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Sample records for dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation

  1. Enrichment of putative stem cells from adipose tissue using dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Vykoukal, Jody; Vykoukal, Daynene M.; Freyberg, Susanne; Alt, Eckhard U.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.

    2009-01-01

    We have applied the microfluidic cell separation method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) to the enrichment of a putative stem cell population from an enzyme-digested adipose tissue derived cell suspension. A DEP-FFF separator device was constructed using a novel microfluidic-microelectronic hybrid flex-circuit fabrication approach that is scaleable and anticipates future low-cost volume manufacturing. We report the separation of a nucleated cell fraction from cell debris and the bulk of the erythrocyte population, with the relatively rare (<2% starting concentration) NG2-positive cell population (pericytes and/or putative progenitor cells) being enriched up to 14-fold. This work demonstrates a potential clinical application for DEP-FFF and further establishes the utility of the method for achieving label-free fractionation of cell subpopulations. PMID:18651083

  2. Dynamic physical properties of dissociated tumor cells revealed by dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Sangjo; Gascoyne, Peter; Noshari, Jamileh; Stemke Hale, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic disease results from the shedding of cancer cells from a solid primary tumor, their transport through the cardiovascular system as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and their engraftment and growth at distant sites. Little is known about the properties and fate of tumor cells as they leave their growth site and travel as single cells. We applied analytical dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (dFFF) to study the membrane capacitance, density and hydrodynamic properties together with the size and morphology of cultured tumor cells after they were harvested and placed into single cell suspensions. After detachment, the tumor cells exhibited biophysical properties that changed with time through a process of cytoplasmic shedding whereby membrane and cytoplasm were lost. This process appeared to be distinct from the cell death mechanisms of apoptosis, anoikis and necrosis and it may explain why multiple phenotypes are seen among CTCs isolated from patients and among the tumor cells obtained from ascitic fluid of patients. The implications of dynamic biophysical properties and cytoplasmic loss for CTC migration into small blood vessels in the circulatory system, survival and gene expression are discussed. Because the total capacitance of tumor cells remained higher than blood cells even after they had shed cytoplasm, dFFF offers a compelling, antibody-independent technology for isolating viable CTCs from blood even when they are no larger than peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:21691666

  3. Dielectrophoretic Field-Flow Fractionation System for Detection of Aquatic Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    Pui-ock, Sittisak; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Gascoyne, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (dFFF) was applied as a contact-free way to sense changes in the plasma membrane capacitances and conductivities of cultured human HL-60 cells in response to toxicant exposure. A micropatterned electrode imposed electric forces on cells in suspension in a parabolic flow profile as they moved through a thin chamber. Relative changes in the dFFF peak elution time, reflecting changes in cell membrane area and ion permeability, were measured as indices of response during the first 150 min of exposure to eight toxicants having different single or mixed modes of action (acrylonitrile, actinomycin D, carbon tetrachloride, endosulfan, N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU), paraquat dichloride, puromycin, and styrene oxide). The dFFF method was compared with the cell viability assay for all toxicants and with the mitochondrial potentiometric dye assay or DNA alkaline comet assay according to the mode of action of the specific agents. Except for low doses of nucleic acid-targeting agents (actinomycin D and NMU), the dFFF method detected all toxicants more sensitively than other assays, in some cases up to 105 times more sensitively than the viability approach. The results suggest the dFFF method merits additional study for possible applicability in toxicology. PMID:18788754

  4. Separation of polystyrene microbeads using dielectrophoretic/gravitational field-flow-fractionation.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X B; Vykoukal, J; Becker, F F; Gascoyne, P R

    1998-01-01

    The characterization of a dielectrophoretic/gravitational field-flow-fractionation (DEP/G-FFF) system using model polystyrene (PS) microbeads is presented. Separations of PS beads of different surface functionalization (COOH and none) and different sizes (6, 10, and 15 microm in diameter) are demonstrated. To investigate the factors influencing separation performance, particle elution times were determined as a function of particle suspension conductivity, fluid flow rate, and applied field frequency and voltage. Experimental data were analyzed using a previously reported theoretical model and good agreement between theory and experiment was found. It was shown that separation of PS beads was based on the differences in their effective dielectric properties. Particles possessing different dielectric properties were positioned at different heights in a fluid-flow profile in a thin chamber by the balance of DEP and gravitational forces, transported at different velocities under the influence of the fluid flow, and thereby separated. To explore hydrodynamic (HD) lift effects, velocities of PS beads were determined as a function of fluid flow rate in the separation chamber when no DEP field was applied. In this case, particle equilibrium height positions were governed solely by the balance of HD lift and gravitational forces. It was concluded that under the experimental conditions reported here, the DEP force was the dominant factor in controlling particle equilibrium height and that HD lift force played little role in DEP/G-FFF operation. Finally, the influence of various experimental parameters on separation performance was discussed for the optimization of DEP/G-FFF. PMID:9591693

  5. Model-based analysis of a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Abutayeh, Mohammad; Stiharu, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We present the development of a dynamic model for predicting the trajectory of microparticles in microfluidic devices, employing dielectrophoresis, for Hyperlayer field-flow fractionation. The electrode configuration is such that multiple finite-sized electrodes are located on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel; the electrodes on the walls are aligned with each other. The electric potential inside the microchannel is described using the Laplace equation while the microparticles' trajectory is described using equations based on Newton's second law. All equations are solved using finite difference method. The equations of motion account for forces including inertia, buoyancy, drag, gravity, virtual mass, and dielectrophoresis. The model is used for parametric study; the geometric parameters analyzed include microparticle radius, microchannel depth, and electrode/spacing lengths while volumetric flow rate and actuation voltage are the two operating parameters considered in the study. The trajectory of microparticles is composed of transient and steady state phases; the trajectory is influenced by all parameters. Microparticle radius and volumetric flow rate, above the threshold, do not influence the steady state levitation height; microparticle levitation is not possible below the threshold of the volumetric flow rate. Microchannel depth, electrode/spacing lengths, and actuation voltage influence the steady-state levitation height.

  6. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  7. Introducing dielectrophoresis as a new force field for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y; Wang, X B; Becker, F F; Gascoyne, P R

    1997-01-01

    We present the principle of cell characterization and separation by dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation and show preliminary experimental results. The operational device takes the form of a thin chamber in which the bottom wall supports an array of microelectrodes. By applying appropriate AC voltage signals to these electrodes, dielectrophoretic forces are generated to levitate cells suspended in the chamber and to affect their equilibrium heights. A laminar flow profile is established in the chamber so that fluid flows faster with increasing distance from the chamber walls. A cell carried in the flow stream will attain an equilibrium height, and a corresponding velocity, based on the balance of dielectrophoretic, gravitational, and hydrodynamic lift forces it experiences. We describe a theoretical model for this system and show that the cell velocity is a function of the mean fluid velocity, the voltage and frequency of the signals applied to the electrodes, and, most significantly, the cell dielectric properties. The validity of the model is demonstrated with human leukemia (HL-60) cells subjected to a parallel electrode array, and application of the device to separating HL-60 cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is shown. PMID:9251828

  8. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  9. Autophagic subpopulation sorting by sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Naves, Thomas; Battu, Serge; Jauberteau, Marie-Odile; Cardot, Philippe J P; Ratinaud, Marie-Hélène; Verdier, Mireille

    2012-10-16

    The development of hypoxic areas often takes place in solid tumors and leads cells to undergo adaptive signalization like autophagy. This process is responsible for misfolded or aggregated proteins and nonfunctional organelle recycling, allowing cells to maintain their energetic status. However, it could constitute a double-edged pathway leading to both survival and cell death. So, in response to stress such as hypoxia, autophagic and apoptotic cells are often mixed. To specifically study and characterize autophagic cells and the process, we needed to develop a method able to (1) isolate autophagic subpopulation and (2) respect apoptotic and autophagic status. Sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was first used to monitor physical parameter changes due to the hypoxia mimetic CoCl(2) in the p53 mutated SKNBE2(c) human neuroblastoma cell line. Second, we showed that "hyperlayer" elution is able to prepare autophagic enriched populations, fraction (F3), overexpressing autophagic markers (i.e., LC3-II accumulation and punctiform organization of autophagosomes as well as cathepsin B overactivity). Conversely, the first eluted fraction exhibited apoptotic markers (caspase-3 activity and Bax increased expression). For the first time, SdFFF was employed as an analytical tool in order to discriminate apoptotic and autophagic cells, thus providing an enriched autophagic fraction consecutively to a hypoxic stress.

  10. Field flow fractionation techniques to explore the "nano-world".

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia

    2017-04-01

    Field flow fractionation (FFF) techniques are used to successfully characterize several nanomaterials by sizing nano-entities and producing information about the aggregation/agglomeration state of nanoparticles. By coupling FFF techniques to specific detectors, researchers can determine particle-size distributions (PSDs), expressed as mass-based or number-based PSDs. This review considers FFF applications in the food, biomedical, and environmental sectors, mostly drawn from the past 4 y. It thus underlines the prominent role of asymmetrical flow FFF within the FFF family. By concisely comparing FFF techniques with other techniques suitable for sizing nano-objects, the advantages and the disadvantages of these instruments become clear. A consideration of select recent publications illustrates the state of the art of some lesser-known FFF techniques and innovative instrumental set-ups.

  11. Sedimentation field flow fractionation monitoring of bimodal wheat starch amylolysis.

    PubMed

    Salesse, C; Battu, S; Begaud-Grimaud, G; Cledat, D; Cook-Moreau, J; Cardot, P J P

    2006-10-06

    Enzymatic starch granule hydrolysis is one of the most important reactions in many industrial processes. In this study, we investigated the capacity of sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) to monitor the amylolysis of a bimodal starch population: native wheat starch. Results demonstrated a correlation between fractogram changes and enzymatic hydrolysis. Furthermore, SdFFF was used to sort sub-populations which enhanced the study of granule size distribution changes occurring during amylolysis. These results show the interest in coupling SdFFF with particle size measurement methods to study complex starch size/density modifications associated to hydrolysis. These results suggested different applications such as the association of SdFFF with structural investigations to better understand the specific mechanisms of amylolysis or starch granule structure.

  12. Coating microchannels to improve Field-Flow Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shendruk, Tyler N.; Slater, Gary W.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a selective-steric-mode Field-Flow Fractionation (ssFFF) technique for size separation of particles. Grafting a dense polymer brush onto the accumulation wall of a microchannel adds two novel effects to FFF: the particles must pay an entropic cost to enter the brush and the brush has a hydrodynamic thickness that shifts the no-slip condition. For small particles, the brush acts as a low-velocity region, leading to chromatographic-like retention. We present an analytical retention theory for small but finite-sized particles in a microchannel with a dense Alexander brush coating that possesses a well-defined hydrodynamic thickness. This theory is compared to a numerical solution for the retention ratio given by a flow approximated by the Brinkman equation and particle-brush interaction that is both osmotic and compressional. Large performance improvements are predicted in several regimes. Multi-Particle Collision simulations of the system assess the impact of factors neglected by the theory such as the dynamics of particle impingement on the brush subject to a flow.

  13. Paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokbin; Kwak, Rhokyun; Kim, Wonjung

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel paper-based flow fractionation system for preconcentration and field-flow fractionation. The paper fluidic system consisting of a straight channel connected with expansion regions can generate a fluid flow with a constant flow rate for 10 min without any external pumping devices. The flow bifurcates with a fraction ratio of up to 30 depending on the control parameters of the channel geometry. Utilizing this simple paper-based bifurcation system, we developed a continuous-flow preconcentrator and a field-flow fractionator on a paper platform. Our experimental results show that the continuous-flow preconcentrator can produce a 33-fold enrichment of the ion concentration and that the flow fractionation system successfully separates the charged dyes. Our study suggests simple, cheap ways to construct preconcentration and field-flow fractionation systems for paper-based microfluidic diagnostic devices. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) grant funded by the Korea government(MSIP) (NRF-2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  14. Illustrating Some Principles of Separation Science through Gravitational Field-Flow Fractionation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckett, Ronald; Sharma, Reshmi; Andric, Goja; Chantiwas, Rattikan; Jakmunee, Jaroon; Grudpan, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Particle separation is an important but often neglected topic in undergraduate curricula. This article discusses how the method of gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) can be used to illustrate many principles of separation science and some fundamental concepts of physical chemistry. GrFFF separates particles during their elution through…

  15. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation of white wine chromophoric colloidal matter.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Parot, Jérémie; Gonsior, Michael; Nikolantonaki, Maria; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Parlanti, Edith; Gougeon, Régis D

    2017-04-01

    Two analytical separation methods-size-exclusion chromatography and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-were implemented to evaluate the integrity of the colloidal composition of Chardonnay white wine and the impact of pressing and fermentations on the final macromolecular composition. Wine chromophoric colloidal matter, representing UV-visible-absorbing wine macromolecules, was evaluated by optical and structural measurements combined with the description of elution profiles obtained by both separative techniques. The objective of this study was to apply these two types of fractionation on a typical Chardonnay white wine produced in Burgundy and to evaluate how each of them impacted the determination of the macromolecular chromophoric content of wine. UV-visible and fluorescence measurements of collected fractions were successfully applied. An additional proteomic study revealed that grape and microorganism proteins largely impacted the composition of chromophoric colloidal matter of Chardonnay wines. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation appeared to be more reliable and less invasive with respect to the native chemical environment of chromophoric wine macromolecules, and hence is recommended as a tool to fractionate chromophoric colloidal matter in white wines. Graphical Abstract An innovative macromolecular separation method based on Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation was developed to better control colloidal dynamics across Chardonnay white winemaking.

  16. Method of electric field flow fractionation wherein the polarity of the electric field is periodically reversed

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1992-01-01

    A novel method of electric field flow fractionation for separating solute molecules from a carrier solution is disclosed. The method of the invention utilizes an electric field that is periodically reversed in polarity, in a time-dependent, wave-like manner. The parameters of the waveform, including amplitude, frequency and wave shape may be varied to optimize separation of solute species. The waveform may further include discontinuities to enhance separation.

  17. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and flow field flow fractionation as tools for studying the aging effects of WO₃ colloids for photoelectrochemical uses.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto

    2011-07-08

    WO₃ colloidal suspensions obtained through a simple sol-gel procedure were subjected to a controlled temperature aging process whose time evolution in terms of particle mass and size distribution was followed by sedimentation field flow fractionation (SdFFF) and flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF). The experiments performed at a temperature of 60 °C showed that in a few hours the initially transparent sol of WO₃ particles, whose size was less than 25 nm, undergoes a progressive size increase allowing nanoparticles to reach a maximum equivalent spherical size of about 130 nm after 5 h. The observed shift in particle size distribution maxima (SdFFF), the broadening of the curves (FlFFF) and the SEM-TEM observations suggest a mixed mechanism of growth-aggregation of initial nanocrystals to form larger particles. The photoelectrochemical properties of thin WO₃ films obtained from the aged suspensions at regular intervals, were tested in a biased photoelectrocatalytic cell with 1M H₂SO₄ under solar simulated irradiation. The current-voltage polarization curves recorded in the potential range 0-1.8 V (vs. SCE) showed a diminution of the maximum photocurrent from 3.7 mA cm⁻² to 2.8 mA cm⁻² with aging times of 1h and 5h, respectively. This loss of performance was mainly attributed to the reduction of the electroactive surface area of the sintered particles as suggested by the satisfactory linear correlation between the integrated photocurrent and the cyclic voltammetry cathodic wave area of the W(VI)→W(V) process measured in the dark.

  18. Fractionating power and outlet stream polydispersity in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part I: isocratic operation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2016-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF) has become the most commonly used of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, because of the interdependence of the channel flow and the cross flow through the accumulation wall, it is the most difficult of the techniques to optimize, particularly for programmed cross flow operation. For the analysis of polydisperse samples, the optimization should ideally be guided by the predicted fractionating power. Many experimentalists, however, neglect fractionating power and rely on light scattering detection simply to confirm apparent selectivity across the breadth of the eluted peak. The size information returned by the light scattering software is assumed to dispense with any reliance on theory to predict retention, and any departure of theoretical predictions from experimental observations is therefore considered of no importance. Separation depends on efficiency as well as selectivity, however, and efficiency can be a strong function of retention. The fractionation of a polydisperse sample by field-flow fractionation never provides a perfectly separated series of monodisperse fractions at the channel outlet. The outlet stream has some residual polydispersity, and it will be shown in this manuscript that the residual polydispersity is inversely related to the fractionating power. Due to the strong dependence of light scattering intensity and its angular distribution on the size of the scattering species, the outlet polydispersity must be minimized if reliable size data are to be obtained from the light scattering detector signal. It is shown that light scattering detection should be used with careful control of fractionating power to obtain optimized analysis of polydisperse samples. Part I is concerned with isocratic operation of As-FlFFF, and part II with programmed operation.

  19. Hollow-Fiber Flow Field-Flow Fractionation for Mass Spectrometry: From Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Rambaldi, Diana Cristina; Roda, Aldo; Hee Moon, Myeong

    Mass spectrometry (MS) provides analyte identification over a wide molar-mass range. However, particularly in the case of complex matrices, this ability is often enhanced by the use of pre-MS separation steps. A separation, prototype technique for the "gentle" fractionation of large/ultralarge analytes, from proteins to whole cells, is here described to reduce complexity and maintain native characteristics of the sample before MS analysis. It is based on flow field-flow fractionation, and it employs a micro-volume fractionation channel made of a ca. 20 cm hollow-fiber membrane of sub-millimeter section. The key advantages of this technique lie in the low volume and low-cost of the channel, which makes it suitable to a disposable usage. Fractionation performance and instrumental simplicity make it an interesting methodology for in-batch or on-line pre-MS treatment of such samples.

  20. Improved performance of gravitational field-flow fractionation for screening wine-making yeast varieties.

    PubMed

    Sanz, R; Torsello, B; Reschiglian, P; Puignou, L; Galceran, M T

    2002-08-09

    Performance of gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) is improved here with respect to the ability to fractionate and distinguish different varieties of wine-making yeast from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A new GFFF channel with non-polar walls has been employed to enhance fractionation selectivity and reproducibility. Since GFFF retention depends from first principles on particle size, Coulter counter measurements were performed in order to compare size distribution profiles with GFFF profiles. From such a comparison, GFFF was shown to be able to reveal differences in yeast cells other than size. This could make use of GFFF for screening different varieties of wine-making yeast towards future quality assessment procedures based on a possible correlation between yeast cell morphology indexes and quality indexes.

  1. Theory for nanoparticle retention time in the helical channel of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-05-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a separation and characterization technique for magnetic nanoparticles such as those used for cell labeling and for targeted drug therapy. A helical separation channel is used to efficiently exploit the quadrupole magnetic field. The fluid and sample components therefore have angular and longitudinal components to their motion in the thin annular space occupied by the helical channel. The retention ratio is defined as the ratio of the times for non-retained and a retained material to pass through the channel. Equations are derived for the respective angular and longitudinal components to retention ratio.

  2. Meeting in Florida: Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study of nanomaterials in environmental systems requires robust and specific analytical methods. Analytical methods which discriminate based on particle size and molecular composition are not widely available. Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation...

  3. Circuit modification in electrical field flow fractionation systems generating higher resolution separation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tasci, Tonguc O; Johnson, William P; Fernandez, Diego P; Manangon, Eliana; Gale, Bruce K

    2014-10-24

    Compared to other sub-techniques of field flow fractionation (FFF), cyclical electrical field flow fractionation (CyElFFF) is a relatively new method with many opportunities remaining for improvement. One of the most important limitations of this method is the separation of particles smaller than 100nm. For such small particles, the diffusion rate becomes very high, resulting in severe reductions in the CyElFFF separation efficiency. To address this limitation, we modified the electrical circuitry of the ElFFF system. In all earlier ElFFF reports, electrical power sources have been directly connected to the ElFFF channel electrodes, and no alteration has been made in the electrical circuitry of the system. In this work, by using discrete electrical components, such as resistors and diodes, we improved the effective electric field in the system to allow high resolution separations. By modifying the electrical circuitry of the ElFFF system, high resolution separations of 15 and 40nm gold nanoparticles were achieved. The effects of applying different frequencies, amplitudes and voltage shapes have been investigated and analyzed through experiments.

  4. Monitoring the growth of polyoxomolybdate nanoparticles in suspension by flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bailin; Jiang, Huijian; Zhu, Yan; Cammers, Arthur; Selegue, John P

    2005-03-30

    We follow the evolution of polyoxomolybdate nanoparticles in suspensions derived from the keplerate (NH4)42[MoVI72MoV60O372(CH3CO2)30(H2O)72].ca..300H2O.ca..10CH3CO2NH4 ({Mo132}) by flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) to monitor the particle-size distribution in situ, atomic force and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (AFM, SEM, and HRTEM) to confirm particle sizes, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) to determine the Mo content of the FlFFF-separated fractions, and UV/visible spectroscopy to confirm the identity of the species in suspension. We observe the formation of 3-75-nm polyoxomolybdate particles in suspension and the dynamic growth of {Mo132} crystals.

  5. Quantitative analysis of virus-like particle size and distribution by field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Chuan, Yap P; Fan, Yuan Y; Lua, Linda; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2008-04-15

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AFFFF) coupled with multiple-angle light scattering (MALS) is a powerful technique showing potential for the analysis of pharmaceutically-relevant virus-like particles (VLPs). A lack of published methods, and concerns that membrane adsorption during sample fractionation may cause sample aggregation, have limited widespread acceptance. Here we report a reliable optimized method for VLP analysis using AFFFF-MALS, and benchmark it against dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). By comparing chemically identical VLPs having very different quaternary structure, sourced from both bacteria and insect cells, we show that optimized AFFFF analysis does not cause significant aggregation, and that accurate size and distribution information can be obtained for heterogeneous samples in a way not possible with TEM and DLS. Optimized AFFFF thus provides a quantitative way to monitor batch consistency for new vaccine products, and rapidly provides unique information on the whole population of particles within a sample.

  6. Hydrodynamic chromatography and field flow fractionation in finite aspect ratio channels.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, T N; Slater, G W

    2014-04-25

    Hydrodynamic chromatography (HC) and field-flow fractionation (FFF) separation methods are often performed in 3D rectangular channels, though ideal retention theory assumes 2D systems. Devices are commonly designed with large aspect ratios; however, it can be unavoidable or desirable to design rectangular channels with small or even near-unity aspect ratios. To assess the significance of finite-aspect ratio effects and interpret experimental retention results, an ideal, analytical retention theory is needed. We derive a series solution for the ideal retention ratio of HC and FFF rectangular channels. Rather than limiting devices' ability to resolve samples, our theory predicts that retention curves for normal-mode FFF are well approximated by the infinite plate solution and that the performance of HC is actually improved. These findings suggest that FFF devices need not be designed with large aspect ratios and that rectangular HC channels are optimal when the aspect ratio is unity.

  7. Nanoparticle separation with a miniaturized asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation cartridge

    PubMed Central

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Mello, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) is a separation technique applicable to particles over a wide size range. Despite the many advantages of AF4, its adoption in routine particle analysis is somewhat limited by the large footprint of currently available separation cartridges, extended analysis times and significant solvent consumption. To address these issues, we describe the fabrication and characterization of miniaturized AF4 cartridges. Key features of the down-scaled platform include simplified cartridge and reagent handling, reduced analysis costs and higher throughput capacities. The separation performance of the miniaturized cartridge is assessed using certified gold and silver nanoparticle standards. Analysis of gold nanoparticle populations indicates shorter analysis times and increased sensitivity compared to conventional AF4 separation schemes. Moreover, nanoparticulate titanium dioxide populations exhibiting broad size distributions are analyzed in a rapid and efficient manner. Finally, the repeatability and reproducibility of the miniaturized platform are investigated with respect to analysis time and separation efficiency. PMID:26258119

  8. Development of flow/steric field-flow fractionation as a routine process control method

    SciTech Connect

    Barman, B.N.

    1988-08-30

    Researchers studied the feasibility of using the Flow/Steric Field-Flow Fractionation (Flow/StFFF) method for the characterization of particulate materials with diameters in the 1-100 micrometers range. Studies on the optimization of the method for the separation and characterization of different size particulate samples, as well as on the role of the crossflow field and channel flowrate on the separation and resolution, were performed with a number of spherical polystyrene divinylbenzene latex standards and included in the report. Applicability of the method as a fast and reliable practical tool for industrial process control, particularly for grinding operations, was examined by analyzing a number of samples obtained by grinding. Examples of materials considered include coal, limestone and glass.

  9. A novel approach to improve operation and performance in flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Johann, Christoph; Elsenberg, Stephan; Roesch, Ulrich; Rambaldi, Diana C; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi

    2011-07-08

    A new system design and setup are proposed for the combined use of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) within the same instrumentation. To this purpose, three innovations are presented: (a) a new flow control scheme where focusing flow rates are measured in real time allowing to adjust the flow rate ratio as desired; (b) a new HF5 channel design consisting of two sets of ferrule, gasket and cap nut used to mount the fiber inside a tube. This design provides a mechanism for effective and straightforward sealing of the fiber; (c) a new AF4 channel design with only two fluid connections on the upper plate. Only one pump is needed to deliver the necessary flow rates. In the focusing/relaxation step the two parts of the focusing flow and a bypass flow flushing the detectors are created with two splits of the flow from the pump. In the elution mode the cross-flow is measured and controlled with a flow controller device. This leads to reduced pressure pulsations in the channel and improves signal to noise ratio in the detectors. Experimental results of the separation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and of a mix of four proteins demonstrate a significant improvement in the HF5 separation performance, in terms of efficiency, resolution, and run-to-run reproducibility compared to what has been reported in the literature. Separation performance in HF5 mode is shown to be comparable to the performance in AF4 mode using a channel with two connections in the upper plate.

  10. Fractionating power and outlet stream polydispersity in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part II: programmed operation.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (As-FlFFF) is a widely used technique for analyzing polydisperse nanoparticle and macromolecular samples. The programmed decay of cross flow rate is often employed. The interdependence of the cross flow rate through the membrane and the fluid flow along the channel length complicates the prediction of elution time and fractionating power. The theory for their calculation is presented. It is also confirmed for examples of exponential decay of cross flow rate with constant channel outlet flow rate that the residual sample polydispersity at the channel outlet is quite well approximated by the reciprocal of four times the fractionating power. Residual polydispersity is of importance when online MALS or DLS detection are used to extract quantitative information on particle size or molecular weight. The theory presented here provides a firm basis for the optimization of programmed flow conditions in As-FlFFF. Graphical abstract Channel outlet polydispersity remains significant following fractionation by As-FlFFF under conditions of programmed decay of cross flow rate.

  11. Size characterization by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation of silica particles used as food additives.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Ravani, Laura; Passarella, Martina

    2013-07-25

    Four types of SiO2, available on the market as additives in food and personal care products, were size characterized using Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF), SEM, TEM and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). The synergic use of the different analytical techniques made it possible, for some samples, to confirm the presence of primary nanoparticles (10 nm) organized in clusters or aggregates of different dimension and, for others, to discover that the available information is incomplete, particularly that regarding the presence of small particles. A protocol to extract the silica particles from a simple food matrix was set up, enriching (0.25%, w w(-1)) a nearly silica-free instant barley coffee powder with a known SiO2 sample. The SdFFF technique, in conjunction with SEM observations, made it possible to identify the added SiO2 particles and verify the new particle size distribution. The SiO2 content of different powdered foodstuffs was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS); the concentrations ranged between 0.006 and 0.35% (w w(-1)). The protocol to isolate the silica particles was so applied to the most SiO2-rich commercial products and the derived suspensions were separated by SdFFF; SEM and TEM observations supported the size analyses while GFAAS determinations on collected fractions permitted element identification.

  12. Analysis of plant ribosomes with asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Tuomainen, Päivi; Eskelin, Katri

    2014-02-01

    Ribosome profiling is a technique used to separate ribosomal subunits, 80S ribosomes (monosomes), and polyribosomes (polysomes) from other RNA-protein complexes. It is traditionally performed in sucrose gradients. In this study, we used asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) to characterize ribosome profiles of Nicotiana benthamiana plants. With the optimized running conditions, we were able to separate free molecules from ribosomal subunits and intact ribosomes. We used various chemical and enzymatic treatments to validate the positions of subunits, monosomes, and polysomes in the AsFlFFF fractograms. We also characterized the protein and RNA content of AsFlFFF fractions by gel electrophoresis and western blotting. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that ribosomes remained bound to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) during the analysis. Therefore, we conclude that AsFlFFF can be used for ribosome profiling to study the mRNAs that are being translated. It can also be used to study the protein composition of ribosomes that are active in translation at that particular moment.

  13. Optimization and evaluation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Navratilova, Jana; Legros, Samuel; Wagner, Stephan; Grombe, Ringo; Snell, James; von der Kammer, Frank; Larsen, Erik H

    2013-01-11

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) in combination with on-line optical detection and mass spectrometry is one of the most promising methods for separation and quantification of nanoparticles (NPs) in complex matrices including food. However, to obtain meaningful results regarding especially the NP size distribution a number of parameters influencing the separation need to be optimized. This paper describes the development of a separation method for polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in aqueous suspension. Carrier liquid composition, membrane material, cross flow rate and spacer height were shown to have a significant influence on the recoveries and retention times of the nanoparticles. Focus time and focus flow rate were optimized with regard to minimum elution of AgNPs in the void volume. The developed method was successfully tested for injected masses of AgNPs from 0.2 to 5.0 μg. The on-line combination of AF(4) with detection methods including ICP-MS, light absorbance and light scattering was helpful because each detector provided different types of information about the eluting NP fraction. Differences in the time-resolved appearance of the signals obtained by the three detection methods were explained based on the physical origin of the signal. Two different approaches for conversion of retention times of AgNPs to their corresponding sizes and size distributions were tested and compared, namely size calibration with polystyrene nanoparticles (PSNPs) and calculations of size based on AF(4) theory. Fraction collection followed by transmission electron microscopy was performed to confirm the obtained size distributions and to obtain further information regarding the AgNP shape. Characteristics of the absorbance spectra were used to confirm the presence of non-spherical AgNP.

  14. Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light scattering detection - an orthogonal sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Galyean, Anne A; Filliben, James J; Holbrook, R David; Vreeland, Wyatt N; Weinberg, Howard S

    2016-11-18

    Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF(4)) has several instrumental factors that may have a direct effect on separation performance. A sensitivity analysis was applied to ascertain the relative importance of AF(4) primary instrument factor settings for the separation of a complex environmental sample. The analysis evaluated the impact of instrumental factors namely, cross flow, ramp time, focus flow, injection volume, and run buffer concentration on the multi-angle light scattering measurement of natural organic matter (NOM) molar mass (MM). A 2((5-1)) orthogonal fractional factorial design was used to minimize analysis time while preserving the accuracy and robustness in the determination of the main effects and interactions between any two instrumental factors. By assuming that separations resulting in smaller MM measurements would be more accurate, the analysis produced a ranked list of effects estimates for factors and interactions of factors based on their relative importance in minimizing the MM. The most important and statistically significant AF(4) instrumental factors were buffer concentration and cross flow. The least important was ramp time. A parallel 2((5-2)) orthogonal fractional factorial design was also employed on five environmental factors for synthetic natural water samples containing silver nanoparticles (NPs), namely: NP concentration, NP size, NOM concentration, specific conductance, and pH. None of the water quality characteristic effects or interactions were found to be significant in minimizing the measured MM; however, the interaction between NP concentration and NP size was an important effect when considering NOM recovery. This work presents a structured approach for the rigorous assessment of AF(4) instrument factors and optimal settings for the separation of complex samples utilizing efficient orthogonal factional factorial design and appropriate graphical analysis.

  15. Macromolecular geometries determined with field-flow fractionation and their impact on the overlap concentration.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Cinthia Carola; Wahlund, Karl-Gustav; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2008-06-01

    In this paper we aim to understand the size/conformation relationship in waxy barley starch, a polydisperse and ultrahigh molar mass biomacromolecule. Characterizations are performed with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). Furthermore, we study the effect of homogenization on the molar mass, rms radius (r rms) and hydrodynamic radius (r h). For the untreated sample, the macromolecules are elongated objects with low apparent density. As a result of homogenization, molar mass, and r rms decrease, while r h remains unaffected. The process also induces an increase, and scaling with size, of apparent density as well as changes in conformation, represented qualitatively by r rms/ r h. Finally, results from AsFlFFF are compared with viscosimetry and discussed in terms of concentration and close-packing in relation to macromolecular shape and conformation. Hence, the results show that AsFlFFF and our novel methodology enable the determination of several physical properties with high relevance for the solution behavior of polydisperse macromolecules.

  16. Effect of carrier ionic strength in microscale cyclical electrical field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kantak, Ameya S; Srinivas, Merugu; Gale, Bruce K

    2006-04-15

    Recent work with cyclical electrical field-flow fractionation systems has shown promise for the technique as a separation and analysis tool, but little is understood about how the carrier composition in the system affects its capabilities. The electrical properties of microscale CyElFFF systems change when the carrier ionic conditions are altered, and it is well known that the effects of increasing ionic strength carriers on retention in normal ElFFF systems are severe. Specifically, retention levels fall significantly. Accordingly, this work seeks to understand the effect that increasing carrier ionic strength in CyElFFF has on nanoparticle retention in the channels. The retention of polystyrene particles in the CyElFFF microsystem is reported at various ionic strengths of ammonium carbonate and at a variety of pH levels. The experiments are compared to the theory of CyElFFF available in the literature. The results indicate that the ionic strength of the carrier has a significant impact on retention and that high ionic strength carrier solutions lead to poor performance of the CyElFFF system. These results have significant impact on the possible uses of the technique and its applications, especially in the biomedical arena.

  17. Size sorting of citrate reduced gold nanoparticles by sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto

    2009-12-25

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been synthesized through the citrate reduction method; the citrate/gold(III) ratio was changed from 1:1 up to 10:1 and the size of the resulting nanoparticles was measured by sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF). Experimental data showed that the GNPs size decreases in the ratio range 1:1-3:1 and then increases from 5:1 to 10:1 passing through a plateau region in between, and is almost independent of the precursor solution concentrations. In the zone of minimum diameters the synthetic process does not produce monodispersed GNPs but often multiple distributions, very close in size, are observed as evidenced by the particle size distributions (PSDs) derived from the SdFFF fractograms. UV-vis spectrophotometry, being the most common technique employed in the optical characterization of nanoparticles suspensions, was used throughout this work. A confirmation of the nucleation-aggregation-fragmentation mechanism was inferred from the cross-correlation between UV-vis and SdFFF results.

  18. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and optical absorption spectroscopy for a quantitative size characterization of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2016-11-04

    Many advanced industrial and biomedical applications that use silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), require that particles are not only nano-sized, but also well dispersed, not aggregated and not agglomerated. This study presents two methods able to give rapidly sizes of monodispersed AgNPs suspensions in the dimensional range of 20-100nm. The first method, based on the application of Mie's theory, determines the particle sizes from the values of the surface plasmon resonance wavelength (SPRMAX), read from the optical absorption spectra, recorded between 190nm and 800nm. The computed sizes were compared with those determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and resulted in agreement with the nominal values in a range between 13% (for 20nm NPs) and 1% (for 100nm NPs), The second method is based on the masterly combination of the Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF - now sold as Centrifugal FFF-CFFF) and the Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (OAS) techniques to accomplish sizes and quantitative particle size distributions for monodispersed, non-aggregated AgNPs suspensions. The SdFFF separation abilities, well exploited to size NPs, greatly benefits from the application of Mie's theory to the UV-vis signal elaboration, producing quantitative mass-based particle size distributions, from which trusted number-sized particle size distributions can be derived. The silver mass distributions were verified and supported by detecting off-line the Ag concentration with the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS).

  19. Biased cyclical electrical field-flow fractionation for separation of submicron particles.

    PubMed

    Ornthai, Mathuros; Siripinyanond, Atitaya; Gale, Bruce K

    2016-01-01

    The potential of biased cyclical electrical field-flow fractionation (BCyElFFF), which applies the positive cycle voltage longer than the negative cycle voltage, for characterization of submicron particles, was investigated. Parameters affecting separation and retention such as voltage, frequency, and duty cycle were examined. The results suggest that the separation mechanism in BCyElFFF in many cases is more related to the size of particles, as is the case with normal ElFFF, in the studied conditions, than the electrophoretic mobility, which is what the theory predicts for CyElFFF. However, better resolution was obtained when separating using BCyElFFF mode than when using normal CyElFFF. BCyElFFF was able to demonstrate simultaneous baseline separations of a mixture of 0.04-, 0.1-, and 0.2-μm particles and near separation of 0.5-μm particles. This study has shown the applicability of BCyElFFF for separation and characterization of submicron particles greater than 0.1-μm in size, which had not been demonstrated previously. The separation and retention results suggest that for particles of this size, retention is based more on particle size than on electrophoretic mobility, which is contrary to existing theory for CyElFFF.

  20. Zeta-potential Analyses using Micro Electrical Field Flow Fractionation with Fluorescent Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Moon-Hwan; Dosev, Dosi; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly growing application of nanoparticles in biotechnology requires fast and accessible tools for their manipulation and for characterization of their colloidal properties. In this work we determine the zeta-potentials for polystyrene nanoparticles using micro electrical field flow fractionation (μ–EFFF) which is an efficient method for sorting of particles by size. The data obtained by μ–EFFF were compared to zeta potentials determined by standard capillary electrophoresis. For proof of concept, we used polystyrene nanoparticles of two different sizes, impregnated with two different fluorescent dyes. Fluorescent emission spectra were used to evaluate the particle separation in both systems. Using the theory of electrophoresis, we estimated the zeta-potentials as a function of size, dielectric permittivity, viscosity and electrophoretic mobility. The results obtained by the μ–EFFF technique were confirmed by the conventional capillary electrophoresis measurements. These results demonstrate the applicability of the μ–EFFF method not only for particle size separation but also as a simple and inexpensive tool for measurements of nanoparticles zeta potentials. PMID:18542710

  1. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis of PEG-asparaginase.

    PubMed

    John, C; Herz, T; Boos, J; Langer, K; Hempel, G

    2016-01-01

    Monomethoxypolyethylene glycol L-asparaginase (PEG-ASNASE) is the PEGylated version of the enzyme L-asparaginase (ASNASE). Both are used for remission induction in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The treatment control is generally carried out by performing activity assays, though methods to determine the actual enzyme rather than its activity are rare. Using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) offered the chance to develop a method capable of simultaneously measuring PEG-ASNASE and PEG. A method validation was performed in accordance with FDA guidelines for PEG-ASNASE from non-biological solutions. The method unfolded a linearity of 15-750 U/mL with coefficients of correlation of r(2)>0.99. The coefficients of variation (CV) for within-run and between-run variability were 1.18-10.15% and 2.43-8.73%, respectively. Furthermore, the method was used to perform stability tests of the product Oncaspar® (PEG-ASNASE) and estimation of the molecular weight by multi-angle light scattering (MALS) of stressed samples to correlate them with the corresponding activity. The findings indicate that Oncaspar® stock solution should not be stored any longer than 24 h at room temperature and cannot be frozen in pure aqueous media. The validated method might be useful for the pharmaceutical industry and its quality control of PEG-ASNASE production.

  2. Comparison of on-line detectors for field flow fractionation analysis of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bednar, A J; Poda, A R; Mitrano, D M; Kennedy, A J; Gray, E P; Ranville, J F; Hayes, C A; Crocker, F H; Steevens, J A

    2013-01-30

    Characterization of nanomaterials must include analysis of both size and chemical composition. Many analytical techniques, such as dynamic light scattering (DLS), are capable of measuring the size of suspended nanometer-sized particles, yet provide no information on the composition of the particle. While field flow fractionation (FFF) is a powerful nanoparticle sizing technique, common detectors used in conjunction with the size separation, including UV, light-scattering, and fluorescence spectroscopy, do not provide the needed particle compositional information. Further, these detectors do not respond directly to the mass concentration of nanoparticles. The present work describes the advantages achieved when interfacing sensitive and elemental specific detectors, such as inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, to FFF separation analysis to provide high resolution nanoparticle sizing and compositional analysis at the μg/L concentration level, a detection at least 10-100-fold lower than DLS or FFF-UV techniques. The full benefits are only achieved by utilization of all detector capabilities, such as dynamic reaction cell (DRC) ICP-MS. Such low-level detection and characterization capability is critical to nanomaterial investigations at biologically and environmentally relevant concentrations. The techniques have been modified and applied to characterization of all four elemental constituents of cadmium selenide-zinc sulfide core-shell quantum dots, and silver nanoparticles with gold seed cores. Additionally, sulfide coatings on silver nanoparticles can be detected as a potential means to determine environmental aging of nanoparticles.

  3. Application of asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation to the characterization of colloidal dispersions undergoing aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lattuada, Marco; Olivo, Carlos; Gauer, Cornelius; Storti, Giuseppe; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-05-18

    The characterization of complex colloidal dispersions is a relevant and challenging problem in colloidal science. In this work, we show how asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to static light scattering can be used for this purpose. As an example of complex colloidal dispersions, we have chosen two systems undergoing aggregation. The first one is a conventional polystyrene latex undergoing reaction-limited aggregation, which leads to the formation of fractal clusters with well-known structure. The second one is a dispersion of elastomeric colloidal particles made of a polymer with a low glass transition temperature, which undergoes coalescence upon aggregation. Samples are withdrawn during aggregation at fixed times, fractionated with AF4 using a two-angle static light scattering unit as a detector. We have shown that from the analysis of the ratio between the intensities of the scattered light at the two angles the cluster size distribution can be recovered, without any need for calibration based on standard elution times, provided that the geometry and scattering properties of particles and clusters are known. The nonfractionated samples have been characterized also by conventional static and dynamic light scattering to determine their average radius of gyration and hydrodynamic radius. The size distribution of coalescing particles has been investigated also through image analysis of cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures. The average radius of gyration and the average hydrodynamic radius of the nonfractionated samples have been calculated and successfully compared to the values obtained from the size distributions measured by AF4. In addition, the data obtained are also in good agreement with calculations made with population balance equations.

  4. Iron-rich colloids as carriers of phosphorus in streams: A field-flow fractionation study.

    PubMed

    Baken, Stijn; Regelink, Inge C; Comans, Rob N J; Smolders, Erik; Koopmans, Gerwin F

    2016-08-01

    Colloidal phosphorus (P) may represent an important fraction of the P in natural waters, but these colloids remain poorly characterized. In this work, we demonstrate the applicability of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high resolution ICP-MS for the characterization of low concentrations of P-bearing colloids. Colloids from five streams draining catchments with contrasting properties were characterized by AF4-ICP-MS and by membrane filtration. All streams contain free humic substances (2-3 nm) and Fe-bearing colloids (3-1200 nm). Two soft water streams contain primary Fe oxyhydroxide-humic nanoparticles (3-6 nm) and aggregates thereof (up to 150 nm). In contrast, three harder water streams contain larger aggregates (40-1200 nm) which consist of diverse associations between Fe oxyhydroxides, humic substances, clay minerals, and possibly ferric phosphate minerals. Despite the diversity of colloids encountered in these contrasting streams, P is in most of the samples predominantly associated with Fe-bearing colloids (mostly Fe oxyhydroxides) at molar P:Fe ratios between 0.02 and 1.5. The molar P:Fe ratio of the waters explains the partitioning of P between colloids and truly dissolved species. Waters with a high P:Fe ratio predominantly contain truly dissolved species because the Fe-rich colloids are saturated with P, whereas waters with a low P:Fe ratio mostly contain colloidal P species. Overall, AF4-ICP-MS is a suitable technique to characterize the diverse P-binding colloids in natural waters. Such colloids may increase the mobility or decrease the bioavailability of P, and they therefore need to be considered when addressing the transport and environmental effects of P in catchments.

  5. Frit inlet field-flow fractionation techniques for the characterization of polyion complex self-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Till, Ugo; Gaucher, Mireille; Amouroux, Baptiste; Gineste, Stéphane; Lonetti, Barbara; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Mingotaud, Christophe; Bria, Carmen R M; Williams, S Kim Ratanathanawongs; Violleau, Frédéric; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise

    2017-01-20

    Polymer self-assemblies joining oppositely charged chains, known as polyion complexes (PICs), have been formed using poly(ethyleneoxide - b - acrylic acid)/poly(l-lysine), poly(ethyleneoxide-b-acrylic acid)/dendrigraft poly(l-lysine) and poly[(3-acrylamidopropyl) trimethylammonium chloride - b - N - isopropyl acrylamide]/poly(acrylic acid). The self-assemblies have been first characterized in batch by Dynamic Light Scattering. In a second step, their analysis by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation techniques (FlFFF) was examined. They were shown to be very sensitive to shearing, especially during the focus step of the fractionation, and this led to an incompatibility with asymmetrical FlFFF. On the other hand, Frit Inlet FlFFF proved to be very efficient to observe them, either in its symmetrical (FI-FlFFF) or asymmetrical version (FI-AsFlFFF). Conditions of elution were found to optimize the sample recovery in pure water. Spherical self-assemblies were detected, with a size range between 70-400nm depending on the polymers. Compared to batch DLS, FI-AsFlFFF clearly showed the presence of several populations in some cases. The influence of salt on poly(ethyleneoxide-b-acrylic acid) (PEO-PAA) 6000-3000/dendrigraft poly(l-lysine) (DGL 3) was also assessed in parallel in batch DLS and FI-AsFlFFF. Batch DLS revealed a first process of swelling of the self-assembly for low concentrations up to 0.8M followed by the dissociation. FI-AsFlFFF furthermore indicated a possible ejection of DGL3 from the PIC assembly for concentrations as low as 0.2M, which could not be observed in batch DLS.

  6. Determining Aqueous Fullerene Particle Size Distributions by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) without Surfactants

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the behavior of nanoparticles in environmental systems, methods must be developed to measure nanoparticle size. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) is an aqueous compatible size separation technique which is able to separate particles from 1 nm to 10 µm in...

  7. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an element-specific detector for field-flow fractionation particle separation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Howard E.; Garbarino, John R.; Murphy, Deirdre M.; Beckett, Ronald

    1992-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer was used for the quantitative measurement of trace elements In specific,submicrometer size-fraction particulates, separated by sedimentation field-flow fractionation. Fractions were collected from the eluent of the field-flow fractionation centrifuge and nebulized, with a Babington-type pneumatic nebulizer, into an argon inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. Measured Ion currents were used to quantify the major, minor, and trace element composition of the size-separated colloidal (< 1-microm diameter) particulates. The composition of surface-water suspended matter collected from the Yarra and Darling rivers in Australia is presented to illustrate the usefulness of this tool for characterizing environmental materials. An adsorption experiment was performed using cadmium lon to demonstrate the utility for studying the processes of trace metal-suspended sediment interactions and contaminant transport in natural aquatic systems.

  8. Effect of Ionic and Nonionic Carriers in Electrical Field-Flow Fractionation.

    PubMed

    Ornthai, Mathuros; Siripinyanond, Atitaya; Gale, Bruce K

    2016-02-02

    A major limitation of electrical field-flow fractionation (ElFFF) is the polarization of the electrodes that occurs when using an ionic carrier liquid. As there is great interest in using ElFFF with biological materials and biological materials typically have high ionic strengths and high osmotic concentrations, we explore the effect of concentration for phosphate buffered saline (PBS), a typical ionic medium for biological samples, and for two nonionic materials common in bioparticle analysis: isopropanol (IPA) and sucrose. Their effect on retention and separations in ElFFF for increasing concentrations was observed. The results suggest that modifying the carrier solution with PBS, sucrose, and/or IPA would enable characterization and separation of biological samples in ElFFF. Specifically, changes of elution time and electrical parameters such as current, conductivity, and bulk channel resistance were observed as functions of carrier ionic and osmotic strength for the different carrier additives. PBS can be used in the micromolar range, equivalent to about 0.1% 1× PBS (150 μM). These concentrations are far from the isotonic condition of PBS (∼ 150 mM) that is normally used with biological samples. However, the nonionic additive carriers IPA and sucrose show quality retention even when added in high concentrations. The results show that IPA could be used in ratios up to 60% and that sucrose can be used in concentrations up to 0.3 M. Concentrations of 2% IPA (0.26 M) and 0.30 M sucrose are biologically isotonic conditions (275-299 mOsm/kg), and retention was readily obtained in these conditions using both DC ElFFF and cyclical ElFFF (CyE1FFF). Carriers of this type may make it possible to use ElFFF with biological samples.

  9. Quantum dot agglomerates in biological media and their characterization by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Moquin, Alexandre; Neibert, Kevin D; Maysinger, Dusica; Winnik, Françoise M

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the biological environment of nanoparticles influences their physical properties and changes their pristine physicochemical identity. In order to understand, or predict, the interactions of cells with specific nanoparticles, it is critical to know their size, shape, and agglomeration state not only in their nascent state but also in biological media. Here, we use asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with on-line multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-Visible absorption detections to determine the relative concentration of isolated nanoparticles and agglomerates in the case of three types of semi-conductor quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Media (DMEM) containing 10% of fetal bovine serum (DMEM-FBS). AF4 analysis also yielded the size and size distribution of the agglomerates as a function of the time of QDs incubation in DMEM-FBS. The preferred modes of internalization of the QDs are assessed for three cell-types, N9 microglia, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) and human embryonic kidney cells (Hek293), by confocal fluorescence imaging of live cells, quantitative determination of the intracellular QD concentration, and flow cytometry. There is an excellent correlation between the agglomeration status of the three types of QDs in DMEM-FBS determined by AF4 analysis and their preferred mode of uptake by the three cell lines, which suggests that AF4 yields an accurate description of the nanoparticles as they encounter cells and advocates its use as a means to characterize particles under evaluation.

  10. Influence of secondary preparative parameters and aging effects on PLGA particle size distribution: a sedimentation field flow fractionation investigation.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Vighi, Eleonora; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles in the 200-400-nm size range were formulated through nanoprecipitation and solvent evaporation methods. Different concentrations of the polymer and stabilizer (Pluronic® F 68) were tested in order to identify the best conditions for making poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles of suitable size, stable in time, and to be used as carriers for brain-targeting drugs. The particles with the best characteristics for delivery system design were those formulated by nanoprecipitation with an organic/water phase ratio of 2:30, a polymer concentration of 25 mg/mL, and a surfactant concentration of 0.83 mg/mL; their surface charge was reasonably negative (approximately -27 mV) and the average size of the almost monodisperse population was roughly 250 nm. Particle characterization was obtained through ζ-potential measurements, scanning electron microscope observations, and particle size distribution determinations; the latter achieved by both photon-correlation spectroscopy and sedimentation field flow fractionation. Sedimentation field flow fractionation, which is considered more reliable than photon-correlation spectroscopy in describing the possible particle size distribution modifications, was used to investigate the effects of 3 months of storage at 4 °C had on the lyophilized particles. Figure Particle size ditribution from the SdFFF and the PCS techniques.

