H.

    2005-01-01

    Strata interpreted to be eolian are recognized in the Neoproterozoic Big Bear Group in the San Bernardino Mountains of southern California, USA. The strata consist of medium- to large-scale (30 cm to > 6 m) cross-stratified quartzite considered to be eolian dune deposits and interstratified thinly laminated quartzite that are problematically interpreted as either eolian translatent climbing ripple laminae, or as tidal-flat deposits. High index ripples and adhesion structures considered to be eolian are associated with the thinly laminated and cross-stratified strata. The eolian strata are in a succession that is characterized by flaser bedding, aqueous ripple marks, mudcracks, and interstratified small-scale cross-strata that are suggestive of a tidal environment containing local fluvial deposits. The eolian strata may have formed in a near-shore environment inland of a tidal flat. The Neoproterozoic Big Bear Group is unusual in the western United States and may represent a remnant of strata that were originally more widespread and part of the hypothetical Neoproterozoic supercontinent of Rodinia. The Big Bear Group perhaps is preserved only in blocks that were downdropped along Neoproterozoic extensional faults. The eolian deposits of the Big Bear Group may have been deposited during arid conditions that preceded worldwide glacial events in the late Neoproterozoic. Possibly similar pre-glacial arid events are recognized in northern Mexico, northeast Washington, Australia, and northwest Canada.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide measurements in recreational marine bathing waters in Southern California, USA.

    PubMed

    Clark, Catherine D; De Bruyn, Warren J; Hirsch, Charlotte M; Jakubowski, Scott D

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was measured in the surf zone at 13 bathing beaches in Southern California, USA. Summer dry season concentrations averaged 122 +/- 38 nM with beaches with tide pools having lower levels (50-90 nM). No significant differences were observed for ebb waters at a salt marsh outlet vs. a beach (179 +/- 20 vs. 163 +/- 26 nM), and between ebb and flood tides at one site (171 +/- 24 vs. 146 +/- 42 nM). H(2)O(2) levels showed little annual variation. Diel cycling was followed over short (30 min; 24 h study) and long (d) time scales, with maximum afternoon concentration = 370 nM and estimated photochemical production rate of 44 nM h(-1). There was no correlation between the absorbance coefficient at 300 nm (used as a measure of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) levels) and H(2)O(2). H(2)O(2) concentrations measured in this study are likely sufficient to inhibit fecal indicator bacteria in marine recreational waters through indirect photoinactivation.

  6. Risk Factors for Human Lice and Bartonellosis among the Homeless, San Francisco, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Cole-Porse, Charsey; Kjemtrup, Anne; Osikowicz, Lynn; Kosoy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Homeless persons in San Francisco, California, USA, have been shown to have head and body lice infestations and Bartonella quintana infections. We surveyed a self-selected population of homeless persons in San Francisco to assess infestations of head and body lice, risks of having body lice, and presence of B. quintana in lice. A total of 203 persons who reported itching were surveyed during 2008–2010 and 2012: 60 (30%) had body lice, 10 (4.9%) had head lice, and 6 (3.0%) had both. B. quintana was detected in 10 (15.9%) of 63 body lice pools and in 6 (37.5%) of 16 head lice pools. Variables significantly associated (p<0.05) with having body lice in this homeless population included male sex, African–American ethnicity, and sleeping outdoors. Our study findings suggest that specific segments of the homeless population would benefit from information on preventing body lice infestations and louseborne diseases. PMID:25280380

  7. Fine scale mapping of the structure and composition of the Elkhorn Slough (California, USA) tidal plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Andrew M.; Ryan, John P.; Rienecker, Erich V.

    2017-01-01

    Fine scale mapping of the structure and composition of a tidal ebb plume from a highly modified coastal lagoon (Elkhorn Slough, California, USA) was conducted by combining in situ, observational data sets from surface underway mapping, autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) profiles, drifter tracking and the analysis of plume structure indices. The results reveal a 6-m-deep, jet-like, sediment laden plume extending one km offshore at low tide, which becomes entrained in the prevailing nearshore circulation. The plume that exits the slough is significantly different from the water that enters the slough. The rapidly evolving discharge plume is associated with elevated and highly correlated (r = 0.93) concentrations of dissolved organic matter and nitrate. While dissolved constituents remain in the shallow plume and are transported northward with the prevailing current, sediment may settle quickly through the water column and can be transported southwestward with the littoral currents. This study illustrates the applications of AUVs, when coupled with additional datasets, for generating higher resolution observational snapshots of dynamic and ephemeral tidal plumes. The results provide unique perspective on small-scale dynamics of an estuarine plume and its influence on coastal ecology.

  8. Feline infectious peritonitis in a mountain lion (Puma concolor), California, USA.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Nicole; Swift, Pamela; Moeller, Robert B; Worth, S Joy; Foley, Janet

    2013-04-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal immune-mediated vasculitis of felids caused by a mutant form of a common feline enteric virus, feline enteric coronavirus. The virus can attack many organ systems and causes a broad range of signs, commonly including weight loss and fever. Regardless of presentation, FIP is ultimately fatal and often presents a diagnostic challenge. In May 2010, a malnourished young adult male mountain lion (Puma concolor) from Kern County, California, USA was euthanized because of concern for public safety, and a postmortem examination was performed. Gross necropsy and histopathologic examination revealed necrotizing, multifocal myocarditis; necrotizing, neutrophilic, and histiocytic myositis and vasculitis of the tunica muscularis layer of the small and large intestines; and embolic, multifocal, interstitial pneumonia. Feline coronavirus antigen was detected in both the heart and intestinal tissue by immunohistochemistry. A PCR for coronavirus performed on kidney tissue was positive, confirming a diagnosis of FIP. Although coronavirus infection has been documented in mountain lions by serology, this is the first confirmed report of FIP.

  9. Pyrethroid and organophosphate pesticide-associated toxicity in two coastal watersheds (California, USA).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Hunt, John W; Siegler, Katie; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Tjeerdema, Ron S; McNeill, Katie

    2012-07-01

    Portions of the Santa Maria River and Oso Flaco Creek watersheds in central California, USA, are listed as impaired under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act and require development of total maximum daily load (TMDL) allocations. These listings are for general pesticide contamination, but are largely based on historic monitoring of sediment and fish tissue samples that showed contamination by organochlorine pesticides. Recent studies have shown that toxicity in these watersheds is caused by organophosphate pesticides (water and sediment) and pyrethroid pesticides (sediment). The present study was designed to provide information on the temporal and spatial variability of toxicity associated with these pesticides to better inform the TMDL process. Ten stations were sampled in four study areas, one with urban influences, and the remaining in agriculture production areas. Water toxicity was assessed with the water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia, and sediment toxicity was assessed with the amphipod Hyalella azteca. Stations in the lower Santa Maria River had the highest incidence of toxicity, followed by stations influenced by urban inputs. Toxicity identification evaluations and chemical analysis demonstrated that the majority of the observed water toxicity was attributed to organophosphate pesticides, particularly chlorpyrifos, and that sediment toxicity was caused by mixtures of pyrethroid pesticides. The results demonstrate that both agriculture and urban land uses are contributing toxic concentrations of these pesticides to adjacent watersheds, and regional water quality regulators are now using this information to develop management objectives.

  10. Chemical preservation of insect cuticle from the Pleistocene asphalt deposits of California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankiewicz, B. Artur; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Evershed, Richard P.; Duncan, Ian J.

    1997-06-01

    Cuticles of Coleoptera (beetles) and Orthoptera (crickets) from the Pleistocene asphalt deposits of Rancho La Brea and McKittrick in California, USA were studied by means of flash pyrolysis-gas chromatography /mass spectrometry (py-GC/MS). Commercial chitin, amino acid standards, and fresh and decayed cuticles of modern beetle and cricket were likewise investigated to allow the state of preservation of the fossil specimens to be interpreted. Insect cuticles are composed of chitin and proteins covalently cross-linked via catecholamine moieties. Pyrolysis of the fossil insects yielded all the products normally obtained from the pyrolysis of the chitin biopolymer, indicating that it has survived in a highly intact state. Proteins, on the other hand, are poorly preserved. Only phenols, indoles, and nitrobenzenes were present among the pyrolysis products, providing evidence for the preservation of tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine moieties. This demonstrates the preferential preservation of chitin in comparison with proteins, a result confirmed by scanning electron microscopy of the structure.

  11. Tidal salt marsh sediment in California, USA. Part 2: occurrence and anthropogenic input of trace metals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Green, Peter G; Higashi, Richard M; Young, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    Surface sediment samples (0-5 cm) from 5 tidal salt marshes along the coast in California, USA were analyzed to investigate the occurrence and anthropogenic input of trace metals. Among study areas, Stege Marsh located in the central San Francisco Bay was the most contaminated marsh. Concentrations of metals in Stege Marsh sediments were higher than San Francisco Bay ambient levels. Zinc (55.3-744 microg g(-1)) was the most abundant trace metal and was followed by lead (26.6-273 microg g(-1)). Aluminum normalized enrichment factors revealed that lead was the most anthropogenically impacted metal in all marshes. Enrichment factors of lead in Stege Marsh ranged from 8 to 49 (median=16). Sediments from reference marshes also had high enrichment factors (2-8) for lead, indicating that lead contamination is ubiquitous, possibly due to continuous input from atmospherically transported lead that was previously used as a gasoline additive. Copper, silver, and zinc in Stege Marsh were also enriched by anthropogenic input. Though nickel concentrations in Stege Marsh and reference marshes exceeded sediment quality guidelines, enrichment factors indicated nickel from anthropogenic input was negligible. Presence of nickel-rich source rock such as serpentinite in the San Francisco Bay watershed can explain high levels of nickel in this area. Coefficients of variation were significantly different between anthropogenically impacted and non-impacted metals and might be used as a less conservative indicator for anthropogenic input of metals when enrichment factors are not available.

  12. Aerobic methane oxidation and methanotroph community composition during seasonal stratification in Mono Lake, California (USA).

    PubMed

    Carini, Stephen; Bano, Nasreen; LeCleir, Gary; Joye, Samantha B

    2005-08-01

    Patterns of aerobic methane (CH4) oxidation and associated methanotroph community composition were investigated during the development of seasonal stratification in Mono Lake, California (USA). CH4 oxidation rates were measured using a tritiated CH4 radiotracer technique. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and sequence analysis were used to characterize methanotroph community composition. A temporally shifting zone of elevated CH4 oxidation (59-123 nM day(-1)) was consistently associated with a suboxycline, microaerophilic zone that migrated upwards in the water column as stratification progressed. FISH analysis revealed stable numbers of type I (4.1-9.3 x 10(5) cells ml(-1)) and type II (1.4-3.4 x 10(5) cells ml(-1)) methanotrophs over depth and over time. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis indicated slight shifts in methanotroph community composition despite stable absolute cell numbers. Variable CH4 oxidation rates in the presence of a relatively stable methanotroph population suggested that zones of high CH4 oxidation resulted from an increase in activity of a subset of the existing methanotroph population. These results challenge existing paradigms suggesting that zones of elevated CH4 oxidation activity result from the accumulation of methanotrophic biomass and illustrate that type II methanotrophs may be an important component of the methanotroph population in saline and/or alkaline pelagic environments.

  13. Risk factors for human lice and bartonellosis among the homeless, San Francisco, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Denise L; Cole-Porse, Charsey; Kjemtrup, Anne; Osikowicz, Lynn; Kosoy, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Homeless persons in San Francisco, California, USA,have been shown to have head and body lice infestations and Bartonella quintana infections. We surveyed a self selected population of homeless persons in San Francisco to assess infestations of head and body lice, risks of having body lice, and presence of B. quintana in lice. A total of 203 persons who reported itching were surveyed during 2008-2010 and 2012: 60 (30%) had body lice, 10 (4.9%)had head lice, and 6 (3.0%) had both. B. quintana was detected in 10 (15.9%) of 63 body lice pools and in 6 (37.5%)of 16 head lice pools. Variables significantly associated(p<0.05) with having body lice in this homeless population included male sex, African-American ethnicity, and sleeping outdoors. Our study findings suggest that specific segments of the homeless population would benefit from information on preventing body lice infestations and louse borne diseases.

  14. Dietary and other lifestyle factors of women with brain gliomas in Los Angeles County (California, USA)

    PubMed

    Blowers, L; Preston-Martin, S; Mack, W J

    1997-01-01

    A population-based interview study in Los Angeles County (California, USA) of 94 women with intracranial gliomas and 94 individually matched neighborhood controls investigated the relationship to various sources of exposure to N-nitroso compounds and their precursors and to vitamins which inhibit the endogenous formation of these compounds. The study offers some support for the hypothesis that dietary sources of nitroso exposure relate to risk. Risk increased with increasing consumption of cured meats, most notably of bacon (odds ratio [OR] for the third tertile of intake = 6.6, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.9-22.5, P trend < 0.001). Risk was reduced with increasing intake of vegetables such as bell peppers (OR for third tertile = 0.2, CI = 0.1-0.7, P trend < 0.01). In addition, use of vitamin supplements appeared protective, and there was some suggestion that eating cured meats in combination with foods which inhibit endogenous nitrosation mitigates risk. Other potential sources of nitroso exposure such as smoking, cosmetics, and drinking water did not relate to risk. Despite the limitations of data on usual adult diet, it appears that dietary sources of nitroso compounds may be important in the development of gliomas.

  15. Alicyclobacillus vulcanalis sp. nov., a thermophilic, acidophilic bacterium isolated from Coso Hot Springs, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Simbahan, Jessica; Drijber, Rhae; Blum, Paul

    2004-09-01

    A thermo-acidophilic Gram-positive bacterium, strain CsHg2T, which grows aerobically at 35-65 degrees C (optimum 55 degrees C) and at pH 2.0-6.0 (optimum 4.0), was isolated from a geothermal pool located in Coso Hot Springs in the Mojave Desert, California, USA. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that this bacterium was most closely related to the type strains of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (97.8 % identity) and Alicyclobacillus sendaiensis (96.9 %), three Japanese strains denoted as UZ-1, KHA-31 and MIH 332 (96.1-96.5 %) and Alicyclobacillus genomic species FR-6 (96.3 %). Phenotypic characteristics including temperature and pH optima, G+C composition, acid production from a variety of carbon sources and sensitivity to different metal salts distinguished CsHg2T from A. acidocaldarius, A. sendaiensis and FR-6. The cell lipid membrane was composed mainly of omega-cyclohexyl fatty acid, consistent with membranes from other Alicyclobacillus species. Very low DNA-DNA hybridization values between CsHg2T and the type strains of Alicyclobacillus indicate that CsHg2T represents a distinct species. On the basis of these results, the name Alicyclobacillus vulcanalis sp. nov. is proposed for this organism. The type strain is CsHg2T (ATCC BAA-915T = DSM 16176T).

  16. Groundwater movement, recharge, and perchlorate occurrence in a faulted alluvial aquifer in California (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Teague, Nicholas F.; Hatzinger, Paul B.; Böhlke, John Karl; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2015-01-01

    Perchlorate from military, industrial, and legacy agricultural sources is present within an alluvial aquifer in the Rialto-Colton groundwater subbasin, 80 km east of Los Angeles, California (USA). The area is extensively faulted, with water-level differences exceeding 60 m across parts of the Rialto-Colton Fault separating the Rialto-Colton and Chino groundwater subbasins. Coupled well-bore flow and depth-dependent water-quality data show decreases in well yield and changes in water chemistry and isotopic composition, reflecting changing aquifer properties and groundwater recharge sources with depth. Perchlorate movement through some wells under unpumped conditions from shallower to deeper layers underlying mapped plumes was as high as 13 kg/year. Water-level maps suggest potential groundwater movement across the Rialto-Colton Fault through an overlying perched aquifer. Upward flow through a well in the Chino subbasin near the Rialto-Colton Fault suggests potential groundwater movement across the fault through permeable layers within partly consolidated deposits at depth. Although potentially important locally, movement of groundwater from the Rialto-Colton subbasin has not resulted in widespread occurrence of perchlorate within the Chino subbasin. Nitrate and perchlorate concentrations at the water table, associated with legacy agricultural fertilizer use, may be underestimated by data from long-screened wells that mix water from different depths within the aquifer.

  17. Temporal and spatial patterns of phytoplankton production in Tomales Bay, California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    Primary productivity in the water column was measured 14 times between April 1985 and April 1986 at three sites in Tomales Bay, California, USA The conditions at these three stations encompassed the range of hydrographic conditions, phytoplankton biomass, phytoplankton community composition, and turbidity typical of this coastal embayment. Linear regression of the measured daily carbon uptake against the composite parameter B Zp Io (where B is the average phytoplankton biomass in the photic zone; Zp is the photic depth; and Io is the daily surface insolation) indicates that 90% of the variability in primary productivity is explained by variations in phytoplankton biomass and light availability. The linear function derived using Tomales Bay data is essentially the same as that which explains more than 80% of the variation in productivity in four other estuarine systems. Using the linear function and measured values for B, Zp, and Io, the daily photic-zone productivity was estimated for 10 sites at monthly intervals over the annual period. The average daily photic-zone productivity for the 10 sites ranged from 0??2 to 2??2 g C m-2. The bay-wide average annual primary productivity in the water column was 400 g C m-2, with most of the uptake occuring in spring and early summer. Spatial and temporal variations in primary productivity were similar to variations in phytoplankton biomass. Productivity was highest in the seaward and central regions of the bay and lowest in the shallow landward region. ?? 1989.

  18. Microbial diversity and community structure along a lake elevation gradient in Yosemite National Park, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Curtis J; Beman, J Michael

    2016-06-01

    Microbial communities are key components of lake ecosystems and play central roles in lake biogeochemical cycles. Freshwater lakes, in turn, have a disproportionate influence on global carbon and nitrogen cycling, while also acting as 'sentinels' of environmental change. Determining what factors regulate microbial community dynamics and their relationship to lake biogeochemistry is therefore essential to understanding global change feedbacks. We used Illumina sequencing of >2 million 16S rRNA genes to examine microbial community structure and diversity in relation to spatial, temporal and biogeochemical variation, within and across lakes located along a 871 m elevation gradient in Yosemite National Park, California, USA. We captured a rich microbial community that included many rare operational taxonomic units (OTUs), but was dominated by a few bacterial classes and OTUs frequently detected in other freshwater ecosystems. Neither richness, evenness nor overall diversity was directly related to elevation. However, redundancy analysis showed that changes in microbial community structure were significantly related to elevation. Along with sampling period and dissolved nutrient concentrations, 29% of the variation in community structure could be explained by measured variables - in congruence with studies in other lakes using different techniques. We also found a distance-decay relationship in microbial community structure across lakes, suggesting that both local environmental factors and dispersal play a role in structuring communities. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Prevalence of selected pathogens in western pond turtles and sympatric introduced red-eared sliders in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, C; Clifford, D L; Bettaso, J; Worth, S; Foley, J

    2013-11-25

    Pathogen introduction by invasive species has been speculated to be a cause of declining western pond turtle Emys marmorata populations in California, USA. This study determined the prevalence of Ranavirus spp., Herpesvirus spp., Mycoplasma spp. (via polymerase chain reaction of blood and nasal flush contents), and Salmonella spp. infection (via fecal culture) in native E. marmorata and invasive red-eared sliders Trachemys scripta elegans and compared infection prevalence in E. marmorata populations sympatric with T. scripta elegans to E. marmorata populations that were not sympatric by sampling 145 E. marmorata and 33 T. scripta elegans at 10 study sites throughout California. Mycoplasma spp. were detected in both species: prevalence in E. marmorata was 7.8% in the northern, 9.8% in the central, and 23.3% in the southern California regions. In T. scripta elegans, Mycoplasma spp. were not detected in the northern California region but were detected at 4.5 and 14.3% in the central and southern regions, respectively. All turtles tested negative for Herpesvirus spp. and Ranavirus spp. Enteric bacteria but not Salmonella spp. were isolated from feces. E. marmorata populations that were sympatric with T. scripta elegans did not have increased risk of Mycoplasma spp. infection. For E. marmorata, there was a significant association between Mycoplasma spp. infection and lower body weight and being located in the southern California region. This study is the first of its kind to document pathogen prevalence in native E. marmorata habitats and those sympatric with T. scripta elegans in California.

  20. [Experiences of undocumented Mexican migrant women when accessing sexual and reproductive health services in California, USA: a case study].

    PubMed

    Deeb-Sossa, Natalia; Díaz Olavarrieta, Claudia; Juárez-Ramírez, Clara; García, Sandra G; Villalobos, Aremis

    2013-05-01

    This study focuses on the experience of Mexican women migrants in California, USA, with the use of formal health services for sexual and reproductive health issues. The authors used a qualitative interpretative approach with life histories, interviewing eight female users of healthcare services in California and seven key informants in Mexico and California. There were three main types of barriers to healthcare: immigration status, language, and gender. Participants reported long waiting times, discriminatory attitudes, and high cost of services. A combination of formal and informal healthcare services was common. The assessment of quality of care was closely related to undocumented immigration status. Social support networks are crucial to help solve healthcare issues. Quality of care should take intercultural health issues into account.