  11. Characterization of colloidal phosphorus species in drainage waters from a clay soil using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Regelink, Inge C; Koopmans, Gerwin F; van der Salm, Caroline; Weng, Liping; van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus transport from agricultural land contributes to eutrophication of surface waters. Pipe drain and trench waters from a grassland field on a heavy clay soil in the Netherlands were sampled before and after manure application. Phosphorus speciation was analyzed by physicochemical P fractionation, and the colloidal P fraction in the dissolved fraction (<0.45 μm) was analyzed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to high-resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and ultraviolet diode array detector. When no manure was applied for almost 7 mo, total P (TP) concentrations were low (<21 μmol L), and TP was almost evenly distributed among dissolved reactive P (DRP), dissolved unreactive P (DUP), and particulate P (PP). Total P concentrations increased by a factor of 60 and 4 when rainfall followed shortly after application of cattle slurry or its solid fraction, respectively. Under these conditions, DRP contributed 50% or more to TP. The P speciation within the DUP and PP fractions varied among the different sampling times. Phosphorus associated with dissolved organic matter, probably via cation bridging, comprised a small fraction of DUP at all sampling times. Colloidal P coeluted with clay particles when P application was withheld for almost 7 mo and after application of the solid cattle slurry fraction. At these sampling times, PP correlated well with particulate Fe, Al, and Si, indicating that P is associated with colloidal clay particles. After cattle slurry application, part of DUP was probably present as phospholipids. Physicochemical fractionation combined with AF4 analysis is a promising tool to unravel the speciation of colloidal P in environmental water samples.

  12. Characterisation of cationic potato starch by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Influence of ionic strength and degree of substitution.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Stalin

    2014-06-15

    The properties of a paper sheet depend on the absorption together with the physico-chemical properties of additives used in the paper processing. The effect of ionic strength and degree of substitution of cationic potato starch on the elution pattern of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation was analysed. The effect of starch derivatisation, in either dry or wet phase, was also investigated. Average molar mass showed no difference between the starches obtained from the two derivatisation processes. Apparent densities showed that dry cationic starch had higher density than wet cationic starch for a hydrodynamic radius between 50 and 100 nm. Elution times of native and three cationic starches increased when the ionic strength increased from 50 to 100mM. No differences in the molar mass among cationic starches with different degree of substitution suggested no degradation due to a derivatisation process. Large sample loads can be used at 100mM without overloading.

  13. Temporal variability of colloidal material in agricultural storm runoff from managed grassland using flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Gimbert, Laura J; Worsfold, Paul J

    2009-12-25

    This paper reports the use of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) to determine the temporal variability of colloidal (<1mum) particle size distributions in agricultural runoff waters in a small managed catchment in SW England during storm events. Three storm events of varying intensity were captured and the colloidal material in the runoff analysed by FlFFF. The technique had sufficient sensitivity to determine directly the changing colloidal profile over the 0.08-1.0mum size range in the runoff waters during these storm events. Rainfall, total phosphorus and suspended solids in the bulk runoff samples were also determined throughout one storm and showed significant correlation (P<0.01) with the amount of colloidal material. Whilst there are some uncertainties in the resolution and absolute calibration of the FlFFF profiles, the technique has considerable potential for the quantification of colloidal material in storm runoff waters.

  14. Size- and density-dependent elution of normal and pathological red blood cells by gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Cardot, P J; Elgéa, C; Guernet, M; Godet, D; Andreux, J P

    1994-04-01

    Elution of normal and pathological human red blood cells (RBCs) was performed by gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF). The reproducibility of the retention factor was lower than 10% and elution at high and low flow-rates confirmed the existence of "lifting forces". No direct correlation between size and retention was observed for normal RBCs in the absence of density information. Elution of pathological human RBCs, known to be modified in shape, density and rigidity, was performed. The elution parameters confirmed that the retention mechanism of RBCs is at least density dependent but that other factors can be involved, such as shape or deformity. Moreover, peak profile description parameters (standard deviation and asymmetry) can be qualitatively related to some biophysical parameters. Numerous elution characteristics can be linked to cell properties described in the literature and although GFFF appeared to have limited capabilities in terms of size analysis it appeared to be a versatile tool for studying cell biophysical characteristics.

  15. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part II. Experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Emma; Håkansson, Andreas; Janiak, John; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    In this study we investigate the effect of programmed cross-flows on the error in the hydrodynamic radii (r(h)) determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF). Three different standard polystyrene particles (nominal radii of 30 and 40 and 50 nm) are fractionated with exponentially and linearly decaying cross-flows with different decay rates. Hydrodynamic radii are calculated according to retention theory including steric effects. Rapid decay is expected to give rise to systematic deviations in r(h) determination. The error in r(h) was found to be small when decay rates with half-lives longer than 6 min were used, whereas steeper decays could give rise to errors as high as 16% of the particle size. The error is often explained in terms of secondary relaxation. However, comparisons show that experimental errors are significantly larger than what would be expected due to secondary relaxation, suggesting that other factors also have to be considered in order to fully understand deviations for rapidly decaying cross-flow.

  16. Application of flow field-flow fractionation for the characterization of macromolecules of biological interest: a review

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Rashid Nazir

    2010-01-01

    An overview is given of the recent literature on (bio) analytical applications of flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). FlFFF is a liquid-phase separation technique that can separate macromolecules and particles according to size. The technique is increasingly used on a routine basis in a variety of application fields. In food analysis, FlFFF is applied to determine the molecular size distribution of starches and modified celluloses, or to study protein aggregation during food processing. In industrial analysis, it is applied for the characterization of polysaccharides that are used as thickeners and dispersing agents. In pharmaceutical and biomedical laboratories, FlFFF is used to monitor the refolding of recombinant proteins, to detect aggregates of antibodies, or to determine the size distribution of drug carrier particles. In environmental studies, FlFFF is used to characterize natural colloids in water streams, and especially to study trace metal distributions over colloidal particles. In this review, first a short discussion of the state of the art in instrumentation is given. Developments in the coupling of FlFFF to various detection modes are then highlighted. Finally, application studies are discussed and ordered according to the type of (bio) macromolecules or bioparticles that are fractionated. PMID:20957473

  17. Characterization of silver nanoparticles using flow-field flow fractionation interfaced to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Poda, A R; Bednar, A J; Kennedy, A J; Harmon, A; Hull, M; Mitrano, D M; Ranville, J F; Steevens, J

    2011-07-08

    The ability to detect and identify the physiochemical form of contaminants in the environment is important for degradation, fate and transport, and toxicity studies. This is particularly true of nanomaterials that exist as discrete particles rather than dissolved or sorbed contaminant molecules in the environment. Nanoparticles will tend to agglomerate or dissolve, based on solution chemistry, which will drastically affect their environmental properties. The current study investigates the use of field flow fractionation (FFF) interfaced to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as a sensitive and selective method for detection and characterization of silver nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to verify the morphology and primary particle size and size distribution of precisely engineered silver nanoparticles. Subsequently, the hydrodynamic size measurements by FFF are compared to dynamic light scattering (DLS) to verify the accuracy of the size determination. Additionally, the sensitivity of the ICP-MS detector is demonstrated by fractionation of μg/L concentrations of mixed silver nanoparticle standards. The technique has been applied to nanoparticle suspensions prior to use in toxicity studies, and post-exposure biological tissue analysis. Silver nanoparticles extracted from tissues of the sediment-dwelling, freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus increased in size from approximately 31-46nm, indicating a significant change in the nanoparticle characteristics during exposure.

  18. Complementary use of flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques for size characterizing biodegradable poly(lactic acid) nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Contado, Catia; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified evaporation method, testing two different surfactants (sodium cholate and Pluronic F68) for the process. During their formulation the prodrug 5′-octanoyl-CPA (Oct-CPA) of the antiischemic N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) was encapsulated. Three different purification methods were compared with respect to the influence of surfactant on the size characteristics of the final nanoparticle product. Flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques (FlFFF and SdFFF, respectively) were used to size characterize the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. Two different combinations of carrier solution (mobile phase) were employed in the FlFFF analyses, while a solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as mobile phase for the SdFFF runs. The separation performances of the two techniques were compared and the particle size distributions, derived from the fractograms, were interpreted with the support of observations by scanning electron microscopy. Some critical aspects, such as the carrier choice and the channel thickness determination for the FlFFF, have been investigated. This is the first comprehensive comparison of the two FFF techniques for characterizing non standard particulate materials. The two FFF techniques proved to be complementary and gave good, congruent and very useful information on the size distributions of the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. PMID:17482199

  19. Study on steric transition in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and application to characterization of high-energy material.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Lee, Yong-Ju; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Byung-Chul; Lee, Seungho

    2013-08-23

    In field-flow fractionation (FFF), there is the 'steric transition' phenomenon where the sample elution mode changes from the normal to steric/hyperlayer mode. Accurate analysis by FFF requires understanding of the steric transition phenomenon, particularly when the sample has a broad size distribution, for which the effect by combination of different modes may become complicated to interpret. In this study, the steric transition phenomenon in asymmetrical flow FFF (AF4) was studied using polystyrene (PS) latex beads. The retention ratio (R) gradually decreases as the particle size increases (normal mode) and reaches a minimum (Ri) at diameter around 0.5μm, after which R increases with increasing diameter (steric/hyperlayer mode). It was found that the size-based selectivity (Sd) tends to increase as the channel thickness (w) increases. The retention behavior of cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (commonly called 'research department explosive' (RDX)) particles in AF4 was investigated by varying experimental parameters including w and flow rates. AF4 showed a good reproducibility in size determination of RDX particles with the relative standard deviation of 4.1%. The reliability of separation obtained by AF4 was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  20. Simultaneous sample preconcentration and matrix removal using field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ammar, Assad; Siripinyanond, Atitaya; Barnes, Ramon M.

    2001-10-01

    An on-channel sample preconcentration-matrix removal arrangement, based on coupling field-flow fractionation (FFF) to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), has been constructed for on-line sample pretreatment ICP-MS trace element determination. A commercial FFF system is modified to incorporate an on-channel preconcentration procedure allowing injection of up to 50 ml of sample, which could be preconcentrated by 50-1400 fold. A high molecular weight complexing agent added to the sample forms strong complexes with the measured trace analytes but not with the sample matrix. When the sample-complexing agent mixture is introduced to the FFF unit, the uncomplexed matrix element is removed by permeation through a membrane that separates the FFF sample compartment. The trace analytes remain in the FFF channel, because their high molecular weight complexes do not permeate through the membrane. Preconcentration and matrix elimination occur simultaneously. The matrix-free, preconcentrated sample is introduced directly to the ICP-MS nebulizer. The method was tested using 10-ml sample aliquots that contain As, Cd, Cu, Mo, Pb, Re, Sn, Te, Tl, Y, Zn and Zr analytes and 5000 mg l -1 Ca or Na matrices and ethylene imine polymer complexing agent. Copper and Re isotopic ratio values in reference standards also were determined after preconcentration and matrix element removal.

  1. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part I. A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Andreas; Magnusson, Emma; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    Direct determination of hydrodynamic radius from retention time is an advantage of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, this is not always completely straight forward since non-idealities exist and assumptions have been made in deriving the retention equations. In this study we investigate the effect on accuracy from two factors: (1) level of sophistication of the equations used to determine channel height from a calibration experiment and (2) the influence of secondary relaxation on the accuracy of hydrodynamic radius determination. A new improved technique for estimating the channel height from calibration experiments is suggested. It is concluded that severe systematic error can arise if the most common channel height equations are used and an alternative more rigorous approach is described. For secondary relaxation it is concluded that this effect increases with the cross-flow decay rate. The secondary relaxation effect is quantified for different conditions. This is part one of two. In the second part the determination of hydrodynamic radius are evaluated experimentally under similar conditions.

  2. Effects of comprehensive function of factors on retention behavior of microparticles in gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuang; Qiu, Bai-Ling; Zhu, Chen-Qi; Yang, Ya-Ya Gao; Wu, Di; Liang, Qi-Hui; Han, Nan-Yin

    2016-09-15

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) is a useful technique for separation and characterization for micrometer-sized particles. Elution behavior of micrometer-sized particles in GrFFF was researched in this study. Particles in GrFFF channel are subject to hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF), fluid inertial forces and gravity, which drive them to different velocities by carrier flow, resulting in a size-based separation. Effects of ionic strength, flow rate and viscosity as well as methanol were investigated using polystyrene latex beads as model particles. This study is devoted to experimental verification of the effect of every factor and their comprehensive function. All experiments were performed to show isolated influence of every variable factor. The orthogonal design test was used to evaluate various factors comprehensively. Results suggested that retention ratio of particles increases with increasing flow rate or the viscosity of carrier liquid by adjusting external forces acting on particles. In addition, retention ratio increases as ionic strength decreases because of decreased electrostatic repulsion between particles and channel accumulation wall. As far as methanol, there is no general trend due to the change of both density and viscosity. On the basis of orthogonal design test it was found that viscosity of carrier liquid plays a significant role in determining resolution of micrometer-sized particles in GrFFF.

  3. Study on aggregation behavior of Cytochrome C-conjugated silver nanoparticles using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Tae; Lee, Yong-Ju; Hwang, Yu-Sik; Lee, Seungho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 40 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized using the citrate reduction method and then the surface of AgNPs was modified by conjugating Cytochrome C (Cyto C) to improve stability and to enhance bioactivity and biocompatibility of AgNPs. It is known that Cyto C may undergo conformational changes under various conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc., resulting in aggregation of the particles. These parameters also affect the size and size distribution of Cyto C-conjugated AgNPs (Cyto C-AgNP). ζ-potential measurement revealed that the adsorption of Cyto C on the surface of AgNPs is saturated at the molar ratio [Cyto C]/[AgNPs] above about 300. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) analysis showed that hydrodynamic diameter of AgNPs increases by about 4 nm when the particle is saturated by Cyto C. The aggregation behavior of Cyto C-AgNP at various conditions of pH, temperature and ionic strength were investigated using AsFlFFF and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the aggregation of Cyto C-AgNP increases with decreasing pH, increasing temperature and ionic strength due to denaturation of Cyto C on AgNPs and reduction in the thickness of electrostatic double layer on the surface of Cyto C-AgNP.

  4. A novel method to detect unlabeled inorganic nanoparticles and submicron particles in tissue by sedimentation field-flow fractionation

    PubMed Central

    Deering, Cassandra E; Tadjiki, Soheyl; Assemi, Shoeleh; Miller, Jan D; Yost, Garold S; Veranth, John M

    2008-01-01

    A novel methodology to detect unlabeled inorganic nanoparticles was experimentally demonstrated using a mixture of nano-sized (70 nm) and submicron (250 nm) silicon dioxide particles added to mammalian tissue. The size and concentration of environmentally relevant inorganic particles in a tissue sample can be determined by a procedure consisting of matrix digestion, particle recovery by centrifugation, size separation by sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF), and detection by light scattering. Background Laboratory nanoparticles that have been labeled by fluorescence, radioactivity, or rare elements have provided important information regarding nanoparticle uptake and translocation, but most nanomaterials that are commercially produced for industrial and consumer applications do not contain a specific label. Methods Both nitric acid digestion and enzyme digestion were tested with liver and lung tissue as well as with cultured cells. Tissue processing with a mixture of protease enzymes is preferred because it is applicable to a wide range of particle compositions. Samples were visualized via fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy to validate the SdFFF results. We describe in detail the tissue preparation procedures and discuss method sensitivity compared to reported levels of nanoparticles in vivo. Conclusion Tissue digestion and SdFFF complement existing techniques by precisely identifying unlabeled metal oxide nanoparticles and unambiguously distinguishing nanoparticles (diameter<100 nm) from both soluble compounds and from larger particles of the same nominal elemental composition. This is an exciting capability that can facilitate epidemiological and toxicological research on natural and manufactured nanomaterials. PMID:19055780

  5. Field-flow fractionation: An efficient approach for matrix removal of soil extract for inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangsawong, Supharart; Waiyawat, Weerawan; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2011-06-01

    An on-line coupling between a continuous-flow sequential extraction (CFSE) unit and flow field-flow fractionation with cross flow matrix removal (FlFFF/CFM) with ICP-OES detection was developed for determination of metal leachability from soil. The use of high concentration of Mg(NO 3) 2 in exchangeable phase can cause undesirable matrix effects by shifting ionization equilibrium in the plasma, etc., resulting in a clear need for matrix removal. Therefore, the capability of FlFFF/CFM to remove Mg matrix ion from soil extract was evaluated. Poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) having molecular weight of 25,000 Da was added to form complexes with analyte elements (Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) but not the matrix element (Mg). The free Mg matrix ions were then removed by filtering off through the ultrafiltration membrane, having a 1000-Da molecular weight cut-off, inside the FlFFF channel. With the use of FlFFF/CFM, matrix removal efficiency was approximately 83.5%, which was equivalent to approximately 6-fold dilution of the matrix ion. The proposed hyphenated system of CFSE and FlFFF/CFM with ICP-OES detection was examined for its reliability by checking with SRM 2710 (a highly contaminated soil from Montana). The metal contents determined by the proposed method were not significantly different (at 95% confidence) from the certified values.

  6. Development and evaluation of methods for starch dissolution using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation. Part II: Dissolution of amylose.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rea, Daysi; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate whether dissolution in water under autoclaving conditions (140 °C, 20 min) or in dimethyl sulfoxide, DMSO (100 °C, 1 h), is preferable for characterization of amylose. Two types of amylose, potato and maize, were dissolved either in water using an autoclave or in DMSO. On the aqueous solutions obtained, the extent of molecular dissolution of the sample (referred to as the dissolution yield) was determined by enzymatic analysis as well as the molecular properties, such as molar mass and root-mean-square radius, obtained with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi-angle light scattering and differential refractive index detection (AF4-MALS-dRI). The results showed that both dissolution methods are efficient at dissolving amylose. However, AF4-MALS-dRI analysis revealed substantial differences. Amylose aqueous solutions obtained by dissolution in DMSO were relatively stable over time, but the dissolution method in autoclave caused some degradation of the molecules, and their solutions display a high tendency to retrograde.

  7. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  8. Field-flow fractionation as analytical technique for the characterization of dry yeast: correlation with wine fermentation activity.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Ramsés; Galceran, Ma Teresa; Puignou, Lluís

    2003-01-01

    Important oenological properties of wine depend on the winemaking yeast used in the fermentation process. There is considerable controversy about the quality of yeast, and a simple and cheap analytical methodology for quality control of yeast is needed. Gravitational field flow fractionation (GFFF) was used to characterize several commercial active dry wine yeasts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus and to assess the quality of the raw material before use. Laboratory-scale fermentations were performed using two different S. cerevisiae strains as inocula, and GFFF was used to follow the behavior of yeast cells during alcoholic fermentation. The viable/nonviable cell ratio was obtained by flow cytometry (FC) using propidium iodide as fluorescent dye. In each experiment, the amount of dry wine yeast to be used was calculated in order to provide the same quantity of viable cells. Kinetic studies of the fermentation process were performed controlling the density of the must, from 1.071 to 0.989 (20/20 density), and the total residual sugars, from 170 to 3 g/L. During the wine fermentation process, differences in the peak profiles obtained by GFFF between the two types of commercial yeasts that can be related with the unlike cell growth were observed. Moreover, the strains showed different fermentation kinetic profiles that could be correlated with the corresponding fractograms monitored by GFFF. These results allow optimism that sedimentation FFF techniques could be successfully used for quality assessment of the raw material and to predict yeast behavior during yeast-based bioprocesses such as wine production.

  9. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Williams, P. Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation. PMID:24141316

  10. Feasibility study of red blood cell debulking by magnetic field-flow fractionation with step-programmed flow.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee R; Williams, P Stephen; Nehl, Franziska; Abe, Koji; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications of rare cell separation and analysis, such as separation of mature red blood cells from hematopoietic cell cultures, require efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. We have tested the feasibility of magnetic RBC separation as an alternative to centrifugal separation using an approach based on the mechanism of magnetic field-flow fractionation (MgFFF). A specially designed permanent magnet assembly generated a quadrupole field having a maximum field of 1.68 T at the magnet pole tips, zero field at the aperture axis, and a nearly constant radial field gradient of 1.75 T/mm (with a negligible angular component) inside a cylindrical aperture of 1.9 mm (diameter) and 76 mm (length). The cell samples included high-spin hemoglobin RBCs obtained by chemical conversion of hemoglobin to methemoglobin (met RBC) or by exposure to anoxic conditions (deoxy RBC), low-spin hemoglobin obtained by exposure of RBC suspension to ambient air (oxy RBC), and mixtures of deoxy RBC and cells from a KG-1a white blood cell (WBC) line. The observation that met RBCs did not elute from the channel at the lower flow rate of 0.05 mL/min applied for 15 min but quickly eluted at the subsequent higher flow rate of 2.0 mL/min was in agreement with FFF theory. The well-defined experimental conditions (precise field and flow characteristics) and a well-established FFF theory verified by studies with model cell systems provided us with a strong basis for making predictions about potential practical applications of the magnetic RBC separation.

  11. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering and quasi-elastic light scattering for characterization of polymersomes: comparison with classical techniques.

    PubMed

    Till, Ugo; Gaucher-Delmas, Mireille; Saint-Aguet, Pascale; Hamon, Glenn; Marty, Jean-Daniel; Chassenieux, Christophe; Payré, Bruno; Goudounèche, Dominique; Mingotaud, Anne-Françoise; Violleau, Frédéric

    2014-12-01

    Polymersomes formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, such as poly(ethyleneoxide-b-ε-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) or poly(ethyleneoxide-b-methylmethacrylate), were characterized by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled with quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS), multi-angle light scattering (MALS), and refractive index detection, leading to the determination of their size, shape, and molecular weight. The method was cross-examined with more classical ones, like batch dynamic and static light scattering, electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The results show good complementarities between all the techniques; asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation being the most pertinent one when the sample exhibits several different types of population.

  12. Polysaccharide characterization by hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation with on-line multi-angle static light scattering and differential refractometry.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Leena; Striegel, André M

    2015-02-06

    Accurate characterization of the molar mass and size of polysaccharides is an ongoing challenge, oftentimes due to architectural diversity but also to the broad molar mass (M) range over which a single polysaccharide can exist and to the ultra-high M of many polysaccharides. Because of the latter, many of these biomacromolecules experience on-column, flow-induced degradation during analysis by size-exclusion and, even, hydrodynamic chromatography (SEC and HDC, respectively). The necessity for gentler fractionation methods has, to date, been addressed employing asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Here, we introduce the coupling of hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (HF5) to multi-angle static light scattering (MALS) and differential refractometry (DRI) detection for the analysis of polysaccharides. In HF5, less stresses are placed on the macromolecules during separation than in SEC or HDC, and HF5 can offer a higher sensitivity, with less propensity for system overloading and analyte aggregation, than generally found in AF4. The coupling to MALS and DRI affords the determination of absolute, calibration-curve-independent molar mass averages and dispersities. Results from the present HF5/MALS/DRI experiments with dextrans, pullulans, and larch arabinogalactan were augmented with hydrodynamic radius (RH) measurements from off-line quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) and by RH distribution calculations and fractogram simulations obtained via a finite element analysis implementation of field-flow fractionation theory by commercially available software. As part of this study, we have investigated analyte recovery in HF5 and also possible reasons for discrepancies between calculated and simulated results vis-à-vis experimentally determined data.

  13. Chemical speciation studies on DU contaminated soils using flow field flow fractionation linked to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FlFFF-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Brittain, S R; Cox, A G; Tomos, A D; Paterson, E; Siripinyanond, A; McLeod, C W

    2012-03-01

    Flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to study the chemical speciation of U and trace metals in depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils. A chemical extraction procedure using sodium pyrophosphate, followed by isolation of humic and fulvic substances was applied to two dissimilar DU contaminated sample types (a sandy soil and a clay-rich soil), in addition to a control soil. The sodium pyrophosphate fractions of the firing range soils (Eskmeals and Kirkcudbright) were found to contain over 50% of the total U (measured after aqua regia digestion), compared to approximately 10% for the control soil. This implies that the soils from the contaminated sites contained a large proportion of the U within more easily mobile soil fractions. Humic and fulvic acid fractions each gave characteristic peak maxima for analytes of interest (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and U), with the fulvic acid fraction eluting at a smaller diameter (approximately 2.1 nm on average) than the humic fraction (approximately 2.4 nm on average). DU in the fulvic acid fraction gave a bimodal peak, not apparent for other trace elements investigated, including natural U. This implies that DU interacts with the fulvic acid fraction in a different way to all other elements studied.

  14. Characterization of colloidal arsenic at two abandoned gold mine sites in Nova Scotia, Canada, using asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tindale, Kathryn J; Patel, Pritesh J; Wallschläger, Dirk

    2016-11-01

    Asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation-inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to determine whether colloidal arsenic (As) exists in soil pore water and soil extract samples at two arsenic-contaminated abandoned gold mines (Montague and Goldenville, Nova Scotia). Colloidal arsenic was found in 12 out of the 80 collected samples (=15%), and was primarily associated with iron (Fe) in the encountered colloids. The molar Fe/As ratios indicate that the colloids in some samples appeared to be discrete iron-arsenic minerals, whereas in other samples, they were more consistent with As-rich iron (oxy)hydroxides. Up to three discrete size fractions of colloidal As were encountered in the samples, with mean colloid diameters between 6 and 14nm. The pore water samples only contained one size fraction of As-bearing colloids (around 6nm diameter), while larger As-bearing colloids were only encountered in soil extracts.

  15. Size-based speciation of iron in clay mineral particles by gravitational field-flow fractionation with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantiwas, Rattikan; Beckett, Ronald; Grudpan, Kate

    2005-01-01

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (FFF) coupled to UV and ETAAS detectors has been tested for micron-size particles in the range of 5-20 μm using three Fe-rich clay samples. The iron content estimated after aqua regia extraction was about 20-40 mg kg -1. The ETAAS analysis was performed both off-line from collected fractions and in an online continuous sampling mode using a specially designed flow through vial placed in the autosampler of the ETAAS. Comparison of the direct injection method with total analysis after aqua regia digestion shows that slurry injection of the dilute samples in the gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) effluent is quite efficient in these samples. In the majority of cases, more than 90% recovery was obtained for the slurry injection method. Fe mass-based particle size distributions and Fe concentration versus particle diameter plots can be generated using certain assumptions. This provides detailed information on size-based speciation of particulate samples. Generally, the Fe concentrations in the particles decreased slightly with an increase in particle size as is often found for soil and sediment samples.

  16. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. IV. Field programming achieved with channels of non-constant cross-sections.

    PubMed

    Plocková, Jana; Matulík, Frantisek; Chmelík, Josef

    2002-04-26

    Force field programming provided increased speed of separation with an improved resolution and detection capability in many field-flow fractionation (FFF) techniques. Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) uses the Earth's gravitational field to cause the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Although this field is constant and relatively weak, there are different ways to implement force field programming in GFFF. Because hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF) participate in the separation process in focusing (hyperlayer) elution mode, they can control the resulting force field acting on particles via changes in flow-velocity. These changes can be accomplished by a programmable pump or with channels of non-constant cross-sections. This work is focused on flow-velocity programming accomplished with channels of non-constant cross-sections. Three trapezoidal channels of decreasing breadth and two channels of decreasing height (along the longitudinal axis) are tested as tools for optimization of the separation of a model silica gel particle mixture. The trapezoidal channels yielded reduced separation times. However, taking into account both speed of separation and resolution, the optimization effect was lower compared with the flow-rate gradients generated by a programmable pump. The channels of non-constant height did not yield advantageous separations.

  17. Size characterization of barley starch granules by gravitational field-flow fractionation: a rapid, low-cost method to assess the brewing capability of different strains.

    PubMed

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Casolari, Sonia; Krumlova, Andrea; Budinska, Marcela; Chmelík, Josef

    2002-04-01

    Cereal starch occurs as two types of micrometer-sized granules, large and small. Large starch granules are more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. When cereal starch is used for fermentation processes, as in brewing of barley malt, the barley strains with the highest content of large starch granules should be preferred. Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) is a separation method able to fractionate starch samples at low cost and short analysis time. In this work, the search for the best GFFF conditions for the analytical separation of barley starch within an inter-laboratory approach is presented. For different barley strains cultivated under monitored conditions the size distributions of starch granules is here quickly monitored and characterized by GFFF. As a consequence, dimensional characterization of barley starch can allow for the selection of the most suitable strains with the lowest content of non-degradable starch.

  18. Interface for direct and continuous sample-matrix deposition onto a MALDI probe for polymer analysis by thermal field flow fractionation and off-line MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Basile, Franco; Kassalainen, Galina E; Ratanathanawongs Williams, S Kim

    2005-05-01

    A simple interface based on an oscillating capillary nebulizer (OCN) is described for direct deposition of eluate from a thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) system onto a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) probe. In this study, the polymer-containing eluent from the ThFFF system was mixed on-line with MALDI matrix solution and deposited directly onto a moving MALDI probe. The result was a continuous sample track representative of the fractionation process. Subsequent off-line MALDI-mass spectrometry analysis was performed in automated and manual modes. Polystyrene samples of broad polydispersity were used to characterize the overall system performance. The OCN interface is easy to build and operate without the use of heaters or high voltages and is compatible with any MALDI probe format.

  19. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples.

  20. A new analytical approach based on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ultraviolet spectrometry and light scattering detection for SWCNT aqueous dispersion studies.

    PubMed

    Gigault, Julien; Grassl, Bruno; Lespes, Gaëtane

    2012-02-21

    This work demonstrates the potential of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (A4F) coupled to Ultraviolet spectrometry (UV) and multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for the study of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) dispersion in aqueous solutions containing a surfactant. The results indicate that this technique is a powerful analytical tool that is able to evaluate SWCNT dispersion states in aqueous media and, more importantly, determine the presence or absence of aggregates, the numbers and sizes of different SWCNT populations and the SWCNT size distribution. Dynamic light scattering was employed to complete and demonstrate the relevance of the data that were obtained via A4F-UV-MALS. Two different anionic surfactants that are used to disperse SWCNTs were then studied. The dispersing powers of the surfactants were experimentally evaluated based on their structural organizations. This study demonstrates that surfactant concentration and sonication energy are key parameters that control the SWCNT dispersion state and SWCNT structural integrity therein.

  1. Size determination and quantification of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles by flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, L; Bolea, E; Laborda, F; Cubel, C; Ferrer, P; Gianolio, D; da Silva, I; Castillo, J R

    2016-03-18

    Facing the lack of studies on characterization and quantification of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs), whose consumption and release is greatly increasing, this work proposes a method for their sizing and quantification by Flow Field-flow Fractionation (FFFF) coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Two modalities of FFFF (Asymmetric Flow- and Hollow Fiber-Flow Field Flow Fractionation, AF4 and HF5, respectively) are compared, and their advantages and limitations discussed. Experimental conditions (carrier composition, pH, ionic strength, crossflow and carrier flow rates) are studied in detail in terms of NP separation, recovery, and repeatability. Size characterization of CeO2 NPs was addressed by different approaches. In the absence of feasible size standards of CeO2 NPs, suspensions of Ag, Au, and SiO2 NPs of known size were investigated. Ag and Au NPs failed to show a comparable behavior to that of the CeO2 NPs, whereas the use of SiO2 NPs provided size estimations in agreement to those predicted by the theory. The latter approach was thus used for characterizing the size of CeO2 NPs in a commercial suspension. Results were in adequate concordance with those achieved by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and dynamic light scattering. The quantification of CeO2 NPs in the commercial suspension by AF4-ICP-MS required the use of a CeO2 NPs standards, since the use of ionic cerium resulted in low recoveries (99 ± 9% vs. 73 ± 7%, respectively). A limit of detection of 0.9 μg L(-1) CeO2 corresponding to a number concentration of 1.8 × 1012 L(-1) for NPs of 5 nm was achieved for an injection volume of 100 μL.

  2. Characterization of Nanomaterials Using Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometery (FFF-ICP-MS and SP-ICP-MS): Scientific Operating Procedure SOP-C

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    min minute ng nanogram nL nanoliter nm nanometer SED Sedimentation SEM Scanning Electron Microscopy SF4 Symmetrical flow Field Flow...used approaches to visually study nanoparticles is microscopy , either Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) or scanning probe microscopy (SEM...composition. Field Flow Fractionation (FFF) is a powerful tool for determining the size of nanoparticles . Through the use of a combination of common

  3. Characterization of oxidized tannins: comparison of depolymerization methods, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation and small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Vernhet, Aude; Dubascoux, Stéphane; Cabane, Bernard; Fulcrand, Hélène; Dubreucq, Eric; Poncet-Legrand, Céline

    2011-09-01

    Condensed tannins are a major class of plant polyphenols. They play an important part in the colour and taste of foods and beverages. Due to their chemical reactivity, tannins are not stable once extracted from plants. A number of chemical reactions can take place, leading to structural changes of the native structures to give so-called derived tannins and pigments. This paper compares results obtained on native and oxidized tannins with different techniques: depolymerization followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4). Upon oxidation, new macromolecules were formed. Thioglycolysis experiments showed no evidence of molecular weight increase, but thioglycolysis yields drastically decreased. When oxidation was performed at high concentration (e.g., 10 g L(-1)), the weight average degree of polymerization determined from SAXS increased, whereas it remained stable when oxidation was done at low concentration (0.1 g L(-1)), indicating that the reaction was intramolecular, yet the conformations were different. Differences in terms of solubility were observed; ethanol being a better solvent than water. We also separated soluble and non-water-soluble species of a much oxidized fraction. Thioglycolysis showed no big differences between the two fractions, whereas SAXS and AF4 showed that insoluble macromolecules have a weight average molecular weight ten times higher than the soluble ones.

  4. Flow field-flow fractionation for the analysis and characterization of natural colloids and manufactured nanoparticles in environmental systems: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Baalousha, M; Stolpe, B; Lead, J R

    2011-07-08

    The use of flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) for the separation and characterization of natural colloids and nanoparticles has increased in the last few decades. More recently, it has become a popular method for the characterization of manufactured nanoparticles. Unlike conventional filtration methods, FlFFF provides a continuous and high-resolution separation of nanoparticles as a function of their diffusion coefficient, hence the interest for use in determining particle size distribution. Moreover, when coupled to other detectors such as inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy, light scattering, UV-absorbance, fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, FlFFF provides a wealth of information on particle properties including, size, shape, structural parameters, chemical composition and particle-contaminant association. This paper will critically review the application of FlFFF for the characterization of natural colloids and natural and manufactured nanoparticles. Emphasis will be given to the detection systems that can be used to characterize the nanoparticles eluted from the FlFFF system, the obtained information and advantages and limitation of FlFFF compared to other fractionation and particle sizing techniques. This review will help users understand (i) the theoretical principles and experimental consideration of the FlFFF, (ii) the range of analytical tools that can be used to further characterize the nanoparticles after fractionation by FlFFF, (iii) how FlFFF results are compared to other analytical techniques and (iv) the range of applications of FlFFF for natural and manufactured NPs.

  5. TiO2 in commercial sunscreen lotion: flow field-flow fractionation and ICP-AES together for size analysis.

    PubMed

    Contado, Catia; Pagnoni, Antonella

    2008-10-01

    A new method for determining the size of titanium dioxide particles is proposed and assayed in a commercial sunscreen product. Today many sun protection cosmetics incorporate physical UV filters as active ingredients, and there are no official methods for determining these compounds in sunscreen cosmetics. Here flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) has been tested, first to sort two different types of TiO2 nano- and microstandard materials (AeroxideTiO2 Degussa P-25 and TiO2 rutile 0.1-0.2-microm size) and then to fractionate TiO2 particles, extracted from a commercial sunscreen lotion. All the TiO2 FlFFF separations were detected by UV but during elution fractions were collected and their Ti content measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES); the Ti concentration profiles obtained by ICP-AES were well correlated with the UV signals. The TiO2 particle mass-size distribution were calculated from the UV profiles. This methodology is relatively simple and rapid, and the sample treatment is as a whole easy and low cost.

  6. The potential of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation hyphenated to multiple detectors for the quantification and size estimation of silica nanoparticles in a food matrix.

    PubMed

    Heroult, Julien; Nischwitz, Volker; Bartczak, Dorota; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2014-06-01

    This work represents a first systematic approach to the size-based elemental quantification and size estimation of metal(loid) oxide nanoparticles such as silica (SiO2) in a real food matrix using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled online with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and multi-angle light scattering (MALS) and offline with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Coffee creamer was selected as the model sample since it is known to contain silica as well as metal oxides such as titania at the milligramme per kilogramme levels. Optimisation of sample preparation conditions such as matrix-to-solvent ratio, defatting with organic solvents and sonication time that may affect nanoparticle size and size distribution in suspensions was investigated. Special attention was paid to the selection of conditions that minimise particle transformation during sample preparation and analysis. The coffee creamer matrix components were found to stabilise food grade SiO2 particles in comparison with water suspensions whilst no significant effect of defatting using hexane was found. The use of sample preparation procedures that mimic food cooking in real life was also investigated regarding their effect on particle size and particle size distribution of silica nanoparticles in the investigated food matrix; no significant effect of the water temperature ranging from ambient temperature to 60 °C was observed. Field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (FFF-ICP-MS) analysis of extracts of both unspiked coffee creamer and coffee creamer spiked with food grade silicon dioxide, using different approaches for size estimation, enabled determination of SiO2 size-based speciation. Element-specific detection by ICP-MS and post-FFF calibration with elemental calibration standards was used to determine the elemental composition of size fractions separated online by FFF

  7. Size Dependent Lipidomic Analysis of Urinary Exosomes from Patients with Prostate Cancer by Flow Field-Flow Fractionation and Nanoflow Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joon Seon; Lee, Jong Cheol; Byeon, Seul Kee; Rha, Koon Ho; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2017-02-21

    Exosomes are membrane-bound extracellular vesicles involved in intercellular communication and tumor cell metastasis. In this study, flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) was utilized to separate urinary exosomes by size, demonstrating a significant difference in exosome sizes between healthy controls and patients with prostate cancer (PCa). Exosome fractions of different sizes were collected for microscopic analysis during an FlFFF run and evaluated with exosome marker proteins using Western blot analysis. The results indicated that exosomes of different sizes originated from different types of cells. Collected exosome fractions were further examined using nanoflow ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nUPLC-ESI-MS/MS) for lipidomic analysis. A total of 162 lipids (from 286 identified) were quantified using a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method. The overall amount of lipids increased by 1.5- to 2-fold in patients with PCa and degree of increase was more significant in the smaller fractions (diameter <150 nm) than in the larger ones (diameter >150 nm) some classes of lipids. In addition, neutral lipids like diacylglycerol (DAG) and triacylglycerol (TAG) decreased in all exosomes without size dependency. Moreover, a dramatic increase in 22:6/22:6-phosphatidylglycerol (PG) was observed and significant decrease in (16:0,16:0)- and (16:1, 18:1)-DAG species (nearly 5-fold) and high abundant TAG species (>2.5-fold) was observed in patients with PCa. The results of this study indicate that FlFFF can be employed for the high-speed screening of urinary exosome sizes in patients with PCa and lipidomic analysis of the fractionated exosomes has potential for developing and distinguishing biomarkers of PCa.

  8. Dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device

    DOEpatents

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Derzon, Mark S.

    2010-05-11

    A dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device uses interdigitated microelectrodes to provide a spatially non-uniform electric field in a fluid that generates a dipole within particles in the fluid. The electric field causes the particles to either be attracted to or repelled from regions where the electric field gradient is large, depending on whether the particles are more or less polarizable than the fluid. The particles can thereby be forced into well defined stable paths along the interdigitated microelectrodes. The device can be used for flow cytometry, particle control, and other process applications, including cell counting or other types of particle counting, and for separations in material control.

  9. Combining asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with on- and off-line fluorescence detection to examine biodegradation of riverine dissolved and particulate organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Tak; Yang, Boram; Kim, Jin-Yong; Park, Ji-Hyung; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-08-28

    This study demonstrated that asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with on-line UV and fluorescence detection (FLD) and off-line excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy can be employed to analyze the influence of microbial metabolic activity on the consumption and production of freshwater organic matter. With the AF4 system, organic matter is on-line enriched during a focusing/relaxation period, which is an essential process prior to separation. Size-fractionated chromophoric and fluorophoric organic materials were simultaneously monitored during the 30-min AF4 separation process. Two fractions of different sizes (dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM)) of freshwater samples from three locations (up-, mid-, and downstream) along the Han River basin of Korea were incubated with the same inoculum for 14 days to analyze fraction-specific alterations in optical properties using AF4-UV-FLD. A comparison of AF4 fractograms obtained from pre- and post-incubation samples revealed that POM-derived DOM were more susceptible to microbial metabolic activity than was DOM. Preferential microbial consumption of protein-like DOM components concurred with enhanced peaks of chromophoric and humic-like fluorescent components, presumably formed as by-products of microbial processing. AF4-UV-FLD combined with off-line identification of microbially processed components using EEM fluorescence spectroscopy provides a powerful tool to study the relationship between microbial activity and composition as well as biodegradability of DOM and POM-derived DOM from different origins, especially for the analysis of chromophoric and fluorophoric organic matter that are consumed and produced by microbial metabolic activity. The proposed AF4 system can be applied to organic matter in freshwater samples having low concentration range (0.3-2.5ppm of total organic carbon) without a pre-concentration procedure.

  10. High speed two-dimensional protein separation without gel by isoelectric focusing-asymmetrical flow field flow fractionation: application to urinary proteome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Hun; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2009-09-01

    An online multilane channel system for isoelectric focusing and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (IEF-AF4) is utilized for the two-dimensional separation (2D: isoelectric point, pI, and hydrodynamic diameter, d(s)) of a human proteome sample followed by the shotgun proteomic analysis using nanoflow liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS-MS). IEF-AF4 was recently developed to carry out nongel-based high speed two-dimensional protein separation [ Kim , K. , et al. Anal. Chem. 2009, 81 , 1715 ]. In IEF-AF4, proteins are separated according to pI along an IEF channel located at the head of six AF4 channels, and then the fractionated protein bands are directed to multilane AF4 channels for size-based separation. In this report, the original IEF-AF4 system has been modified to avoid the possible adsorption of proteins onto the membrane wall of IEF segments during isoelectric focusing by isolating the IEF channel segments from the multilane AF4 channels. The performance of the modified IEF-AF4 system was tested with protein standards and was further applied for the 2D fractionation of the human urinary proteome sample under two ampholyte solutions with different pH ranges (pH 3-10 and 3-6). The entire 2D separation was achieved in less than 30 min. The collected protein fractions were digested for peptide analysis using nLC-ESI-MS-MS, resulting in the identification of 245 total urinary proteins, including 110 unique proteins that are not yet reported in literature. Our experiments also showed a higher efficiency in the identification of urine proteins using ampholyte solution in the narrower pH range.

  11. Colloidal mercury (Hg) distribution in soil samples by sedimentation field-flow fractionation coupled to mercury cold vapour generation atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santoro, A; Terzano, R; Medici, L; Beciani, M; Pagnoni, A; Blo, G

    2012-01-01

    Diverse analytical techniques are available to determine the particle size distribution of potentially toxic elements in matrices of environmental interest such as soil, sediments, freshwater and groundwater. However, a single technique is often not exhaustive enough to determine both particle size distribution and element concentration. In the present work, the investigation of mercury in soil samples collected from a polluted industrial site was performed by using a new analytical approach which makes use of sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) coupled to cold vapour generation electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-ETAAS). The Hg concentration in the SdFFF fractions revealed a broad distribution from about 0.1 to 1 μm, roughly following the particle size distributions, presenting a maximum at about 400-700 nm in diameter. A correlation between the concentration of Hg in the colloidal fraction and organic matter (O.M.) content in the soil samples was also found. However, this correlation is less likely to be related to Hg sorption to soil O.M. but rather to the presence of colloidal mercuric sulfide particles whose size is probably controlled by the occurrence of dissolved O.M. The presence of O.M. could have prevented the aggregation of smaller particles, leading to an accumulation of mercuric sulfides in the colloidal fraction. In this respect, particle size distribution of soil samples can help to understand the role played by colloidal particles in mobilising mercury (also as insoluble compounds) and provide a significant contribution in determining the environmental impact of this toxic element.

  12. Coupling asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation and fluorescence parallel factor analysis reveals stratification of dissolved organic matter in a drinking water reservoir.

    PubMed

    Pifer, Ashley D; Miskin, Daniel R; Cousins, Sarah L; Fairey, Julian L

    2011-07-08

    Using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and fluorescence parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), we showed physicochemical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Beaver Lake Reservoir (Lowell, AR) were stratified by depth. Sampling was performed at a drinking water intake structure from May to July 2010 at three depths (3-, 10-, and 18-m) below the water surface. AF4-fractograms showed that the CDOM had diffusion coefficient peak maximums between 3.5 and 2.8 x 10⁻⁶ cm² s⁻¹, which corresponded to a molecular weight range of 680-1950 Da and a size of 1.6-2.5 nm. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices of whole water samples and AF4-generated fractions were decomposed with a PARAFAC model into five principal components. For the whole water samples, the average total maximum fluorescence was highest for the 10-m depth samples and lowest (about 40% less) for 18-m depth samples. While humic-like fluorophores comprised the majority of the total fluorescence at each depth, a protein-like fluorophore was in the least abundance at the 10-m depth, indicating stratification of both total fluorescence and the type of fluorophores. The results present a powerful approach to investigate CDOM properties and can be extended to investigate CDOM reactivity, with particular applications in areas such as disinfection byproduct formation and control and evaluating changes in drinking water source quality driven by climate change.

  13. Importance of material matching in the calibration of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation: material specificity and nanoparticle surface coating effects on retention time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Haiou; Quevedo, Ivan R.; Linder, Sean W.; Fong, Andrew; Mudalige, Thilak K.

    2016-10-01

    Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with dynamic light scattering or multiangle light scattering detectors is a promising technique for the size-based separation of colloidal particles (nano- and submicron scale) and the online determination of the particle size of the separated fractions in aqueous suspensions. In most cases, the applications of these detectors are problematic due to the material-specific properties of the analyte that results in erroneous calculations, and as an alternative, different nanoparticle size standards are required to properly calibrate the size-based retention in AF4. The availability of nanoparticle size standards in different materials is limited, and this deviation from ideal conditions of retention is mainly due to material-specific and particle coating-specific membrane-particle interactions. Here, we present an experimental method on the applicability of polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NP) as standard for AF4 calibration and compare with gold nanoparticle (Au NP) standards having different nominal sizes and surface functionalities.

  14. A quantitative determination of magnetic nanoparticle separation using on-off field operation of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF).

    PubMed

    Orita, Toru; Moore, Lee R; Joshi, Powrnima; Tomita, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Takashi; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation (QMgFFF) is a technique for characterization of sub-micrometer magnetic particles based on their retention in the magnetic field from flowing suspensions. Different magnetic field strengths and volumetric flow rates were tested using on-off field application and two commercial nanoparticle preparations that significantly differed in their retention parameter, λ (by nearly 8-fold). The fractograms showed a regular pattern of higher retention (98.6% v. 53.3%) for the larger particle (200 nm v. 90 nm) at the higher flow rate (0.05 mL/min v. 0.01 mL/min) at the highest magnetic field (0.52 T), as expected because of its lower retention parameter. The significance of this approach is a demonstration of a system that is simpler in operation than a programmed field QMgFFF in applications to particle mixtures consisting of two distinct particle fractions. This approach could be useful for detection of unwanted particulate contaminants, especially important in industrial and biomedical applications.

  15. A Quantitative Determination of Magnetic Nanoparticle Separation Using On-Off Field Operation of Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation (QMgFFF)

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Toru; Moore, Lee R.; Joshi, Powrnima; Tomita, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Takashi; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Quadrupole Magnetic Field-Flow Fractionation (QMgFFF) is a technique for characterization of sub-micrometer magnetic particles based on their retention in the magnetic field from flowing suspensions. Different magnetic field strengths and volumetric flow rates were tested using on-off field application and two commercial nanoparticle preparations that significantly differed in their retention parameter, λ (by nearly 8-fold). The fractograms showed a regular pattern of higher retention (98.6% v. 53.3%) for the larger particle (200 nm v. 90 nm) at the higher flow rate (0.05 mL/min v. 0.01 mL/min) at the highest magnetic field (0.52 T), as expected because of its lower retention parameter. The significance of this approach is a demonstration of a system that is simpler in operation than a programmed field QMgFFF in applications to particle mixtures consisting of two distinct particle fractions. This approach could be useful for detection of unwanted particulate contaminants, especially important in industrial and biomedical applications. PMID:23842422

  16. Asymmetrical Flow-Field-Flow Fractionation coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the analysis of gold nanoparticles in the presence of natural nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Meisterjahn, Boris; Neubauer, Elisabeth; Von der Kammer, Frank; Hennecke, Dieter; Hofmann, Thilo

    2014-11-03

    Flow-Field-Flow Fractionation (Flow-FFF), coupled with online detection systems, is one of the most promising tools available for the analysis and characterization of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in complex matrices. In order to demonstrate the applicability of Flow-FFF for the detection, quantification, and characterization of engineered gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), model dispersions were prepared containing AuNPs with diameters of 30 or 100nm, natural nanoparticles (NNPs) extracted from a soil sample, and different concentrations of natural organic matter (NOM), which were then used to investigate interactions between the AuNPs and the NNPs. It could be shown that light scattering detection can be used to evaluate the fractionation performance of the pure NNPs, but not the fractionation performance of the mixed samples that also contained AuNPs because of specific interactions between the AuNPs and the laser light. A combination of detectors (i.e. light absorbance and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) was found to be useful for differentiating between heteroaggregation and homoaggregation of the nanoparticles (NPs). The addition of NOM to samples containing 30nm AuNPs stabilized the AuNPs without affecting the NP size distribution. However, fractograms for samples with no added NOM showed a change in the size distribution, suggesting interactions between the AuNPs and NNPs. This interpretation was supported by unchanged light absorption wavelengths for the AuNPs. In contrast, results for samples containing 100nm AuNPs were inconclusive with respect to recovery and size distributions because of problems with the separation system that probably related to the size and high density of these nanoparticles, highlighting the need for extensive method optimization strategies, even for nanoparticles of the same material but different sizes.

  17. Analysis of β-glucan molar mass from barley malt and brewer's spent grain with asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) and their association to proteins.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Claudia; Teixeira, Cristina; Ding, Huihuang; Cui, Steve; Nyman, Margareta; Nilsson, Lars

    2017-02-10

    β-Glucan benefits are related with its molar mass and it would be of interest to better understand how this parameter can be changed by processing and variety for design of food with specific health effects. For this purpose, extracts from barley malts and brewers' spent grain, processed at different conditions, were analysed regarding β-glucan content, molar mass, and protein content. Molar mass distribution was assessed using asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) with multiangle light scattering (MALS), differential refractive index (dRI) and fluorescence (FL) detection. β-Glucan was detected in a wide molar mass range, <2000 to approximately 6.7×10(6)g/mol. Differences in molar masses were more noticeable between barley varieties and steeping malting conditions than by mashing of malt. Barley products processed to preserve β-glucan contained more β-glucan of high molar mass with potential to shift the fermentation site to the distal colon. Enzymatic degradation of proteins indicated presence of aggregates containing β-glucan and protein.

  18. Size separations of starch of different botanical origin studied by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Wahlund, Karl-Gustav; Leeman, Mats; Santacruz, Stalin

    2011-02-01

    Asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation combined with multiangle light scattering and refractive index detection has been revealed to be a powerful tool for starch characterization. It is based on size separation according to the hydrodynamic diameter of the starch components. Starch from a wide range of different botanical sources were studied, including normal starch and high-amylose and high-amylopectin starch. The starch was dissolved by heat treatment at elevated pressure in a laboratory autoclave. This gave clear solutions with no granular residues. Amylose retrogradation was prevented by using freshly dissolved samples. Programmed cross flow starting at 1.0 mL min(-1) and decreasing exponentially with a half-life of 4 min was utilised. The starches showed two size populations representing mainly amylose and mainly amylopectin with an overlapping region where amylose and amylopectin were possibly co-eluted. Most of the first population had molar masses below 10(6) g mol(-1), and most of the second size population had molar masses above 10(7) g mol(-1). Large differences were found in the relative amounts of the two populations, the molar mass, and hydrodynamic diameters, depending on the plant source and its varieties.