  1. Multimedia screening of contaminants of emerging concern (CECS) in coastal urban watersheds in southern California (USA).

    PubMed

    Maruya, Keith A; Dodder, Nathan G; Sengupta, Ashmita; Smith, Deborah J; Lyons, J Michael; Heil, Ann T; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-08-01

    To examine the occurrence and fate of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and inform future monitoring of CECs in coastal urban waterways, water, sediment, and fish tissue samples were collected and analyzed for a broad suite of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), commercial and/or household chemicals, current use pesticides, and hormones in an effluent-dominated river and multiple embayments in southern California (USA). In the Santa Clara River, which receives treated wastewater from several facilities, aqueous phase CECs were detectable at stations nearest discharges from municipal wastewater treatment plants but were attenuated downstream. Sucralose and the chlorinated phosphate flame retardants tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) were most abundant in water, with maximum concentrations of 35 μg/L, 3.3 μg/L, 1.4 μg/L, and 0.81 μg/L, respectively. Triclocarban, an antimicrobial agent in use for decades, was more prevalent in water than triclosan or nonylphenol. Maximum concentrations of bifenthrin, permethrin, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and degradates of fipronil exceeded CEC-specific monitoring trigger levels recently established for freshwater and estuarine sediments by factors of 10 to 1000, respectively. Maximum fish tissue concentrations of PBDEs varied widely (370 ng/g and 7.0 ng/g for the Santa Clara River and coastal embayments, respectively), with most species exhibiting concentrations at the lower end of this range. These results suggest that continued monitoring of pyrethroids, PBDEs, and degradates of fipronil in sediment is warranted in these systems. In contrast, aqueous pharmaceutical concentrations in the Santa Clara River were not close to exceeding current monitoring trigger levels, suggesting a lower priority for targeted monitoring in this medium. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1986-1994. © 2016 SETAC.

  2. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faunt, Claudia; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jonathan A.; Brandt, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007–2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  3. Water availability and land subsidence in the Central Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunt, Claudia C.; Sneed, Michelle; Traum, Jon; Brandt, Justin T.

    2016-05-01

    The Central Valley in California (USA) covers about 52,000 km2 and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. This agriculture relies heavily on surface-water diversions and groundwater pumpage to meet irrigation water demand. Because the valley is semi-arid and surface-water availability varies substantially, agriculture relies heavily on local groundwater. In the southern two thirds of the valley, the San Joaquin Valley, historic and recent groundwater pumpage has caused significant and extensive drawdowns, aquifer-system compaction and subsidence. During recent drought periods (2007-2009 and 2012-present), groundwater pumping has increased owing to a combination of decreased surface-water availability and land-use changes. Declining groundwater levels, approaching or surpassing historical low levels, have caused accelerated and renewed compaction and subsidence that likely is mostly permanent. The subsidence has caused operational, maintenance, and construction-design problems for water-delivery and flood-control canals in the San Joaquin Valley. Planning for the effects of continued subsidence in the area is important for water agencies. As land use, managed aquifer recharge, and surface-water availability continue to vary, long-term groundwater-level and subsidence monitoring and modelling are critical to understanding the dynamics of historical and continued groundwater use resulting in additional water-level and groundwater storage declines, and associated subsidence. Modeling tools such as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model, can be used in the evaluation of management strategies to mitigate adverse impacts due to subsidence while also optimizing water availability. This knowledge will be critical for successful implementation of recent legislation aimed toward sustainable groundwater use.

  4. Selenium bioaccumulation and body condition in shorebirds and terns breeding in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated Se bioaccumulation in four waterbird species (n = 206 birds) that breed within San Francisco Bay, California, USA: American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia). Selenium concentrations were variable and influenced by several factors, including species, region, reproductive stage, age, and sex. Adult Se concentrations (μg/g dry wt) in livers ranged from 3.07 to 48.70 in avocets (geometric mean ± standard error, 7.92 ± 0.64), 2.28 to 41.10 in stilts (5.29 ± 0.38), 3.73 to 14.50 in Forster's terns (7.13 ± 0.38), and 4.77 to 14.40 in Caspian terns (6.73 ± 0.78). Avocets had higher Se concentrations in the North Bay compared to the South Bay, whereas stilt Se concentrations were similar between these regions and Forster's terns had lower Se concentrations in the North Bay compared to the South Bay. Female avocets had higher Se concentrations than male avocets, but this was not the case for stilts and Forster's terns. Of the factors assessed, reproductive stage had the most consistent effect among species. Prebreeding birds tended to have higher liver Se concentrations than breeding birds, but this trend was statistically significant only for Forster's terns. Forster's tern chicks had lower Se concentrations than Forster's tern adults, whereas avocet and stilt adults and chicks were similar. Additionally, body condition was negatively related to liver Se concentrations in Forster's tern adults but not in avocet, stilt, or Caspian tern adults and chicks. These variable results illustrate the complexity of Se bioaccumulation and highlight the need to sample multiple species and examine several factors to assess the impact of Se on wildlife.

  5. Selenium bioaccumulation and body condition in shorebirds and terns breeding in San Francisco Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Eagles-Smith, Collin A

    2009-10-01

    The present study evaluated Se bioaccumulation in four waterbird species (n=206 birds) that breed within San Francisco Bay, California, U.S.A.: American avocets (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), Forster's terns (Sterna forsteri), and Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia). Selenium concentrations were variable and influenced by several factors, including species, region, reproductive stage, age, and sex. Adult Se concentrations (microg/g dry wt) in livers ranged from 3.07 to 48.70 in avocets (geometric mean +/- standard error, 7.92 +/- 0.64), 2.28 to 41.10 in stilts (5.29 +/- 0.38), 3.73 to 14.50 in Forster's terns (7.13 _ 0.38), and 4.77 to 14.40 in Caspian terns (6.73 +/- 0.78). Avocets had higher Se concentrations in the North Bay compared to the South Bay, whereas stilt Se concentrations were similar between these regions and Forster's terns had lower Se concentrations in the North Bay compared to the South Bay. Female avocets had higher Se concentrations than male avocets, but this was not the case for stilts and Forster's terns. Of the factors assessed, reproductive stage had the most consistent effect among species. Prebreeding birds tended to have higher liver Se concentrations than breeding birds, but this trend was statistically significant only for Forster's terns. Forster's tern chicks had lower Se concentrations than Forster's tern adults, whereas avocet and stilt adults and chicks were similar. Additionally, body condition was negatively related to liver Se concentrations in Forster's tern adults but not in avocet, stilt, or Caspian tern adults and chicks. These variable results illustrate the complexity of Se bioaccumulation and highlight the need to sample multiple species and examine several factors to assess the impact of Se on wildlife.

  6. Tidal salt marsh sediment in California, USA. Part 1: occurrence and sources of organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Green, Peter G; Young, Thomas M

    2006-08-01

    Surface sediment samples (0-5 cm) from five tidal marshes along the coast of California, USA were analyzed for organic pollutants to investigate their relationship to land use, current distribution within marshes, and possible sources. Among the study areas, Stege Marsh, located in San Francisco Bay, was the most contaminated. Compared to San Francisco Bay, Stege Marsh had much higher levels of organic contaminants such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), DDTs, and chlordanes. At reference marshes (Tom's Point and Walker Creek in Tomales Bay), organic contaminants in sediments were very low. While PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) were found at all of the study areas (22-13,600 ng g(-1)), measurable concentrations of PCBs were found only in the sediments from Stege Marsh (80-9,940 ng g(-1)). Combustion related (pyrogenic) high molecular weight PAHs were dominant in sediments from Stege and Carpinteria Marshes, while in sediments from Tom's Point and Walker Creek petroleum related (petrogenic) low molecular weight PAHs and alkyl-substituted PAHs were much more abundant than pyrogenic PAHs. PCB congener patterns in all of the Stege Marsh samples were the same and revealed that Aroclor 1248 was a predominant source. In all marshes, the sum of DDE and DDD accounted for more than 90% of total DDTs, indicating that DDT has degraded significantly. The ratios of p,p'-DDE to p,p'-DDD in sediments from Stege Marsh provide evidence of possible previous use of technical DDD. Chlordane ratios indicated that chlordanes have degraded slightly. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (280-32,000 ng g(-1)) was the most abundant phthalate. The data indicates that Stege Marsh may be a source of contaminants that continue to be discharged into San Francisco Bay.

  7. Bed composition generation for morphodynamic modeling: Case study of San Pablo Bay in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van der Wegen, M.; Dastgheib, A.; Jaffe, B.E.; Roelvink, D.

    2011-01-01

    Applications of process-based morphodynamic models are often constrained by limited availability of data on bed composition, which may have a considerable impact on the modeled morphodynamic development. One may even distinguish a period of "morphodynamic spin-up" in which the model generates the bed level according to some ill-defined initial bed composition rather than describing the realistic behavior of the system. The present paper proposes a methodology to generate bed composition of multiple sand and/or mud fractions that can act as the initial condition for the process-based numerical model Delft3D. The bed composition generation (BCG) run does not include bed level changes, but does permit the redistribution of multiple sediment fractions over the modeled domain. The model applies the concept of an active layer that may differ in sediment composition above an underlayer with fixed composition. In the case of a BCG run, the bed level is kept constant, whereas the bed composition can change. The approach is applied to San Pablo Bay in California, USA. Model results show that the BCG run reallocates sand and mud fractions over the model domain. Initially, a major sediment reallocation takes place, but development rates decrease in the longer term. Runs that take the outcome of a BCG run as a starting point lead to more gradual morphodynamic development. Sensitivity analysis shows the impact of variations in the morphological factor, the active layer thickness, and wind waves. An important but difficult to characterize criterion for a successful application of a BCG run is that it should not lead to a bed composition that fixes the bed so that it dominates the "natural" morphodynamic development of the system. Future research will focus on a decadal morphodynamic hindcast and comparison with measured bathymetries in San Pablo Bay so that the proposed methodology can be tested and optimized. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

  8. Detection of the oyster herpesvirus in commercial bivalve in northern California, USA: conventional and quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Burge, Colleen A; Strenge, Robyn E; Friedman, Carolyn S

    2011-04-06

    The ostreid herpesvirus (OsHV-1) and related oyster herpesviruses (OsHV) are associated with world-wide mortalities of larval and juvenile bivalves. To quantify OsHV viral loads in mollusc tissues, we developed a SYBR Green quantitative PCR (qPCR) based on the A-region of the OsHV-1 genome. Reaction efficiency and precision were demonstrated using a plasmid standard curve. The analytical sensitivity is 1 copy per reaction. We collected Crassostrea gigas, C. sikamea, C. virginica, Ostrea edulis, O. lurida, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Venerupis phillipinarum from Tomales Bay (TB), and C. gigas from Drakes Estero (DE), California, U.S.A., and initially used conventional PCR (cPCR) to test for presence of OsHV DNA. Subsequently, viral loads were quantified in selected samples of all tested bivalves except O. lurida. Copy numbers were low in each species tested but were significantly greater in C. gigas (p < 0.0001) compared to all other species, suggesting a higher level of infection. OsHV DNA was detected with cPCR and/or qPCR and confirmed by sequencing in C. gigas, C. sikamea, C. virginica, O. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and V phillipinarum from TB and C. gigas from DE. These data indicate that multiple bivalve species may act as reservoirs for OsHV in TB. A lack of histological abnormalities in potential reservoirs requires alternative methods for their identification. Further investigation is needed to determine the host-parasite relationship for each potential reservoir, including characterization of viral loads and their relationship with infection (via in situ hybridization), assessments of mortality, and host responses.

  9. RNA shotgun metagenomic sequencing of northern California (USA) mosquitoes uncovers viruses, bacteria, and fungi

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, James Angus; Liu, Rachel M.; Bennett, Shannon N.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes, most often recognized for the microbial agents of disease they may carry, harbor diverse microbial communities that include viruses, bacteria, and fungi, collectively called the microbiota. The composition of the microbiota can directly and indirectly affect disease transmission through microbial interactions that could be revealed by its characterization in natural populations of mosquitoes. Furthermore, the use of shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) approaches could allow the discovery of unknown members of the microbiota. In this study, we use RNA SMS to characterize the microbiota of seven individual mosquitoes (species include Culex pipiens, Culiseta incidens, and Ochlerotatus sierrensis) collected from a variety of habitats in California, USA. Sequencing was performed on the Illumina HiSeq platform and the resulting sequences were quality-checked and assembled into contigs using the A5 pipeline. Sequences related to single stranded RNA viruses of the Bunyaviridae and Rhabdoviridae were uncovered, along with an unclassified genus of double-stranded RNA viruses. Phylogenetic analysis finds that in all three cases, the closest relatives of the identified viral sequences are other mosquito-associated viruses, suggesting widespread host-group specificity among disparate viral taxa. Interestingly, we identified a Narnavirus of fungi, also reported elsewhere in mosquitoes, that potentially demonstrates a nested host-parasite association between virus, fungi, and mosquito. Sequences related to 8 bacterial families and 13 fungal families were found across the seven samples. Bacillus and Escherichia/Shigella were identified in all samples and Wolbachia was identified in all Cx. pipiens samples, while no single fungal genus was found in more than two samples. This study exemplifies the utility of RNA SMS in the characterization of the natural microbiota of mosquitoes and, in particular, the value of identifying all microbes associated with a specific host

  10. RNA shotgun metagenomic sequencing of northern California (USA) mosquitoes uncovers viruses, bacteria, and fungi.

    PubMed

    Chandler, James Angus; Liu, Rachel M; Bennett, Shannon N

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes, most often recognized for the microbial agents of disease they may carry, harbor diverse microbial communities that include viruses, bacteria, and fungi, collectively called the microbiota. The composition of the microbiota can directly and indirectly affect disease transmission through microbial interactions that could be revealed by its characterization in natural populations of mosquitoes. Furthermore, the use of shotgun metagenomic sequencing (SMS) approaches could allow the discovery of unknown members of the microbiota. In this study, we use RNA SMS to characterize the microbiota of seven individual mosquitoes (species include Culex pipiens, Culiseta incidens, and Ochlerotatus sierrensis) collected from a variety of habitats in California, USA. Sequencing was performed on the Illumina HiSeq platform and the resulting sequences were quality-checked and assembled into contigs using the A5 pipeline. Sequences related to single stranded RNA viruses of the Bunyaviridae and Rhabdoviridae were uncovered, along with an unclassified genus of double-stranded RNA viruses. Phylogenetic analysis finds that in all three cases, the closest relatives of the identified viral sequences are other mosquito-associated viruses, suggesting widespread host-group specificity among disparate viral taxa. Interestingly, we identified a Narnavirus of fungi, also reported elsewhere in mosquitoes, that potentially demonstrates a nested host-parasite association between virus, fungi, and mosquito. Sequences related to 8 bacterial families and 13 fungal families were found across the seven samples. Bacillus and Escherichia/Shigella were identified in all samples and Wolbachia was identified in all Cx. pipiens samples, while no single fungal genus was found in more than two samples. This study exemplifies the utility of RNA SMS in the characterization of the natural microbiota of mosquitoes and, in particular, the value of identifying all microbes associated with a specific host.

  11. Toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from Keswick Reservoir, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Finlayson, B.; Fujimura, R.; Huang, Z.Z.

    2000-02-01

    Keswick Reservoir, California, USA, receives metal-laden acid-mine drainage (AMD) from the abandoned Iron Mountain Mine. Mixing of the AMD with reservoir water causes precipitation and deposition of metal-rich sludge in the reservoir. Hydroelectric generation activities can scour the sediments and mobilize trace metals cadmium, copper, and zinc into the water column, thus creating potentially toxic conditions to fish and aquatic invertebrates. Sediment samples collected from Keswick Reservoir in 1993 and 1994 were analyzed for acid-volatile sulfides and for simultaneously extractable metals (SEM), and whole sediments and sediment elutriates were tested for toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), amphipods (Hyalella azteca), and cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia). Acid-volatile sulfide concentrations in the sediments were low (<10 {micro}mol/g H{sub 2}S), indicating that dissolved metals in the sediment pore water were not limited by sulfide. The SEM concentrations were generally high (up to 11 {micro}g/g Cd, 4,800 {micro}g/g Cu, and 1,600 {micro}g/g Zn, dry weight) in the sediments. Whole sediments and 20% w/w sediment elutriates from 16 sites were tested for toxicity. Low survival (as low as 0{degree}) in whole sediments was generally associated with copper and zinc, and to a lesser extent cadmium, concentrations that exceeded probable effect level values for freshwater sediments; survival also may have been influenced by low pH and alkalinity conditions. Low survival (as low as 0%) in sediment elutriates was also generally associated with higher concentrations of dissolved zinc. Further study is required to formulate sediment cleanup levels that are protective of fish and wildlife. Source control in the Iron Mountain Mine drainage will eventually significantly lessen the production of sediments.

  12. Calibration of numerical models for small debris flows in Yosemite Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bertolo, P.; Wieczorek, G.F.

    2005-01-01

    This study compares documented debris flow runout distances with numerical simulations in the Yosemite Valley of California, USA, where about 15% of historical events of slope instability can be classified as debris flows and debris slides (Wieczorek and Snyder, 2004). To model debris flows in the Yosemite Valley, we selected six streams with evidence of historical debris flows; three of the debris flow deposits have single channels, and the other three split their pattern in the fan area into two or more channels. From field observations all of the debris flows involved coarse material, with only very small clay content. We applied the one dimensional DAN (Dynamic ANalysis) model (Hungr, 1995) and the two-dimensional FLO2D model (O'Brien et al., 1993) to predict and compare the runout distance and the velocity of the debris flows observed in the study area. As a first step, we calibrated the parameters for the two softwares through the back analysis of three debris- flows channels using a trial-and-error procedure starting with values suggested in the literature. In the second step we applied the selected values to the other channels, in order to evaluate their predictive capabilities. After parameter calibration using three debris flows we obtained results similar to field observations We also obtained a good agreement between the two models for velocities. Both models are strongly influenced by topography: we used the 30 m cell size DTM available for the study area, that is probably not accurate enough for a highly detailed analysis, but it can be sufficient for a first screening. European Geosciences Union ?? 2005 Author(s). This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

  13. Proceedings from an NPRDC/ONR Workshop: Improving the Research Transition Process Held at San Diego, California on 23-24 May 1984

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    University of California, Irvine Dr. David Bowers Rensis Likert Associates, Inc. Dr. William Ouchi University of California, Los Angeles WORKSHOP...Montague Dr. Robert Penn Mr. Eugene Ramras Ms. Lorraine Ratto CAPT David Ringberg Dr. Jeffrey Schneider CDR Warren Schultz Dr. John Silva Mr...S. Crawford Reviewed by E . M. Ramras Released by 3ames W. Tweeddale Technical Director Approved for public release; distribution unlimited

  14. High-resolution boomer seismic-reflection profiles of the shelf off southern California from cruise A-1-00-SC: Santa Monica Bay to San Diego

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutmacher, Christina E.; Ross, Stephanie L.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Sliter, Ray W.; Normark, William R.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution boomer data were collected in the California Continental Borderland as part of the southern California Earthquake Hazards Task of the Southern California Coastal and Marine Geology Regional Investigations Project. During the period from 1997 to 2002, five data-acquisition cruises collected seismic-reflection data using several different systems from offshore Santa Barbara, California, south to the Exclusive Economic Zone boundary with Mexico. A key mission of this project was to map late Quaternary deformation in addition to improving our understanding of which offshore fault zones might have potential to damage highly populated areas of southern California. State regulations concerning the use of seismic-reflection equipment within three miles of the coastline precluded the routine gathering of high-resolution multichannel data in that swath adjacent to the coast. Boomer seismic-reflection data, however, can be obtained within the state 3-mile limit provided the operation receives authorization from the California State Lands Commission. The Geopulse boomer data accessible through this report were collected on the cruise A-1-00-SC, which was the only survey where we requested permission to work inside the 3-mile limit of the State of California. These data are critical to discovering connections between onshore and offshore faults, the overall lengths of which are related to the potential size of an earthquake that might be generated along them. The 2000 survey was designed to fill the gap between onshore data and reflection data obtained in deeper water on previous cruises as well as data anticipated from future surveys. This report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles.

  15. Prevalences of zoonotic bacteria among seabirds in rehabilitation centers along the Pacific Coast of California and Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Steele, Christine M; Brown, Richard N; Botzler, Richard G

    2005-10-01

    Many seabirds are rehabilitated annually by wildlife rehabilitation centers along the Pacific Coast, USA. Although various strains of zoonotic bacteria have been isolated from seabirds, risks to rehabilitators at these centers have not been well documented. From November 2001 through January 2003, we determined the prevalence of detectable enteric fauna by isolation and characterization of Gram-negative bacteria from cloacal swabs taken from 26 common murres (Uria aalge), 49 gulls (Larus spp.), and 14 other seabirds treated by rehabilitators in California and Washington (USA). At least 25 bacterial species were identified, including multiple strains of Escherichia coli, as well as Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antibiotic resistance was found in 13 of 19 bacterial isolates tested, including E. coli, K. pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Potential transfer of these bacteria poses a risk to wildlife rehabilitators and to seabirds in these centers, as well as to free-ranging birds.

  16. 78 FR 58878 - Safety Zone; San Diego Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay... Diego Shark Fest Swim. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of the participants, crew... this rule because the logistical details of the San Diego Shark Fest Swim were not finalized nor...

  17. Comparison of enzootic risk measures for predicting West Nile disease, Los Angeles, California, USA, 2004-2010.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Jennifer L; Park, Bborie K; Carpenter, Tim E; Ngo, Van; Civen, Rachel; Reisen, William K

    2012-08-01

    In Los Angeles, California, USA, 2 epidemics of West Nile virus (WNV) disease have occurred since WNV was recognized in 2003. To assess which measure of risk was most predictive of human cases, we compared 3 measures: the California Mosquito-Borne Virus Surveillance and Response Plan Assessment, the vector index, and the Dynamic Continuous-Area Space-Time system. A case-crossover study was performed by using symptom onset dates from 384 persons with WNV infection to determine their relative environmental exposure to high-risk conditions as measured by each method. Receiver-operating characteristic plots determined thresholds for each model, and the area under the curve was used to compare methods. We found that the best risk assessment model for human WNV cases included surveillance data from avian, mosquito, and climate sources.

  18. Larva of Nothotrichia shasta Harris & Armitage (Trichoptera: Hydroptilidae) from California, USA, with its phylogenetic and taxonomic implications.

    PubMed

    Parys, Katherine A; Harris, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Nothotrichia Flint 1967 is a small genus of infrequently collected microcaddisflies known from Chile and Brazil in South America, Costa Rica in Central America, and the United States in North America. Previously known only from adult specimens, we provide the first description and illustration of a larva in the genus, the larva of N. shasta from California, USA. We provide characters to separate Nothotrichia from other similar genera and an updated key to larval Hydroptilidae modified from that of Wiggins (1996). Larval characters provide additional evidence for the phylogeny and classification of the genus, which we now place tentatively in tribe Ochrotrichiini (subfamily Hydroptilinae).

  19. Invasive Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) do not replace native ants as seed dispersers of Dendromecon rigida (Papaveraceae) in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Carney, Shanna E; Byerley, M Brooke; Holway, David A

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the indirect effects of Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) invasions on patterns of seed dispersal and predation in the myrmecochorous tree poppy Dendromecon rigida in coastal San Diego County, California. Significantly more seeds were removed from ant-accessible seed stations at sites numerically dominated by a common harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex subnitidus), a native disperser of these seeds and a species sensitive to displacement by L. humile, than from those stations at sites where L. humile was in the majority. Predation of seeds was high, but variable, across sites, suggesting that reduced dispersal could result in increased seed predation in some habitats. Removal of elaiosomes did not affect the frequency with which predators removed seeds, but ants removed significantly more seeds with elaiosomes than without. In behavior trials, only P. subnitidus was able to carry seeds of Dendromecon rigida effectively. L. humile and a small native ant species, Dorymyrmex insanus, while displaying interest in the diaspores, were seldom able to carry whole seeds and, when they did, only carried them a few centimeters. Displacement of native harvester ants by L. humile appears to decrease the dispersal of Dendromecon rigida seeds and may be increasing loss of seeds due to predation.

  20. Thin layers and species-specific characterization of the phytoplankton community in Monterey Bay, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rines, J. E. B.; McFarland, M. N.; Donaghay, P. L.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    During the summers of 2005 and 2006, experiments designed to understand the properties of densely concentrated, thin layers of plankton and the processes governing their dynamics were conducted in Monterey Bay, California, USA. Our goal was to elucidate the role that species-specific properties of phytoplankton play in thin layer dynamics. Using adaptive sampling, we collected water samples from inside and outside bio-optical features of the water column. Characterization of the phytoplankton was compiled from live and preserved samples, and analyzed within a framework of physical, optical, chemical and acoustical data. In both years, Monterey Bay was home to an extraordinarily diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other protists. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates, and Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) taxa were common. In 2005, community assemblages were widespread, thus advection of water through the experimental mooring array did not result in floristic changes. In 2006 phytoplankton were very patchy in horizontal distribution, and advection of water through the array was at times accompanied by dramatic shifts in community composition. Individual taxa often exhibited disparate patterns of vertical distribution, with some found throughout the water column, whereas others were restricted to narrow depth intervals. Thin layers were observed in both years. In 2005, the dinoflagellate Akashiwo sanguinea formed intense thin layers near the pycnocline at night, and migrated to near surface waters at dawn. In 2006, layer composition was more complex, and related to the water mass present at the time of sampling. Optically detected thin layers of phytoplankton can be studied from the perspective of the impact their high biomass has on both ecological processes, and ocean optics. But thin layers can also be studied from the species-specific perspective of each organism, its role within the thin layer habitat, and the impact that life within a thin layer has on its life history

  1. Holocene climate on the Modoc Plateau, northern California, USA: The view from Medicine Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starratt, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    Medicine Lake is a small (165 ha), relatively shallow (average 7.3 m), intermediate elevation (2,036 m) lake located within the summit caldera of Medicine Lake volcano, Siskiyou County, California, USA. Sediment cores and high-resolution bathymetric and seismic reflection data were collected from the lake during the fall of 1999 and 2000. Sediments were analyzed for diatoms, pollen, density, grain size (sand/mud ratio), total organic carbon (TOC), and micro-scale fabric analysis. Using both 14C (AMS) dating and tephrochronology, the basal sediments were estimated to have been deposited about 11,400 cal year BP, thus yielding an estimated average sedimentation rate of about 20.66 cm/1,000 year. The lowermost part of the core (11,400-10,300 cal year BP) contains the transition from glacial to interglacial conditions. From about 11,000-5,500 cal year BP, Medicine Lake consisted of two small, steep-sided lakes or one lake with two steep-sided basins connected by a shallow shelf. During this time, both the pollen (Abies/Artemisia ratio) and the diatom (Cyclotella/Navicula ratio) evidences indicate that the effective moisture increased, leading to a deeper lake. Over the past 5,500 years, the pollen record shows that effective moisture continued to increase, and the diatom record indicates fluctuations in the lake level. The change in the lake level pattern from one of the increasing depths prior to about 6,000 cal year BP to one of the variable depths may be related to changes in the morphology of the Medicine Lake caldera associated with the movement of magma and the eruption of the Medicine Lake Glass Flow about 5,120 cal year BP. These changes in basin morphology caused Medicine Lake to flood the shallow shelf which surrounds the deeper part of the lake. During this period, the Cyclotella/Navicula ratio and the percent abundance of Isoetes vary, suggesting that the level of the lake fluctuated, resulting in changes in the shelf area available for colonization by

  2. Fuel deposition rates of montane and subalpine conifers in the central Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Moore, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    Fire managers and researchers need information on fuel deposition rates to estimate future changes in fuel bed characteristics, determine when forests transition to another fire behavior fuel model, estimate future changes in fuel bed characteristics, and parameterize and validate ecosystem process models. This information is lacking for many ecosystems including the Sierra Nevada in California, USA. We investigated fuel deposition rates and stand characteristics of seven montane and four subalpine conifers in the Sierra Nevada. We collected foliage, miscellaneous bark and crown fragments, cones, and woody fuel classes from four replicate plots each in four stem diameter size classes for each species, for a total of 176 sampling sites. We used these data to develop predictive equations for each fuel class and diameter size class of each species based on stem and crown characteristics. There were consistent species and diameter class differences in the annual amount of foliage and fragments deposited. Foliage deposition rates ranged from just over 50 g m-2 year-1 in small diameter mountain hemlock stands to ???300 g m-2 year-1 for the three largest diameter classes of giant sequoia. The deposition rate for most woody fuel classes increased from the smallest diameter class stands to the largest diameter class stands. Woody fuel deposition rates varied among species as well. The rates for the smallest woody fuels ranged from 0.8 g m-2 year-1 for small diameter stands of Jeffrey pine to 126.9 g m-2 year-1 for very large diameter stands of mountain hemlock. Crown height and live crown ratio were the best predictors of fuel deposition rates for most fuel classes and species. Both characteristics reflect the amount of crown biomass including foliage and woody fuels. Relationships established in this study allow predictions of fuel loads to be made on a stand basis for each of these species under current and possible future conditions. These predictions can be used to

  3. Mortality and herpesvirus infections of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in Tomales Bay, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Burge, Colleen A; Griffin, Frederick J; Friedman, Carolyn S

    2006-09-14

    Seed losses of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas have been associated with an ostreid herpesvirus-1 (OsHV-1) in Europe, and in 2002, a similar OsHV was detected in Tomales Bay, California, USA. In May of 2003, 5 stocks of seed Pacific oysters were planted at 2 sites (Inner Bay and Outer Bay) in Tomales Bay and monitored for mortality, presence/prevalence of OsHV (using polymerase chain reaction [PCR] and histology), and growth. Temperature (degrees C) and salinity data were collected every half an hour at each site. OsHV was detected at both the Inner and Outer Bay sites on the same sample date and mean temperature predicted OsHV presence (p < 0.005). High levels of mortality occurred 2 wk (Inner Bay site) and 4 wk (Outer Bay site) after OsHV detection. OsHV presence predicted mortality (p = 0.01). Temperature maximums and overall temperature exposure were greater at the Inner Bay site and may explain why mortality affected these oysters sooner than oysters planted at the Outer Bay site. Differences in cumulative mortality were significant among stocks (p < 0.0001), but not between sites (p > 0.05). OsHV prevalence was similar among stocks (p > 0.05) and between sites (p > 0.05). No evidence of herpesvirus-induced Cowdry type A nuclear inclusions or other pathogens were observed. Changes in tissue and cellular architecture including dilation of the digestive tubules and nuclear chromatin margination and pycnosis were observed in OsHV-infected oysters, consistent with previously observed OsHV infections. Stocks with smaller oysters had higher mortality rates than those with larger oysters; growth rate did not correlate with mortalities (p > 0.05). Taken together, these data suggest that the OsHV may cause or act in synergy with temperature to kill Pacific oyster seed in Tomales Bay, but further investigation of OsHV etiology in seed oysters is needed.

  4. Pliocene to late Pleistocene magmatism in the Aurora Volcanic Field, Nevada and California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, S.; Cousens, B.; John, D. A.; du Bray, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 3.9- 0.1 Ma Aurora Volcanic Field (AVF) covers 325 km2 east and southeast of the Bodie Hills, north of Mono Lake, California, USA. The AVF is located immediately northwest of the Long Valley magmatic system and adjacent and overlapping the Miocene Bodie Hills Volcanic Field (BHVF). Rock types range from trachybasalt to trachydacite, and high-silica rhyolite. The trachybasalts to trachydacites are weakly to moderately porphyritic (1-30%) with variable phenocryst assemblages that are some combination of plagioclase, hornblende, clinopyroxene, and lesser orthopyroxene, olivine, and/or biotite. Microphenocrysts are dominated by plagioclase, and include opaque oxides, clinopyroxene, and apatite. These rocks are weakly to strongly devitrified. The high-silica rhyolites are sparsely porphyritic with trace to 10% phenocrysts of quartz, sanidine, plagioclase, biotite, (+/- hornblende), accessory opaque oxide minerals, titanite, allanite, (+/-apatite, zircon), and have glassy groundmasses. Rocks in the AVF are less strongly porphyritic than those of BHVF. Plagioclase phenocrysts are often oscillatory zoned and many have sieve texture. Amphiboles have distinct black opaque rims. Xenocrystic quartz and plagioclase are rare. AVF lavas have bimodal SiO2 compositions, ranging from 49 to 78 wt%, with a gap between 65 and 75 wt%. They are high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic in composition, and are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous. They are enriched in rare earth elements (REE), especially light REEs, compared to the Miocene BHVF rocks. Primordial mantle-normalized incompatible element patterns show arc- or subduction-related signatures, with enrichment in Ba and Pb, and depletion in Nb and Ta. Enrichment in K and Sr and depletion in Ti are less pronounced than in the BHVF rocks. There is no correlation between lead isotope ratios and silica (initial 206Pb/204Pb ratios range from 18.974 to 19.151). Neodymium isotope ratios show a moderate negative correlation with silica

  5. Sources and Movement of Saline Groundwater in a Coastal Aquifer, Southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, R.; Stolp, B. J.; Danskin, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    Development of local groundwater resources in coastal areas is limited by the presence of saline groundwater. For a study in the San Diego area, a geochemical approach was used to investigate the sources and movement of saline groundwater in the coastal aquifer. Chemical and isotopic data were collected from multiple-depth monitoring-well sites near the San Diego coastline at discrete intervals to depths of more than 650 meters. The groundwater samples were analyzed for major and minor ions, the stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and strontium, and radioactive isotopes of tritium and carbon-14. Each chemical and isotopic tracer preserves some aspect of the hydrologic history of the groundwater ranging from the chemical characteristics (major and minor ions), to the source of water (stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen), to the types of rock encountered in the groundwater flow system (strontium isotopes), to time-since-recharge (tritium and carbon-14). By using sodium-to-calcium mass ratios, in combination with the isotopic data, the occurrence of saline groundwater as a result of seawater intrusion was distinguishable from groundwater in a previously-saline aquifer that has been "flushed" by fresher continental recharge. The systematic analysis of these tracers indicate that the sources and movement of saline groundwater in the coastal San Diego area are dominated by: 1) regional flow of higher-elevation precipitation that recharged many thousands of years ago along deep flowpaths; 2) recharge of local precipitation in relatively shallower portions of the flow system; and 3) intrusion of seawater that primarily entered the aquifer during pre-modern times. Use of multiple chemical and isotopic tracers provides unique insight regarding the processes affecting groundwater quality, enabling local water agencies to assess the groundwater resources in the coastal aquifer and begin to reduce the area's reliance on imported water.

  6. Implementation plan for operating alternatives for the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station cogeneration facility at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D.M.; Parker, S.A.; Stucky, D.J.

    1994-04-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools, software, and procedures used to identify and evaluate energy efficiency technologies and improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy use efficiency. To assist in procurement of energy efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies devise and implement performance contracting and utility demand-side management strategies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) supports the FEMP mission of energy systems modernization. Under this charter, the Laboratory and its contractors work with federal facility energy managers to assess and implement energy efficiency improvements at federal facilities nationwide. The SouthWestern Division of the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, in cooperation with FEMP, has tasked PNL with developing a plan for implementing recommended modifications to the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) cogeneration plant at the Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) in San Diego. That plan is detailed in this report.

  7. ORGANIC POLLUTANT DEPOSITION TO THE SIERRA NEVADA (CALIFORNIA, USA) SNOWPACK AND ASSOCIATED LAKE AND STREAM ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    High elevation ecosystems in the western USA and Canada are receiving deposition of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that presumably originate in the USA as well as outside its borders. In April 1992 we obtained paired snowpack samples from each of two watersheds located in t...

  8. ORGANIC POLLUTANT DEPOSITION TO THE SIERRA NEVADA (CALIFORNIA, USA) SNOWPACK AND ASSOCIATED LAKE AND STREAM ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    High elevation ecosystems in the western USA and Canada are receiving deposition of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that presumably originate in the USA as well as outside its borders. In April 1992 we obtained paired snowpack samples from each of two watersheds located in t...

  9. CoSMoS Southern California v3.0 Phase 1 (100-year storm) flood hazard projections: Los Angeles, San Diego and Orange counties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnard, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Foxgrover, Amy; O'Neill, Andrea; Herdman, Liv

    2015-01-01

    The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes detailed predictions (meter-scale) over large geographic scales (100s of kilometers) of storm-induced coastal flooding and erosion for both current and future sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. CoSMoS v3.0 for Southern California shows projections for future climate scenarios (sea-level rise and storms) to provide emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazards information that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage and allocate resources within complex coastal settings. Phase I data for Southern California include flood-hazard information for the coast from the Mexican Border to Pt. Conception for a 100-year storm scenario. Data are complete for the information presented but are considered preliminary; changes may be reflected in the full data release (Phase II) in summer 2016.

  10. Flies from L.A., The Sequel: A further twelve new species of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) from the BioSCAN Project in Los Angeles (California, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brian V.; Disney, R. Henry L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Presented are continued results from the BioSCAN Project, an urban biodiversity study sampling primarily from private backyards in Los Angeles, California (USA). Presented are continued results from the BioSCAN Project, an urban biodiversity study sampling primarily from private backyards in Los Angeles, California (USA). New information Twelve new species of Megaselia (Diptera: Phoridae) are described: M. baileyae, M. friedrichae, M. gonzalezorum, M. joanneae, M. losangelensis, M. phyllissunae, M. pongsaiae, M. shatesae, M. stoakesi, M. studentorum, M. voluntariorum, M. wongae. PMID:27226746

  11. 76 FR 5732 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA... FR 4833), regarding security zones for cruise ships in the Port of San Diego, California. This...

  12. 76 FR 4833 - Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port... Guard proposes to amend 33 CFR 165.1108, Security Zones; Cruise Ships, Port of San Diego, California, by... waters within a 100 yard radius around any cruise ship that is located within the San Diego port area...

  13. 78 FR 66269 - Safety Zone, Sea World Fireworks; Mission Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Sea World Fireworks; Mission Bay, San Diego... temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Mission Bay in San Diego, California for Sea World... firework event that is part of Sea World Christmas festivities. This safety zone is necessary to...

  14. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLES AND BENTHIC DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES IN CALIFORNIA CENTRAL VALLEY STREAMS (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams and rivers in the California Central Valley Ecoregion have been substantially modified by human activities. This study examines distributional patterns of benthic diatom assemblages in relation to environmental characteristics in streams and rivers of this region. Benthic...

  15. California Dust and Ash

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Airborne Dust and Ash over Southern California     ... during late fall and winter swept large amounts of dust and ash across the skies of San Diego and over the Pacific Ocean on November 27, ...

  16. Habitat requirements of the endangered California freshwater shrimp (Syncaris pacifica) in lagunitas and Olema creeks, Marin County, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Barbara A.; Saiki, Michael K.; Fong, Darren

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to better understand the habitat requirements and environmental limiting factors of Syncaris pacifica, the California freshwater shrimp. This federally listed endangered species is native to perennial lowland streams in a few watersheds in northern California. Field sampling occurred in Lagunitas and Olema creeks at seasonal intervals from February 2003 to November 2004. Ten glides, five pools, and five riffles served as fixed sampling reaches, with eight glides, four pools, and four riffles located in Lagunitas Creek and the remainder in Olema Creek. A total of 1773 S. pacifica was counted during this study, all of which were captured along vegetated banks in Lagunitas Creek. Syncaris pacifica was most numerous in glides (64), then in pools (31), and lastly in riffles (5). According to logistic regression analysis, S. pacifica was mostly associated with submerged portions of streambank vegetation (especially overhanging vegetation such as ferns and blackberries, emergent vegetation such as sedge and brooklime, and fine roots associated with water hemlock, willow, sedge, and blackberries) along with low water current velocity and a sandy substrate. These seemingly favorable habitat conditions for S. pacifica were present in glides and pools in Lagunitas Creek, but not in Olema Creek. ?? 2009 The Crustacean Society.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Groundwater Conditions in a Coastal Aquifer, Southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolp, B. J.; Anders, R.; Danskin, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    Development of local groundwater resources in coastal areas is influenced by freshwater recharge and discharge, topography, geologic structure, and changes in sea level. For the coastal San Diego area, a density-dependent cross-sectional groundwater flow model was constructed to examine the aquifer and flow characteristics. The model domain represents generalized conditions along an east-west transect that is described by data from two multiple-depth monitoring-well sites; the domain extends into the Pacific Ocean to the 120 meter (m) bathymetric contour. Vertically, the model was discretized into four zones that represent geologic formations; each zone was assigned a horizontal permeability based on aquifer testing. Temporally, the model was divided into two stress periods. The first stress period simulates pre-development conditions, with an instantaneous sea-level rise of 120 m starting 6,000 years ago. This is a simplified representation of transient conditions since the last glacial maximum. The second stress period simulates 60 years of groundwater development, which is represented in terms of net fresh water flow through the domain. Near the coast, observed water-quality data indicate (1) brackish-to-hypersaline groundwater at shallow depths, (2) fresh continental recharge at intermediate depths, and (3) seawater intrusion at depths greater than 300 m. In order to simulate these general groundwater conditions, vertical anisotropy of the upper permeability zone was increased, freshwater discharge was constrained to the seafloor (no discharge along the coast), and groundwater development was simulated as exceeding freshwater recharge (additional water is provided by depletion of freshwater reserves). This numerical testing identifies specific factors that influence current conditions and provides an initial assessment of resource management alternatives for the San Diego coastal aquifer.