  19. Combining gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA), light scattering, field flow fractionation and cryo electron microscopy in a multidimensional approach to characterize liposomal carrier vesicles.

    PubMed

    Urey, Carlos; Weiss, Victor U; Gondikas, Andreas; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Marko-Varga, György; Andersson, Roland

    2016-11-20

    For drug delivery, characterization of liposomes regarding size, particle number concentrations, occurrence of low-sized liposome artefacts and drug encapsulation are of importance to understand their pharmacodynamic properties. In our study, we aimed to demonstrate the applicability of nano Electrospray Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analyser (nES GEMMA) as a suitable technique for analyzing these parameters. We measured number-based particle concentrations, identified differences in size between nominally identical liposomal samples, and detected the presence of low-diameter material which yielded bimodal particle size distributions. Subsequently, we compared these findings to dynamic light scattering (DLS) data and results from light scattering experiments coupled to Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4), the latter improving the detectability of smaller particles in polydisperse samples due to a size separation step prior detection. However, the bimodal size distribution could not be detected due to method inherent limitations. In contrast, cryo transmission electron microscopy corroborated nES GEMMA results. Hence, gas-phase electrophoresis proved to be a versatile tool for liposome characterization as it could analyze both vesicle size and size distribution. Finally, a correlation of nES GEMMA results with cell viability experiments was carried out to demonstrate the importance of liposome batch-to-batch control as low-sized sample components possibly impact cell viability.

  20. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation. III. Field programming by flow-rate gradient generated by a programmable pump.

    PubMed

    Plocková, J; Chmelík, J

    2001-05-25

    Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) utilizes the Earth's gravitational field as an external force that causes the settlement of particles towards the channel accumulation wall. Hydrodynamic lift forces oppose this action by elevating particles away from the channel accumulation wall. These two counteracting forces enable modulation of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF. In this work, force-field programming based on modulating the magnitude of hydrodynamic lift forces was implemented via changes of flow-rate, which was accomplished by a programmable pump. Several flow-rate gradients (step gradients, linear gradients, parabolic, and combined gradients) were tested and evaluated as tools for optimization of the separation of a silica gel particle mixture. The influence of increasing amount of sample injected on the peak resolution under flow-rate gradient conditions was also investigated. This is the first time that flow-rate gradients have been implemented for programming of the resulting force field acting on particles in GFFF.

  1. Multidetector thermal field-flow fractionation as a unique tool for the tacticity-based separation of poly(methyl methacrylate)-polystyrene block copolymer micelles.

    PubMed

    Greyling, Guilaume; Pasch, Harald

    2015-10-02

    Poly(methyl methacrylate)-polystyrene (PMMA-PS) micelles with isotactic and syndiotactic coronas are prepared in acetonitrile and subjected to thermal field-flow fractionation (ThFFF) analysis at various conditions of increasing temperature gradients. It is shown for the first time that multidetector ThFFF provides comprehensive information on important micelle characteristics such as size (Dh), shape (Rg/Rh), aggregation number (Z), thermal diffusion (DT) and Soret coefficients (ST) as a function of temperature from a single injection. Moreover, it is found that micelles exhibit a unique decreasing trend in DT as a function of temperature which is independent of the tacticity of the corona and the micelle preparation method used. It is also demonstrated that ThFFF can monitor micelle to vesicle transitions as a function of temperature. In addition to ThFFF, it is found from DLS analysis that the tacticity of the corona influences the critical micelle concentration and the magnitude to which micelles expand/contract with temperature. The tacticity does not, however, influence the critical micelle temperature. Furthermore, the separation of micelles based on the tacticity of the corona highlight the unique capabilities of ThFFF.

  2. Agglomeration behaviour of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in river waters: A multi-method approach combining light scattering and field-flow fractionation techniques.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Roy, M; Tijing, L D; Donner, E; Lombi, E; Shon, H K

    2015-08-15

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are currently one of the most prolifically used nanomaterials, resulting in an increasing likelihood of release to the environment. This is of concern as the potential toxicity of TiO2 NPs has been investigated in several recent studies. Research into their fate and behaviour once entering the environment is urgently needed to support risk assessment and policy development. In this study, we used a multi-method approach combining light scattering and field-flow fractionation techniques to assess both the aggregation behaviour and aggregate structure of TiO2 NPs in different river waters. Results showed that both the aggregate size and surface-adsorbed dissolved organic matter (DOM) were strongly related to the initial DOM concentration of the tested waters (i.e. R(2) > 0.90) suggesting that aggregation of TiO2 NPs is controlled by the presence and concentration of DOM. The conformation of the formed aggregates was also found to be strongly related to the surface-adsorbed DOM (i.e. R(2) > 0.95) with increasing surface-adsorbed DOM leading to more compact structures. Finally, the concentration of TiO2 NPs remaining in the supernatant after sedimentation of the larger aggregates was found to decrease proportionally with both increasing IS and decreasing DOM concentration, resulting in more than 95% sedimentation in the highest IS sample.

  3. Separation and size distribution of red blood cells of diverse size, shape, and origin by flow/hyperlayer field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Barman, B N; Ashwood, E R; Giddings, J C

    1993-07-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from human, equine, canine, feline, and bovine whole blood samples have been separated and characterized by high-speed flow/hyperlayer field-flow fractionation (Fl/HyFFF). The elution-based separation of RBCs by this method is based mainly on the size and shape of the cell particles. The typical separation time for RBCs is less than 3 min. Size distributions can be derived from the fractograms of cell samples using a calibration plot based on retention data for uniform polystyrene beads. The method is shown to be effective both to separate and to characterize cell populations, including those with cells of abnormal shape and size. In order to investigate differences in cell morphology, shape and size changes induced by 500,000 Da Dextran were monitored. The changes in the Fl/HyFFF elution profiles indicate that the RBCs decrease in size but become partially aggregated in the presence of the dextran. These changes were found to depend on polymer concentration and specific blood samples. Some of the results from Fl/HyFFF were compared with those from the Coulter counter and from microscopy.

  4. Biophysical characterization of influenza virus subpopulations using field flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering: correlation of particle counts, size distribution and infectivity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ziping; McEvoy, Matt; Razinkov, Vladimir; Polozova, Alla; Li, Elizabeth; Casas-Finet, Jose; Tous, Guillermo I; Balu, Palani; Pan, Alfred A; Mehta, Harshvardhan; Schenerman, Mark A

    2007-09-01

    Adequate biophysical characterization of influenza virions is important for vaccine development. The influenza virus vaccines are produced from the allantoic fluid of developing chicken embryos. The process of viral replication produces a heterogeneous mixture of infectious and non-infectious viral particles with varying states of aggregation. The study of the relative distribution and behavior of different subpopulations and their inter-correlation can assist in the development of a robust process for a live virus vaccine. This report describes a field flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FFF-MALS) method optimized for the analysis of size distribution and total particle counts. The FFF-MALS method was compared with several other methods such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), size exclusion chromatography followed by MALS (SEC-MALS), quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT Q-PCR), median tissue culture dose (TCID(50)), and the fluorescent focus assay (FFA). The correlation between the various methods for determining total particle counts, infectivity and size distribution is reported. The pros and cons of each of the analytical methods are discussed.

  5. Particle size characterization of titanium dioxide in sunscreen products using sedimentation field-flow fractionation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Samontha, Atitaya; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2011-01-01

    Sedimentation field-flow fractionation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SdFFF-ICP-MS) was successfully applied to investigate particle size distribution of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) in sunscreen samples after hexane extraction to remove organic components from the samples. Three brands of sunscreen products of various sun protection factor (SPF) value were used as samples. Different particle size distribution profiles were observed for sunscreen samples of various brands and SPF values; however, the particle size distributions of titanium dioxide in most sunscreen samples investigated in this work were larger than 100 nm. The titanium dioxide concentrations were higher for the products of higher SPF values. By comparing the results obtained from online SdFFF-ICP-MS and those from the off-line ICP-MS determination of titanium after acid digestion, ICP-MS was found to effectively atomize and ionize the titanium dioxide particle without the need for acid digestion of the samples. Therefore, the online coupling between SdFFF and ICP-MS could be effectively used to provide quantitative information of titanium dioxide concentrations across particle size distribution profiles.

  6. Asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the quantification of quantum dots bioconjugation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Menéndez-Miranda, Mario; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernández, José M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2015-11-27

    Hyphenation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) to an on-line elemental detection (inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ICP-MS) is proposed as a powerful diagnostic tool for quantum dots bioconjugation studies. In particular, conjugation effectiveness between a "model" monoclonal IgG antibody (Ab) and CdSe/ZnS core-shell Quantum Dots (QDs), surface-coated with an amphiphilic polymer, has been monitored here by such hybrid AF4-ICP-MS technique. Experimental conditions have been optimized searching for a proper separation between the sought bioconjugates from the eventual free reagents excesses employed during the bioconjugation (QDs and antibodies). Composition and pH of the carrier have been found to be critical parameters to ensure an efficient separation while ensuring high species recovery from the AF4 channel. An ICP-MS equipped with a triple quadropole was selected as elemental detector to enable sensitive and reliable simultaneous quantification of the elemental constituents, including sulfur, of the nanoparticulated species and the antibody. The hyphenated technique used provided nanoparticle size-based separation, elemental detection, and composition analysis capabilities that turned out to be instrumental in order to investigate in depth the Ab-QDs bioconjugation process. Moreover, the analytical strategy here proposed allowed us not only to clearly identify the bioconjugation reaction products but also to quantify nanoparticle:antibodies bioconjugation efficiency. This is a key issue in future development of analytical and bioanalytical photoluminescent QDs applications.

  7. Analysis of self-assembled cationic lipid-DNA gene carrier complexes using flow field-flow fractionation and light scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Williams, S K; Allison, S D; Anchordoquy, T J

    2001-02-15

    Self-assembled cationic lipid-DNA complexes have shown an ability to facilitate the delivery of heterologous DNA across outer cell membranes and nuclear membranes (transfection) for gene therapy applications. While the size of the complex and the surface charge (which is a function of the lipid-to-DNA mass ratio) are important factors that determine transfection efficiency, lipid-DNA complex preparations are heterogeneous with respect to particle size and net charge. This heterogeneity contributes to the low transfection efficiency and instability of cationic lipid-DNA vectors. Efforts to define structure-activity relations and stable vector populations have been hampered by the lack of analytical techniques that can separate this type of particle and analyze both the physical characteristics and biological activity of the resulting fractions. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of flow field-flow fractionation (flow FFF) to separate cationic lipid-DNA complexes prepared at various lipid-DNA ratios. The compatibility of the lipid-DNA particles with several combinations of FFF carrier liquids and channel membranes was assessed. In addition, changes in elution profiles (or size distributions) were monitored as a function of time using on-line ultraviolet, multiangle light scattering, and refractive index detectors. Multiangle light scattering detected the formation of particle aggregates during storage, which were not observed with the other detectors. In comparison to population-averaged techniques, such as photon correlation spectroscopy, flow FFF allows a detailed examination of subtle changes in the physical properties of nonviral vectors and provides a basis for the definition of structure-activity relations for this novel class of pharmaceutical agents.

  8. Ultraviolet-B radiation mobilizes uranium from uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes in aquatic systems, demonstrated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Nehete, Sachin Vilas; Christensen, Terje; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian

    2017-03-21

    Humic substances have a tendency to form complexes with metal ions in aquatic medium, impacting the metal mobility, decreasing bioavailability and toxicity. Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation exposure degrades the humic substance, changes their molecular weight distribution and their metal binding capacity in aquatic medium. In this study, we experimented the effect of UV-B radiation on the uranium complexed with fulvic acids and humic acids in a soft water system at different pH, uranium concentrations and radiant exposure. The concentration and distribution of uranium in a complexed form were investigated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi detection technique (AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS). The major concentration of uranium present in complexes was primarily associated with average and higher molecular weight fulvic and humic acids components. The concentration of uranium in a complexed form increased with increasing fulvic and humic acid concentrations as well as pH of the solution. The higher molecular weight fraction of uranium was degraded due to the UV-B exposure, transforming about 50% of the uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes into low molecular weight uranium species in complex form with organic ligands and/or free form. The result also suggests AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS to be an important separation and detection technique for understanding the interaction of radionuclides with dissolved organic matter, tracking size distribution changes during degradation of organic complexes for understanding mobility, bioavailability and ecosystem transfer of radionuclides as well as metals.

  9. Dielectrophoretically tunable optofluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Su; Ren, Hongwen; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2013-12-01

    Tunable optofluidic devices exhibit some unique characteristics that are not achievable in conventional solid-state photonic devices. They provide exciting opportunities for emerging applications in imaging, information processing, sensing, optical communication, lab-on-a-chip and biomedical engineering. A dielectrophoresis effect is an important physical mechanism to realize tunable optofluidic devices. Via balancing the voltage-induced dielectric force and interfacial tension, the liquid interface can be dynamically manipulated and the optical output reconfigured or adaptively tuned in real time. Dielectrophoretically tunable optofluidic devices offer several attractive features, such as rapid prototyping, miniaturization, easy integration and low power consumption. In this review paper, we first explain the underlying operation principles and then review some recent progress in this field, covering the topics of adaptive lens, beam steering, iris, grating, optical switch/attenuator and single pixel display. Finally, the future perspectives are discussed.

  10. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  11. Dissolution and nanoparticle generation behavior of Be-associated materials in synthetic lung fluid using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjie; Fernandez, Diego; Rudd, Abigail; Johnson, William P; Deubner, David; Sabey, Philip; Storrs, Jason; Larsen, Rod

    2011-07-08

    Various Be-containing micro-particle suspensions were equilibrated with simulated lung fluid (SLF) to examine their dissolution behavior as well as the potential generation of nanoparticles. The motivation for this study was to explore the relationship between dissolution/particle generation behaviors of Be-containing materials relevant to Be-ore processing, and their epidemiologically indicated inhalation toxicities. Limited data suggest that BeO is associated with higher rates of beryllium sensitization (BS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) relative to the other five relevant materials studied: bertrandite-containing ore, beryl-containing ore, frit (a processing intermediate), Be(OH)₂ (a processing intermediate), and silica (control). These materials were equilibrated with SLF at two pH values (4.5 and 7.2) to reflect inter- and intra-cellular environments in lung tissue. Concentrations of Be, Al, and Si in SLF increased linearly during the first 20 days of equilibration, and then rose slowly, or in some cases reached a maximum, and subsequently decreased. Relative to the other materials, BeO produced relatively low Be concentration in solution at pH 7.2; and relatively high Be concentration in solution at pH 4.5 during the first 20 days of equilibration. For both pH values, however, the Be concentration in SLF normalized to Be content of the material was lowest for BeO, demonstrating that BeO was distinct among the four other Be-containing materials in terms of its persistence as a source of Be to the SLF solution. Following 149 days of equilibration, the SLF solutions were fractionated using flow-field flow fractionation (FlFFF) with detection via ICP-MS. For all materials, nanoparticles (which were formed during equilibration) were dominantly distributed in the 10-100 nm size range. Notably, BeO produced the least nanoparticle-associated Be mass (other than silica) at both pH values. Furthermore, BeO produced the highest Be concentrations in the size

  12. Physicochemical characterization of titanium dioxide pigments using various techniques for size determination and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Helsper, Johannes P F G; Peters, Ruud J B; van Bemmel, Margaretha E M; Rivera, Zahira E Herrera; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Tromp, Peter C; Hofmann, Thilo; Weigel, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Seven commercial titanium dioxide pigments and two other well-defined TiO2 materials (TiMs) were physicochemically characterised using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (aF4) for separation, various techniques to determine size distribution and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for chemical characterization. The aF4-ICPMS conditions were optimised and validated for linearity, limit of detection, recovery, repeatability and reproducibility, all indicating good performance. Multi-element detection with aF4-ICPMS showed that some commercial pigments contained zirconium co-eluting with titanium in aF4. The other two TiMs, NM103 and NM104, contained aluminium as integral part of the titanium peak eluting in aF4. The materials were characterised using various size determination techniques: retention time in aF4, aF4 hyphenated with multi-angle laser light spectrometry (MALS), single particle ICPMS (spICPMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle tracking analysis (PTA). PTA appeared inappropriate. For the other techniques, size distribution patterns were quite similar, i.e. high polydispersity with diameters from 20 to >700 nm, a modal peak between 200 and 500 nm and a shoulder at 600 nm. Number-based size distribution techniques as spICPMS and SEM showed smaller modal diameters than aF4-UV, from which mass-based diameters are calculated. With aF4-MALS calculated, light-scattering-based "diameters of gyration" (Øg) are similar to hydrodynamic diameters (Øh) from aF4-UV analyses and diameters observed with SEM, but much larger than with spICPMS. A Øg/Øh ratio of about 1 indicates that the TiMs are oblate spheres or fractal aggregates. SEM observations confirm the latter structure. The rationale for differences in modal peak diameter is discussed.

  13. Optimisation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation for the characterisation of nanoparticles in coated polydisperse TiO2 with applications in food and feed.

    PubMed

    Omar, J; Boix, A; Kerckhove, G; von Holst, C

    2016-12-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has various applications in consumer products and is also used as an additive in food and feeding stuffs. For the characterisation of this product, including the determination of nanoparticles, there is a strong need for the availability of corresponding methods of analysis. This paper presents an optimisation process for the characterisation of polydisperse-coated TiO2 nanoparticles. As a first step, probe ultrasonication was optimised using a central composite design in which the amplitude and time were the selected variables to disperse, i.e., to break up agglomerates and/or aggregates of the material. The results showed that high amplitudes (60%) favoured a better dispersion and time was fixed in mid-values (5 min). In a next step, key factors of asymmetric flow field-flow fraction (AF4), namely cross-flow (CF), detector flow (DF), exponential decay of the cross-flow (CFexp) and focus time (Ft), were studied through experimental design. Firstly, a full-factorial design was employed to establish the statistically significant factors (p < 0.05). Then, the information obtained from the full-factorial design was utilised by applying a central composite design to obtain the following optimum conditions of the system: CF, 1.6 ml min(-1); DF, 0.4 ml min(-1); Ft, 5 min; and CFexp, 0.6. Once the optimum conditions were obtained, the stability of the dispersed sample was measured for 24 h by analysing 10 replicates with AF4 in order to assess the performance of the optimised dispersion protocol. Finally, the recovery of the optimised method, particle shape and particle size distribution were estimated.

  14. Optimisation of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation for the characterisation of nanoparticles in coated polydisperse TiO2 with applications in food and feed

    PubMed Central

    Omar, J.; Boix, A.; Kerckhove, G.; von Holst, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has various applications in consumer products and is also used as an additive in food and feeding stuffs. For the characterisation of this product, including the determination of nanoparticles, there is a strong need for the availability of corresponding methods of analysis. This paper presents an optimisation process for the characterisation of polydisperse-coated TiO2 nanoparticles. As a first step, probe ultrasonication was optimised using a central composite design in which the amplitude and time were the selected variables to disperse, i.e., to break up agglomerates and/or aggregates of the material. The results showed that high amplitudes (60%) favoured a better dispersion and time was fixed in mid-values (5 min). In a next step, key factors of asymmetric flow field-flow fraction (AF4), namely cross-flow (CF), detector flow (DF), exponential decay of the cross-flow (CFexp) and focus time (Ft), were studied through experimental design. Firstly, a full-factorial design was employed to establish the statistically significant factors (p < 0.05). Then, the information obtained from the full-factorial design was utilised by applying a central composite design to obtain the following optimum conditions of the system: CF, 1.6 ml min–1; DF, 0.4 ml min–1; Ft, 5 min; and CFexp, 0.6. Once the optimum conditions were obtained, the stability of the dispersed sample was measured for 24 h by analysing 10 replicates with AF4 in order to assess the performance of the optimised dispersion protocol. Finally, the recovery of the optimised method, particle shape and particle size distribution were estimated. PMID:27650879

  15. Characterization of cationic polymers by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering-A comparison with traditional techniques.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael; Pietsch, Christian; Tauhardt, Lutz; Schallon, Anja; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2014-01-17

    In the field of nanomedicine, cationic polymers are the subject of intensive research and represent promising carriers for genetic material. The detailed characterization of these carriers is essential since the efficiency of gene delivery strongly depends on the properties of the used polymer. Common characterization methods such as size exclusion chromatography (SEC) or mass spectrometry (MS) suffer from problems, e.g. missing standards, or even failed for cationic polymers. As an alternative, asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) was investigated. Additionally, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, as well-established techniques, were applied to evaluate the results obtained by AF4. In this study, different polymers of molar masses between 10 and 120kgmol(-1) with varying amine functionalities in the side chain or in the polymer backbone were investigated. To this end, some of the most successful gene delivery agents, namely linear poly(ethylene imine) (LPEI) (only secondary amines in the backbone), branched poly(ethylene imine) (B-PEI) (secondary and tertiary amino groups in the backbone, primary amine end groups), and poly(l-lysine) (amide backbone and primary amine side chains), were characterized. Moreover, poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA), poly(2-(amino)ethyl methacrylate) (PAEMA), and poly(2-(tert-butylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PtBAEMA) as polymers with primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the side chain, have been investigated. Reliable results were obtained for all investigated polymers by AF4. In addition, important factors for all methods were evaluated, e.g. the influence of different elution buffers and AF4 membranes. Besides this, the correct determination of the partial specific volume and the suppression of the polyelectrolyte effect are the most critical issues for AUC investigations.

  16. Prospects and difficulties in TiO₂ nanoparticles analysis in cosmetic and food products using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    López-Heras, Isabel; Madrid, Yolanda; Cámara, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we proposed an analytical approach based on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation combined to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (AsFlFFF-ICP-MS) for rutile titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs) characterization and quantification in cosmetic and food products. AsFlFFF-ICP-MS separation of TiO2NPs was performed using 0.2% (w/v) SDS, 6% (v/v) methanol at pH 8.7 as the carrier solution. Two problems were addressed during TiO2NPs analysis by AsFlFFF-ICP-MS: size distribution determination and element quantification of the NPs. Two approaches were used for size determination: size calibration using polystyrene latex standards of known sizes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A method based on focused sonication for preparing NPs dispersions followed by an on-line external calibration strategy based on AsFlFFF-ICP-MS, using rutile TiO2NPs as standards is presented here for the first time. The developed method suppressed non-specific interactions between NPs and membrane, and overcame possible erroneous results obtained when quantification is performed by using ionic Ti solutions. The applicability of the quantification method was tested on cosmetic products (moisturizing cream). Regarding validation, at the 95% confidence level, no significant differences were detected between titanium concentrations in the moisturizing cream prior sample mineralization (3865±139 mg Ti/kg sample), by FIA-ICP-MS analysis prior NPs extraction (3770±24 mg Ti/kg sample), and after using the optimized on-line calibration approach (3699±145 mg Ti/kg sample). Besides the high Ti content found in the studied food products (sugar glass and coffee cream), TiO2NPs were not detected.

  17. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  18. Dielectrophoretic systems without embedded electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2006-03-21

    Method and apparatus for dielectrophoretic separation of particles in a fluid based using array of insulating structures arranged in a fluid flow channel. By utilizing an array of insulating structures, a spatially inhomogeneous electric field is created without the use of the embedded electrodes conventionally employed for dielectrophoretic separations. Moreover, by using these insulating structures a steady applied electric field has been shown to provide for dielectrophoresis in contrast to the conventional use of an alternating electric field. In a uniform array of posts, dielectrophoretic effects have been produced flows having significant pressure-driven and electrokinetic transport. Above a threshold applied electric field, filaments of concentrated and rarefied particles appear in the flow as a result of dielectrophoresis. Above a higher threshold applied voltage, dielectrophoresis produces zones of highly concentrated and immobilized particles. These patterns are strongly influenced by the angle of the array of insulating structures with respect to the mean applied electric field and the shape of the insulating structures.

  19. Continuous flow dielectrophoretic particle concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B.

    2007-04-17

    A continuous-flow filter/concentrator for separating and/or concentrating particles in a fluid is disclosed. The filter is a three-port device an inlet port, an filter port and a concentrate port. The filter separates particles into two streams by the ratio of their dielectrophoretic mobility to their electrokinetic, advective, or diffusive mobility if the dominant transport mechanism is electrokinesis, advection, or diffusion, respectively.Also disclosed is a device for separating and/or concentrating particles by dielectrophoretic trapping of the particles.

  20. Interaction of bentonite colloids with Cs, Eu, Th and U in presence of humic acid: A flow field-flow fractionation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouby, Muriel; Geckeis, Horst; Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Mihai, Silvia; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of Cs(I), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) with montmorillonite colloids was investigated in natural Grimsel Test Site groundwater over a 3 years period. The asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation combined with various detectors was applied to study size variations of colloids and to monitor colloid association of trace metals. The colloids suspended directly in the low ionic strength ( I), slightly alkaline granitic groundwater ( I = 10 -3 mol/L, pH 9.6) showed a gradual agglomeration with a size distribution shift from initially 10-200 nm to 50-400 nm within over 3 years. The Ca 2+ concentration of 2.1 × 10 -4 mol/L in the ground water is believed to be responsible for the slow agglomeration due to Ca 2+ ion exchange against Li + and Na + at the permanently charged basal clay planes. Furthermore, the Ca 2+ concentration lies close to the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of 10 -3 mol L -1 for clay colloids. Slow destabilization may delimit clay colloid migration in this specific groundwater over long time scales. Eu(III) and Th(IV) are found predominantly bound to clay colloids, while U(VI) prevails as the UO 2(OH) 3- complex and Cs(I) remains mainly as aquo ion under our experimental conditions. Speciation calculations qualitatively represent the experimental data. A focus was set on the reversibility of metal ion-colloid binding. Addition of humic acid as a competing ligand induces rapid metal ion dissociation from clay colloids in the case of Eu(III) even after previous aging for about 3 years. Interestingly only partial dissociation occurs in the case of Th(IV). Experiments and calculations prove that the humate complexes dominate the speciation of all metal ions under given conditions. The partial irreversibility of clay bound Th(IV) is presently not understood but might play an important role for the colloid-mediated transport of polyvalent actinides over wide distances in natural groundwater.

  1. Feasibility of asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation coupled to ICP-MS for the characterization of wear metal particles and metalloproteins in biofluids from hip replacement patients.

    PubMed

    Loeschner, Katrin; Harrington, Chris F; Kearney, Jacque-Lucca; Langton, David J; Larsen, Erik H

    2015-06-01

    Hip replacements are used to improve the quality of life of people with orthopaedic conditions, but the use of metal-on-metal (MoM) arthroplasty has led to poor outcomes for some patients. These problems are related to the generation of micro- to nanosized metal wear particles containing Cr, Co or other elements, but the current analytical methods used to investigate the processes involved do not provide sufficient information to understand the size or composition of the wear particles generated in vivo. In this qualitative feasibility study, asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to investigate metal protein binding and the size and composition of wear metal particles present in serum and hip aspirates from MoM hip replacement patients. A well-established HPLC anion exchange chromatography (AEC) separation system coupled to ICP-MS was used to confirm the metal-protein associations in the serum samples. Off-line single particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) analysis was used to confirm the approximate size distribution indicated by AF(4) of the wear particles in hip aspirates. In the serum samples, AF(4) -ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with transferrin (Tf) and Co with albumin (Alb) and an unidentified species; AEC-ICP-MS confirmed these associations and also indicated an association of Cr with Alb. In the hip aspirate sample, AF(4)-ICP-MS suggested that Cr was associated with Alb and Tf and that Co was associated with Alb and two unidentified compounds; AEC analysis confirmed the Cr results and the association of Co with Alb and a second compound. Enzymatic digestion of the hip aspirate sample, followed by separation using AF(4) with detection by UV absorption (280 nm), multi-angle light scattering and ICP-MS, suggested that the sizes of the Cr-, Co- and Mo-containing wear particles in a hip aspirate sample were in the range 40-150 nm. Off-line spICP-MS was used to confirm these

  2. Silver and gold nanoparticle separation using asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation: Influence of run conditions and of particle and membrane charges.

    PubMed

    Meisterjahn, Boris; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Hennecke, Dieter; Hofmann, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (Flow-FFF), coupled with online detection systems is one of the most promising tools available for the separation and quantification of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in complex matrices. To correctly relate the retention of nanoparticles in the Flow-FFF-channel to the particle size, ideal separation conditions must be met. This requires optimization of the parameters that influence the separation behavior. The aim of this study was therefore to systematically investigate and evaluate the influence of parameters such as the carrier liquid, the cross flow, and the membrane material, on the separation behavior of two metallic ENPs. For this purpose the retention, recovery, and separation efficiency of sterically stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and electrostatically stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), which represent two materials widely used in investigations on environmental fate and ecotoxicology, were investigated against a parameter matrix of three different cross-flow densities, four representative carrier solutions, and two membrane materials. The use of a complex mixture of buffers, ionic and non-ionic surfactants (FL-70 solution) together with a medium cross-flow density provided an acceptable compromise in peak quality and recovery for both types of ENPs. However, these separation conditions do not represent a perfect match for both particle types at the same time (maximized recovery at maximized retention). It could be shown that the behavior of particles within Flow-FFF channels cannot be predicted or explained purely in terms of electrostatic interactions. Particles were irreversibly lost under conditions where the measured zeta potentials suggested that there should have been sufficient electrostatic repulsion to ensure stabilization of the particles in the Flow-FFF channel resulting in good recoveries. The wide variations that we observed in ENP behavior under different conditions, together with the different

  3. Application of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation multi-detector approach for metallic engineered nanoparticle characterization--prospects and limitations demonstrated on Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hagendorfer, Harald; Kaegi, Ralf; Traber, Jacqueline; Mertens, Stijn F L; Scherrers, Roger; Ludwig, Christian; Ulrich, Andrea

    2011-11-14

    In this work we discuss about the method development, applicability and limitations of an asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (A4F) system in combination with a multi-detector setup consisting of UV/vis, light scattering, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The overall aim was to obtain a size dependent-, element specific-, and quantitative method appropriate for the characterization of metallic engineered nanoparticle (ENP) dispersions. Thus, systematic investigations of crucial method parameters were performed by employing well characterized Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as a defined model system. For good separation performance, the A4F flow-, membrane-, and carrier conditions were optimized. To obtain reliable size information, the use of laser light scattering based detectors was evaluated, where an online dynamic light scattering (DLS) detector showed good results for the investigated Au-NP up to a size of 80 nm in hydrodynamic diameter. To adapt large sensitivity differences of the various detectors, as well as to guarantee long term stability and minimum contamination of the mass spectrometer a split-flow concept for coupling ICPMS was evaluated. To test for reliable quantification, the ICPMS signal response of ionic Au standards was compared to that of Au-NP. Using proper stabilization with surfactants, no difference for concentrations of 1-50 μg Au L(-1) in the size range from 5 to 80 nm for citrate stabilized dispersions was observed. However, studies using different A4F channel membranes showed unspecific particle-membrane interaction resulting in retention time shifts and unspecific loss of nanoparticles, depending on the Au-NP system as well as membrane batch and type. Thus, reliable quantification and discrimination of ionic and particular species was performed using ICPMS in combination with ultracentrifugation instead of direct quantification with the A4F multi-detector setup. Figures of merit were obtained, by comparing the

  4. Effect of size of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on electrochemical performance of screen printed electrode using sedimentation field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Haiyang; Kim, Beom-Ju; Choi, Seong-Ho; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2014-10-01

    Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and Fe3O4-deposited multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4@MWCNTs) were synthesized by ultrasonic co-precipitation method. The surface and structural properties of Fe3O4 MNPs and Fe3O4@MWCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was, for the first time, employed to study the influence of synthesis parameters on size distribution of Fe3O4 MNPs. A reasonable resolution for SdFFF analysis of Fe3O4 MNPs was obtained by a combination of 1,600 RPM, flow rate of 0.3 mL min-1, and Triton X-100. The results suggest that lower pH and higher reaction temperature tend to yield smaller Fe3O4 MNPs size. The size distribution of Fe3O4 MNPs obtained from SdFFF was compared with those obtained from TEM and DLS. Also the effect of the particle size of Fe3O4 MNPs on electrochemical property of Fe3O4@MWCNTs-treated screen printed electrode (SPE) was studied. Cyclic voltammetry revealed that SPE treated with MWCNTs yields a significantly enhanced signal than that with no treatment. The SPE signal was even further enhanced with addition of Fe3O4 MNPs. For SPE analysis of dopamine, a liner range of 0.005-0.1 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.986 was observed. Results revealed that (1) SdFFF is a useful tool for size-based separation and characterization of MNPs; (2) Proposed methods for synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4@MWCNTs are mild and fast (about 30 min); (3) SPE treated with Fe3O4@MWCNTs shows potential applicability for biosensing.

  5. Size fractionation and size characterization of nanoemulsions of lipid droplets and large unilamellar lipid vesicles by asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation/multi-angle light scattering and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Vezočnik, Valerija; Rebolj, Katja; Sitar, Simona; Ota, Katja; Tušek-Žnidarič, Magda; Štrus, Jasna; Sepčić, Kristina; Pahovnik, David; Maček, Peter; Žagar, Ema

    2015-10-30

    Asymmetric-flow field-flow fractionation technique coupled to a multi-angle light-scattering detector (AF4-MALS) was used together with dynamic light-scattering (DLS) in batch mode and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the size characteristics of the trioleoylglycerol lipid droplets covered by a monolayer of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, in water phase. These lipid droplet nanoemulsions (LD) were formed by ultrasonication. In parallel, the size characteristics of large unilamellar lipid vesicles (LUV) prepared by extrusion and composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol were determined. LD and LUV were prepared at two different molar ratios (1/1, 4/1) of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. In AF4-MALS, various cross-flow conditions and mobile phase compositions were tested to optimize the separation of LD or LUV particles. The particle radii, R, as well as the root-mean-square radii, Rrms, of LD and LUV were determined by AF4-MALS, whereas the hydrodynamic radii, Rh, were obtained by DLS. TEM visualization revealed round shape particles of LD and LUV.

  6. Accurate Size and Size-Distribution Determination of Polystyrene Latex Nanoparticles in Aqueous Medium Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Asymmetrical Flow Field Flow Fractionation with Multi-Angle Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Takahashi, Kayori; Kinugasa, Shinichi

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AFFFF) using multi-angle light scattering (MALS) with consideration of band broadening in AFFFF separation. The intensity-average diameter determined by DLS and AFFFF-MALS agreed well within the estimated uncertainties, although the size distribution of PS-latex determined by DLS was less reliable in comparison with that determined by AFFFF-MALS.

  7. Influence of protein formulation and carrier solution on asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation: a case study of the plant-produced recombinant anthrax protective antigen pp-PA83.

    PubMed

    Palais, Caroline; Chichester, Jessica A; Manceva, Slobodanka; Yusibov, Vidadi; Arvinte, Tudor

    2015-02-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (afFFF) was used to investigate the properties of a plant-produced anthrax toxin protective antigen, pp-PA83. The afFFF fractogram consisted of two main peaks with molar masses similar to the molecular mass of pp-PA83 monomer. afFFF carrier solutions strongly influenced the ratio and the intensity of the two main peaks. These differences indicate that conformation changes in the pp-PA83 molecule occurred during the afFFF analysis. Similar fractograms were obtained for different pp-PA83 formulations when the afFFF carrier solution and the protein formulation were the same (or very similar). The data show that in specific cases, afFFF could be used to study protein conformation and document the importance of studying the influence of the carrier solution on afFFF.

  8. Separation of silver nanoparticles by hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation: Addition of tannic acid into carrier liquid as a modifier.

    PubMed

    Saenmuangchin, Rattaporn; Mettakoonpitak, Jaruwan; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2015-10-09

    A homemade hollow fiber flow-field fractionation (Hf-FlFFF) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was set-up for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) separation by using polysulfone hollow fiber membrane (30,000 MW cutoff) as a separation channel. Tannic acid and citrate stabilized AgNPs were synthesized and introduced into Hf-FlFFF. The effects of carrier liquid and stabilizing agent on retention behavior of AgNPs were investigated. Different elution behaviors were observed as follows: with 0.02% (w/v) FL-70, all of AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF but differences in retention behaviors were observed for AgNPs with tannic acid and citrate stabilizing agents; and with 30mM TRIS buffer, only tannic acid stabilized AgNPs were eluted from Hf-FlFFF, whereas citrate stabilized AgNPs were not eluted. In this work, tannic acid addition into carrier liquid was proposed to modify the surface of AgNPs and the surface of the membrane, and thereby adjusting the retention behaviors of AgNPs. Various concentrations of tannic acid were added into FL-70 and TRIS buffer. With the use of 0.1mM tannic acid in 30mM TRIS buffer as the carrier liquid, retention behaviors of both tannic acid stabilized- and citrate stabilized-AgNPs were similar and with similar fractionation recovery.

  9. Hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation and multi-angle light scattering investigation of the size, shape and metal-release of silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium for nano-risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Marassi, Valentina; Casolari, Sonia; Roda, Barbara; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Panzavolta, Silvia; Tofail, Syed A M; Ortelli, Simona; Delpivo, Camilla; Blosi, Magda; Costa, Anna Luisa

    2015-03-15

    Due to the increased use of silver nanoparticles in industrial scale manufacturing, consumer products and nanomedicine reliable measurements of properties such as the size, shape and distribution of these nano particles in aqueous medium is critical. These properties indeed affect both functional properties and biological impacts especially in quantifying associated risks and identifying suitable risk-mediation strategies. The feasibility of on-line coupling of a fractionation technique such as hollow-fiber flow field flow fractionation (HF5) with a light scattering technique such as MALS (multi-angle light scattering) is investigated here for this purpose. Data obtained from such a fractionation technique and its combination thereof with MALS have been compared with those from more conventional but often complementary techniques e.g. transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray fluorescence. The combination of fractionation and multi angle light scattering techniques have been found to offer an ideal, hyphenated methodology for a simultaneous size-separation and characterization of silver nanoparticles. The hydrodynamic radii determined by fractionation techniques can be conveniently correlated to the mean average diameters determined by multi angle light scattering and reliable information on particle morphology in aqueous dispersion has been obtained. The ability to separate silver (Ag(+)) ions from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) via membrane filtration during size analysis is an added advantage in obtaining quantitative insights to its risk potential. Most importantly, the methodology developed in this article can potentially be extended to similar characterization of metal-based nanoparticles when studying their functional effectiveness and hazard potential.

  10. Light-Induced Dielectrophoretic Manipulation of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hoeb, Marco; Rädler, Joachim O.; Klein, Stefan; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Light-induced dielectrophoretic movement of polystyrene beads and λ-DNA is studied using thin films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon as local photoaddressable electrodes with a diameter of 4 μm. Positive (high-field seeking) dielectrophoretic movement is observed for both types of objects. The absence of strong negative (low-field seeking) dielectrophoresis of DNA at high frequencies is in agreement with the similarity of the dielectric constants of DNA and water, the real part of the dielectric function. The corresponding imaginary part of the dielectric function governed by the conductivity of DNA can be determined from a comparison of the frequency dependence of the dielectrophoretic drift velocity with the Clausius-Mossotti relation. PMID:17483160

  11. Elemental ratios for characterization of quantum-dots populations in complex mixtures by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation on-line coupled to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Miranda, Mario; Fernandez-Arguelles, Maria T; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-08-11

    Separation and identification of nanoparticles of different composition, with similar particle diameter, coexisting in heterogeneous suspensions of polymer-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have been thoroughly assessed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled on-line to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) detectors. Chemical characterization of any previously on-line separated nanosized species was achieved by the measurement of the elemental molar ratios of every element involved in the synthesis of the QDs, using inorganic standards and external calibration by flow injection analysis (FIA). Such elemental molar ratios, strongly limited so far to pure single nanoparticles suspensions, have been achieved with adequate accuracy by coupling for the first time an ICP-QQQ instrument to an AF4 system. This hyphenation turned out to be instrumental to assess the chemical composition of the different populations of nanoparticles coexisting in the relatively complex mixtures, due to its capabilities to detect the hardly detectable elements involved in the synthesis. Interestingly such information, complementary to that obtained by fluorescence, was very valuable to detect and identify unexpected nanosized species, present at significant level, produced during QDs synthesis and hardly detectable by standard approaches.

  12. Multielement characterization of metal-humic substances complexation by size exclusion chromatography, asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation, ultrafiltration and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry detection: a comparative approach.

    PubMed

    Bolea, E; Gorriz, M P; Bouby, M; Laborda, F; Castillo, J R; Geckeis, H

    2006-10-06

    The use of three different separation techniques, ultrafiltration (UF), high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF), for the characterization of a compost leachate is described. The possible interaction of about 30 elements with different size fractions of humic substances (HS) has been investigated coupling these separation techniques with UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as detection techniques. The organic matter is constituted by a polydisperse mixture of humic substances ranging from low molecular weights (around 1kDa) to significantly larger entities. Elements can be classified into three main groups with regard to their interaction with HS. The first group is constituted by primarily the monovalent alkaline metal ions and anionic species like B, W, Mo, As existing as oxyanions all being not significantly associated to HS. The second group consists of elements that are at least partly associated to a smaller HS size fraction (such as Ni, Cu, Cr and Co). A third group of mainly tri- and tetravalent metal ions like Al, Fe, the lanthanides, Sn and Th are rather associated to larger-sized HS fractions. The three separation techniques provide a fairly consistent size classification for most of the metal ions, even though slight disagreements were observed. The number-average molecular weight (Mn), the weight-average molecular weight (Mw) and the polydispersity (rho) parameters have been calculated both from AsFlFFF and HPSEC experiments and compared for HS and some metal-HS species. Differences in values can be partly explained by an overloading effect observed in the AsFlFFF experiments induced by electrostatic repulsion effects in the low ionic strength, high pH carrier solution. Size information obtained from ultrafiltration is not as resolved as for the other methods. Molecular weight cut-offs (MWCO) of the individual filter

  13. Flow field-flow fractionation-inductively coupled optical emission spectrometric investigation of the size-based distribution of iron complexed to phytic and tannic acids in a food suspension: implications for iron availability.

    PubMed

    Purawatt, Sopon; Siripinyanond, Atitaya; Shiowatana, Juwadee

    2007-10-01

    Flow field-flow fractionation-inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (FlFFF-ICP-OES) was applied to achieve the size-based fractionation of iron in a food suspension in order to gain insights into iron availability. The binding of iron with phytic and tannic acids, employed as model inhibitors of iron availability in foods, was investigated at pH 2.0 (representing stomach fluid), pH 5.0 (the transition stage in the upper part of the duodenum), and pH 7.0 (the small intestine). In the presence of phytic acid, iron was found as a free ion or it was associated with molecules smaller than 1 kDa at pH 2.0. Iron associated with molecules larger than 1 kDa when the pH of the mixture was raised to 5.0 and 7.0. In the presence of tannic acid, iron was again mostly associated with molecules smaller than 1 kDa at pH 2.0. However, at pH 5.0, iron and tannic acid associated in large molecules (approximately 25 kDa), while at pH 7.0, most of the iron was associated with macromolecules larger than 500 kDa. Iron size-based distributions of kale extract and tea infusion containing phytic and tannic acids, respectively, were also examined at the three pH values, with and without enzymatic digestion. Without enzymatic digestion of the kale extract and the tea infusion at pH 2.0, most of the iron was released as free ions or associated with molecules smaller than 1 kDa. At other pH values, most of the iron in the kale extract and the tea infusion was found to bind with ~2 kDa and >500 kDa macromolecules, respectively. Upon enzymatic gastrointestinal digestion, the iron was not observed to bind to macromolecules >1 kDa but <500 kDa, due to the enzymatic breakdown of large molecules to smaller ones (<1 kDa).

  14. Dielectrophoretic analysis of microbes in water.

    PubMed

    Betts, W B; Brown, A P

    1998-12-01

    Traditional microbiological methods are still used extensively for analysis of micro-organisms in water. However, they are inefficient due to a high labour input requirement, a low sample capacity, and often a long time lag before results are available. Analytical stages involving incubation and growth (enrichments and colony isolation) contribute the greatest delay in reporting, although subsequent identification can also be protracted. The use of electrometric growth analysers (measuring impedance, conductance or capacitance changes) is now more common in water microbiology. Although these instruments can provide more rapid results and provide increased handling capacity, the bacterial generation times required to provide detectable changes cause delays and suitable selective media are not fully developed for all microbes of interest. Most other recent methods have equally disappointing drawbacks and thus extensive research continues in order to realise the ambition of 'real-time' analytical microbiology. Several research groups have demonstrated the potential of dielectrophoresis in providing microbial concentration, separation and identification systems which are not limited by bacterial growth and are therefore extremely rapid. Dielectrophoresis occurs when cells are placed in non-uniform electric fields. The cells move towards the electrodes (regardless of the direction of the applied field) as determined by their dielectric properties (conductivity and permittivity) rather than by their charge as occurs in electrophoresis. Also, the polarisability of the cells, and therefore the polarity and magnitude of the dielectrophoretic force, varies as a function of the electric field frequency. Because the dielectric properties of a particular cell type have characteristic frequency-dependent components, if cell collection at electrodes is observed across a frequency range, the collection spectrum produced is distinctive for the cell type under investigation. This

  15. Dielectrophoresis and dielectrophoretic impedance detection of adenovirus and rotavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Michihiko; Ding, Zhenhao; Suehiro, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is the electrical detection of pathogenic viruses, namely, adenovirus and rotavirus, using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM). DEPIM consists of two simultaneous processes: dielectrophoretic trapping of the target and measurement of the impedance change and increase in conductance with the number of trapped targets. This is the first study of applying DEPIM, which was originally developed to detect bacteria suspended in aqueous solutions, to virus detection. The dielectric properties of the viruses were also investigated in terms of their dielectrophoretic behavior. Although their estimated dielectric properties were different from those of bacteria, the trapped viruses increased the conductance of the microelectrode in a manner similar to that in bacteria detection. We demonstrated the electrical detection of viruses within 60 s at concentrations as low as 70 ng/ml for adenovirus and 50 ng/ml for rotavirus.

  16. Holding forces of single-particle dielectrophoretic traps.

    PubMed Central

    Voldman, J; Braff, R A; Toner, M; Gray, M L; Schmidt, M A

    2001-01-01

    We present experimental results and modeling on the efficacy of dielectrophoresis-based single-particle traps. Dielectrophoretic forces, caused by the interaction of nonuniform electric fields with objects, have been used to make planar quadrupole traps that can trap single beads. A simple experimental protocol was then used to measure how well the traps could hold beads against destabilizing fluid flows. These were compared with predictions from modeling and found to be in close agreement, allowing the determination of sub-piconewton forces. This not only validates our ability to model dielectrophoretic forces in these traps but also gives insight into the physical behavior of particles in dielectrophoresis-based traps. Anomalous frequency effects, not explainable by dielectrophoretic forces alone, were also encountered and attributed to electrohydrodynamic flows. Such knowledge can now be used to design traps for cell-based applications. PMID:11159423

  17. Nanoscale dielectrophoretic spectroscopy of individual immobilized mammalian blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Brian P; Hilton, Al M; Simpson, Garth J

    2006-10-01

    Dielectrophoretic force microscopy (DEPFM) and spectroscopy have been performed on individual intact surface-immobilized mammalian red blood cells. Dielectrophoretic force spectra were obtained in situ in approximately 125 ms and could be acquired over a region comparable in dimension to the effective diameter of a scanning probe microscopy tip. Good agreement was observed between the measured dielectrophoretic spectra and predictions using a single-shell cell model. In addition to allowing for highly localized dielectric characterization, DEPFM provided a simple means for noncontact imaging of mammalian blood cells under aqueous conditions. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using DEPFM to monitor localized changes in membrane capacitance in real time with high spatial resolution on immobilized cells, complementing previous studies of mobile whole cells and cell suspensions.

  18. Fifty years of dielectrophoretic cell separation technology.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    In 1966, Pohl and Hawk [Science 152, 647-649 (1966)] published the first demonstration of dielectrophoresis of living and dead yeast cells; their paper described how the different ways in which the cells responded to an applied nonuniform electric field could form the basis of a cell separation method. Fifty years later, the field of dielectrophoretic (DEP) cell separation has expanded, with myriad demonstrations of its ability to sort cells on the basis of differences in electrical properties without the need for chemical labelling. As DEP separation enters its second half-century, new approaches are being found to move the technique from laboratory prototypes to functional commercial devices; to gain widespread acceptance beyond the DEP community, it will be necessary to develop ways of separating cells with throughputs, purities, and cell recovery comparable to gold-standard techniques in life sciences, such as fluorescence- and magnetically activated cell sorting. In this paper, the history of DEP separation is charted, from a description of the work leading up to the first paper, to the current dual approaches of electrode-based and electrodeless DEP separation, and the path to future acceptance outside the DEP mainstream is considered.

  19. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of cells with spiral electrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X B; Huang, Y; Wang, X; Becker, F F; Gascoyne, P R

    1997-01-01

    Electrokinetic responses of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were studied in suspensions of conductivities 18, 56, and 160 mS/m on a microelectrode array consisting of four parallel spiral electrode elements energized with phase-quadrature signals of frequencies between 100 Hz and 100 MHz. At low frequencies cells were levitated and transported toward or away from the center of the spiral array, whereas at high frequencies cells were trapped at electrode edges. The frequencies of transition between these characteristic cell behaviors increased with increasing suspension conductivity. Levitation heights and radial velocities were determined simultaneously for individual cells as a function of the applied field magnitude and frequency. Results were compared with theoretical predictions from generalized dielectrophoresis theory applied in conjunction with cell dielectric parameters and simulated electric field distributions corrected for electrode polarization effects. It was shown that the conventional and traveling-wave dielectrophoretic force components dominated cell levitation and radial motion, respectively. Both theoretical predictions and experimental data showed that the cell radial velocity was very sensitive to the field frequency when the in-phase component of the field-induced polarization was close to zero. Applications of spiral electrode arrays, including the isolation of cells of clinical relevance, are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 11 PMID:9083692

  20. Fifty years of dielectrophoretic cell separation technology

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    In 1966, Pohl and Hawk [Science 152, 647–649 (1966)] published the first demonstration of dielectrophoresis of living and dead yeast cells; their paper described how the different ways in which the cells responded to an applied nonuniform electric field could form the basis of a cell separation method. Fifty years later, the field of dielectrophoretic (DEP) cell separation has expanded, with myriad demonstrations of its ability to sort cells on the basis of differences in electrical properties without the need for chemical labelling. As DEP separation enters its second half-century, new approaches are being found to move the technique from laboratory prototypes to functional commercial devices; to gain widespread acceptance beyond the DEP community, it will be necessary to develop ways of separating cells with throughputs, purities, and cell recovery comparable to gold-standard techniques in life sciences, such as fluorescence- and magnetically activated cell sorting. In this paper, the history of DEP separation is charted, from a description of the work leading up to the first paper, to the current dual approaches of electrode-based and electrodeless DEP separation, and the path to future acceptance outside the DEP mainstream is considered. PMID:27462377

  1. Dielectrophoretic immobilisation of antibodies on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Otto, Saskia; Kaletta, Udo; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2014-03-07

    A silicon based chip device with a regular array of more than 100,000 cylindrical sub-microelectrodes has been developed for the dielectrophoretic (DEP) manipulation of nanoparticles and molecules in solution. It was fabricated by a standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) compatible process. The distribution of the electrical field gradient was calculated to predict the applicability of the setup. Heating due to field application was determined microscopically using a temperature sensitive fluorescent dye. Depending on voltage and frequency, temperature increase was found to be compatible with protein function. Successful field controlled immobilisation of biomolecules from solution was demonstrated with the autofluorescent protein R-phycoerythrin (RPE) and with fluorescently labelled IgG antibodies. Biological activity after DEP application was proven by immobilisation of an anti-RPE antibody and subsequent binding of RPE. These results demonstrate that the developed chip system allows the directed immobilisation of proteins onto microelectrodes by dielectrophoresis without the need for any chemical modification and that protein function is preserved. Being based on standard lithographical methods, further miniaturisation and on-chip integration of electronics towards a multiparameter single cell analysis system appear near at hand.