  18. Molecular Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi Detected in the Vector Triatoma protracta from California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Shender, Lisa A.; Lewis, Michael D.; Rejmanek, Daniel; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, is a vector-borne zoonotic protozoan parasite that can cause fatal cardiac disease. While recognized as the most economically important parasitic infection in Latin America, the incidence of Chagas disease in the United States of America (US) may be underreported and even increasing. The extensive genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Latin America is well-documented and likely influences disease progression, severity and treatment efficacy; however, little is known regarding T. cruzi strains endemic to the US. It is therefore important to expand our knowledge on US T. cruzi strains, to improve upon the recognition of and response to locally acquired infections. Methodology/Principle Findings We conducted a study of T. cruzi molecular diversity in California, augmenting sparse genetic data from southern California and for the first time investigating genetic sequences from northern California. The vector Triatoma protracta was collected from southern (Escondido and Los Angeles) and northern (Vallecito) California regions. Samples were initially screened via sensitive nuclear repetitive DNA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA PCR assays, yielding an overall prevalence of approximately 28% and 55% for southern and northern California regions, respectively. Positive samples were further processed to identify discrete typing units (DTUs), revealing both TcI and TcIV lineages in southern California, but only TcI in northern California. Phylogenetic analyses (targeting COII-ND1, TR and RB19 genes) were performed on a subset of positive samples to compare Californian T. cruzi samples to strains from other US regions and Latin America. Results indicated that within the TcI DTU, California sequences were similar to those from the southeastern US, as well as to several isolates from Latin America responsible for causing Chagas disease in humans. Conclusions/Significance Triatoma protracta populations

  19. Molecular Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi Detected in the Vector Triatoma protracta from California, USA.

    PubMed

    Shender, Lisa A; Lewis, Michael D; Rejmanek, Daniel; Mazet, Jonna A K

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, is a vector-borne zoonotic protozoan parasite that can cause fatal cardiac disease. While recognized as the most economically important parasitic infection in Latin America, the incidence of Chagas disease in the United States of America (US) may be underreported and even increasing. The extensive genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Latin America is well-documented and likely influences disease progression, severity and treatment efficacy; however, little is known regarding T. cruzi strains endemic to the US. It is therefore important to expand our knowledge on US T. cruzi strains, to improve upon the recognition of and response to locally acquired infections. We conducted a study of T. cruzi molecular diversity in California, augmenting sparse genetic data from southern California and for the first time investigating genetic sequences from northern California. The vector Triatoma protracta was collected from southern (Escondido and Los Angeles) and northern (Vallecito) California regions. Samples were initially screened via sensitive nuclear repetitive DNA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA PCR assays, yielding an overall prevalence of approximately 28% and 55% for southern and northern California regions, respectively. Positive samples were further processed to identify discrete typing units (DTUs), revealing both TcI and TcIV lineages in southern California, but only TcI in northern California. Phylogenetic analyses (targeting COII-ND1, TR and RB19 genes) were performed on a subset of positive samples to compare Californian T. cruzi samples to strains from other US regions and Latin America. Results indicated that within the TcI DTU, California sequences were similar to those from the southeastern US, as well as to several isolates from Latin America responsible for causing Chagas disease in humans. Triatoma protracta populations in California are frequently infected with T. cruzi. Our data extend

  20. Surface motion of active rock glaciers in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA: inventory and a case study using InSAR

    Treesearch

    L. Liu; C.I. Millar; R.D. Westfall; H.A. Zebker

    2013-01-01

    Despite the abundance of rock glaciers in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA, few efforts have been made to measure their surface flow. Here we use the interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) technique to compile a~benchmark inventory describing the kinematic state of 59 active rock glaciers in this region. Statistically, these rock glaciers moved at...

  1. Response of Subalpine Conifers in the Sierra Nevada, California, U.S.A., to 20th-Century Warming and Decadal Climate Variability

    Treesearch

    Constance I. Millar; Robert D. Westfall; Diane L. Delany; John C. King; Lisa J. Graumlich

    2004-01-01

    Four independent studies of conifer growth between 1880 and 2002 in upper elevation forests of the central Sierra Nevada, California, U.S.A., showed correlated multidecadal and century-long responses associated with climate. Using tree-ring and ecological plot analysis, we studied annual branch growth of krummholz Pinus albicaulis; invasion by P....

  2. Potential climatic refugia in semi-arid, temperate mountains: plant and arthropod assemblages associated with rock glaciers, talus slopes, and their forefield wetlands, Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    Treesearch

    Constance I. Millar; Robert D. Westfall; Angela Evenden; Jeffrey G. Holmquist; Jutta Schmidt-Gengenbach; Rebecca S. Franklin; Jan Nachlinger; Diane L. Delany

    2015-01-01

    Unique thermal and hydrologic regimes of rock-glacier and periglacial talus environments support little-studied mountain ecosystems. We report the first studies of vascular plant and arthropod diversity for these habitats in the central Sierra Nevada, California, USA. Surfaces of active rock glaciers develop scattered islands of soil that provide habitat for vegetation...

  3. INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ULTRA-FINE PARTICLE COUNTS IN A 1999 TWO-SEASON FRESNO, CALIFORNIA, USA ACUTE CARDIAC PANEL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor and Outdoor Ultrafine Particle Counts in a 1999 Two-Season Fresno, California, USA Acute Cardiac Panel Study.

    John Creason, Debra Walsh, Lucas Neas, US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects R...

  4. Re-introduction of tule elk to Point Reyes National Seashore, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gogan, Peter J.; McCrea A. Cobb,; Gates, Natalie B.; Barrett, Reginald H.; Soorae, P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes), a subspecies endemic to California, was historically found in large herds throughout much of central and coastal California. Market hunting during the California Gold Rush decimated these herds, and by 1895, only two to 10 elk remained. This remnant group was protected and served as the source for early relocation efforts (McCullough, 1971). Early efforts were generally unsuccessful but did establish a herd in California’s Owens Valley, outside their historical range, in 1933. The herd grew rapidly and supported six controversial hunts between 1943 and 1969. In an effort to limit hunting, concerned preservationists formed the Committee for the Preservation of Tule Elk in 1960. Public pressure resulted in the California State Legislature passing a law in 1971 that halted hunting until either state-wide numbers reached 2,000, or no further unoccupied elk habitat existed. This law prompted the California Department of Fish and Game to begin reintroducing tule elk throughout their former range. In 1976, the U.S. Congress passed a resolution that concurred with state law and directed federal agencies to make lands available for reintroductions within the subspecies’ historical range. Point Reyes National Seashore was identified as a potential translocation site.

  5. Isolation of Onchocerca lupi in Dogs and Black Flies, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hassan K; Bolcen, Shanna; Kubofcik, Joseph; Nutman, Thomas B; Eberhard, Mark L; Middleton, Kelly; Wekesa, Joseph Wakoli; Ruedas, Gimena; Nelson, Kimberly J; Dubielzig, Richard; De Lombaert, Melissa; Silverman, Bruce; Schorling, Jamie J; Adler, Peter H; Unnasch, Thomas R; Beeler, Emily S

    2015-05-01

    In southern California, ocular infections caused by Onchocerca lupi were diagnosed in 3 dogs (1 in 2006, 2 in 2012). The infectious agent was confirmed through morphologic analysis of fixed parasites in tissues and by PCR and sequencing of amplicons derived from 2 mitochondrially encoded genes and 1 nuclear-encoded gene. A nested PCR based on the sequence of the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene of the parasite was developed and used to screen Simulium black flies collected from southern California for O. lupi DNA. Six (2.8%; 95% CI 0.6%-5.0%) of 213 black flies contained O. lupi DNA. Partial mitochondrial16S rRNA gene sequences from the infected flies matched sequences derived from black fly larvae cytotaxonomically identified as Simulium tribulatum. These data implicate S. tribulatum flies as a putative vector for O. lupi in southern California.

  6. Isolation of Onchocerca lupi in Dogs and Black Flies, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Hassan K.; Bolcen, Shanna; Kubofcik, Joseph; Nutman, Thomas B.; Eberhard, Mark L.; Middleton, Kelly; Wekesa, Joseph Wakoli; Ruedas, Gimena; Nelson, Kimberly J.; Dubielzig, Richard; De Lombaert, Melissa; Silverman, Bruce; Schorling, Jamie J.; Adler, Peter H.; Beeler, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    In southern California, ocular infections caused by Onchocerca lupi were diagnosed in 3 dogs (1 in 2006, 2 in 2012). The infectious agent was confirmed through morphologic analysis of fixed parasites in tissues and by PCR and sequencing of amplicons derived from 2 mitochondrially encoded genes and 1 nuclear-encoded gene. A nested PCR based on the sequence of the cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene of the parasite was developed and used to screen Simulium black flies collected from southern California for O. lupi DNA. Six (2.8%; 95% CI 0.6%–5.0%) of 213 black flies contained O. lupi DNA. Partial mitochondrial16S rRNA gene sequences from the infected flies matched sequences derived from black fly larvae cytotaxonomically identified as Simulium tribulatum. These data implicate S. tribulatum flies as a putative vector for O. lupi in southern California. PMID:25897954

  7. Accelerating slip rates on the puente hills blind thrust fault system beneath metropolitan Los Angeles, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergen, Kristian J; Shaw, John H.; Leon, Lorraine A; Dolan, James F; Pratt, Thomas L.; Ponti, Daniel J.; Morrow, Eric; Barrera, Wendy; Rhodes, Edward J.; Murari, Madhav K.; Owen, Lewis

    2017-01-01

    Slip rates represent the average displacement across a fault over time and are essential to estimating earthquake recurrence for proba-bilistic seismic hazard assessments. We demonstrate that the slip rate on the western segment of the Puente Hills blind thrust fault system, which is beneath downtown Los Angeles, California (USA), has accel-erated from ~0.22 mm/yr in the late Pleistocene to ~1.33 mm/yr in the Holocene. Our analysis is based on syntectonic strata derived from the Los Angeles River, which has continuously buried a fold scarp above the blind thrust. Slip on the fault beneath our field site began during the late-middle Pleistocene and progressively increased into the Holocene. This increase in rate implies that the magnitudes and/or the frequency of earthquakes on this fault segment have increased over time. This challenges the characteristic earthquake model and presents an evolving and potentially increasing seismic hazard to metropolitan Los Angeles.

  8. Valve morphology and systematic position of Navicula walkeri (Bacillariophyceae), a diatom endemic to Oregon and California (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kociolek, J.P.; Spaulding, S.A.; Kingston, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Variation in valve size and ultrastructure is documented for Navicula walkeri, a freshwater diatom species endemic to Oregon and central California (USA). In LM, this large diatom has longitudinal lines on either side of the axial area, as well as lineolate striae. External proximal raphe ends recurve toward the same side as the deflected distal ends. A large central nodule and bulbous areas at the terminus of each raphe branch are visible internally. The edges of an axial plate form the image of longitudinal lines. The suite of features present in N. walkeri suggests it is part of Navicula sensu stricto but occupies an isolated position within the group. Navicula sensu stricto is not an entirely homogeneous assemblage, and further refinements of the systematic affinities of its members may be warranted.

  9. The effects of timber harvesting on the structure and composition of adjacent old-growth coast redwood forest, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, W.H.; Jones, C.

    2001-01-01

    Data collected across timber harvest boundaries on nine sites within the Redwood National and State Park management area in California, USA, were used to estimate the effective size of old-growth coast redwood preserves. Fourteen variables related to stand structure and composition, wildlife habitat, and physical environment were significantly correlated to distance from the timber harvest boundary using multiple regression analysis. A maximum depth of edge influence of 200 m was determined for variables exhibiting a significant correlation to the distance from the harvest edge. A spatial analysis using ArcView indicated that 53% of the old growth preserved within the study area was influenced by edge conditions, leaving 47% as effective old-growth.

  10. Health Care–Associated Infection Outbreak Investigations in Outpatient Settings, Los Angeles County, California, USA, 2000−2012

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Laura; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Terashita, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Health care services are increasingly delivered in outpatient settings. However, infection control oversight in outpatient settings to ensure patient safety has not improved and literature quantifying reported health care–associated infection outbreaks in outpatient settings is scarce. The objective of this analysis was to characterize investigations of suspected and confirmed outbreaks in outpatient settings in Los Angeles County, California, USA, reported during 2000–2012, by using internal logs; publications; records; and correspondence of outbreak investigations by characteristics of the setting, number, and type of infection control breaches found during investigations, outcomes of cases, and public health responses. Twenty-eight investigations met the inclusion criteria. Investigations occurred frequently, in diverse settings, and required substantial public health resources. Most outpatient settings investigated had >1 infection control breach. Lapses in infection control were suspected to be the outbreak source for 16 of the reviewed investigations. PMID:26196293

  11. A Mixed-Effects Heterogeneous Negative Binomial Model for Postfire Conifer Regeneration in Northeastern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Justin S. Crotteau; Martin W. Ritchie; J. Morgan. Varner

    2014-01-01

    Many western USA fire regimes are typified by mixed-severity fire, which compounds the variability inherent to natural regeneration densities in associated forests. Tree regeneration data are often discrete and nonnegative; accordingly, we fit a series of Poisson and negative binomial variation models to conifer seedling counts across four distinct burn severities and...

  12. San Diego Community College District Student Satisfaction Survey, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego Community Coll. District, CA. Research and Planning.

    The San Diego Community College District (SDCCD), California, conducted a student satisfaction survey at three colleges during fall 2002. The survey instrument includes the following three parts: (1) Service Areas: students were asked to rate the levels of importance and satisfaction for 22 services; (2) Survey Themes: seventy-six statements were…

  13. Managing Diversity: The City of San Diego Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannwald, William

    1999-01-01

    Considers how libraries can build and manage a work force that is sensitive to and mirrors the increasingly diverse population they serve. Defines diversity; describes the experiences of the city of San Diego (California) in developing its "Diversity Commitment" and the involvement of the public library in the program; and provides…

  14. Courtney and I Teach San Diego County History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harry, Kay

    1982-01-01

    Describes how a koala hand puppet was used to teach county history as well as reading and writing skills, multicultural awareness, music, art, and self-esteem to third graders in San Diego, California. Activities that involved the puppet are described. (AM)

  15. Determinants of Student Achievement: New Evidence from San Diego

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Julian R.; Zau, Andrew C.; Rice, Lorien A.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of a conducted by the authors in collaboration with the San Diego Unified School District (SDUSD), the second-largest district in California. For this study, the authors compiled a highly detailed, student-level database that enabled them to link factors influencing student achievement in ways that have not been…

  16. Courtney and I Teach San Diego County History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harry, Kay

    1982-01-01

    Describes how a koala hand puppet was used to teach county history as well as reading and writing skills, multicultural awareness, music, art, and self-esteem to third graders in San Diego, California. Activities that involved the puppet are described. (AM)

  17. Our Economy: How It Works. San Diego Results (1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Teaching Economics, San Francisco, CA.

    Five hundred and thirteen ninth grade students in San Diego, California, used the junior high economics textbook "Our Economy: How It Works" (Addison-Wesley, 1980) in a semester-long course and then were evaluated. The text uses case studies about the manufacture of familiar products, financial institutions, and government to make…

  18. Earthshots: Satellite images of environmental change – Imperial Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2013-01-01

    At the bottom of the sink lies the Salton Sea, the largest lake in California. It lacks an outlet to the ocean and lies 70 m below sea level. About 85% of the sea’s inflows come from agricultural runoff, and its waters are 37% saltier than the Pacific Ocean.

  19. Change in spatial characteristics of forest openings in the Klamath Mountains of northwestern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Carl N. Skinner

    1995-01-01

    Change in the spatial characteristics of forest openings was investigated in three forested watersheds in northwestern Siskiyou County, California totalling approximately 24,600 hectares. Watersheds with minimal human disturbance were chosen for study. However, fi;e suppression has been pervasive throughout. Characteristics of forest openings (area, perimeter, distance...

  20. Historical and contemporary distributions of carnivores in forests of the Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    Treesearch

    William J Zielinski; Richard L Truex; Fredrick V. Schlexer; Lori A. Campbell; Carlos Caroll

    2005-01-01

    Malammalian carnivores are considered particularly sensitive indicators of environmental change. Information on the distribution of carnivores from the early 1900s provides a unique opportunity to evaluate changes in their distributions over a 75-year period during which the influence of human uses of forest resources in California greatly increased. We present...

  1. Predicting landslides related to clearcut logging, northwestern California, U.S.A.

    Treesearch

    David J. Furbish; Raymond M. Rice

    1983-01-01

    Abstract - Landslides related to clearcut logging are a significant source of erosion in the mountains of northwestern California. Forest managers, therefore, frequently must include assessments of landslide risk in their land-use plans. A quantitative method is needed to predict such risk over large areas of rugged mountainous terrain. From air photographs, data...

  2. Olive fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) in California table olives, USA: Invasion, distribution, and management implications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), was discovered in California in late 1998. Thereafter, intensive research was conducted to develop pest control methods in table olives. The life history of olive fruit fly was elucidated, and the distribution and abundance of the adults determined through ...

  3. Classic biological control of olive fruit fly in California, USA: release and recovery of introduced parasitoids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The establishment of olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) in California led to a classical biological program. This study reports the release and recovery of two solitary larval endoparasitoids, Psyttalia humilis Silvestri and Psyttalia lounsburyi (Silvestri) from sub-Saharan Africa, in two coa...

  4. Factors influencing fire severity under moderate burning conditions in the Klamath Mountains, northern California, USA

    Treesearch

    Becky L. Estes; Eric E. Knapp; Carl N. Skinner; Jay D. Miller; Haiganoush K. Preisler

    2017-01-01

    Topography, weather, and fuels are known factors driving fire behavior, but the degree to which each contributes to the spatial pattern of fire severity under different conditions remains poorly understood. The variability in severity within the boundaries of the 2006 wildfires that burned in the Klamath Mountains, northern California, along with data on burn...

  5. Citizen scientists monitor a deadly fungus threatening amphibian communities in northern coastal California, USA

    Treesearch

    Karen L. Pope; Greta M. Wengert; Janet E. Foley; Donald T. Ashton; Richard G. Botzler

    2016-01-01

    Ecoclub youth and supervising family members conducted citizen science to assess regional prevalence and distribution of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) among amphibians at Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) and Redwood National and State Parks (Parks), Humboldt County, California, US, May 2013 through December...

  6. REVIEW OF THE FISHERIES OF THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA, USA: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salton Sea is an endorheic, 980-km2 salt lake in the Sonoran Desert of southern California. The historical fish community switched from freshwater to marine species as salinity increased due to evaporation and brackish water inflows. Three species, bairdiella (<...

  7. Response of ponderosa pine plantations to competing vegetation control in Northern California, USA: A meta- analysis

    Treesearch

    Jianwei Zhang; Robert Powers; William Oliver; Young David

    2013-01-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to determine response of stand basal area growth to competing vegetation control (CVC) in ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) plantations grown at 29 sites across northern California. These studies were installed during the last 50 years on site indices from 11 to 35 m at 50 years and often included other treatments...

  8. Use of soil fumigants and air quality issues in California, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many high value cash crops use soil fumigants for profitable production.The primary fumigants used in California are 1,3-dichloropropene (Telone®), chloropicrin, metam salts (sodium or potassium), and methyl bromide. Most of these toxic chemicals and their formulations are volatile compounds (VOCs),...

  9. Thermal regimes and snowpack relations of periglacial talus slopes, Sierra Nevada, California, USA.

    Treesearch

    Constance I Millar; Robert D. Westfall; Diane L. Delany

    2014-01-01

    Thermal regimes of eight periglacial talus slopes, at contrasting elevations, aspects, and substrates, in the Sierra Nevada, California, had complex microclimatic patterns partially decoupled from external conditions. Over three years, warm seasons showed mean talus matrix temperatures and daily variances lower than surfaces and cooler than free-air; talus surface and...

  10. APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL GROUNDWATER TRACERS AT THE SULPHUR BANK MERCURY MINE, CALIFORNIA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on boron, chloride, sulfate, δD, δ18O, and 3H concentrations in surface water and groundwater samples from the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, California (SBMM) to examine and provide constraints on the site’s groundwater system. SBMM is an abandoned sulfur and merc...

  11. APPLICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL GROUNDWATER TRACERS AT THE SULPHUR BANK MERCURY MINE, CALIFORNIA, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on boron, chloride, sulfate, δD, δ18O, and 3H concentrations in surface water and groundwater samples from the Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine, California (SBMM) to examine and provide constraints on the site’s groundwater system. SBMM is an abandoned sulfur and merc...

  12. REVIEW OF THE FISHERIES OF THE SALTON SEA, CALIFORNIA, USA: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE. (R826552)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Salton Sea is an endorheic, 980-km2 salt lake in the Sonoran Desert of southern California. The historical fish community switched from freshwater to marine species as salinity increased due to evaporation and brackish water inflows. Three species, bairdiella (<...

  13. Water- and air-quality and surficial bed-sediment monitoring of the Sweetwater Reservoir watershed, San Diego County, California, 2003-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, Gregory O.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Morita, Andrew Y.

    2015-01-01

    Sampling results show concentrations of the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether in water and air samples declined after it was phased out by the State of California in January 2004. The largest concentrations of gasoline hydrocarbons benzene and toluene in water were detected at or near the surface of the SWR. Isophorone and phenol were the two most frequently detected BNA compounds in water. Diuron, prometon, and simazine were the most frequently detected pesticide compounds in water. Concentrations of benzene and toluene in air samples were highest during the cooler months and had a consistent seasonal pattern over time. Ten PAH compounds were detected frequently in air samples. Twelve pesticide compounds were also detected in air samples. Surficial bed-sediment samples were analyzed for 53 PAHs; 22 of the compounds had one or more detections. Surficial bed-sediment samples were analyzed for 22 organic compounds; only 6 compounds had one or more detections. Surficial bed-sediment samples were analyzed for 37 metals.