  2. Movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-02-03

    Manipulation of DNA and cells/spores using dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces to perform sample preparation protocols for polymerized chain reaction (PCR) based assays for various applications. This is accomplished by movement of particles using sequentially activated dielectrophoretic particle trapping. DEP forces induce a dipole in particles, and these particles can be trapped in non-uniform fields. The particles can be trapped in the high field strength region of one set of electrodes. By switching off this field and switching on an adjacent electrodes, particles can be moved down a channel with little or no flow.

  3. A novel concept of dielectrophoretic engine oil filter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yueyang; Elele, Ezinwa; Khusid, Boris

    2011-09-01

    A novel concept of an alternating current (AC) dielectrophoretic filter with a three-dimensional electrode array is presented. A filter is constructed by winding into layers around the core tube two sheets of woven metal wire-mesh with several sheets of woven insulating wire-mesh sandwiched in between. Contrary to conventional dielectrophoretic devices, the proposed design of electrodes generates a high-gradient field over a large working volume by applying several hundred volts at a standard frequency of 60 Hz. The operating principle of filtration is based on our recently developed method of AC dielectrophoretic gating for microfluidics. The filtration efficiency is expressed in terms of two non-dimensional parameters, which describe the combined influence of the particle polarizability and size, the oil viscosity and flow rate, and the field gradient on the particle captivity. The proof-of-concept is tested by measuring the single-pass performance of two filters on positively polarized particles dispersed in engine oil: spherical glass beads, fused aluminum oxide powder, and silicon metal powder, all smaller than the mesh opening. The results obtained are used to consider the potential of using AC dielectrophoretic filtration and provide critical design guidelines for the development of a filter based on the retention capability of challenge particles.

  4. Experimental investigation on neural cell survival after dielectrophoretic trapping.

    PubMed

    Heida, T; Rutten, W L C; Marani, E

    2002-12-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic forces can effectively be used to trap cortical rat neurons. The creation of dielectrophoretic forces requires electric fields of high non-uniformity. High electric field strengths, however, can cause excessive membrane potentials by which cells may unrecoverably be changed or it may lead to cell death. In a previous study it was found that cells trapped at 3 Vtt/14 MHz did not change morphologically as compared to cells that were not exposed to the electric field. This study investigates the viability of fetal cortical rat neurons after being trapped by negative dielectrophoretic forces at frequencies up to 1 MHz. A planar quadrupole micro-electrode structure was used for the creation of a non-uniform electric field. The sinusoidal input signal was varied in amplitude (3 and 5 Vtt) and frequency (10 kHz-1 MHz). The results presented in this paper show that the viability of dielectrophoretically trapped postnatal cortical rat cells was greatly frequency dependent. To preserve viability frequencies above 100 kHz (at 3 Vtt) or 1 MHz (5 Vtt) must be used.

  5. Sedimentation field flow fractionation monitoring of rice starch amylolysis.

    PubMed

    Morelon, X; Battu, S; Salesse, C; Begaud-Grimaud, G; Cledat, D; Cardot, P J P

    2005-11-04

    Enzymatic starch granule hydrolysis is one of the most important reactions in many industrial processes. In this work, we investigated the capacity of SdFFF to monitor the native rice starch amylolysis. In order to determine if fractogram changes observed were correlated to granule biophysical modifications which occurred during amylolysis, SdFFF separation was associated with particle size distribution analysis. The results showed that SdFFF is an effective tool to monitor amylolysis of native rice starch. SdFFF analysis was a rapid (less than 10 min), simple and specific method to follow biophysical modifications of starch granules. These results suggested many different applications such as testing series of enzymes and starches. By using sub-population sorting, SdFFF could be also used to better understand starch hydrolysis mechanisms or starch granule structure.

  6. Nanofluidic devices for dielectrophoretic mobility shift assays by soft lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viefhues, M.; Regtmeier, J.; Anselmetti, D.

    2012-11-01

    We report development and application of 3D structured nano-microfluidic devices that were produced via soft lithography with poly(dimethylsiloxane). The procedure does not rely on hazardous or time-consuming production steps. Here, the nanochannels were created by channel-spanning ridges that reduce the flow height of the microchannel. Several realizations of the ridge layout and nanochannel height are demonstrated, depicting the high potential of this technique. The nanochannels proved to be stable even for width-to-height aspect ratios of 873:1. Additionally, an application of these submicrometer structures is presented with a new technique of a dielectrophoretic mobility shift assay (DEMSA). The DEMSA was used to detect different DNA variants, e.g. protein-DNA-complexes, via a shift in (dielectrophoretically retarded) migration velocities within an array of nanoslits.

  7. A travelling wave dielectrophoretic pump for blood delivery.

    PubMed

    Lei, U; Huang, C W; Chen, James; Yang, C Y; Lo, Y J; Wo, Andrew; Chen, C F; Fung, T W

    2009-05-21

    The travelling wave dielectrophoretic pump studied here is essentially a rectangular straight micro-channel with an electrode array on part of its wall, and operated under an ac voltage with phase shift at neighbouring electrodes. The travelling wave dielectrophoretic force drives the cells, which drag the plasma, and after some sophisticated interaction between conventional dielectrophoresis, travelling wave dielectrophoresis and fluid mechanics, the whole blood is delivered. The pump was fabricated using MEMS techniques and studied in details for different parameters. It is found that the pumping velocity is maximized at an intermediate frequency around 20-30 MHz (varies with phase shift), and at an intermediate channel height at about 40 microm. The quasi-static average cell velocity can reach 15 microm s(-1) for a pump with 1 mm length and 16 electrodes (total array length 465 microm) operated at 5 V and 20 MHz with 90 degrees phase shift.

  8. Dielectrophoretic Stretching of DNA Tethered to a Fiber Tip

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under AC electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, AC frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the dielectrophoretic force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  9. Dielectrophoretic separation of biological samples in a 3D filtering chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Ciprian; Xu, Guo Lin; Ong, Poh Lam; Leck, Kwong Joo

    2007-07-01

    A field-flow dielectrophoretic separation method in a 3D filtering chip has been developed in this work. The separation method was possible due to the special configuration of the DEP filtering chip, which has a structure similar to a classical capacitor with two parallel plate electrodes (realized by using a stainless steel mesh) and a dielectric medium (defined by a suspension of 100 µm diameter silica beads in buffer solution). The dielectrophoretic phenomenon is generated by the non-uniformities of the dielectric media, which produce a gradient of the electric field and, as a consequence, a DEP force. If a suspension medium with cells flows through the filter, the DEP force can trap these cells around the contact points between the silica beads (if the cells exhibit positive DEP) or they are repelled into the space between the beads (if the cells exhibit negative DEP). It is shown that for two different cell populations, the frequency of the electric field and permittivity of the media can be tuned in such a way that one population will exhibit positive DEP and the other one negative DEP. The population that expresses negative DEP can be easily flushed out due to the hydrodynamic force which is larger at the center point between the beads. In such a way two cell populations can be separated. The working principle was verified with both live and dead yeast cells. Best results for the separation of viable and nonviable cell populations were achieved at an applied voltage of 150 V in a frequency range between 10 kHz and 20 kHz for flow rates of 0.1 ml min-1 and 0.2 ml min-1. With a few of these devices cascaded in series, higher efficiency could be achieved. As a result, this device and the associated proposed separation method can be very useful tools for bio-pharmaceutical industries since continuous flow separation at relatively high flow rates is both time and cost saving.

  10. Dielectrophoretic characterization of erythrocytes: positive ABO blood types.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Soumya K; Daggolu, Prashant R; Burgess, Shane C; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2008-12-01

    Dielectrophoretic manipulation of erythrocytes/red blood cells is investigated as a tool to identify blood type for medical diagnostic applications. Positive blood types of the ABO typing system (A+, B+, AB+ and O+) were tested and cell responses quantified. The dielectrophoretic response of each blood type was observed in a platinum electrode microdevice, delivering a field of 0.025V(pp)/microm at 1 MHz. Responses were recorded via video microscopy for 120 s and erythrocyte positions were tabulated at 20-30 s intervals. Both vertical and horizontal motions of erythrocytes were quantified via image object recognition, object tracking in MATLAB, binning into appropriate electric field contoured regions (wedges) and statistical analysis. Cells of O+ type showed relatively attenuated response to the dielectrophoretic field and were distinguished with greater than 95% confidence from all the other three blood types. AB+ cell responses differed from A+ and B+ blood types likely because AB+ erythrocytes express both the A and B glycoforms on their membrane. This research suggests that dielectrophoresis of untreated erythrocytes beyond simple dilution depends on blood type and could be used in portable blood typing devices.

  11. Characterization of Gd loaded chitosan-TPP nanohydrogels by a multi-technique approach combining dynamic light scattering (DLS), asymetrical flow-field-flow-fractionation (AF4) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and design of positive contrast agents for molecular resonance imaging (MRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaux, G.; Gheran, C. V.; Callewaert, M.; Cadiou, C.; Voicu, S. N.; Dinischiotu, A.; Andry, M. C.; Vander Elst, L.; Laurent, S.; Muller, R. N.; Berquand, A.; Molinari, M.; Huclier-Markai, S.; Chuburu, F.

    2017-02-01

    Chitosan CS—tripolyphosphate TPP/hyaluronic acid HA nanohydrogels loaded with gadolinium chelates (GdDOTA ⊂ CS-TPP/HA NGs) synthesized by ionic gelation were designed for lymph node (LN) MRI. In order to be efficiently drained to LNs, nanogels (NGs) needed to exhibit a diameter ϕ < 100 nm. For that, formulation parameters were tuned, using (i) CS of two different molecular weights (51 and 37 kDa) and (ii) variable CS/TPP ratio (2 < CS/TPP < 8). Characterization of NG size distribution by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and asymetrical flow-field-flow-fractionation (AF4) showed discrepancies since DLS diameters were consistently above 200 nm while AF4 showed individual nano-objects with ϕ < 100 nm. Such a difference could be correlated to the presence of aggregates inherent to ionic gelation. This point was clarified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid mode which highlighted the main presence of individual nano-objects in nanosuspensions. Thus, combination of DLS, AF4 and AFM provided a more precise characterization of GdDOTA ⊂ CS-TPP/HA nanohydrogels which, in turn, allowed to select formulations leading to NGs of suitable mean sizes showing good MRI efficiency and negligible toxicity.

  12. Characterization of Gd loaded chitosan-TPP nanohydrogels by a multi-technique approach combining dynamic light scattering (DLS), asymetrical flow-field-flow-fractionation (AF4) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and design of positive contrast agents for molecular resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Rigaux, G; Gheran, C V; Callewaert, M; Cadiou, C; Voicu, S N; Dinischiotu, A; Andry, M C; Vander Elst, L; Laurent, S; Muller, R N; Berquand, A; Molinari, M; Huclier-Markai, S; Chuburu, F

    2017-02-03

    Chitosan CS-tripolyphosphate TPP/hyaluronic acid HA nanohydrogels loaded with gadolinium chelates (GdDOTA ⊂ CS-TPP/HA NGs) synthesized by ionic gelation were designed for lymph node (LN) MRI. In order to be efficiently drained to LNs, nanogels (NGs) needed to exhibit a diameter ϕ < 100 nm. For that, formulation parameters were tuned, using (i) CS of two different molecular weights (51 and 37 kDa) and (ii) variable CS/TPP ratio (2 < CS/TPP < 8). Characterization of NG size distribution by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and asymetrical flow-field-flow-fractionation (AF4) showed discrepancies since DLS diameters were consistently above 200 nm while AF4 showed individual nano-objects with ϕ < 100 nm. Such a difference could be correlated to the presence of aggregates inherent to ionic gelation. This point was clarified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid mode which highlighted the main presence of individual nano-objects in nanosuspensions. Thus, combination of DLS, AF4 and AFM provided a more precise characterization of GdDOTA ⊂ CS-TPP/HA nanohydrogels which, in turn, allowed to select formulations leading to NGs of suitable mean sizes showing good MRI efficiency and negligible toxicity.

  13. Development of a 3D Graphene Electrode Dielectrophoretic Device

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hongyu; Tewari, Radheshyam; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Narendra, Jeffri; Heldt, Caryn; King, Julia; Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2014-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a novel 3D electrode microdevice using 50 µm thick graphene paper and 100 µm double sided tape is described. The protocol details the procedures to construct a versatile, reusable, multiple layer, laminated dielectrophoresis chamber. Specifically, six layers of 50 µm x 0.7 cm x 2 cm graphene paper and five layers of double sided tape were alternately stacked together, then clamped to a glass slide. Then a 700 μm diameter micro-well was drilled through the laminated structure using a computer-controlled micro drilling machine. Insulating properties of the tape layer between adjacent graphene layers were assured by resistance tests. Silver conductive epoxy connected alternate layers of graphene paper and formed stable connections between the graphene paper and external copper wire electrodes. The finished device was then clamped and sealed to a glass slide. The electric field gradient was modeled within the multi-layer device. Dielectrophoretic behaviors of 6 μm polystyrene beads were demonstrated in the 1 mm deep micro-well, with medium conductivities ranging from 0.0001 S/m to 1.3 S/m, and applied signal frequencies from 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Negative dielectrophoretic responses were observed in three dimensions over most of the conductivity-frequency space and cross-over frequency values are consistent with previously reported literature values. The device did not prevent AC electroosmosis and electrothermal flows, which occurred in the low and high frequency regions, respectively. The graphene paper utilized in this device is versatile and could subsequently function as a biosensor after dielectrophoretic characterizations are complete. PMID:24998694

  14. Microfluidic system for dielectrophoretic separation based on a trapezoidal electrode array.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sungyoung; Park, Je-Kyun

    2005-10-01

    This paper presents a novel microfluidic device for dielectrophoretic separation based on a trapezoidal electrode array (TEA). In this method, particles with different dielectric properties are separated by the device composed of the TEA for the dielectrophoretic deflection of particles under negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) and poly(dimethylsiloxane)(PDMS) microfluidic channel with a sinuous and expanded region. Polystyrene microparticles are exposed to an electric field generated from the TEA in the microfluidic channel and are dielectrophoretically focused to make all of them line up to one sidewall. When these particles arrive at the region of another TEA for dielectrophoretic separation, they are separated having different positions along the perpendicular direction to the fluid flow due to their different dielectrophoretic velocities. To evaluate the separation process and performance, both the effect of the flow rate on dielectrophoretic focusing and the influence of the number of trapezoidal electrodes on dielectrophoretic separation are investigated. Now that this method utilizes the TEA as a source of negative DEP, non-specific particle adhering to the electrode surface can be prevented; conventional separation approaches depending on the positive DEP force suffer from this problem. In addition, since various particle types are continuously separated, this method can be easily applicable to the separation and analysis of various dielectric particles with high particle recovery and selectivity.

  15. Dielectrophoretic particle-particle interaction under AC electrohydrodynamic flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doh-Hyoung; Yu, Chengjie; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Farouk, Bakhtier; Noh, Hongseok M

    2011-09-01

    We used the Maxwell stress tensor method to understand dielectrophoretic particle-particle interactions and applied the results to the interpretation of particle behaviors under alternating current (AC) electrohydrodynamic conditions such as AC electroosmosis (ACEO) and electrothermal flow (ETF). Distinct particle behaviors were observed under ACEO and ETF. Diverse particle-particle interactions observed in experiments such as particle clustering, particles keeping a certain distance from each other, chain and disc formation and their rotation, are explained based on the numerical simulation data. The improved understanding of particle behaviors in AC electrohydrodynamic flows presented here will enable researchers to design better particle manipulation strategies for lab-on-a-chip applications.

  16. Dielectrophoretic Manipulation and Separation of Microparticles Using Microarray Dot Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yafouz, Bashar; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a dielectrophoretic system for the manipulation and separation of microparticles. The system is composed of five layers and utilizes microarray dot electrodes. We validated our system by conducting size-dependent manipulation and separation experiments on 1, 5 and 15 μm polystyrene particles. Our findings confirm the capability of the proposed device to rapidly and efficiently manipulate and separate microparticles of various dimensions, utilizing positive and negative dielectrophoresis (DEP) effects. Larger size particles were repelled and concentrated in the center of the dot by negative DEP, while the smaller sizes were attracted and collected by the edge of the dot by positive DEP. PMID:24705632

  17. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mureau, Natacha; Mendoza, Ernest; Silva, S Ravi P

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under dielectrophoretic conditions and demonstrate their collection with fluorescence microscopy. SWCNTs are dispersed in water with the aid of a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, and labeled through noncovalent binding with the dye 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diOC(6)). The chromophore's affinity to the SWCNTs is due to pi-stacking interactions. Carbon nanotube (CNT) localization is clearly identified on the fluorescence images, showing that the nanotubes concentrate between the electrodes and align along the electric field lines.

  18. Embryo formation from low sperm concentration by using dielectrophoretic force

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Kao, Wei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    A biochip system imitates the oviduct of mammals with a microfluidic channel to achieve fertilization in vitro of imprinting-control-region (ICR) mice. We apply a method to manipulate and to position the oocyte and the sperm of ICR mice at the same time in our microfluidic channel with a positive dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. The positive dielectrophoretic response of the oocyte and sperm was exhibited under applied bias conditions AC 10 Vpp waveform, 1 MHz, 10 min. With this method, the concentration of sperm in the vicinity of the oocyte was increased and enhanced the probability of natural fertilization. We used commercial numerical software (CFDRC-ACE+) to simulate the square of the electric field and analyzed the location at which the oocyte and sperm are trapped. The microfluidic devices were designed and fabricated with poly(dimethylsiloxane). The results of our experiments indicate that a positive DEP served to drive the position of the oocyte and the sperm to natural fertilization (average rate of fertilization 51.58%) in our microchannel structures at insemination concentration 1.5 × 106 sperm ml−1. Embryos were cultured to two cells after 24 h and four cells after 48 h. PMID:25825615

  19. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme. PMID:27383027

  20. Dielectrophoretic behaviours of microdroplet sandwiched between LN substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lipin; Li, Shaobei; Fan, Bolin; Yan, Wenbo; Wang, Donghui; Shi, Lihong; Chen, Hongjian; Ban, Dechao; Sun, Shihao

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate a sandwich configuration for microfluidic manipulation in LiNbO3 platform based on photovoltaic effect, and the behaviours of dielectric microdroplet under this sandwich configuration are investigated. It is found that the microdroplet can generate in the form of liquid bridge inside the LiNbO3-based sandwich structure under the governing dielectrophoretic force, and the dynamic process of microdroplet generation highly depends on the substrate combinations. Dynamic features found for different combinations are explained by the different electrostatic field distribution basing on the finite-element simulation results. Moreover, the electrostatic field required by the microdroplet generation is estimated through meniscus evolution and it is found in good agreement with the simulated electrostatic field inside the sandwich gap. Several kinds of microdroplet manipulations are attempted in this work. We suggest that the local dielectrophoretic force acting on the microdroplet depends on the distribution of the accumulated irradiation dosage. Without using any additional pumping or jetting actuator, the microdroplet can be step-moved, deformed or patterned by the inconsecutive dot-irradiation scheme, as well as elastically stretched out and back or smoothly guided in a designed pass by the consecutive line-irradiation scheme.

  1. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of the mixture of isotropic and nematic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Lee, Bomi; Kang, Shin-Woong; Song, Jang-Kun

    2015-08-01

    In various applications involving liquid crystals, the manipulation of the nanoscale molecular assembly and microscale director alignment is highly useful. Here we show that a nematic-isotropic mixture, a unique bi-liquid system, has potential for the fabrication of microstructures having an ordered phase within a disordered phase, or vice versa. The volume expansion and shrinkage, migration, splitting, mergence and elongation of one phase within the other are easily accomplished via thermal treatment and dielectrophoretic manipulation. This is particularly achievable when one phase is suspended in the middle. In that case, a highly biased ordered-phase preference of surfaces, that is, the nematic-philic nature of a polyimide layer and the nematic-phobic nature of a self-assembled monolayer of chlorosilane derivatives, is used. Further, by combining this approach with photopolymerization, the patterned microstructure is solidified as a patterned polymer film having both isotropic and anisotropic molecular arrangements simultaneously, or as a template with a morphological variation.

  2. Cell patterning for liver tissue engineering via dielectrophoretic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-07-02

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  3. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of particles for use in microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Belgrader, P; Bettencourt, K; Hamilton, J; Miles, R; Nasarabadi, S

    1999-06-23

    Amplification and hybridization of DNA are commonly used techniques to verify the presence of a specific DNA sequence in a test sample. Automatic sample handling to concentrate and purify sample prior to amplification is desirable both from the cost standpoint and from the standpoint of reducing the possibility of sample contamination. This paper explores the use of the dielectrophoretic force to manipulate DNA, Bacillus globigii spores, and Erwinia herbicola bacteria to provide concentration and purification as part of the sample handling functions in biological monitoring equipment. It was found that for what would be considered a typical microfabricated structure with electrode gaps at 30 {micro}m operating at 5V, that concentration of the particles is very effective.

  4. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  5. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C.; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  6. Direct current insulator-based dielectrophoretic characterization of erythrocytes: ABO-Rh human blood typing.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Soumya K; Artemiou, Andreas; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2011-09-01

    A microfluidic platform developed for quantifying the dependence of erythrocyte (red blood cell, RBC) responses by ABO-Rh blood type via direct current insulator dielectrophoresis (DC-iDEP) is presented. The PDMS DC-iDEP device utilized a 400 x 170 μm² rectangular insulating obstacle embedded in a 1.46-cm long, 200-μm wide inlet channel to create spatial non-uniformities in direct current (DC) electric field density realized by separation into four outlet channels. The DC-iDEP flow behaviors were investigated for all eight blood types (A+, A-, B+, B-, AB+, AB-, O+, O-) in the human ABO-Rh blood typing system. Three independent donors of each blood type, same donor reproducibility, different conductivity buffers (0.52-9.1 mS/cm), and DC electric fields (17.1-68.5 V/cm) were tested to investigate separation dependencies. The data analysis was conducted from image intensity profiles across inlet and outlet channels in the device. Individual channel fractions suggest that the dielectrophoretic force experienced by the cells is dependent on erythrocyte antigen expression. Two different statistical analysis methods were conducted to determine how distinguishable a single blood type was from the others. Results indicate that channel fraction distributions differ by ABO-Rh blood types suggesting that antigens present on the erythrocyte membrane polarize differently in DC-iDEP fields. Under optimized conductivity and field conditions, certain blind blood samples could be sorted with low misclassification rates.

  7. Fourier-bessel series modeling of dielectrophoretic bionanoparticle transport: principles and applications.

    PubMed

    Bakewell, David J; Chichenkov, Aleksandr

    2012-03-01

    Principles and applications are described for a Fourier-Bessel series model that predicts the transport of bionanoparticles driven by a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force and randomized by Brownian motion. The model is applicable for a dielectrophoretic force that spatially decays from the electrode array according to a reciprocal-law; that is, in the near field of a planar interdigitated array or in the far field where other long range forces assist DEP transport, e.g., ac electro-osmosis. Capabilities of the model are demonstrated for estimating and decomposing data typical of dielectrophoretic bionanoparticle collection experiments. An important approximation, for moderately strong DEP forces, is that a collection can largely be described by a single exponential profile with a square-law dependence on microdevice chamber height. Applications of the model demonstrate transformation and representation of time-dependent bionanoparticle transport in the frequency domain and prediction of a modulation bandwidth that concurs with experimental observations.

  8. Dielectrophoretic characterization of antibiotic-treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinnosuke; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Becker, Annie L; Weigel, Kris M; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has become a serious concern for proper treatment of patients. As a phenotypic method, dielectrophoresis can be useful but is yet to be attempted to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells. This paper investigates the dielectrophoretic behavior of Mycobacterium bovis (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, BCG) cells that are treated with heat or antibiotics rifampin (RIF) or isoniazid (INH). The experimental parameters are designed on the basis of our sensitivity analysis. The medium conductivity (σ(m)) and the frequency (f) for a crossover frequency (f(xo1)) test are decided to detect the change of σ(m)-f(xo1) in conjunction with the drug mechanism. Statistical modeling is conducted to estimate the distributions of viable and nonviable cells from the discrete measurement of f (xo1). Finally, the parameters of the electrophysiology of BCG cells, C(envelope) and σ(cyto), are extracted through a sampling algorithm. This is the first evaluation of the dielectrophoresis (DEP) approach as a means to assess the effects of antimicrobial drugs on M. tuberculosis complex cells.

  9. Nano plasmon device fabrications using dielectrophoretic (DEP) force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kang, C.-M.; Kim, S.; Suh, J.-k. F.; Shin, H. J.; Park, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a fabrication process using dielectrophoretic (DEP) force for plasmonic devices as a light source. The 100nm wide Au nanowires fabricated by e-beam lithography and lift-off were used to trap 25nm diameter cadmium selenide (CdSe) QDs on its end-facet with DEP force. DEP force was induced around the nanowire using 8 Vpp, 3MHz sine wave. An Electric field of 108 V/m order and electric field gradient of 1015 V/m2 order intensity were calculated with COMSOL multiphysics simulation tool. And the values are enough to induce DEP force for QD trapping. Before the QD manipulations, polystyrene bead was used which is more rigid and influenced by DEP force than QD. Concentration of 10-5% order and approximately 120sec reaction time are considered with polystyrene bead and QD manipulations are accomplished with the conditions. Finally, the QDs were manipulated to the nanowires array and `QD on nanowire' nanostructure was formed as a practical plasmonic device using DEP force.

  10. Nanotip analysis for dielectrophoretic concentration of nanosized viral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Woon-Hong; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2013-05-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of low-abundance viral particles is strongly demanded in health care, environmental control, military defense, and homeland security. Current detection methods, however, lack either assay speed or sensitivity, mainly due to the nanosized viral particles. In this paper, we compare a dendritic, multi-terminal nanotip (‘dendritic nanotip’) with a single terminal nanotip (‘single nanotip’) for dielectrophoretic (DEP) concentration of viral particles. The numerical computation studies the concentration efficiency of viral particles ranging from 25 to 100 nm in radius for both nanotips. With DEP and Brownian motion considered, when the particle radius decreases by two times, the concentration time for both nanotips increases by 4-5 times. In the computational study, a dendritic nanotip shows about 1.5 times faster concentration than a single nanotip for the viral particles because the dendritic structure increases the DEP-effective area to overcome the Brownian motion. For the qualitative support of the numerical results, the comparison experiment of a dendritic nanotip and a single nanotip is conducted. Under 1 min of concentration time, a dendritic nanotip shows a higher sensitivity than a single nanotip. When the concentration time is 5 min, the sensitivity of a dendritic nanotip for T7 phage is 104 particles ml-1. The dendritic nanotip-based concentrator has the potential for rapid identification of viral particles.

  11. Nanotip analysis for dielectrophoretic concentration of nanosized viral particles.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Woon-Hong; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2013-05-10

    Rapid and sensitive detection of low-abundance viral particles is strongly demanded in health care, environmental control, military defense, and homeland security. Current detection methods, however, lack either assay speed or sensitivity, mainly due to the nanosized viral particles. In this paper, we compare a dendritic, multi-terminal nanotip ('dendritic nanotip') with a single terminal nanotip ('single nanotip') for dielectrophoretic (DEP) concentration of viral particles. The numerical computation studies the concentration efficiency of viral particles ranging from 25 to 100 nm in radius for both nanotips. With DEP and Brownian motion considered, when the particle radius decreases by two times, the concentration time for both nanotips increases by 4-5 times. In the computational study, a dendritic nanotip shows about 1.5 times faster concentration than a single nanotip for the viral particles because the dendritic structure increases the DEP-effective area to overcome the Brownian motion. For the qualitative support of the numerical results, the comparison experiment of a dendritic nanotip and a single nanotip is conducted. Under 1 min of concentration time, a dendritic nanotip shows a higher sensitivity than a single nanotip. When the concentration time is 5 min, the sensitivity of a dendritic nanotip for T7 phage is 10(4) particles ml(-1). The dendritic nanotip-based concentrator has the potential for rapid identification of viral particles.

  12. Isolation of prostate tumor initiating cells (TICs) through their dielectrophoretic signature.

    PubMed

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Romero, Lina; Shafiee, Hadi; Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C; Stremler, Mark A; Cramer, Scott D; Davalos, Rafael V

    2012-01-07

    In this study, the dielectrophoretic response of prostate tumor initiating cells (TICs) was investigated in a microfluidic system utilizing contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP). The dielectrophoretic response of prostate TICs was observed to be distinctively different than that for non-TICs, enabling them to be sorted using cDEP. Culturing the sorted TICs generated spheroids, indicating that they were indeed initiating cells. This study presents the first marker-free TIC separation from non-TICs utilizing their electrical fingerprints through dielectrophoresis.

  13. A continuous DC-insulator dielectrophoretic sorter of microparticles.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Soumya Keshavamurthy; Baylon-Cardiel, Javier L; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H; Minerick, Adrienne Robyn

    2011-04-01

    A lab-on-a-chip device is described for continuous sorting of fluorescent polystyrene microparticles utilizing direct current insulating dielectrophoresis (DC-iDEP) at lower voltages than previously reported. Particles were sorted by combining electrokinetics and dielectrophoresis in a 250 μm wide PDMS microchannel containing a rectangular insulating obstacle and four outlet channels. The DC-iDEP particle flow behaviors were investigated with 3.18, 6.20 and 10 μm fluorescent polystyrene particles which experience negative DEP forces depending on particle size, DC electric field magnitude and medium conductivity. Due to negative DEP effects, particles are deflected into different outlet streams as they pass the region of high electric field density around the obstacle. Particles suspended in dextrose added phosphate buffer saline (PBS) at conductivities ranging from 0.50 to 8.50 mS/cm at pH 7.0 were compared at 6.85 and 17.1V/cm. Simulations of electrokinetic and dielectrophoretic forces were conducted with COMSOL Multiphysics® to predict particle pathlines. Experimental and simulation results show the effect of medium and voltage operating conditions on particle sorting. Further, smaller particles experience smaller iDEP forces and are more susceptible to competing nonlinear electrostatic effects, whereas larger particles experience greater iDEP forces and prefer channels 1 and 2. This work demonstrates that 6.20 and 10 μm particles can be independently sorted into specific outlet streams by tuning medium conductivity even at low operating voltages. This work is an essential step forward in employing DC-iDEP for multiparticle sorting in a continuous flow, multiple outlet lab-on-a-chip device.

  14. Label-free electrical quantification of the dielectrophoretic response of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Anja; Henkel, Jörg; Bier, Frank F; Hölzel, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    A purely electrical sensing scheme is presented that determines the concentration of macromolecules in solution by measuring the capacitance between planar microelectrodes. Concentrations of DNA in the ng/mL range have been used in samples of 1 μL volume. The method has been applied to the characterisation of the dielectrophoretic response of DNA without the need for any chemical modifications. The influence of electrical parameters like duty cycle, voltage and frequency has been investigated. The results are in good agreement with data from dielectrophoretic studies on fluorescently labelled DNA. Extension of the method down to the single molecule level appears feasible. PACS: 87.50.ch, 87.80.Fe, 87.85.fK PMID:19351426

  15. Joule heating effects on particle immobilization in insulator-based dielectrophoretic devices

    PubMed Central

    Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C.; Sano, Michael B.; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the temperature effects due to Joule heating obtained by application of a DC electric potential were investigated for a microchannel with cylindrical insulating posts employed for insulator based dielectrophoresis (iDEP). The conductivity of the suspending medium, the local electric field, and the gradient of the squared electric field, which directly affect the magnitude of the dielectrophoretic force exerted on particles, were computationally simulated employing COMSOL Multiphysics. It was observed that a temperature gradient is formed along the microchannel which redistributes the conductivity of the suspending medium leading to an increase of the dielectrophoretic force towards the inlet of the channel while decreasing towards the outlet. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations on the particle trapping zones anticipated. This study demonstrates the importance of considering Joule heating effects when designing iDEP systems. PMID:24002905

  16. Joule heating effects on particle immobilization in insulator-based dielectrophoretic devices.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C; Sano, Michael B; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H; Davalos, Rafael V

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the temperature effects due to Joule heating obtained by application of a direct current electric potential were investigated for a microchannel with cylindrical insulating posts employed for insulator-based dielectrophoresis. The conductivity of the suspending medium, the local electric field, and the gradient of the squared electric field, which directly affect the magnitude of the dielectrophoretic force exerted on particles, were computationally simulated employing COMSOL Multiphysics. It was observed that a temperature gradient is formed along the microchannel, which redistributes the conductivity of the suspending medium leading to an increase of the dielectrophoretic force toward the inlet of the channel while decreasing toward the outlet. Experimental results are in good agreement with simulations on the particle-trapping zones anticipated. This study demonstrates the importance of considering Joule heating effects when designing insulator-based dielectrophoresis systems.

  17. Effect of surface charge convection and shape deformation on the dielectrophoretic motion of a liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-04-01

    The dielectrophoretic motion and shape deformation of a Newtonian liquid drop in an otherwise quiescent Newtonian liquid medium in the presence of an axisymmetric nonuniform dc electric field consisting of uniform and quadrupole components is investigated. The theory put forward by Feng [J. Q. Feng, Phys. Rev. E 54, 4438 (1996), 10.1103/PhysRevE.54.4438] is generalized by incorporating the following two nonlinear effects—surface charge convection and shape deformation—towards determining the drop velocity. This two-way coupled moving boundary problem is solved analytically by considering small values of electric Reynolds number (ratio of charge relaxation time scale to the convection time scale) and electric capillary number (ratio of electrical stress to the surface tension) under the framework of the leaky dielectric model. We focus on investigating the effects of charge convection and shape deformation for different drop-medium combinations. A perfectly conducting drop suspended in a leaky (or perfectly) dielectric medium always deforms to a prolate shape and this kind of shape deformation always augments the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. For a perfectly dielectric drop suspended in a perfectly dielectric medium, the shape deformation leads to either increase (for prolate shape) or decrease (for oblate shape) in the dielectrophoretic drop velocity. Both surface charge convection and shape deformation affect the drop motion for leaky dielectric drops. The combined effect of these can significantly increase or decrease the dielectrophoretic drop velocity depending on the electrohydrodynamic properties of both the liquids and the relative strength of the electric Reynolds number and electric capillary number. Finally, comparison with the existing experiments reveals better agreement with the present theory.

  18. Dielectrophoretic differentiation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts using contactless dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Kittur, Harsha; Sano, Michael B.; C. Roberts, Paul; Schmelz, Eva M.; Davalos, Rafael V.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies in women. The primary challenge is the detection of the cancer at an early stage, since this drastically increases the survival rate. In this study we investigated the dielectrophoretic responses of progressive stages of mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cells, as well as mouse fibroblast and macrophage cell lines, utilizing contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP). cDEP is a relatively new cell manipulation technique that has addressed some of the challenges of conventional dielectrophoretic methods. To evaluate our microfluidic device performance, we computationally studied the effects of altering various geometrical parameters, such as the size and arrangement of insulating structures, on dielectrophoretic and drag forces. We found that the trapping voltage of MOSE cells increases as the cells progress from a non-tumorigenic, benign cell to a tumorigenic, malignant phenotype. Additionally, all MOSE cells display unique behavior compared to fibroblasts and macrophages, representing normal and inflammatory cells found in the peritoneal fluid. Based on these findings, we predict that cDEP can be utilized for isolation of ovarian cancer cells from peritoneal fluid as an early cancer detection tool. PMID:22536308

  19. Quantitative characterization for dielectrophoretic behavior of biological cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In Soo; Hee Park, Se; Woo Lee, Sang; Sung Yoon, Dae; Kim, Beop-Min

    2014-02-01

    We report a method to precisely quantify dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces and cutoff frequencies (fc) of viable and nonviable yeast cells. The method consists of a two-step process in which generated DEP forces act upon a cell through a micro-electrode device, followed by direct measurement of DEP forces using optical tweezers. DEP behaviors of viable and nonviable yeast cells are monitored as a function of AC frequency. We believe that the proposed method can be used as a powerful platform for cell-based assays to characterize the DEP behavior of various cell types including cancer and normal cells.

  20. A low cost solution for the fabrication of dielectrophoretic microfluidic devices and embedded electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sano, Michael B; Caldwell, John L; Davalos, Rafael V

    2011-01-01

    The versatility of a simple method for producing microfluidic devices with embedded electrodes is demonstrated through the fabrication and operation of two dielectrophoretic devices; one employing interdigitated electrode structures on glass and the other employing contactless electrode reservoirs. Device manufacture is based on the precipitation of silver and subsequent photolithography of thin film resists conducted outside of a cleanroom environment. In current experiments, minimum channel widths of 50 microns and electrode widths of 25 microns are achieved when the distance between features is 40 microns or greater. These results illustrate this technique's potential to produce microfluidic devices with embedded electrodes for lab on chip applications while significantly reducing fabrication expense.

  1. Gravitational Effects on Near-Field Flow Structure of Low-Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze-Wing; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in earth gravity and micro gravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2 s drop tower at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of sight measurement technique suited for the microgravity environment. The flow structure was characterized by distribution of helium mole fraction obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70% wider than that in Earth gravity. Experiments reveal that the global flow oscillations observed in Earth are absent in microgravity. Quantitative deatails are provided of the evolution as the experiment undergoes changes in gravity in the drop tower.

  2. Using Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) to Determine C60 Colloidal Size Distributions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of aqueous fullerene suspensions by solvent exchange, sonication, or extended mixing in water is widely reported. Commonly used methods for determining the size of these aggregates rely on static and dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy (EM), or atomic forc...

  3. Dielectrophoretic behavior of PEGylated RNase A inside a microchannel with diamond-shaped insulating posts.

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Marco A; Gallo-Villanueva, Roberto C; González-Valdez, José; Martínez-Chapa, Sergio O; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Ribonuclease A (RNase A) has proven potential as a therapeutic agent, especially in its PEGylated form. Grafting of PEG molecules to this protein yields mono-PEGylated (mono-PEG) and di-PEGylated (di-PEG) RNase A conjugates, and the unreacted protein. Mono-PEG RNase A is of great interest. The use of electrokinetic forces in microdevices represents a novel alternative to chromatographic methods to separate this specie. This work describes the dielectrophoretic behavior of the main protein products of the RNase A PEGylation inside a microchannel with insulators under direct current electric fields. This approach represents the first step in route to design micro-bioprocesses to separate PEGylated RNase A from unreacted native protein. The three proteins exhibited different dielectrophoretic behaviors. All of them experienced a marked streaming pattern at 3000 V consistent with positive dielectrophoresis. Native protein was not captured at any of the conditions tested, while mono-PEG RNase A and di-PEG RNase A were captured presumably due to positive dielectrophoresis at 4000 and 2500 V, respectively. Concentration of mono-PEG RNase A with a maximal enrichment efficiency of ≈9.6 times the feed concentration was achieved in few seconds. These findings open the possibility of designing novel devices for rapid separation, concentration, and recovery of PEGylated RNase A in a one-step operation.

  4. Prototype for Automatable, Dielectrophoretically-Accessed Intracellular Membrane–Potential Measurements by Metal Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sukhorukov, Vladimir L.; Zimmermann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Functional access to membrane proteins, for example, ion channels, of individual cells is an important prerequisite in drug discovery studies. The highly sophisticated patch-clamp method is widely used for electrogenic membrane proteins, but is demanding for the operator, and its automation remains challenging. The dielectrophoretically-accessed, intracellular membrane–potential measurement (DAIMM) method is a new technique showing high potential for automation of electrophysiological data recording in the whole-cell configuration. A cell suspension is brought between a mm-scaled planar electrode and a μm-scaled tip electrode, placed opposite to each other. Due to the asymmetric electrode configuration, the application of alternating electric fields (1–5 MHz) provokes a dielectrophoretic force acting on the target cell. As a consequence, the cell is accelerated and pierced by the tip electrode, hence functioning as the internal (working) electrode. We used the light-gated cation channel Channelrhodopsin-2 as a reporter protein expressed in HEK293 cells to characterize the DAIMM method in comparison with the patch-clamp technique. PMID:22994967

  5. Nanopore sensing at ultra-low concentrations using single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Kevin J.; Otto, Lauren M.; Ivanov, Aleksandar P.; Barik, Avijit; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Edel, Joshua B.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being developed with the exciting prospect of revolutionizing the healthcare industry by generating vast amounts of genetic and proteomic data. One exceptionally promising route is in the use of nanopore sensors. However, a well-known complexity is that detection and capture is predominantly diffusion limited. This problem is compounded when taking into account the capture volume of a nanopore, typically 108–1010 times smaller than the sample volume. To rectify this disproportionate ratio, we demonstrate a simple, yet powerful, method based on coupling single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping to nanopore sensing. We show that DNA can be captured from a controllable, but typically much larger, volume and concentrated at the tip of a metallic nanopore. This enables the detection of single molecules at concentrations as low as 5 fM, which is approximately a 103 reduction in the limit of detection compared with existing methods, while still maintaining efficient throughput. PMID:26732171

  6. Nanopore sensing at ultra-low concentrations using single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Kevin J; Otto, Lauren M; Ivanov, Aleksandar P; Barik, Avijit; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Edel, Joshua B

    2016-01-06

    Single-molecule techniques are being developed with the exciting prospect of revolutionizing the healthcare industry by generating vast amounts of genetic and proteomic data. One exceptionally promising route is in the use of nanopore sensors. However, a well-known complexity is that detection and capture is predominantly diffusion limited. This problem is compounded when taking into account the capture volume of a nanopore, typically 10(8)-10(10) times smaller than the sample volume. To rectify this disproportionate ratio, we demonstrate a simple, yet powerful, method based on coupling single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping to nanopore sensing. We show that DNA can be captured from a controllable, but typically much larger, volume and concentrated at the tip of a metallic nanopore. This enables the detection of single molecules at concentrations as low as 5 fM, which is approximately a 10(3) reduction in the limit of detection compared with existing methods, while still maintaining efficient throughput.

  7. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-01

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  8. Dielectrophoretic bending of directly printed free-standing ultra-soft nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Galliker, P.; Schneider, J.; Poulikakos, D.

    2014-02-17

    Electrohydrodynamic printing has shown superior resolution compared to conventional ink-jet printing, but the use of electrically charged liquid commonly leads to unwanted repulsion effects posing a threshold to resolution capabilities. However, a recently demonstrated controlled dripping process of nanoscale, particle-laden droplets, could circumvent such resolution obstacles even on insulating substrates. Here, we show that so-printed free-standing nanostructures can be autonomously deformed, and mechanically characterized due to the presence of the electrified nozzle, or, after voltage termination, due to transient charge residuals on the structures themselves. Dielectrophoretic forces, arising between two subsequently printed nanopillars lead to their contactless bending and to the formation of out-of-plane arc structures arising from the connection of the pillar apexes. Once connected, the ultra-soft nanopillars are found to be tightly merged and could, for example, serve in electronics as out of plane nanobonds.

  9. Nanopore sensing at ultra-low concentrations using single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Kevin J.; Otto, Lauren M.; Ivanov, Aleksandar P.; Barik, Avijit; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Edel, Joshua B.

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule techniques are being developed with the exciting prospect of revolutionizing the healthcare industry by generating vast amounts of genetic and proteomic data. One exceptionally promising route is in the use of nanopore sensors. However, a well-known complexity is that detection and capture is predominantly diffusion limited. This problem is compounded when taking into account the capture volume of a nanopore, typically 108-1010 times smaller than the sample volume. To rectify this disproportionate ratio, we demonstrate a simple, yet powerful, method based on coupling single-molecule dielectrophoretic trapping to nanopore sensing. We show that DNA can be captured from a controllable, but typically much larger, volume and concentrated at the tip of a metallic nanopore. This enables the detection of single molecules at concentrations as low as 5 fM, which is approximately a 103 reduction in the limit of detection compared with existing methods, while still maintaining efficient throughput.

  10. Modeling of the dielectrophoretic conveyer-belt assembling microparticles into large-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusid, Boris; Jacqmin, David; Kumar, Anil; Acrivos, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    A dielectrophoretic conveyor-belt method for assembling negatively polarized microparticles into large-scale structures was recently developed (APL 90, 154104, 2007). To do this, first, an array of microelectrodes is energized to generate a spatially periodic AC electric field that causes the particles to aggregate into boluses in positions of the field intensity- minima, which are located mid-way along the height of the channel. The minima and their associated boluses are then moved by periodically grounding and energizing the electrode array so as to generate an electrical field moving along the electrode array. We simulate this experiment numerically via a two- dimensional electro-hydrodynamic model (PRE 69, 021402, 2004). The numerical results are in qualitative agreement with experiments in that they show similar particle aggregation rates, bolus sizes and bolus transport speeds.

  11. Estimation of Metabolism Characteristics for Heat-Injured Bacteria Using Dielectrophoretic Impedance Measurement Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, Eri; Enjoji, Takaharu; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    Constant monitoring and immediate control of fermentation processes have been required for advanced quality preservation in food industry. In the present work, simple estimation of metabolic states for heat-injured Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a micro-cell was investigated using dielectrophoretic impedance measurement (DEPIM) method. Temporal change in the conductance between micro-gap (ΔG) was measured for various heat treatment temperatures. In addition, the dependence of enzyme activity, growth capacity and membrane situation for E. coli on heat treatment temperature was also analyzed with conventional biological methods. Consequently, a correlation between ΔG and those biological properties was obtained quantitatively. This result suggests that DEPIM method will be available for an effective monitoring technique for complex change in various biological states of microorganisms.

  12. Real-time, step-wise, electrical detection of protein molecules using dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT-film FET aptasensors.

    PubMed

    An, Taechang; Kim, Ki Su; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Lim, Geunbae

    2010-08-21

    Aptamer functionalized addressable SWNT-film arrays between cantilever electrodes were successfully developed for biosensor applications. Dielectrophoretically aligned SWNT suspended films made possible highly specific and rapid detection of target proteins with a large binding surface area. Thrombin aptamer immobilized SWNT-film FET biosensor resulted in a real-time, label-free, and electrical detection of thrombin molecules down to a concentration of ca. 7 pM with a step-wise rapid response time of several seconds.

  13. Correlation between dielectric property by dielectrophoretic levitation and growth activity of cells exposed to electric field.

    PubMed

    Hakoda, Masaru; Hirota, Yusuke

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system analyzing cell activity by the dielectrophoresis method. Our previous studies revealed a correlation between the growth activity and dielectric property (Re[K(ω)]) of mouse hybridoma 3-2H3 cells using dielectrophoretic levitation. Furthermore, it was clarified that the differentiation activity of many stem cells could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)] without differentiation induction. In this paper, 3-2H3 cells exposed to an alternating current (AC) electric field or a direct current (DC) electric field were cultivated, and the influence of damage by the electric field on the growth activity of the cells was examined. To evaluate the activity of the cells by measuring the Re[K(ω)], the correlation between the growth activity and the Re[K(ω)] of the cells exposed to the electric field was examined. The relations between the cell viability, growth activity, and Re[K(ω)] in the cells exposed to the AC electric field were obtained. The growth activity of the cells exposed to the AC electric field could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)]. Furthermore, it was found that the adverse effects of the electric field on the cell viability and the growth activity were smaller in the AC electric field than the DC electric field.

  14. Enhanced cell viability and cell adhesion using low conductivity medium for negative dielectrophoretic cell patterning.

    PubMed

    Puttaswamy, Srinivasu Valagerahally; Sivashankar, Shilpa; Chen, Rong-Jhe; Chin, Chung-Kuang; Chang, Hwan-You; Liu, Cheng Hsien

    2010-10-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic (n-DEP) cell manipulation is an efficient way to pattern human liver cells on micro-electrode arrays. Maintaining cell viability is an important objective for this approach. This study investigates the effect of low conductivity medium and the optimally designed microchip on cell viability and cell adhesion. To explore the influence of conductivity on cell viability and cell adhesion, we have used earlier reported dielectrophoresis (DEP) buffer with a conductivity of 10.2 mS/m and three formulated media with conductivity of 9.02 (M1), 8.14 (M2), 9.55 (M3) mS/m. The earlier reported isotonic sucrose/dextrose buffer (DEP buffer) used for DEP manipulation has the drawback of poor cell adhesion and cell viability. A microchip prototype with well-defined positioning of titanium electrode arrays was designed and fabricated on a glass substrate. The gap between the radial electrodes was accurately determined to achieve good cell patterning performance. Parameters such as dimension of positioning electrode, amplitude, and frequency of voltage signal were investigated to optimize the performance of the microchip.

  15. An inverted dielectrophoretic device for analysis of attached single cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Lownes Urbano, Rebecca; Morss Clyne, Alisa

    2016-02-07

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the force induced on a polarizable body by a non-uniform electric field, has been widely used to manipulate single cells in suspension and analyze their stiffness. However, most cell types do not naturally exist in suspension but instead require attachment to the tissue extracellular matrix in vivo. Cells alter their cytoskeletal structure when they attach to a substrate, which impacts cell stiffness. It is therefore critical to be able to measure mechanical properties of cells attached to a substrate. We present a novel inverted quadrupole dielectrophoretic device capable of measuring changes in the mechanics of single cells attached to a micropatterned polyacrylamide gel. The device is positioned over a cell of defined size, a directed DEP pushing force is applied, and cell centroid displacement is dynamically measured by optical microscopy. Using this device, single endothelial cells showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force following actin cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D. In addition, transformed mammary epithelial cell (MCF10A-NeuT) showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force compared to untransformed cells (MCF10A). DEP device measurements were confirmed by showing that the cells with greater centroid displacement also had a lower elastic modulus by atomic force microscopy. The current study demonstrates that an inverted DEP device can determine changes in single attached cell mechanics on varied substrates.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Microfluidic Channel for Dielectrophoretic BioMEMS Application

    PubMed Central

    Low, Wan Shi; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar bin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a strategy for optimizing distribution of flow in a typical benchtop microfluidic chamber for dielectrophoretic application. It is aimed at encouraging uniform flow velocity along the whole analysis chamber in order to ensure DEP force is evenly applied to biological particle. Via the study, we have come up with a constructive strategy in improving the design of microfluidic channel which will greatly facilitate the use of DEP system in laboratory and primarily focus on the relationship between architecture and cell distribution, by resorting to the tubular structure of blood vessels. The design was validated by hydrodynamic flow simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics v4.2a software. Simulations show that the presence of 2-level bifurcation has developed portioning of volumetric flow which produced uniform flow across the channel. However, further bifurcation will reduce the volumetric flow rate, thus causing undesirable deposition of cell suspension around the chamber. Finally, an improvement of microfluidic design with rounded corner is proposed to encourage a uniform cell adhesion within the channel. PMID:25136701

  17. Microfluidic multifunctional probe array dielectrophoretic force spectroscopy with wide loading rates.

    PubMed

    Park, In Soo; Eom, Kilho; Son, Jongsang; Chang, Woo-Jin; Park, Kidong; Kwon, Taeyun; Yoon, Dae Sung; Bashir, Rashid; Lee, Sang Woo

    2012-10-23

    The simultaneous investigation of a large number of events with different types of intermolecular interactions, from nonequilibrium high-force pulling assays to quasi-equilibrium unbinding events in the same environment, can be very important for fully understanding intermolecular bond-rupture mechanisms. Here, we describe a novel dielectrophoretic force spectroscopy technique that utilizes microsized beads as multifunctional probes for parallel measurement of intermolecular forces with an extremely wide range of force rate (10(-4) to 10(4) pN/s) inside a microfluidic device. In our experiments, various forces, which broadly form the basis of all molecular interactions, were measured across a range of force loading rates by multifunctional probes of various diameters with a throughput of over 600 events per mm(2), simultaneously and in the same environment. Furthermore, the individual bond-rupture forces, the parameters for the characterization of entire energy landscapes, and the effective stiffness of the force spectroscopy were determined on the basis of the measured results. This method of determining intermolecular forces could be very useful for the precise and simultaneous examination of various molecular interactions, as it can be easily and cost-effectively implemented within a microfluidic device for a range of applications including immunoassays, molecular mechanics, chemical and biological screening, and mechanobiology.