  14. Water resources of Borrego Valley and vicinity, San Diego County, California; Phase 2, Development of a ground-water flow model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitten, H.T.; Lines, G.C.; Berenbrock, Charles; Durbin, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Because of the imbalance between recharge and pumpage, groundwater levels declined as much as 100 ft in some areas of Borrego Valley, California during drinking 1945-80. As an aid to analyzing the effects of pumping on the groundwater system, a three-dimensional finite-element groundwater flow model was developed. The model was calibrated for both steady-state (1945) and transient-state (1946-79) conditions. For the steady-state calibration, hydraulic conductivities of the three aquifers were varied within reasonable limits to obtain an acceptable match between measured and computed hydraulic heads. Recharge from streamflow infiltration (4,800 acre-ft/yr) was balanced by computed evapotranspiration (3,900 acre-ft/yr) and computed subsurface outflow from the model area (930 acre-ft/yr). For the transient state calibration, the volumes and distribution of net groundwater pumpage were estimated from land-use data and estimates of consumptive use for irrigated crops. The pumpage was assigned to the appropriate nodes in the model for each of seventeen 2-year time steps representing the period 1946-79. The specific yields of the three aquifers were varied within reasonable limits to obtain an acceptable match between measured and computed hydraulic heads. Groundwater pumpage input to the model was compensated by declines in both the computed evapotranspiration and the amount of groundwater in storage. (USGS)

  15. An Investigation of Summertime Inland Water Body Temperatures in California and Nevada (USA): Recent Trends and Future Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healey, Nathan; Hook, Simon; Piccolroaz, Sebastiano; Toffolon, Marco; Radocinski, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Inland water body temperature has been identified as an ideal indicator of potential climate change. Understanding inland water body temperature trends is important for forecasting impacts to limnological, biological, and hydrological resources. Many inland water bodies are situated in remote locations with incomplete data records of in-situ monitoring or lack in-situ observations altogether. Thus, the utilization of satellite data is essential for understanding the behavior of global inland water body temperatures. Part of this research provides an analysis of summertime (July-September) temperature trends in the largest California/Nevada (USA) inland water bodies between 1991 and 2015. We examine satellite temperature retrievals from ATSR (ATSR-1, ATSR-2, AATSR), MODIS (Terra and Aqua), and VIIRS sensors. Our findings indicate that inland water body temperatures in the western United States were rapidly warming between 1991 and 2009, but since then trends have been decreasing. This research also includes implementation of a model called air2water to predict future inland water body surface temperature through the sole input of air temperature. Using projections from CMIP5-CCSM4 output, our model indicates that Lake Tahoe (USA) is expected to experience an increase of roughly 3 °C by 2100.

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of an endornavirus from bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) in California, U.S.A.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sun-Jung; Tan, Shih-Hua; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2014-08-01

    The full-length nucleotide sequence and genome organization of an Endornavirus isolated from ornamental hard shell bottle gourd plants (Lagenaria siceraria (Molina) Standl.) in California (CA), USA tentatively named L. siceraria endornavirus-California (LsEV-CA) was determined. The LsEV-CA genome was 15088 bp in length, with a G + C content of 36.55 %. The lengths of the 5' and 3' untranslated regions were 111 and 52 bp, respectively. The genome of LsEV-CA contained one large ORF encoding a 576 kDa polyprotein. The predicted protein contains two glycosyltransferase motifs, as well as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and helicase domains. LsEV-CA was detected in healthy-looking field-grown gourd plants, as well as plants expressing yellows symptoms. It was also detected in non-symptomatic greenhouse-grown gourd seedlings grown from seed obtained from the same field sites. These preliminary data indicate that LsEV-CA is likely not associated with the gourd-yellows syndrome observed in the field.

  17. Cadmium content in fresh and canned squid (Loligo opalescens) from the Pacific coastal waters of California (USA).

    PubMed

    Galitsopoulou, A; Georgantelis, D; Kontominas, M G

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) levels were determined in 70 samples of mantle tissue and 70 whole individual squid (Loligo opalescens; commercially known as California squid). Samples were collected from the coastal zones of California (USA) during the period 2007/2008. To further investigate consumer exposure to processed fishery products, cadmium concentration was also determined in 200 canned samples of squid. Cd concentrations in raw mantle were low, between 0.01 and 0.29 mg kg(-1) and below the tolerance limit of current regulations (1 mg kg(-1)). Respective concentrations in whole individuals were significantly higher, ranging from 0.51 to 1.18 mg kg(-1), attributed to the presence of the visceral portion in whole squid samples. Cd concentrations varied in relation to age and sex of squid, indicating that several physiological factors may influence accumulation. Furthermore, canning of squid substantially enhanced Cd levels. Cd concentration ranged 0.17-0.67 mg kg(-1) in canned mantle tissue and 0.86-2.07 mg kg(-1) in canned whole squid samples, due to both concentration after canning and movement of the metal between different tissues. Several biological compounds, including metallothioneins, nucleic acids and enzymes, may affect Cd concentrations in commercial fishery products.

  18. Hip dysplasia in koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) at the San Diego Zoo.

    PubMed

    Pye, Geoffrey W; Hamlin-Andrus, Chris; Moll, Jennifer

    2008-03-01

    A retrospective/prospective radiographic study documented 55 cases of moderate to severe hip dysplasia, with varying degrees of shallowing of the acetabulum, flattening or loss of the femoral head, widening or loss of the femoral neck, and femoral diaphyseal abnormalities in northern koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in the San Diego Zoo (San Diego, California, USA) collection. For the retrospective study, historic radiographs were examined when availble. For the prospective study, three standard views (ventrodorsal extended leg, ventrodorsal frog leg, and lateral extended leg) were used. A scoring system was developed using four areas (acetabulum, femoral head, femoral neck, and femur) and ranges of 0 to 5 (0 = not affected to 5 = severely affected) for each area, creating a total score out of 40. Scores were graded as follows: 0-2 = normal dysplasia; 3-6 = mild dysplasia; 10-19 = moderate dysplasia; and 20-40 = severe dysplasia. Thirty koalas were graded as severe, 25 koalas as moderate, and 38 koalas as excellent or mild. Affected koalas may or may not demonstrate gait abnormalities. Mild to severe degenerative joint disease may develop and symptoms may be alleviated with glucosamine/chondroitin sulfate and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The etiology of hip dysplasia in koalas is not currently understood.

  19. 75 FR 55975 - Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego... Shark Fest Swim, consisting of 600 swimmers swimming a predetermined course. The sponsor will provide 26...; San Diego Harbor Shark Fest Swim; San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. (a) Location. The following area is a...

  20. Governing stem cell research in California and the USA: towards a social infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Winickoff, David E

    2006-09-01

    Owing to the restrictive human embryonic stem cell (hESC) policies of the US government, the question of whether to pursue human embryonic stem cell experiments has dominated the ethical and political discourse concerning such research. Explicit attention must now turn to problems of implementing the research on a large scale: in the 2004 US elections, California voters approved a state initiative for stem cell research, earmarking $3 billion in direct spending over 10 years. This article explores three ethical and political problem areas emerging out of the California program, the resolution of which will help set the trajectory of hESC research in the US and abroad, and then proposes an institutional approach to help address them: a network of public stem cell banks in the US that feature transparent and shared governance.

  1. Genotypes and phylogeographical relationships of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Garry O; Bendorf, Christin M; Yun, Susan C; Kurath, Gael; Hedrick, Ronald P

    2007-08-13

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains 3 major genogroups in North America with discreet geographic ranges designated as upper (U), middle (M), and lower (L). A comprehensive genotyping of 237 IHNV isolates from hatchery and wild salmonids in California revealed 25 different sequence types (a to y) all in the L genogroup; specifically, the genogroup contained 14 sequence types that were unique to individual isolates as well as 11 sequence types representing 2 or more identical isolates. The most evident trend was the phylogenetic and geographical division of the L genogroup into 2 distinct subgroups designated as LI and LII. Isolates within Subgroup LI were primarily found within waterways linked to southern Oregon and northern California coastal rivers. Isolates in Subgroup LII were concentrated within inland valley watersheds that included the Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and their tributaries. The temporal and spatial patterns of virus occurrence suggested that infections among adult Chinook salmon in the hatchery or that spawn in the river are a major source of virus potentially infecting other migrating or resident salmonids in California. Serum neutralization results of the California isolates of IHNV corroborated a temporal trend of sequence divergence; specifically, 2 progressive shifts in which more recent virus isolates represent new serotypes. A comparison of the estimates of divergence rates for Subgroup LI (1 x 10(-5) mutations per nucleotide site per year) indicated stasis similar to that observed in the U genogroup, while the Subgroup LII rate (1 x 10(-3) mutations per nucleotide site per year) suggested a more active evolution similar to that of the M genogroup.

  2. Genotypes and phylogeographical relationships of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus in California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, G.O.; Bendorf, C.M.; Yun, S.C.; Kurath, G.; Hedrick, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) contains 3 major genogroups in North America with discreet geographic ranges designated as upper (U), middle (M), and lower (L). A comprehensive genotyping of 237 IHNV isolates from hatchery and wild salmonids in California revealed 25 different sequence types (a to y) all in the L genogroup; specifically, the genogroup contained 14 sequence types that were unique to individual isolates as well as 11 sequence types representing 2 or more identical isolates. The most evident trend was the phylogenetic and geographical division of the L genogroup into 2 distinct subgroups designated as LI and LII. Isolates within Subgroup LI were primarily found within waterways linked to southern Oregon and northern California coastal rivers. Isolates in Subgroup LII were concentrated within inland valley watersheds that included the Sacramento River, San Joaquin River, and their tributaries. The temporal and spatial patterns of virus occurrence suggested that infections among adult Chinook salmon in the hatchery or that spawn in the river are a major source of virus potentially infecting other migrating or resident salmonids in California. Serum neutralization results of the California isolates of IHNV corroborated a temporal trend of sequence divergence; specifically, 2 progressive shifts in which more recent virus isolates represent new serotypes. A comparison of the estimates of divergence rates for Subgroup LI (1 ?? ICT5 mutations per nucleotide site per year) indicated stasis similar to that observed in the U genogroup, while the Subgroup LII rate (1 ?? 10 3 mutations per nucleotide site per year) suggested a more active evolution similar to that of the M genogroup. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  3. Age Determination of the Remaining Peat in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith Z.; de Fontaine, Christian S.; Knifong, Donna L.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California was once a 1,400 square kilometer (km2) tidal marsh, which contained a vast layer of peat ranging up to 15 meters (m) thick (Atwater and Belknap, 1980). Because of its favorable climate and highly fertile peat soils, the majority of the Delta was drained and reclaimed for agriculture during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Drainage of the peat soils changed the conditions in the surface layers of peat from anaerobic (having no free oxygen present) to aerobic (exposed to the atmosphere). This change in conditions greatly increased the decomposition rate of the peat, which consists largely of organic (plant) matter. Thus began the process of land-surface subsidence, which initially was a result of peat shrinkage and compaction, and later largely was a result of oxidation by which organic carbon in the peat essentially vaporized to carbon dioxide (Deverel and others, 1998; Ingebritsen and Ikehara, 1999). Because of subsidence, the land-surface elevation on farmed islands in the Delta has decreased from a few meters to as much as 8 m below local mean sea level (California Department of Water Resources, 1995; Steve Deverel, Hydrofocus, Inc., written commun., 2007). The USGS, in collaboration with the University of California at Davis, and Hydrofocus Inc. of Davis, California, has been studying the formation of the Delta and the impact of wetland reclamation on the peat column as part of a project called Rates and Evolution of Peat Accretion through Time (REPEAT). The purpose of this report is to provide results on the age of the remaining peat soils on four farmed islands in the Delta.

  4. Emplacement mode of a composite post-collisonal pluton in the Klamath Mountains (California, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machek, M.; Zavada, P.; Spicak, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Klamath Mountains represent an accreationary complex on the northwest California and southwestern Oregon. It consists of four arcuate belts representing terranes of former island archipelago environments that span in age from Paleozoic to Jurrasic and are divided by eastward dipping thrust faults (Snoke and Barnes, 2006). During and after the accretion, the entire thrust sheet was penetrated by numerous plutonic bodies. The Castle Crags pluton was selected for detailed internal fabrics to understand the emplacement mode of post-collisional plutons. Castle Crags pluton that intruded the Eastern Klamath terrane and in particular ultramafic Trinity Complex subterrane is an elliptical NW-SE elongated pluton with 12 km and 7 km in its long and short dimension, respectively. It is a well exposed composite plutonic body with about 1 km vertical crossfall. The pluton is affected by prominent NW-SE trending vertical joints and another less well developed vertical set perpendicular to the first one. The pluton is zoned and consists of three following igneous varieties: 1) marginal fine-grained granodioritic facies with abundant subsolidus shear zones, 2) coarse-grained granodiorite and 3) central, circular in plan-form and about 2 km in diameter, domain of trondhjemite. Numerous miarolitic cavities with macroscopically measurable trends mark the transition between the central trondhjemite and surrounding granodiorite (Vennum, 1980 a,b). Macroscopic foliations, jointing and sampling on the Castle Crags was carried out along the main crest of the pluton and numerous sideway crests and valleys gaining about 70 samples. The internal magmatic foliations and magnetic foliations show a concentric pattern of margin-parallel vertical foliations. The magnetic lineations reveal plunge trends parallel to the margins of the pluton and continuously increasing plunge angles from the margin to the core of the pluton. The zonality and fabric pattern of the pluton can reflect either

  5. A Radiocarbon Chronology of Hunter-Gatherer Occupation from Bodega Bay, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, M A; Russell, A D; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-27

    The evolution of hunter-gatherer maritime adaptations in western North America has been a prominent topic of discussion among archaeologists in recent years (e.g. Arnold 1992; Erlandson and Colten 1991; Erlandson and Glassow 1997; Lightfoot 1993). Although vast coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific (for example, southern California) have been investigated in detail, our understanding of hunter-gatherer developments along the coast of northern California is limited. Previous research indicates that humans have exploited marine mammals, fish and shellfish along the northern California shoreline since the early Holocene (Schwaderer 1992). By the end of the late Holocene, some groups remained year-round on the coast subsisting primarily on marine resources (e.g. Gould 1975; Hildebrandt and Levulett 2002). However, a paucity of well-dated cultural deposits has hindered our understanding of these developments, particularly during the early and middle Holocene. The lack of a long and reliable chronological sequence has restricted our interpretations of behavioral change, including the adaptive strategies (such as foraging, mobility and settlement) used by human foragers to colonize and inhabit the coastal areas of this region. These shortcomings have also hindered comparative interpretations with other coastal and inland regions in western North America. Here we present a Holocene radiocarbon chronology of hunter-gatherer occupation based on contemporaneous samples of charcoal and Mytilus californianus (California sea mussel) shell recovered from seven archaeological sites near Bodega Bay, California. A series of 127 {sup 14}C ages reveal a chronological sequence that spans from ca. 8940-110 cal BP (1{sigma}) (7890-160 {sup 14}C yr BP = charcoal; 8934-101 {sup 14}C yr BP = shell). As part of this sequence, we report new {sup 14}C dates from the stratified cave and open-air midden deposits at Duncan's Landing (CA-SON-348/H). In addition, we present {sup 14}C ages

  6. Epidemiology of primary brain tumors in the Middle Eastern population in California, USA 2001-2005.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, Kiumarss; Mills, John R

    2009-01-01

    The fast growing Middle Eastern (ME) population has rarely been studied in the U.S.. The purpose of this study was to compare the epidemiology of primary brain tumors in this ethnic population with the non-Hispanic, non-Middle Eastern White (NHNMW) in California. ME cases were identified by surname in the California cancer registry and ME population estimates were based on ancestry. Data for 683 cases of primary brain tumors (429 benign, 238 malignant, 16 uncertain) in the ME and 15,589 cases (8352 benign, 6812 malignant, 425 uncertain) in the NHNMW were available for this study. ME patients were significantly (p < 0.05) younger and their age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000 for benign tumors of 10.0 in men and 17.6 in women were higher than similar rates of 7.3 and 10.6 in the NHNMW group (p < 0.05). Rates for malignant tumors were similar. Meningioma was the main histology responsible for the observed increase in patients over 40 years of age. Also increased were benign tumors of the pituitary and pineal glands. The overall mortality in patients with benign tumors was significantly lower than malignant tumors. This study presents a significantly high incidence of benign meningioma in the ME population in California. This may be due to higher susceptibility or exposure of this ethnic group to the risk factor(s) for this neoplasm. Considering the reported causal association of benign meningioma with childhood radiation exposure from Israel, exposure to this risk factor in this ethnic group needs to be evaluated in future studies.

  7. CITIZEN SCIENTISTS MONITOR A DEADLY FUNGUS THREATENING AMPHIBIAN COMMUNITIES IN NORTHERN COASTAL CALIFORNIA, USA.

    PubMed

    Group, Ecoclub Amphibian; Pope, Karen L; Wengert, Greta M; Foley, Janet E; Ashton, Donald T; Botzler, Richard G

    2016-07-01

    Ecoclub youth and supervising family members conducted citizen science to assess regional prevalence and distribution of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) among amphibians at Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) and Redwood National and State Parks (Parks), Humboldt County, California, US, May 2013 through December 2014. Using quantitative real-time PCR, 26 (17%) of 155 samples were positive for Bd. Positive samples occurred in four frog and toad species: foothill yellow-legged frog ( Rana boylii ), northern red-legged frog ( Rana aurora ), Pacific chorus frog ( Pseudacris regilla ), and western toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] boreas); no salamanders or anuran larvae were positive. Except for R. aurora , all infected anurans were first-time species reports for coastal northern California. At the Refuge, significantly fewer (6/71) postmetamorphic amphibians were positive compared to the Parks (20/69; P=0.0018). We assessed the association of being PCR-positive for Bd, season of sampling, and age of sampler (child, teen, or adult). The full model with season, species, and sampler age had the greatest support. Frogs tested in winter or spring were more likely to be positive than those tested in summer or fall; foothill yellow-legged frogs, northern red-legged frogs, and western toads were more likely to be positive than were Pacific chorus frogs; and the probability of being positive nearly doubled when a child (≤12 yr old) collected the sample compared to a teen or adult. Our results support other chytrid studies that found amphibians are more susceptible to Bd when temperatures are cool and that species differ in their susceptibility. The Ecoclub's findings provide new information important to conservation of northern California's coastal amphibians and demonstrate the value of involving children in citizen science.

  8. The plumbotectonics of the West Shasta mining district, eastern Klamath Mountains, California ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doe, B.R.; Delevaux, M.H.; Albers, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The tectonic setting comprising the West Shasta mining district has often been compared with that of primitive island arcs. Concentrations of U, Th, and Pb and Pb isotope compositions were determined for Devonian ores and rocks of the West Shasta district, E Klamath Mountains, California, to help evaluate the tectonic classification. The lead isotope pattern is found to be complex. From comparison of the data with those on younger ores and rocks in the region and with those isotopic patterns found in modern tectonic terranes, however, a number of conclusions are described in detail. -after Authors

  9. Stable sulfur isotope hydrogeochemical studies using desert shrubs and tree rings, Death Valley, California, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wenbo; Spencer, R.J.; Krouse, H.R.

    1996-08-01

    The {delta}{sup 34}S values of two dominant xerophytes, Atriplex hymenehytra and Larrea tridentata, in Death Valley, California, vary similarly from +7 to +18{per_thousand}, corresponding isotopically to sulfate in the water supplies at a given location. Going radially outwards, tree ring data from a phreatophyte tree, Tamarix aphylla, show a distinct time dependence, with {delta}{sup 34}S values increasing from +13.5 to +18{per_thousand} for soluble sulfate and from +12 to +17% for total sulfur. These data are interpreted in terms of sulfur sources, water sources and flow paths, and tree root growth. 32 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Serosurvey for West Nile Virus Antibodies in Steller's Jays ( Cyanocitta stelleri ) Captured in Coastal California, USA.

    PubMed

    West, Elena; Hofmeister, Erik; Peery, M Zach

    2017-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was first detected in New York in 1999 and, during its expansion across the continental US, southern Canada, and Mexico, members of the Corvidae (ravens, crows, magpies, and jays) were frequently infected and highly susceptible to the virus. As part of a behavioral study of Steller's Jays ( Cyanocitta stelleri ) conducted from 2011-14 in the coastal California counties of San Mateo and Santa Cruz, 380 Steller's Jays were captured and tested for antibodies to WNV. Using the wild bird immunoglobulin G enzyme linked immunoassay, we failed to detect antibodies to WNV, indicating either that there was no previous exposure to the virus or that exposed birds had died.