  18. Dielectrophoretic capture voltage spectrum for measurement of dielectric properties and separation of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liqun; Lanry Yung, Lin-Yue; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new dielectrophoresis (DEP) method based on capture voltage spectrum is proposed for measuring dielectric properties of biological cells. The capture voltage spectrum can be obtained from the balance of dielectrophoretic force and Stokes drag force acting on the cell in a microfluidic device with fluid flow and strip electrodes. The method was demonstrated with the measurement of dielectric properties of human colon cancer cells (HT-29 cells). From the capture voltage spectrum, the real part of Clausius–Mossotti factor of HT-29 cells for different frequencies of applied electric field was obtained. The dielectric properties of cell interior and plasma membrane were then estimated by using single-shell dielectric model. The cell interior permittivity and conductivity were found to be insensitive to changes in the conductivity of the medium in which the cells are suspended, but the measured permittivity and conductivity of cell membrane were found to increase with the increase of medium conductivity. In addition, the measurement of capture voltage spectrum was found to be useful in providing the optimum operating conditions for separating HT-29 cells from other cells (such as red blood cells) using dielectrophoresis. PMID:22662097

  19. Electronic detection of dielectrophoretic forces exerted on particles flowing over interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Nikolic-Jaric, Marija; Romanuik, Sean F; Ferrier, Graham A; Cabel, Tim; Salimi, Elham; Levin, David B; Bridges, Greg E; Thomson, Douglas J

    2012-06-01

    Dielectric particles flowing through a microfluidic channel over a set of coplanar electrodes can be simultaneously capacitively detected and dielectrophoretically (DEP) actuated when the high (1.45 GHz) and low (100 kHz-20 MHz) frequency electromagnetic fields are concurrently applied through the same set of electrodes. Assuming a simple model in which the only forces acting upon the particles are apparent gravity, hydrodynamic lift, DEP force, and fluid drag, actuated particle trajectories can be obtained as numerical solutions of the equations of motion. Numerically calculated changes of particle elevations resulting from the actuation simulated in this way agree with the corresponding elevation changes estimated from the electronic signatures generated by the experimentally actuated particles. This verifies the model and confirms the correlation between the DEP force and the electronic signature profile. It follows that the electronic signatures can be used to quantify the actuation that the dielectric particle experiences as it traverses the electrode region. Using this principle, particles with different dielectric properties can be effectively identified based exclusively on their signature profile. This approach was used to differentiate viable from non-viable yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of microfluidic channel for dielectrophoretic BioMEMS application.

    PubMed

    Low, Wan Shi; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Abas, Wan Abu Bakar bin Wan

    2014-01-01

    We propose a strategy for optimizing distribution of flow in a typical benchtop microfluidic chamber for dielectrophoretic application. It is aimed at encouraging uniform flow velocity along the whole analysis chamber in order to ensure DEP force is evenly applied to biological particle. Via the study, we have come up with a constructive strategy in improving the design of microfluidic channel which will greatly facilitate the use of DEP system in laboratory and primarily focus on the relationship between architecture and cell distribution, by resorting to the tubular structure of blood vessels. The design was validated by hydrodynamic flow simulation using COMSOL Multiphysics v4.2a software. Simulations show that the presence of 2-level bifurcation has developed portioning of volumetric flow which produced uniform flow across the channel. However, further bifurcation will reduce the volumetric flow rate, thus causing undesirable deposition of cell suspension around the chamber. Finally, an improvement of microfluidic design with rounded corner is proposed to encourage a uniform cell adhesion within the channel.

  1. Dynamic evolution of interacting carbon nanotubes suspended in a fluid using a dielectrophoretic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliva-Avilés, A. I.; Zozulya, V. V.; Gamboa, F.; Avilés, F.

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical investigation of the dynamic response of interacting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) dispersed in a liquid medium under alternating current electric fields is presented. The proposed modeling strategy is based on the dielectrophoretic theory and classical electrodynamics of rigid bodies, and considers the coupled rotation-translation motion of interacting CNTs represented as electrical dipoles. Based on experimental evidence, the parameters which are expected to cause a major contribution to the CNTs' motion are investigated for different initial configurations of CNTs. It is predicted that high electric field frequencies, long CNTs, high values of electrical permittivity and conductivity of the CNTs immersed in solvents of high polarity promote faster equilibrium conditions, achieved by CNT tip-to-tip contact and alignment along the electric field direction. For the majority of the scenarios, CNT alignment along the field direction is predicted as the first event, followed by the translation of aligned CNTs until the tip-to-tip contact condition is reached. For systems with interacting CNTs with different lengths, equilibrium of the shorter CNT is achieved faster. Predictions also show that the initial rotation angles and initial location of CNTs have a paramount influence on the evolution of the system towards the equilibrium configuration.

  2. An Inverted Dielectrophoretic Device for Analysis of Attached Single Cell Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Rebecca Lownes; Clyne, Alisa Morss

    2016-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the force induced on a polarizable body by a non-uniform electric field, has been widely used to manipulate single cells in suspension and analyze their stiffness. However, most cell types do not naturally exist in suspension but instead require attachment to the tissue extracellular matrix in vivo. Cells alter their cytoskeletal structure when they attach to a substrate, which impacts cell stiffness. It is therefore critical to be able to measure mechanical properties of cells attached to a substrate. We present a novel inverted quadrupole dielectrophoretic device capable of measuring changes in the mechanics of single cells attached to a micropatterned polyacrylamide gel. The device is positioned over a cell of defined size, a directed DEP pushing force is applied, and cell centroid displacement is dynamically measured by optical microscopy. Using this device, single endothelial cells showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force following actin cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin D. In addition, transformed mammary epithelial cell (MCF10A-NeuT) showed greater centroid displacement in response to applied DEP pushing force compared to untransformed cells (MCF10A). DEP device measurements were confirmed by showing that the cells with greater centroid displacement also had a lower elastic modulus by atomic force microscopy. The current study demonstrates that an inverted DEP device can determine changes in single attached cell mechanics on varied substrates. PMID:26738543

  3. Modifying dielectrophoretic response of nonviable yeast cells by ionic surfactant treatment.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhang, Wei; Baratchi, Sara; Nasabi, Mahyar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2013-07-02

    Nonviable cells are essential biosystems, due to the functionalities they offer and their effects on viable cells. Therefore, the separation and immobilization of nonviable cells separately or in the vicinity of viable cells is of great importance for many fundamentals investigations in cell biology. However, most nonviable cells become less polarizable than the surrounding medium at conductivities above 0.01 S/m. This means that in such a medium, dielectrophoresis, despite its great versatilities for manipulation of cells, cannot be employed for immobilizing nonviable cells. Here, we present a novel approach to change the dielectrophoretic (DEP) response of nonviable yeast cells by treating them with low concentrations of ionic surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate. After this treatment, they exhibit a strong positive DEP response, even at high medium conductivities. The capability of this treatment is demonstrated in two proof-of-concept experiments. First, we show the sorting and immobilization of viable and nonviable yeast cells, along consecutive microelectrode arrays. Second, we demonstrate the immobilization of viable and nonviable cells in the vicinity of each other along the same microelectrode array. The proposed technique allows DEP platforms to be utilized for the immobilization and subsequent postanalysis of both viable and nonviable cells with and without the presence of each other.

  4. Rapid formation of cell-particle complexes via dielectrophoretic manipulation for the detection of surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuma; Yamamoto, Masashi; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Fumio

    2014-11-15

    A rapid and simple method for the fabrication of the island patterns with particles and cells was applied to detect the presence of specific antigens on the cell surface. An upper interdigitated microband array (IDA) electrode was mounted on a lower substrate with the same design to fabricate a microfluidic-channel device for dielectrophoretic manipulation. The electrode grid structure was fabricated by rotating the upper template IDA by 90° relative to the lower IDA. A suspension of anti-CD33 modified particles and HL-60 cells was introduced into the channel. An AC electrical signal (typically 20 V peak-to-peak, 100 kHz) was then applied to the bands of the upper and lower IDAs, resulting in the formation of island patterns at the intersections with low electric fields. Immunoreactions between the antibodies immobilized on the accumulated particles and the CD33 present on the surface of the cells led to the formation of complexes comprising corresponding antigen-antibody pairs. Non-specific pairs accumulated at the intersection, which did not form complexes, were then dispersed after removal of the applied field. The time required for the detection of the formation/dispersion of the complexes is as short as 6 min in the present procedure. Furthermore, this novel cell binding assay does not require pretreatment such as target labeling or washing of the unbound cells.

  5. Dielectrophoretic sample preparation for environmental monitoring of microorganisms: Soil particle removal.

    PubMed

    Fatoyinbo, Henry O; McDonnell, Martin C; Hughes, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Detection of pathogens from environmental samples is often hampered by sensors interacting with environmental particles such as soot, pollen, or environmental dust such as soil or clay. These particles may be of similar size to the target bacterium, preventing removal by filtration, but may non-specifically bind to sensor surfaces, fouling them and causing artefactual results. In this paper, we report the selective manipulation of soil particles using an AC electrokinetic microfluidic system. Four heterogeneous soil samples (smectic clay, kaolinitic clay, peaty loam, and sandy loam) were characterised using dielectrophoresis to identify the electrical difference to a target organism. A flow-cell device was then constructed to evaluate dielectrophoretic separation of bacteria and clay in a continous flow through mode. The average separation efficiency of the system across all soil types was found to be 68.7% with a maximal separation efficiency for kaolinitic clay at 87.6%. This represents the first attempt to separate soil particles from bacteria using dielectrophoresis and indicate that the technique shows significant promise; with appropriate system optimisation, we believe that this preliminary study represents an opportunity to develop a simple yet highly effective sample processing system.

  6. Capillary-driven microfluidic chips with evaporation-induced flow control and dielectrophoretic microbead trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Skorucak, Jelena; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2014-03-01

    This work reports our efforts on developing simple-to-use microfluidic devices for point-of-care diagnostic applications with recent extensions that include the trapping of microbeads using dielectrophoresis (DEP) and the modulation of capillary-driven flow using integrated microheaters. DEP serves the purpose of trapping microbeads coated with receptors and analytes for detection of a fluorescent signal. The microheater is actuated once the chip is filled by capillarity, creating an evaporation-induced flow tuned according to assay conditions. The chips are composed of a glass substrate patterned with 50-nm-thick Pd electrodes and microfluidic structures made using a 20-μm-thick dry-film resist (DFR). Chips are covered/sealed by low-temperature (50 °C) lamination of a 50-μm-thick DFR layer having excellent optical and mechanical properties. To separate cleaned and sealed chips from the wafer, we used an effective chip singulation technique that we informally call the "chip-olate" process. In the experimental section, we first studied dielectrophoretic trapping of 10 μm beads for flow rates ranging from 80 pL s-1 to 2.5 nL s-1 and that are generated by an external syringe pump. Then, we characterized the embedded microheater in DFR-covered chips. Flow rates as high as 8 nL s-1 were generated by evaporation-induced flow when the heater was biased by 10 V, corresponding to 270 mW power. Finally, DEP-based trapping and fluorescent detection of functionalized beads were demonstrated as the flow was generated by the combination of capillary filling and evaporation-induced flow.

  7. Capillary-driven microfluidic chips with evaporation-induced flow control and dielectrophoretic microbead trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Yuksel; Skorucak, Jelena; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2014-07-01

    This work reports our efforts on developing simple-to-use microfluidic devices for point-of-care diagnostic applications with recent extensions that include the trapping of microbeads using dielectrophoresis (DEP) and the modulation of the liquid flow using integrated microheaters. DEP serves the purpose of trapping microbeads coated with receptors and analytes for detection of a fluorescent signal. The microheater is actuated once the chip is filled by capillarity, creating an evaporation-induced flow tuned according to assay conditions. The chips are composed of a glass substrate patterned with 50-nm-thick Pd electrodes and microfluidic structures made using a 20-μm-thick dry-film resist (DFR). Chips are covered/sealed by low temperature (50°C) lamination of a 50-μm-thick DFR layer having excellent optical and mechanical properties. To separate cleaned and sealed chips from the wafer, we used an effective chip singulation technique which we informally call the "chip-olate" process. In the experimental section, we first studied dielectrophoretic trapping of 10-μm beads for flow rates ranging from 80 pL s-1 to 2.5 nL s-1 that are generated by an external syringe pump. Then, we characterized the embedded microheater in DFR-covered chips. Flow rates as high as 8 nL s-1 were generated by evaporation-induced flow when the heater was biased by 10 V, corresponding to 270-mW power. Finally, DEP-based trapping and fluorescent detection of functionalized beads were demonstrated as the flow was generated by evaporation-induced flow after the microfluidic structures were filled by capillarity.

  8. Lab on a chip for multiplexed immunoassays to detect bladder cancer using multifunctional dielectrophoretic manipulations.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Cheng-Hsin; Wu, Ting-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Ho; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Ju, Jing-Wei; Huang, Yao-Wei; Van Nhan, Vo

    2015-07-21

    A multiplexed immunosensor has been developed for the detection of specific biomarkers Galectin-1 (Gal-1) and Lactate Dehydrogenase B (LDH-B) present in different grades of bladder cancer cell lysates. In order to immobilize nanoprobes with different antibodies on a single chip we employed three-step programmable dielectrophoretic manipulations for focusing, guiding and trapping to enhance the fluorescent response and reduce the interference between the two antibody arrays. The chip consisted of a patterned indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode for sensing and a middle fish bone shaped gold electrode for focusing and guiding. Using ITO electrodes for the sensing area can effectively eliminate the background noise of fluorescence response as compared to metal electrodes. It was also observed that the three step manipulation increased fluorescence response after immunosensing by about 4.6 times as compared to utilizing DEP for just trapping the nanoprobes. Two different-grade bladder cancer cell lysates (grade I: RT4 and grade III: T24) were individually analyzed for detecting the protein expression levels of Gal-1 and LDH-B. The fluorescence intensity observed for Gal-1 is higher than that of LDH-B in the T24 cell lysate; however the response observed in RT4 is higher for LDH-B as compared to Gal-1. Thus we can effectively identify the different grades of bladder cancer cells. In addition, the platform for DEP manipulation developed in this study can enable real time detection of multiple analytes on a single chip and provide more practical benefits for clinical diagnosis.

  9. Creation of carbon nanotube based bioSensors through dielectrophoretic assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Nilan S.; Kim, Steve; Annam, Kaushik; Bane, Danielle; Subramanyam, Guru

    2015-08-01

    Due to their excellent electrical, optical, and mechanical properties, nanosized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have attracted significant attention as a transducing element in nano-bio sensor research. Controlled assembly, device fabrication, and bio-functionalization of the SWNTs are crucial in creating the sensors. In this study, working biosensor platforms were created using dielectrophoretic assembly of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as a bridge between two gold electrodes. SWNTs in a commercial SDS surfactant solution were dispensed in the gap between the two gold electrodes, followed by applying an ac voltage across the two electrodes. The dielectrophoresis aligns the CNTs and forms a bridge between the two electrodes. A copious washing and a subsequent annealing of the devices at 200 °C remove the surfactants and create an excellent semiconducting (p-type) bridge between the two electrodes. A liquid gated field effect transistor (LGFET) was built using DI water as the gate dielectric and the SWNT bridge as the channel. Negative gate voltages of the FET increased the drain current and applying a positive gate voltage of +0.5V depleted the channel of charges and turned the device off. The biosensor was verified using both the two terminal and three terminal devices. Genomic salmon DNA dissolved in DI water was applied on the SWNT bridge in both type of devices. In the two terminal device, the conductance of the bridge dropped by 65x after the binding of the DNA. In the LGFET, the transconductance of the device decreased 2X after the binding of the DNA. The binding of the DNA also suppressed hysteresis in the Drain Current vs Gate Voltage characteristics of the LGFET.

  10. Performance impact of dynamic surface coatings on polymeric insulator-based dielectrophoretic particle separators.

    PubMed

    Davalos, Rafael V; McGraw, Gregory J; Wallow, Thomas I; Morales, Alfredo M; Krafcik, Karen L; Fintschenko, Yolanda; Cummings, Eric B; Simmons, Blake A

    2008-02-01

    Efficient and robust particle separation and enrichment techniques are critical for a diverse range of lab-on-a-chip analytical devices including pathogen detection, sample preparation, high-throughput particle sorting, and biomedical diagnostics. Previously, using insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) in microfluidic glass devices, we demonstrated simultaneous particle separation and concentration of various biological organisms, polymer microbeads, and viruses. As an alternative to glass, we evaluate the performance of similar iDEP structures produced in polymer-based microfluidic devices. There are numerous processing and operational advantages that motivate our transition to polymers such as the availability of numerous innate chemical compositions for tailoring performance, mechanical robustness, economy of scale, and ease of thermoforming and mass manufacturing. The polymer chips we have evaluated are fabricated through an injection molding process of the commercially available cyclic olefin copolymer Zeonor 1060R. This publication is the first to demonstrate insulator-based dielectrophoretic biological particle differentiation in a polymeric device injection molded from a silicon master. The results demonstrate that the polymer devices achieve the same performance metrics as glass devices. We also demonstrate an effective means of enhancing performance of these microsystems in terms of system power demand through the use of a dynamic surface coating. We demonstrate that the commercially available nonionic block copolymer surfactant, Pluronic F127, has a strong interaction with the cyclic olefin copolymer at very low concentrations, positively impacting performance by decreasing the electric field necessary to achieve particle trapping by an order of magnitude. The presence of this dynamic surface coating, therefore, lowers the power required to operate such devices and minimizes Joule heating. The results of this study demonstrate that iDEP polymeric

  11. The dielectrophoretic disassociation of chloride ions and the influence on diamagnetic anisotropy in cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Purnell, Marcy C; Skrinjar, Terence J

    2016-11-01

    Chloride channels represent ubiquitously expressed proteins that regulate fundamental cellular processes including membrane potential, maintenance of intracellular pH, and regulation of cell volume. However, mechanisms to modulate this large family of ion channels have remained elusive to date. This large chloride channel family does not appear to operate with selectivity similar to the sodium and potassium channels. These unique channels appear to be bi-directional cotransporters of two or more different molecules or ions across a bilayer phospholipid membrane. Here we show how 3 amperes of direct current from a device that generates an electromagnetic field in a 3 mM hypotonic saline solution leads to a dielectrophoretic disassociation of the chloride ion from its chloro-metabolites transforming it into a polymorphic diamagnetically disassociated bio-chloride (bCl-). This field treated aqueous solution appears to continue to induce a magnetic moment change in solution for some hours when no longer under the influence of the direct current; for when this field influenced solution is used to reconstitute growth media of human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-231) and human breast epithelial (MCF-10A) cells in vitro, significant changes in chloride ion channel expression, membrane potential, cell volume, and a massive transcriptional reprogramming of 2,468 genes expressions by Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Gene Chip Array (Affymetrix) analyses occur. We will highlight how the strong changes in chloride ion channel expression and cell physiology could be intricately linked to enhanced diamagnetic anisotropy in cell membranes that occur under the influence of this disassociated polymorphic bCl-.

  12. Dielectrophoretic lab-on-CMOS platform for trapping and manipulation of cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoungchul; Kabiri, Shideh; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2016-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of cells are essential operations in numerous studies in biology and life sciences. We discuss the realization of a Lab-on-a-Chip platform for dielectrophoretic trapping and repositioning of cells and microorganisms on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, which we define here as Lab-on-CMOS (LoC). The LoC platform is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP) which is the force experienced by any dielectric particle including biological entities in non-uniform AC electrical field. DEP force depends on the permittivity of the cells, its size and shape and also on the permittivity of the medium and therefore it enables selective targeting of cells based on their phenotype. In this paper, we address an important matter that of electrode design for DEP for which we propose a three-dimensional (3D) octapole geometry to create highly confined electric fields for trapping and manipulation of cells. Conventional DEP-based platforms are implemented stand-alone on glass, silicon or polymers connected to external infrastructure for electronics and optics, making it bulky and expensive. In this paper, the use of CMOS as a platform provides a pathway to truly miniaturized lab-on-CMOS or LoC platform, where DEP electrodes are designed using built-in multiple metal layers of the CMOS process for effective trapping of cells, with built-in electronics for in-situ impedance monitoring of the cell position. We present electromagnetic simulation results of DEP force for this unique 3D octapole geometry on CMOS. Experimental results with yeast cells validate the design. These preliminary results indicate the promise of using CMOS technology for truly compact miniaturized lab-on-chip platform for cell biotechnology applications.

  13. An integrated acoustic and dielectrophoretic particle manipulation in a microfluidic device for particle wash and separation fabricated by mechanical machining

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Barbaros; Özer, Mehmet Bülent; Çağatay, Erdem; Büyükkoçak, Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    In this study, acoustophoresis and dielectrophoresis are utilized in an integrated manner to combine the two different operations on a single polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip in sequential manner, namely, particle wash (buffer exchange) and particle separation. In the washing step, particles are washed with buffer solution with low conductivity for dielectrophoretic based separation to avoid the adverse effects of Joule heating. Acoustic waves generated by piezoelectric material are utilized for washing, which creates standing waves along the whole width of the channel. Coupled electro-mechanical acoustic 3D multi-physics analysis showed that the position and orientation of the piezoelectric actuators are critical for successful operation. A unique mold is designed for the precise alignment of the piezoelectric materials and 3D side-wall electrodes for a highly reproducible fabrication. To achieve the throughput matching of acoustophoresis and dielectrophoresis in the integration, 3D side-wall electrodes are used. The integrated device is fabricated by PDMS molding. The mold of the integrated device is fabricated using high-precision mechanical machining. With a unique mold design, the placements of the two piezoelectric materials and the 3D sidewall electrodes are accomplished during the molding process. It is shown that the proposed device can handle the wash and dielectrophoretic separation successfully. PMID:26865905

  14. Determination of size and element composition distributions of complex colloids by sedimentation field-flow fractionation—inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Deirdre M.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) have been directly combined and the resulting SdFFF-ICP-MS instrument can be used to produce element based size distributions of colloidal samples. Using appropriate tracer elements the size distributions of specific components can be picked out from a complex mixture. Changes in chemical composition of mixtures as a function of particle size can be readily monitored by plotting appropriate element atomic ratio distributions. These applications have been illustrated using data obtained with samples of the clay minerals kaolinite and illite and a natural suspended particulate matter from the Darling River (Australia).

  15. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of a biological and non-biological analytes in a microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Dawn J.

    Micro-total-analytical systems (muTASs) for analyzing chemical/biological substances are now used across a wide variety of applications ranging from biological warfare agent detection to the healthcare industry. The first step in the operation of a muTAS consists of concentrating and separating the analytes of interest from the background matrix and positioning them into selected locations for subsequent analysis. The use of ac electric fields was demonstrated to have promising potential for a muTAS because the application of an ac field suppresses undesirable electrolytic effects in the liquid. The main purpose of this work is to study micro-scale phenomena in a flowing suspension subject to shear and high-gradient strong ac electric field. A microfluidic device equipped with dielectrophoretic gates arranged perpendicular to the flow was designed and fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were conducted on flowing suspensions over a broad range of flow and electric field parameters to investigate how these characteristics affect the concentration and separation of particles. It was found that dipolar interactions between suspended particles subject to a high-gradient ac field and shear lead to a new many-body phenomenon of dielectrophoresis accompanied by the field-induced phase separation in a flowing suspension. As a result, shear and electric stresses strongly compress a layer enriched with particles. The predictions of the proposed electro-hydrodynamic model for the coupled shear, dielectrophoresis, and phase separation in a flowing suspension are shown to be consistent with experimental data even though the model contains no fitting parameters. Both the model and the experiments showed that the concentration volume could be increased up to about 50%. It was demonstrated that the field-induced dielectrophoresis accompanied by the phase separation provides a new method for concentrating particles in focused regions and for separating biological

  16. Different elution modes and field programming in gravitational field-flow fractionation: field programming using density and viscosity gradients.

    PubMed

    Plocková, Jana; Chmelík, Josef

    2006-06-23

    In previous papers, several approaches to programming of the resulting force field in GFFF were described and investigated. The experiments were dealing with flow-velocity and channel thickness, i.e. factors influencing hydrodynamic lift forces (HLF). The potential of density and viscosity of carrier liquid for field programming was predicted and demonstrated by preliminary experiments. This work is devoted to experimental verification of the influence of carrier liquid density and viscosity. Several carrier liquid density and simultaneously viscosity gradients using water-methanol mixtures are in this work implemented in the separation of a model silica mixture. Working with the water-methanol gradients, one is not able to separate the influence of density from the contribution of viscosity. However, we found experimental conditions to show the isolated effect of carrier liquid density (two water-methanol mixtures of equal viscosity differing in their densities). In order to demonstrate the isolated effect of viscosity, we implemented in this work a new system of (hydroxypropyl)methyl cellulose (HPMC) carrier liquids. Three different HPMC compositions enabled to vary the viscosity more than two times at almost constant density. With increasing carrier liquid viscosity, the focusing and elevating trend was clearly pronounced for 5 and 10 microm silica particles. By the isolated effect of increased viscosity, the centre of the 10 microm particle zone was elevated to the streamline at 16% of the channel height. These experiments have shown that the influence of carrier liquid viscosity on HLF should be taken into account even at higher levels above the channel bottom, i.e. beyond the near-wall region. Further, it is shown that higher value of carrier liquid viscosity improves the separation of the model mixture in terms of time and resolution.

  17. The development of malaria diagnostic techniques: a review of the approaches with focus on dielectrophoretic and magnetophoretic methods.

    PubMed

    Kasetsirikul, Surasak; Buranapong, Jirayut; Srituravanich, Werayut; Kaewthamasorn, Morakot; Pimpin, Alongkorn

    2016-07-12

    The large number of deaths caused by malaria each year has increased interest in the development of effective malaria diagnoses. At the early-stage of infection, patients show non-specific symptoms or are asymptomatic, which makes it difficult for clinical diagnosis, especially in non-endemic areas. Alternative diagnostic methods that are timely and effective are required to identify infections, particularly in field settings. This article reviews conventional malaria diagnostic methods together with recently developed techniques for both malaria detection and infected erythrocyte separation. Although many alternative techniques have recently been proposed and studied, dielectrophoretic and magnetophoretic approaches are among the promising new techniques due to their high specificity for malaria parasite-infected red blood cells. The two approaches are discussed in detail, including their principles, types, applications and limitations. In addition, other recently developed techniques, such as cell deformability and morphology, are also overviewed in this article.

  18. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  19. Rapid 3D Refractive‐Index Imaging of Live Cells in Suspension without Labeling Using Dielectrophoretic Cell Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Habaza, Mor; Kirschbaum, Michael; Guernth‐Marschner, Christian; Dardikman, Gili; Barnea, Itay; Korenstein, Rafi; Duschl, Claus

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge in the field of optical imaging of live cells is achieving rapid, 3D, and noninvasive imaging of isolated cells without labeling. If successful, many clinical procedures involving analysis and sorting of cells drawn from body fluids, including blood, can be significantly improved. A new label‐free tomographic interferometry approach is presented. This approach provides rapid capturing of the 3D refractive‐index distribution of single cells in suspension. The cells flow in a microfluidic channel, are trapped, and then rapidly rotated by dielectrophoretic forces in a noninvasive and precise manner. Interferometric projections of the rotated cell are acquired and processed into the cellular 3D refractive‐index map. Uniquely, this approach provides full (360°) coverage of the rotation angular range around any axis, and knowledge on the viewing angle. The experimental demonstrations presented include 3D, label‐free imaging of cancer cells and three types of white blood cells. This approach is expected to be useful for label‐free cell sorting, as well as for detection and monitoring of pathological conditions resulting in cellular morphology changes or occurrence of specific cell types in blood or other body fluids. PMID:28251046

  20. Enhanced sub-micron colloidal particle separation with interdigitated microelectrode arrays using mixed AC/DC dielectrophoretic scheme.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Vikhram V; Shannon, Mark A; Bashir, Rashid

    2015-04-01

    Dielectrophoretic separation of particles finds a variety of applications in the capture of species such as cells, viruses, proteins, DNA from biological systems, as well as other organic and inorganic contaminants from water. The ability to capture particles is constrained by poor volumetric scaling of separation force with respect to particle diameter, as well as the weak penetration of electric fields in the media. In order to improve the separation of sub-micron colloids, we present a scheme based on multiple interdigitated electrode arrays under mixed AC/DC bias. The use of high frequency longitudinal AC bias breaks the shielding effects through electroosmotic micromixing to enhance electric fields through the electrolyte, while a transverse DC bias between the electrode arrays enables penetration of the separation force to capture particles from the bulk of the microchannel. We determine the favorable biasing conditions for field enhancement with the help of analytical models, and experimentally demonstrate the improved capture from sub-micron colloidal suspensions with the mixed AC/DC electrostatic excitation scheme over conventional AC-DEP methods.

  1. Dielectric elastomer actuators of silicone rubber-titanium dioxide composites obtained by dielectrophoretic assembly of filler particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, S.; Razzaghi-Kashani, M.

    2010-04-01

    Formation of controlled morphology of fillers in polymeric composites may be difficult to achieve by conventional methods such as mechanical shear or chemical methods. Tunable structure of filler and anisotropic properties in composites can be obtained by exploiting dielectrophoretic assembly of fillers in a polymer composite by using electric fields. In this study, different concentrations of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) particles in silicone rubber matrix were assembled in a chain-like structure by using an alternating electric field. Silicone rubber matrix was vulcanized to transform the liquid to solid and maintain the filler structure in the desired direction. Generation of chain structure of filler was verified by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and equilibrium swelling. It was shown that dielectric permittivity of the oriented composite is higher whereas its dielectric loss factor is lower in the orientation (thickness) direction than those for the composites with random distribution of filler. This phenomenon was in agreement with results of dynamic-mechanical loss factor for these composites, and can be utilized in more efficient dielectric elastomer actuators. Elastic modulus is higher for the structured samples, but presence of titania filler induced a softening effect at higher strains where the actuators are practically being pre-stretched. A critical concentration of filler was distinguished as the percolation point at which the change in dielectric behavior is amplified. Using a simple blocking-force measurement, potential advantages of structured composites over the ones with randomly-distributed filler was explained for potential dielectric elastomer actuator applications.

  2. On-chip SERS analysis for single mimic pathogen detection using Raman-labeled nanoaggregate-embedded beads with a dielectrophoretic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen-Han; Lin, Hsing-Ying; Kuo, I.-Ting; Hsieh, Wen-Hsin; Huang, Ping-Ji; Yang, Tzyy-Schiuan; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    2012-02-01

    The integration of Raman-labeled nanoaggregate-embedded beads (NAEBs) for high performance SERS analysis of single mimic pathogen on a self-designed dielectrophoretic chip is demonstrated. The Raman tags called NAEBs are silica-coated, dye-induced aggregates of a small number of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). In this work, NAEBs consisting of a Raman dye tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-isothiosyanate (TRITC) are chemically functionalized with streptavidin to detect biotin-functionalized polystyrene (PS) microspheres which mimic as pathogens. The sample solution of completely mixed streptavidin-functionalized NAEBs and biotin-functionalized PS microspheres is pumped into the microfluidic channel of a dielectrophoretic chip. By giving an AC voltage on the embedded electrodes, a single mimic pathogen can be caught via the non-contact dielectrophoretic force and suspended at the central cross of four aluminum electrodes for subsequent Raman spectroscopic detection. The SERS signal of TRITC is used as a spectral signature of specific mimic pathogen recognition, otherwise only the background Raman signal of a PS microsphere is observed. A pathogen-specific biosensor based on the dielectrophoresis-Raman spectroscopy system is developed, and the proof-ofconcept is confirmed by the specific molecular interaction model of streptavidin with biotin. Therefore, the on-chip multiplex SERS analysis of pathogens can be anticipated by employing different dye-tagged NAEBs simultaneously in a sample solution. We believe this bioassay has the ability to screen and detect multiple pathogens with minimal sample processing and handling even a small number of pathogens is present.

  3. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yep, Tze-Wing; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon; Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2-second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet flow was significantly influenced by the gravity. The jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes a change in gravity in the drop tower.

  4. Gravitational Effects on Near Field Flow Structure of Low Density Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, D. W.; Yep, T. W.; Agrawal, A. K.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Earth gravity and microgravity to acquire quantitative data on near field flow structure of helium jets injected into air. Microgravity conditions were simulated in the 2.2- second drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet flow was observed by quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a non-intrusive line of site measurement technique for the whole field. The flow structure was characterized by distributions of angular deflection and helium mole percentage obtained from color schlieren images taken at 60 Hz. Results show that the jet in microgravity was up to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The global jet flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity were absent in microgravity, providing direct experimental evidence that the flow instability in the low density jet was buoyancy induced. The paper provides quantitative details of temporal flow evolution as the experiment undergoes change in gravity in the drop tower.

  5. Size and medium conductivity dependence on dielectrophoretic behaviors of gas core poly-L-lysine shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chungja; Wu, Chun-Jen; Ostafin, Agnes E; Thibaudeau, Giselle; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic (dis)assembly of biocompatible nanoparticles into 3D, packed structures would benefit drug delivery, films, and diagnostics. Dielectrophoretic (DEP) microdevices can rapidly assemble and manipulate polarizable particles within nonuniform electric fields. DEP has primarily discerned micrometer particles since nanoparticles experience smaller forces. This work examines conductivity and size DEP dependencies of previously unexplored spherical core-shell nanoparticle (CSnp) into 3D particle assemblies. Poly-L-lysine shell material was custom synthesized around a gas core to form CSnps. DEP frequencies from 1 kHz to 80 MHz at fixed 5 volts peak-to-peak and medium conductivities of 10(-5) and 10(-3) S/m were tested. DEP responses of ∼220 and ∼400 nm poly-L-lysine CSnps were quantified via video intensity densitometry at the microdevice's quadrapole electrode center for negative DEP (nDEP) and adjacent to electrodes for positive DEP. Intensity densitometry was then translated into a relative DEP response curve. An unusual nDEP peak occurred at ∼57 MHz with 25-80 times greater apparent nDEP force. All electrical circuit components were then impedance matched, which changed the observed response to weak positive DEP at low frequencies and consistently weak nDEP from ∼100 kHz to 80 MHz. This impedance-matched behavior agrees with conventional Clausius-Mossotti DEP signatures taking into account the gas core's contributions to the polarization mechanisms. This work describes a potential pitfall when conducting DEP at higher frequencies in microdevices and concurrently demonstrates nDEP behavior for a chemically and structurally distinct particle system. This work provides insight into organic shell material properties in nanostructures and strategies to facilitate dynamic nanoparticle assemblies.

  6. Numerical modelling and measurement of cell trajectories in 3-D under the influence of dielectrophoretic and hydrodynamic forces.

    PubMed

    Holzner, Felix; Hagmeyer, Britta; Schütte, Julia; Kubon, Massimo; Angres, Brigitte; Stelzle, Martin

    2011-09-01

    This research is part of a program aiming at the development of a fluidic microsystem for in vitro drug testing. For this purpose, primary cells need to be assembled to form cellular aggregates in such a way as to resemble the basic functional units of organs. By providing for in vivo-like cellular contacts, proper extracellular matrix interaction and medium perfusion it is expected that cells will retain their phenotype over prolonged periods of time. In this way, in vitro test systems exhibiting in vivo type predictivity in drug testing are envisioned. Towards this goal a 3-D microstructure micro-milled in a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) was designed in such a way as to assemble liver cells via insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) in a sinusoid-type fashion. First, numeric modelling and simulation of dielectrophoretic and hydrodynamic forces acting on cells in this microsystem was performed. In particular, the problem of the discontinuity of the electric field at the interface between the fluid media in the system and the polymer materials it consists of was addressed. It was shown that in certain cases, the material of the microsystem may be neglected altogether without introducing considerable error into the numerical solution. This simplification enabled the simulation of 3-D cell trajectories in complex chip geometries. Secondly, the assembly of HepG2 cells by insulator-based dielectrophoresis in this device is demonstrated. Finally, theoretical results were validated by recording 3-D cell trajectories and the Clausius-Mossotti factor of liver cells was determined by combining results obtained from both simulation and experiment.

  7. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  8. Dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping: A new numerical tool for three-dimensional analysis of particle trajectories in a dielectrophoretic system.

    PubMed

    Knoerzer, Markus; Szydzik, Crispin; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco Javier; Tang, Xinke; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar

    2016-02-01

    Dielectrophoresis is a widely used means of manipulating suspended particles within microfluidic systems. In order to efficiently design such systems for a desired application, various numerical methods exist that enable particle trajectory plotting in two or three dimensions based on the interplay of hydrodynamic and dielectrophoretic forces. While various models are described in the literature, few are capable of modeling interactions between particles as well as their surrounding environment as these interactions are complex, multifaceted, and computationally expensive to the point of being prohibitive when considering a large number of particles. In this paper, we present a numerical model designed to enable spatial analysis of the physical effects exerted upon particles within microfluidic systems employing dielectrophoresis. The model presents a means of approximating the effects of the presence of large numbers of particles through dynamically adjusting hydrodynamic drag force based on particle density, thereby introducing a measure of emulated particle-particle and particle-liquid interactions. This model is referred to as "dynamic drag force based on iterative density mapping." The resultant numerical model is used to simulate and predict particle trajectory and velocity profiles within a microfluidic system incorporating curved dielectrophoretic microelectrodes. The simulated data are compared favorably with experimental data gathered using microparticle image velocimetry, and is contrasted against simulated data generated using traditional "effective moment Stokes-drag method," showing more accurate particle velocity profiles for areas of high particle density.

  9. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  10. Pitch Fractionation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    13 3. Solvent Fractionation Experiments .................................... 15 4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra for A240 Petrolem Pitch AG 12...34 and Mesophase Pitch AG 164B ............................... 21 5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra ................................... 23 6...compared by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis using a Digilab Model FTS 14 spectrophotometer (Rockwell International, Anaheim, California

  11. Effect of Gravity on the Near Field Flow Structure of Helium Jet in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Parthasarathy, Ramkumar; Griffin, DeVon

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have shown that a low-density jet injected into a high-density surrounding medium undergoes periodic oscillations in the near field. Although the flow oscillations in these jets at Richardson numbers about unity are attributed to the buoyancy, the direct physical evidence has not been acquired in the experiments. If the instability were indeed caused by buoyancy, the near-field flow structure would undergo drastic changes upon removal of gravity in the microgravity environment. The present study was conducted to investigate this effect by simulating microgravity environment in the 2.2-second drop tower at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The non-intrusive, rainbow schlieren deflectometry technique was used for quantitative measurements of helium concentrations in buoyant and non-buoyant jets. Results in a steady jet show that the radial growth of the jet shear layer in Earth gravity is hindered by the buoyant acceleration. The jet in microgravity was 30 to 70 percent wider than that in Earth gravity. The microgravity jet showed typical growth of a constant density jet shear layer. In case of a self-excited helium jet in Earth gravity, the flow oscillations continued as the jet flow adjusted to microgravity conditions in the drop tower. The flow oscillations were however not present at the end of the drop when steady microgravity conditions were reached.

  12. ApoStream™, a new dielectrophoretic device for antibody independent isolation and recovery of viable cancer cells from blood

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal; Jafferji, Insiya; Garza, Miguel; Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Hasegawa, David K.; Pethig, Ronald; Davis, Darren W.

    2012-01-01

    Isolation and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are used to monitor metastatic disease progression and guide cancer therapy. However, currently available technologies are limited to cells expressing specific cell surface markers, such as epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) or have limited specificity because they are based on cell size alone. We developed a device, ApoStream™ that overcomes these limitations by exploiting differences in the biophysical characteristics between cancer cells and normal, healthy blood cells to capture CTCs using dielectrophoretic technology in a microfluidic flow chamber. Further, the system overcomes throughput limitations by operating in continuous mode for efficient isolation and enrichment of CTCs from blood. The performance of the device was optimized using a design of experiment approach for key operating parameters such as frequency, voltage and flow rates, and buffer formulations. Cell spiking studies were conducted using SKOV3 or MDA-MB-231 cell lines that have a high and low expression level of EpCAM, respectively, to demonstrate linearity and precision of recovery independent of EpCAM receptor levels. The average recovery of SKOV3 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells spiked into approximately 12 × 106 peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from 7.5 ml normal human donor blood was 75.4% ± 3.1% (n = 12) and 71.2% ± 1.6% (n = 6), respectively. The intra-day and inter-day precision coefficients of variation of the device were both less than 3%. Linear regression analysis yielded a correlation coefficient (R2) of more than 0.99 for a spiking range of 4–2600 cells. The viability of MDA-MB-231 cancer cells captured with ApoStream was greater than 97.1% and there was no difference in cell growth up to 7 days in culture compared to controls. The ApoStream device demonstrated high precision and linearity of recovery of viable cancer cells independent of their EpCAM expression level. Isolation

  13. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  14. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  15. Size Determination of Aqueous C60 by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) and in-Line Dynamic Light Scattering

    EPA Science Inventory

    To date, studies on the environmental behaviour of aggregated aqueous fullerene nanomaterials have used the entire size distribution of fullerene aggregates and do not distinguish between different aggregate size classes. This is a direct result of the lack of analytical methods ...

  16. Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4) of Aqueous C60 Aggregates with Dynamic Light Scattering Size and LC-MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for the size determination of nanomaterials in aqueous suspension include dynamic or static light scattering and electron or atomic force microscopy techniques. Light scattering techniques are limited by poor resolution and the scattering intensity dependence on p...

  17. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation Online with Single Particle – Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry: Detection and Quantification of Silver Nanoparticles in Aqueous Samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly being used in many consumer products as disinfectants. Through the use of these products, AgNPs could likely enter aquatic environments. Because recent studies have shown that AgNPs are toxic to various species, including microorgan...

  18. Selective nanomanipulation of fluorescent polystyrene nano-beads and single quantum dots at gold nanostructures based on the AC-dielectrophoretic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinsik; Hwang, Kyo Seon; Lee, Sangyoup; Park, Jung Ho; Shin, Hyun-Joon

    2015-11-01

    We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and controlled for achieving a strong attaching force of nanoparticles using the gap between microelectrodes and nanostructures as well as the rotation of structures. Fluorescent PS nano-beads and QDs were attached at the designed end facet, side, and position of nanostructures with high selectivity. A single QD attachment was also realized at gold nanostructures, and the attached QDs were verified as single using optical ``blinking'' measurements.We introduced the selective manipulation of polystyrene (PS) nano-beads and single quantum dots (QDs) at a gold nanostructure by using the AC-dielectrophoretic (DEP) force. Manipulation in three degrees of freedom (end-facet, side, and position-selective manipulation) was accomplished in gold nanostructures between microelectrodes. A 10 μm gap between the microelectrodes, which has a 100 nm-wide nanowire and 200 nm-wide vortex nanostructures at the inside of the gap, was fabricated, and nanostructures were not connected with the electrodes. We also performed theoretical calculations to verify the selective manipulation through the floating AC-DEP force. A sufficiently high gradient of the square of the electric field (∇|E|2, ~1019 V2 m-3) was accomplished and

  19. Theoretical and experimental examination of particle-particle interaction effects on induced dipole moments and dielectrophoretic responses of multiple particle chains.

    PubMed

    Moncada-Hernandez, Hector; Nagler, Eliot; Minerick, Adrienne R

    2014-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), an electrokinetic phenomenon based on particle polarizations in nonuniform electric fields, is increasingly employed for particle and cell characterizations and manipulations in microdevices. However, particle number densities are rarely varied and particle-particle interactions are largely overlooked, but both affect particle's effective polarizations by changing the local electric field, which directly impacts particle assembly into chains. This work examines theoretical and experimental particle-particle interactions and dielectrophoretic responses in nonuniform electric fields, then presents individual and chain velocities of spherical polystyrene microparticles and red blood cells (RBCs) under DEP forces in a modified quadruple electrode microdevice. Velocities are independently compared between 1, 2, 3, and 4 polystyrene beads and RBCs assembled into chains aligned with the electric field. Simulations compared induced dipole moments for particles experiencing the same (single point) and changing (multiple points) electric fields. Experiments and simulations are compared by plotting DEP velocities versus applied signal frequency from 1 kHz to 80 MHz. Simulations indicate differences in the DEP force exerted on each particle according to chain position. Simulations and experiments show excellent qualitative agreement; chains with more particles experienced a decrease in the DEP response for both polystyrene beads and RBCs. These results advance understanding of the extent that induced dipole polarizations with multiple particle chains affect observed behaviors in electrokinetic cellular diagnostic systems.

  20. On-chip concentration of bacteria using a 3D dielectrophoretic chip and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-hyeong; Lee, Jeong-Gun

    2010-06-01

    We report the on-chip concentration of bacteria using a dielectrophoretic (DEP) chip with 3D electrodes and subsequent laser-based DNA extraction in the same chip. The DEP chip has a set of interdigitated Au post electrodes with 50 µm height to generate a network of non-uniform electric fields for the efficient trapping by DEP. The metal post array was fabricated by photolithography and subsequent Ni and Au electroplating. Three model bacteria samples (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans) were tested and over 80-fold concentrations were achieved within 2 min. Subsequently, on-chip DNA extraction from the concentrated bacteria in the 3D DEP chip was performed by laser irradiation using the laser-irradiated magnetic bead system (LIMBS) in the same chip. The extracted DNA was analyzed with silicon chip-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The total process of on-chip bacteria concentration and the subsequent DNA extraction can be completed within 10 min including the manual operation time.

  1. Semiautomated isolation and molecular characterisation of single or highly purified tumour cells from CellSearch enriched blood samples using dielectrophoretic cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, D J E; De Laere, B; Van den Eynden, G G; Van Laere, S J; Rothé, F; Ignatiadis, M; Sieuwerts, A M; Lambrechts, D; Rutten, A; van Dam, P A; Pauwels, P; Peeters, M; Vermeulen, P B; Dirix, L Y

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molecular characterisation of single circulating tumour cells (CTCs) holds considerable promise for predictive biomarker assessment and to explore CTC heterogeneity. We evaluate a new method, the DEPArray system, that allows the dielectrophoretic manipulation and isolation of single and 100% purified groups of CTCs from pre-enriched blood samples and explore the feasibility of their molecular characterisation. Methods: Samples containing known numbers of two cell populations were used to assess cell loss during sample loading. Cultured breast cancer cells were isolated from spiked blood samples using CellSearch CTC and Profile kits. Single tumour cells and groups of up to 10 tumour cells were recovered with the DEPArray system and subjected to transcriptional and mutation analysis. Results: On average, 40% cell loss was observed when loading samples to the DEPArray system. Expected mutations in clinically relevant markers could be obtained for 60% of single recovered tumour cells and all groups of tumour cells. Reliable gene expression profiles were obtained from single cells and groups of up to 10 cells for 2 out of 3 spiked breast cancer cell lines. Conclusion: We describe a semiautomated workflow for the isolation of small groups of 1 to 10 tumour cells from whole blood samples and provide proof of principle for the feasibility of their comprehensive molecular characterisation. PMID:23470469

  2. Bovine red blood cell starvation age discrimination through a glutaraldehyde-amplified dielectrophoretic approach with buffer selection and membrane cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Zachary; Gordon, Jason; Sengupta, Shramik; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    2008-06-01

    We report a novel buffer electric and dielectric relaxation time tuning technique, coupled with a glutaraldehyde (Glt.) cross-linking cell fixation reaction that allows for sensitive dielectrophoretic analysis and discrimination of bovine red blood cells of different starvation age. Guided by a single-shell oblate spheroid model, a zwitterion buffer composition is selected to ensure that two measurable crossover frequencies (cof's) near 500 kHz exist for dielectrophoresis (DEP) within a small range of each other. It is shown that the low cof is sensitive to changes in the cell membrane dielectric constant, in which cross-linking by Glt. reduces the dielectric constant of the cell membrane from 10.5 to 3.8, while the high cof is sensitive to cell cytoplasm conductivity changes. We speculate that this enhanced particle polarizability that results from the cross-linking reaction is because younger (reduced starvation time) cells possess more amino groups that the reaction can release to enhance the cell interior ionic strength. Such sensitive discrimination of cells with different age (surface protein density) by DEP is not possible without the zwitterion buffer and cleavage by Glt. treatment. It is then expected that rapid identification and sorting of healthy from diseased cells can be similarly sensitized.

  3. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  4. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  5. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  6. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude.

  7. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  8. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  9. Pitch fractionation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, V.L.; White, J.L.

    1981-12-15

    Petroleum pitch (Ashland A240) has been subjected to thermal treatment and solvent fractionation to produce refined pitches to be evaluated as impregnants for carbon-carbon composites. The solvent fractions were obtained by sequential Soxhlet extraction with solvents such as hexane, cyclohexane, toluene, and pyridine. The most severe thermal treatment produced a mesophase pitch (approximately 50% mesophase); an appreciable portion of the mesophase was soluble in strong solvents. There were substantial differences in chemical composition and in pyrolysis behavior of the fractions. As the depth of fraction increased, the pyrolysis yield and bloating increased, and the microstructure of the coke became finer until glassy microconstituents were formed in the deepest fractions.

  10. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  11. Fractionation and composition of colloidal and suspended particulate materials in rivers.

    PubMed

    Ran, Y; Fu, J M; Sheng, G Y; Beckett, R; Hart, B T

    2000-07-01

    The association of pollutants (nutrients, heavy metals and organic compounds) with colloidal and suspended particle matter (SPM) plays a dominant role in determining their transport, fate, biogeochemistry, bioavailability and toxicity in natural waters. A scheme for the fractionation and composition of colloidal and SPM from river waters has been tested. All four separation methods, i.e. sieving, continuous flow centrifugation, tangential flow filtration, sedimentation field-flow fractionation, were for the first time used to separate five size particulate fractions from river. Significant (gram) amounts of colloidal material (<1 microm) in three size ranges, nominally 1-0.2, 0.2-0.006 and 0.006-0.003 microm were obtained. The separation scheme was able to process large samples (100 l), within reasonable times (1 day) and the apparatus was portable. The aquatic colloid size was also characterized with high resolution by using sedimentation field-flow fractionation technique. The mass-based particle size distribution for the water sample showed a broad size distribution between 0.05 and 0.4 microm with the maximum around 0.14 microm. There was a systematic increase in the content of organic carbon (estimated by loss on ignition), Mg, Ca, Na, Cu and Zn with decreasing particle size, highlighting the importance of the colloidal (<1 microm) fraction. It was concluded that the colloidal Cu and Zn concentrations in rivers might be much higher than those reported before.

  12. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  13. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  14. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  15. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  16. On fractional programming

    SciTech Connect

    Bajona-Xandri, C.; Martinez-Legaz, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper studies the minimax fractional programming problem, assuming quasiconvexity of the objective function, under the lower subdifferentiability viewpoint. Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions and dual properties are found. We present applications of this theory to find the Pareto efficient solutions of a multiobjective fractional problem and to solve several economic models.

  17. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  18. Fractional dissipative standard map.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Edelman, M

    2010-06-01

    Using kicked differential equations of motion with derivatives of noninteger orders, we obtain generalizations of the dissipative standard map. The main property of these generalized maps, which are called fractional maps, is long-term memory. The memory effect in the fractional maps means that their present state of evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. Already a small deviation of the order of derivative from the integer value corresponding to the regular dissipative standard map (small memory effects) leads to the qualitatively new behavior of the corresponding attractors. The fractional dissipative standard maps are used to demonstrate a new type of fractional attractors in the wide range of the fractional orders of derivatives.

  19. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  20. Fractionation and characterization of nano- and microparticles in liquid media.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, Petr S; Vanifatova, Nataliya G; Shkinev, Valery M; Spivakov, Boris Ya

    2011-06-01

    Submicron and micron particles present in liquid environmental, biological, and technological samples differ in their dimensions, shape, mass, chemical composition, and charge. Their properties cannot be reliably studied unless the particles are fractionated. Synthetic particles applied as components of analytical systems may also need preliminary fractionation and investigation. The review is focused on the methods for fractionation and characterization of nanoparticles and microparticles in liquid media, the most representative examples of their application, and the trends in developing novel approaches to the separation and investigation of particles. Among the separation techniques, the main attention is devoted to membrane filtration, field-flow fractionation, chromatographic, and capillary electrokinetic methods. Microfluidic systems employing the above-mentioned and other separation principles and providing a basis for the fabrication of lab-on-chip devices are also examined. Laser light scattering methods and other physical techniques for the characterization of particles are considered. Special attention is given to "hyphenated" techniques which enable the separation and characterization of particles to be performed in online modes.

  1. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  2. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  3. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  4. Thermodynamics in Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilanov, R. P.; Magomedov, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of thermodynamics in the formalism of fractional-order derivatives is given. Results of the traditional thermodynamics of Carnot, Clausius, and Helmholtz are obtained in the particular case where the exponent of a fractional-order derivative is equal to unity. A one-parametric "fractal" equation of state is obtained with account of the second virial coefficient. The application of the resulting equation of state in the case of the gas argon is considered.

  5. Symmetric continued fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Panprasitwech, Oranit; Laohakosol, Vichian; Chaichana, Tuangrat

    2010-11-11

    Explicit formulae for continued fractions with symmetric patterns in their partial quotients are constructed in the field of formal power series. Similar to the work of Cohn in 1996, which generalized the so-called folding lemma to {kappa}-fold symmetry, the notion of {kappa}-duplicating symmetric continued fractions is investigated using a modification of the 1995 technique due to Clemens, Merrill and Roeder.

  6. Chromatographic methods of fractionation.

    PubMed

    Friesen, A D

    1987-01-01

    Chromatography's functional versatility, separation efficiency, gentle non-denaturing separating process and ease of automation and scale-up make it attractive for industrial scale protein purification. The Winnipeg Rh Institute's new Plasma Fractionation facility is an example of the use of chromatography for the large scale purification of plasma protein fractions. The fractionation facility has a capacity to process 800 litres of plasma per batch into blood clotting factor VIII and IX, albumin and intravenous immune serum globulin (i.v. ISG). Albumin and i.v. ISG are purified using ion exchange columns of DEAE-Sepharose (230 litre size), DEAE-Biogel (150 litre size) and CM-Sepharose (150 litre size). The chromatographic process is automated using a Modicon 584 Programmable Logic Controller to regulate valves, pumps and sensors which control plasma flow during fractionation. The stainless steel tanks and piping are automatically cleaned-in-place. The high degree of automation and cleaning provides efficient operation and sanitary processing. Chromatographic methods (DEAE-Sepharose and metal chelation) are also being used at the pilot scale to purify the human blood products superoxide dismutase and hemoglobin from outdated red blood cells. Characterization of the protein fractions produced by chromatography has shown them to be of equal or higher quality than fractions produced by other techniques.

  7. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  8. Continuous separation of breast cancer cells from blood samples using multi-orifice flow fractionation (MOFF) and dielectrophoresis (DEP).

    PubMed

    Moon, Hui-Sung; Kwon, Kiho; Kim, Seung-Il; Han, Hyunju; Sohn, Joohyuk; Lee, Soohyeon; Jung, Hyo-Il

    2011-03-21

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are highly correlated with the invasive behavior of cancer, so their isolations and quantifications are important for biomedical applications such as cancer prognosis and measuring the responses to drug treatments. In this paper, we present the development of a microfluidic device for the separation of CTCs from blood cells based on the physical properties of cells. For use as a CTC model, we successfully separated human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) from a spiked blood cell sample by combining multi-orifice flow fractionation (MOFF) and dielectrophoretic (DEP) cell separation technique. Hydrodynamic separation takes advantage of the massive and high-throughput filtration of blood cells as it can accommodate a very high flow rate. DEP separation plays a role in precise post-processing to enhance the efficiency of the separation. The serial combination of these two different sorting techniques enabled high-speed continuous flow-through separation without labeling. We observed up to a 162-fold increase in MCF-7 cells at a 126 µL min(-1) flow rate. Red and white blood cells were efficiently removed with separation efficiencies of 99.24% and 94.23% respectively. Therefore, we suggest that our system could be used for separation and detection of CTCs from blood cells for biomedical applications.

  9. Identifying Fractions on Number Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, George W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the ways students represented fractions on number lines and the effects of instruction on those representations. The instruction primarily concerned representing fractions and ordering fractions on number lines. (Author/PK)

  10. Release Fraction Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2004-01-01

    This document presents results of experiments conducted to measure release fractions during certain tank retrieval processes. The tests were performed in a 1/4 scale model of a waste storage tank. The retrieval processes simulated were: (1) Discharging liquid or slurry from the mouth of a vertically oriented two-in. Schedule 40 pipe. The discharging material was in free-fall from the mouth of the pipe near the top of the tank into a liquid or slurry pool at the bottom of the tank. (2) The jet from a 9/16-in.-diameter nozzle transferring liquid or slurry waste from one side of the tank to the other. The discharging liquid was aimed at the opposite side of the tank from the nozzle and either impacted the tank wall or fell into a liquid or slurry pool in the bottom of the tank. (3) A high pressure fan jet of liquid striking a steel plate or simulated waste from a stand-off distance of a few inches. For each process, a water-soluble fluorescent dye was added to the liquid fraction as a tracer. Kaolin clay was used to represent the solids. The tank was covered and there was no forced ventilation in the tank during the tests. Six air samples were collected during each test. The air samples were collected at fixed positions in the tank. The air sample filters were dried and weighed to determine the solids collection. The fluorescent dye was then leached from each filter and quantified with a fluorometer to determine the collection of liquid. Samples of the slurry and liquid simulants were also collected to determine the quantities of simulant used in each test. To calculate the release fraction, the quantity collected on each air sample was adjusted for the fraction of the tank volume sampled and divided by the quantity of material exposed in the simulation. The method was not as sensitive for the solids content as it was for the liquid content, but in those instances where a solids release fraction was determined, it was in relatively good agreement with that of the

  11. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  12. Fractionating nanosilver: importance for determining toxicity to aquatic test organisms.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan J; Hull, Matthew S; Bednar, Anthony J; Goss, Jennifer D; Gunter, Jonas C; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Vikesland, Peter J; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2010-12-15

    This investigation applied novel techniques for characterizing and fractionating nanosilver particles and aggregates and relating these measurements to toxicological endpoints. The acute toxicity of eight nanosilver suspensions of varying primary particle sizes (10-80 nm) and coatings (citrate, polyvinylpyrrolidone, EDTA, proprietary) was assessed using three aquatic test organisms (Daphnia magna, Pimephales promelas, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata). When 48-h lethal median concentrations (LC50) were expressed as total silver, both D. magna and P. promelas were significantly more sensitive to ionic silver (Ag(+)) as AgNO(3) (mean LC50 = 1.2 and 6.3 μg/L, respectively) relative to a wide range in LC50 values determined for the nanosilver suspensions (2 -126 μg/L). However, when LC50 values for nanosilver suspensions were expressed as fractionated nanosilver (Ag(+) and/or <4 nm particles), determined by ultracentrifugation of particles and confirmed field-flow-fractograms, the LC50 values (0.3-5.6 μg/L) were comparable to the values obtained for ionic Ag(+) as AgNO(3). These results suggest that dissolved Ag(+) plays a critical role in acute toxicity and underscores the importance of characterizing dissolved fractions in nanometal suspensions.

  13. Breakdown of doublet recirculation and direct line drives by far-field flow in reservoirs: implications for geothermal and hydrocarbon well placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, R.; van Harmelen, A.

    2016-07-01

    An important real world application of doublet flow occurs in well design of both geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs. A guiding principle for fluid management of injection and extraction wells is that mass balance is commonly assumed between the injected and produced fluid. Because the doublets are considered closed loops, the injection fluid is assumed to eventually reach the producer well and all the produced fluid ideally comes from stream tubes connected to the injector of the well pair making up the doublet. We show that when an aquifer background flow occurs, doublets will rarely retain closed loops of fluid recirculation. When the far-field flow rate increases relative to the doublet's strength, the area occupied by the doublet will diminish and eventually vanishes. Alternatively, rather than using a single injector (source) and single producer (sink), a linear array of multiple injectors separated by some distance from a parallel array of producers can be used in geothermal energy projects as well as in waterflooding of hydrocarbon reservoirs. Fluid flow in such an arrangement of parallel source-sink arrays is shown to be macroscopically equivalent to that of a line doublet. Again, any far-field flow that is strong enough will breach through the line doublet, which then splits into two vortices. Apart from fundamental insight into elementary flow dynamics, our new results provide practical clues that may contribute to improve the planning and design of doublets and direct line drives commonly used for flow management of groundwater, geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  14. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  15. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; ...

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  16. Sweet Work with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  17. Fraction collector for electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1977-01-01

    Rotating-tube electrophoresis apparatus employs rotating jet of eluting buffer to reduce effects of convection during separation. Designed for separation of microorganisms and biological species, system combines gravity/gradient compensating of lumen with buffer flush at fraction outlet to increase separation efficiency.

  18. Young Children's Notations for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brizuela, Barbara M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the kinds of notations young children make for fractional numbers. The extant literature in the area of fractional numbers acknowledges children's difficulties in conceptualizing fractional numbers. Some of the research suggests possibly delaying an introduction to conventional notations for algorithms and fractions until…

  19. Creating, Naming, and Justifying Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Daniel; Gaskin, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    For students to develop meaningful conceptions of fractions and fraction operations, they need to think of fractions in terms other than as just whole-number combinations. In this article, we suggest two powerful images for thinking about fractions that move beyond whole-number reasoning. (Contains 5 figures.)

  20. Arbitrage with fractional Gaussian processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xili; Xiao, Weilin

    2017-04-01

    While the arbitrage opportunity in the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Brownian motion has a long history, the arbitrage strategy in the Black-Scholes model driven by general fractional Gaussian processes is in its infancy. The development of stochastic calculus with respect to fractional Gaussian processes allowed us to study such models. In this paper, following the idea of Shiryaev (1998), an arbitrage strategy is constructed for the Black-Scholes model driven by fractional Gaussian processes, when the stochastic integral is interpreted in the Riemann-Stieltjes sense. Arbitrage opportunities in some fractional Gaussian processes, including fractional Brownian motion, sub-fractional Brownian motion, bi-fractional Brownian motion, weighted-fractional Brownian motion and tempered fractional Brownian motion, are also investigated.

  1. Testing fractional action cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchigolev, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    The present work deals with a combined test of the so-called Fractional Action Cosmology (FAC) on the example of a specific model obtained by the author earlier. In this model, the effective cosmological term is proportional to the Hubble parameter squared through the so-called kinematic induction. The reason of studying this cosmological model could be explained by its ability to describe two periods of accelerated expansion, that is in agreement with the recent observations and the cosmological inflation paradigm. First of all, we put our model through the theoretical tests, which gives a general conception of the influence of the model parameters on its behavior. Then, we obtain some restrictions on the principal parameters of the model, including the fractional index, by means of the observational data. Finally, the cosmography parameters and the observational data compared to the theoretical predictions are presented both analytically and graphically.

  2. Fractional lattice charge transport

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Sergej; Khomeriki, Ramaz

    2017-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of noninteracting quantum particles on a square lattice in the presence of a magnetic flux α and a dc electric field E oriented along the lattice diagonal. In general, the adiabatic dynamics will be characterized by Bloch oscillations in the electrical field direction and dispersive ballistic transport in the perpendicular direction. For rational values of α and a corresponding discrete set of values of E(α) vanishing gaps in the spectrum induce a fractionalization of the charge in the perpendicular direction - while left movers are still performing dispersive ballistic transport, the complementary fraction of right movers is propagating in a dispersionless relativistic manner in the opposite direction. Generalizations and the possible probing of the effect with atomic Bose-Einstein condensates and photonic networks are discussed. Zak phase of respective band associated with gap closing regime has been computed and it is found converging to π/2 value. PMID:28102302

  3. Floquet Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushin, Adolfo G.; Gómez-León, Álvaro; Neupert, Titus

    2014-04-01

    We show theoretically that periodically driven systems with short range Hubbard interactions offer a feasible platform to experimentally realize fractional Chern insulator states. We exemplify the procedure for both the driven honeycomb and the square lattice, where we derive the effective steady state band structure of the driven system by using the Floquet theory and subsequently study the interacting system with exact numerical diagonalization. The fractional Chern insulator state equivalent to the 1/3 Laughlin state appears at 7/12 total filling (1/6 filling of the upper band). The state also features spontaneous ferromagnetism and is thus an example of the spontaneous breaking of a continuous symmetry along with a topological phase transition. We discuss light-driven graphene and shaken optical lattices as possible experimental systems that can realize such a state.

  4. Fractional Trajectories: Decorrelation Versus Friction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-27

    from the integration of fractional differential equations in time. In Section 2 we provide a general demonstration of the new perspective on fractional ...section we demonstrate the equivalence between a fractional trajectory that is the solution of a Caputo fractional differential equation , and the... fractional differential equation dα dtα V(t) = OV(t), (1) where 0 < α < 1 and O is an operator, either linear or nonlinear, acting on the vector V(t

  5. Fractional Galilean symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseiny, Ali; Rouhani, Shahin

    2016-09-01

    We generalize the differential representation of the operators of the Galilean algebras to include fractional derivatives. As a result a whole new class of scale invariant Galilean algebras are obtained. The first member of this class has dynamical index z = 2 similar to the Schrödinger algebra. The second member of the class has dynamical index z = 3 / 2, which happens to be the dynamical index Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation.

  6. New Dry Fractionation Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation describes new fractionation methods that are used to create dust that is respirable for testing the effects of inhalation of lunar dust in preparation for future manned lunar exploration. Because lunar dust is a very limited commodity, a method that does not result in loss of the material had to be developed. The dust separation system that is described incorporates some traditional methods, while preventing the dust from being contaminated or changed in reactivity properties while also limiting losses.

  7. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  8. [Ablative and fractional lasers].

    PubMed

    Beylot, C; Grognard, C; Michaud, T

    2009-10-01

    The use of pulsed or scanning Carbon Dioxide, and pulsed Erbium-YAG lasers allows the programmable and reproducible photocoagulation of thin layers of the epidermis and superficial dermis. Thermal damage depends on the type of laser and is greater with CO(2) lasers. The degree of neocollagenesis is proportional to the thermal damage and is better with CO(2) lasers. Their main indication is the correction of photoaged facial skin but they can also be used for corrective dermatology, e.g. for scars and genodermatosis. Results are highly satisfactory but the technique is invasive and the patient experiences a social hindrance of around two weeks. Fractionated techniques treat 25% of the defective skin area at each session in noncontiguous microzones; four sessions are therefore necessary to treat the entire cutaneous surface. The treatment is given under topical anesthesia and is much less invasive, particularly with nonablative fractional laser treatment in which photothermolysis does not penetrate below the epidermis and/or the effects are slight, with no or very little social isolation. However, the results are much less satisfactory than the results of ablative laser and there is no firming effect. Other zones than the face can be treated. With the fractional CO(2) and Erbium ablative lasers, which have multiplied over the past 2 years, the much wider impacts cause perforation of the epidermis and there is a zone of ablation by laser photovaporization, with a zone of thermal damage below. The results are better in correcting photoaging of the face, without, however, achieving the efficacy of ablative lasers, which remain the reference technique. However, the effects are not insignificant, requiring at least 5 days of social isolation.

  9. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    1994-01-01

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynscronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board.

  10. Fractional channel multichannel analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Anderson, G.A.

    1994-08-23

    A multichannel analyzer incorporating the features of the present invention obtains the effect of fractional channels thus greatly reducing the number of actual channels necessary to record complex line spectra. This is accomplished by using an analog-to-digital converter in the asynchronous mode, i.e., the gate pulse from the pulse height-to-pulse width converter is not synchronized with the signal from a clock oscillator. This saves power and reduces the number of components required on the board to achieve the effect of radically expanding the number of channels without changing the circuit board. 9 figs.

  11. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  12. Body Fractions: A Physical Approach to Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Many students experience great difficulty understanding the meaning of fractions. For many students who have spent their early mathematics lessons focusing on counting (whole) numbers, recognising that there are many numbers between those whole numbers called fractional numbers, is quite revolutionary. The foundation of understanding fractions is…

  13. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping ...

  14. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2016-07-14

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  15. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  16. The random continued fraction transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalle, Charlene; Kempton, Tom; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a random dynamical system related to continued fraction expansions. It uses random combinations of the Gauss map and the Rényi (or backwards) continued fraction map. We explore the continued fraction expansions that this system produces, as well as the dynamical properties of the system.

  17. Fractional diffusion on bounded domains

    DOE PAGES

    Defterli, Ozlem; D'Elia, Marta; Du, Qiang; ...

    2015-03-13

    We found that the mathematically correct specification of a fractional differential equation on a bounded domain requires specification of appropriate boundary conditions, or their fractional analogue. In this paper we discuss the application of nonlocal diffusion theory to specify well-posed fractional diffusion equations on bounded domains.

  18. Numerical approaches to fractional calculus and fractional ordinary differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changpin; Chen, An; Ye, Junjie

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, fractional calculus are used to model various different phenomena in nature, but due to the non-local property of the fractional derivative, it still remains a lot of improvements in the present numerical approaches. In this paper, some new numerical approaches based on piecewise interpolation for fractional calculus, and some new improved approaches based on the Simpson method for the fractional differential equations are proposed. We use higher order piecewise interpolation polynomial to approximate the fractional integral and fractional derivatives, and use the Simpson method to design a higher order algorithm for the fractional differential equations. Error analyses and stability analyses are also given, and the numerical results show that these constructed numerical approaches are efficient.

  19. Fractional chemotaxis diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Langlands, T A M; Henry, B I

    2010-05-01

    We introduce mesoscopic and macroscopic model equations of chemotaxis with anomalous subdiffusion for modeling chemically directed transport of biological organisms in changing chemical environments with diffusion hindered by traps or macromolecular crowding. The mesoscopic models are formulated using continuous time random walk equations and the macroscopic models are formulated with fractional order differential equations. Different models are proposed depending on the timing of the chemotactic forcing. Generalizations of the models to include linear reaction dynamics are also derived. Finally a Monte Carlo method for simulating anomalous subdiffusion with chemotaxis is introduced and simulation results are compared with numerical solutions of the model equations. The model equations developed here could be used to replace Keller-Segel type equations in biological systems with transport hindered by traps, macromolecular crowding or other obstacles.

  20. Soot Volume Fraction Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S.; Ku, Jerry C.

    1994-01-01

    A new technique is described for the full-field determination of soot volume fractions via laser extinction measurements. This technique differs from previously reported point-wise methods in that a two-dimensional array (i.e., image) of data is acquired simultaneously. In this fashion, the net data rate is increased, allowing the study of time-dependent phenomena and the investigation of spatial and temporal correlations. A telecentric imaging configuration is employed to provide depth-invariant magnification and to permit the specification of the collection angle for scattered light. To improve the threshold measurement sensitivity, a method is employed to suppress undesirable coherent imaging effects. A discussion of the tomographic inversion process is provided, including the results obtained from numerical simulation. Results obtained with this method from an ethylene diffusion flame are shown to be in close agreement with those previously obtained by sequential point-wise interrogation.

  1. Functional fractionation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Haver, V M; Gear, A R

    1981-02-01

    Studies of platelet populations suggest that they are heterogeneous in size, age, and metabolic parameters. In an attempt to correlate these parameters with efficiency of aggregation, a new technique, functional fractionation, was developed. Platelet populations are separated by their differential reactivity to aggregating agents. For example, low doses of ADP (0.1 to 0.7 microM) are added to stirred PRP, after which gentle centrifugation is used to remove aggregates from single unreacted platelets. The loose aggregates can be readily dispersed for comparison of the physical or biochemical properties of the reacted versus unreacted platelets. It was found that reactive platelets were larger (6.5 micrometer3) than unreacted platelets (5.51 micrometer3). No significant difference in density existed between the two populations, and no release of [14C]serotonin from prelabeled platelets occurred during functional fractionation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size difference and revealed that in both populations platelets were structurally intact with a normal discoid shape and no significant difference in organelle content. Human platelets most reactive to ADP were also enriched in glycogen (3.6-fold), ATP (1.6-fold), and ADP (twofold), compared with less reactive cells. These "reactive" cells took up more 51[Cr] and contained 1.9 times more surface sialic acid. In an in vivo aging experiment, rats were injected with 75[Se]methionine. Shortly after labeling (1 day), the most reactive platelets possessed the highest amount of 75[Se]. These results reveal that functionally active platelets, which are also larger, are more active metabolically than less reactive platelets, possess a higher negative surface charge, and may be a younger population.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF SUB-MICRON AQUEOUS IRON(III) COLLOIDS FORMED IN THE PRESENCE OF PHOSPHATE BY SEDIMENTATION FIELD FLOW FRACTIONATION WITH MULTI-ANGLE LASER LIGHT SCATTERING DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron colloids play a major role in the water chemistry of natural watersheds and of engineered drinking water distribution systems. Phosphate is frequently added to distribution systems to control corrosion problems, so iron-phosphate colloids may form through reaction of iron in...

  3. Fraction Reduction in Membrane Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction. PMID:24772037

  4. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Wurstbauer, U; Wójs, A; Pinczuk, A; Jain, J K

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  5. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    SciTech Connect

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; Pinczuk, A.; Jain, J. K.

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeeman energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.

  6. Fractional variational calculus in terms of Riesz fractional derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, O. P.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents extensions of traditional calculus of variations for systems containing Riesz fractional derivatives (RFDs). Specifically, we present generalized Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems (FVPs) defined in terms of RFDs. We consider two problems, a simple FVP and an FVP of Lagrange. Results of the first problem are extended to problems containing multiple fractional derivatives, functions and parameters, and to unspecified boundary conditions. For the second problem, we present Lagrange-type multiplier rules. For both problems, we develop the Euler-Lagrange-type necessary conditions which must be satisfied for the given functional to be extremum. Problems are considered to demonstrate applications of the formulations. Explicitly, we introduce fractional momenta, fractional Hamiltonian, fractional Hamilton equations of motion, fractional field theory and fractional optimal control. The formulations presented and the resulting equations are similar to the formulations for FVPs given in Agrawal (2002 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 368, 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 10375) and to those that appear in the field of classical calculus of variations. These formulations are simple and can be extended to other problems in the field of fractional calculus of variations.

  7. Rapid flow fractionation of particles combining liquid and particulate dielectrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Michael R. (Inventor); Lomakin, Oleg (Inventor); Jones, Thomas B. (Inventor); Ahmed, Rajib (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Rapid, size-based, deposition of particles from liquid suspension is accomplished using a nonuniform electric field created by coplanar microelectrode strips patterned on an insulating substrate. The scheme uses the dielectrophoretic force both to distribute aqueous liquid containing particles and, simultaneously, to separate the particles. Size-based separation is found within nanoliter droplets formed along the structure after voltage removal. Bioparticles or macromolecules of similar size can also be separated based on subtle differences in dielectric property, by controlling the frequency of the AC current supplied to the electrodes.

  8. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  9. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  10. Fractional-time quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iomin, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Application of the fractional calculus to quantum processes is presented. In particular, the quantum dynamics is considered in the framework of the fractional time Schrödinger equation (SE), which differs from the standard SE by the fractional time derivative: partial differential/partial differentialt --> partial differential(alpha)/partial differentialt(alpha). It is shown that for alpha=1/2 the fractional SE is isospectral to a comb model. An analytical expression for the Green's functions of the systems are obtained. The semiclassical limit is discussed.

  11. Fractional random walk lattice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelitsch, T. M.; Collet, B. A.; Riascos, A. P.; Nowakowski, A. F.; Nicolleau, F. C. G. A.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze time-discrete and time-continuous ‘fractional’ random walks on undirected regular networks with special focus on cubic periodic lattices in n  =  1, 2, 3,.. dimensions. The fractional random walk dynamics is governed by a master equation involving fractional powers of Laplacian matrices {{L}\\fracα{2}}} where α =2 recovers the normal walk. First we demonstrate that the interval 0<α ≤slant 2 is admissible for the fractional random walk. We derive analytical expressions for the transition matrix of the fractional random walk and closely related the average return probabilities. We further obtain the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} , and the mean relaxation time (Kemeny constant) for the fractional random walk. The representation for the fundamental matrix {{Z}(α )} relates fractional random walks with normal random walks. We show that the matrix elements of the transition matrix of the fractional random walk exihibit for large cubic n-dimensional lattices a power law decay of an n-dimensional infinite space Riesz fractional derivative type indicating emergence of Lévy flights. As a further footprint of Lévy flights in the n-dimensional space, the transition matrix and return probabilities of the fractional random walk are dominated for large times t by slowly relaxing long-wave modes leading to a characteristic {{t}-\\frac{n{α}} -decay. It can be concluded that, due to long range moves of fractional random walk, a small world property is emerging increasing the efficiency to explore the lattice when instead of a normal random walk a fractional random walk is chosen.

  12. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  13. Rational Exponentials and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Using continued fraction expansions, we can approximate constants, such as pi and e, using an appropriate integer n raised to the power x[superscript 1/x], x a suitable rational. We review continued fractions and give an algorithm for producing these approximations.

  14. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  15. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, J.; Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  16. Radiating subdispersive fractional optical solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, J. Espinosa, A.; Rodríguez, R. F.; Malomed, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    It was recently found [Fujioka et al., Phys. Lett. A 374, 1126 (2010)] that the propagation of solitary waves can be described by a fractional extension of the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation which involves a temporal fractional derivative (TFD) of order α > 2. In the present paper, we show that there is also another fractional extension of the NLS equation which contains a TFD with α < 2, and in this case, the new equation describes the propagation of radiating solitons. We show that the emission of the radiation (when α < 2) is explained by resonances at various frequencies between the pulses and the linear modes of the system. It is found that the new fractional NLS equation can be derived from a suitable Lagrangian density, and a fractional Noether's theorem can be applied to it, thus predicting the conservation of the Hamiltonian, momentum and energy.

  17. A new fractional wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a potent tool to analyze the time-varying signal. However, it fails in locating the fractional Fourier domain (FRFD)-frequency contents which is required in some applications. A novel fractional wavelet transform (FRWT) is proposed to solve this problem. It displays the time and FRFD-frequency information jointly in the time-FRFD-frequency plane. The definition, basic properties, inverse transform and reproducing kernel of the proposed FRWT are considered. It has been shown that an FRWT with proper order corresponds to the classical wavelet transform (WT). The multiresolution analysis (MRA) associated with the developed FRWT, together with the construction of the orthogonal fractional wavelets are also presented. Three applications are discussed: the analysis of signal with time-varying frequency content, the FRFD spectrum estimation of signals that involving noise, and the construction of fractional Harr wavelet. Simulations verify the validity of the proposed FRWT.

  18. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  19. Arsenic speciation in the dispersible colloidal fraction of soils from a mine-impacted creek.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Susana; Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; O'Day, Peggy A; Laborda, Francisco; Bolea, Eduardo; Garrido, Fernando

    2015-04-09

    Arsenic and iron speciation in the dispersible colloid fraction (DCF; 10-1000 nm) from an As-rich mine waste pile, sediments of a streambed that collects runoff from waste pile, the streambed subsoil, and the sediments of a downstream pond were investigated by combining asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF)/inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy. Calcium, Fe and As (Fe/As molar ratio ∼ 1) were the main components of the DCF from waste pile. TEM/EDS and As and Fe XAS analysis revealed the presence of nanoparticle scorodite in this same DCF, as well as Fe nanoparticles in all samples downstream of the waste pile. Arsenic and Fe XAS showed As(V) adsorbed onto nanoparticulate ferrihydrite in the DCF of downstream samples. Micro-X-ray fluorescence indicated a strong correlation between Fe and As in phyllosilicate/Fe(3+) (oxi) hydroxide aggregates from the sediment pond. Fractionation analysis showed the mean particle size of the DCF from the streambed sample to be smaller than that of the streambed subsoil and sediment ponds samples. These results show that an important and variable fraction of As may be bound to dispersible colloids that can be released from contaminated soils and transported downstream in natural systems.

  20. Fractionally charged skyrmions in fractional quantum Hall effect

    DOE PAGES

    Balram, Ajit C.; Wurstbauer, U.; Wójs, A.; ...

    2015-11-26

    The fractional quantum Hall effect has inspired searches for exotic emergent topological particles, such as fractionally charged excitations, composite fermions, abelian and nonabelian anyons and Majorana fermions. Fractionally charged skyrmions, which support both topological charge and topological vortex-like spin structure, have also been predicted to occur in the vicinity of 1/3 filling of the lowest Landau level. The fractional skyrmions, however, are anticipated to be exceedingly fragile, suppressed by very small Zeeman energies. Here we show that, slightly away from 1/3 filling, the smallest manifestations of the fractional skyrmion exist in the excitation spectrum for a broad range of Zeemanmore » energies, and appear in resonant inelastic light scattering experiments as well-defined resonances slightly below the long wavelength spin wave mode. The spectroscopy of these exotic bound states serves as a sensitive tool for investigating the residual interaction between composite fermions, responsible for delicate new fractional quantum Hall states in this filling factor region.« less

  1. Recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon fractions.

    PubMed

    Hansell, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exhibits a spectrum of reactivity, from very fast turnover of the most bioavailable forms in the surface ocean to long-lived materials circulating within the ocean abyss. These disparate reactivities group DOC by fractions with distinctive functions in the cycling of carbon, ranging from support of the microbial loop to involvement in the biological pump to a hypothesized major source/sink of atmospheric CO(2) driving paleoclimate variability. Here, the major fractions constituting the global ocean's recalcitrant DOC pool are quantitatively and qualitatively characterized with reference to their roles in carbon biogeochemistry. A nomenclature for the fractions is proposed based on those roles.

  2. Australia's Next Top Fraction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Gould suggests Australia's next top fraction model should be a linear model rather than an area model. He provides a convincing argument and gives examples of ways to introduce a linear model in primary classrooms.

  3. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  4. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Pollack, J B; Kasting, J F

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system.

  5. Fractional characteristic times and dissipated energy in fractional linear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario; Pinnola, Francesco P.

    2016-08-01

    In fractional viscoelasticity the stress-strain relation is a differential equation with non-integer operators (derivative or integral). Such constitutive law is able to describe the mechanical behavior of several materials, but when fractional operators appear, the elastic and the viscous contribution are inseparable and the characteristic times (relaxation and retardation time) cannot be defined. This paper aims to provide an approach to separate the elastic and the viscous phase in the fractional stress-strain relation with the aid of an equivalent classical model (Kelvin-Voigt or Maxwell). For such equivalent model the parameters are selected by an optimization procedure. Once the parameters of the equivalent model are defined, characteristic times of fractional viscoelasticity are readily defined as ratio between viscosity and stiffness. In the numerical applications, three kinds of different excitations are considered, that is, harmonic, periodic, and pseudo-stochastic. It is shown that, for any periodic excitation, the equivalent models have some important features: (i) the dissipated energy per cycle at steady-state coincides with the Staverman-Schwarzl formulation of the fractional model, (ii) the elastic and the viscous coefficients of the equivalent model are strictly related to the storage and the loss modulus, respectively.

  6. Delayed coker fractionator advanced control

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisinghani, R.; Minter, B. ); Tica, A.; Puglesi, A.; Ojeda, R. )

    1993-08-01

    In a delayed coking process, as coke drum switches are made, rapid changes occur in both the fractionator feed rate and composition. With conventional control, it is not unusual to see long transient behavior of large swings in both quality and flowrates of coker gas oils. This can extract a heavy economic toll, not only in coker operation, but in the operation of downstream units as the upset is propagated. An advanced process control application (APC) was recently implemented on the coker fractionator at the Yacimentos Petroliferos Fiscales (YPF), Lujan de Cuyo Refinery, in Mendoza, Argentina. This coker fractionator control design was unique as it handled two different operating objectives: control of product qualities via tower temperature profile during normal operation and control of gas oil product flow ratio during drum switch. This combination of control objectives in one multivariable predictive control program was achieved by including special logic to decouple the individual tuning requirements. Also, additional logic was included to unambiguously detect and identify drum switch and drum steam out as discrete events within 30 seconds of their actual occurrence. These discrete events were then used as disturbance variables to minimize fractionator transient behavior. As a performance measure, the overhead temperature was controlled within 2 C to 2.5 C of its target, gas oil flows were stabilized during drum switches and steam generation via pump around was maximized. Overall, implementing advanced control for the delayed coker fractionator resulted in substantial benefits from product quality control, product flow control and minimized energy consumption.

  7. Dominoes as Fractions: Misconceptions and Understandings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Robin A.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students must arrange five fractions represented by dominoes in ascending order and justify their reasons for the ordering. Representing common fractions with dominoes helps identify students' misconceptions about fractions. (ASK)

  8. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  9. On Fractional Model Reference Adaptive Control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bao; Dong, Chao

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends the conventional Model Reference Adaptive Control systems to fractional ones based on the theory of fractional calculus. A control law and an incommensurate fractional adaptation law are designed for the fractional plant and the fractional reference model. The stability and tracking convergence are analyzed using the frequency distributed fractional integrator model and Lyapunov theory. Moreover, numerical simulations of both linear and nonlinear systems are performed to exhibit the viability and effectiveness of the proposed methodology. PMID:24574897

  10. Fractional Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Nick

    2002-11-01

    Some properties of the fractional Schrödinger equation are studied. We prove the Hermiticity of the fractional Hamilton operator and establish the parity conservation law for fractional quantum mechanics. As physical applications of the fractional Schrödinger equation we find the energy spectra of a hydrogenlike atom (fractional "Bohr atom") and of a fractional oscillator in the semiclassical approximation. An equation for the fractional probability current density is developed and discussed. We also discuss the relationships between the fractional and standard Schrödinger equations.

  11. Understanding Partitive Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Jack M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Concrete experience should be a first step in the development of new abstract concepts and their symbolization. Presents concrete activities based on Hyde and Nelson's work with egg cartons and Steiner's work with money to develop students' understanding of partitive division when using fractions. (MDH)

  12. Fractions, trees and unfinished business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shraiman, Boris

    In this talk, mourning the loss of a teacher and a dear friend, I would like to share some unfinished thoughts loosely connecting - via Farey fraction trees - Kadanoff's study of universality of quasi-periodic route to chaos with the effort to understand universal features of genealogical trees.

  13. Optimization in fractional aircraft ownership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, R. D.; Pasaribu, H. M.; Soewono, E.; Fayalita, R. A.

    2012-05-01

    Fractional Aircraft Ownership is a new concept in flight ownership management system where each individual or corporation may own a fraction of an aircraft. In this system, the owners have privilege to schedule their flight according to their needs. Fractional management companies (FMC) manages all aspects of aircraft operations, including utilization of FMC's aircraft in combination of outsourced aircrafts. This gives the owners the right to enjoy the benefits of private aviations. However, FMC may have complicated business requirements that neither commercial airlines nor charter airlines faces. Here, optimization models are constructed to minimize the number of aircrafts in order to maximize the profit and to minimize the daily operating cost. In this paper, three kinds of demand scenarios are made to represent different flight operations from different types of fractional owners. The problems are formulated as an optimization of profit and a daily operational cost to find the optimum flight assignments satisfying the weekly and daily demand respectively from the owners. Numerical results are obtained by Genetic Algorithm method.

  14. Math Fair: Focus on Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokashi, Neelima A.

    2009-01-01

    This article depicts the rewarding experience of creating mathematical environments for kindergarten and elementary students by focusing on one of the most important and often difficult-to-grasp concepts (fractions) through play methods incorporated into a math fair. The basic concept of a math fair is threefold: (1) to create preplanned,…

  15. Staircase and Fractional Part Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages--they have some basic uses in…

  16. Fractional quantum Hall effect revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, J.; Łydżba, P.; Jacak, L.

    2015-10-01

    The topology-based explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is summarized. The cyclotron braid subgroups crucial for this approach are introduced in order to identify the origin of the Laughlin correlations in 2D (two-dimensional) Hall systems. Flux-tubes and vortices for composite fermions in their standard constructions are explained in terms of cyclotron braids. The derivation of the hierarchy of the FQHE is proposed by mapping onto the integer effect within the topology-based approach. The experimental observations of the FQHE supporting the cyclotron braid picture are reviewed with a special attention paid to recent experiments with a suspended graphene. The triggering role of a carrier mobility for organization of the fractional state in Hall configuration is emphasized. The prerequisites for the FQHE are indicated including topological conditions substantially increasing the previously accepted set of physical necessities. The explanation of numerical studies by exact diagonalizations of the fractional Chern insulator states is formulated in terms of the topology condition applied to the Berry field flux quantization. Some new ideas withz regard to the synthetic fractional states in the optical lattices are also formulated.

  17. Pythagorean Approximations and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Javier

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we will show that the Pythagorean approximations of [the square root of] 2 coincide with those achieved in the 16th century by means of continued fractions. Assuming this fact and the known relation that connects the Fibonacci sequence with the golden section, we shall establish a procedure to obtain sequences of rational numbers…

  18. Isotopic Fractionation in Interstellar Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Isotopically fractionated material is found in many solar system objects, including meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar material that was incorporated into the solar sys tem without undergoing significant processing. In this poster, we sho w the results of several models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon f ractionation in proto-stellar cores.

  19. Fractional diffusion: recovering the distributed fractional derivative from overposed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundell, W.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-03-01

    There has been considerable recent study in ‘subdiffusion’ models that replace the standard parabolic equation model by a one with a fractional derivative in the time variable. There are many ways to look at this newer approach and one such is to realize that the order of the fractional derivative is related to the time scales of the underlying diffusion process. This raises the question of what order α of derivative should be taken and if a single value actually suffices. This has led to models that combine a finite number of these derivatives each with a different fractional exponent {αk} and different weighting value c k to better model a greater possible range of time scales. Ultimately, one wants to look at a situation that combines derivatives in a continuous way—the so-called distributional model with parameter μ ≤ft(α \\right) . However all of this begs the question of how one determines this ‘order’ of differentiation. Recovering a single fractional value has been an active part of the process from the beginning of fractional diffusion modeling and if this is the only unknown then the markers left by the fractional order derivative are relatively straightforward to determine. In the case of a finite combination of derivatives this becomes much more complex due to the more limited analytic tools available for such equations, but recent progress in this direction has been made, (Li et al 2015 Appl. Math. Comput. 257 381–97, Li and Yamamoto 2015 Appl. Anal. 94 570–9). This paper considers the full distributional model where the order is viewed as a function μ ≤ft(α \\right) on the interval (0, 1]. We show existence, uniqueness and regularity for an initial-boundary value problem including an important representation theorem in the case of a single spatial variable. This is then used in the inverse problem of recovering the distributional coefficient μ ≤ft(α \\right) from a time trace of the solution and a uniqueness result is

  20. Assessment of elemental composition and properties of copper smelter-affected dust and its nano- and micron size fractions.

    PubMed

    Ermolin, Mikhail S; Fedotov, Petr S; Ivaneev, Alexandr I; Karandashev, Vasily K; Burmistrov, Andrey A; Tatsy, Yury G

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive approach has been developed to the assessment of composition and properties of atmospherically deposited dust in the area affected by a copper smelter. The approach is based on the analysis of initial dust samples, dynamic leaching of water soluble fractions in a rotating coiled column (RCC) followed by the determination of recovered elements and characterization of size, morphology and elemental composition of nano-, submicron, and micron particles of dust separated using field-flow fractionation in a RCC. Three separated size fractions of dust (<0.2, 0.2-2, and >2 μm) were characterized by static light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, whereupon the fractions were analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS (after digestion). It has been evaluated that toxic elements, which are characteristics for copper smelter emissions (As, Cu, Zn), are accumulated in fraction >2 μm. At the same time, up to 2.4, 3.1, 8.2, 6.7 g/kg of As, Cu, Zn, Pb, correspondently, were found in nanoparticles (<0.2 μm). It has been also shown that some trace elements (Sn, Sb, Ag, Bi, and Tl) are accumulated in fraction <0.2, and their content in this fraction may be one order of magnitude higher than that in the fraction >2 μm, or the bulk sample. It may be assumed that Sn, Sb, Ag, Bi, Tl compounds are adsorbed onto the finest dust particles as compared to As, Cu, Zn compounds, which are directly emitted from the copper smelter as microparticles.

  1. Improving Children's Knowledge of Fraction Magnitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Lisa K.; Kennedy, Casey A.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether playing a computerized fraction game, based on the integrated theory of numerical development and on the Common Core State Standards' suggestions for teaching fractions, would improve children's fraction magnitude understanding. Fourth and fifth-graders were given brief instruction about unit fractions and played "Catch…

  2. 12 CFR 5.67 - Fractional shares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... fair price upon the fraction not being issued through its sale, or the purchase of the additional fraction required for a full share, if there is an established and active market in the national bank's stock; (c) Remit the cash equivalent of the fraction not being issued to those to whom fractional...

  3. A fractional Dirac equation and its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslih, Sami I.; Agrawal, Om P.; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a fractional Dirac equation and its solution. The fractional Dirac equation may be obtained using a fractional variational principle and a fractional Klein-Gordon equation; both methods are considered here. We extend the variational formulations for fractional discrete systems to fractional field systems defined in terms of Caputo derivatives. By applying the variational principle to a fractional action S, we obtain the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations of motion. We present a Lagrangian and a Hamiltonian for the fractional Dirac equation of order α. We also use a fractional Klein-Gordon equation to obtain the fractional Dirac equation which is the same as that obtained using the fractional variational principle. Eigensolutions of this equation are presented which follow the same approach as that for the solution of the standard Dirac equation. We also provide expressions for the path integral quantization for the fractional Dirac field which, in the limit α → 1, approaches to the path integral for the regular Dirac field. It is hoped that the fractional Dirac equation and the path integral quantization of the fractional field will allow further development of fractional relativistic quantum mechanics.

  4. Using Number Sense to Compare Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Wendy S.; Abreu-Sanchez, Laura

    2010-01-01

    One mathematical focus for third graders is to develop deep understanding of fractions and fraction equivalence, including comparing fractions through use of models and reasoning strategies. Before reading further, consider how you might solve the following problem: Which fraction is greater, 14/24 or 17/36? The initial impulse of many adults is…

  5. Evaluating fractionated space systems - Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornford, S.; Jenkins, S.; Wall, S.; Cole, B.; Bairstow, B.; Rouquette, N.; Dubos, G.; Ryan, T.; Zarifian, P.; Boutwell, J.

    DARPA has funded a number of teams to further refine its Fractionated Spacecraft vision. Several teams, including this team led by JPL, have been tasked to develop a tool for the evaluation of the Business case for a fractionated system architecture. This evaluation is to understand under what conditions and constraints the fractionated architecture make more sense (in a cost/benefit sense) than the traditional monolithic paradigm. Our approach to this evaluation is to generate and evaluate a variety of trade space options. These options include various sets of stimuli, various degrees of fractionation and various subsystem element properties. The stimuli include many not normally modeled such as technology obsolescence, funding profile changes and changes in mission objectives during the mission itself. The degrees of fractionation enable various traditional subsystem elements to be distributed across different free flyers which then act in concert as needed. This will enable key technologies to be updated as need dictates and availability allows. We have described our approach in a previous IEEE Aerospace conference paper but will briefly summarize here. Our approach to generate the Business Case evaluation is to explicitly model both the implementation and operation phases for the life cycle of a fractionated constellation. A variety of models are integrated into the Phoenix ModelCenter framework and are used to generate various intermediate data which is aggregated into the Present Strategic Value (PSV). The PSV is essentially the value (including the value of the embedded real options) minus the cost. These PSVs are calculated for a variety of configurations and scenarios including variations of various stimuli or uncertainties (e.g. supply chain delays, launch vehicle failures and orbital debris events). There are various decision options (e.g. delay, accelerate, cancel) which can now be exercised for each stimulus. We can compute the PSV for the various comb

  6. Fractional variational calculus and the transversality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, O. P.

    2006-08-01

    This paper presents the Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems. The fractional derivatives are defined in the sense of Riemann-Liouville and Caputo. The connection between the transversality conditions and the natural boundary conditions necessary to solve a fractional differential equation is examined. It is demonstrated that fractional boundary conditions may be necessary even when the problem is defined in terms of the Caputo derivative. Furthermore, both fractional derivatives (the Riemann-Liouville and the Caputo) arise in the formulations, even when the fractional variational problem is defined in terms of one fractional derivative only. Examples are presented to demonstrate the applications of the formulations.

  7. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of nematic and isotropic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bomi; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-03-01

    Dielectrophoresis can provide a delicate tool to control electrically neutral particles in colloid. The dielectrophoresis is usually applied to solid particles or heterogeneous liquid droplet in continuous liquid, but we devised and investigated the dielectrophoresis of isotropic droplets within nematic phase or vice versa. Using multi-components liquid crystal mixtures that exhibit relatively wide temperature range of nematic-isotropic coexistence, we achieved a field-induced phase separation between isotropic and nematic. We also fabricated the isotropic-nematic filaments that was achieved using a biased surface preference for either isotropic or nematic phase of the alignment layer [1]. The dielectrophoresis manipulations of isotropic and nematic droplets required much lower voltage compared to that for the electro wetting type devices. In addition, we observed the bi-directional actuation of isotropic droplets using anisotropic dielectric property of liquid crystal, which is not possible in usual dielectrophoresis. The bidirectional actuation was achieved by controlling the LC director within the cell so as to change the sign of the difference between the effective dielectric constant of nematic and isotropic liquid crystals. We simulated the bi-directional dielectrophoresis by performing the LC director calculation and the corresponding dielectrophoresis. The simulation results matched well with the experimental data. Thus, the bi-directional dielectrophoresis using isotropic and nematic droplets may open new possibility of electro- optical applications using liquid crystals.

  8. Dielectrophoretic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-09-07

    The use of dielectrophoresis to collect particles under the conditions of electrokinetically-driven flow. Dielectrophortic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow is accomplished by interdigitated electrodes patterned on an inner surface of a microfluid channel, a DC voltage is applied across the ends to the channel, and an AC voltage is applied across the electrodes, and particles swept down the channel electrokinetically are trapped within the field established by the electrodes. The particles can be released when the voltage to the electrodes is released.

  9. Thermal dielectrophoretic force on a dielectric particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaparenko, Barukyah; Hu, Howard; Bau, Haim

    2013-11-01

    A particle immersed in a fluid subjected simultaneously to electric and thermal fields experiences an electrostatic force given by not only classical dielectrophoresis (DEP), but also an additional force, which we term thermal DEP. Assuming the change in the background electric field across the particle and the relative change of temperature-dependent electric properties across the particle are both small, we develop a linearized model to solve the electric field analytically and integrate the Maxwell stress tensor to find an expression for the thermal DEP force for aligned electric and thermal fields. This thermal DEP force is proportional to the temperature gradient, the square of the electric field strength, and the particle's volume. We compute the fully-coupled system in COMSOL to determine a range of validity for our linearized model and show a practical way to superimpose the classical DEP and thermal DEP forces to find the total electrostatic force on the particle relative to the fluid. Additionally, we examine the thermal DEP force and torque on the particle for unaligned fields. Due to the high electrical conductivity of common biological buffers, the thermal DEP force can play an important role when an electric field is used to control and manipulate cells or bacteria.

  10. Microfluidic dielectrophoretic sorter using gel vertical electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jason; Nelson, Edward L.; Li, G. P.; Bachman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We report the development and results of a two-step method for sorting cells and small particles in a microfluidic device. This approach uses a single microfluidic channel that has (1) a microfabricated sieve which efficiently focuses particles into a thin stream, followed by (2) a dielectrophoresis (DEP) section consisting of electrodes along the channel walls for efficient continuous sorting based on dielectric properties of the particles. For our demonstration, the device was constructed of polydimethylsiloxane, bonded to a glass surface, and conductive agarose gel electrodes. Gold traces were used to make electrical connections to the conductive gel. The device had several novel features that aided performance of the sorting. These included a sieving structure that performed continuous displacement of particles into a single stream within the microfluidic channel (improving the performance of downstream DEP, and avoiding the need for additional focusing flow inlets), and DEP electrodes that were the full height of the microfluidic walls (“vertical electrodes”), allowing for improved formation and control of electric field gradients in the microfluidic device. The device was used to sort polymer particles and HeLa cells, demonstrating that this unique combination provides improved capability for continuous DEP sorting of particles in a microfluidic device. PMID:24926390

  11. Complexity and the Fractional Calculus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Paolo Grigolini,, Mauro Bologna,, Bruce West 611102 c. THIS PAGE The public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to...dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/498789 Research Article Complexity and the Fractional Calculus Pensri Pramukkul,1 Adam Svenkeson,1 Paolo Grigolini,1 Mauro ...8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER Paolo Grigolini Pensri Pramukkul, Adam Svenkeson

  12. FRACTIONAL DYNAMICS AT MULTIPLE TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Straka, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A continuous time random walk (CTRW) imposes a random waiting time between random particle jumps. CTRW limit densities solve a fractional Fokker-Planck equation, but since the CTRW limit is not Markovian, this is not sufficient to characterize the process. This paper applies continuum renewal theory to restore the Markov property on an expanded state space, and compute the joint CTRW limit density at multiple times. PMID:23378670

  13. Electrochemically controlled iron isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Young, Edward D.; Kavner, Abby

    2010-02-01

    Variations in the stable isotope abundances of transition metals have been observed in the geologic record and trying to understand and reconstruct the physical/environmental conditions that produced these signatures is an area of active research. It is clear that changes in oxidation state lead to large fractionations of the stable isotopes of many transition metals such as iron, suggesting that transition metal stable isotope signatures could be used as a paleo-redox proxy. However, the factors contributing to these observed stable isotope variations are poorly understood. Here we investigate how the kinetics of iron redox electrochemistry generates isotope fractionation. Through a combination of electrodeposition experiments and modeling of electrochemical processes including mass-transport, we show that electron transfer reactions are the cause of a large isotope separation, while mass transport-limited supply of reactant to the electrode attenuates the observed isotopic fractionation. Furthermore, the stable isotope composition of electroplated transition metals can be tuned in the laboratory by controlling parameters such as solution chemistry, reaction overpotential, and solution convection. These methods are potentially useful for generating isotopically-marked metal surfaces for tracking and forensic purposes. In addition, our studies will help interpret stable isotope data in terms of identifying underlying electron transfer processes in laboratory and natural samples.

  14. Fractional statistical potential in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardenghi, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    In this work the fractional statistics is applied to an anyon gas in graphene to obtain the special features that the arbitrary phase interchange of the particle coordinates introduce in the thermodynamic properties. The electron gas is constituted by N anyons in the long wavelength approximation obeying fractional exclusion statistics and the partition function is analyzed in terms of a perturbation expansion up to first order in the dimensionless constant λ / L being L the length of the graphene sheet and λ = βℏvF the thermal wavelength. By considering the correct permutation expansion of the many-anyons wavefunction, taking into account that the phase changes with the number of inversions in each permutation, the statistical fermionic/bosonic potential is obtained and the intermediate statistical behavior is found. It is shown that "extra" fermonic and bosonic particles states appears and this "statistical particle" distribution depends on N. Entropy and specific heat is obtained up to first order in λ / L showing that the results obtained differs from those obtained in different approximation to the fractional exclusion statistics.

  15. Improving Children's Knowledge of Fraction Magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Fazio, Lisa K; Kennedy, Casey A; Siegler, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether playing a computerized fraction game, based on the integrated theory of numerical development and on the Common Core State Standards' suggestions for teaching fractions, would improve children's fraction magnitude understanding. Fourth and fifth-graders were given brief instruction about unit fractions and played Catch the Monster with Fractions, a game in which they estimated fraction locations on a number line and received feedback on the accuracy of their estimates. The intervention lasted less than 15 minutes. In our initial study, children showed large gains from pretest to posttest in their fraction number line estimates, magnitude comparisons, and recall accuracy. In a more rigorous second study, the experimental group showed similarly large improvements, whereas a control group showed no improvement from practicing fraction number line estimates without feedback. The results provide evidence for the effectiveness of interventions emphasizing fraction magnitudes and indicate how psychological theories and research can be used to evaluate specific recommendations of the Common Core State Standards.

  16. On fractional Langevin equation involving two fractional orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghani, Omid

    2017-01-01

    In numerical analysis, it is frequently needed to examine how far a numerical solution is from the exact one. To investigate this issue quantitatively, we need a tool to measure the difference between them and obviously this task is accomplished by the aid of an appropriate norm on a certain space of functions. For example, Sobolev spaces are indispensable part of theoretical analysis of partial differential equations and boundary integral equations, as well as are necessary for the analysis of some numerical methods for the solving of such equations. But most of articles that appear in this field usually use ‖.‖∞ in the space of C[a, b] which is very restrictive. In this paper, we introduce a new norm that is convenient for the fractional and singular differential equations. Using this norm, the existence and uniqueness of initial value problems for nonlinear Langevin equation with two different fractional orders are studied. In fact, the obtained results could be used for the classical cases. Finally, by two examples we show that we cannot always speak about the existence and uniqueness of solutions just by using the previous methods.

  17. Conformable Fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karayer, H.; Demirhan, D.; Büyükkılıç, F.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce conformable fractional Nikiforov—Uvarov (NU) method by means of conformable fractional derivative which is the most natural definition in non-integer calculus. Since, NU method gives exact eigenstate solutions of Schrödinger equation (SE) for certain potentials in quantum mechanics, this method is carried into the domain of fractional calculus to obtain the solutions of fractional SE. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the conformable fractional NU method, we solve fractional SE for harmonic oscillator potential, Woods—Saxon potential, and Hulthen potential.

  18. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  19. Trends in whey protein fractionation.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Mayyada M H; Chase, Howard A

    2011-08-01

    Whey is a by-product of cheese manufacture that is normally treated as a waste. However, it contains a mixture of proteins with important nutritional and biological attributes. To extract these valuable proteins, whey fractionation has been developed using three main techniques; namely chromatographic (e.g., ion-exchange and hydrophobic adsorption), membrane (e.g., traditional pressure-driven and electro-separation)-, or combined methods. Recently, new promising techniques have been introduced such as aqueous two-phase separation (ATPS) and magnetic fishing. This article reviews the use of these techniques together with an evaluation of their performance regarding the yield and purity of two major proteins in whey.

  20. Immersed Boundary Fractional Step Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Kunihiko

    2005-11-01

    We present a new formulation of the immersed boundary method for incompressible flow over moving rigid bodies. Like many existing techniques we introduce a set of interpolation points on the surface at which the no-slip boundary condition is satisfied by including a (regularized) force in the momentum equations. By introducing interpolation and regularization operators and grouping pressure and force unknowns together, the discretized Navier-Stokes equations with the immersed boundary method can be formulated with an identical structure to the traditional fractional step method, but with a modified Poisson equation whose unknowns are both the pressure and the boundary force. The method highlights the analogous roles of pressure and boundary forcing as Lagrange multipliers in order to satisfy the divergence free and no-slip constraints, respectively. The overall method is found to be a simple addition to an existing fractional step code and the extended Poisson equation is solved efficiently with the conjugate gradient method. We demonstrate convergence and present results for two-dimensional flows with a variety of moving rigid bodies.

  1. Staircase and fractional part functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amram, Meirav; Dagan, Miriam; Ioshpe, Michael; Satianov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    The staircase and fractional part functions are basic examples of real functions. They can be applied in several parts of mathematics, such as analysis, number theory, formulas for primes, and so on; in computer programming, the floor and ceiling functions are provided by a significant number of programming languages - they have some basic uses in various programming tasks. In this paper, we view the staircase and fractional part functions as a classical example of non-continuous real functions. We introduce some of their basic properties, present some interesting constructions concerning them, and explore some intriguing interpretations of such functions. Throughout the paper, we use these functions in order to explain basic concepts in a first calculus course, such as domain of definition, discontinuity, and oddness of functions. We also explain in detail how, after researching the properties of such functions, one can draw their graph; this is a crucial part in the process of understanding their nature. In the paper, we present some subjects that the first-year student in the exact sciences may not encounter. We try to clarify those subjects and show that such ideas are important in the understanding of non-continuous functions, as a part of studying analysis in general.

  2. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  3. Ejection Fraction: What Does It Measure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... does the term "ejection fraction" mean? What does it measure? Answers from Rekha Mankad, M.D. Ejection fraction ... percentage of blood leaving your heart each time it contracts. During each heartbeat pumping cycle, the heart ...

  4. Fractional Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Maciejko, Joseph; Zhang Shoucheng; Qi Xiaoliang; Karch, Andreas

    2010-12-10

    Topological insulators can be generally defined by a topological field theory with an axion angle {theta} of 0 or {pi}. In this work, we introduce the concept of fractional topological insulator defined by a fractional axion angle and show that it can be consistent with time reversal T invariance if ground state degeneracies are present. The fractional axion angle can be measured experimentally by the quantized fractional bulk magnetoelectric polarization P{sub 3}, and a 'halved' fractional quantum Hall effect on the surface with Hall conductance of the form {sigma}{sub H}=(p/q)(e{sup 2}/2h) with p, q odd. In the simplest of these states the electron behaves as a bound state of three fractionally charged 'quarks' coupled to a deconfined non-Abelian SU(3) 'color' gauge field, where the fractional charge of the quarks changes the quantization condition of P{sub 3} and allows fractional values consistent with T invariance.

  5. Calcium and titanium isotopic fractionations during evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junjun; Huang, Shichun; Davis, Andrew M.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Hashimoto, Akihiko; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2014-09-01

    Isotope fractionations associated with high temperature evaporation provide important constraints on the physicochemical processes that affected planetary materials at the birth of the solar system. Previous evaporation experiments have focused on isotopic fractionation of moderately to highly volatile elements. Here, we investigate the isotope fractionation behavior of two highly refractory elements, calcium and titanium, during evaporation of perovskite (CaTiO3) in a vacuum furnace. In our experiments, isotope fractionation during evaporation follows the Rayleigh law, but not the commonly used exponential law, with the dominant evaporating species being Ca(g) and TiO2(g). If isotope fractionations in early solar system materials did follow the Rayleigh law, the common practice of using an exponential fractionation law to correct for mass-dependent fractionation in the study of mass-independent fractionations may introduce significant artificial isotope anomalies.

  6. Fractionation of Organosolv Lignin Using Acetone:Water and Properties of the Obtained Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghifar, Hasan; Wells, Tyrone; Le, Rosemary Khuu; Sadeghifar, Fatemeh; Yuan, Joshua S.; Jonas Ragauskas, Arthur

    2016-11-07

    In this study, lignin fractions with different molecular weight were prepared using a simple and almost green method from switchgrass and pine organosolv lignin. Different proportions of acetone in water, ranging from 30 to 60%, were used for lignin fractionation. A higher concentration of acetone dissolved higher molecular weight fractions of the lignin. Fractionated organosolv lignin showed different molecular weight and functional groups. Higher molecular weight fractions exhibited more aliphatic and less phenolic OH than lower molecular weight fractions. Lower molecular weight fractions lead to more homogeneous structure compared to samples with a higher molecular weight. In conclusion, all fractions showed strong antioxidant activity.

  7. Fast parareal iterations for fractional diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shu-Lin; Zhou, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Numerical methods for fractional PDEs is a hot topic recently. This work is concerned with the parareal algorithm for system of ODEs u‧ (t) + Au (t) = f that arising from semi-discretizations of time-dependent fractional diffusion equations with nonsymmetric Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives. The spatial semi-discretization of this kind of fractional derivatives often results in a coefficient matrix A with spectrum σ (A)

  8. Stretching Student Teachers' Understanding of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Roger

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of fractions in elementary school is known to be challenging. Literature indicates that teachers' and prospective teachers' lack of depth of fraction content knowledge and associated pedagogical knowledge is of concern. This study investigated the fraction content knowledge of prospective teachers and their ability to use that…

  9. Mediants Make (Number) Sense of Fraction Foibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDowell, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    By the time they reach middle school, all students have been taught to add fractions. However, not all have "learned" to add fractions. The common mistake in adding fractions is to report that a/b + c/d is equal to (a + c)/(b + d). It is certainly necessary to correct this mistake when a student makes it. However, this occasion also…

  10. Early Predictors of Middle School Fraction Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Drew H.; Siegler, Robert S.; Geary, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings that earlier fraction knowledge predicts later mathematics achievement raise the question of what predicts later fraction knowledge. Analyses of longitudinal data indicated that whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction magnitudes in middle school, controlling for whole number arithmetic…

  11. The Richness of Children's Fraction Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Laura B.; Empson, Susan B.; Nielsen, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a special type of multiplication-and-division-of-fractions problem that elementary school teachers can use to promote children's understanding of fractional quantities and their relationships. These problems are accessible to students working at different levels of fraction understanding, and they can be solved…

  12. 16 CFR 500.17 - Fractions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fractions. 500.17 Section 500.17 Commercial... LABELING ACT § 500.17 Fractions. (a) SI metric declarations of net quantity of contents of any consumer commodity may contain only decimal fractions. Other declarations of net quantity of contents may...

  13. Locating Fractions on a Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Understanding fractions remains problematic for many students. The use of the number line aids in this understanding, but requires students to recognise that a fraction represents the distance from zero to a dot or arrow marked on a number line which is a linear scale. This article continues the discussion from "Identifying Fractions on a…

  14. Teaching Fractions. Educational Practices Series-22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, Lisa; Siegler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Students around the world have difficulties in learning about fractions. In many countries, the average student never gains a conceptual knowledge of fractions. This research guide provides suggestions for teachers and administrators looking to improve fraction instruction in their classrooms or schools. The recommendations are based on a…

  15. Identifying Fractions on a Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Fractions are generally introduced to students using the part--whole model. Yet the number line is another important representation which can be used to build fraction concepts (Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority [ACARA], 2012). Number lines are recognised as key in students' number development not only of fractions, but…

  16. An Alternative Starting Point for Fraction Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortina, José Luis; Višnovská, Jana; Zúñiga, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the results of a study conducted for the purpose of assessing the viability of an alternative starting point for teaching fractions. The alternative is based on Freudenthal's insights about fraction as comparison. It involves portraying the entities that unit fractions quantify as always being apart from the reference unit, instead of…

  17. Few Fractional Order Derivatives and Their Computations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatta, D. D.

    2007-01-01

    This work presents an introductory development of fractional order derivatives and their computations. Historical development of fractional calculus is discussed. This paper presents how to obtain computational results of fractional order derivatives for some elementary functions. Computational results are illustrated in tabular and graphical…

  18. Preparing for Algebra by Building Fraction Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Jessica; Dyson, Nancy I.; Hansen, Nicole; Jordan, Nancy C.

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are troublesome for many children, especially students with learning difficulties and disabilities in mathematics. To address this serious educational concern, this article recommends the use of number lines to build fraction sense. Math activities that center on the number line build fraction concepts as early as third grade. A number…

  19. Isotopic Fractionation by Gravitational Escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammer, H. S. J.

    2003-04-01

    Present natural data bases for abundances of the isotopic compositions of noble gases, carbon and nitrogen inventories can be found in the Sun, the solar wind, meteorites and the planetary atmospheres and crustal reservoirs. Mass distributions in the various volatile reservoirs provide boundary conditions which must be satisfied in modelling the history of the present atmospheres. Such boundary conditions are constraints posed by comparison of isotopic ratios in primordial volatile sources with the isotopic pattern which was found on the planets and their satellites. Observations from space missions and Earth-based spectroscopic telescope observations of Venus, Mars and Saturn's major satellite Titan show that the atmospheric evolution of these planetary bodies to their present states was affected by processes capable of fractionating their elements and isotopes. The isotope ratios of D/H in the atmospheres of Venus and Mars indicate evidence for their planetary water inventories. Venus' H2O content may have been at least 0.3% of a terrestrial ocean. Analysis of the D/H ratio on Mars imply that a global H2O ocean with a depth of ≤ 30 m was lost since the end of hydrodynamic escape. Calculations of the time evolution of the 15N/14N isotope anomalies in the atmospheres of Mars and Titan show that the Martian atmosphere was at least ≥ 20 times denser than at present and that the mass of Titan's early atmosphere was about 30 times greater than its present value. A detailed study of gravitational fractionation of isotopes in planetary atmospheres furthermore indicates a much higher solar wind mass flux of the early Sun during the first half billion years.

  20. Fractional Action Cosmology with Variable Order Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Fractional action cosmology with variable order parameter was constructed in this paper. Starting from a fractional weighted action which generalizes the fractional actionlike variational approach, a large number of cosmological dynamical equations are obtained depending on the mathematical type of the fractional order parameter. Through this paper, we selected two independent types which result on a number of cosmological scenarios and we discussed their dynamical consequences. It was observed that the present fractional cosmological formalism holds a large family of solutions and offers new features not found in the standard formalism and in many fundamental research papers.

  1. Correlation Structure of Fractional Pearson Diffusions.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-09-01

    The stochastic solution to a diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients is called a Pearson diffusion. If the first time derivative is replaced by a Caputo fractional derivative of order less than one, the stochastic solution is called a fractional Pearson diffusion. This paper develops an explicit formula for the covariance function of a fractional Pearson diffusion in steady state, in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. That formula shows that fractional Pearson diffusions are long range dependent, with a correlation that falls off like a power law, whose exponent equals the order of the fractional derivative.

  2. Correlation Structure of Fractional Pearson Diffusions

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-01-01

    The stochastic solution to a diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients is called a Pearson diffusion. If the first time derivative is replaced by a Caputo fractional derivative of order less than one, the stochastic solution is called a fractional Pearson diffusion. This paper develops an explicit formula for the covariance function of a fractional Pearson diffusion in steady state, in terms of Mittag-Leffler functions. That formula shows that fractional Pearson diffusions are long range dependent, with a correlation that falls off like a power law, whose exponent equals the order of the fractional derivative. PMID:24089586

  3. Fractional Action Cosmology with Variable Order Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nabulsi, Rami Ahmad

    2017-04-01

    Fractional action cosmology with variable order parameter was constructed in this paper. Starting from a fractional weighted action which generalizes the fractional actionlike variational approach, a large number of cosmological dynamical equations are obtained depending on the mathematical type of the fractional order parameter. Through this paper, we selected two independent types which result on a number of cosmological scenarios and we discussed their dynamical consequences. It was observed that the present fractional cosmological formalism holds a large family of solutions and offers new features not found in the standard formalism and in many fundamental research papers.

  4. Fractionation of Organosolv Lignin Using Acetone:Water and Properties of the Obtained Fractions

    DOE PAGES

    Sadeghifar, Hasan; Wells, Tyrone; Le, Rosemary Khuu; ...

    2016-11-07

    In this study, lignin fractions with different molecular weight were prepared using a simple and almost green method from switchgrass and pine organosolv lignin. Different proportions of acetone in water, ranging from 30 to 60%, were used for lignin fractionation. A higher concentration of acetone dissolved higher molecular weight fractions of the lignin. Fractionated organosolv lignin showed different molecular weight and functional groups. Higher molecular weight fractions exhibited more aliphatic and less phenolic OH than lower molecular weight fractions. Lower molecular weight fractions lead to more homogeneous structure compared to samples with a higher molecular weight. In conclusion, all fractionsmore » showed strong antioxidant activity.« less

  5. Fractions Learning in Children With Mathematics Difficulties.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S

    2016-08-04

    Learning fractions is difficult for children in general and especially difficult for children with mathematics difficulties (MD). Recent research on developmental and individual differences in fraction knowledge of children with MD and typically achieving (TA) children has demonstrated that U.S. children with MD start middle school behind their TA peers in fraction understanding and fall further behind during middle school. In contrast, Chinese children, who like the MD children in the United States score in the bottom one third of the distribution in their country, possess reasonably good fraction understanding. We interpret these findings within the framework of the integrated theory of numerical development. By emphasizing the importance of fraction magnitude knowledge for numerical understanding in general, the theory proved useful for understanding differences in fraction knowledge between MD and TA children and for understanding how knowledge can be improved. Several interventions demonstrated the possibility of improving fraction magnitude knowledge and producing benefits that generalize to fraction arithmetic learning among children with MD. The reasonably good fraction understanding of Chinese children with MD and several successful interventions with U.S. students provide hope for the improvement of fraction knowledge among American children with MD.

  6. Stretching student teachers' understanding of fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Roger

    2012-12-01

    The teaching of fractions in elementary school is known to be challenging. Literature indicates that teachers' and prospective teachers' lack of depth of fraction content knowledge and associated pedagogical knowledge is of concern. This study investigated the fraction content knowledge of prospective teachers and their ability to use that knowledge in a novel situation. Prospective teachers who regarded their own fractional content knowledge as weak were recruited to participate in the study. They completed a questionnaire and then participated in a loosely structured teaching experiment in which they were shown how an elastic strip could be used to assist in the development of fraction ideas. Data gained from questionnaires and transcripts of the teaching experiment indicated that using the elastic strip was effective in challenging and enriching the participants' knowledge of equivalent fractions and ordering fractions. The physical nature of the use of the fraction strip required participants to articulate their thoughts to other participants which assisted in making their actions relating to the fraction tasks explicit. The results suggest that the use of the elastic strip, and associated teaching, should be considered as a productive way of assisting prospective teachers to develop their understanding of fractional concepts.

  7. Fractionation of iron species and iron isotopes in the Baltic Sea euphotic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelting, J.; Breitbarth, E.; Stolpe, B.; Hassellöv, M.; Ingri, J.

    2009-07-01

    Measurements of the physiochemical speciation of Fe in the euphotic zone were performed at three different locations, over a well defined salinity gradient, during spring and summer in the Baltic Sea. The average of total Fe changed from 114 nM in the Bothnian Sea, 44 nM at Landsort Deep and 15 nM at Gotland Deep. Particulate Fe (PFe) was the dominating phase at all stations and on average accounted for 75-85% of the total Fe pool. At all three locations, a decrease in total Fe of 80-90% from initial measurements compared to the summer was found. A strong positive correlation between PFe and chl-a was observed. Hence, primary production strongly regulates cycling of suspended Fe. However, this relation is not dominated by active uptake of Fe in phytoplankton; instead this reflects cycling of phosphorus, growth of diatoms, and removal of PFe during phytoplankton sedimentation. The average colloidal iron fraction, CFe, showed decreasing concentrations along the salinity gradient; Bothnian Sea 15 nM; Landsort Deep 1 nM and Gotland Deep 0.5 nM. Field Flow Fractionation data indicate that the main colloidal carrier phase for Fe in the Baltic Sea is a carbon-rich fulvic acid associated compound, likely of riverine origin. The Fe isotope composition (δ56Fe) of the PFe showed constant positive values in the Bothnian Sea surface waters (+0.08 to +0.20‰). Enrichment of heavy Fe in the Bothnian Sea PFe is most likely associated to input of aggregated land derived Fe-oxyhydroxides and a rapid overturn of Fe(II). At the Landsort deep, the fractionation of PFe changed between -0.08‰ to +0.28‰. The negative values, in early spring, probably indicate exchange over the oxic-anoxic boundary at ~80 m depth.

  8. WATER FRACTIONS IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETESIMALS

    SciTech Connect

    Jura, M.; Xu, S. E-mail: sxu@astro.ucla.edu

    2012-01-15

    With the goal of using externally polluted white dwarfs to investigate the water fractions of extrasolar planetesimals, we assemble from the literature a sample that we estimate to be more than 60% complete of DB white dwarfs warmer than 13,000 K, more luminous than 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} L{sub Sun }, and within 80 pc of the Sun. When considering all the stars together, we find that the summed mass accretion rate of heavy atoms exceeds that of hydrogen by over a factor of 1000. If so, this sub-population of extrasolar asteroids treated as an ensemble has little water and is at least a factor of 20 drier than CI chondrites, the most primitive meteorites. Furthermore, while an apparent 'excess' of oxygen in a single DB can be interpreted as evidence that the accreted material originated in a water-rich parent body, we show that at least in some cases, there can be sufficient uncertainties in the time history of the accretion rate that such an argument may be ambiguous. Regardless of the difficulty associated with interpreting the results from an individual object, our analysis of the population of polluted DBs provides indirect observational support for the theoretical view that a snow line is important in disks where rocky planetesimals form.

  9. Quantum Spin Liquids and Fractionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misguich, Grégoire

    This chapter discusses quantum antiferromagnets which do not break any symmetries at zero temperature - also called "spin liquids" - and focuses on lattice spin models with Heisenberg-like (i.e. SU(2)-symmetric) interactions in dimensions larger than one. We begin by discussing the Lieb-Schultz-Mattis theorem and its recent extension to D > 1 by Hastings (2004), which establishes an important distinction between spin liquids with an integer and with a half-integer spin per unit cell. Spin liquids of the first kind, "band insulators", can often be understood by elementary means, whereas the latter, "Mott insulators", are more complex (featuring "topological order") and support spin-1/2 excitations (spinons). The fermionic formalism (Affleck and Marston, 1988) is described and the effect of fluctuations about mean-field solutions, such as the possible creation of instabilities, is discussed in a qualitative way. In particular, we explain the emergence of gauge modes and their relation to fractionalization. The concept of the projective symmetry group (X.-G. Wen, 2002) is introduced, with the aid of some examples. Finally, we present the phenomenology of (gapped) short-ranged resonating-valence-bond spin liquids, and make contact with the fermionic approach by discussing their description in terms of a fluctuating Z 2 gauge field. Some recent references are given to other types of spin liquid, including gapless ones.

  10. Generalized hydrodynamic correlations and fractional memory functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Rosalio F.; Fujioka, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    A fractional generalized hydrodynamic (GH) model of the longitudinal velocity fluctuations correlation, and its associated memory function, for a complex fluid is analyzed. The adiabatic elimination of fast variables introduces memory effects in the transport equations, and the dynamic of the fluctuations is described by a generalized Langevin equation with long-range noise correlations. These features motivate the introduction of Caputo time fractional derivatives and allows us to calculate analytic expressions for the fractional longitudinal velocity correlation function and its associated memory function. Our analysis eliminates a spurious constant term in the non-fractional memory function found in the non-fractional description. It also produces a significantly slower power-law decay of the memory function in the GH regime that reduces to the well-known exponential decay in the non-fractional Navier-Stokes limit.

  11. Possible isotopic fractionation effects in sputtered minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haff, P. K.; Watson, C. C.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A model which makes definite predictions for the fractionation of isotopes in sputtered material is discussed. The fractionation patterns are nonlinear, and the pattern for a particular set of isotopes depends on the chemical matrix within which those isotopes are contained. Calculations are presented for all nonmonoisotopic elements contained in the minerals perovskite, anorthite, ackermanite, enstatite, and troilite. All isotopes are fractionated at the level of approximately 4-6 deg/o per atomic mass unit. Oxygen is always positively fractionated (heavier isotopes sputtered preferentially), and heavier elements are generally negatively fractioned (light isotopes sputtered preferentially). The value of Delta (O-18:O-16) is always less by about 1.8 deg/o than a linear extrapolation based upon the calculated delta (O-17:O-16) value would suggest. The phenomenon of both negative and positive fractionation patterns from a single target mineral are used to make an experimental test of the proposed model.

  12. Unpacking the Division Interpretation of a Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Rebecca C.; Lewis, Priscilla Eide

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges in learning fractions is understanding how and why a fraction can have multiple interpretations. As presented in one textbook, a fraction is "a symbol, such as 2/3, 5/1, or 8/5, used to name a part of a whole, a part of a set, a location on a number line, or a division of whole numbers" (Charles et al. 2012, p.…

  13. Fractional Differential and Integral Inequalities with Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-14

    nanotechnology . Consider the equation (3.1) ( )(t) = f(, () ) + (, () ), (0) = 0, where 0 < < 1, (, () ), (, ...boundary conditions. References [1] D. Baleanu, Z. B. Guvencs̈ , J.A. T. Machado, New Trends in Nanotechnology and Fractional Calculus Applications...Rivero, J. Trujillo and M. Pilar Velasco, “On Deterministic Fractional Models,” New Trends in Nanotechnology and Fractional Calculus Applications, edited

  14. A dynamic programming approach to adaptive fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Craft, David; Bortfeld, Thomas; Tsitsiklis, John N.

    2012-03-01

    We conduct a theoretical study of various solution methods for the adaptive fractionation problem. The two messages of this paper are as follows: (i) dynamic programming (DP) is a useful framework for adaptive radiation therapy, particularly adaptive fractionation, because it allows us to assess how close to optimal different methods are, and (ii) heuristic methods proposed in this paper are near-optimal, and therefore, can be used to evaluate the best possible benefit of using an adaptive fraction size. The essence of adaptive fractionation is to increase the fraction size when the tumor and organ-at-risk (OAR) are far apart (a ‘favorable’ anatomy) and to decrease the fraction size when they are close together. Given that a fixed prescribed dose must be delivered to the tumor over the course of the treatment, such an approach results in a lower cumulative dose to the OAR when compared to that resulting from standard fractionation. We first establish a benchmark by using the DP algorithm to solve the problem exactly. In this case, we characterize the structure of an optimal policy, which provides guidance for our choice of heuristics. We develop two intuitive, numerically near-optimal heuristic policies, which could be used for more complex, high-dimensional problems. Furthermore, one of the heuristics requires only a statistic of the motion probability distribution, making it a reasonable method for use in a realistic setting. Numerically, we find that the amount of decrease in dose to the OAR can vary significantly (5-85%) depending on the amount of motion in the anatomy, the number of fractions and the range of fraction sizes allowed. In general, the decrease in dose to the OAR is more pronounced when: (i) we have a high probability of large tumor-OAR distances, (ii) we use many fractions (as in a hyper-fractionated setting) and (iii) we allow large daily fraction size deviations.

  15. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartly, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the importance of historical effects in fractional-order systems, this paper presents a general fractional-order control theory that includes the time-varying initialization response. Previous studies have not properly accounted for these historical effects. The initialization response, along with the forced response, for fractional-order systems is determined. Stability properties of fractional-order systems are presented in the complex Airplane, which is a transformation of the s-plane. Time responses are discussed with respect to pole positions in the complex Airplane and frequency response behavior is included. A fractional-order vector space representation, which is a generalization of the state space concept, is presented including the initialization response. Control methods for vector representations of initialized fractional-order systems are shown. Nyquist, root-locus, and other input-output control methods are adapted to the control of fractional-order systems. Finally, the fractional-order differintegral is generalized to continuous order-distributions that have the possibility of including a continuum of fractional orders in a system element.

  16. Fractionation and utilization of gossypol resin

    SciTech Connect

    Tursunov, A.K.; Dzhailov, A.T.; Fatkhullaev, E.; Sadykov, A.A.

    1985-10-01

    Gossypol resin is formed as a secondary waste product during distillation of fatty acides isolated from cottonseed oil soap stocks; it is insoluble in water but soluble in products of petroleum distillation. For fractionation, gossypol resin was saponified with caustic soda or caustic potash. Using this method, the resin was separated into unsaponifiable (21-24%) and saponifiable (76-79%) parts. Details of the individual fractions of gossypol resin are presented. The unsaponifiable fraction contains hydrocarbons, alcohols, beta-sito-sterol, beta-amyrin, and vitamin E. The fatty acid fraction of the resin is a mixture of fatty acids and lactones.

  17. The derivative of a continued fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Kimiko o

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers second order continued fractions associated with (I) the Psi function {psi}(z), (II) the continued fraction component in ln {Gamma}(z) due to Stieltjes. The second order sequences k*{sub s}/k{sub s} provide approximants, some of which are remarkably close. In addition a series form for the convergent {chi}{sub s}={omega}{sub s} associated with a continued fraction provides an expression for the derivatives of a continued fraction. The implementation uses a Maple code for derivatives.

  18. Thermomechanical Fractional Model of TEMHD Rotational Flow

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, F.; Abd El-Latief, A.; Khatan, W.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the fractional mathematical model of an unsteady rotational flow of Xanthan gum (XG) between two cylinders in the presence of a transverse magnetic field has been studied. This model consists of two fractional parameters α and β representing thermomechanical effects. The Laplace transform is used to obtain the numerical solutions. The fractional parameter influence has been discussed graphically for the functions field distribution (temperature, velocity, stress and electric current distributions). The relationship between the rotation of both cylinders and the fractional parameters has been discussed on the functions field distribution for small and large values of time. PMID:28045941

  19. Developmental Foundations of Children's Fraction Magnitude Knowledge.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi; Li, Yaoran; Hoard, Mary K; Nugent, Lara D; Chu, Felicia W; Rouder, Jeffrey N; Geary, David C

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual insight that fractions represent magnitudes is a critical yet daunting step in children's mathematical development, and the knowledge of fraction magnitudes influences children's later mathematics learning including algebra. In this study, longitudinal data were analyzed to identify the mathematical knowledge and domain-general competencies that predicted 8(th) and 9(th) graders' (n=122) knowledge of fraction magnitudes and its cross-grade gains. Performance on the fraction magnitude measures predicted 9(th) grade algebra achievement. Understanding and fluently identifying the numerator-denominator relation in 7(th) grade emerged as the key predictor of later fraction magnitudes knowledge in both 8(th) and 9(th) grades. Competence at using fraction procedures, knowledge of whole number magnitudes, and the central executive contributed to 9(th) but not 8(th) graders' fraction magnitude knowledge, and knowledge of whole number magnitude contributed to cross-grade gains. The key results suggest fluent processing of numerator-denominator relations presages students' understanding of fractions as magnitudes and that the integration of whole number and fraction magnitudes occurs gradually.

  20. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ASPECTS OF ISOTOPIC FRACTIONATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, James R.

    1986-01-01

    Essential to the interpretation of natural variations of light stable isotope ratios is knowledge of the magnitude and temperature dependence of isotopic fractionation factors between the common minerals and fluids. These fractionation factors are obtained in three ways: (1) Semi-empirical calculations using spectroscopic data and the methods of statistical mechanics. (2) Laboratory calibration studies. (3) Measurements of natural samples whose formation conditions are well-known or highly constrained. In this chapter methods (1) and (2) are evaluated and a review is given of the present state of knowledge of the theory of isotopic fractionation and the fraction that influence the isotopic properties of minerals.

  1. Oxygen isotope fractionation in double carbonates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong-Fei; Böttcher, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen isotope fractionations in double carbonates of different crystal structures were calculated by the increment method. Synthesis experiments were performed at 60 °C and 100 °C to determine oxygen and carbon isotope fractionations involving PbMg[CO3]2. The calculations suggest that the double carbonates of calcite structure are systematically enriched in (18)O relative to those of aragonite and mixture structures. Internally consistent oxygen isotope fractionation factors are obtained for these minerals with respect to quartz, calcite and water at a temperature range of 0-1200 °C. The calculated fractionation factors for double carbonate-water systems are generally consistent with the data available from laboratory experiments. The experimentally determined fractionation factors for PbMg[CO3]2, BaMg[CO3]2 and CaMg[CO3]2 against H2O not only fall between fractionation factors involving pure carbonate end-members but are also close to the calculated fractionation factors. In contrast, experimentally determined carbon isotope fractionation factors between PbMg[CO3]2 and CO2 are much closer to theoretical predictions for the cerussite-CO2 system than for the magnesite-CO2 system, similar to the fractionation behavior for BaMg[CO3]2. Therefore, the combined theoretical and experimental results provide insights into the effects of crystal structure and exchange kinetics on oxygen isotope partitioning in double carbonates.

  2. Characterzation of colloidal and humic-bound Ni and U in the "dissolved" fraction of contaminated sediment extracts.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Brian P; Ranville, James F; Bertsch, Paul M; Sowder, Andrew G

    2005-04-15

    The dissolved phase of environmental aqueous samples is generally defined by filtration at 0.2 microm or even 0.45 microm. However, it is also acknowledged that colloids <0.2 microm suspended in the aqueous phase can be important for determining contaminant availability and mobility. We have used flow field-flow fractionation (FI FFF) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to UV-absorbance (UVA) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to study the dissolved organic matter (DOM) and colloidal binding of U and Ni in water extracts of sediments collected from a contaminated area of the Savannah River Site, a U.S. Department of Energy former nuclear materials production and processing facility, near Aiken, SC. High-performance SEC-UVA-ICP-MS was well-suited to the separation of DOM overthe molecular weight (MW) range of approximately 200-7000 Da. The ICP-MS element specific data indicated that a significant fraction of U was associated with DOM. Uranium exhibited a bimodal distribution and the other fraction was greater than the exclusion limit for the column and coeluted with Al. Flow FFF was used to size this fraction as colloidal with an approximate effective spherical diameter of 0.09-0.12 microm. Element specific ICP-MS data confirmed that U and Al were associated with the colloidal phase. High-field FI FFF was also applicable to sizing DOM but resolution was poorer than SEC. The results of this study suggest that "dissolved" U at this site is predominantly either complexed by DOM or bound to a colloidal fraction while Ni is predominately present as labile complexes or the free cation and, therefore, potentially bioavailable.

  3. Caputo standard α-family of maps: fractional difference vs. fractional.

    PubMed

    Edelman, M

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the author compares behaviors of systems which can be described by fractional differential and fractional difference equations using the fractional and fractional difference Caputo standard α-Families of maps as examples. The author shows that properties of fractional difference maps (systems with falling factorial-law memory) are similar to the properties of fractional maps (systems with power-law memory). The similarities (types of attractors, power-law convergence of trajectories, existence of cascade of bifurcations and intermittent cascade of bifurcations type trajectories, and dependence of properties on the memory parameter α) and differences in properties of falling factorial- and power-law memory maps are investigated.

  4. A Fractional Variational Approach to the Fractional Basset-Type Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Garra, Roberto; Petras, Ivo

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we discuss an application of fractional variational calculus to the Basset-type fractional equations. It is well known that the unsteady motion of a sphere immersed in a Stokes fluid is described by an integro-differential equation involving derivative of real order. Here we study the inverse problem, i.e. we consider the problem from a Lagrangian point of view in the framework of fractional variational calculus. In this way we find an application of fractional variational methods to a classical physical model, finding a Basset-type fractional equation starting from a Lagrangian depending on derivatives of fractional order.

  5. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2004-01-01

    Fractional-Order systems, or systems containing fractional derivatives and integrals, have been studied by many in the engineering area. Additionally, very readable discussions, devoted specifically to the subject, are presented by Oldham and Spanier, Miller and Ross, and Pudlubny (1999a). It should be noted that there are a growing number of physical systems whose behavior can be compactly described using fractional system theory. Of specific interest to electrical engineers are long lines, electrochemical processes, dielectric polarization, colored noise, viscoelastic materials, and chaos. With the growing number of applications, it is important to establish a theory of control for these fractional-order systems, and for the potential use of fractional-order systems as feedback compensators. This topic is addressed in this paper. The first section discusses the control of fractional-order systems using a vector space representation, where initialization is included in the discussion. It should be noted that Bagley and Calico and Padovan and Sawicki both present a fractional state-space representation, which do not include the important historic effects. Incorporation of these effects based on the initialized fractional calculus is presented . The control methods presented in this paper are based on the initialized fractional order system theory. The second section presents an input-output approach. Some of the problems encountered in these sections are: a) the need to introduce a new complex plane to study the dynamics of fractional-order systems, b) the need to properly define the Laplace transform of the fractional derivative, and c) the proper inclusion of the initialization response in the system and control formulation. Following this, the next section generalizes the proportional-plus-integral-control (PI-control) and PID-control (PI-plus- derivative) concepts using fractional integrals. This is then further generalized using general fractional- order

  6. Paper Plate Fractions: The Counting Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Ann; Barnett, Joann; Stine, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Without a doubt, fractions prove to be a stumbling block for many children. Researchers have suggested a variety of explanations for why this is the case. The introduction of symbolization and operations before the development of conceptual understanding of fractions, a lack of understanding of the role of the numerator and denominator, and an…

  7. Nonlinear Filtering with Fractional Brownian Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Amirdjanova, A.

    2002-12-19

    Our objective is to study a nonlinear filtering problem for the observation process perturbed by a Fractional Brownian Motion (FBM) with Hurst index 1/2 fractional' Zakai equation for the unnormalized optimal filter is derived.

  8. Fractional dynamics pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Verotta, Davide

    2010-06-01

    While an increasing number of fractional order integrals and differential equations applications have been reported in the physics, signal processing, engineering and bioengineering literatures, little attention has been paid to this class of models in the pharmacokinetics-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) literature. One of the reasons is computational: while the analytical solution of fractional differential equations is available in special cases, it this turns out that even the simplest PKPD models that can be constructed using fractional calculus do not allow an analytical solution. In this paper, we first introduce new families of PKPD models incorporating fractional order integrals and differential equations, and, second, exemplify and investigate their qualitative behavior. The families represent extensions of frequently used PK link and PD direct and indirect action models, using the tools of fractional calculus. In addition the PD models can be a function of a variable, the active drug, which can smoothly transition from concentration to exposure, to hyper-exposure, according to a fractional integral transformation. To investigate the behavior of the models we propose, we implement numerical algorithms for fractional integration and for the numerical solution of a system of fractional differential equations. For simplicity, in our investigation we concentrate on the pharmacodynamic side of the models, assuming standard (integer order) pharmacokinetics.

  9. Fractional dynamics pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamic models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    While an increasing number of fractional order integrals and differential equations applications have been reported in the physics, signal processing, engineering and bioengineering literatures, little attention has been paid to this class of models in the pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamic (PKPD) literature. One of the reasons is computational: while the analytical solution of fractional differential equations is available in special cases, it this turns out that even the simplest PKPD models that can be constructed using fractional calculus do not allow an analytical solution. In this paper, we first introduce new families of PKPD models incorporating fractional order integrals and differential equations, and, second, exemplify and investigate their qualitative behavior. The families represent extensions of frequently used PK link and PD direct and indirect action models, using the tools of fractional calculus. In addition the PD models can be a function of a variable, the active drug, which can smoothly transition from concentration to exposure, to hyper-exposure, according to a fractional integral transformation. To investigate the behavior of the models we propose, we implement numerical algorithms for fractional integration and for the numerical solution of a system of fractional differential equations. For simplicity, in our investigation we concentrate on the pharmacodynamic side of the models, assuming standard (integer order) pharmacokinetics. PMID:20455076

  10. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    PubMed

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  11. Assessing Students' Understanding of Fraction Multiplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumsey, Chepina; Guarino, Jody; Beltramini, Jennie; Cole, Shelbi; Farmer, Alicia; Gray, Kristin; Saxby, Morgan

    2016-01-01

    In this article the authors describe a project during which they unpacked fraction standards, created rigorous tasks and lesson plans, and developed formative and summative assessments to analyze students' thinking about fraction multiplication. The purpose of this article is to (1) illustrate a process that can be replicated by educators…

  12. Representations of the Magnitudes of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Michael; Siegler, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    We tested whether adults can use integrated, analog, magnitude representations to compare the values of fractions. The only previous study on this question concluded that even college students cannot form such representations and instead compare fraction magnitudes by representing numerators and denominators as separate whole numbers. However,…

  13. Tin isotope fractionation in terrestrial cassiterites

    SciTech Connect

    McNaughton, N.J. ); Rosman, K.J.R. )

    1991-02-01

    The isotopic composition of tin has been measured in a range of cassiterites and pure reagents to assess the extent to which this element is isotopically fractionated in natural processes. Only two samples showed evidence of isotopic fractionation, and it is concluded that natural Sn isotope fractionation is small and uncommon. This feature reflects the world dominance of Sn-oxide ores Sn-sulfide ores, and the highly efficient processes of Sn dissolution and precipitation which negate equilibrium and kinetic fractionation of Sn isotopes, respectively. The two samples which show slight fractionation are a highly purified and cassiterite from the Archaean Greenbushes pegmatite, Western Australia. The latter Sn is 0.15{per thousand} per mass unit heavier than the authors laboratory standard, whereas the former is 0.12{per thousand} per mass unit lighter. Although the cassiterite fractionation is considered to result from natural geological processes, the fractionation of purified Sn may be either natural or relate to the purification process, the fractionation of this magnitude has a negligible effect on the current best estimate of the atomic weight of Sn, but it does place a lower limit on its associated accuracy.

  14. Unpacking Referent Units in Fraction Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philipp, Randolph A.; Hawthorne, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Although fraction operations are procedurally straightforward, they are complex, because they require learners to conceptualize different units and view quantities in multiple ways. Prospective secondary school teachers sometimes provide an algebraic explanation for inverting and multiplying when dividing fractions. That authors of this article…

  15. Fractions Instruction: Linking Concepts and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitsolantis, Nicole; Osana, Helena P.

    2013-01-01

    It is not surprising, as research has shown, that fractions are one of the most difficult of the elementary school math topics to teach and learn in ways that are meaningful. The authors reference a work by James Hiebert, "Mathematical, Cognitive, and Instructional Analyses of Decimal Fractions" (1992), that mathematical concepts should…

  16. In Search of the Prototypical Fraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Vince Wright makes a convincing argument for presenting children with a different "prototype" of a fraction to the typical one-half. Consider how the prototype that Wright mentions may be applied to a variety of fraction concepts. We are sure that you will never look at a doughnut in quite the same way.

  17. Engaging Students with Multiple Models of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Xiaofen; Clements, M. A.; Ellerton, Nerida F.

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of unit fractions, and especially of one-half, one-third, and one-fourth, is crucially important for elementary school children's development of number sense (CCSSI 2010). We describe multimodal activities designed to assist elementary school students in gaining a rich understanding of unit fractions. Research has shown (Zhang,…

  18. Fractions: A New Slant on Slope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    An understanding of fractions is foundational to proportional reasoning and algebra. For example, a direct-variation relationship may include a constant of proportionality that is rational, and linear equations may have solutions that are fractions. Beyond that, a grasp of the concept of proportionality and of rational numbers is necessary for…

  19. Using Technology Effectively to Teach about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensberry, Karina K. R.; Moore, Emily B.; Perkins, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe classroom use of technology that successfully engaged fourth grade students (typically aged 9-10) in the United States in learning about fractions. The activities involved the use of an interactive simulation designed to support student learning of fractions, and whole-class discussion where students were…

  20. Estimation's Role in Calculations with Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanning, Debra I.

    2011-01-01

    Estimation is more than a skill or an isolated topic. It is a thinking tool that needs to be emphasized during instruction so that students will learn to develop algorithmic procedures and meaning for fraction operations. For students to realize when fractions should be added, subtracted, multiplied, or divided, they need to develop a sense of…

  1. Levels of Students' "Conception" of Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantziara, Marilena; Philippou, George

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we examine sixth grade students' degree of conceptualization of fractions. A specially developed test aimed to measure students' understanding of fractions along the three stages proposed by Sfard ("1991") was administered to 321 sixth grade students. The Rasch model was applied to specify the reliability of the test…

  2. Understanding Division of Fractions: An Alternative View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredua-Kwarteng, E.; Ahia, Francis

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer three alternatives to patterns or visualization used to justify division of fraction "algorithm" invert and multiply". The three main approaches are historical, similar denominators and algebraic, that teachers could use to justify the standard algorithm of division of fraction. The historical approach uses…

  3. Fractional populations in sex-linked inheritance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo Lee, Seung; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Koo Kim, Chul; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-03-01

    We study the fractional populations in chromosome inherited diseases. The governing equations for the fractional populations are found and solved in the presence of mutation and selection. The physical fixed points obtained are used to discuss the cases of color blindness and hemophilia.

  4. Mathematical Analogs and the Teaching of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Kathy; Nason, Rod; Cooper, Tom

    The literature has noted that some mathematical analogs are more effective than others for the teaching of fractions. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of seven mathematical analogs commonly used in the teaching of the partitive quotient fraction construct. A sample of twelve purposively selected Year Three children were presented with…

  5. Egyptian Fractions: Ahmes to Fibonacci to Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurd, Spencer P.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is the ancient Egyptian algorithm for the operations of multiplication and division of integers and fractions. Theorems involving unit fractions, proved by Fibonacci, justifying and extending the Egyptian or Ahmes' methods into the Hindu-Arabic numeric representational system are given. (MDH)

  6. Procedural and Conceptual Knowledge: Adults Reviewing Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William J.; Czarnocha, Bronislaw; Dias, Olen; Doyle, Kathleen; Kennis, James R.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States a majority of the students who enroll in community colleges require a review of secondary math before they are eligible for college level mathematics. In the pre-algebra course, that has a high drop-out rate, the most difficult topic for students is fractions. In order to better understand the fraction concept, Kieren…

  7. The Whole Story: Understanding Fraction Computation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Juli K.; Tobias, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    What does it look like to "understand" operations with fractions? The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) uses the term "understand" when describing expectations for students' knowledge related to each of the fraction operations within grades 4 through 6 (CCSSI 2010). Furthermore, CCSSM elaborates that…

  8. Fractions Learning in Children with Mathematics Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Learning of fractions is difficult for children in general and especially difficult for children with mathematics difficulties (MD). Recent research on developmental and individual differences in fraction knowledge of MD and typically achieving (TA) children has demonstrated that U.S. children with MD start middle school behind TA peers in…

  9. [Carbon isotope fractionation inplants]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, M.H.

    1990-12-31

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  10. Making Sense of Fractions and Percentages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitin, David J.; Whitin, Phyllis

    2012-01-01

    Because fractions and percentages can be difficult for children to grasp, connecting them whenever possible is beneficial. Linking them can foster representational fluency as children simultaneously see the part-whole relationship expressed numerically (as a fraction and as a percentage) and visually (as a pie chart). NCTM advocates these…

  11. Reply to "Comment on 'Fractional quantum mechanics' and 'Fractional Schrödinger equation' ".

    PubMed

    Laskin, Nick

    2016-06-01

    The fractional uncertainty relation is a mathematical formulation of Heisenberg's uncertainty principle in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics. Two mistaken statements presented in the Comment have been revealed. The origin of each mistaken statement has been clarified and corrected statements have been made. A map between standard quantum mechanics and fractional quantum mechanics has been presented to emphasize the features of fractional quantum mechanics and to avoid misinterpretations of the fractional uncertainty relation. It has been shown that the fractional probability current equation is correct in the area of its applicability. Further studies have to be done to find meaningful quantum physics problems with involvement of the fractional probability current density vector and the extra term emerging in the framework of fractional quantum mechanics.

  12. Generalized space-time fractional diffusion equation with composite fractional time derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomovski, Živorad; Sandev, Trifce; Metzler, Ralf; Dubbeldam, Johan

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the solution of space-time fractional diffusion equations with a generalized Riemann-Liouville time fractional derivative and Riesz-Feller space fractional derivative. The Laplace and Fourier transform methods are applied to solve the proposed fractional diffusion equation. The results are represented by using the Mittag-Leffler functions and the Fox H-function. Special cases of the initial and boundary conditions are considered. Numerical scheme and Grünwald-Letnikov approximation are also used to solve the space-time fractional diffusion equation. The fractional moments of the fundamental solution of the considered space-time fractional diffusion equation are obtained. Many known results are special cases of those obtained in this paper. We investigate also the solution of a space-time fractional diffusion equations with a singular term of the form δ(x)ṡ tΓ/(1-β) (β>0).

  13. Representations of the magnitudes of fractions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Michael; Siegler, Robert S

    2010-10-01

    We tested whether adults can use integrated, analog, magnitude representations to compare the values of fractions. The only previous study on this question concluded that even college students cannot form such representations and instead compare fraction magnitudes by representing numerators and denominators as separate whole numbers. However, atypical characteristics of the presented fractions might have provoked the use of atypical comparison strategies in that study. In our 3 experiments, university and community college students compared more balanced sets of single-digit and multi-digit fractions and consistently exhibited a logarithmic distance effect. Thus, adults used integrated, analog representations, akin to a mental number line, to compare fraction magnitudes. We interpret differences between the past and present findings in terms of different stimuli eliciting different solution strategies.

  14. Fractional tunnelling resonance in plasmonic media

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hun; -Han Park, Q.

    2013-01-01

    Metals can transmit light by tunnelling when they possess skin-depth thickness. Tunnelling can be resonantly enhanced if resonators are added to each side of a metal film, such as additional dielectric layers or periodic structures on a metal surface. Here we show that, even with no additional resonators, tunnelling resonance can arise if the metal film is confined and fractionally thin. In a slit waveguide filled with a negative permittivity metallic slab of thickness L, resonance is shown to arise at fractional thicknesses (L = Const./m; m = 1,2,3,…) by the excitation of ‘vortex plasmons'. We experimentally demonstrate fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons using microwave and negative permittivity metamaterials. The measured spectral peaks of the fractional tunnelling resonance and modes of the vortex plasmons agree with theoretical predictions. Fractional tunnelling resonance and vortex plasmons open new perspectives in resonance physics and promise potential applications in nanotechnology. PMID:23939460

  15. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Sharma, Vishaldeep; Fricke, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  16. Variable-order fuzzy fractional PID controller.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Pan, Feng; Xue, Dingyu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new tuning method of variable-order fractional fuzzy PID controller (VOFFLC) is proposed for a class of fractional-order and integer-order control plants. Fuzzy logic control (FLC) could easily deal with parameter variations of control system, but the fractional-order parameters are unable to change through this way and it has confined the effectiveness of FLC. Therefore, an attempt is made in this paper to allow all the five parameters of fractional-order PID controller vary along with the transformation of system structure as the outputs of FLC, and the influence of fractional orders λ and μ on control systems has been investigated to make the fuzzy rules for VOFFLC. Four simulation results of different plants are shown to verify the availability of the proposed control strategy.

  17. Fractional kinetics in multi-compartmental systems.

    PubMed

    Dokoumetzidis, Aristides; Magin, Richard; Macheras, Panos

    2010-10-01

    Fractional calculus, the branch of calculus dealing with derivatives of non-integer order (e.g., the half-derivative) allows the formulation of fractional differential equations (FDEs), which have recently been applied to pharmacokinetics (PK) for one-compartment models. In this work we extend that theory to multi-compartmental models. Unlike systems defined by a single ordinary differential equation (ODE), considering fractional multi-compartmental models is not as simple as changing the order of the ordinary derivatives of the left-hand side of the ODEs to fractional orders. The latter may produce inconsistent systems which violate mass balance. We present a rationale for fractionalization of ODEs, which produces consistent systems and allows processes of different fractional orders in the same system. We also apply a method of solving such systems based on a numerical inverse Laplace transform algorithm, which we demonstrate that is consistent with analytical solutions when these are available. As examples of our approach, we consider two cases of a basic two-compartment PK model with a single IV dose and multiple oral dosing, where the transfer from the peripheral to the central compartment is of fractional order α < 1, accounting for anomalous kinetics and deep tissue trapping, while all other processes are of the usual order 1. Simulations with the studied systems are performed using the numerical inverse Laplace transform method. It is shown that the presence of a transfer rate of fractional order produces a non-exponential terminal phase, while multiple dose and constant infusion systems never reach steady state and drug accumulation carries on indefinitely. The IV fractional system is also fitted to PK data and parameter values are estimated. In conclusion, our approach allows the formulation of systems of FDEs, mixing different fractional orders, in a consistent manner and also provides a method for the numerical solution of these systems.

  18. A generalized fractional sub-equation method for fractional differential equations with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bo; He, Yinnian; Wei, Leilei; Zhang, Xindong

    2012-08-01

    In this Letter, a generalized fractional sub-equation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations with variable coefficients. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional Gardner equation with variable coefficients. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained including hyperbolic function solutions, trigonometric function solutions and rational solutions. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient and powerful mathematical tool for solving many other fractional differential equations in mathematical physics.

  19. Fractional Modeling of Viscoelasticity in Brain Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Karniadakis, George

    2014-11-01

    We develop fundamental new numerical methods for fractional order PDEs, and investigate corresponding models for arterial walls. Specifically, the arterial wall is a heterogeneous soft tissue with complex biomechanical properties, and its constitutive laws are typically derived using integer-order differential equations. However, recent simulations on 1D model have indicated that fractional order models may offer a more powerful alternative for describing arterial wall mechanics, because they are less sensitive to the parameter estimation compared with the integer-calculus-based models. We study the specific fractional PDEs that better model the properties of the 3D arterial walls, and for the first time employ them in simulating flow structure interactions for patient-specific brain aneurysms. A comparison study indicates that for the integer order models, the viscous behavior strongly depends on the relaxation parameters while the fractional order models are less sensitive. This finding is consistent with what is observed in the 1D models for arterial networks (Perdikaris & Karniadakis, 2014), except that when the fractional order is small, the 3D fractional-order models are more sensitive to the fractional order compared to the 1D models.

  20. Isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labolle, Eric M.; Fogg, Graham E.; Eweis, Juana B.; Gravner, Janko; Leaist, Derek G.

    2008-07-01

    During the last decade, isotopic fractionation has gained acceptance as an indicator of microbiological and chemical transformations of contaminants in groundwater. These transformation processes typically favor isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, contaminants, resulting in enrichment of the latter in the residual aqueous phase. In these isotope applications, it has been generally presumed that physical transport processes in groundwater have a negligible effect on isotopic enrichment. It is well known, however, that aqueous phase diffusion generally proceeds faster for isotopically light, compared to isotopically heavy, solute molecules, often resulting in isotopic fractionation in groundwater. This paper considers the potential for isotopic fractionation during transport in groundwater resulting from minute isotopic effects on aqueous diffusion coefficients. Analyses of transport in heterogeneous systems delimit the viable range of isotopic fractionation by diffusion in groundwater. Results show that diffusion can result in similar degrees of depletion and enrichment of isotopically heavy solutes during transport in heterogeneous systems with significant diffusion rate-limited mass transfer between fast- and slow-flow zones. Additional analyses and examples explore conditions that attenuate the development of significant fractionation. Examples are presented for 13C methyl tertiary butyl ether and deuterated and nondeuterated isopropanol and tertiary butyl alcohol using aqueous diffusion coefficients measured by the Taylor dispersion method with refractive index profiling as a part of this study. Examples elucidate the potential for diffusive fractionation as a confounder in isotope applications and emphasize the importance of hydrogeologic analysis for assessing the role of diffusive fractionation in isotope applications at contaminant field sites.

  1. Fractional calculus in bioengineering, part 3.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  2. Fractional Cable Models for Spiny Neuronal Dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B. I.; Langlands, T. A. M.; Wearne, S. L.

    2008-03-01

    Cable equations with fractional order temporal operators are introduced to model electrotonic properties of spiny neuronal dendrites. These equations are derived from Nernst-Planck equations with fractional order operators to model the anomalous subdiffusion that arises from trapping properties of dendritic spines. The fractional cable models predict that postsynaptic potentials propagating along dendrites with larger spine densities can arrive at the soma faster and be sustained at higher levels over longer times. Calibration and validation of the models should provide new insight into the functional implications of altered neuronal spine densities, a hallmark of normal aging and many neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Matrix approach to discrete fractional calculus II: Partial fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlubny, Igor; Chechkin, Aleksei; Skovranek, Tomas; Chen, YangQuan; Vinagre Jara, Blas M.

    2009-05-01

    A new method that enables easy and convenient discretization of partial differential equations with derivatives of arbitrary real order (so-called fractional derivatives) and delays is presented and illustrated on numerical solution of various types of fractional diffusion equation. The suggested method is the development of Podlubny's matrix approach [I. Podlubny, Matrix approach to discrete fractional calculus, Fractional Calculus and Applied Analysis 3 (4) (2000) 359-386]. Four examples of numerical solution of fractional diffusion equation with various combinations of time-/space-fractional derivatives (integer/integer, fractional/integer, integer/fractional, and fractional/fractional) with respect to time and to the spatial variable are provided in order to illustrate how simple and general is the suggested approach. The fifth example illustrates that the method can be equally simply used for fractional differential equations with delays. A set of MATLAB routines for the implementation of the method as well as sample code used to solve the examples have been developed.

  4. Antioxidant activity of cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysates: Fractionation and characterisation of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Sabeena Farvin, K H; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Otte, Jeanette; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch; Jessen, Flemming; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to characterise peptide fractions (>5kDa, 3-5kDa and <3kDa) with antioxidative activity obtained from a cod protein hydrolysate. The free amino acids in all fractions were dominated by Ala, Gly, Glu and Ser. The total amino acid composition had high proportions of Lys, Ala and Glu. The 3-5kDa and <3kDa fractions were further fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. All sub-fractions showed high Fe(2+) chelating activity. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the 3-5kDa fraction was exerted mainly by one sub-fraction dominated by peptides with masses below 600Da. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the <3kDa fraction was exerted by sub-fractions with low molecular weight. The highest reducing power was found in a sub-fraction containing peptides rich in Arg, Tyr and Phe. Both free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides thus seemed to contribute to the antioxidative activity of the peptide fractions, and Tyr seemed to play a major role in the antioxidant activity.

  5. A fractional-order infectivity SIR model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angstmann, C. N.; Henry, B. I.; McGann, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Fractional-order SIR models have become increasingly popular in the literature in recent years, however unlike the standard SIR model, they often lack a derivation from an underlying stochastic process. Here we derive a fractional-order infectivity SIR model from a stochastic process that incorporates a time-since-infection dependence on the infectivity of individuals. The fractional derivative appears in the generalised master equations of a continuous time random walk through SIR compartments, with a power-law function in the infectivity. We show that this model can also be formulated as an infection-age structured Kermack-McKendrick integro-differential SIR model. Under the appropriate limit the fractional infectivity model reduces to the standard ordinary differential equation SIR model.

  6. Tellurium Stable Isotope Fractionation in Chondritic Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehr, M. A.; Hammond, S. J.; Parkinson, I. J.

    2014-09-01

    New Te double spike procedures were set up to obtain high-precision accurate Te stable isotope data. Tellurium stable isotope data for 16 chondrite falls are presented, providing evidence for significant Te stable isotope fractionation.

  7. Developmental predictors of fraction concepts and procedures.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Nancy C; Hansen, Nicole; Fuchs, Lynn S; Siegler, Robert S; Gersten, Russell; Micklos, Deborah

    2013-09-01

    Developmental predictors of children's fraction concepts and procedures at the end of fourth grade were investigated in a 2-year longitudinal study. Participants were 357 children who started the study in third grade. Attentive behavior, language, nonverbal reasoning, number line estimation, calculation fluency, and reading fluency each contributed uniquely to later conceptual understanding of fractions. Number line estimation, attentive behavior, calculation fluency, and working memory made unique contributions to acquisition of fraction arithmetic procedures. Notably, number line estimation made the largest independent contribution in both models. The results suggest that although there is considerable shared variance among the predictors, both general and number-related competencies are uniquely important for explaining why some children struggle with fractions.

  8. Casimir Energy Associated With Fractional Derivative Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, S. C.

    2007-04-28

    Casimir energy associated with fractional derivative scalar massless field at zero and positive temperature can be obtained using the regularization based on generalized Riemann zeta function of Epstein-Hurwitz type.

  9. Ca isotope fractionation on the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, W. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Tombrello, T. A.; Epstein, S.

    1977-01-01

    Ca has been measured in a lunar soil in order to establish the presence of isotopically mass-fractionated components. Ca was extracted by a series of water leaches after the soils were 'activated' by brief exposures to fluorine gas. The O2 obtained by this fluorination is found to have delta (O-18) of +21 per mil and to be, therefore, significantly mass-fractionated. Ca obtained in the leaches was analyzed using the double-spike technique. Very small Ca isotope fractionation is found in the leaches of this soil of up to 1 per mil per mass unit difference. The small Ca effects are in marked contrast to the measured delta (O-18) for the same sample and to large effects observed in many soils for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium. The data on Ca provide stringent constraints on models which attempt to explain the isotope mass-fractionation effects in lunar soils.

  10. Early predictors of middle school fraction knowledge.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Drew H; Siegler, Robert S; Geary, David C

    2014-09-01

    Recent findings that earlier fraction knowledge predicts later mathematics achievement raise the question of what predicts later fraction knowledge. Analyses of longitudinal data indicated that whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction magnitudes in middle school, controlling for whole number arithmetic proficiency, domain general cognitive abilities, parental income and education, race, and gender. Similarly, knowledge of whole number arithmetic in first grade predicted knowledge of fraction arithmetic in middle school, controlling for whole number magnitude knowledge in first grade and the other control variables. In contrast, neither type of early whole number knowledge uniquely predicted middle school reading achievement. We discuss the implications of these findings for theories of numerical development and for improving mathematics learning.

  11. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  12. [Plasma fractionation in the world: current status].

    PubMed

    Burnouf, T

    2007-05-01

    From 22 to 25 million liters of plasma are fractionated yearly in about 70 fractionation plants, either private or government-owned, mainly located in industrialized countries, and with a capacity ranging from 50000 to three million liters. In an increasingly global environment, the plasma industry has recently gone through a major consolidation phase that has seen mergers and acquisitions, and has led to the closure of a number of small plants in Europe. Currently, some fifteen countries are involved into contract plasma fractionation programs to ensure a supply of plasma-derived medicinal products. The majority of the plasma for fractionation is obtained by automated plasmapheresis, the remaining (recovered plasma) being prepared from whole blood as a by-product of red cell production. Plasma for fractionation should be produced, and controlled following well established procedures to meet the strict quality requirements set by regulatory authorities and fractionators. The plasma fractionation technology still relies heavily on the cold ethanol fractionation process, but has been improved by the introduction of modern chromatographic purification methods, and efficient viral inactivation and removal treatments, ensuring quality and safety to a large portfolio of fractionated plasma products. The safety of these products with regards to the risk of transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease seems to be provided, based on current scientific data, by extensive removal of the infectious agent during certain fractionation steps. The leading plasma product is now the intravenous immunoglobulin G, which has replaced factor VIII and albumin in this role. The supply of plasma products (most specifically coagulation products and immunoglobulin) at an affordable price and in sufficient quantity remains an issue; the problem is particularly acute in developing countries, as the switch to recombinant factor VIII in rich countries has not solved the supply issue and has

  13. Fractional calculus in bioengineering, part 2.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  14. Laser Resurfacing: Full Field and Fractional.

    PubMed

    Pozner, Jason N; DiBernardo, Barry E

    2016-07-01

    Laser resurfacing is a very popular procedure worldwide. Full field and fractional lasers are used in many aesthetic practices. There have been significant advances in laser resurfacing in the past few years, which make patient treatments more efficacious and with less downtime. Erbium and carbon dioxide and ablative, nonablative, and hybrid fractional lasers are all extremely effective and popular tools that have a place in plastic surgery and dermatology offices.

  15. Isotope fractionation of benzene during partitioning - Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kopinke, F-D; Georgi, A; Imfeld, G; Richnow, H-H

    2017-02-01

    Isotope fractionation between benzene-D0 and benzene-D6 caused by multi-step partitioning of the benzenes between water and two organic solvents, n-octane and 1-octanol, as well as between water and the gas phase, was measured. The obtained fractionation factors αH = KH/KD are αH = 1.080 ± 0.015 and αH = 1.074 ± 0.015 for extraction into n-octane and 1-octanol, respectively, and αH = 1.049 ± 0.010 for evaporation from aqueous solution. The comparison of solvent- and gas-phase partitioning reveals that about 2/3 of the driving force of fractionation is due to different interactions in the aqueous phase, whereas 1/3 is due to different interactions in the organic phase. The heavy benzene isotopologue behaves more 'hydrophilically' and the light one more 'hydrophobically'. This synergistic alignment gives rise to relatively large fractionation effects in partitioning between water and non-polar organic matter. In contrast to a previous study, there is no indication of strong fractionation by specific interactions between benzene and octanol. Partitioning under non-equilibrium conditions yields smaller apparent fractionation effects due to opposite trends of thermodynamic and kinetic fractionation parameters, i.e. partition and diffusion coefficients of the isotopologues. This may have consequences which should be taken into account when considering isotope fractionation due to sorption in environmental compartments.

  16. On the Cn/Zm fractional branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Robert L.

    2009-02-01

    We construct several geometric representatives for the Cn/Zm fractional branes on either a partially or the completely resolved orbifold. In the process we use large radius and conifold-type monodromies and provide a strong consistency check. In particular, for C3/Z5 we give three different sets of geometric representatives. We also find the explicit Seiberg duality which connects our fractional branes to the ones given by the McKay correspondence.

  17. Locating Fraction on a Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannula, Markku S.

    2003-01-01

    Based on a survey of 3067 Finnish 5th and 7th graders and a task-based interview of 20 7th graders we examine student's understanding of fraction. Two tasks frame a specific fraction (3/4) in different contexts: as part of an eight-piece bar (area context) and as a location on a number line. The results suggest that students' understanding of…

  18. The Vertical Linear Fractional Initialization Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a solution to the initialization problem for a system of linear fractional-order differential equations. The scalar problem is considered first, and solutions are obtained both generally and for a specific initialization. Next the vector fractional order differential equation is considered. In this case, the solution is obtained in the form of matrix F-functions. Some control implications of the vector case are discussed. The suggested method of problem solution is shown via an example.

  19. Wave function methods for fractional electrons.

    PubMed

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Yang, Weitao

    2013-08-21

    Determining accurate chemical potentials is of considerable interest in various chemical and physical contexts: from small molecular charge-transfer complexes to bandgap in bulk materials such as semi-conductors. Chemical potentials are typically evaluated either by density functional theory, or, alternatively, by computationally more intensive Greens function based GW computations. To calculate chemical potentials, the ground state energy needs to be defined for fractional charges. We thus explore an extension of wave function theories to fractional charges, and investigate the ionization potential and electron affinity as the derivatives of the energy with respect to the electron number. The ultimate aim is to access the chemical potential of correlated wave function methods without the need of explicitly changing the numbers of electrons, making the approach readily applicable to bulk materials. We find that even though second order perturbation theory reduces the fractional charge error considerably compared to Hartree-Fock and standard density functionals, higher order perturbation theory is more accurate and coupled-cluster approaches are even more robust, provided the electrons are bound at the Hartree-Fock level. The success of post-HF approaches to improve over HF relies on two equally important aspects: the integer values are more accurate and the Coulomb correlation between the fractionally occupied orbital and all others improves the straight line behavior significantly as identified by a correction to Hartree-Fock. Our description of fractional electrons is also applicable to fractional spins, illustrating the ability of coupled-cluster singles and doubles to deal with two degenerate fractionally occupied orbitals, but its inadequacy for three and more fractional spins, which occur, for instance, for spherical atoms and when dissociating double bonds. Our approach explores the realm of typical wave function methods that are applied mostly in molecular

  20. Fokker Planck equation with fractional coordinate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.; Zaslavsky, George M.

    2008-11-01

    Using the generalized Kolmogorov-Feller equation with long-range interaction, we obtain kinetic equations with fractional derivatives with respect to coordinates. The method of successive approximations, with averaging with respect to a fast variable, is used. The main assumption is that the correlation function of probability densities of particles to make a step has a power-law dependence. As a result, we obtain a Fokker-Planck equation with fractional coordinate derivative of order 1<α<2.

  1. Void fraction prediction in subchannel geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, H.J.; Kosaly, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two-phase flow void fraction calculation via drift flux formulation requires specific correlations for the distribution parameter, C/sub 0/, and the vapor drift velocity, V/sub gj/. The void fraction may then be calculated from Zuber-Findlay's void-quality model. The distribution parameter is defined using void and flow distributions. Different correlations for C/sub 0/ are available for bundle-averaged void fraction calculation. Yet no such correlations have been developed for subchannel void fraction calculation. The aim of this summary is to demonstrate the results of subchannel void fraction calculation obtained from the model developed here. The three-dimensional subchannel drift flux code CANAL has been used in the present analysis to perform the calculations. The code uses four conservation equations, which include liquid and vapor continuity equations in addition to mixture momentum and energy equations. The subchannel mass flux and quality prediction capability of CANAL has already been demonstrated for a wide range of experiments. Therefore, with the use of appropriate drift flux parameters, subchannel void fractions can be calculated by CANAL.

  2. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaue, Doerthe; Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  3. Isotopic fractionation of tritium in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Pierre; Fromm, Michel; Vichot, Laurent; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Guétat, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Isotopic fractionation of tritium is a highly relevant issue in radiation protection and requires certain radioecological considerations. Sound evaluation of this factor is indeed necessary to determine whether environmental compartments are enriched/depleted in tritium or if tritium is, on the contrary, isotopically well-distributed in a given system. The ubiquity of tritium and the standard analytical methods used to assay it may induce biases in both the measurement and the signification that is accorded to the so-called fractionation: based on an exhaustive review of the literature, we show how, sometimes large deviations may appear. It is shown that when comparing the non-exchangeable fraction of organically bound tritium (neOBT) to another fraction of tritium (e.g. tritiated water) the preparation of samples and the measurement of neOBT reported frequently led to underestimation of the ratio of tritium to hydrogen (T/H) in the non-exchangeable compartment by a factor of 5% to 50%. In the present study, corrections are proposed for most of the biological matrices studied so far. Nevertheless, the values of isotopic fractionation reported in the literature remain difficult to compare with each other, especially since the physical quantities and units often vary between authors. Some improvements are proposed to better define what should encompass the concepts of exchangeable and non-exchangeable fractions.

  4. Approximate solutions to fractional subdiffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, J.

    2011-03-01

    The work presents integral solutions of the fractional subdiffusion equation by an integral method, as an alternative approach to the solutions employing hypergeometric functions. The integral solution suggests a preliminary defined profile with unknown coefficients and the concept of penetration (boundary layer). The prescribed profile satisfies the boundary conditions imposed by the boundary layer that allows its coefficients to be expressed through its depth as unique parameter. The integral approach to the fractional subdiffusion equation suggests a replacement of the real distribution function by the approximate profile. The solution was performed with Riemann-Liouville time-fractional derivative since the integral approach avoids the definition of the initial value of the time-derivative required by the Laplace transformed equations and leading to a transition to Caputo derivatives. The method is demonstrated by solutions to two simple fractional subdiffusion equations (Dirichlet problems): 1) Time-Fractional Diffusion Equation, and 2) Time-Fractional Drift Equation, both of them having fundamental solutions expressed through the M-Wright function. The solutions demonstrate some basic issues of the suggested integral approach, among them: a) Choice of the profile, b) Integration problem emerging when the distribution (profile) is replaced by a prescribed one with unknown coefficients; c) Optimization of the profile in view to minimize the average error of approximations; d) Numerical results allowing comparisons to the known solutions expressed to the M-Wright function and error estimations.

  5. Sedimentary environments and preservation biases limit sulfur isotope fractionation observed in pyrite, despite large microbial fractionations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halevy, I.; Wing, B. A.; Wenk, C.; Guimond, C.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial S isotope fractionations close to the thermodynamic fractionation between sulfate and sulfide (~70‰) are encountered only at the slowest rates of sulfate reduction in laboratory cultures. In turn, the slowest laboratory reduction rates overlap with only the highest values of cell-specific sulfate reduction rates measured in marine sediments. This chain-of-logic implies that sulfate-reducing microbes in the marine sedimentary biosphere fractionate S isotopes at magnitudes close to the thermodynamic limit. Recent observations from sulfate-poor environments indicate that fractionations are large even at micromolar sulfate concentrations, in agreement with model predictions of near-thermodynamic S isotope fractionation at these sulfate concentrations as long as cell-specific sulfate reduction rates are low. Despite the expectation of large microbial fractionations, pyrite in both modern marine sediments and Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks records apparent fractionations ranging from 0 to more than 70‰. We suggest that the observed range of modern marine and geologic apparent fractionations recorded in pyrite does not reflect variability in intrinsic microbial behavior, but an early diagenetic modulation of large microbial fractionations, which are pinned to the thermodynamic limit by the low natural rates of sulfate reduction. With a diagenetic model developed in this study, we show that the entire range of apparent fractionations is possible with microbial fractionations at the thermodynamic limit. Apparent fractionations depend on a variety of physical parameters of the sedimentary environment like sedimentation rate, porosity, and organic matter content, most of which correlate with water depth. These findings, in combination with knowledge about the preservation potential of sediments deposited at different depths, make predictions for the observed geologic range of apparent fractionations, and ways in which it differs from the range in modern marine

  6. The Two Faces of Fractionated Photodynamic Therapy: Increasing Efficacy With Light Fractionation or Adjuvant Use of Fractional Laser Technology.

    PubMed

    Juhasz, Margit L W; Levin, Melissa K; Marmur, Ellen S

    2016-11-01

    "Fractionated photodynamic therapy (PDT)" is a new term being used by dermatologists to describe advances in PDT technology including fractionated light or the adjuvant use of fractional lasers. Although dermatologists have used PDT since the early 1990s for the treatment of photodamage and precancerous lesions, newer developments in technology have allowed for the treatment of non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), in ammatory disorders, and even uses in the eld of anti-aging. Recent developments in fractionated light therapy have allowed for PDT with dark intervals and two-fold illumination schemes to increase cellular damage and apoptosis. Combining PDT with fractional laser technology has allowed for enhanced dermal penetration of topical photosensitizers including 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and methyl aminolevulinate (MAL), as well as increased ef cacy of treatment. These advances in PDT technology will allow for increased convenience, decreased treatment time, only one application of topical photosensitizer, and decreased cost to the patient and dermatologist. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(11):1324-1328..

  7. Weighted fractional permutation entropy and fractional sample entropy for nonlinear Potts financial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kaixuan; Wang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, recently introduced permutation entropy and sample entropy are further developed to the fractional cases, weighted fractional permutation entropy (WFPE) and fractional sample entropy (FSE). The fractional order generalization of information entropy is utilized in the above two complexity approaches, to detect the statistical characteristics of fractional order information in complex systems. The effectiveness analysis of proposed methods on the synthetic data and the real-world data reveals that tuning the fractional order allows a high sensitivity and more accurate characterization to the signal evolution, which is useful in describing the dynamics of complex systems. Moreover, the numerical research on nonlinear complexity behaviors is compared between the returns series of Potts financial model and the actual stock markets. And the empirical results confirm the feasibility of the proposed model.

  8. Fractions as percepts? Exploring cross-format distance effects for fractional magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Percival G; Chesney, Dana L

    2015-05-01

    This study presents evidence that humans have intuitive, perceptually based access to the abstract fraction magnitudes instantiated by nonsymbolic ratio stimuli. Moreover, it shows these perceptually accessed magnitudes can be easily compared with symbolically represented fractions. In cross-format comparisons, participants picked the larger of two ratios. Ratios were presented either symbolically as fractions or nonsymbolically as paired dot arrays or as paired circles. Response patterns were consistent with participants comparing specific analog fractional magnitudes independently of the particular formats in which they were presented. These results pose a challenge to accounts that argue human cognitive architecture is ill-suited for processing fractions. Instead, it seems that humans can process nonsymbolic ratio magnitudes via perceptual routes and without recourse to conscious symbolic algorithms, analogous to the processing of whole number magnitudes. These findings have important implications for theories regarding the nature of human number sense - they imply that fractions may in some sense be natural numbers, too.

  9. A high-speed algorithm for computation of fractional differentiation and fractional integration.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masataka; Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2013-05-13

    A high-speed algorithm for computing fractional differentiations and fractional integrations in fractional differential equations is proposed. In this algorithm, the stored data are not the function to be differentiated or integrated but the weighted integrals of the function. The intervals of integration for the memory can be increased without loss of accuracy as the computing time-step n increases. The computing cost varies as n log n, as opposed to n(2) of standard algorithms.

  10. Downstream alterations in biodegradability and optical characteristics of dissolved and particulate organic carbon fractions exported during storm events in a mixed land-use watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Byung-Joon; Yang, Boram; Park, Ji-Hyung

    2014-05-01

    Although storm pulses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) can account for a significant C loss from the terrestrial sink of atmospheric CO2, there have been rare attempts to compare the biodegradation and chemical transformation of terrestrially derived DOC and POC in receiving waters. Short-term laboratory incubations were performed with water and sediment samples collected during intense monsoon rainfalls at four stream locations in a mountainous, mixed land-use watershed, Korea to compare biodegradation and optical properties of DOC and POC exported from different sources. Biodegradable DOC (BDOC) and fluorescence EEMs coupled with PARAFAC modeling in either bulk or flow field-flow fractionated samples were measured to track changes in biodegradation and optical characteristics of DOC and suspended sediment-derived DOC (SS-DOC). During a 30 day incubation at 25 °C, both DOC and POC from a forested headwater stream initially exhibited rapid biodegradation of labile components, whereas sediment-derived materials increased continuously not just DOC concentrations, but also fulvic- and humic-like fluorescent components. In the second 13-day incubation with DOC and POC samples from a forest stream, an agricultural stream, and two downstream rivers, the BDOC of filtered waters differed little between sites, whereas the BDOC of SS-DOC was higher in downstream rivers. Higher ratios of protein- to fuvic- or humic-like fluorescence in the SS-DOC from two downstream rivers compared to upstream measurements pointed to a higher contribution of labile organic components to the biodegradation of SS-DOC from the downstream rivers. Downstream increases in labile moieties of SS-DOC were also observed in fluorescence measurements of field-flow fractionated samples. The results suggest that storm pulses of POC contain labile organic components that are increasingly released from downstream sources and can rapidly change in optical properties

  11. Jacobi wavelet operational matrix of fractional integration for solving fractional integro-differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Loh Jian; Chang, Phang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we first define generalized shifted Jacobi polynomial on interval and then use it to define Jacobi wavelet. Then, the operational matrix of fractional integration for Jacobi wavelet is being derived to solve fractional differential equation and fractional integro-differential equation. This method can be seen as a generalization of other orthogonal wavelet operational methods, e.g. Legendre wavelets, Chebyshev wavelets of 1st kind, Chebyshev wavelets of 2nd kind, etc. which are special cases of the Jacobi wavelets. We apply our method to a special type of fractional integro-differential equation of Fredholm type.

  12. Fractional Adams-Bashforth/Moulton methods: An application to the fractional Keller-Segel chemotaxis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayernouri, Mohsen; Matzavinos, Anastasios

    2016-07-01

    We first formulate a fractional class of explicit Adams-Bashforth (A-B) and implicit Adams-Moulton (A-M) methods of first- and second-order accuracy for the time-integration of τ 0 CDt u (x , t) = g (t ; u), τ ∈ (0 , 1 ], where τ 0 CDt denotes the fractional derivative in the Caputo sense. In this fractional setting and in contrast to the standard Adams methods, an extra history load term emerges and the associated weight coefficients are τ-dependent. However when τ = 1, the developed schemes reduce to the well-known A-B and A-M methods with standard coefficients. Hence, in terms of scientific computing, our approach constitutes a minimal modification of the existing Adams libraries. Next, we develop an implicit-explicit (IMEX) splitting scheme for linear and nonlinear fractional PDEs of a general advection-reaction-diffusion type, and we apply our scheme to the time-space fractional Keller-Segel chemotaxis system. In this context, we evaluate the nonlinear advection term explicitly, employing the fractional A-B method in the prediction step, and we treat the corresponding diffusion term implicitly in the correction step using the fractional A-M scheme. Moreover, we perform the corresponding spatial discretization by employing an efficient and spectrally-accurate fractional spectral collocation method. Our numerical experiments exhibit the efficiency of the proposed IMEX scheme in solving nonlinear fractional PDEs.

  13. On the origins of generalized fractional calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiryakova, Virginia

    2015-11-01

    In Fractional Calculus (FC), as in the (classical) Calculus, the notions of derivatives and integrals (of first, second, etc. or arbitrary, incl. non-integer order) are basic and co-related. One of the most frequent approach in FC is to define first the Riemann-Liouville (R-L) integral of fractional order, and then by means of suitable integer-order differentiation operation applied over it (or under its sign) a fractional derivative is defined - in the R-L sense (or in Caputo sense). The first mentioned (R-L type) is closer to the theoretical studies in analysis, but has some shortages - from the point of view of interpretation of the initial conditions for Cauchy problems for fractional differential equations (stated also by means of fractional order derivatives/ integrals), and also for the analysts' confusion that such a derivative of a constant is not zero in general. The Caputo (C-) derivative, arising first in geophysical studies, helps to overcome these problems and to describe models of applied problems with physically consistent initial conditions. The operators of the Generalized Fractional Calculus - GFC (integrals and derivatives) are based on commuting m-tuple (m = 1, 2, 3, …) compositions of operators of the classical FC with power weights (the so-called Erdélyi-Kober operators), but represented in compact and explicit form by means of integral, integro-differential (R-L type) or differential-integral (C-type) operators, where the kernels are special functions of most general hypergeometric kind. The foundations of this theory are given in Kiryakova 18. In this survey we present the genesis of the definitions of the GFC - the generalized fractional integrals and derivatives (of fractional multi-order) of R-L type and Caputo type, analyze their properties and applications. Their special cases are all the known operators of classical FC, their generalizations introduced by other authors, the hyper-Bessel differential operators of higher integer

  14. Attitude Estimation in Fractionated Spacecraft Cluster Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Blackmore, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An attitude estimation was examined in fractioned free-flying spacecraft. Instead of a single, monolithic spacecraft, a fractionated free-flying spacecraft uses multiple spacecraft modules. These modules are connected only through wireless communication links and, potentially, wireless power links. The key advantage of this concept is the ability to respond to uncertainty. For example, if a single spacecraft module in the cluster fails, a new one can be launched at a lower cost and risk than would be incurred with onorbit servicing or replacement of the monolithic spacecraft. In order to create such a system, however, it is essential to know what the navigation capabilities of the fractionated system are as a function of the capabilities of the individual modules, and to have an algorithm that can perform estimation of the attitudes and relative positions of the modules with fractionated sensing capabilities. Looking specifically at fractionated attitude estimation with startrackers and optical relative attitude sensors, a set of mathematical tools has been developed that specify the set of sensors necessary to ensure that the attitude of the entire cluster ( cluster attitude ) can be observed. Also developed was a navigation filter that can estimate the cluster attitude if these conditions are satisfied. Each module in the cluster may have either a startracker, a relative attitude sensor, or both. An extended Kalman filter can be used to estimate the attitude of all modules. A range of estimation performances can be achieved depending on the sensors used and the topology of the sensing network.

  15. Current Status of Fractional Laser Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Carniol, Paul J; Hamilton, Mark M; Carniol, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Fractional lasers were first developed based on observations of lasers designed for hair transplantation. In 2007, ablative fractional laser resurfacing was introduced. The fractionation allowed deeper tissue penetration, leading to greater tissue contraction, collagen production and tissue remodeling. Since then, fractional erbium:YAG resurfacing lasers have also been introduced. These lasers have yielded excellent results in treating photoaging, acne scarring, and dyschromia. With the adjustment of microspot density, pulse duration, number of passes, and fluence, the surgeon can adjust the treatment effects. These lasers have allowed surgeons to treat patients with higher Fitzpatrick skin types (types IV to VI) and greater individualize treatments to various facial subunits. Immunohistochemical analysis has demonstrated remodeling effects of the tissues for several months, producing longer lasting results. Adjuvant treatments are also under investigation, including concomitant face-lift, product deposition, and platelet-rich plasma. Finally, there is a short recovery time from treatment with these lasers, allowing patients to resume regular activities more quickly. Although there is a relatively high safety profile for ablative fractionated lasers, surgeons should be aware of the limitations of specific treatments and the associated risks and complications.

  16. On sampling fractions and electron shower shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Peryshkin, Alexander; Raja, Rajendran; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    We study the usage of various definitions of sampling fractions in understanding electron shower shapes in a sampling multilayer electromagnetic calorimeter. We show that the sampling fractions obtained by the conventional definition (I) of (average observed energy in layer)/(average deposited energy in layer) will not give the best energy resolution for the calorimeter. The reason for this is shown to be the presence of layer by layer correlations in an electromagnetic shower. The best resolution is obtained by minimizing the deviation from the total input energy using a least squares algorithm. The 'sampling fractions' obtained by this method (II) are shown to give the best resolution for overall energy. We further show that the method (II) sampling fractions are obtained by summing the columns of a non-local {lambda} tensor that incorporates the correlations. We establish that the sampling fractions (II) cannot be used to predict the layer by layer energies and that one needs to employ the full {lambda} tensor for this purpose. This effect is again a result of the correlations.

  17. Minimizing metastatic risk in radiotherapy fractionation schedules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Hamidreza; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Leder, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Metastasis is the process by which cells from a primary tumor disperse and form new tumors at distant anatomical locations. The treatment and prevention of metastatic cancer remains an extremely challenging problem. This work introduces a novel biologically motivated objective function to the radiation optimization community that takes into account metastatic risk instead of the status of the primary tumor. In this work, we consider the problem of developing fractionated irradiation schedules that minimize production of metastatic cancer cells while keeping normal tissue damage below an acceptable level. A dynamic programming framework is utilized to determine the optimal fractionation scheme. We evaluated our approach on a breast cancer case using the heart and the lung as organs-at-risk (OAR). For small tumor α /β values, hypo-fractionated schedules were optimal, which is consistent with standard models. However, for relatively larger α /β values, we found the type of schedule depended on various parameters such as the time when metastatic risk was evaluated, the α /β values of the OARs, and the normal tissue sparing factors. Interestingly, in contrast to standard models, hypo-fractionated and semi-hypo-fractionated schedules (large initial doses with doses tapering off with time) were suggested even with large tumor α/β values. Numerical results indicate the potential for significant reduction in metastatic risk.

  18. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  19. From Students' Problem-Solving Strategies to Connections in Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Alfinio; Klein, Erika

    2005-01-01

    Strategies that children used to solve a fraction problem are presented, and an insight into how students think about divisions and fractions is described. Teachers can use these strategies to help students establish connections related to fractions.

  20. Extension of many-body theory and approximate density functionals to fractional charges and fractional spins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weitao; Mori-Sánchez, Paula; Cohen, Aron J

    2013-09-14

    The exact conditions for density functionals and density matrix functionals in terms of fractional charges and fractional spins are known, and their violation in commonly used functionals has been shown to be the root of many major failures in practical applications. However, approximate functionals are designed for physical systems with integer charges and spins, not in terms of the fractional variables. Here we develop a general framework for extending approximate density functionals and many-electron theory to fractional-charge and fractional-spin systems. Our development allows for the fractional extension of any approximate theory that is a functional of G(0), the one-electron Green's function of the non-interacting reference system. The extension to fractional charge and fractional spin systems is based on the ensemble average of the basic variable, G(0). We demonstrate the fractional extension for the following theories: (1) any explicit functional of the one-electron density, such as the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximations; (2) any explicit functional of the one-electron density matrix of the non-interacting reference system, such as the exact exchange functional (or Hartree-Fock theory) and hybrid functionals; (3) many-body perturbation theory; and (4) random-phase approximations. A general rule for such an extension has also been derived through scaling the orbitals and should be useful for functionals where the link to the Green's function is not obvious. The development thus enables the examination of approximate theories against known exact conditions on the fractional variables and the analysis of their failures in chemical and physical applications in terms of violations of exact conditions of the energy functionals. The present work should facilitate the calculation of chemical potentials and fundamental bandgaps with approximate functionals and many-electron theories through the energy derivatives with respect to the

  1. Deuterium Fractionation just after the Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, D.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have recently conducted a five-point strip observation of the DCO+, H13CO+, DNC, HN13C, and N2H+ lines toward low mass Class I protostar L1551 IRS5, and have evaluated the deuterium fractionation ratios DCO+/HCO+ and DNC/HNC. The DCO+/HCO+ ratio is found to be lower toward the protostar position than those toward the adjacent positions. On the other hand, the DNC/HNC ratio does not show such a decrease toward the protostar position. This suggests that the deuterium fractionation ratio of the neutral species is conserved after the star formation. If so, the deuterium fractionation of the neutral species can be used as a novel tracer to investigate the initial condition of the star formation process.

  2. Fractional Fourier processing of quantum light.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yifan; Tao, Ran; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-13

    We have extended Fourier transform of quantum light to a fractional Fourier processing, and demonstrated that a classical optical fractional Fourier processor can be used for the shaping of quantum correlations between two or more photons. Comparing the present method with that of Fourier processing, we find that fractional Fourier processing for quantum light possesses many advantages. Based on such a method, not only quantum correlations can be shaped more rich, but also the initial states can be easily identified. Moreover, the twisted phase information can be recovered and quantum states are easily controlled in performing quantum information experiments. Our findings open up new avenues for the manipulation of correlations between photons in optical quantum information processing.

  3. Fractionalized Z_{2} Classical Heisenberg Spin Liquids.

    PubMed

    Rehn, J; Sen, Arnab; Moessner, R

    2017-01-27

    Quantum spin systems are by now known to exhibit a large number of different classes of spin liquid phases. By contrast, for classical Heisenberg models, only one kind of fractionalized spin liquid phase, the so-called Coulomb or U(1) spin liquid, has until recently been identified: This exhibits algebraic spin correlations and impurity moments, "orphan spins," whose size is a fraction of that of the underlying microscopic degrees of freedom. Here, we present two Heisenberg models exhibiting fractionalization in combination with exponentially decaying correlations. These can be thought of as a classical continuous spin version of a Z_{2} spin liquid. Our work suggests a systematic search and classification of classical spin liquids as a worthwhile endeavor.

  4. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Tharapiwattananon, N.; Osuwan, S.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant from water. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used and three surfactants were studied (two anionic and one cationic). The effects of air flow rate, foam height, liquid height, liquid feed surfactant concentration, and sparger porosity were studied. This technique was shown to be effective in either surfactant recovery or the reduction of surfactant concentration in water to acceptable levels. As an example of the effectiveness of this technique, the cetylpyridinium chloride concentration in water can be reduced by 90% in one stage with a liquid residence time of 375 minutes. The surfactant concentration in the collapsed foam is 21.5 times the feed concentration. This cationic surfactant was easier to remove from water by foam fractionation than the anionic surfactants studied.

  5. Isotope Fractionation in the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  6. Models of Isotopic Fractionation in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These studies make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by high-resolution molecular line observations with ALMA.

  7. Oxygen isotope fractionation in divalent metal carbonates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neil, J.R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.

    1969-01-01

    Equilibrium fractionation factors for the distribution of 18O between alkaline-earth carbonates and water have been measured over the temperature range 0-500??C. The fractionation factors ?? can be represented by the equations CaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.78(106 T-2)-3.39, SrCO3-H 2O, 1000 ln??=2.69(106 T-2)-3.74, BaCO3-H2O, 1000 ln??=2.57(106 T -2)-4.73. Measurements on MnCO3, CdCO3, and PbCO3 were made at isolated temperatures. A statistical-mechanical calculation of the isotopic partition function ratios gives reasonably good agreement with experiment. Both cationic size and mass are important in isotopic fractionation, the former predominantly in its effect on the internal vibrations of the anion, the latter in its effect on the lattice vibrations.

  8. Iron Isotope Fractionation in the Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Lin, J. F.; Dauphas, N.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of iron isotopes in the deep Earth is of great importance, for it provides clues for determining the history of planetary differentiation and core formation, as well as the origin of the Earth. However, iron isotope composition of the Earth's interior is rarely known due to lack of samples. Previous theoretical and experimental results are insufficient because they presume the spin state of iron or they are based on relatively low quality experimental data. Here we will use a newly developed technique --NRIXS(Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering)-- to measure the force constant of lower mantle mineral candidates ferropericlase and pervoskite at relevant pressure. A reliable iron isotope fractionation factor will then be derived using SciPhon, which is a software designed specifically for the isotope fractionation factor derivation from NRIXS data. We report new high pressure 57Fe NRIXS spectra collected at beamline 3 ID-B of the Advanced Photon Source, with the aim to understand the pressure effect on iron isotope fractionation. The experiments were conducted using a 3-fold Diamond Anvil Cell and a >95% 57Fe enriched sample fp25((Fe0.25Mg0.75)O). NRIXS spectra were collected by tuning the x-ray energy range within ± 200meV around the 57Fe resonant energy of 14.4125keV. We will present the force constants and derived iron isotope fractionation factors of ferropericlase. It is expected that pressure will have an effect on the iron isotope fractionation factor and should be taken into account when modeling isotope fractionation of planetary scale and when using iron isotope systems to constrain the planetary differentiation. We will also use first-principle studies and geochemical observations to study the Fe,O,Si isotope system in the deep Earth. Our ultimate goal is to build a self-consistent geophysical and geochemical model that can be used in deciphering the mystery of Earth's history.

  9. Adsorption and isotopic fractionation of Xe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical description of the mechanisms of isotopic fractionation arising during adsorption of noble gases in a Henry's Law pressure regime is given. Experimental data on the isotopic composition of Xe adsorbed on activated charcoal in the temperature range 220 K to 350 K are presented. Both theoretical considerations and the experimental data indicate that equilibrium adsorption does not significantly alter the isotopic structure of adsorbed structure of adsorbed noble gases. Therefore, if adsorption is responsible for the elemental noble gas pattern in meteorites and the earth, the heavy noble gas isotopic fractionation between them must have been produced prior to and by a different process than equilibrium adsorption.

  10. Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Metal Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A.; Wasylenki, L.; Liermann, L.; Mathur, R.; Brantley, S.

    2006-12-01

    The possibility that metal stable isotopes record the influence of microbes on metal geochemical cycling has motivated much recent research on "non-traditional" stable isotopes, particularly Fe. The initial wave of research on biogenic metal isotope effects focused on Fe isotope fractionation during microbially-mediated dissimilatory reduction or oxidation of Fe. Although isotope variations arising from biogenic effects have been reported in laboratory systems it is difficult to ascribe comparable variations in nature to biology because of pervasive and significant abiotic fractionation. As an alternative approach, we are investigating isotope fractionation during microbial assimilation of transition metals. Assimilation occurs because a large number of metals are essential intracellular constituents. Although assimilatory isotope fractionation is not likely to be unique in direction or magnitude compared to other processes, the large number of elements potentially involved greatly broadens the number of elements that can be examined for biogenic isotope effects in materials of interest. This raises the possibility of multi- element isotope "fingerprints" of biological metal processing. In experiments with Azotobacter vinelandii, a nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium that does not use Fe or other metals in dissimilatory respiration, fractionation of both Fe and Mo isotopes are observed. The two systems exhibit opposite sense fractionation: preferential assimilation of heavy isotopes is observed for Fe, while Mo assimilation favors uptake of light isotopes. Rayleigh-type behavior is seen in both cases; α = 1.0011 and 0.9997, respectively. The Fe isotope results are most readily interpreted in terms of an equilibrium fractionation between inorganic Fe complexes and strongly bound Fe-siderophore complexes that are taken into the cell. In contrast, the Mo isotope results may reflect a kinetic isotope effect. However, it is alternatively possible that Mo isotope

  11. Fractional laser photothermolysis using Bessel beams

    PubMed Central

    Mignon, Charles; Rodriguez, Aura Higuera; Palero, Jonathan A.; Varghese, Babu; Jurna, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Fractional photothermolysis uses lasers to generate a pattern of microscopic columnar thermal lesions within the skin stimulating collagen remodeling. In this paper we investigate the use of Bessel beams as an alternative to conventional Gaussian beams in creating laser photothermal lesions of different aspect ratios in skin. We show for the first time the improved photothermal lesion depth-to-diameter aspect ratio using Bessel beams in ex vivo human skin as well as in numerical simulations using electric field Monte Carlo photon transport, finite difference methods and Arrhenius model. Bessel beams allow the creation of deep and narrow thermal lesions necessary for improved efficacy in fractional photothermolysis. PMID:28018718

  12. Chaos in a Fractional Order Chua System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.; Qammar, Helen Killory

    1996-01-01

    This report studies the effects of fractional dynamics in chaotic systems. In particular, Chua's system is modified to include fractional order elements. Varying the total system order incrementally from 2.6 to 3.7 demonstrates that systems of 'order' less than three can exhibit chaos as well as other nonlinear behavior. This effectively forces a clarification of the definition of order which can no longer be considered only by the total number of differentiations or by the highest power of the Laplace variable.

  13. Fractionation of iron species and iron isotopes in the Baltic Sea euphotic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelting, J.; Breitbarth, E.; Stolpe, B.; Hassellöv, M.; Ingri, J.

    2010-08-01

    To indentify sources and transport mechanisms of iron in a coastal marine environment, we conducted measurements of the physiochemical speciation of Fe in the euphotic zone at three different locations in the Baltic Sea. In addition to sampling across a salinity gradient, we conducted this study over the spring and summer season. Moving from the riverine input characterized low salinity Bothnian Sea, via the Landsort Deep near Stockholm, towards the Gotland Deep in the Baltic Proper, total Fe concentrations averaged 114, 44, and 15 nM, respectively. At all three locations, a decrease in total Fe of 80-90% from early spring to summer was observed. Particulate Fe (PFe) was the dominating phase at all stations and accounted for 75-85% of the total Fe pool on average. The Fe isotope composition (δ 56Fe) of the PFe showed constant positive values in the Bothnian Sea surface waters (+0.08 to +0.20‰). Enrichment of heavy Fe in the Bothnian Sea PFe is possibly associated to input of aggregated land derived Fe-oxyhydroxides and oxidation of dissolved Fe(II). At the Landsort Deep the isotopic fractionation of PFe changed between -0.08‰ to +0.28‰ over the sampling period. The negative values in early spring indicate transport of PFe from the oxic-anoxic boundary at ∼80 m depth. The average colloidal iron fraction (CFe) showed decreasing concentrations along the salinity gradient; Bothnian Sea 15 nM; Landsort Deep 1 nM, and Gotland Deep 0.5 nM. Field Flow Fractionation data indicate that the main colloidal carrier phase for Fe in the Baltic Sea is a carbon-rich fulvic acid associated compound, likely of riverine origin. A strong positive correlation between PFe and chl-a indicates that cycling of suspended Fe is at least partially controlled by primary production. However, this relationship may not be dominated by active uptake of Fe into phytoplankton, but instead may reflect scavenging and removal of PFe during phytoplankton sedimentation.

  14. Learning to Use Fractions: Examining Middle School Students Emerging Fraction Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanning, Debra I.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes one prevalent practice that a group of 6th- and 7th-grade students engaged in when they used fractions in the context of area and perimeter, decimal operations, similarity, and ratios and proportions. The study's results revealed that students did not simply take the concepts and skills learned in formal fractions units and…

  15. Limited Intervention at Sub Concept of Fractions in the Object Conversion into Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurniawan, Henry; Nusantara, Toto; Subanji; Susiswo; Setiawan, Iwan; Sutawidjaja, Akbar; As'ari, Abdur Rahman; Muksar, Makbul

    2016-01-01

    This research is an exploratory study with a qualitative approach, which is based on interviews with a task-based the purpose of this study is to describe the understanding of elementary school students in interpreting sub concept fractions in changing of the object is given to fractions with limit intervention. While intervention on problems…

  16. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-08-15

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed.

  17. Numerical analysis of a fractional-order chaotic system based on conformable fractional-order derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shaobo; Sun, Kehui; Mei, Xiaoyong; Yan, Bo; Xu, Siwei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the numerical solutions of conformable fractional-order linear and nonlinear equations are obtained by employing the constructed conformable Adomian decomposition method (CADM). We found that CADM is an effective method for numerical solution of conformable fractional-order differential equations. Taking the conformable fractional-order simplified Lorenz system as an example, the numerical solution and chaotic behaviors of the conformable fractional-order simplified Lorenz system are investigated. It is found that rich dynamics exist in the conformable fractional-order simplified Lorenz system, and the minimum order for chaos is even less than 2. The results are validated by means of bifurcation diagram, Lyapunov characteristic exponents and phase portraits.

  18. Shot-Noise Evidence of Fractional Quasiparticle Creation in a Local Fractional Quantum Hall State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashisaka, Masayuki; Ota, Tomoaki; Muraki, Koji; Fujisawa, Toshimasa

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally identify fractional quasiparticle creation in a tunneling process through a local fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state. The local FQH state is prepared in a low-density region near a quantum point contact in an integer quantum Hall (IQH) system. Shot-noise measurements reveal a clear transition from elementary-charge tunneling at low bias to fractional-charge tunneling at high bias. The fractional shot noise is proportional to T1(1 -T1) over a wide range of T1 , where T1 is the transmission probability of the IQH edge channel. This binomial distribution indicates that fractional quasiparticles emerge from the IQH state to be transmitted through the local FQH state. The study of this tunneling process enables us to elucidate the dynamics of Laughlin quasiparticles in FQH systems.

  19. Students' Distributive Reasoning with Fractions and Unknowns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackenberg, Amy J.; Lee, Mi Yeon

    2016-01-01

    To understand relationships between students' quantitative reasoning with fractions and their algebraic reasoning, a clinical interview study was conducted with 18 middle and high school students. The study included six students with each of three different multiplicative concepts, which are based on how students create and coordinate composite…

  20. FRACTIONAL PENETRATION OF PAINT OVERSPRAY ARRESTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development of fractional penetration curves for liquid droplet penetration of overspray arrestors for discrete droplet diameters from 0.3 to 10 micrometers. (NOTE: Fine particulates are particles with diameters of 10 micrometers or less.) These data poin...