  11. Parasites of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, in southern California, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuperman, Boris I.; Matey, Victoria E.; Fisher, Richard N.; Ervin, Edward L.; Warburton, Manna L.; Bakhireva, Ludmila; Lehman, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    A total of 230 feral African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis, from 3 localities in southern California were examined for parasites. The following species were found: 3 species of Protozoa, Nyctotherussp., Balantidium xenopodis, Protoopalina xenopodus; 2 species of Monogenea, Protopolystoma xenopodis, Gyrdicotylus gallieni; 1 species of Digenea, Clinostomum sp. (as metacercariae); 1 species of Cestoda, Cephalochlamys namaquensis; 2 species of Nematoda, Contracaecum sp. (as larvae), Eustrongylides sp. (as larvae); and 1 species of Acanthocephala, Acanthocephalus sp. (as cystacanth). Of these, the protozoans P. xenopodus and B. xenopodis, both monogeneans, and the cestode have an African origin. Contracaecum sp., Eustrongylides sp., and Acanthocephalus sp. have not been previously reported from X. laevis.

  12. Processes of coastal bluff erosion in weakly lithified sands, Pacifica, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, B.D.; Sitar, N.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal bluff erosion and landsliding are currently the major geomorphic processes sculpting much of the marine terrace dominated coastline of northern California. In this study, we identify the spatial and temporal processes responsible for erosion and landsliding in an area of weakly lithified sand coastal bluffs located south of San Francisco, California. Using the results of a five year observational study consisting of site visits, terrestrial lidar scanning, and development of empirical failure indices, we identify the lithologic and process controls that determine the failure mechanism and mode for coastal bluff retreat in this region and present concise descriptions of each process. Bluffs composed of weakly cemented sands (unconfined compressive strength - UCS between 5 and 30??kPa) fail principally due to oversteepening by wave action with maximum slope inclinations on the order of 65 at incipient failure. Periods of significant wave action were identified on the basis of an empirical wave run-up equation, predicting failure when wave run-up exceeds the seasonal average value and the bluff toe elevation. The empirical relationship was verified through recorded observations of failures. Bluffs composed of moderately cemented sands (UCS up to 400??kPa) fail due to precipitation-induced groundwater seepage, which leads to tensile strength reduction and fracture. An empirical rainfall threshold was also developed to predict failure on the basis of a 48-hour cumulative precipitation index but was found to be dependent on a time delay in groundwater seepage in some cases.

  13. Cetacean Morbillivirus in Odontocetes Stranded along the Central California Coast, USA, 2000-15.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Liliana; Simeone, Claire A; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Duignan, Padraig J; Goldstein, Tracey; Gulland, Frances M D

    2017-04-01

    Effects of cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) on dolphins vary from causing epidemics to subclinical infections. The former have been documented in the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea but not in the North Pacific Ocean, and the reasons for this are unknown. To explore the distribution of this virus in areas that have not experienced epidemics, we reviewed evidence for morbilliviral infection in odontocetes stranded along the California coast, US from 2000-15. Nine of 212 animals examined histologically had lesions compatible with morbilliviral infection, and 11 were tested for CeMV via reverse transcriptase-PCR. One striped dolphin ( Stenella coeruleoalba ) was PCR positive, and the sequenced product was most closely related to sequences in two strains found in cetaceans in Hawaii. This study suggests that CeMV may be a cause of morbidity and a rare contributor to mortality in cetaceans stranding along the California coast. Additional work is needed to understand CeMV distribution and host species susceptibility in this region.

  14. Amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) in coastal and montane California, USA Anurans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fellers, Gary M.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Reinitz, David M.; Kleeman, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    We found amphibian chytrid fungus (Bd = Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) to be widespread within a coastalwatershed at Point Reyes National Seashore, California and within two high elevation watersheds at Yosemite NationalPark, California. Bd was associated with all six species that we sampled (Bufo boreas, B. canorus, Pseudacris regilla, Ranadraytonii, R. sierrae, and Lithobates catesbeianus). For those species sampled at 10 or more sites within a watershed, thepercentage of Bd-positive sites varied from a low of 20.7% for P. regilla at one Yosemite watershed to a high of 79.6% forP. regilla at the Olema watershed at Point Reyes. At Olema, the percent of Bd-positive water bodies declined each year ofour study (2005-2007). Because P. regilla was the only species found in all watersheds, we used that species to evaluatehabitat variables related to the sites where P. regilla was Bd-positive. At Olema, significant variables were year, length ofshoreline (perimeter), percentage cover of rooted vegetation, and water depth. At the two Yosemite watersheds, waterdepth, water temperature, and silt/mud were the most important covariates, though the importance of these three factorsdiffered between the two watersheds. The presence of Bd in species that are not declining suggests that some of theamphibians in our study were innately resistant to Bd, or had developed resistance after Bd became established.

  15. WEST NILE VIRUS-RELATED TRENDS IN AVIAN MORTALITY IN CALIFORNIA, USA, 2003-12.

    PubMed

    Foss, Leslie; Padgett, Kerry; Reisen, William K; Kjemtrup, Anne; Ogawa, Joshua; Kramer, Vicki

    2015-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus transmitted enzootically by Culex mosquitoes among avian hosts. Since 2000, the California Dead Bird Surveillance Program (DBSP) has tracked avian mortality reported by the public on a telephone hotline and website and measured the prevalence of WNV infection in dead birds. We summarize herein WNV prevalence in dead birds tested and variation of WNV transmission over time and space with the use of DBSP data from 2003 to 2012. Prevalence among dead birds was highest in 2004, 2008, and 2012. This pattern was similar to peak WNV infection years for mosquitoes but not to human WNV incidence. Although American Crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos) were most frequently reported and tested, this species ranked third in infection prevalence (44%) after Yellow-billed Magpies (Pica nuttalli; 62%) and Western Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma californica; 48%). Overall prevalence in American Robin (Turdus migratorius), House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus), and House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) carcasses ranged from 18% to 22%. Corvid WNV prevalence was highest in South Coast, Bay/Delta, Sacramento, and San Joaquin valleys, and Klamath/North Coast bioregions, overlapping areas of elevated WNV activity in other surveillance measurements. Bioregional analysis revealed the avian species most likely to be reported and found positive in each bioregion. Our results may be useful to WNV surveillance and control efforts and provide insight into bird population trends in California.

  16. Accumulation of pesticides in pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla) from California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Fellers, Gary M.; Kleeman, Patrick M.; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides are receiving increasing attention as potential causes of amphibian declines, acting singly or in combination with other stressors, but limited information is available on the accumulation of current-use pesticides in tissue. The authors examined potential exposure and accumulation of currently used pesticides in pond-breeding frogs (Pseudacris regilla) collected from 7 high elevations sites in northern California. All sites sampled are located downwind of California's highly agricultural Central Valley and receive inputs of pesticides through precipitation and/or dry deposition. Whole frog tissue, water, and sediment were analyzed for more than 90 current-use pesticides and pesticide degradates using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Two fungicides, pyraclostrobin and tebuconazole, and one herbicide, simazine, were the most frequently detected pesticides in tissue samples. Median pesticide concentration ranged from 13 µg/kg to 235 µg/kg wet weight. Tebuconazole and pyraclostrobin were the only 2 compounds observed frequently in frog tissue and sediment. Significant spatial differences in tissue concentration were observed, which corresponded to pesticide use in the upwind counties. Data generated indicated that amphibians residing in remote locations are exposed to and capable of accumulating current-use pesticides. A comparison of P. regilla tissue concentrations with water and sediment data indicated that the frogs are accumulating pesticides and are potentially a more reliable indicator of exposure to this group of pesticides than either water or sediment.

  17. Tuberculosis and HIV Co-infection, California, USA, 1993–2008

    PubMed Central

    Porco, Travis C.; Westenhouse, Janice; Damesyn, Mark; Facer, Matt; Hill, Julia; Xia, Qiang; Watt, James P.; Hopewell, Philip C.; Flood, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    To understand the epidemiology of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV co-infection in California, we cross-matched incident TB cases reported to state surveillance systems during 1993–2008 with cases in the state HIV/AIDS registry. Of 57,527 TB case-patients, 3,904 (7%) had known HIV infection. TB rates for persons with HIV declined from 437 to 126 cases/100,000 persons during 1993–2008; rates were highest for Hispanics (225/100,000) and Blacks (148/100,000). Patients co-infected with TB–HIV during 2001–2008 were significantly more likely than those infected before highly active antiretroviral therapy became available to be foreign born, Hispanic, or Asian/Pacific Islander and to have pyrazinamide-monoresistant TB. Death rates decreased after highly active antiretroviral therapy became available but remained twice that for TB patients without HIV infection and higher for women. In California, HIV-associated TB has concentrated among persons from low and middle income countries who often acquire HIV infection in the peri-immigration period. PMID:23745218

  18. Prevalence of eustrongylidosis in wading birds from colonies in California, Texas, and Rhode Island, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Custer, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) and Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) nestlings from colonies in Texas, Rhode Island, and California and Great Egret (Casmerodius albus) nestlings from Texas were examined for eustrongylidosis, or infection by the parasitic nematode Eustrongylides spp. In 31% (24/77) of all broods examined, at least one nestling was infected. Snowy Egret broods from Texas were more frequently (100%) infected than those from California (20%) or Rhode Island (10%), and the prevalence of eustrongylidosis in 5- and 10-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings was higher in the Texas colony than the other two. Within the Texas colony, the frequency of eustrongylidosis was greater for Snowy Egret (100%) and Great Egret (80%) broods than for Black-crowned Night-Heron broods (12.5%). Also in Texas, eustrongylidosis was more frequent in 5-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings than 5-day-old Black-crowned Night-Heron or Great Egret nestlings, and in 10-day-old Snowy Egret nestlings than in 10-day-old Black-crowned Night-Heron nestlings. Eustrongylides spp. caused perforations of the gastrointestinal tract and peritonitis, particularly in Snowy Egrets.

  19. Accumulation of pesticides in Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla) from California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, USA.

    PubMed

    Smalling, Kelly L; Fellers, Gary M; Kleeman, Patrick M; Kuivila, Kathryn M

    2013-09-01

    Pesticides are receiving increasing attention as potential causes of amphibian declines, acting singly or in combination with other stressors, but limited information is available on the accumulation of current-use pesticides in tissue. The authors examined potential exposure and accumulation of currently used pesticides in pond-breeding frogs (Pseudacris regilla) collected from 7 high elevations sites in northern California. All sites sampled are located downwind of California's highly agricultural Central Valley and receive inputs of pesticides through precipitation and/or dry deposition. Whole frog tissue, water, and sediment were analyzed for more than 90 current-use pesticides and pesticide degradates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Two fungicides, pyraclostrobin and tebuconazole, and one herbicide, simazine, were the most frequently detected pesticides in tissue samples. Median pesticide concentration ranged from 13 µg/kg to 235 µg/kg wet weight. Tebuconazole and pyraclostrobin were the only 2 compounds observed frequently in frog tissue and sediment. Significant spatial differences in tissue concentration were observed, which corresponded to pesticide use in the upwind counties. Data generated indicated that amphibians residing in remote locations are exposed to and capable of accumulating current-use pesticides. A comparison of P. regilla tissue concentrations with water and sediment data indicated that the frogs are accumulating pesticides and are potentially a more reliable indicator of exposure to this group of pesticides than either water or sediment.

  20. Pyrethroid insecticide concentrations and toxicity in streambed sediments and loads in surface waters of the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Weston, D.P.; Zhang, M.; Hladik, M.

    2010-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticide use in California, USA, is growing, and there is a need to understand the fate of these compounds in the environment. Concentrations and toxicity were assessed in streambed sediment of the San Joaquin Valley of California, one of the most productive agricultural regions of the United States. Concentrations were also measured in the suspended sediment associated with irrigation or storm-water runoff, and mass loads during storms were calculated. Western valley streambed sediments were frequently toxic to the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, with most of the toxicity attributable to bifenthrin and cyhalothrin. Up to 100% mortality was observed in some locations with concentrations of some pyrethroids up to 20 ng/g. The western San Joaquin Valley streams are mostly small watersheds with clay soils, and sediment-laden irrigation runoff transports pyrethroid insecticides throughout the growing season. In contrast, eastern tributaries and the San Joaquin River had low bed sediment concentrations (<1 ng/g) and little or no toxicity because of the preponderance of sandy soils and sediments. Bifenthrin, cyhalothrin, and permethrin were the most frequently detected pyrethroids in irrigation and storm water runoff. Esfenvalerate, fenpropathrin, and resmethrin were also detected. All sampled streams contributed to the insecticide load of the San Joaquin River during storms, but some compounds detected in the smaller creeks were not detected in the San Joaquin River. The two smallest streams, Ingram and Hospital Creeks, which had high sediment toxicity during the irrigation season, accounted for less than 5% of the total discharge of the San Joaquin River during storm conditions, and as a result their contribution to the pyrethroid mass load of the larger river was minimal. ?? 2010 SETAC.

  1. New Tsunami Response, Mitigation, and Recovery Planning "Playbooks" for California (USA) Maritime Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. I.; Lynett, P. J.; Miller, K.; Eskijian, M.; Dengler, L. A.; Ayca, A.; Keen, A.; Admire, A. R.; Siegel, J.; Johnson, L. A.; Curtis, E.; Hornick, M.

    2015-12-01

    The 2010 Chile and 2011 Japan tsunamis both struck the California coast offering valuable experience and raised a number of significant issues for harbor masters, port captains, and other maritime entities. There was a general call for more planning products to help guide maritime communities in their tsunami response, mitigation, and recovery activities. The State of California is working with the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), and other tsunami experts to provide communities with new tsunami planning tools to address these issues: Response Playbooks and plans have been developed for ports and harbors identifying potential tsunami current hazards and related damage for various size events. Maps have been generated showing minor, moderate, and severe damage levels that have been linked to current velocity thresholds of 3, 6, and 9 knots, respectively. Knowing this information allows harbor personnel to move ships or strengthen infrastructure prior to the arrival of distant source tsunamis. Damage probability tools and mitigation plans have been created to help reduce tsunami damage by evaluating the survivability of small and large vessels in harbors and ports. These results were compared to the actual damage assessments performed in California and Japan following the 2011 Japanese tsunami. Fragility curves were developed based on current velocity and direction to help harbor and port officials upgrade docks, piles, and related structures. Guidance documents are being generated to help in the development of both local and statewide recovery plans. Additional tools, like post-tsunami sediment and debris movement models, will allow harbors and ports to better understand if and where recovery issues are most likely to occur. Streamlining the regulatory and environmental review process is also a goal of the guidance. These maritime products and procedures are being integrated into guidance

  2. Notes on a Mesodinium rubrum red tide in San Francisco Bay (California, USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Cole, Brian E.; Hager, Stephen W.

    1994-01-01

    Discrete red patches of water were observed in South San Francisco Bay (USA) on 30 April 1993, and examination of live samples showed that this red tide was caused by surface accumulations of the pigmented ciliate Mesodinium rubrum . Vertical profiles showed strong salinity and temperature stratification in the upper 5 m, peak chlorophyll fluorescence in the upper meter, and differences in the small-scale density structure and fluorescence distribution among red patches. Events preceding this Mesodinium red tide included: (i) heavy precipitation and run-off, allowing for strong salinity stratification; (ii) a spring diatom bloom where the chlorophyll a concentration reached 50 mg m −3 ; (ii) depletions of dissolved inorganic N and Si in the photic zone; and (iv) several days of rapid warming and stabilization of the upper surface layer. These conditions may be general prerequisites for M.rubrum blooms in temperate estuaries.

  3. 2007 San Diego Wildfires And Asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Chirag; Renvall, Marian J.; Chao, Peter; Ferguson, Paul; Ramsdell, Joe W.

    2011-01-01

    Context This case series reports the changes in the respiratory health of eight asthmatic subjects and the relationship to air quality associated with the October, 2007 firestorm in San Diego County of California. Case Presentation Participants were eight subjects with asthma enrolled in Asthma Clinical Research Network (ACRN) (NIH# U10-HL074218) studies at the University of California San Diego, School of Medicine, (UCSD), who had study data collected immediately prior, during and one month after the five-day firestorm in San Diego County. Air quality deteriorated to an extreme average of 71.5 ug/m3small particulate matter less than 2.5 microns (PM2.5) during the firestorm. Respiratory health data included morning and evening peak expiratory flow rates [PEFR], morning and evening Forced Expiratory Volume in one second [FEV1], rescue medication usage, and sputum eosinophils. Morning and evening PEFR and FEV1 rates remained stable. The two subjects tested during the fires had elevated eosinophil counts and rescue medication usage was increased in five of the eight subjects. Discussion Pulmonary function test values were stable during the wildfires for all eight subjects but there was a statistical significant increase in rescue medication usage during the wildfires which correlated with PM 2.5 values. The two subjects tested during the fires showed increases in sputum eosinophil counts consistent with increased airways inflammation. Relevance These findings suggests that poor air quality associated with wildfires resulted in an increase airways inflammation in these asthmatic subjects, but pulmonary function tests remained stable, possibly due to increased rescue medication usage. This is especially pertinent as there is an increase in incidence of wildfires this decade. PMID:21158525

  4. 2007 San Diego wildfires and asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Vora, Chirag; Renvall, Marian J; Chao, Peter; Ferguson, Paul; Ramsdell, Joe W

    2011-02-01

    This case series reports the changes in the respiratory health of eight asthmatic subjects and the relationship with air quality associated with the October 2007 firestorm in San Diego County of California. Participants were eight subjects with asthma enrolled in Asthma Clinical Research Network (ACRN) (NIH# U10-HL074218) studies at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), School of Medicine, who had study data collected immediately prior, during and 1 month after the 5-day firestorm in San Diego County. Air quality deteriorated to an extreme average of 71.5 mg/m(3) small particulate matter less than 2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) during the firestorm. Respiratory health data included morning and evening peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR), morning and evening Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV(1)), rescue medication usage, and sputum eosinophils. Morning and evening PEFR and FEV(1) rates remained stable. The two subjects tested during the fires had elevated eosinophil counts and rescue medication usage was increased in five of the eight subjects. Pulmonary function test values were stable during the wildfires for all eight subjects but there was a statistically significant increase in rescue medication usage during the wildfires that correlated with PM(2.5) values. The two subjects tested during the fires showed increases in sputum eosinophil counts consistent with increased airways inflammation. These findings suggest that poor air quality associated with wildfires resulted in an increase in airways inflammation in these asthmatic subjects, but pulmonary function tests remained stable, possibly due to increased rescue medication usage. This is especially pertinent as there is an increase in incidence of wildfires this decade.

  5. Diagnosis and seroprevalence of leptospirosis in California sea lions from coastal California.

    PubMed

    Colagross-Schouten, Angela M; Mazet, Jonna A K; Gulland, Frances M D; Miller, Melissa A; Hietala, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) as a method for detection of exposure to Leptospira spp. in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) were determined. Sera came from individuals that demonstrated clinical signs of renal disease, had lesions suggestive of leptospirosis at necropsy, and had visible leptospires in silver stained kidney sections as positive controls. Sera from unexposed captive individuals were used as negative controls. The test was 100% sensitive at 1:3,200 for confirming renal infection and 100% specific at negative < 1:100 for detection of Leptospira interrogans scrovar pomona antibodies by MAT in California sea lions. Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona was used as a screening serovar because it has been isolated previously from the kidneys and placentas of California sea lions, and there appears to be cross-reactivity between serovar pomona and other serovars. Sera from 225 free-ranging California sea lions presented to one of three participating California (USA) coastal marine mammal rehabilitation centers in 1996 were then evaluated for antibodies to serovar pomona using the MAT. The overall seroprevalence was 38.2% (86/225), although the prevalence varied among locations from 100% (38/38) in animals at the Marine Mammal Care Center (Fort MacArthur, California, USA) to 0% (0/14) at SeaWorld California (San Diego, California). At The Marine Mammal Center (Sausalito, California) [prevalence 27.8% (48/173)], the majority of seropositive animals were subadults and adults, and males were 4.7 times more likely to be seropositive to serovar pomona than females. When combining results from all three centers, subadult and adult animals were more likely to be seropositive than pups and juvenile sea lions, and the highest proportion of seropositive animals presented during the autumn months. Serum elevations of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, phosphorus, and/or calcium were associated with seropositivity

  6. Mercury contamination in three species of anuran amphibians from the Cache Creek Watershed, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Hothem, Roger L; Jennings, Mark R; Crayon, John J

    2010-04-01

    Fish and wildlife may bioaccumulate mercury (Hg) to levels that adversely affect reproduction, growth, and survival. Sources of Hg within the Cache Creek Watershed in northern California have been identified, and concentrations of Hg in invertebrates and fish have been documented. However, bioaccumulation of Hg by amphibians has not been evaluated. In this study, adult and juvenile American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) and foothill yellow-legged frogs (Rana boylii), adult Northern Pacific treefrogs (Pseudacris regilla), and larval bullfrogs were collected and analyzed for total Hg. One or more species of amphibians from 40% of the 35 sites had mean Hg concentrations greater than the US Environmental Protection Agency's tissue residue criterion for fish (0.3 microg/g). Of the bullfrog tissues analyzed, the liver had the highest concentrations of both total Hg and methyl mercury. Total Hg in carcasses of bullfrogs was highly correlated with total Hg in leg muscle, the tissue most often consumed by humans.

  7. Soils and vegetation of Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, William L.; Fenn, Dennis B.; Allardice, William R.

    1988-01-01

    The multifaceted development of an erosion surface on Santa Barbara Island, Channel Islands National Park, California, has led to this study of the relationship between soils and vegetation. A dry Mediterranean climate and past attempts at farming and introductions of alien species have led to vegetative degradation accompanied by both gully and surface erosion. Soil and vegetation analyses show this erosion to be in a location of transition. The soils are Typic Chromoxererts (Vertisol Order) with high clay, salinity, and sodium contents. The vegetation is ecotonal in nature, grading from a principally alien annual grassland with Avena fatua and Atriplex semibaccata to a shrub community dominated by the native Suaeda californica. Management toward revegetation and stabilization of this island ecosystem will be difficult with high clay, saline-sodic soils and disturbed vegetation.

  8. Global positioning system surveying to monitor land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikehara, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    A subsidence research program began in 1985 to document the extent and magnitude of land subsidence in Sacramento Valley, California, an area of about 15 600 km2m, using Global Positioning System (GPS) surveying. In addition to periodic conventional spirit levelling, an examination was made of the changes in GPS-derived ellipsoidal height differences (summary differences) between pairs of adjacent bench marks in central Sacramento Valley from 1986 to 1989. The average rates of land subsidence in the southern Sacramento Valley for the past several decades were determined by comparing GPS-derived orthometric heights with historic published elevations. A maximum average rate of 0.053 m year-1 (0.90 m in 17 years) of subsidence has been measured. -Author

  9. Thirty-one years of debris-flow observation and monitoring near La Honda, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Wilson, R.C.; Ellen, S.D.; Reid, M.E.; Jayko, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    From 1975 until 2006,18 intense storms triggered at least 248 debris flows within 10 km2 northwest of the town of La Honda within the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. In addition to mapping debris flows and other types of landslides, studies included soil sampling and geologic mapping, piezometric and tensiometer monitoring, and rainfall measurement and recording. From 1985 until 1995, a system with radio telemetered rain gages and piezometers within the La Honda region was used for issuing six debris-flow warnings within the San Francisco Bay region through the NOAA ALERT system. Depending upon the relative intensity of rainfall during storms, debris flows were generated from deep slumps, shallow slumps, shallow slides in colluvium and shallow slides over bedrock. Analysis shows the storms with abundant antecedent rainfall followed by several days of steady heavy intense rainfall triggered the most abundant debris flows. ?? 2007 millpress.

  10. Miocene rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calzia, James P.; Ramo, O.T.

    2005-01-01

    Rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, include the 12.4-Ma granite of Kingston Peak, the ca. 10.6-Ma Little Chief stock, and the 9.8-Ma Shoshone pluton. All of these granitic rocks are texturally zoned from a porphyritic rim facies, characterized by rapakivi textures and miarolitic cavities, to an equigranular aplite core. These granites crystallized from anhydrous and peraluminous to metaluminous magmas that were more oxidized and less alkalic than type rapakivi granites from southern Finland. Chemical and isotope (Nd–Sr–Pb) data suggest that rapakivi granites of the southern Death Valley region were derived by partial melting of lower crustal rocks (possibly including Mesozoic plutonic component) with some mantle input as well; they were emplaced at shallow crustal levels (4 km) in an actively extending orogen.

  11. Miocene rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calzia, J.P.; Ramo, O.T.

    2005-01-01

    Rapakivi granites in the southern Death Valley region, California, include the 12.4-Ma granite of Kingston Peak, the ca. 10.6-Ma Little Chief stock, and the 9.8-Ma Shoshone pluton. All of these granitic rocks are texturally zoned from a porphyritic rim facies, characterized by rapakivi textures and miarolitic cavities, to an equigranular aplite core. These granites crystallized from anhydrous and peraluminous to metaluminous magmas that were more oxidized and less alkalic than type rapakivi granites from southern Finland. Chemical and isotope (Nd-Sr-Pb) data suggest that rapakivi granites of the southern Death Valley region were derived by partial melting of lower crustal rocks (possibly including Mesozoic plutonic component) with some mantle input as well; they were emplaced at shallow crustal levels (4 km) in an actively extending orogen.

  12. Biogeochemical cycling of selenium in the San Joaquin Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.; Ohlendorf, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    Subsurface agricultural drainage waters from western San Joaquin Valley, California, were found to contain elevated concentrations of the element selenium in the form of selenate. In 1978, these drainage waters began to replace previous input to Kesterson Reservoir, a pond system within Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge; this substitution was completed by 1982. In the 1983 nesting season, unusual rates of deformity and death in embryos and hatchlings of wild aquatic birds (up to 64% of eared grebe and American coot nests) occurred at the refuge and were attributed to selenium toxicosis. Features necessary for contamination to have taken place included geologic setting, climate, soil type, availability of imported irrigation water, type of irrigation, and the unique chemical properties of selenium. The mechanisms of biogeochemical cycling raise questions about other ecosystems and human exposure.

  13. Potential toxicity concerns from chemical coagulation treatment of stormwater in the Tahoe basin, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Lopus, S E; Bachand, P A M; Heyvaert, A C; Werner, I; Teh, S J; Reuter, J E

    2009-10-01

    Coagulant dosing of stormwater runoff with polyaluminum chlorides (PACs) is used in numerous waterbodies to improve water clarity, but the potential risks of PACs to aquatic organisms in Lake Tahoe, California are not fully understood. To assess these risks, the USEPA 3-species toxicity test and a non-standard fish test using Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were used to determine the toxicity of PAC-treated and non-treated stormwater samples to aquatic species. Stormwater samples were collected from three sites representing runoff from different urbanized areas in May 2004; samples received coagulant dosing using three different coagulants (JC1720, PAX-XL9, Sumalchlor50) at levels optimized with jar testing. Raw stormwaters were toxic to algae and fathead minnows (mortality). Treatment with coagulants increased toxicity to zooplankton (reproduction) and had no consistent effects on the other toxicity metrics.

  14. Increasing summer river discharge in southern California, USA, linked to urbanization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Pataki, Diane E.; Liu, Hongxing; Li, Zhaofu; Wu, Qiusheng; Thomas, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    southern California relies heavily on imported water for domestic use. A synthesis of river discharge data in this region reveals that summer (June, July, and August) river discharge in watersheds that have at least 50% urban, suburban, and/or commercial land cover has increased by 250% or more over the past half-century, without any substantial precipitation during these months. Total annual discharge in the Los Angeles River has also increased at levels up to several hundred percent. Three factors likely contribute to our observations: (1) increased groundwater recharge rates from leaking water pipelines, (2) inputs of treated wastewater into streams and rivers, and (3) increased runoff or recharge due to over-irrigation of ornamental landscaping. In the southwestern United States, water importation consumes large amounts of energy and contributes to decline of river flows in source regions. Here we show that water importation also increases river flows in urban areas.

  15. Sodium metasomatism along the Melones fault zone, Sierra Nevada foothills, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albino, G.V.

    1995-01-01

    Albitite, locally aegirine- and riebeckite-bearing, formed as a result of sodium metasomatism of felsic dykes and argillites along the Melones Fault Zone near Jamestown, California. Pyrite, magnetite, hematite and titanite are common in small amounts in altered dykes. The dykes were originally plagioclase-hornblende porphyritic, and had major and trace element abundances typical of calc-alkaline rocks, whereas they now have Na2O contents as high as 11.40%. Mass balance calculations indicate that alteration involved addition of large amounts of sodium, and the removal of SiO2 and K2O. Textural preservation, combined with volume factors calculated from specific gravity and whole rock analytical data, indicate that Na-metasomatism was essentially isovolumetric. -from Author

  16. Occurrence of Pharmaceutical and Other Organic Compounds in Ground Water in Ten Regions of California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagalski, J.; Belitz, K.; Furlong, E. T.

    2007-05-01

    A State-wide assessment of the occurrence of pharmaceuticals, pesticides, and other anthropogenic and natural constituents in ground-water aquifers that are used for public supply is being made as part of the California Ground-Water Assessment and Monitoring Program (http:ca.water.usgs.gov/gama/). During the first three years of the program, a total of 682 wells were sampled in ten areas of California representing a wide range of climatic, land-use, population density, and hydrogeologic conditions. Although the wells were generally deep (greater than 100 meters below land surface), the percent of wells containing at least one pesticide ranged from 15 to 88 in the ten study areas. In contrast, the detection frequency of pharmaceuticals ranged from 5 to 22 percent. Concentrations of pharmaceutical compounds were generally less than 50 parts per trillion. Of the 14 pharmaceutical compounds investigated, only 3 were detected in more than half of the study areas (carbamazapine, acetaminophen, and sulfmethoxazole) and only one was detected in more than 2 percent of the wells (carbamapazine). These 3 compounds have low soil-water partition coefficients (Kd) and are presumably less degradable, with respect to the time of transport to the sampled portion of the aquifer, compared to the other compounds. These 3 compounds are also a subset of the pharmaceuticals that have been detected most frequently in surface water. Several other pharmaceutical compounds that are frequently detected in surface water but not abundant in this study have high Kd values, suggesting sorption onto aquifer solids may limit their sub- surface transport, or have faster degradation rates. The occurrence of pharmaceutical compounds is not well correlated with that of pesticides, but may be related to land-use as the highest detection frequency occurred in the study unit with the highest urban density.

  17. Geology and mammalian paleontology of the Horned Toad Hills, Mojave Desert, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, S.R.; Woodburne, M.O.; Lindsay, E.H.; Albright, L.B.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A.; Wan, E.; Wahl, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    The Horned Toad Formation includes five lithostratigraphic members that record alluvial fan, fluvial, lake margin, and lacustrine deposition within a relatively small basin just south of the active Garlock fault during the late Miocene to early Pliocene. These sediments experienced northwest-southeast contractional deformation during the Pliocene-Pleistocene associated with basement-involved reverse faults. Member Two of the Horned Toad Formation has yielded 24 taxa of fossil mammals, referred to as the Warren Local Fauna, including Cryptotis sp., cf. Scapanus, Hypolagus vetus, Hypolagus edensis,? Spermophilus sp., Prothomomys warrenensis n. gen., n. sp., Perognathus sp., Repomys gustelyi, Postcopemys valensis, Peromyscus sp. A, Peromyscus sp. B, Jacobsomys dailyi n. sp., Borophagus cf. B. secundus, cf. Agriotherium, Machairodus sp. cf. M. coloradensis, Rhynchotherium sp. cf. R. edensis, Pliomastodon vexillarius, Dinohippus edensis, Teleoceras sp. cf. T. fossiger, cf. Prosthennops, Megatylopus sp. cf. M. matthewi, Hemiauchenia vera, Camelidae gen. et. sp. indet., and the antilocaprid cf. Sphenophalos. The majority of fossil localities are confined to a 20 m thick stratigraphic interval within a reversed polarity magnetozone. The fauna demonstrates affinity with other late Hemphillian faunas from California, Nevada, Nebraska, Texas, and Mexico. The Lawlor Tuff, dated elsewhere in California at 4.83 ?? 0.04 Ma and geochemically identified in the Horned Toad Formation, overlies most of the fossil mammal localities. Magnetic polarity data are correlated with Chrons 3n.3r, 3n.3n, and 3n.2r, suggesting an age of approximately 5.0 - 4.6 Ma. These constraints indicate an age for the late Hemphillian Warren Local Fauna of 4.85 - 5.0 Ma. ?? Society of Vertebrate Paleontology November 2011.

  18. Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls in dust from homes in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Todd P; Ward, Mary H; Colt, Joanne S; Nishioka, Marcia G; Buffler, Patricia A; Rappaport, Stephen M; Metayer, Catherine

    2013-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) production ceased in the U.S. over 30 years ago, but these persistent chemicals remain ubiquitous contaminants. Here, we evaluate potential determinants of PCB levels in dust from California homes including characteristics of the residence as well as the residents' habits and occupations. Dust was collected from 415 households as part of a large case-control study (the Northern California Childhood Leukaemia Study), using a high-volume small surface sampler. Dust concentrations of 6 PCBs (PCB-105, PCB-118, PCB-138, PCB-153, PCB-170, and PCB-180) were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Individual PCB detection rates ranged from 9% to 54% with PCB concentrations ranging from below detection (1 or 2 ng g (-1)) to 270 ng g(-1) and PCB loadings ranging from below detection to 960 ng m (-2). Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to identify potential determinants of residential PCB contamination based on in-home interviews and residential geographic locations. We observed that residences built prior to 1980 had higher odds of PCB detection and higher PCB loadings than more recently constructed homes. Households where residents typically did not remove their shoes had higher PCB dust loadings than households where residents did. PCBs were less likely to be detected in carpet dust from households that had frequently vacuumed or replaced carpets compared to other households. Since we used a cross-sectional dust sampling protocol and report significant, but modest, effects of these determinants on levels of PCBs in residential dust, our results should be interpreted with caution. Longitudinal studies to determine optimal strategies for reducing PCBs in homes are warranted.

  19. Metals and trace elements in giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento Valley, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Glenn D; Hothem, Roger L; Bergen, Darrin R; Martin, Lisa L; Taylor, Robert J; Brussee, Brianne E

    2009-04-01

    The giant garter snake (GGS; Thamnophis gigas) is a federally listed threatened species endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Habitat destruction has been the main factor in the decline of GGS populations, but the effects of contaminants on this species are unknown. To contribute to the recovery of these snakes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began studies of the life history and habitat use of GGSs in 1995. During a series of investigations conducted from 1995 to the present, specimens of dead GGSs were opportunistically collected from the Colusa National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), the Natomas Basin, and other sites in northern California. Whole snakes were stored frozen for potential future analysis. As funding became available, we analyzed tissues of 23 GGSs to determine the concentrations of total mercury (Hg) and other trace elements in livers and concentrations of Hg in brains and tail clips. Mercury concentrations (microg/g, wet weight) ranged from 0.08 to 1.64 in livers, 0.01 to 0.18 in brains, and 0.02 to 0.32 in tail clips. In livers, geometric mean concentrations (microg/g, dry weight) of arsenic (25.7) and chromium (1.02) were higher than most values from studies of other snakes. Mercury concentrations in tail clips were positively correlated with concentrations in livers and brains, with the most significant correlations occurring at the Natomas Basin and when Natomas and CNWR were combined. Results indicate the value of using tail clips as a nonlethal bioindicator of contaminant concentrations.

  20. Determinants of polychlorinated biphenyls in dust from homes in California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Mary H.; Colt, Joanne S.; Nishioka, Marcia G.; Buffler, Patricia A.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Metayer, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) production ceased in the U.S. over 30 years ago, but these persistent chemicals remain ubiquitous contaminants. Here, we evaluate potential determinants of PCB levels in dust from California homes including characteristics of the residence as well as the residents’ habits and occupations. Dust was collected from 415 households as part of a large case-control study (the Northern California Childhood Leukaemia Study), using a high-volume small surface sampler. Dust concentrations of 6 PCBs (PCB-105, PCB-118, PCB-138, PCB-153, PCB-170, and PCB-180) were measured using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Individual PCB detection rates ranged from 9% to 54% with PCB concentrations ranging from below detection (1 or 2 ng/g) to 270 ng/g and PCB loadings ranging from below detection to 960 ng/m2. Multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to identify potential determinants of residential PCB contamination based on in-home interviews and residential geographic locations. We observed that residences built prior to 1980 had higher odds of PCB detection and higher PCB loadings than more recently constructed homes. Households where residents typically did not remove their shoes had higher PCB dust loadings than households where residents did. PCBs were less likely to be detected in carpet dust from households that had frequently vacuumed or replaced carpets compared to other households. Since we used a cross-sectional dust sampling protocol and report significant, but modest, effects of these determinants on levels of PCBs in residential dust, our results should be interpreted with caution. Longitudinal studies to determine optimal strategies for reducing PCBs in homes are warranted. PMID:25208698

  1. Metals and trace elements in giant garter snakes (Thamnophis gigas) from the Sacramento Valley, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wylie, G.D.; Hothem, R.L.; Bergen, D.R.; Martin, L.L.; Taylor, R.J.; Brussee, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    The giant garter snake (GGS; Thamnophis gigas) is a federally listed threatened species endemic to wetlands of the Central Valley of California. Habitat destruction has been the main factor in the decline of GGS populations, but the effects of contaminants on this species are unknown. To contribute to the recovery of these snakes, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began studies of the life history and habitat use of GGSs in 1995. During a series of investigations conducted from 1995 to the present, specimens of dead GGSs were opportunistically collected from the Colusa National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), the Natomas Basin, and other sites in northern California. Whole snakes were stored frozen for potential future analysis. As funding became available, we analyzed tissues of 23 GGSs to determine the concentrations of total mercury (Hg) and other trace elements in livers and concentrations of Hg in brains and tail clips. Mercury concentrations (??g/g, wet weight) ranged from 0.08 to 1.64 in livers, 0.01 to 0.18 in brains, and 0.02 to 0.32 in tail clips. In livers, geometric mean concentrations (??g/g, dry weight) of arsenic (25.7) and chromium (1.02) were higher than most values from studies of other snakes. Mercury concentrations in tail clips were positively correlated with concentrations in livers and brains, with the most significant correlations occurring at the Natomas Basin and when Natomas and CNWR were combined. Results indicate the value of using tail clips as a nonlethal bioindicator of contaminant concentrations. ?? 2008 US Government.

  2. Diurnal, Seasonal and Inter-annual Variations of N2O Fluxes from Perennial Vineyard Soils in California, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suddick, E. C.; Carlisle, E. A.; Spencer, R. G.; Smart, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    The USA emits 1562 million metric tons of carbon equivalents a year, whereby this value is projected to rise by an estimated 14 % in 2012. California is the 12th major global emitter of greenhouse gases, emitting approximately 500 million metric tons of carbon equivalents a year. 84 % of greenhouse gas emissions are from CO2, 7 % and 6 % from N2O and CH4 respectively and approximately 8 % of these emissions are derived from agricultural activities. The concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O) within the atmosphere has been increasing at a rate of approximately 0.27 % per year and has mainly been attributed to agricultural practices such as land-use changes, biomass burning, nitrogen fertilization, livestock and manure management. Agriculture related activities generate from 6 to 35 Tg N2O-N per year, or about 60 to 70 % of global production. The primary biogenic sources of N2O are from terrestrial soils, which are thought to be a major source of N2O to the atmosphere and mainly involve the microbial nitrogen transformations brought about by nitrification and denitrification. The aim of this study was to quantify the seasonal and inter-annual variability of N2O emissions and nitrogen cycling from a conventionally tilled wine grape vineyard in Napa, California during a two year closed static chamber study and to also investigate the diurnal N2O flux pattern and effects of fertilization management practices on emissions within a table grape vineyard in Delano, California. Preliminary data shows that the annual N2O fluxes were influenced by soil properties, management practices and weather such as precipitation events where increases in N2O emissions were observed after irrigation or fertilization practices and immediately following rainfall. Vineyard floor and vine management will be discussed in terms of the significance management practices have upon the release of N2O emissions from vineyard soils where the high water and nitrogen fertilizer usage within these

  3. Stratigraphic controls on seawater intrusion and implications for groundwater management, Dominguez Gap area of Los Angeles, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishikawa, T.; Siade, A.J.; Reichard, E.G.; Ponti, D.J.; Canales, A.G.; Johnson, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    Groundwater pumping has led to extensive water-level declines and seawater intrusion in coastal Los Angeles, California (USA). A SUTRA-based solute-transport model was developed to test the hydraulic implications of a sequence-stratigraphic model of the Dominguez Gap area and to assess the effects of water-management scenarios. The model is two-dimensional, vertical and follows an approximate flow line extending from the Pacific Ocean through the Dominguez Gap area. Results indicate that a newly identified fault system can provide a pathway for transport of seawater and that a stratigraphic boundary located between the Bent Spring and Upper Wilmington sequences may control the vertical movement of seawater. Three 50-year water-management scenarios were considered: (1) no change in water-management practices; (2) installation of a slurry wall; and (3) raising inland water levels to 7.6 m above sea level. Scenario 3 was the most effective by reversing seawater intrusion. The effects of an instantaneous 1-m sea-level rise were also tested using water-management scenarios 1 and 3. Results from two 100-year simulations indicate that a 1-m sea-level rise may accelerate seawater intrusion for scenario 1; however, scenario 3 remains effective for controlling seawater intrusion. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  4. Behaviour of wintering Tundra Swans Cygnus columbianus columbianus at the Eel River delta and Humboldt Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, Jeffrey M.; Gress, Carol; Byers, Jacob W.; Jennings, Emily; Ely, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Tundra Swan Cygnus columbianus columbinanus phenology and behaviour at the Eel River delta and southern Humboldt Bay in northern California, USA, is described. Counts made each January from 1963 onwards peaked at 1,502 swans in 1988. Monthly counts recorded during the 2006/07 and 2008/09 winters peaked in February, at 1,033 and 772 swans respectively. Swans roosted on ephemeral ponds at the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, on ephemeral ponds within grassland pastures in the vicinity of the Refuge, and perhaps also used the Eel River as a roost. Flights between Refuge roosts and the pastures and ponds occurred in the two hours after sunrise and before dark. In winters 2008/09 and 2009/10, the percentage of cygnets in the flocks was 10.6% and 21.4% respectively, and increased to =31% cygnets each year after most swans had departed from the area in March. Average brood size in 2009/10 was 2.1 cygnets. Daily activities consisted of foraging (44.9% of activities recorded), comfort behaviour (22.1%), locomotion (16.2%) and vigilance (15.5%). Eight neck-collared swans identified in the wintering flock were marked at four locations in different parts of Alaska, up to 1,300 km apart.

  5. Recent rates of carbon accumulation in montane fens ofYosemite National Park, California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith; Fuller, Christopher C.; Orlando, James L.; Moore, Peggy E.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about recent rates of carbon storage in montane peatlands, particularly in the western United States. Here we report on recent rates of carbon accumulation (past 50 to 100 years) in montane groundwater-fed peatlands (fens) of Yosemite National Park in central California, U.S.A. Peat cores were collected at three sites ranging in elevation from 2070 to 2500 m. Core sections were analyzed for bulk density, % organic carbon, and 210Pb activities for dating purposes. Organic carbon densities ranged from 0.026 to 0.065 g C cm-3. Mean vertical accretion rates estimated using210Pb over the 50-year period from ∼1960 to 2011 and the 100-year period from ∼1910 to 2011 were 0.28 (standard deviation = ±0.09) and 0.18 (±-0.04) cm yr-1, respectively. Mean carbon accumulation rates over the 50- and 100-year periods were 95.4 (±25.4) and 74.7 (±17.2) g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. Such rates are similar to recent rates of carbon accumulation in rich fens in western Canada, but more studies are needed to definitively establish both the similarities and differences in peat formation between boreal and temperate montane fens.

  6. Sediment quality assessment in tidal salt marshes in northern California, USA: An evaluation of multiple lines of evidence approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Carr, Robert S.; Cherr, Gary N.; Green, Peter G.; Grosholz, Edwin G.; Judah, Linda; Morgan, Steven G.; Ogle, Scott; Rashbrook, Vanessa K.; Rose, Wendy L.; Teh, Swee J.; Vines, Carol A.; Anderson, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of integrating a traditional sediment quality triad approach with selected sublethal chronic indicators in resident species in assessing sediment quality in four salt marshes in northern California, USA. These included the highly contaminated (Stege Marsh) and relatively clean (China Camp) marshes in San Francisco Bay and two reference marshes in Tomales Bay. Toxicity potential of contaminants and benthic macroinvertebrate survey showed significant differences between contaminated and reference marshes. Sublethal responses (e.g., apoptotic DNA fragmentation, lipid accumulation, and glycogen depletion) in livers of longjaw mudsucker (Gillichthys mirabilis) and embryo abnormality in lined shore crab (Pachygrapsus crassipes) also clearly distinguished contaminated and reference marshes, while other responses (e.g., cytochrome P450, metallothionein) did not. This study demonstrates that additional chronic sublethal responses in resident species under field exposure conditions can be readily combined with sediment quality triads for an expanded multiple lines of evidence approach. This confirmatory step may be warranted in environments like salt marshes in which natural variables may affect interpretation of toxicity test data. Qualitative and quantitative integration of the portfolio of responses in resident species and traditional approach can support a more comprehensive and informative sediment quality assessment in salt marshes and possibly other habitat types as well.

  7. Influences of the unsaturated, saturated, and riparian zones on the transport of nitrate near the Merced River, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domagalski, J.L.; Phillips, S.P.; Bayless, E.R.; Zamora, C.; Kendall, C.; Wildman, R.A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Transport and transformation of nitrate was evaluated along a 1-km groundwater transect from an almond orchard to the Merced River, California, USA, within an irrigated agricultural setting. As indicated by measurements of pore-water nitrate and modeling using the root zone water quality model, about 63% of the applied nitrogen was transported through a 6.5-m unsaturated zone. Transport times from recharge locations to the edge of a riparian zone ranged from approximately 6 months to greater than 100 years. This allowed for partial denitrification in horizons having mildly reducing conditions, and essentially no denitrification in horizons with oxidizing conditions. Transport times across a 50-100-m-wide riparian zone of less than a year to over 6 years and more strongly reducing conditions resulted in greater rates of denitrification. Isotopic measurements and concentrations of excess N2 in water were indicative of denitrification with the highest rates below the Merced River. Discharge of water and nitrate into the river was dependent on gradients driven by irrigation or river stage. The results suggest that the assimilative capacity for nitrate of the groundwater system, and particularly the riverbed, is limiting the nitrate load to the Merced River in the study area. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  8. Effect of attitudes towards patients on sexual history taking: a survey of Iranian?American physicians in California, USA.

    PubMed

    Rashidian, Mitra; Minichiello, Victor; Knutsen, Synnove F; Ghamsary, Mark

    2017-06-16

    Background: Although obtaining sexual history from patients is essential, the attitudes of physicians can become a barrier to sexual health care. Iranian-American physicians may face particular challenges because talking about sexuality is considered a taboo within their culture. Our study examined these physicians' attitudes when taking a sexual history from their patients. Methods: In 2013, a self-administrated questionnaire was sent to 1550 Iranian-American physicians in California, USA. Using factor analysis, the principal components approach with a Varimax rotation was used on a set of 12-item questions (five-point Likert scales) to detect latent factors that explain attitudes affecting sexual history taking. Scores are generated to determine physicians' attitudes towards sexual history taking. Results: In total, 354 questionnaires were returned (23% response rate). Three factors were identified as internally consistent (Cronbach's α=0.84 - 0.94): (1) attitude towards various patients; (2) female sexuality; and (3) age and marriage. Significant association were found between these three factors and some variables such as physicians' gender, country of medical graduation, religion, birthplace and age. Conclusions: Results revealed that cultural attitudes are important factors affecting physicians' involvement in sexual history taking. Additional studies from this population and other subpopulations of US physicians are needed. New strategies that reflect on physicians' attitude on sexual healthcare delivery is needed. If confirmed in other studies, our findings could have implications for the training of medical graduates globally.

  9. Diel cycles of hydrogen peroxide in marine bathing waters in Southern California, USA: in situ surf zone measurements.

    PubMed

    Clark, Catherine D; De Bruyn, Warren J; Hirsch, Charlotte M; Aiona, Paige

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is photochemically produced in natural waters. It has been implicated in the oxidative-induced mortality of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), a microbial water quality measure. To assess levels and cycling of peroxide in beach waters monitored for FIB, diel studies were carried out in surf zone waters in July 2009 at Crystal Cove State Beach, Southern California, USA. Maximum concentrations of 160-200 nM were obtained within 1h of solar noon. Levels dropped at night to 20-40 nM, consistent with photochemical production from sunlight. Day-time production and night-time dark loss rates averaged 16 ± 3 nM h(-1) and 12 ± 4 nM h(-1) respectively. Apparent quantum yields averaged 0.07 ± 0.02. Production was largely dominated by sunlight, with some dependence on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) levels in waters with high absorption coefficients. Peroxide levels measured here are sufficient to cause oxidative-stress-induced mortality of bacteria, affect FIB diel cycling and impact microbial water quality in marine bathing waters.

  10. Storm surges and climate change implications for tidal marshes: Insight from the San Francisco Bay Estuary, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, Karen M.; Buffington, Kevin J.; Swanson, Kathleen; Takekawa, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    Tidal marshes are dynamic ecosystems, which are influenced by oceanic and freshwater processes and daily changes in sea level. Projected sea-level rise and changes in storm frequency and intensity will affect tidal marshes by altering suspended sediment supply, plant communities, and the inundation duration and depth of the marsh platform. The objective of this research was to evaluate if regional weather conditions resulting in low-pressure storms changed tidal conditions locally within three tidal marshes. We hypothesized that regional storms will increase sea level heights locally, resulting in increased inundation of the tidal marsh platform and plant communities. Using site-level measurements of elevation, plant communities, and water levels, we present results from two storm events in 2010 and 2011 from the San Francisco Bay Estuary (SFBE), California, USA. The January 2010 storm had the lowest recorded sea level pressure in the last 30 years for this region. During the storm episodes, the duration of tidal marsh inundation was 1.8 and 3.1 times greater than average for that time of year, respectively. At peak storm surges, over 65% in 2010 and 93% in 2011 of the plant community was under water. We also discuss the implications of these types of storms and projected sea-level rise on the structure and function of the tidal marshes and how that will impact the hydro-geomorphic processes and marsh biotic communities.

  11. Testing alternative conceptual models of seawater intrusion in a coastal aquifer using computer simulation, southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishikawa, T.

    1997-01-01

    Two alternative conceptual models of the physical processes controlling seawater intrusion in a coastal basin in California, USA, were tested to identify a likely principal pathway for seawater intrusion. The conceptual models were tested by using a two-dimensional, finite-element groundwater flow and transport model. This pathway was identified by the conceptual model that best replicated the historical data. The numerical model was applied in cross section to a submarine canyon that is a main avenue for seawater to enter the aquifer system underlying the study area. Both models are characterized by a heterogeneous, layered, water-bearing aquifer. However, the first model is characterized by flat-lying aquifer layers and by a high value of hydraulic conductivity in the basal aquifer layer, which is thought to be a principal conduit for seawater intrusion. The second model is characterized by offshore folding, which was modeled as a very nearshore outcrop, thereby providing a shorter path for seawater to intrude. General conclusions are that: 1) the aquifer system is best modeled as a flat, heterogeneous, layered system; 2) relatively thin basal layers with relatively high values of hydraulic conductivity are the principal pathways for seawater intrusion; and 3) continuous clay layers of low hydraulic conductivity play an important role in controlling the movement of seawater.

  12. Landscape position influences soil respiration variability and sensitivity to physiological drivers in mixed-use lands of Southern California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Steven M.; Liang, Liyin L.; Jenerette, G. Darrel

    2016-10-01

    Linking variation in ecosystem functioning to physiological and landscape drivers has become an important research need for understanding ecosystem responses to global changes. We investigate how these contrasting scale-dependent ecosystem drivers influence soil respiration (Rs), a key ecosystem process, using in situ landscape surveys and experimental subsidies of water and labile carbon. Surveys and experiments were conducted in summer and winter seasons and were distributed along a coastal to desert climate gradient and among the dominant land use classes in Southern California, USA. We found that Rs decreased from lawn to agricultural and wildland land uses for both seasons and along the climate gradient in the summer while increasing along the climate gradient in the winter. Rs variation was positively correlated with soil temperature and negatively to soil moisture and substrate. Water additions increased Rs in wildland land uses, while urban land uses responded little or negatively. However, most land uses exhibited carbon limitation, with wildlands experiencing largest responses to labile carbon additions. These findings show that intensively managed land uses have increased rates, decreased spatial variation, and decreased sensitivity to environmental conditions in Rs compared to wildlands, while increasing aridity has the opposite effect. In linking scales, physiological drivers were correlated with Rs but landscape position influenced Rs by altering both the physiological drivers and the sensitivity to the drivers. Systematic evaluation of physiological and landscape variation provides a framework for understanding the effects of interactive global change drivers to ecosystem metabolism across multiple scales.

  13. Sediment quality assessment in tidal salt marshes in northern California, USA: an evaluation of multiple lines of evidence approach.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Carr, R Scott; Cherr, Gary N; Green, Peter G; Grosholz, Edwin D; Judah, Linda; Morgan, Steven G; Ogle, Scott; Rashbrook, Vanessa K; Rose, Wendy L; Teh, Swee J; Vines, Carol A; Anderson, Susan L

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of integrating a traditional sediment quality triad approach with selected sublethal chronic indicators in resident species in assessing sediment quality in four salt marshes in northern California, USA. These included the highly contaminated (Stege Marsh) and relatively clean (China Camp) marshes in San Francisco Bay and two reference marshes in Tomales Bay. Toxicity potential of contaminants and benthic macroinvertebrate survey showed significant differences between contaminated and reference marshes. Sublethal responses (e.g., apoptotic DNA fragmentation, lipid accumulation, and glycogen depletion) in livers of longjaw mudsucker (Gillichthys mirabilis) and embryo abnormality in lined shore crab (Pachygrapsus crassipes) also clearly distinguished contaminated and reference marshes, while other responses (e.g., cytochrome P450, metallothionein) did not. This study demonstrates that additional chronic sublethal responses in resident species under field exposure conditions can be readily combined with sediment quality triads for an expanded multiple lines of evidence approach. This confirmatory step may be warranted in environments like salt marshes in which natural variables may affect interpretation of toxicity test data. Qualitative and quantitative integration of the portfolio of responses in resident species and traditional approach can support a more comprehensive and informative sediment quality assessment in salt marshes and possibly other habitat types as well.

  14. Polychlorinated biphenyls and toxaphene in Pacific tree frog tadpoles (Hyla regilla) from the California Sierra Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Angermann, Jeffrey E; Fellers, Gary M; Matsumura, Fumio

    2002-10-01

    Pacific tree frog (Hyla regilla) tadpoles were collected throughout the Sierra Nevada mountain range, California, USA, in 1996 and 1997 and analyzed for the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and toxaphene. Whole-tadpole sigma PCB levels ranged from 244 ng/g (wet wt) at lower elevations on the western slope to 1.6 ng/g high on the eastern slope, whereas sigma toxaphene levels ranged from 15.6 to 1.5 ng/g. Linear regression of PCB and toxaphene residue levels versus elevation indicated a significant relationship, with an r2 value of 0.33 for PCB and 0.45 for toxaphene indicating a significant elevation effect on PCB and toxaphene bioaccumulation in Sierra Nevada H. regilla. Tadpole samples from sites in east-facing versus west-facing drainage basins showed significant differences in PCB and toxaphene residue levels, suggesting the possibility of a rain-shadow effect in the long-range atmospheric transport of these contaminants to the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

  15. Polychlorinated biphenyls and toxaphene in Pacific tree frog tadpoles (Hyla regilla) from the California Sierra Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angermann, Jeffrey E.; Fellers, Gary M.; Matsumura, Fumio

    2002-01-01

    Pacific tree frog (Hyla regilla) tadpoles were collected throughout the Sierra Nevada mountain range, California, USA, in 1996 and 1997 and analyzed for the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and toxaphene. Whole-tadpole Σ PCB levels ranged from 244 ng/g (wet wt) at lower elevations on the western slope to 1.6 ng/g high on the eastern slope, whereas Σ toxaphene levels ranged from 15.6 to 1.5 ng/g. Linear regression of PCB and toxaphene residue levels versus elevation indicated a significant relationship, with an r2 value of 0.33 for PCB and 0.45 for toxaphene indicating a significant elevation effect on PCB and toxaphene bioaccumulation in Sierra Nevada H. regilla. Tadpole samples from sites in east-facing versus west-facing drainage basins showed significant differences in PCB and toxaphene residue levels, suggesting the possibility of a rain-shadow effect in the long-range atmospheric transport of these contaminants to the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

  16. Pesticides in mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa) from the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fellers, G.M.; McConnell, L.L.; Pratt, D.; Datta, S.

    2004-01-01

    In 1997, pesticide concentrations were measured in mountain yellow-legged frogs (Rana muscosa) from two areas in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California, USA. One area (Sixty Lakes Basin, Kings Canyon National Park) had large, apparently healthy populations of frogs. A second area (Tablelands, Sequoia National Park) once had large populations, but the species had been extirpated from this area by the early 1980s. The Tablelands is exposed directly to prevailing winds from agricultural regions to the west. When an experimental reintroduction of R. muscosa in 1994 to 1995 was deemed unsuccessful in 1997, the last 20 (reintroduced) frogs that could be found were collected from the Tablelands, and pesticide concentrations in both frog tissue and the water were measured at both the Tablelands and at reference sites at Sixty Lakes. In frog tissues, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) concentration was one to two orders of magnitude higher than the other organochlorines (46 ?? 20 ng/g wet wt at Tablelands and 17 ?? 8 Sixty Lakes). Both ??-chlordane and trans-nonachlor were found in significantly greater concentrations in Tablelands frog tissues compared with Sixty Lakes. Organophosphate insecticides, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon were observed primarily in surface water with higher concentrations at the Tablelands sites. No contaminants were significantly higher in our Sixty Lakes samples.

  17. Influences of the unsaturated, saturated, and riparian zones on the transport of nitrate near the Merced River, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagalski, Joseph L.; Phillips, Steven P.; Bayless, E. Randall; Zamora, Celia; Kendall, Carol; Wildman, Richard A.; Hering, Janet G.

    2008-06-01

    Transport and transformation of nitrate was evaluated along a 1-km groundwater transect from an almond orchard to the Merced River, California, USA, within an irrigated agricultural setting. As indicated by measurements of pore-water nitrate and modeling using the root zone water quality model, about 63% of the applied nitrogen was transported through a 6.5-m unsaturated zone. Transport times from recharge locations to the edge of a riparian zone ranged from approximately 6 months to greater than 100 years. This allowed for partial denitrification in horizons having mildly reducing conditions, and essentially no denitrification in horizons with oxidizing conditions. Transport times across a 50-100-m-wide riparian zone of less than a year to over 6 years and more strongly reducing conditions resulted in greater rates of denitrification. Isotopic measurements and concentrations of excess N2 in water were indicative of denitrification with the highest rates below the Merced River. Discharge of water and nitrate into the river was dependent on gradients driven by irrigation or river stage. The results suggest that the assimilative capacity for nitrate of the groundwater system, and particularly the riverbed, is limiting the nitrate load to the Merced River in the study area.

  18. Evapotranspiration rates and crop coefficients for a restored marsh in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, J.Z.; Anderson, F.E.; Snyder, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    The surface renewal method was used to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) for a restored marsh on Twitchell Island in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California, USA. ET estimates for the marsh, together with reference ET measurements from a nearby climate station, were used to determine crop coefficients over a 3-year period during the growing season. The mean ET rate for the study period was 6 mm day-1, which is high compared with other marshes with similar vegetation. High ET rates at the marsh may be due to the windy, semi-arid Mediterranean climate of the region, and the permanently flooded nature of the marsh, which results in very low surface resistance of the vegetation. Crop coefficient (Kc) values for the marsh ranged from 0.73 to 1.18. The mean Kc value over the entire study period was 0-95. The daily Kc values for any given month varied from year to year, and the standard deviation of daily Kc values varied between months. Although several climate variables were undoubtedly responsible for this variation, our analysis revealed that wind direction and the temperature of standing water in the wetland were of particular importance in determining ET rates and Kc values.

  19. Chlorinated, brominated, and perfluorinated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements in livers of sea otters from California, Washington, and Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia).

    PubMed

    Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Yun, Se Hun; Agusa, Tetsuro; Thomas, Nancy J; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2008-04-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (DDTs, HCHs, and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and 20 trace elements were determined in livers of 3- to 5-year old stranded sea otters collected from the coastal waters of California, Washington, and Alaska (USA) and from Kamchatka (Russia). Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and PBDEs were high in sea otters collected from the California coast. Concentrations of DDTs were 10-fold higher in California sea otters than in otters from other locations; PCB concentrations were 5-fold higher, and PBDE concentrations were 2-fold higher, in California sea otters than in otters from other locations. Concentrations of PAHs were higher in sea otters from Prince William Sound than in sea otters from other locations. Concentrations of several trace elements were elevated in sea otters collected from California and Prince William Sound. Elevated concentrations of Mn and Zn in sea otters from California and Prince William Sound were indicative of oxidative stress-related injuries in these two populations. Concentrations of all of the target compounds, including trace elements, that were analyzed in sea otters from Kamchatka were lower than those found from the US coastal locations.

  20. Chlorinated, brominated, and perfluorinated compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and trace elements in livers of sea otters from California, Washington, and Alaska (USA), and Kamchatka (Russia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kannan, K.; Moon, H.-B.; Yun, S.-H.; Agusa, T.; Thomas, N.J.; Tanabe, S.

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (DDTs, HCHs, and chlordanes), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), and 20 trace elements were determined in livers of 3- to 5-year old stranded sea otters collected from the coastal waters of California, Washington, and Alaska (USA) and from Kamchatka (Russia). Concentrations of organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and PBDEs were high in sea otters collected from the California coast. Concentrations of DDTs were 10-fold higher in California sea otters than in otters from other locations; PCB concentrations were 5-fold higher, and PBDE concentrations were 2-fold higher, in California sea otters than in otters from other locations. Concentrations of PAHs were higher in sea otters from Prince William Sound than in sea otters from other locations. Concentrations of several trace elements were elevated in sea otters collected from California and Prince William Sound. Elevated concentrations of Mn and Zn in sea otters from California and Prince William Sound were indicative of oxidative stress-related injuries in these two populations. Concentrations of all of the target compounds, including trace elements, that were analyzed in sea otters from Kamchatka were lower than those found from the US coastal locations. ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry.