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Sample records for diet-induced obesity increases

  1. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  2. Diet-Induced Obesity Significantly Increases the Severity of Post-Traumatic Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Louer, Craig R.; Furman, Bridgette D.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Olson, Steven A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity and joint injury are both primary risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) that involve potential alterations in the biomechanical and inflammatory environments of the joint. Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a frequent long-term complication of intra-articular fractures. Obesity has been linked to primary OA and may potentially contribute to the development of PTA by a variety of mechanisms. The objectives of this study were to determine if diet-induced obesity influences the severity of PTA in mice and to examine interrelationships between joint degeneration and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in this response. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal chow (13% fat) or a high-fat diet (60% fat) starting at 4 weeks of age. At 16 weeks, half of each group received closed intra-articular fracture of the left knee. At 8 weeks post-fracture, knee osteoarthritis was assessed by cartilage and synovium histology in addition to bone morphology. Serum cytokine concentrations were determined with multiplex assay. Results Fractured knee joints of mice on a high-fat diet showed significantly increased osteoarthritic degeneration compared to non-fractured contralateral controls, while fractured knee joints of low-fat mice did not demonstrate significant differences from non-fractured contralateral controls. High-fat diet increased serum concentrations of interleukin-12p70, interleukin-6, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, while decreasing adiponectin concentrations. Systemic levels of adiponectin were inversely correlated with synovial inflammation in control limbs. Conclusion Diet-induced obesity significantly increased the severity of osteoarthritis following intra-articular fracture. Obesity and joint injury together can alter systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-12p70. PMID:22576842

  3. Ghrelin secretion is not reduced by increased fat mass during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiang; Reed, Jason T; Wang, Guiyun; Han, Song; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2008-08-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion, adiposity, and food intake. Gastric ghrelin production and secretion are regulated by caloric intake; ghrelin secretion increases during fasting, decreases with refeeding, and is reduced by diet-induced obesity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypotheses that 1) an increase in body adiposity will play an inhibitory role in the reduction of gastric ghrelin synthesis and secretion during chronic ingestion of a high-fat (HF) diet and 2) chronic ingestion of an HF diet will suppress the rise in circulating ghrelin levels in response to acute fasting. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a standard AIN-76A (approximately 5-12% of calories from fat) or an HF (approximately 45% of calories from fat) diet. The effect of increased adiposity on gastric ghrelin homeostasis was assessed by comparison of stomach ghrelin production and plasma ghrelin levels in obese and nonobese rats fed the HF diet. HF diet-fed, nonobese rats were generated by administration of triiodothyronine to lower body fat accumulation. Our findings indicate that an increased fat mass per se does not exert an inhibitory effect on ghrelin homeostasis during ingestion of the HF diet. Additionally, the magnitude of change in plasma ghrelin in response to fasting was not blunted, indicating that a presumed, endogenous signal for activation of ingestive behavior remains intact, despite excess stored calories in HF-fed rats.

  4. Increased expression of receptors for orexigenic factors in nodose ganglion of diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Gabriel; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Knotts, Trina A; Oort, Pieter J; Newman, John W; Adams, Sean H; Raybould, Helen E

    2009-04-01

    The vagal afferent pathway is important in short-term regulation of food intake, and decreased activation of this neural pathway with long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet may contribute to hyperphagic weight gain. We tested the hypothesis that expression of genes encoding receptors for orexigenic factors in vagal afferent neurons are increased by long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet, thus supporting orexigenic signals from the gut. Obesity-prone (DIO-P) rats fed a high-fat diet showed increased body weight and hyperleptinemia compared with low-fat diet-fed controls and high-fat diet-induced obesity-resistant (DIO-R) rats. Expression of the type I cannabinoid receptor and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a in the nodose ganglia was increased in DIO-P compared with low-fat diet-fed controls or DIO-R rats. Shifts in the balance between orexigenic and anorexigenic signals within the vagal afferent pathway may influence food intake and body weight gain induced by high fat diets.

  5. Increased expression of receptors for orexigenic factors in nodose ganglion of diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Gabriel; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Knotts, Trina A.; Oort, Pieter J.; Newman, John W.; Adams, Sean H.; Raybould, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    The vagal afferent pathway is important in short-term regulation of food intake, and decreased activation of this neural pathway with long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet may contribute to hyperphagic weight gain. We tested the hypothesis that expression of genes encoding receptors for orexigenic factors in vagal afferent neurons are increased by long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet, thus supporting orexigenic signals from the gut. Obesity-prone (DIO-P) rats fed a high-fat diet showed increased body weight and hyperleptinemia compared with low-fat diet-fed controls and high-fat diet-induced obesity-resistant (DIO-R) rats. Expression of the type I cannabinoid receptor and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a in the nodose ganglia was increased in DIO-P compared with low-fat diet-fed controls or DIO-R rats. Shifts in the balance between orexigenic and anorexigenic signals within the vagal afferent pathway may influence food intake and body weight gain induced by high fat diets. PMID:19190260

  6. Increasing adipocyte lipoprotein lipase improves glucose metabolism in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Zhu, Beibei; Unal, Resat; Spencer, Michael; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Charnigo, Richard; Katz, Wendy S; Daugherty, Alan; Howatt, Deborah A; Kern, Philip A; Finlin, Brian S

    2015-05-01

    Lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle contributes to co-morbidities associated with diabetes and obesity. We made a transgenic mouse in which the adiponectin (Adipoq) promoter drives expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in adipocytes to potentially increase adipose tissue lipid storage. These mice (Adipoq-LPL) have improved glucose and insulin tolerance as well as increased energy expenditure when challenged with a high fat diet (HFD). To identify the mechanism(s) involved, we determined whether the Adipoq-LPL mice diverted dietary lipid to adipose tissue to reduce peripheral lipotoxicity, but we found no evidence for this. Instead, characterization of the adipose tissue of the male mice after HFD challenge revealed that the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and a number of PPARγ-regulated genes were higher in the epididymal fat pads of Adipoq-LPL mice than control mice. This included adiponectin, whose mRNA levels were increased, leading to increased adiponectin serum levels in the Adipoq-LPL mice. In many respects, the adipose phenotype of these animals resembles thiazolidinedione treatment except for one important difference, the Adipoq-LPL mice did not gain more fat mass on HFD than control mice and did not have increased expression of genes in adipose such as glycerol kinase, which are induced by high affinity PPAR agonists. Rather, there was selective induction of PPARγ-regulated genes such as adiponectin in the adipose of the Adipoq-LPL mice, suggesting that increasing adipose tissue LPL improves glucose metabolism in diet-induced obesity by improving the adipose tissue phenotype. Adipoq-LPL mice also have increased energy expenditure.

  7. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Goritz, Vincent; Doberstein, Henriette; Hiller, Grit Gesine Ruth; Rosenstock, Philip; Jahn, Janine; Pörtner, Ole; Berreis, Tobias; Mueller, Thomas; Spielmann, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK) cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In addition, leptin incubation decreased the expression of activating NK cell receptors. In animal studies, colon cancer growth was induced by injection of azoxymethane (AOM) in normal weight and diet-induced obese rats. Body weight and visceral fat mass were increased in obese animals compared to normal weight rats. AOM-treated obese rats showed an increased quantity, size, and weight of colon tumors compared to the normal weight tumor group. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a decreased number of NK cells in spleen and liver in obesity. Additionally, the expression levels of activating NK cell receptors were lower in spleen and liver of obese rats. The results show for the first time that the decreased number and impaired NK cell function may be one cause for the higher colon cancer risk in obesity. PMID:28357137

  8. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  9. Increased inflammatory properties of adipose tissue macrophages recruited during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N; Deyoung, Stephanie M; Bodzin, Jennifer L; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Although recent studies show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) participate in the inflammatory changes in obesity and contribute to insulin resistance, the properties of these cells are not well understood. We hypothesized that ATMs recruited to adipose tissue during a high-fat diet have unique inflammatory properties compared with resident tissue ATMs. Using a dye (PKH26) to pulse label ATMs in vivo, we purified macrophages recruited to white adipose tissue during a high-fat diet. Comparison of gene expression in recruited and resident ATMs using real-time RT-PCR and cDNA microarrays showed that recruited ATMs overexpress genes important in macrophage migration and phagocytosis, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Many of these genes were not induced in ATMs from high-fat diet-fed CCR2 knockout mice, supporting the importance of CCR2 in regulating recruitment of inflammatory ATMs during obesity. Additionally, expression of Apoe was decreased, whereas genes important in lipid metabolism, such as Pparg, Adfp, Srepf1, and Apob48r, were increased in the recruited macrophages. In agreement with this, ATMs from obese mice had increased lipid content compared with those from lean mice. These studies demonstrate that recruited ATMs in obese animals represent a subclass of macrophages with unique properties.

  10. Two-generation diet-induced obesity model producing mice with increased amount of body fat in early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kubandová, J; Fabian, D; Burkuš, J; Cikoš, Š; Czikková, S; Mozeš, Š; Šefčíková, Z; Koppel, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a model producing obese mice in early adulthood (4-6 weeks) based on their over-nutrition during fetal and early postnatal development. The fertilized dams of the parental generation were fed the standard diet supplemented with high-energy nutritional product Ensure Plus during gestation and lactation. Delivered weanlings were then fed with standard or supplemented diet and assessed for body fat deposits using EchoMRI at the time of early and late adulthood. Maternal over-feeding during the period before weaning had the most significant effect on obesity development in the filial generation. In weanlings, significantly higher body fat deposits and average body weight were recorded. Later, further significant increase in percentage of body fat in both male and female mice was observed. Withdrawal of the Ensure Plus supplement caused a decrease in the percentage of body fat in part of the filial generation. In offspring fed the standard diet, higher fat deposits persisted till the time of late adulthood. We conclude that this diet-induced obesity model might be used in exploration of the effects of elevated body fat on physiological functions of various organ systems during juvenile and early adulthood periods of life of a human being.

  11. Over-Expression of Leptin Receptors in Hypothalamic POMC Neurons Increases Susceptibility to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gamber, Kevin M.; Huo, Lihong; Ha, Sangdeuk; Hairston, Joyce E.; Greeley, Sarah; Bjørbæk, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) in rodents is characterized by impaired activation of signal-transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by leptin receptors (LepRb) within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. This signaling defect likely plays an important role in development of DIO. However, the neuro-chemical identity of the leptin-STAT3 resistant arcuate neurons has not been determined and the underlying mechanisms responsible for development of cellular leptin resistance remain unclear. To investigate this, we first measured arcuate gene expression of known key signaling components of the LepRb signaling pathway and tested whether specifically the critical arcuate pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are resistant to LepRb-STAT3 signaling in mice given a high-fat-diet (HFD) compared to mice provided a low-fat control diet (LFD). We found that leptin-dependent STAT3 phosphorylation was decreased within POMC neurons of HFD mice. In addition, Leprb mRNA and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3) mRNA were elevated in the arcuate of HFD mice. To investigate whether increased LepRb expression per se in POMC neurons can influence development of DIO and Socs3 expression, we created mice that over-express LepRb selectively in POMC neurons (POMC-LepRb). No differences in body weight, fat mass or food intake were found between LFD POMC-LepRb mice and LFD controls. Surprisingly, body weight, fat mass and caloric intake of HFD POMC-LepRb mice was markedly higher than HFD control mice. In addition, arcuate Socs3 mRNA was increased in HFD POMC-LepRb mice compared to HFD controls. These data show that specifically POMC neurons of DIO mice are resistant to STAT3 activation by leptin, indicating that those cells might play a role in development of DIO. Furthermore, over-expression of LepRb selectively in POMC neurons increases susceptibility to the development of DIO. We propose a model where over-reactivity of the leptin-LepRb signaling system in arcuate neurons may play

  12. TLQP-21, a VGF-derived peptide, increases energy expenditure and prevents the early phase of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, A.; La Corte, G.; Possenti, R.; Locatelli, V.; Rigamonti, A. E.; Torsello, A.; Bresciani, E.; Bulgarelli, I.; Rizzi, R.; Pavone, F.; D’Amato, F. R.; Severini, C.; Mignogna, G.; Giorgi, A.; Schininà, M. E.; Elia, G.; Brancia, C.; Ferri, G.-L.; Conti, R.; Ciani, B.; Pascucci, T.; Dell’Omo, G.; Muller, E. E.; Levi, A.; Moles, A.

    2006-01-01

    The vgf gene has been identified as an energy homeostasis regulator. Vgf encodes a 617-aa precursor protein that is processed to yield an incompletely characterized panel of neuropeptides. Until now, it was an unproved assumption that VGF-derived peptides could regulate metabolism. Here, a VGF peptide designated TLQP-21 was identified in rat brain extracts by means of immunoprecipitation, microcapillary liquid chromatography–tandem MS, and database searching algorithms. Chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of TLQP-21 (15 μg/day for 14 days) increased resting energy expenditure (EE) and rectal temperature in mice. These effects were paralleled by increased epinephrine and up-regulation of brown adipose tissue β2-AR (β2 adrenergic receptor) and white adipose tissue (WAT) PPAR-δ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ), β3-AR, and UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1) mRNAs and were independent of locomotor activity and thyroid hormones. Hypothalamic gene expression of orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides was unchanged. Furthermore, in mice that were fed a high-fat diet for 14 days, TLQP-21 prevented the increase in body and WAT weight as well as hormonal changes that are associated with a high-fat regimen. Biochemical and molecular analyses suggest that TLQP-21 exerts its effects by stimulating autonomic activation of adrenal medulla and adipose tissues. In conclusion, we present here the identification in the CNS of a previously uncharacterized VGF-derived peptide and prove that its chronic i.c.v. infusion effected an increase in EE and limited the early phase of diet-induced obesity. PMID:16983076

  13. Increased Energy Expenditure, Ucp1 Expression, and Resistance to Diet-induced Obesity in Mice Lacking Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-related Transcription Factor-2 (Nrf2).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kevin; Valdez, Joshua; Nguyen, Janice; Vawter, Marquis; Galke, Brandi; Kurtz, Theodore W; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2016-04-01

    The NRF2 (also known as NFE2L2) transcription factor is a critical regulator of genes involved in defense against oxidative stress. Previous studies suggest thatNrf2plays a role in adipogenesisin vitro, and deletion of theNrf2gene protects against diet-induced obesity in mice. Here, we demonstrate that resistance to diet-induced obesity inNrf2(-/-)mice is associated with a 20-30% increase in energy expenditure. Analysis of bioenergetics revealed thatNrf2(-/-)white adipose tissues exhibit greater oxygen consumption. White adipose tissue showed a >2-fold increase inUcp1gene expression. Oxygen consumption is also increased nearly 2.5-fold inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. Oxidative stress induced by glucose oxidase resulted in increasedUcp1expression. Conversely, antioxidant chemicals (such asN-acetylcysteine and Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride) and SB203580 (a known suppressor ofUcp1expression) decreasedUcp1and oxygen consumption inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. These findings suggest that increasing oxidative stress by limitingNrf2function in white adipocytes may be a novel means to modulate energy balance as a treatment of obesity and related clinical disorders.

  14. Diet-induced obesity promotes myelopoiesis in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Kanakadurga; DelProposto, Jennifer; Lee Morris, David; Zamarron, Brian; Mergian, Taleen; Maley, Nidhi; Cho, Kae Won; Geletka, Lynn; Subbaiah, Perla; Muir, Lindsey; Martinez-Santibanez, Gabriel; Nien-Kai Lumeng, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an activated macrophage phenotype in multiple tissues that contributes to tissue inflammation and metabolic disease. To evaluate the mechanisms by which obesity potentiates myeloid activation, we evaluated the hypothesis that obesity activates myeloid cell production from bone marrow progenitors to potentiate inflammatory responses in metabolic tissues. High fat diet-induced obesity generated both quantitative increases in myeloid progenitors as well as a potentiation of inflammation in macrophages derived from these progenitors. In vivo, hematopoietic stem cells from obese mice demonstrated the sustained capacity to preferentially generate inflammatory CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophages after serial bone marrow transplantation. We identified that hematopoietic MyD88 was important for the accumulation of CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophage accumulation by regulating the generation of myeloid progenitors from HSCs. These findings demonstrate that obesity and metabolic signals potentiate leukocyte production and that dietary priming of hematopoietic progenitors contributes to adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:25161889

  15. High vitamin D and calcium intakes increase bone mineral (Ca and P) content in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingming; Sergeev, Igor N

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone formation, mineralization, and remodeling. Recent studies demonstrated that an increased body mass can be detrimental to bone health. However, whether an increase in dietary vitamin D and calcium intakes in obesity is beneficial to bone health has not been established. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of increased vitamin D and calcium intakes, alone or in combination, on bone status in a high-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. We hypothesized that DIO in growing mice affects bone mineral status and that high vitamin D and calcium intakes will promote mineralization of the growing bone in obesity via Ca(2+) regulatory hormones, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Male mice were fed high vitamin D3 (10 000 IU/kg), high calcium (1.2%), or high vitamin D3 plus high-calcium diets containing 60% energy as fat for 10 weeks. Bone weight, specific gravity, mineral (Ca and P), and collagen (hydroxyproline) content were measured in the femur and the tibia. Regulators of Ca(2+) metabolism and markers of bone status (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 1,25(OH)2D3, and osteocalcin) were measured in blood plasma. Diet-induced obese mice exhibited lower bone Ca and P content and relative bone weight compared with the normal-fat control mice, whereas collagen (hydroxyproline) content was not different between the two groups. High vitamin D3 and calcium intakes significantly increased bone Ca and P content and relative bone weight in DIO mice, which was accompanied by an increase in 1,25(OH)2D3 and a decrease in PTH and osteocalcin concentrations in blood. The findings obtained indicate that increased vitamin D and calcium intakes are effective in increasing mineral (Ca and P) content in the growing bone of obese mice and that the hormonal mechanism of this effect may involve the vitamin D-PTH axis.

  16. Precision-cut liver slices from diet-induced obese rats exposed to ethanol are susceptible to oxidative stress and increased fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Willis, Monte S; Schaffert, Courtney S; Reidelberger, Roger D; Dusad, Anand; Anderson, Daniel R; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress from fat accumulation in the liver has many deleterious effects. Many believe that there is a second hit that causes relatively benign fat accumulation to transform into liver failure. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of ethanol on ex vivo precision-cut liver slice cultures (PCLS) from rats fed a high-fat diet resulting in fatty liver. Age-matched male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either high-fat (obese) (45% calories from fat, 4.73 kcal/g) or control diet for 13 mo. PCLS were prepared, incubated with 25 mM ethanol for 24, 48, and 72 h, harvested, and evaluated for ethanol metabolism, triglyceride production, oxidative stress, and cytokine expression. Ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde production decreased in PCLS from obese rats compared with age-matched controls (AMC). Increased triglyceride and smooth muscle actin production was observed in PCLS from obese rats compared with AMC, which further increased following ethanol incubation. Lipid peroxidation, measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay, increased in response to ethanol, whereas GSH and heme oxygenase I levels were decreased. TNF-α and IL-6 levels were increased in the PCLS from obese rats and increased further with ethanol incubation. Diet-induced fatty liver increases the susceptibility of the liver to toxins such as ethanol, possibly by the increased oxidative stress and cytokine production. These findings support the concept that the development of fatty liver sensitizes the liver to the effects of ethanol and leads to the start of liver failure, necrosis, and eventually cirrhosis.

  17. Saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity increases adenylate cyclase of myocardial β-adrenergic system and does not compromise cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Vileigas, Danielle F; de Deus, Adriana F; da Silva, Danielle C T; de Tomasi, Loreta C; de Campos, Dijon H S; Adorni, Caroline S; de Oliveira, Scarlet M; Sant'Ana, Paula G; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos R; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which the obesity leads cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated and few studies have evaluated the relationship between obesity and proteins involved in myocardial β-adrenergic (βA) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiac function and βA pathway components in myocardium of obese rats. Male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: control (n = 17; standard diet) and obese (n = 17; saturated high-fat diet) fed for 33 weeks. Nutritional profile and comorbidities were assessed. Cardiac structure and function was evaluated by macroscopic postmortem, echocardiographic and isolated papillary muscle analyzes. Myocardial protein expression of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, Gαs protein, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) was performed by Western blot. Cardiac cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were assessed by ELISA Obese rats showed increased adiposity index (P < 0.001) and several comorbidities as hypertension, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia compared with control rats. Echocardiographic assessment revealed increased left atrium diameter (C: 4.98 ± 0.38 vs. Ob: 5.47 ± 0.53, P = 0.024) and posterior wall shortening velocity (C: 37.1 ± 3.6 vs. Ob: 41.8 ± 3.8, P = 0.007) in obese group. Papillary muscle evaluation indicated that baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation were similar between the groups. Protein expression of myocardial AC was higher in obese group than in the control (C: 1.00 ± 0.21 vs. Ob: 1.25 ± 0.10, P = 0.025), whereas the other components were unchanged. These results suggest that saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity was not effective in triggering cardiac dysfunction and impair the beta-adrenergic signaling.

  18. Deficiency of FcϵR1 Increases Body Weight Gain but Improves Glucose Tolerance in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Liu, Conglin; Liao, Mengyang; Sukhova, Galina K; Shirakawa, Jun; Abdennour, Meriem; Iamarene, Karine; Andre, Sebastien; Inouye, Karen; Clement, Karine; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Banks, Alexander S; Libby, Peter; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies demonstrated increased plasma IgE in diabetic patients, but the direct participation of IgE in diabetes or obesity remains unknown. This study found that plasma IgE levels correlated inversely with body weight, body mass index, and body fat mass among a population of randomly selected obese women. IgE receptor FcϵR1-deficient (Fcer1a(-/-)) mice and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice demonstrated that FcϵR1 deficiency in DIO mice increased food intake, reduced energy expenditure, and increased body weight gain but improved glucose tolerance and glucose-induced insulin secretion. White adipose tissue from Fcer1a(-/-) mice showed an increased expression of phospho-AKT, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, glucose transporter-4 (Glut4), and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) but reduced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) expression, tissue macrophage accumulation, and apoptosis, suggesting that IgE reduces adipogenesis and glucose uptake but induces energy expenditure, adipocyte apoptosis, and white adipose tissue inflammation. In 3T3-L1 cells, IgE inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and preadipocyte adipogenesis and induced adipocyte apoptosis. IgE reduced the 3T3-L1 cell expression of Glut4, phospho-AKT, and glucose uptake, which concurred with improved glucose tolerance in Fcer1a(-/-) mice. This study established two novel pathways of IgE in reducing body weight gain in DIO mice by suppressing adipogenesis and inducing adipocyte apoptosis while worsening glucose tolerance by reducing Glut4 expression, glucose uptake, and insulin secretion.

  19. Arterial stiffening precedes systolic hypertension in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Shiang, Tina; Al Sayah, Leona; Fry, Jessica L; Bajpai, Saumendra; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Lob, Heinrich E; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Mitchell, Gary; Cohen, Richard A; Seta, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Stiffening of conduit arteries is a risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity. Aortic wall stiffening increases pulsatile hemodynamic forces that are detrimental to the microcirculation in highly perfused organs, such as the heart, brain, and kidney. Arterial stiffness is associated with hypertension but presumed to be due to an adaptive response to increased hemodynamic load. In contrast, a recent clinical study found that stiffness precedes and may contribute to the development of hypertension although the mechanisms underlying hypertension are unknown. Here, we report that in a diet-induced model of obesity, arterial stiffness, measured in vivo, develops within 1 month of the initiation of the diet and precedes the development of hypertension by 5 months. Diet-induced obese mice recapitulate the metabolic syndrome and are characterized by inflammation in visceral fat and aorta. Normalization of the metabolic state by weight loss resulted in return of arterial stiffness and blood pressure to normal. Our findings support the hypothesis that arterial stiffness is a cause rather than a consequence of hypertension.

  20. Endurance exercise training increases APPL1 expression and improves insulin signaling in the hepatic tissue of diet-induced obese mice, independently of weight loss.

    PubMed

    Marinho, R; Ropelle, E R; Cintra, D E; De Souza, C T; Da Silva, A S R; Bertoli, F C; Colantonio, E; D'Almeida, V; Pauli, J R

    2012-07-01

    Hepatic insulin resistance is the major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. The protein kinase Akt plays a central role in the suppression of gluconeogenesis involving forkhead box O1 (Foxo1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), and in the control of glycogen synthesis involving the glycogen synthase kinase beta (GSK3β) in the liver. It has been demonstrated that endosomal adaptor protein APPL1 interacts with Akt and blocks the association of Akt with its endogenous inhibitor, tribbles-related protein 3 (TRB3), improving the action of insulin in the liver. Here, we demonstrated that chronic exercise increased the basal levels and insulin-induced Akt serine phosphorylation in the liver of diet-induced obese mice. Endurance training was able to increase APPL1 expression and the interaction between APPL1 and Akt. Conversely, training reduced both TRB3 expression and TRB3 and Akt association. The positive effects of exercise on insulin action are reinforced by our findings that showed that trained mice presented an increase in Foxo1 phosphorylation and Foxo1/PGC-1α association, which was accompanied by a reduction in gluconeogenic gene expressions (PEPCK and G6Pase). Finally, exercised animals demonstrated increased at basal and insulin-induced GSK3β phosphorylation levels and glycogen content at 24 h after the last session of exercise. Our findings demonstrate that exercise increases insulin action, at least in part, through the enhancement of APPL1 and the reduction of TRB3 expression in the liver of obese mice, independently of weight loss.

  1. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  2. Diet-Induced Obesity and Circadian Disruption of Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Blancas-Velazquez, Aurea; Mendoza, Jorge; Garcia, Alexandra N; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behavior shows a rhythmic daily pattern, which in nocturnal rodents is observed mainly during the dark period. This rhythmicity is under the influence of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the main biological clock. Nevertheless, various studies have shown that in rodent models of obesity, using high-energy diets, the general locomotor activity and feeding rhythms can be disrupted. Here, we review the data on the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on locomotor activity and feeding patterns, as well as the effect on the brain sites within the neural circuitry involved in metabolic and rewarding feeding behavior. In general, DIO may alter locomotor activity by decreasing total activity. On the other hand, DIO largely alters eating patterns, producing increased overall ingestion and number of eating bouts that can extend to the resting period. Furthermore, within the hypothalamic areas, little effect has been reported on the molecular circadian mechanism in DIO animals with ad libitum hypercaloric diets and little or no data exist so far on its effects on the reward system areas. We further discuss the possibility of an uncoupling of metabolic and reward systems in DIO and highlight a gap of circadian and metabolic research that may help to better understand the implications of obesity.

  3. Diet-Induced Obesity and Circadian Disruption of Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blancas-Velazquez, Aurea; Mendoza, Jorge; Garcia, Alexandra N.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behavior shows a rhythmic daily pattern, which in nocturnal rodents is observed mainly during the dark period. This rhythmicity is under the influence of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the main biological clock. Nevertheless, various studies have shown that in rodent models of obesity, using high-energy diets, the general locomotor activity and feeding rhythms can be disrupted. Here, we review the data on the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on locomotor activity and feeding patterns, as well as the effect on the brain sites within the neural circuitry involved in metabolic and rewarding feeding behavior. In general, DIO may alter locomotor activity by decreasing total activity. On the other hand, DIO largely alters eating patterns, producing increased overall ingestion and number of eating bouts that can extend to the resting period. Furthermore, within the hypothalamic areas, little effect has been reported on the molecular circadian mechanism in DIO animals with ad libitum hypercaloric diets and little or no data exist so far on its effects on the reward system areas. We further discuss the possibility of an uncoupling of metabolic and reward systems in DIO and highlight a gap of circadian and metabolic research that may help to better understand the implications of obesity. PMID:28223912

  4. Arginase inhibition restores endothelial function in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji Hyung; Moon, Jiyoung; Lee, Youn Sue; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Seung-Min; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2014-08-22

    Arginase may play a major role in the regulation of vascular function in various cardiovascular disorders by impairing nitric oxide (NO) production. In the current study, we investigated whether supplementation of the arginase inhibitor N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA) could restore endothelial function in an animal model of diet-induced obesity. Arginase 1 expression was significantly lower in the aorta of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with nor-NOHA (40mgkg(-1)/day) than in mice fed HFD without nor-NOHA. Arginase inhibition led to considerable increases in eNOS expression and NO levels and significant decreases in the levels of circulating ICAM-1. These findings were further confirmed by the results of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Arg in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In conclusion, arginase inhibition can help restore dysregulated endothelial function by increasing the eNOS-dependent NO production in the endothelium, indicating that arginase could be a therapeutic target for correcting obesity-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

  5. Diet-Induced Obesity Does Not Alter Tigecycline Treatment Efficacy in Murine Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Eshghi, Azad; Anjum, Zoha; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Cameron, Caroline E.; Moriarty, Tara J.

    2017-01-01

    Obese individuals more frequently suffer from infections, as a result of increased susceptibility to a number of bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, obesity can alter antibiotic treatment efficacy due to changes in drug pharmacokinetics which can result in under-dosing. However, studies on the treatment of bacterial infections in the context of obesity are scarce. To address this research gap, we assessed efficacy of antibiotic treatment in diet-induced obese mice infected with the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi. Diet-induced obese C3H/HeN mice and normal-weight controls were infected with B. burgdorferi, and treated during the acute phase of infection with two doses of tigecycline, adjusted to the weights of diet-induced obese and normal-weight mice. Antibiotic treatment efficacy was assessed 1 month after the treatment by cultivating bacteria from tissues, measuring severity of Lyme carditis, and quantifying bacterial DNA clearance in ten tissues. In addition, B. burgdorferi-specific IgG production was monitored throughout the experiment. Tigecycline treatment was ineffective in reducing B. burgdorferi DNA copies in brain. However, diet-induced obesity did not affect antibiotic-dependent bacterial DNA clearance in any tissues, regardless of the tigecycline dose used for treatment. Production of B. burgdorferi-specific IgGs was delayed and attenuated in mock-treated diet-induced obese mice compared to mock-treated normal-weight animals, but did not differ among experimental groups following antibiotic treatment. No carditis or cultivatable B. burgdorferi were detected in any antibiotic-treated group. In conclusion, obesity was associated with attenuated and delayed humoral immune responses to B. burgdorferi, but did not affect efficacy of antibiotic treatment. PMID:28286500

  6. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gotthardt, Juliet D.; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Yeomans, Bryn L.; Yang, Jennifer A.; Yasrebi, Ali; Bello, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%–52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%–13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%–42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%–60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%–32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%–75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy. PMID:26653760

  7. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy.

  8. Intermittent Hypoxia Exacerbates Metabolic Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Drager, Luciano F.; Li, Jianguo; Reinke, Christian; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity causes insulin resistance (IR) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the relative contribution of sleep apnea is debatable. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a hallmark of sleep apnea, on IR and NAFLD in lean mice and mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Mice (C57BL/6J), 6–8 weeks of age were fed a high fat (n = 18) or regular (n = 16) diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to CIH or control conditions (room air) for 4 weeks. At the end of the exposure, fasting (5 h) blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, liver enzymes, and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg) were measured. In DIO mice, body weight remained stable during CIH and did not differ from control conditions. Lean mice under CIH were significantly lighter than control mice by day 28 (P = 0.002). Compared to lean mice, DIO mice had higher fasting levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, the HOMA index, and had glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis at baseline. In lean mice, CIH slightly increased HOMA index (from 1.79 ± 0.13 in control to 2.41 ± 0.26 in CIH; P = 0.05), whereas glucose tolerance was not affected. In contrast, in DIO mice, CIH doubled HOMA index (from 10.1 ± 2.1 in control to 22.5 ± 3.6 in CIH; P < 0.01), and induced severe glucose intolerance. In DIO mice, CIH induced NAFLD, inflammation, and oxidative stress, which was not observed in lean mice. In conclusion, CIH exacerbates IR and induces steatohepatitis in DIO mice, suggesting that CIH may account for metabolic dysfunction in obesity. PMID:21799478

  9. Intermittent hypoxia exacerbates metabolic effects of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Drager, Luciano F; Li, Jianguo; Reinke, Christian; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2011-11-01

    Obesity causes insulin resistance (IR) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the relative contribution of sleep apnea is debatable. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a hallmark of sleep apnea, on IR and NAFLD in lean mice and mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Mice (C57BL/6J), 6-8 weeks of age were fed a high fat (n = 18) or regular (n = 16) diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to CIH or control conditions (room air) for 4 weeks. At the end of the exposure, fasting (5 h) blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, liver enzymes, and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg) were measured. In DIO mice, body weight remained stable during CIH and did not differ from control conditions. Lean mice under CIH were significantly lighter than control mice by day 28 (P = 0.002). Compared to lean mice, DIO mice had higher fasting levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, the HOMA index, and had glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis at baseline. In lean mice, CIH slightly increased HOMA index (from 1.79 ± 0.13 in control to 2.41 ± 0.26 in CIH; P = 0.05), whereas glucose tolerance was not affected. In contrast, in DIO mice, CIH doubled HOMA index (from 10.1 ± 2.1 in control to 22.5 ± 3.6 in CIH; P < 0.01), and induced severe glucose intolerance. In DIO mice, CIH induced NAFLD, inflammation, and oxidative stress, which was not observed in lean mice. In conclusion, CIH exacerbates IR and induces steatohepatitis in DIO mice, suggesting that CIH may account for metabolic dysfunction in obesity.

  10. Chronic rhein treatment improves recognition memory in high-fat diet-induced obese male mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Huang, Xu-Feng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Hongqin; Zhang, Qingsheng; Yu, Shijia; Yu, Yinghua

    2016-10-01

    High-fat (HF) diet modulates gut microbiota and increases plasma concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is associated with obesity and its related low-grade inflammation and cognitive decline. Rhein is the main ingredient of the rhubarb plant which has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for several millennia. However, the potential effects of rhein against HF diet-induced obesity and its associated alteration of gut microbiota, inflammation and cognitive decline have not been studied. In this study, C57BL/6J male mice were fed an HF diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, and then treated with oral rhein (120 mg/kg body weight/day in HF diet) for a further 6 weeks. Chronic rhein treatment prevented the HF diet-induced recognition memory impairment assessed by the novel object recognition test, neuroinflammation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficits in the perirhinal cortex. Furthermore, rhein inhibited the HF diet-induced increased plasma LPS level and the proinflammatory macrophage accumulation in the colon and alteration of microbiota, including decreasing Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and Desulfovibrios spp. DNA and increasing Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. DNA. Moreover, rhein also reduced body weight and improved glucose tolerance in HF diet-induced obese mice. In conclusion, rhein improved recognition memory and prevented obesity in mice on a chronic HF diet. These beneficial effects occur via the modulation of microbiota, hypoendotoxinemia, inhibition of macrophage accumulation, anti-neuroinflammation and the improvement of BDNF expression. Therefore, supplementation with rhein-enriched food or herbal medicine could be beneficial as a preventive strategy for chronic HF diet-induced cognitive decline, microbiota alteration and neuroinflammation.

  11. Effects of Dietary Fibre (Pectin) and/or Increased Protein (Casein or Pea) on Satiety, Body Weight, Adiposity and Caecal Fermentation in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Clare L.; Gratz, Silvia W.; Peinado, Diana I.; Thomson, Lynn M.; Garden, Karen E.; Williams, Patricia A.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Ross, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary constituents that suppress appetite, such as dietary fibre and protein, may aid weight loss in obesity. The soluble fermentable dietary fibre pectin promotes satiety and decreases adiposity in diet-induced obese rats but effects of increased protein are unknown. Adult diet-induced obese rats reared on high fat diet (45% energy from fat) were given experimental diets ad libitum for 4 weeks (n = 8/group): high fat control, high fat with high protein (40% energy) as casein or pea protein, or these diets with added 10% w/w pectin. Dietary pectin, but not high protein, decreased food intake by 23% and induced 23% body fat loss, leading to 12% lower final body weight and 44% lower total body fat mass than controls. Plasma concentrations of satiety hormones PYY and total GLP-1 were increased by dietary pectin (168% and 151%, respectively) but not by high protein. Plasma leptin was decreased by 62% on pectin diets and 38% on high pea (but not casein) protein, while plasma insulin was decreased by 44% on pectin, 38% on high pea and 18% on high casein protein diets. Caecal weight and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the caecum were increased in pectin-fed and high pea protein groups: caecal succinate was increased by pectin (900%), acetate and propionate by pectin (123% and 118%, respectively) and pea protein (147% and 144%, respectively), and butyrate only by pea protein (309%). Caecal branched-chain fatty acid concentrations were decreased by pectin (down 78%) but increased by pea protein (164%). Therefore, the soluble fermentable fibre pectin appeared more effective than high protein for increasing satiety and decreasing caloric intake and adiposity while on high fat diet, and produced a fermentation environment more likely to promote hindgut health. Altogether these data indicate that high fibre may be better than high protein for weight (fat) loss in obesity. PMID:27224646

  12. Ladder-Climbing Training Prevents Bone Loss and Microarchitecture Deterioration in Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Gao, Xiaohang; Yang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chentao; Wang, Xudan; Han, Yanqi; Zhao, Xinjuan; Chi, Aiping; Sun, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been proved to be effective in improving bone quality in both animal and human studies. However, the issue about whether resistance exercise can inhibit obesity-induced bone loss has not been previously investigated. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of ladder-climbing training, one of the resistance exercises, on bone mechanical properties and microarchitecture in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese rats. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to the Control, HF + sedentary (HF-S) and HF + ladder-climbing training (HF-LCT) groups. Rats in the HF-LCT group performed ladder-climbing training for 8 weeks. The results showed that ladder-climbing training significantly reduced body and fat weight, and increased muscle mass along with a trend toward enhanced muscle strength in diet-induced obese rats. MicroCT analysis demonstrated that obesity-induced bone loss and architecture deterioration were significantly mitigated by ladder-climbing training, as evidenced by increased trabecular bone mineral density, bone volume over total volume, trabecular number and thickness, and decreased trabecular separation and structure model index. However, neither HF diet nor ladder-climbing training had an impact on femoral biomechanical properties. Moreover, ladder-climbing training significantly increased serum adiponectin, decreased serum leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 levels, and downregulated myostatin (MSTN) expression in diet-induced obese rats. Taken together, ladder-climbing training prevents bone loss and microarchitecture deterioration in diet-induced obese rats through multiple mechanisms including increasing mechanical loading on bone due to improved skeletal muscle mass and strength, regulating the levels of myokines and adipokines, and suppressing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It indicates that resistance exercise may be a promising therapy for treating obesity-induced bone loss.

  13. Colesevelam improves insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (F-DIO) rat model by increasing the release of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Shang, Quan; Saumoy, Monica; Holst, Jens Juul; Salen, Gerald; Xu, Guorong

    2010-03-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been shown to lower glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. To investigate how colesevelam (CL) HCl improves hyperglycemia, studies were conducted in diet-induced obesity (F-DIO) rats, which develop insulin resistance when fed a high-energy (high fat/high sucrose) diet (HE). The rats were fed HE; HE + 2% CL; HE + 0.02% SC-435 (SC), an apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter inhibitor; and regular chow (controls). After 4 wk of treatment, both in the HE group and the SC + HE group, plasma glucose and insulin levels remained elevated compared with baseline values throughout an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). In contrast, in the CL + HE group, plasma glucose levels returned to baseline by the end of the test, and insulin peaked in 15-30 min and then returned to baseline. CL induced release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) because the area under the curve of plasma total GLP-1 in the CL + HE group was significantly greater than in the HE group during the OGTT. Bile acid concentrations in the portal blood did not decrease in the HE group but declined significantly both in the CL + HE and SC + HE groups with reduced farnesoid X receptor activation compared with controls. We concluded that CL reduces plasma glucose levels by improving insulin resistance in this rat model. It is unlikely that the improvement is attributable to decreased bile acid flux to the liver but is likely secondary to induced GLP-1 secretion, which improves insulin release.

  14. Diet-induced obesity has a differential effect on adipose tissue and macrophage inflammatory responses of young and old mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity and aging are both associated with increased inflammation in adipose tissue. In this study, we investigated the effect of diet-induced obesity on inflammatory status in young and old mice. Young (2-mo) and old (19-mo) C57BL/6 mice were fed a low fat (10 percent LF) or high fat (60 percent, H...

  15. Heart energy metabolism impairment in Western-diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Neves, Fabiana A; Cortez, Erika; Bernardo, Amélia F; Mattos, Ana B M; Vieira, Anatalia K; Malafaia, Tayanne de O; Thole, Alessandra A; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C de S; Garcia-Souza, Erica P; Sichieri, Rosely; Moura, Anibal S

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional transition has contributed to growing obesity, mainly by changing eating habits of the population. The mechanisms by which diet-induced obesity leads to cardiac injury are not completely understood, but it is known that obesity is associated to impaired cardiac function and energy metabolism, increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, our study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying cardiac metabolism impairment related to Western diet-induced obesity. After weaning, male Swiss mice were fed a Western diet for 16 weeks in order to induce obesity. After this period, the content of proteins involved in heart energy metabolism GLUT1, cytosolic lysate and plasma membrane GLUT4, AMPK, pAMPK, IRβ, IRS-1, PGC-1α, CPT1 and UCP2 was evaluated. Also, the oxidative phosphorylation of myocardial fibers was measured by high-resolution respirometry. Mice in the Western diet group (WG) presented altered biometric parameters compared to those in control group, including higher body weight, increased myocardial lipid deposition and glucose intolerance, which demonstrate the obesogenic role of Western diet. WG presented increased CPT1 and UCP2 contents and decreased IRS-1, plasma membrane GLUT4 and PGC-1α contents. In addition, WG presented cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced biogenesis, demonstrating a lower capacity of carbohydrates and fatty acid oxidation and also decreased coupling between oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Cardiac metabolism impairment related to Western diet-induced obesity is probably due to damaged myocardial oxidative capacity, reduced mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondria uncoupling, which compromise the bioenergetic metabolism of heart.

  16. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  17. Leptin modulates the late fever response to LPS in diet-induced obese animals.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Joanna; Woodside, Barbara; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is an important modulator of both inflammation and energy homeostasis, making it a key interface between the inflammatory response to pathogenic stimuli and the energy status of the host. In previous studies we demonstrated that sickness responses to systemic immune challenge, including fever, are significantly exacerbated in diet induced obese animals. To investigate whether this exacerbation is functionally linked to the obesity associated increase in circulating levels of leptin, a species-specific leptin antiserum (LAS) was used to neutralize endogenous leptin in diet-induced obese adult male Wistar rats treated with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100μg/kg). LAS significantly reduced the magnitude of the later phases of the fever response, and attenuated the circulating levels of IL-6, IL-1ra and bioactivity of leptin in the obese animals. In addition, the antiserum significantly attenuated the hypothalamic expression of IL-1ß, IκBα, COX2, SOCS3 and IL-6 in both lean and obese rats 10h after the LPS injection and NF-IL6 in the hypothalamus of obese rats only. The relatively late rise in brain IL-6 suggested a role in mediating the extended fever response in obese animals and we tested this by neutralizing brain IL-6 using an IL6-AS injected intracerebroventricularly (4μl, icv). The IL6-AS significantly but transiently (between 9h and 12h post LPS) reduced the late fever response of obese rats. These results demonstrate that leptin plays an important part in modulating the late portion of the fever response to LPS, likely through the induction of hypothalamic IL-6 in obese animals.

  18. Diet-induced obesity leads to the development of leptin resistance in vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    de Lartigue, Guillaume; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Espero, Elvis; Lee, Jennifer; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-07-01

    Ingestion of high-fat, high-calorie diets is associated with hyperphagia, increased body fat, and obesity. The mechanisms responsible are currently unclear; however, altered leptin signaling may be an important factor. Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) integrate signals from the gut in response to ingestion of nutrients and express leptin receptors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance occurs in VAN in response to a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley rats, which exhibit a bimodal distribution of body weight gain, were used after ingestion of a high-fat diet for 8 wk. Body weight, food intake, and plasma leptin levels were measured. Leptin signaling was determined by immunohistochemical localization of phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) in cultured VAN and by quantifaction of pSTAT3 protein levels by Western blot analysis in nodose ganglia and arcuate nucleus in vivo. To determine the mechanism of leptin resistance in nodose ganglia, cultured VAN were stimulated with leptin alone or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and SOCS-3 expression measured. SOCS-3 protein levels in VAN were measured by Western blot following leptin administration in vivo. Leptin resulted in appearance of pSTAT3 in VAN of low-fat-fed rats and rats resistant to diet-induced obesity but not diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. However, leptin signaling was normal in arcuate neurons. SOCS-3 expression was increased in VAN of DIO rats. In cultured VAN, LPS increased SOCS-3 expression and inhibited leptin-induced pSTAT3 in vivo. We conclude that VAN of diet-induced obese rats become leptin resistant; LPS and SOCS-3 may play a role in the development of leptin resistance.

  19. Cafeteria diet-induced obesity causes oxidative damage in white adipose.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy R; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Sampey, Brante P; Troester, Melissa A; Hayes, D Neil; Makowski, Liza

    2016-04-29

    Obesity continues to be one of the most prominent public health dilemmas in the world. The complex interaction among the varied causes of obesity makes it a particularly challenging problem to address. While typical high-fat purified diets successfully induce weight gain in rodents, we have described a more robust model of diet-induced obesity based on feeding rats a diet consisting of highly palatable, energy-dense human junk foods - the "cafeteria" diet (CAF, 45-53% kcal from fat). We previously reported that CAF-fed rats became hyperphagic, gained more weight, and developed more severe hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and glucose intolerance compared to the lard-based 45% kcal from fat high fat diet-fed group. In addition, the CAF diet-fed group displayed a higher degree of inflammation in adipose and liver, mitochondrial dysfunction, and an increased concentration of lipid-derived, pro-inflammatory mediators. Building upon our previous findings, we aimed to determine mechanisms that underlie physiologic findings in the CAF diet. We investigated the effect of CAF diet-induced obesity on adipose tissue specifically using expression arrays and immunohistochemistry. Genomic evidence indicated the CAF diet induced alterations in the white adipose gene transcriptome, with notable suppression of glutathione-related genes and pathways involved in mitigating oxidative stress. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated a doubling in adipose lipid peroxidation marker 4-HNE levels compared to rats that remained lean on control standard chow diet. Our data indicates that the CAF diet drives an increase in oxidative damage in white adipose tissue that may affect tissue homeostasis. Oxidative stress drives activation of inflammatory kinases that can perturb insulin signaling leading to glucose intolerance and diabetes.

  20. Autoimmunity to HSP60 during diet induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Şelli, M E; Wick, G; Wraith, D C; Newby, A C

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive immunity has been implicated in adipose tissue inflammation, obesity and its adverse metabolic consequences. No obesity-related autoantigen has yet been identified, although heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has been implicated in other autoimmune diseases. We investigated whether feeding a high-fat diet to C57BL/6J mice would cause autoimmunity to HSP60 and whether immunomodulation with peptides from HSP60 would reverse the resulting obesity or metabolic dysfunction. Obese mice had higher circulating levels of HSP60 associated with increased T-lymphocyte proliferation responses and the emergence of circulating IgG1 and IgG2c antibody levels against HSP60. Treatment with escalating doses of a mixture of three proven immunomodulatory HSP60 peptides did not reduce weight but completely reversed the increase in VLDL/LDL levels and partially reversed the glucose intolerance in obese mice. Obese mice mount an autoimmune response to HSP60, which partly underlies the resulting metabolic disturbances. PMID:27899808

  1. Murine Hepatic miRNAs Expression and Regulation of Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Jiyun; Kim, Suna; Kwon, Dae Young; Ha, Tae Youl

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression primarily by translational repression or by messenger RNA degradation. MicroRNAs play crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little is known regarding their role in obesity. We investigated differences of microRNA (miRNA) expression in liver tissue from diet-induced obese mice and potential effects of them on gene and protein expression. We used a miRNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR to determine miRNA expression in murine liver tissue. Gene and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Effects of miRNA by knock-down using RNAi or overexpression on putative target genes and/or proteins in a murine hepatic cell line were also investigated. MicroRNA array and qRT-PCR analsysis revealed that > 50 miRNAs were down- or upregulated more than 2-fold in the liver of diet-induced obese mice. While changes in expression of many genes were observed at the mRNA level, some were only altered at the protein level. Overexpression or knock-down of miR-107 in murine hepatic cells revealed that the expression of its putative target, fatty acid synthase, was dramatically decreased or increased, respectively. In conclusion, more than 50 hepatic miRNAs were dysregulated in diet-induced obese mice. Some of them regulate protein expression at translation level and others regulate mRNA expression at transcriptional level. MiR-107 is downregulated while FASN, a putative target of miR-107, was increased in diet-induced obese mice. These findings provide the evidence of the correlation of miRNAs and their targets in diet-induced obese mice. PMID:21120623

  2. Moderate physical activity promotes basal hepatic autophagy in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Caldwell, Megan E; Lee, David E; Brown, Jacob L; Brown, Lemuel A; Perry, Richard A; Greene, Elizabeth S; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R; Washington, Tyrone A; Greene, Nicholas P

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a known risk factor for the development of hepatic disease; obesity-induced fatty liver can lead to inflammation, steatosis, and cirrhosis and is associated with degeneration of the mitochondria. Lifestyle interventions such as physical activity may ameliorate this condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate regulation of mitochondrial and autophagy quality control in liver following Western diet-induced obesity and voluntary physical activity. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed a Western diet (WD) or normal chow (NC, control) for 4 weeks; afterwards, groups were divided into voluntary wheel running (VWR) or sedentary (SED) conditions for an additional 4 weeks. WD-SED animals had a median histology score of 2, whereas WD-VWR was not different from NC groups (median score 1). There was no difference in mRNA of inflammatory markers Il6 and Tnfa in WD animals. WD animals had 50% lower mitochondrial content (COX IV and Cytochrome C proteins), 50% lower Pgc1a mRNA content, and reduced content of mitochondrial fusion and fission markers. Markers of autophagy were increased in VWR animals, regardless of obesity, as measured by 50% greater LC3-II/I ratio and 40% lower p62 protein content. BNIP3 protein content was 30% less in WD animals compared with NC animals, regardless of physical activity. Diet-induced obesity results in derangements in mitochondrial quality control that appear to occur prior to the onset of hepatic inflammation. Moderate physical activity appears to enhance basal autophagy in the liver; increased autophagy may provide protection from hepatic fat accumulation.

  3. Diet-induced obesity causes long QT and reduces transcription of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyan; Amin, Vaibhav; Gurin, Michael; Wan, Elaine; Thorp, Edward; Homma, Shunichi; Morrow, John P

    2013-06-01

    In humans, obesity is associated with long QT, increased frequency of premature ventricular complexes, and sudden cardiac death. The mechanisms of the pro-arrhythmic electrophysiologic remodeling of obesity are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that there is decreased expression of voltage-gated potassium channels in the obese heart, leading to long QT. Using implanted telemeters, we found that diet-induced obese (DIO) wild-type mice have impaired cardiac repolarization, demonstrated by long QT, as well as more frequent ventricular ectopy, similar to obese humans. DIO mice have reduced protein and mRNA levels of the potassium channel Kv1.5 caused by a reduction of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in DIO hearts. We found that CREB knock-down by siRNA reduces Kv1.5, CREB binds to the Kv1.5 promoter in the heart, and CREB increases transcription of mouse and human Kv1.5 promoters. The reduction in CREB protein during lipotoxicity can be rescued by inhibiting protein kinase D (PKD). Our results identify a mechanism for obesity-induced electrophysiologic remodeling in the heart, namely PKD-induced reduction of CREB, which in turn decreases expression of the potassium channel Kv1.5.

  4. miR-155 Deletion in Female Mice Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Andrew D.; Fonken, Laura K.; Gushchina, Liubov V.; Aubrecht, Taryn G.; Maurya, Santosh K.; Periasamy, Muthu; Nelson, Randy J.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic in developed countries. Obese individuals are susceptible to comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorder. Increasing the ability of adipose tissue to expend excess energy could improve protection from obesity. One promising target is microRNA (miR)-155-5p. We demonstrate that deletion of miR-155 (-5p and -3p) in female mice prevents diet-induced obesity. Body weight gain did not differ between wild-type (WT) and miR-155 knockout (KO) mice fed control diet (CD); however, miR-155 KO mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) gained 56% less body weight and 74% less gonadal white adipose tissue (WAT) than WT mice. Enhanced WAT thermogenic potential, brown adipose tissue differentiation, and/or insulin sensitivity might underlie this obesity resistance. Indeed, miR-155 KO mice on HFD had 21% higher heat release than WT HFD mice. Compared to WT adipocytes, miR-155 KO adipocytes upregulated brown (Ucp1, Cidea, Pparg) and white (Fabp4, Pnpla2, AdipoQ, Fasn) adipogenic genes, and glucose metabolism genes (Glut4, Irs1). miR-155 deletion abrogated HFD-induced adipocyte hypertrophy and WAT inflammation. Therefore, miR-155 deletion increases adipogenic, insulin sensitivity, and energy uncoupling machinery, while limiting inflammation in WAT, which together could restrict HFD-induced fat accumulation. Our results identify miR-155 as a novel candidate target for improving obesity resistance. PMID:26953132

  5. Meta-review of protein network regulating obesity between validated obesity candidate genes in the white adipose tissue of high-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjung; Kim, Eun Jung; Seo, Seung-Won; Hur, Cheol-Goo; McGregor, Robin A; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide obesity and related comorbidities are increasing, but identifying new therapeutic targets remains a challenge. A plethora of microarray studies in diet-induced obesity models has provided large datasets of obesity associated genes. In this review, we describe an approach to examine the underlying molecular network regulating obesity, and we discuss interactions between obesity candidate genes. We conducted network analysis on functional protein-protein interactions associated with 25 obesity candidate genes identified in a literature-driven approach based on published microarray studies of diet-induced obesity. The obesity candidate genes were closely associated with lipid metabolism and inflammation. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (Pparg) appeared to be a core obesity gene, and obesity candidate genes were highly interconnected, suggesting a coordinately regulated molecular network in adipose tissue. In conclusion, the current network analysis approach may help elucidate the underlying molecular network regulating obesity and identify anti-obesity targets for therapeutic intervention.

  6. CD11c expression in adipose tissue and blood and its role in diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine CD11c, a beta(2)-integrin, on adipose tissue (AT) leukocytes, and blood monocytes and its role in diet-induced obesity. High-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice, CD11c-deficient mice, and obese humans were studied. CD11c, leukocytes, and chemokines/cytokines were examined in AT and/or blo...

  7. Diet-induced obesity suppresses ghrelin in rat gastrointestinal tract and serum.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Suleyman; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2011-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine ghrelin expression in serum and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tissues, and to measure tissue ghrelin levels and obesity-related alterations in some serum biochemical variables in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). The study included 12 male rats, 60 days old. The rats were randomly allocated to two groups (n = 6). Rats in the DIO group were fed a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity, while those in the control group were fed on standard rat pellets. After a 12 week diet program including an adaptation period all rats were decapitated, tissues were individually fixed, ghrelin expression was examined by immunohistochemistry , and tissue and serum ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum biochemical variables were measured using an autoanalyzer. When the baseline and week 12 body mass index and GIT ghrelin expression were compared between DIO and control rats, BMI had increased and ghrelin expression decreased due to obesity. The RIA results were consistent with these findings. Serum glucose, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels were elevated and HDL cholesterol significantly decreased in the DIO group. A comparison of GIT tissues between the control and obese groups demonstrated that ghrelin was decreased in all tissues of the latter. This decrease was brought about a decline in the circulating ghrelin pool. This suggests that rather than being associated with a change in a single tissue, obesity is a pathological condition in which ghrelin expression is changed in all tissues.

  8. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  9. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, K. Monica; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  10. Diet-induced obesity alters dendritic cell function in the presence and absence of tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    James, Britnie R.; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann; Askeland, Eric J.; Kucaba, Tamara; Griffith, Thomas S.; Norian, Lyse A.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a mounting health concern in the United States, and is associated with an increased risk for developing several cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Despite this, little is known regarding the impact of obesity on antitumor immunity. As dendritic cells (DC) are critical regulators of antitumor immunity, we examined the combined effects of obesity and tumor outgrowth on DC function. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) model, DC function was evaluated in mice bearing orthotopic RCC and in tumor-free controls. Tumor-free DIO mice had profoundly altered serum cytokine and chemokine profiles, with upregulation of 15 proteins, including IL-1α, IL-17, and LIF. Tumor-free DIO mice had elevated percentages of conventional splenic DC that were impaired in their ability to stimulate naive T cell expansion, although they were phenotypically similar to normal weight (NW) controls. In DIO mice, intra-renal RCC tumor challenge in the absence of therapy led to increased local infiltration by T cell-suppressive DC and accelerated early tumor outgrowth. Following administration of a DC-dependent immunotherapy, established RCC tumors regressed in NW mice. The same immunotherapy was ineffective in DIO mice, and was characterized by an accumulation of regulatory DC in tumor-bearing kidneys, decreased local infiltration by IFNγ-producing CD8 T cells, and progressive tumor outgrowth. Our results suggest that the presence of obesity as a co-morbidity can impair the efficacy of DC-dependent antitumor immunotherapies. PMID:22745381

  11. Diet-induced obesity alters dendritic cell function in the presence and absence of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    James, Britnie R; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann; Askeland, Eric J; Kucaba, Tamara; Griffith, Thomas S; Norian, Lyse A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity is a mounting health concern in the United States and is associated with an increased risk for developing several cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Despite this, little is known regarding the impact of obesity on antitumor immunity. Because dendritic cells (DC) are critical regulators of antitumor immunity, we examined the combined effects of obesity and tumor outgrowth on DC function. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) model, DC function was evaluated in mice bearing orthotopic RCC and in tumor-free controls. Tumor-free DIO mice had profoundly altered serum cytokine and chemokine profiles, with upregulation of 15 proteins, including IL-1α, IL-17, and LIF. Tumor-free DIO mice had elevated percentages of conventional splenic DC that were impaired in their ability to stimulate naive T cell expansion, although they were phenotypically similar to normal weight (NW) controls. In DIO mice, intrarenal RCC tumor challenge in the absence of therapy led to increased local infiltration by T cell-suppressive DC and accelerated early tumor outgrowth. Following administration of a DC-dependent immunotherapy, established RCC tumors regressed in normal weight mice. The same immunotherapy was ineffective in DIO mice and was characterized by an accumulation of regulatory DC in tumor-bearing kidneys, decreased local infiltration by IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells, and progressive tumor outgrowth. Our results suggest that the presence of obesity as a comorbidity can impair the efficacy of DC-dependent antitumor immunotherapies.

  12. The low density lipoprotein receptor modulates the effects of hypogonadism on diet-induced obesity and related metabolic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Caterina; Mpatsoulis, Diogenis; Natsos, Anastasios; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Traish, Abdulmaged M.; Voshol, Peter J.; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we investigated how LDL receptor deficiency (Ldlr−/−) modulates the effects of testosterone on obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Though sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice fed Western-type diet for 12 weeks became obese and showed disturbed plasma glucose metabolism and plasma cholesterol and TG profiles, castrated mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity and had improved glucose metabolism and reduced plasma TG levels, despite a further deterioration in their plasma cholesterol profile. The effect of hypogonadism on diet-induced weight gain of Ldlr−/− mice was independent of ApoE and Lrp1. Indirect calorimetry analysis indicated that hypogonadism in Ldlr−/− mice was associated with increased metabolic rate. Indeed, mitochondrial cytochrome c and uncoupling protein 1 expression were elevated, primarily in white adipose tissue, confirming increased mitochondrial metabolic activity due to thermogenesis. Testosterone replacement in castrated Ldlr−/− mice for a period of 8 weeks promoted diet-induced obesity, indicating a direct role of testosterone in the observed phenotype. Treatment of sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane for 8 weeks showed that the obesity of castrated Ldlr−/− mice is independent of estrogens. Overall, our data reveal a novel role of Ldlr as functional modulator of metabolic alterations associated with hypogonadism. PMID:24837748

  13. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nakano, Tatsuya; Saito, Ryo; Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle.

  14. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T.; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle. PMID:26766570

  15. Codonopsis lanceolata Extract Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Kui-Jin; Kim, Young-Hyun; Kim, Dan-Bi; Shin, Gi-Hae; Cho, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Bong Kyun; Lee, Boo-Yong; Lee, Ok-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata extract (CLE) has been used in traditional medicine in the Asian-Pacific region for the treatment of bronchitis, cough, and inflammation. However, it is still unclear whether obesity in mice can be altered by diet supplementation with CLE. To investigate whether CLE could have preventative effects on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, male C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a normal chow diet, 60% HFD, or a HFD supplemented with CLE (60, 180, and 360 mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks. CLE decreased body weight and subcutaneous and visceral fat weights in HFD-induced obese mice. CLE group mice showed lower fat accumulation and a smaller adipocyte area in the adipose tissue compared with the HFD group mice. CLE group mice exhibited lower serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), glucose, and insulin compared with the HFD group mice. In addition, CLE decreased liver weight and lowered the increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels in HFD-induced obese mice. These results indicate that CLE can inhibit the development of diet-induced obesity and hyperlipidemia in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:25353662

  16. Effects of Maternal Linseed Oil Supplementation on Metabolic Parameters in Cafeteria Diet-induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Benaissa, Nawel; Merzouk, Hafida; Merzouk, Sid Ahmed; Narce, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Because linseed oil may influence maternal and fetal metabolisms, we investigated its role in the modulation of lipid metabolism in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats and their offspring. Female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria food, which were either supplemented or not supplemented with linseed oil (5%) for 1 month before and during gestation. At parturition, serum and tissue lipids and enzyme activities were analyzed. Cafeteria diet induced adverse metabolic alterations in both mothers and offspring. Linseed oil improved metabolic status. In conclusion, linseed oil displayed health benefits by modulating tissue enzyme activities in both obese mothers and their newborns.

  17. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mike J F; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-08-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or 'wanting'). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened 'wanting' was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact ('liking') of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal 'hot-spots' that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation.

  18. Beneficial effects of milk oligosaccharides on gut permeability, microbial dysbiosis and the obese phenotype in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Microbial dysbiosis and increased intestinal permeability is a target for prevention or reversal of weight gain in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO); however, it is not known whether decreased intestinal permeability is necessary or sufficient for weight loss. Prebiotic milk oligos...

  19. Exercise training starting at weaning age preserves cardiac pacemaker function in adulthood of diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho de Lima, Daniel; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Silveira, Simonton Andrade; Haibara, Andrea Siqueira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    Peripheral sympathetic overdrive in young obese subjects contributes to further aggravation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension, thus inducing worsening clinical conditions in adulthood. Exercise training has been considered a strategy to repair obesity autonomic dysfunction, thereby reducing the cardiometabolic risk. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of early exercise training, starting immediately after weaning, on cardiac autonomic control in diet-induced obese rats. Male Wistar rats (weaning) were divided into four groups: (i) a control group (n = 6); (ii) an exercise-trained control group (n = 6); (iii) a diet-induced obesity group (n = 6); and (iv) an exercise-trained diet-induced obesity group (n = 6). The development of obesity was induced by 9 weeks of palatable diet intake, and the training program was implemented in a motor-driven treadmill (5 times per week) during the same period. After this period, animals were submitted to vein and artery catheter implantation to assess cardiac autonomic balance by methylatropine (3 mg/kg) and propranolol (4 mg/kg) administration. Exercise training increased running performance in both groups (p < 0.05). Exercise training also prevented the increased resting heart rate in obese rats, which seemed to be related to cardiac pacemaker activity preservation (p < 0.05). Additionally, the training program preserved the pressure and bradycardia responses to autonomic blockade in obese rats (p < 0.05). An exercise program beginning at weaning age prevents cardiovascular dysfunction in obese rats, indicating that exercise training may be used as a nonpharmacological therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiometabolic diseases.

  20. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Friedline, Randall H.; Ko, Hwi Jin; Jung, Dae Young; Lee, Yongjin; Bortell, Rita; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Patel, Payal R.; Hu, Xiaodi; Inashima, Kunikazu; Kearns, Caitlyn; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Shultz, Leonard D.; Lee, Ki Won; Greiner, Dale L.; Kim, Jason K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by a dysregulated immune system, which may causally associate with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Despite widespread use of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation (SCID) mice, and SCID bearing a null mutation in the IL-2 common γ chain receptor (NSG) mice as animal models of human diseases including type 1 diabetes, the underlying metabolic effects of a genetically altered immune system are poorly understood. For this, we performed a comprehensive metabolic characterization of these mice fed chow or after 6 wk of a high-fat diet. We found that NOD mice had ∼50% less fat mass and were 2-fold more insulin sensitive, as measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, than C57BL/6 wild-type mice. SCID mice were also more insulin sensitive with increased muscle glucose metabolism and resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure (∼10%) and physical activity (∼40%) as measured by metabolic cages. NSG mice were completely protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose metabolism in peripheral organs. Our findings demonstrate an important role of genetic background, lymphocytes, and cytokine signaling in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.—Friedline, R. H., Ko, H. J., Jung, D. Y., Lee, Y., Bortell, R., Dagdeviren, S., Patel, P. R., Hu, X., Inashima, K., Kearns, C., Tsitsilianos, N., Shafiq, U., Shultz, L. D., Lee, K. W., Greiner, D. L., Kim, J. K. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26644351

  1. Diet-induced obesity skin changes monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haluszka, Dóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Kiss, Norbert; Szipőcs, Róbert; Kuroli, Enikő; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Wikonkál, Norbert M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity related metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have severe consequences on our skin. Latest developments in nonlinear microscopy allow the use of noninvasive, label free imaging methods, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), for early diagnosis of metabolic syndrome-related skin complications by 3D imaging of the skin and the connective tissue. Our aim was to study effects of various types of diet-induced obesity in mice using these methods. We examined mice on different diets for 32 weeks. The collagen morphology was evaluated four times in vivo by SHG microscopy, and adipocytes were examined once at the end of experiment by ex vivo CARS method. A strong correlation was found between the body weight and the adipocyte size, while we found that the SHG intensity of dermal collagen reduces considerably with increasing body weight. Obese mice on high-fat diet showed worse results than those on high-fat - high-fructose diet. Animals on high-fructose diet did not gain more weight than those on ordinary diet despite of the increased calorie intake, but their collagen damage was nonetheless significant. Obesity and high sugar intake damages the skin, mainly the dermal connective tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue, which efficiently can be monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy. PMID:27895989

  2. Inhibition of RXR and PPARγ ameliorates diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Waki, Hironori; Kamon, Junji; Murakami, Koji; Motojima, Kiyoto; Komeda, Kajuro; Miki, Hiroshi; Kubota, Naoto; Terauchi, Yasuo; Tsuchida, Atsuko; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Yamauchi, Naoko; Ide, Tomohiro; Hori, Wataru; Kato, Shigeaki; Fukayama, Masashi; Akanuma, Yasuo; Ezaki, Osamu; Itai, Akiko; Nagai, Ryozo; Kimura, Satoshi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Koichi; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-activated transcription factor and functions as a heterodimer with a retinoid X receptor (RXR). Supraphysiological activation of PPARγ by thiazolidinediones can reduce insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, but these drugs can also cause weight gain. Quite unexpectedly, a moderate reduction of PPARγ activity observed in heterozygous PPARγ-deficient mice or the Pro12Ala polymorphism in human PPARγ, has been shown to prevent insulin resistance and obesity induced by a high-fat diet. In this study, we investigated whether functional antagonism toward PPARγ/RXR could be used to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. We show herein that an RXR antagonist and a PPARγ antagonist decrease triglyceride (TG) content in white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver. These inhibitors potentiated leptin’s effects and increased fatty acid combustion and energy dissipation, thereby ameliorating HF diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Paradoxically, treatment of heterozygous PPARγ-deficient mice with an RXR antagonist or a PPARγ antagonist depletes white adipose tissue and markedly decreases leptin levels and energy dissipation, which increases TG content in skeletal muscle and the liver, thereby leading to the re-emergence of insulin resistance. Our data suggested that appropriate functional antagonism of PPARγ/RXR may be a logical approach to protection against obesity and related diseases such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:11581301

  3. Inhibition of RXR and PPARgamma ameliorates diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, T; Waki, H; Kamon, J; Murakami, K; Motojima, K; Komeda, K; Miki, H; Kubota, N; Terauchi, Y; Tsuchida, A; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, N; Yamauchi, N; Ide, T; Hori, W; Kato, S; Fukayama, M; Akanuma, Y; Ezaki, O; Itai, A; Nagai, R; Kimura, S; Tobe, K; Kagechika, H; Shudo, K; Kadowaki, T

    2001-10-01

    PPARgamma is a ligand-activated transcription factor and functions as a heterodimer with a retinoid X receptor (RXR). Supraphysiological activation of PPARgamma by thiazolidinediones can reduce insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, but these drugs can also cause weight gain. Quite unexpectedly, a moderate reduction of PPARgamma activity observed in heterozygous PPARgamma-deficient mice or the Pro12Ala polymorphism in human PPARgamma, has been shown to prevent insulin resistance and obesity induced by a high-fat diet. In this study, we investigated whether functional antagonism toward PPARgamma/RXR could be used to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. We show herein that an RXR antagonist and a PPARgamma antagonist decrease triglyceride (TG) content in white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver. These inhibitors potentiated leptin's effects and increased fatty acid combustion and energy dissipation, thereby ameliorating HF diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Paradoxically, treatment of heterozygous PPARgamma-deficient mice with an RXR antagonist or a PPARgamma antagonist depletes white adipose tissue and markedly decreases leptin levels and energy dissipation, which increases TG content in skeletal muscle and the liver, thereby leading to the re-emergence of insulin resistance. Our data suggested that appropriate functional antagonism of PPARgamma/RXR may be a logical approach to protection against obesity and related diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

  4. Ameliorating Effect of Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii on High-fat Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Ra; Begum, Shahnaz; Oh, Deuk Sil; Wee, An Jin; Yun, Byung Sun; Sung, Chang Keun

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-obesity effects of Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii (MA) in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Two groups were fed either a normal control diet or an HF (45% kcal fat) diet for 12 weeks and three groups were fed an HF diet supplemented with powdered MA (MAP, 1%, 3%, and 5%) for 12 weeks. The anti-obesity effects of MAP supplementation on body weight, fat mass development, and lipid-related markers were assessed. Consumption of an HF diet resulted in increased body weight, serum lipids, relative adipose tissues weight, and liver fat accumulation. However, administration of MAP significantly decreased body weight gain, food intake, food efficiency ratio, hepatic cholesterol level, and adipose tissue weight in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with MAP significantly reduced the occurrence of fatty liver deposits and steatosis, and inhibited an HF diet-induced increase in adipocyte size. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with MAP exerts anti-obesity effects and indicate that MAP could be used as a functional food to control obesity. PMID:25054104

  5. Diet-induced obesity in rats leads to a decrease in sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is rapidly becoming a worldwide epidemic that affects children and adults. Some studies have shown a relationship between obesity and infertility, but until now it remains controversial. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet-induced obesity on male reproductive parameters. Methods In a first experiment, male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or standard chow (SD) for 15, 30 or 45 weeks, after which they were evaluated by adiposity index, serum leptin levels, reproductive organ weights and sperm counts. In a second experiment, rats received HFD or SD only for 15 weeks, long enough to cause obesity. Sexual hormones and sexual behavior were evaluated in these animals, as well as fertility after natural mating. Another group of rats was submitted to motility analysis and fertility evaluation after in utero insemination. Results After 15, 30 or 45 weeks, HFD-fed animals presented significant increases in obesity index and serum leptin levels. Reproductive organ weights and sperm counts in the testis and epididymis were similar between the two groups at all timepoints studied. Sexual behavior was not altered by the diet regimen, and HFD fertility after natural mating was also similar to SD-fed animals. Intergroup testosterone levels were also comparable, but estradiol levels were increased in HFD rats. Furthermore, sperm quality was reduced in HFD animals as evidenced by their decreased percentage of sperm with progressive movement. This altered motility parameter was followed by a trend toward reduction in fertility potential after artificial in utero insemination. Conclusions The results reported herein showed that obesity can affect sperm quality, by reducing sperm motility, without affecting other sperm parameters. The low sperm quality caused a slight reduction in fertility potential, showing that obesity may lead to impairment in male fertility. PMID:21396114

  6. Propolis prevents diet-induced hyperlipidemia and mitigates weight gain in diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Koya-Miyata, Satomi; Arai, Norie; Mizote, Akiko; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Ushio, Shimpei; Iwaki, Kanso; Fukuda, Shigeharu

    2009-12-01

    We examined the hypolipidemic effect of propolis in a mouse obesity model induced by a high fat-diet. C57BL/6N mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum and given propolis extract intragastrically at 0 mg/kg (control), 5 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d. Compared with mice in the control group, mice in the propolis extract-administrated groups displayed a reduction in all of the following parameters: body weight gain, weight of visceral adipose tissue, liver and serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and non-esterified fatty acids. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of the liver showed down-regulation of mRNA expression associated with fatty acid biosynthesis, including fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha, and sterol regulatory element binding protein in the propolis-administrated mice. Subsequently, obese C57BL/6N mice that had been administered a high-fat diet were given propolis extract at 0 mg/kg (control), 2.5 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg for 4 weeks. The propolis extract treated mice showed a decrease in weight gain, a reduction of serum non-esterified fatty acids, and lipid accumulation in the liver. These results suggest that propolis extract prevented and mitigated high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia by down-regulating the expression of genes associated with lipid metabolism.

  7. Enzymatically synthesized glycogen reduces lipid accumulation in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Furuyashiki, Takashi; Ogawa, Rui; Nakayama, Yoko; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi; Takata, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Kuriki, Takashi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Based on a recent study indicating that enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) possesses a dietary, fiber-like action, we hypothesized that ESG can reduce the risk of obesity. In this study, the antiobesity effects of ESG were investigated in a model of diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups and fed a normal or high-fat diet, with or without 20% ESG, for 4 weeks. Body weight, food intake, lipid deposition in the white adipose tissues and liver, fecal lipid excretion, and plasma lipid profiles were measured. At week 3, the body fat mass was measured using an x-ray computed tomography system, which showed that ESG significantly suppressed the high-fat diet-induced lipid accumulation. Similar results were observed in the weight of the adipose tissue after the experiment. Moreover, ESG significantly suppressed the lipid accumulation in the liver but increased fecal lipid excretion. The plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol and nonesterified fatty acid were lowered after a high-fat diet, whereas the total bile acid concentration was increased by ESG. However, the hepatic messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of enzymes related to lipid metabolism were not affected by ESG. Conversely, the mRNA levels of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were up-regulated by ESG in the muscle. These results suggest that the combined effects of increased fecal lipid excretion, increased mRNA levels of enzymes that oxidize fatty acids in the muscle, and increased total bile acid concentration in the plasma mediate the inhibitory effect of ESG on lipid accumulation.

  8. RNA-mediated paternal heredity of diet-induced obesity and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Valérie; Fourré, Sandra; De Abreu, Diana Andrea Fernandes; Derieppe, Marie-Alix; Remy, Jean-Jacques; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2015-12-14

    The paternal heredity of obesity and diabetes induced by a high-fat and/or high-sugar diet (Western-like diet) has been demonstrated through epidemiological analysis of human cohorts and experimental analysis, but the nature of the hereditary vector inducing this newly acquired phenotype is not yet well defined. Here, we show that microinjection of either testis or sperm RNA of male mice fed a Western-like diet into naive one-cell embryos leads to the establishment of the Western-like diet-induced metabolic phenotype in the resulting progenies, whereas RNAs prepared from healthy controls did not. Among multiple sequence differences between the testis transcriptomes of the sick and healthy fathers, we noted that several microRNAs had increased expression, which was of interest because this class of noncoding RNA is known to be involved in epigenetic control of gene expression. When microinjected into naive one-cell embryos, one of these small RNA, i.e., the microRNA miR19b, induced metabolic alterations that are similar to the diet-induced phenotype. Furthermore, this pathological phenotype was inherited by the offspring after crosses with healthy partners. Our results indicate that acquired food-induced trait inheritance might be enacted by RNA signalling.

  9. Anti-adipogenic effect of Artemisia annua in diet-induced-obesity mice model

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Hye Kyung; Shim, Hyeji; Lim, Hyunmook; Shim, Minju; Kim, Chul-Kyu; Park, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Yong Seok; Song, Ki-Duk; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has increased continuously in western countries during the last several decades and recently become a problem in developing countries. Currently, anti-obesity drugs originating from natural products are being investigated for their potential to overcome adverse effects associated with chemical drugs. Artemisinic acid, which was isolated from the well-known anti-malaria herb Artemisia annua (AA) L., was recently shown to possess anti-adipogenic effects in vitro. However, the anti-adipogenic effects of AA in animal models have not yet been investigated. Therefore, we conducted daily oral administration with AA water extract in a diet-induced obesity animal model and treated 3T3-L1 cells with AA to confirm the anti-adipogenic effects in the related protein expressions. We then evaluated the physiology, adipose tissue histology and mRNA expressions of many related genes. Inhibition of adipogenesis by the AA water extract was observed in vitro. In the animal model, weight gain was significantly lower in the AA treated group, but there were no changes in food intake volume or calories. Reductions in lipid droplet size and mRNA expression associated with adipogenesis were also observed in animal epididymal fat. This study is the first to report that AA has an anti-obese effects in vivo. PMID:26243598

  10. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Susan C; Waters, Katrina M; Karin, Norman J; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Zangar, Richard C; Lee, K Monica; Bigelow, Diana J; Pounds, Joel G; Corley, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  11. Diet-Induced Obesity Reprograms the Inflammatory Response of the Murine Lung to Inhaled Endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, Monika K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  12. Purple Sweet Potato Attenuate Weight Gain in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ronghui; Zheng, Shujuan; Luo, Hongxia; Wang, Changgang; Duan, Lili; Sheng, Yao; Zhao, Changhui; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2017-03-01

    Purple sweet potato (PSP) is widely grown in Asia and considered as a healthy vegetable. The objective of the current study was to determine the anti-obesity effect of the PSP on high fat diet induced obese C57BL/6J mice. The mice were administrated with high fat diet supplemented with the sweet potato (SP) or PSP at the concentration of 15% and 30% for 12 wk, respectively. The results showed that the supplementation of SP or PSP at 30% significantly ameliorated high fat diet induced obesity and its associated risk factors, including reduction of body weight and fat accumulation, improvement of lipid profile and modulation of energy expenditure. Moreover, PSP also posed beneficial effect on the liver and kidney functions. These results indicate that PSP and SP have anti-obesity effect and are effective to reduce the metabolic risk.

  13. Diet-induced obesity and cardiovascular regulation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, T D; Chambers, J B; Roberts, L M; Henderson, R P; Overton, J M

    2003-10-01

    1. In the present study, we determined the effect of diet-induced obesity on cardiovascular and metabolic regulation in mice at standard laboratory temperatures (ambient temperature (Ta) = 22 degrees C) and during exposure to thermoneutrality (Ta = 30 degrees C). 2. Male C57BL/6J (B6) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFF; n = 17) or chow (CHW; n = 14) for 15 weeks were surgically instrumented with telemetry devices, housed in metabolic chambers and assigned to either control or atenolol treatment (25 mg/kg per day in drinking water) to determine the effects of obesity on baseline cardiovascular function and on the responses to thermoneutrality and 24 h fasting. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), arterial pressure and HR variability (time and frequency domain), oxygen consumption (VO2) and locomotor activity were determined. 3. The HFF mice exhibited increased bodyweight (+10.6 +/- 4.1 g), moderate light period hypertension (+8.6 +/- 2.6 mmHg), no difference in HR and increased HR variability at standard laboratory temperature compared with CHW controls. Atenolol produced less of a decrease in HR in HFF mice (-42 +/- 10 b.p.m.) compared with CHW controls (-73 +/- 15 b.p.m.). Acute exposure to thermoneutrality (Ta = 30 degrees C) reduced HR similarly in both HFF and CHW mice (approximately 175 b.p.m.), but reduced MAP less in HFF than in CHW mice (-7.3 +/- 2.5 and -15.2 +/- 1.0 mmHg), respectively. Atenolol treatment had only minor effects on the HR response to thermonuetrality (-114 +/- 13 and -129 +/- 8 b.p.m. in HFF and CHW mice, respectively). The HFF mice displayed greater fasting-induced reductions in light period MAP than did CHW mice (-10.0 +/- 1.1 vs-3.1 +/- 3.5 mmHg, respectively), whereas HR was decreased equally in both groups. Fasting-induced increases in HR variability were attenuated in HFF mice. 4. We conclude that diet-induced obesity produced generally minor changes in cardiovascular regulation in B6 mice at baseline, some of which are distinct

  14. IMPLICATIONS OF CROSSTALK BETWEEN LEPTIN AND INSULIN SIGNALING DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF DIET INDUCED OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Christopher D; Huypens, Peter; Stewart, Laura K; Gettys, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Insulin and leptin play complementary roles in regulating the consumption, uptake, oxidation and storage of nutrients. Chronic consumption of diets that contain a high proportion of calories from saturated fat induces a progressive deterioration in function of both hormones. Certain rat lines and strains of mice are particularly sensitive to the obesogenic and diabetogenic effects of high fat diets, and have been used extensively to study the developmental progression of insulin and leptin resistance in relation to the increasing adiposity that is characteristic of their response to these diets. Some aspects of the diminished efficacy of each hormone are secondary to increased adiposity but a consensus is emerging to support the view that direct effects of dietary components or their metabolites, independent of the resulting obesity, play important roles in development of insulin and leptin resistance. In this minireview, we will examine the implications of crosstalk between leptin and insulin signaling during the development of diet-induced obesity, emphasizing potential interactions between pathways that occur among target sites, and exploring how these interactions may influence the progression of obesity and diabetes. PMID:18852044

  15. Feeding-induced oleoylethanolamide mobilization is disrupted in the gut of diet-induced obese rodents

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Miki; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Narayanaswami, Vidya; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis by initiating neural and hormonal responses to the ingestion of nutrients. In addition to peptide hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CKK) and peptide YY (PYY), the lipid-derived mediator oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been implicated in the control of satiety. Previous studies in humans and rodent models have shown that obesity is associated with changes in CCK, PYY and other gut-derived peptide hormones, which may contribute to decreased satiety and increased energy intake. In the present study, we show that small-intestinal OEA production is disrupted in the gut of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and mice. In lean rodents, feeding or duodenal infusion of Intralipid® or pure oleic acid stimulate jejunal OEA mobilization. This response is strikingly absent in DIO rats and mice. Confirming previous reports, we found that feeding rats or mice a high-fat diet for 7 days is sufficient to suppress jejunal OEA mobilization. Surprisingly, a similar effect is elicited by feeding rats and mice a high-sucrose low-fat diet for 7 days. Collectively, our findings suggest that high fat-induced obesity is accompanied by alterations in the post-digestive machinery responsible for OEA biosynthesis, which may contribute to reduced satiety and hyperphagia. PMID:26024927

  16. Cross-talk between Akkermansia muciniphila and intestinal epithelium controls diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Amandine; Belzer, Clara; Geurts, Lucie; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Druart, Céline; Bindels, Laure B.; Guiot, Yves; Derrien, Muriel; Muccioli, Giulio G.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; de Vos, Willem M.; Cani, Patrice D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier disruption. Microbial composition and the mechanisms of interaction with the host that affect gut barrier function during obesity and type 2 diabetes have not been elucidated. We recently isolated Akkermansia muciniphila, which is a mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the mucus layer. The presence of this bacterium inversely correlates with body weight in rodents and humans. However, the precise physiological roles played by this bacterium during obesity and metabolic disorders are unknown. This study demonstrated that the abundance of A. muciniphila decreased in obese and type 2 diabetic mice. We also observed that prebiotic feeding normalized A. muciniphila abundance, which correlated with an improved metabolic profile. In addition, we demonstrated that A. muciniphila treatment reversed high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, including fat-mass gain, metabolic endotoxemia, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance. A. muciniphila administration increased the intestinal levels of endocannabinoids that control inflammation, the gut barrier, and gut peptide secretion. Finally, we demonstrated that all these effects required viable A. muciniphila because treatment with heat-killed cells did not improve the metabolic profile or the mucus layer thickness. In summary, this study provides substantial insight into the intricate mechanisms of bacterial (i.e., A. muciniphila) regulation of the cross-talk between the host and gut microbiota. These results also provide a rationale for the development of a treatment that uses this human mucus colonizer for the prevention or treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders. PMID:23671105

  17. Cross-talk between Akkermansia muciniphila and intestinal epithelium controls diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Everard, Amandine; Belzer, Clara; Geurts, Lucie; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Druart, Céline; Bindels, Laure B; Guiot, Yves; Derrien, Muriel; Muccioli, Giulio G; Delzenne, Nathalie M; de Vos, Willem M; Cani, Patrice D

    2013-05-28

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier disruption. Microbial composition and the mechanisms of interaction with the host that affect gut barrier function during obesity and type 2 diabetes have not been elucidated. We recently isolated Akkermansia muciniphila, which is a mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the mucus layer. The presence of this bacterium inversely correlates with body weight in rodents and humans. However, the precise physiological roles played by this bacterium during obesity and metabolic disorders are unknown. This study demonstrated that the abundance of A. muciniphila decreased in obese and type 2 diabetic mice. We also observed that prebiotic feeding normalized A. muciniphila abundance, which correlated with an improved metabolic profile. In addition, we demonstrated that A. muciniphila treatment reversed high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, including fat-mass gain, metabolic endotoxemia, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance. A. muciniphila administration increased the intestinal levels of endocannabinoids that control inflammation, the gut barrier, and gut peptide secretion. Finally, we demonstrated that all these effects required viable A. muciniphila because treatment with heat-killed cells did not improve the metabolic profile or the mucus layer thickness. In summary, this study provides substantial insight into the intricate mechanisms of bacterial (i.e., A. muciniphila) regulation of the cross-talk between the host and gut microbiota. These results also provide a rationale for the development of a treatment that uses this human mucus colonizer for the prevention or treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders.

  18. Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Motivation and Pain Behavior in an Operant Assay

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Heather L.; Luu, Anthony K.S.; Kothari, Sunny D.; Kuburas, Adisa; Neubert, John K.; Caudle, Robert M.; Recober, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with multiple chronic pain disorders, including migraine. We hypothesized that diet-induced obesity would be associated with a reduced threshold for thermal nociception in the trigeminal system. In this study, we sought to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on facial pain behavior. Mice of two different strains were fed high-fat or regular diet and tested using a well-established operant facial pain assay. We found that the effects of diet on behavior in this assay were strain and reward dependent. Obesity prone C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat diet display lower number of licks of a caloric, palatable reward (33% sweetened condensed milk or 30% sucrose) than control mice. This occurred at all temperatures, in both sexes, and was evident even before the onset of obesity. This diminished reward-seeking behavior was not observed in obesity resistant SKH1E mice. These findings suggest that diet and strain interact to modulate reward-seeking behavior. Furthermore, we observed a difference between diet groups in operant behavior with caloric, palatable rewards, but not with a non-caloric neutral reward (water). Importantly, we found no effect of diet-induced obesity on acute thermal nociception in the absence of inflammation or injury. This indicates that thermal sensation in the face is not affected by obesity-associated peripheral neuropathy as it occurs when studying pain behaviors in the rodent hindpaw. Future studies using this model may reveal whether obesity facilitates the development of chronic pain after injury or inflammation. PMID:23333672

  19. Korean solar salts reduce obesity and alter its related markers in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jaehyun; Song, Jia-Le; Park, Eui-Seong; Do, Myoung-Sool

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The aim of this experiments was to show anti-obesity effects of Korean solar salt from different salt fields in diet-induced obese mice. SUBJECTS/METHODS Diet-induced obesity (DIO) was induced by a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% cal from fat) in C57BL/6J mice for eight weeks. The mice were fed with the designated diets (chow diet for Normal, HFD for Control, 0.47%-salt-mixed HFD for purified salt (PS), Guerande solar salt from France (SS-G), solar salt from Y salt field (SS-Y), solar salts from T salt field (SS-T) and S salt field (SS-S)) for another eight weeks. We checked body weight, food efficiency ratio (FER) and tissue weights (liver and epididymal adipose tissue (EAT)), and observed serum concentrations of triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol (TC), leptin and insulin. We also evaluated gene expressions of adipogenic / lipogenic mRNAs of C/EBPα, PPARγ and FAS and beta-oxidation-related factors (PPARα and CPT-1) in liver and EAT. The mineral composition of salt samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). RESULTS SS-T and SS-S significantly reduced body weight gain, FER, and weight of EAT compared to control and other samples (P < 0.05). SS-T and SS-S also significantly decreased serum levels of TG, TC, leptin and insulin (P < 0.05). SS-T and SS-S suppressed expressions of adipogenic / lipogenic mRNAs in liver and EAT, while promoting expression of beta-oxidation-related factors. The lowest sodium concentration was observed in SS-T (30.30 ± 0.59%), and the lowest sodium-to-potassium (Na/K) ratio was found in SS-S (17.81). CONCLUSIONS Our study shows that well-processed Korean solar salt may have anti-obesity effects in vivo, probably owing to its differences in mineral composition and other components, presumably resulting from the manufacturing processes. Further research is needed into the mechanism and to explore optimal manufacturing processes. PMID:27909561

  20. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27419109

  1. Miglitol prevents diet-induced obesity by stimulating brown adipose tissue and energy expenditure independent of preventing the digestion of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Kitazumi, Tomoya; Hiraga, Haruna; Nakagawa, Yuko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Osamu; Kim, Hye-jin; Fujita, Yuki; Maruyama, Jun; Susanti, Vina Yanti; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Saito, Masayuki; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2013-01-01

    Miglitol is an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor that improves post-prandial hyperglycemia, and it is the only drug in its class that enters the bloodstream. Anecdotally, miglitol lowers patient body weight more effectively than other alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, but the precise mechanism has not been addressed. Therefore, we analyzed the anti-obesity effects of miglitol in mice and in the HB2 brown adipocyte cell line. Miglitol prevented diet-induced obesity by stimulating energy expenditure without affecting food intake in mice. Long-term miglitol treatment dose-dependently prevented diet-induced obesity and induced mitochondrial gene expression in brown adipose tissue. The anti-obesity effect was independent of preventing carbohydrate digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. Miglitol effectively stimulated energy expenditure in mice fed a high-fat high-monocarbohydrate diet, and intraperitoneal injection of miglitol was sufficient to stimulate energy expenditure in mice. Acarbose, which is a non-absorbable alpha glucosidase inhibitor, also prevented diet-induced obesity, but through a different mechanism: it did not stimulate energy expenditure, but caused indigestion, leading to less energy absorption. Miglitol promoted adrenergic signaling in brown adipocytes in vitro. These data indicate that circulating miglitol stimulates brown adipose tissue and increases energy expenditure, thereby preventing diet-induced obesity. Further optimizing miglitol's effect on brown adipose tissue could lead to a novel anti-obesity drug.

  2. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment.

  3. A Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity Resembling Most Features of Human Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Della Vedova, Maria C.; Muñoz, Marcos D.; Santillan, Lucas D.; Plateo-Pignatari, Maria G.; Germanó, Maria J.; Rinaldi Tosi, Martín E.; Garcia, Silvina; Gomez, Nidia N.; Fornes, Miguel W.; Gomez Mejiba, Sandra E.; Ramirez, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    Increased chicken-derived fat and fructose consumption in the human diet is paralleled by an increasing prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS). Herein, we aimed at developing and characterizing a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) resembling most of the key features of the human MS. To accomplish this, we fed male C57BL/6J mice for 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks with either a low-fat diet (LFD) or a high-chicken-fat diet (HFD) and tap water with or without 10% fructose (F). This experimental design resulted in the following four experimental groups: LFD, LFD + F, HFD, and HFD + F. Over the feeding period, and on a weekly basis, the HFD + F group had more caloric intake and gained more weight than the other experimental groups. Compared to the other groups, and at the end of the feeding period, the HFD + F group had a higher adipogenic index, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting basal glycemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, and atherogenic index and showed steatohepatitis and systemic oxidative stress/inflammation. A mouse model of DIO that will allow us to study the effect of MS in different organs and systems has been developed and characterized. PMID:27980421

  4. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Fagman, Johan B.; Wilhelmson, Anna S.; Motta, Benedetta M.; Pirazzi, Carlo; Alexanderson, Camilla; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Holmäng, Agneta; Anesten, Fredrik; Jansson, John-Olov; Levin, Malin; Borén, Jan; Ohlsson, Claes; Krettek, Alexandra; Romeo, Stefano; Tivesten, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Androgens have important cardiometabolic actions in males, but their metabolic role in females is unclear. To determine the physiologic androgen receptor (AR)–dependent actions of androgens on atherogenesis in female mice, we generated female AR-knockout (ARKO) mice on an atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)–deficient background. After 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, but not on a normal chow diet, atherosclerosis in aorta was increased in ARKO females (+59% vs. control apoE-deficient mice with intact AR gene). They also displayed increased body weight (+18%), body fat percentage (+62%), and hepatic triglyceride levels, reduced insulin sensitivity, and a marked atherogenic dyslipidemia (serum cholesterol, +52%). Differences in atherosclerosis, body weight, and lipid levels between ARKO and control mice were abolished in mice that were ovariectomized before puberty, consistent with a protective action of ovarian androgens mediated via the AR. Furthermore, the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone reduced atherosclerosis (−41%; thoracic aorta), subcutaneous fat mass (−44%), and cholesterol levels (−35%) in ovariectomized mice, reduced hepatocyte lipid accumulation in hepatoma cells in vitro, and regulated mRNA expression of hepatic genes pivotal for lipid homeostasis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the AR protects against diet-induced atherosclerosis in female mice and propose that this is mediated by modulation of body composition and lipid metabolism.—Fagman, J. B., Wilhelmson, A. S., Motta, B. M., Pirazzi, C., Alexanderson, C., De Gendt, K., Verhoeven, G., Holmäng, A., Anesten, F., Jansson, J.-O., Levin, M., Borén, J., Ohlsson, C., Krettek, A., Romeo, S., Tivesten, A. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice. PMID:25550469

  5. Diet-induced obesity and kidney disease - In search of a susceptible mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Shawna E; Nguyen, Trang-Tiffany; Breaux, Chelsea; Kruger, Claudia; Stadler, Krisztian

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease, even without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Here, we compare two mouse models that are susceptible to diet-induced obesity: the relatively renal injury resistant C57BL/6J strain and the DBA2/J strain which is more sensitive to renal injury. Our studies focused on characterizing the effects of high fat diet feeding on renal oxidative stress, albuminuria, fibrosis and podocyte loss/insulin resistance. While the C57BL/6J strain does not develop significant pathological changes in the kidney, at least on lard based diets within the time frame investigated, it does show increased renal iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels and elevated mitochondrial respiration which may be indicative of mitochondrial lipid overfueling. Restricting the high fat diet to decrease adiposity decreased the levels of cellular oxidative stress markers, indicating that adiposity-related proinflammatory changes such as increased iNOS levels may trigger similar responses in the kidney. Mitochondrial respiration remained higher, suggesting that eating excess lipids, despite normal adiposity may still lead to renal mitochondrial overfueling. In comparison, DBA/2J mice developed albuminuria on similar diets, signs of fibrosis, oxidative stress, early signs of podocyte loss (evaluated by the markers podocin and WT-1) and podocyte insulin resistance (unable to phosphorylate their glomerular Akt when insulin was given). To summarize, while the C57BL/6J strain is not particularly susceptible to renal disease, changes in its mitochondrial lipid handling combined with the easy availability of transgenic technology may be an advantage to design new knockout models related to mitochondrial lipid metabolism. The DBA/2J model could serve as a basis for studying podocyte insulin resistance and identifying early renal markers in obesity before more severe kidney disease develops. Based on our observations, we encourage further critical

  6. Examination of the tissue ghrelin expression of rats with diet-induced obesity using radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suleyman; Sahin, Ibrahim; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dag, Ersel; Gunay, Ahmet; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2012-06-01

    Currently, obesity is an important health problem in all countries, both developed and developing. Dietary habits and neurohormonal imbalances play a critical role in obesity. Circulating amounts of ghrelin, which is a neurohormonal hormone, decrease with obesity and increase with weight loss. Although it is known that both mRNA and peptide version of the ghrelin hormone are expressed in almost all tissues of both humans and animals, it is not known how obesity changes the expression of this hormone in the tissues, with the exception of the gastrointestinal system tissues. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to show how diet-induced obesity in rats changes ghrelin expression in all system tissues, and thus, to shed light on the etiopathology of obesity. The study included 12 male and 12 female 2-month-old Wistar albino species rats. The animals in the control group were fed on standard rat pellet, while those in the experiment group were fed ad libitum on a cafeteria-style diet for 2 months. When their body mass index reached 1 g/cm(2), diet-induced obese (DIO) rats were sacrificed in a sterile environment after one night fasting. Ghrelin localizations in the tissues were studied immunohistochemically using avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method, while tissue ghrelin amounts were analyzed using radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. When the ghrelin amounts in the urogenital system (with the exception of kidney tissues), sensory organs, respiratory system, immune system, skeletal muscle system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, and adipose tissue of rats analyzed by RIA method were compared to those in the control group, tissue ghrelin amounts in the DIO group were found lower. Immunohistochemical findings which showed a similar fall in ghrelin concentrations in the tissues were parallel to RIA results. In addition, ghrelin was shown to be synthesized in the cardiovascular system, heart muscle cells, tails of the sperms, hair follicles, lacrimal

  7. Diet-induced obesity causes ghrelin resistance in arcuate NPY/AgRP neurons.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Dana I; Enriori, Pablo J; Lemus, Moyra B; Cowley, Michael A; Andrews, Zane B

    2010-10-01

    Circulating ghrelin is decreased in obesity, and peripheral ghrelin does not induce food intake in obese mice. We investigated whether ghrelin resistance was a centrally mediated phenomenon involving dysregulated neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) circuits. We show that diet-induced obesity (DIO) (12 wk) suppresses the neuroendocrine ghrelin system by decreasing acylated and total plasma ghrelin, decreasing ghrelin and Goat mRNA in the stomach, and decreasing expression of hypothalamic GHSR. Peripheral (ip) or central (intracerebroventricular) ghrelin injection was able to induce food intake and arcuate nucleus Fos immunoreactivity in chow-fed but not high-fat diet-fed mice. DIO decreased expression of Npy and Agrp mRNA, and central ghrelin was unable to promote expression of these genes. Ghrelin did not induce AgRP or NPY secretion in hypothalamic explants from DIO mice. Injection of NPY intracerebroventricularly increased food intake in both chow-fed and high-fat diet-fed mice, indicating that downstream NPY/AgRP neural targets are intact and that defective NPY/AgRP function is a primary cause of ghrelin resistance. Ghrelin resistance in DIO is not confined to the NPY/AgRP neurons, because ghrelin did not stimulate growth hormone secretion in DIO mice. Collectively, our data suggests that DIO causes ghrelin resistance by reducing NPY/AgRP responsiveness to plasma ghrelin and suppressing the neuroendocrine ghrelin axis to limit further food intake. Ghrelin has a number of functions in the brain aside from appetite control, including cognitive function, mood regulation, and protecting against neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, central ghrelin resistance may potentiate obesity-related cognitive decline, and restoring ghrelin sensitivity may provide therapeutic outcomes for maintaining healthy aging.

  8. Alterations in the hippocampal endocannabinoid system in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Massa, Federico; Mancini, Giacomo; Schmidt, Helmut; Steindel, Frauke; Mackie, Ken; Angioni, Carlo; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lutz, Beat

    2010-05-05

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system plays central roles in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Its alteration in activity contributes to the development and maintenance of obesity. Stimulation of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1) receptor) increases feeding, enhances reward aspects of eating, and promotes lipogenesis, whereas its blockade decreases appetite, sustains weight loss, increases insulin sensitivity, and alleviates dysregulation of lipid metabolism. The hypothesis has been put forward that the eCB system is overactive in obesity. Hippocampal circuits are not directly involved in the neuronal control of food intake and appetite, but they play important roles in hedonic aspects of eating. We investigated the possibility whether or not diet-induced obesity (DIO) alters the functioning of the hippocampal eCB system. We found that levels of the two eCBs, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide, were increased in the hippocampus from DIO mice, with a concomitant increase of the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diacylglycerol lipase-alpha and increased CB(1) receptor immunoreactivity in CA1 and CA3 regions, whereas CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding was unchanged. eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity was changed in the CA1 region, as depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition and long-term depression of inhibitory synapses were enhanced. Functionality of CB(1) receptors in GABAergic neurons was furthermore revealed, as mice specifically lacking CB(1) receptors on this neuronal population were partly resistant to DIO. Our results show that DIO-induced changes in the eCB system affect not only tissues directly involved in the metabolic regulation but also brain regions mediating hedonic aspects of eating and influencing cognitive processes.

  9. Pregnancy restores insulin secretion from pancreatic islets in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Vanzela, E C; Ribeiro, R A; de Oliveira, C A Machado; Rodrigues, F B; Bonfleur, M L; Carneiro, E M; Souza, K L A; Boschero, A C

    2010-02-01

    Insulin resistance during pregnancy is counteracted by enhanced insulin secretion. This condition is aggravated by obesity, which increases the risk of gestational diabetes. Therefore, pancreatic islet functionality was investigated in control nonpregnant (C) and pregnant (CP), and cafeteria diet-fed nonpregnant (Caf), and pregnant (CafP) obese rats. Isolated islets were used for measurements of insulin secretion (RIA), NAD(P)H production (MTS), glucose oxidation ((14)CO(2) production), intracellular Ca(2+) levels (fura-2 AM), and gene expression (real-time PCR). Impaired glucose tolerance was clearly established in Caf and CafP rats at the 14th wk on a diet. Insulin secretion induced by direct depolarizing agents such as KCl and tolbutamide and increasing concentrations of glucose was significantly reduced in Caf, compared with C islets. This reduction was not observed in islets from CP and CafP rats. Accordingly, the glucose oxidation and production of reduced equivalents were increased in CafP islets. The glucose-induced Ca(2+) increase was significantly lower in Caf and higher in CafP, compared with all other groups. CP and CafP islets demonstrated an increased Ca(2+) oscillation frequency, compared with both C and Caf islets, and the amplitude of oscillations was augmented in CafP, compared with Caf islets. In addition, Ca(v)alpha1.2 and SERCA2a mRNA levels were reduced in Caf islets. Ca(v)alpha1.2, but not SERCA2a, mRNA was normalized in CafP islets. In conclusion, cafeteria diet-induced obesity impairs insulin secretion. This alteration is related to the impairment of Ca(2+) handling in pancreatic islets, in especial Ca(2+) influx, a defect that is reversed during pregnancy allowing normalization of insulin secretion.

  10. Narciclasine attenuates diet-induced obesity by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sinnakannu, Joanna R.; Ge, Xiaojia; Ma, Wei; Velan, Sendhil S.; Röder, Pia V.; Zhang, Qiongyi; Sim, Choon Kiat; Wu, Jingyi; Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Xie, Wei; McFarlane, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Obesity develops when caloric intake exceeds metabolic needs. Promoting energy expenditure represents an attractive approach in the prevention of this fast-spreading epidemic. Here, we report a novel pharmacological strategy in which a natural compound, narciclasine (ncls), attenuates diet-induced obesity (DIO) in mice by promoting energy expenditure. Moreover, ncls promotes fat clearance from peripheral metabolic tissues, improves blood metabolic parameters in DIO mice, and protects these mice from the loss of voluntary physical activity. Further investigation suggested that ncls achieves these beneficial effects by promoting a shift from glycolytic to oxidative muscle fibers in the DIO mice thereby enhancing mitochondrial respiration and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the skeletal muscle. Moreover, ncls strongly activates AMPK signaling specifically in the skeletal muscle. The beneficial effects of ncls treatment in fat clearance and AMPK activation were faithfully reproduced in vitro in cultured murine and human primary myotubes. Mechanistically, ncls increases cellular cAMP concentration and ADP/ATP ratio, which further lead to the activation of AMPK signaling. Blocking AMPK signaling through a specific inhibitor significantly reduces FAO in myotubes. Finally, ncls also enhances mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces the formation of reactive oxygen species in cultured myotubes. PMID:28207742

  11. Silymarin Ameliorates Metabolic Dysfunction Associated with Diet-Induced Obesity via Activation of Farnesyl X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Jinwen; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yahui; Li, Yin; Li, Yifei; Fan, Shengjie; Ma, Yue-Ming; Tong, Qingchun; Yang, Li; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Silymarin, a standardized extract of the milk thistle seeds, has been widely used to treat chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and other types of toxic liver damage. Despite increasing studies on the action of silymarin and its major active constituent, silybin in their therapeutic properties against insulin resistance, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism underlying silymarin action remains unclear. Experimental approach: C57BL/6 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 months to induce obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidaemia, and fatty liver. These mice were then continuously treated with HFD alone or mixed with silymarin at 40 mg/100 g for additional 6 weeks. Biochemical analysis was used to test the serum lipid and bile acid profiles. Farnesyl X receptor (FXR) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transactivities were analyzed in liver using a gene reporter assay based on quantitative RT-PCR. Key results: Silymarin treatment ameliorated insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and inflammation, and reconstituted the bile acid pool in liver of diet-induced obesity. Associated with this, silybin and silymarin enhanced FXR transactivity. Consistently, in HepG2 cells, silybin inhibited NF-κB signaling, which was enhanced by FXR activation. Conclusion and implications: Our results suggest that silybin is an effective component of silymarin for treating metabolic syndrome by stimulating FXR signaling. PMID:27733832

  12. Artemisia supplementation differentially affects the mucosal and luminal ileal microbiota of diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Shawna, Wicks; M., Taylor Christopher; Meng, Luo; Eugene, Blanchard IV; David, Ribnicky; T., Cefalu William; L., Mynatt Randall; A., Welsh David

    2014-01-01

    Objective The gut microbiome has been implicated in obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, most studies have focused on fecal or colonic samples. Several species of Artemisia have been reported to ameliorate insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to characterize the mucosal and luminal bacterial populations in the terminal ileum with or without supplementation with Artemisia extracts. Materials/Methods Following 4 weeks of supplementation with different Artemisia extracts (PMI 5011, Santa or Scopa), diet-induced obese mice were sacrificed and luminal and mucosal samples of terminal ileum were used to evaluate microbial community composition by pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA hypervariable regions. Results Significant differences in community structure and membership were observed between luminal and mucosal samples, irrespective of diet group. All Artemisia extracts increased the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio in mucosal samples. This effect was not observed in the luminal compartment. There was high inter-individual variability in the phylogenetic assessments of the ileal microbiota, limiting the statistical power of this pilot investigation. Conclusions Marked differences in bacterial communities exist dependent upon the biogeographic compartment in the terminal ileum. Future studies testing the effects of Artemisia or other botanical supplements require larger sample sizes for adequate statistical power. PMID:24985102

  13. Phosphorus Supplementation Recovers the Blunted Diet-Induced Thermogenesis of Overweight and Obese Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bassil, Maya S; Obeid, Omar A

    2016-12-09

    Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) is believed to be largely related to ATP production, which is dependent on phosphorus (P) availability. We aimed to test the effect of P addition on DIT of lean and overweight/obese healthy subjects. DIT was measured with or without P in 10 lean and 13 overweight/obese adults in a double-blind randomized cross-over pilot study with one week washout period. After 10 h overnight fast, resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and substrate utilization were measured at fasting and every 30 min for 3 h after subjects drank a standardized glucose solution, with P (500 mg) or placebo pills. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were assessed before and after the end of each experiment using validated visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaires. Overweight/obese subjects had a blunted DIT with placebo, while P supplementation induced a 23% increase in their DIT area under the curve (p < 0.05), which was associated with a significant increase in carbohydrate oxidation. Subjects had lower appetite following P supplementation, which was expressed as a significantly (p = 0.02) lower desire to eat a meal (4.0 ± 0.7 cm) compared with placebo (5.8 ± 0.9 cm). P supplementation recovers the blunted diet-induced thermogenesis in overweight and obese subjects and enhances their postprandial satiety.

  14. Phosphorus Supplementation Recovers the Blunted Diet-Induced Thermogenesis of Overweight and Obese Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, Maya S.; Obeid, Omar A.

    2016-01-01

    Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) is believed to be largely related to ATP production, which is dependent on phosphorus (P) availability. We aimed to test the effect of P addition on DIT of lean and overweight/obese healthy subjects. DIT was measured with or without P in 10 lean and 13 overweight/obese adults in a double-blind randomized cross-over pilot study with one week washout period. After 10 h overnight fast, resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and substrate utilization were measured at fasting and every 30 min for 3 h after subjects drank a standardized glucose solution, with P (500 mg) or placebo pills. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were assessed before and after the end of each experiment using validated visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaires. Overweight/obese subjects had a blunted DIT with placebo, while P supplementation induced a 23% increase in their DIT area under the curve (p < 0.05), which was associated with a significant increase in carbohydrate oxidation. Subjects had lower appetite following P supplementation, which was expressed as a significantly (p = 0.02) lower desire to eat a meal (4.0 ± 0.7 cm) compared with placebo (5.8 ± 0.9 cm). P supplementation recovers the blunted diet-induced thermogenesis in overweight and obese subjects and enhances their postprandial satiety. PMID:27941661

  15. Diet-induced changes in maternal gut microbiota and metabolomic profiles influence programming of offspring obesity risk in rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Heather A.; Bomhof, Marc R.; Vogel, Hans J.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity and overnutrition during pregnancy and lactation can program an increased risk of obesity in offspring. In this context, improving maternal metabolism may help reduce the intergenerational transmission of obesity. Here we show that, in Sprague-Dawley rats, selectively altering obese maternal gut microbial composition with prebiotic treatment reduces maternal energy intake, decreases gestational weight gain, and prevents increased adiposity in dams and their offspring. Maternal serum metabolomics analysis, along with satiety hormone and gut microbiota analysis, identified maternal metabolic signatures that could be implicated in programming offspring obesity risk and highlighted the potential influence of maternal gut microbiota on maternal and offspring metabolism. In particular, the metabolomic signature of insulin resistance in obese rats normalized when dams consumed the prebiotic. In summary, prebiotic intake during pregnancy and lactation improves maternal metabolism in diet-induced obese rats in a manner that attenuates the detrimental nutritional programming of offspring associated with maternal obesity. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the maternal mechanisms influencing the developmental programming of offspring obesity and provide compelling pre-clinical evidence for a potential strategy to improve maternal and offspring metabolic outcomes in human pregnancy. PMID:26868870

  16. Diet-induced obesity in male mice is associated with reduced fertility and potentiation of acrylamide-induced reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, Burhan I; Bai, Re; Kissling, Grace E; Travlos, Greg; Hoffler, Undi

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of human obesity and related chronic disorders such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer is rapidly increasing. Human studies have shown a direct relationship between obesity and infertility. The objective of the current work was to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on male fertility and the effect of obesity on susceptibility to chemical-induced reproductive toxicity. From 5 to 30 wk of age, genetically intact male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a normal diet or one in which 60% of the kilocalories were from lard. Obese mice exhibited significant differences in the mRNA of several genes within the testes in comparison to lean males. Pparg was increased 2.2-fold, whereas Crem, Sh2b1, Dhh, Igf1, and Lepr were decreased 6.7, 1.4, 3.2, 1.6, and 7.2-fold, respectively. The fertility of male mice was compared through mating with control females. Acrylamide (AA)-induced reproductive toxicity was assessed in obese or lean males treated with water or 25 mg AA kg(-1) day(-1) via gavage for 5 days and then mated to control females. Percent body fat and weight were significantly increased in mice fed a high-fat vs. a normal diet. Obesity resulted in significant reduction in plugs and pregnancies of control females partnered with obese vs. lean males. Serum leptin and insulin levels were each approximately 5-fold higher in obese vs. age-matched lean mice. Sperm from obese males exhibited decreased motility and reduced hyperactivated progression vs. lean mice. Treatment with AA exacerbated male infertility of obese and lean mice; however, this effect was more pronounced in obese mice. Further, females partnered with AA-treated obese mice exhibited a further decrease in the percentage of live fetuses, whereas the percentage of resorptions increased. This work demonstrated that diet-induced obesity in mice caused a significant reduction in male fertility and exacerbated AA-induced reproductive toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity.

  17. Lamp-2 deficiency prevents high-fat diet-induced obese diabetes via enhancing energy expenditure

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Yamahara, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakzu; Ugi, Satoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-09-18

    Autophagy process is essential for maintaining intracellular homeostasis and consists of autophagosome formation and subsequent fusion with lysosome for degradation. Although the role of autophagosome formation in the pathogenesis of diabetes has been recently documented, the role of the latter process remains unclear. This study analyzed high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice lacking lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (lamp-2), which is essential for the fusion with lysosome and subsequent degradation of autophagosomes. Although lamp-2 deficient mice showed little alteration in glucose metabolism under normal diet feeding, they showed a resistance against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia and tissues lipid accumulation, accompanied with higher energy expenditure. The expression levels of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue were significantly increased in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice. Of some serum factors related to energy expenditure, the serum level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 and its mRNA expression level in the liver were significantly higher in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice in an ER stress-, but not PPARα-, dependent manner. In conclusion, a lamp-2-depenedent fusion and degradation process of autophagosomes is involved in the pathogenesis of obese diabetes, providing a novel insight into autophagy and diabetes. - Highlights: • Lamp-2 is essential for autophagosome fusion with lysosome and its degradation. • Lamp-2 deficiency lead to a resistance to diet-induced obese diabetes in mice. • Lamp-2 deficiency increased whole body energy expenditure under HFD-feeding. • Lamp-2 deficiency elevated the serum level of FGF21 under HFD-feeding.

  18. Beta-aminoisobutyric acid prevents diet-induced obesity in mice with partial leptin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Begriche, Karima; Massart, Julie; Abbey-Toby, Adjé; Igoudjil, Anissa; Lettéron, Philippe; Fromenty, Bernard

    2008-09-01

    Beta-Aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA), a thymine catabolite, increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in liver and reduces the gain of body fat mass in Swiss (lean) mice fed a standard chow. We determined whether BAIBA could prevent obesity and related metabolic disorders in different murine models. To this end, BAIBA (100 or 500 mg/kg/day) was administered for 4 months in mice totally deficient in leptin (ob/ob). BAIBA (100 mg/kg/day) was also given for 4 months in wild-type (+/+) mice and mice partially deficient in leptin (ob/+) fed a high-calorie (HC) diet. BAIBA did not limit obesity and hepatic steatosis in ob/ob mice, but reduced liver cytolysis and inflammation. In ob/+ mice fed the HC diet, BAIBA fully prevented, or limited, the gain of body fat, steatosis and necroinflammation, glucose intolerance, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate was increased, whereas expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 was augmented in liver and white adipose tissue. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was more phosphorylated, and de novo lipogenesis was less induced in liver. These favorable effects of BAIBA in ob/+ mice were associated with a restoration of plasma leptin levels. The reduction of body adiposity afforded by BAIBA was less marked in +/+ mice. Finally, BAIBA significantly stimulated the secretion of leptin in isolated ob/+ adipose cells, but not in +/+ cells. Thus, BAIBA could limit triglyceride accretion in tissues through a leptin-dependent stimulation of FAO. As partial leptin deficiency is not uncommon in the general population, supplementation with BAIBA may help to prevent diet-induced obesity and related metabolic disorders in low leptin secretors.

  19. Dual-specificity phosphatase 6 deficiency regulates gut microbiome and transcriptome response against diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Statt, Sarah; Huang, Chih-Ting; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Chan, Hong-Lin; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Tan, Tse-Hua; Kao, Cheng-Yuan

    2016-11-28

    The gut microbiota plays profound roles in host metabolism and the inflammatory response associated with the development of obesity. Dusp6-deficient mice have been shown to be resistant to diet-induced obesity, but the mechanism behind this remains unclear. 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis demonstrated that dusp6-deficient mice harbour unique gut microbiota with resistance to diet-induced-obesity-mediated alteration of the gut microbiome. Using a germ-free mouse model, we found that faecal/gut microbiota derived from dusp6-deficient mice significantly increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain in recipient wild-type mice fed on a high-fat diet. On analysis of the intestinal transcriptome of dusp6-deficient mice, we found that dusp6 deficiency mainly induced biological processes involved in metabolism and the extracellular matrix, particularly the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparγ) pathway and tight-junction genes. Furthermore, dusp6-deficient mice have a high-fat-diet-specific transcriptomic response to reverse the expression of genes associated with intestinal barrier functions and mucosal immunity involved in microbiome homeostasis. This study demonstrates that dusp6 deficiency is a strong genetic factor shaping gut microbiota, and that it confers obesity protection by ameliorating the gut microbiota response to diet-mediated stress.

  20. Diet-induced obesity differentially regulates behavioral, biomechanical, and molecular risk factors for osteoarthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis in both weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing joints. The mechanisms by which obesity influences the structural or symptomatic features of osteoarthritis are not well understood, but may include systemic inflammation associated with increased adiposity. In this study, we examined biomechanical, neurobehavioral, inflammatory, and osteoarthritic changes in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. Methods Female C57BL/6J mice were fed either a 10% kcal fat or a 45% kcal fat diet from 9 to 54 weeks of age. Longitudinal changes in musculoskeletal function and inflammation were compared with endpoint neurobehavioral and osteoarthritic disease states. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine independent associations with diet, percentage body fat, and knee osteoarthritis severity. We also examined healthy porcine cartilage explants treated with physiologic doses of leptin, alone or in combination with IL-1α and palmitic and oleic fatty acids, to determine the effects of leptin on cartilage extracellular matrix homeostasis. Results High susceptibility to dietary obesity was associated with increased osteoarthritic changes in the knee and impaired musculoskeletal force generation and motor function compared with controls. A high-fat diet also induced symptomatic characteristics of osteoarthritis, including hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviors. Controlling for the effects of diet and percentage body fat with a multivariate model revealed a significant association between knee osteoarthritis severity and serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and IL-1α. Physiologic doses of leptin, in the presence or absence of IL-1α and fatty acids, did not substantially alter extracellular matrix homeostasis in healthy cartilage explants. Conclusions These results indicate that diet-induced obesity increases the risk of symptomatic features of osteoarthritis through changes in

  1. Synaptic input organization of the melanocortin system predicts diet-induced hypothalamic reactive gliosis and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Tamas L.; Sarman, Beatrix; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Enriori, Pablo J.; Sotonyi, Peter; Shanabrough, Marya; Borok, Erzsebet; Argente, Jesus; Chowen, Julie A.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul T.; Brönneke, Hella S.; Levin, Barry E.; Diano, Sabrina; Cowley, Michael A.; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal circuits involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy expenditure are soft-wired, reflecting the relative activity of the postsynaptic neuronal system, including the anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing cells of the arcuate nucleus. We analyzed the synaptic input organization of the melanocortin system in lean rats that were vulnerable (DIO) or resistant (DR) to diet-induced obesity. We found a distinct difference in the quantitative and qualitative synaptology of POMC cells between DIO and DR animals, with a significantly greater number of inhibitory inputs in the POMC neurons in DIO rats compared with DR rats. When exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD), the POMC cells of DIO animals lost synapses, whereas those of DR rats recruited connections. In both DIO rats and mice, the HFD-triggered loss of synapses on POMC neurons was associated with increased glial ensheathment of the POMC perikarya. The altered synaptic organization of HFD-fed animals promoted increased POMC tone and a decrease in the stimulatory connections onto the neighboring neuropeptide Y (NPY) cells. Exposure to HFD was associated with reactive gliosis, and this affected the structure of the blood-brain barrier such that the POMC and NPY cell bodies and dendrites became less accessible to blood vessels. Taken together, these data suggest that consumption of an HFD has a major impact on the cytoarchitecture of the arcuate nucleus in vulnerable subjects, with changes that might be irreversible due to reactive gliosis. PMID:20679202

  2. Deficiency of the leukotriene B4 receptor, BLT-1, protects against systemic insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Spite, Matthew; Hellmann, Jason; Tang, Yunan; Mathis, Steven P; Kosuri, Madhavi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2011-08-15

    Chronic inflammation is an underlying factor linking obesity with insulin resistance. Diet-induced obesity promotes an increase in circulating levels of inflammatory monocytes and their infiltration into expanding adipose tissue. Nevertheless, the endogenous pathways that trigger and sustain chronic low-grade inflammation in obesity are incompletely understood. In this study, we report that a high-fat diet selectively increases the circulating levels of CD11b(+) monocytes in wild-type mice that express leukotriene B(4) receptor, BLT-1, and that this increase is abolished in BLT-1-null mice. The accumulation of classically activated (M1) adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (i.e., IL-6 and Ccl2) was largely blunted in adipose tissue of obese BLT-1(-/-) mice, whereas the ratio of alternatively activated (M2) ATMs to M1 ATMs was increased. Obese BLT-1(-/-) mice were protected from systemic glucose and insulin intolerance and this was associated with a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue and liver and a decrease in hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Deletion of BLT-1 prevented high fat-induced loss of insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle. These observations elucidate a novel role of chemoattractant receptor, BLT-1, in promoting monocyte trafficking to adipose tissue and promoting chronic inflammation in obesity and could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating insulin resistance in obesity.

  3. Perilipin overexpression in mice protects against diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perilipin A is the most abundant phosphoprotein on adipocyte lipid droplets and is essential for lipid storage and lipolysis. Perilipin null mice exhibit diminished adipose tissue, elevated basal lipolysis, reduced catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, and increased insulin resistance. To understand t...

  4. Chemical chaperones reduce ER stress and adipose tissue inflammation in high fat diet-induced mouse model of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaqin; Wu, Zhihong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xiang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, which is characteristic by chronic inflammation, is defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation in adipose tissues. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increased in adipose tissue of obese state and is known to be strongly associated with chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ER stress on adipokine secretion in obese mice and explore the potential mechanisms. In this study, we found high-fat diet induced-obesity contributed to strengthened ER stress and triggered chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. Chemical chaperones, 4-PBA and TUDCA, modified metabolic disorders and decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in obese mice fed a high-fat diet. The alleviation of ER stress is in accordance with the decrease of free cholesterol in adipose tissue. Furthermore chemical chaperones suppress NF-κB activity in adipose tissue of obese mice in vivo. In vitro studies showed IKK/NF-κB may be involved in the signal transduction of adipokine secretion dysfunction induced by ER stress. The present study revealed the possibility that inhibition of ER stress may be a novel drug target for metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity. Further studies are now needed to characterize the initial incentive of sustained ER stress in obese. PMID:27271106

  5. Diet-induced obesity attenuates cytokine production following an immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Baumgarner, Katherine M; Setti, Sharay; Diaz, Carolyn; Littlefield, Alyssa; Jones, Amanda; Kohman, Rachel A

    2014-07-01

    Obesity increases susceptibility for numerous diseases and neurological disorders including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. One factor that may contribute to the increased risk for these conditions is the development of chronic inflammation. The current study evaluated whether diet-induced obesity (DIO) affects cognitive performance by increasing neuroinflammation and prolonging the behavioral and inflammatory response to an immune challenge. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat (60% fat) or control diet (10% fat) for 2 or 5 months. After consuming their respective diets for two months, sickness associated behaviors were assessed 4 and 24h after a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline injection. In a separate experiment, DIO and control mice were tested for spatial learning in the water maze and challenged with LPS one month later. Peripheral cytokine production was assessed in adipose and spleen samples and the neuroinflammatory response was assessed in hippocampal, cortical, and brain samples. DIO impaired acquisition of a spatial learning task relative to control mice. However, these deficits are unlikely to be related to inflammation as DIO showed no changes in basal cytokine levels within the periphery or brain. Further, in response to LPS DIO mice showed comparable or attenuated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 relative to control mice. DIO also reduced hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the pre-synaptic marker synaptophysin. Presently, the data indicate that DIO suppresses aspects of the immune response and that cognitive deficits associated with DIO may be related to reduced neurotrophic support rather than inflammation.

  6. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Knockout Preserves Cardiac Homeostasis through Alleviating Akt-Mediated Myocardial Autophagy Suppression in High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xihui; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a role in the development of obesity and diabetes. However, whether MIF plays a role in fat diet-induced obesity and associated cardiac anomalies still remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of MIF knockout on high fat diet-induced obesity, obesity-associated cardiac anomalies and the underlying mechanisms involved with a focus on Akt-mediated autophagy. Methods Adult male wild-type (WT) and MIF knockout (MIF−/−) mice were placed on 45% high fat diet for 5 months. Oxygen consumption, CO2 production, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), locomotor activity, and heat generation were measured using energy calorimeter. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed. Apoptosis was examined using TUNEL staining and western blot analysis. Akt signaling pathway and autophagy markers were evaluated. Cardiomyocytes isolated from WT and MIF−/− mice were treated with recombinant mouse MIF (rmMIF). Results High fat diet feeding elicited increased body weight gain, insulin resistance, and caloric disturbance in WT and MIF−/− mice. High fat diet induced unfavorable geometric, contractile and histological changes in the heart, the effects of which were alleviated by MIF knockout. In addition, fat diet-induced cardiac anomalies were associated with Akt activation and autophagy suppression, which were nullified by MIF deficiency. In cardiomyocytes from WT mice, autophagy was inhibited by exogenous rmMIF through Akt activation. In addition, MIF knockout rescued palmitic acid-induced suppression of cardiomyocyte autophagy, the effect of which was nullified by rmMIF. Conclusions These results indicate that MIF knockout preserved obesity-associated cardiac anomalies without affecting fat diet-induced obesity, probably through restoring myocardial autophagy in an Akt-dependent manner. Our findings provide new insights for the role of MIF in obesity

  7. Mice lacking ghrelin receptors resist the development of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Nakano, Yoshihide; Coppari, Roberto; Balthasar, Nina; Marcus, Jacob N.; Lee, Charlotte E.; Jones, Juli E.; Deysher, Amy E.; Waxman, Amanda R.; White, Ryan D.; Williams, Todd D.; Lachey, Jennifer L.; Seeley, Randy J.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2005-01-01

    Ghrelin is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR; ghrelin receptor). Since its discovery, accumulating evidence has suggested that ghrelin may play a role in signaling and reversing states of energy insufficiency. For example, ghrelin levels rise following food deprivation, and ghrelin administration stimulates feeding and increases body weight and adiposity. However, recent loss-of-function studies have raised questions regarding the physiological significance of ghrelin in regulating these processes. Here, we present results of a study using a novel GHSR-null mouse model, in which ghrelin administration fails to acutely stimulate food intake or activate arcuate nucleus neurons. We show that when fed a high-fat diet, both female and male GHSR-null mice eat less food, store less of their consumed calories, preferentially utilize fat as an energy substrate, and accumulate less body weight and adiposity than control mice. Similar effects on body weight and adiposity were also observed in female, but not male, GHSR-null mice fed standard chow. GHSR deletion also affected locomotor activity and levels of glycemia. These findings support the hypothesis that ghrelin-responsive pathways are an important component of coordinated body weight control. Moreover, our data suggest that ghrelin signaling is required for development of the full phenotype of diet-induced obesity. PMID:16322794

  8. Role of human pregnane X receptor in high fat diet-induced obesity in pre-menopausal female mice

    PubMed Central

    Spruiell, Krisstonia; Jones, Dominique Z.; Cullen, John M.; Awumey, Emmanuel M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gyamfi, Maxwell A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder that is more prevalent among women. Until now, the only relevant rodent models of diet-induced obesity were via the use of ovariectomized (“postmenopausal”) females. However, recent reports suggest that the xenobiotic nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR) may contribute to obesity. Therefore, we compared the roles of mouse and human PXRs in diet-induced obesity between wild type (WT) and PXR-humanized (hPXR) transgenic female mice fed either control or high-fat diets (HFD) for 16 weeks. HFD-fed hPXR mice gained weight more rapidly than controls, exhibited hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. Fundamental differences were observed between control-fed hPXR and WT females: hPXR mice possessed reduced estrogen receptor α (ERα) but enhanced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) protein expression in white adipose tissue (WAT); increased protein expression of the hepatic cytochrome P450 3A11 (CYP3A11) and key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose 6-phosphatase, and increased total cholesterol. Interestingly, HFD ingestion induced both UCP1 and glucokinase protein expression in WT mice, but inhibited these enzymes in hPXR females. Unlike WT mice, CYP3A11 protein, serum 17β-estradiol levels, and WAT ERα expression were unaffected by HFD in hPXR females. Together, these studies indicate that the hPXR gene promotes obesity and metabolic syndrome by dysregulating lipid and glucose homeostasis while inhibiting UCP1 expression. Furthermore, our studies indicate that the human PXR suppresses the protective role of estrogen in metabolic disorders. Finally, these data identify PXR-humanized mice as a promising in vivo research model for studying obesity and diabetes in women. PMID:24721462

  9. Persistence of diet-induced obesity despite access to voluntary activity in mice lacking sarcolipin.

    PubMed

    Gamu, Daniel; Trinh, Anton; Bombardier, Eric; Tupling, A Russell

    2015-09-01

    Several rodent models of obesity have been shown to develop excessive adiposity only when voluntary cage ambulation is restricted. We have previously shown that mice lacking the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump regulatory protein sarcolipin (Sln(-/-)), an uncoupler of Ca(2+) uptake, develop excessive diet-induced obesity under standard housing conditions. However, it is unclear whether this phenotype is due, in part, to the sedentary housing environment in which these animals are kept. To address this, we allowed wild-type and Sln(-/-) animals ad libitum access to voluntary wheel running while consuming a standard chow or high-fat diet for 8 weeks. During this period, wheel revolutions were monitored along with weekly mass gain. Postdiet glucose tolerance and visceral adiposity were also taken. The volume of wheel running completed was similar between genotype, regardless of diet. Although voluntary activity reduced mass gain relative to sedentary controls within each diet (P < 0.05), visceral adiposity was surprisingly unaltered with activity. However, Sln(-/-) mice developed excessive obesity (P < 0.05) and glucose intolerance (P < 0.05) with high-fat feeding relative to wild-type controls. These findings indicate that the excessive diet-induced obese phenotype previously observed in Sln(-/-) mice is not the result of severely restricted daily ambulation, but in fact the inability to recruit uncoupling of the Ca(2+)-ATPase pump.

  10. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Gabriela F. P.; Solon, Carina; Nascimento, Lucas F.; De-Lima-Junior, Jose C.; Nogueira, Guilherme; Moura, Rodrigo; Rocha, Guilherme Z.; Fioravante, Milena; Bobbo, Vanessa; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela; Araujo, Eliana P.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic POMC is the earliest marker distinguishing obesity-prone from obesity-resistant mice. The early inhibition of hypothalamic POMC was sufficient to transform obesity-resistant in obesity-prone mice. In addition, the post-prandial change in the blood level of β-endorphin, a POMC-derived peptide, correlates with body mass gain in rodents and humans. Taken together, these results suggest that defective regulation of POMC expression, which leads to a change of β-endorphin levels, is the earliest hypothalamic defect leading to obesity. PMID:27373214

  11. Changes in Gene Expression Foreshadow Diet-Induced Obesity in Genetically Identical Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koza, Robert A; Nikonova, Larissa; Hogan, Jessica; Rim, Jong-Seop; Mendoza, Tamra; Faulk, Christopher; Skaf, Jihad; Kozak, Leslie P

    2006-01-01

    High phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J inbred mice suggests a molecular model to investigate non-genetic mechanisms of obesity. Feeding mice a high-fat diet beginning at 8 wk of age resulted in a 4-fold difference in adiposity. The phenotypes of mice characteristic of high or low gainers were evident by 6 wk of age, when mice were still on a low-fat diet; they were amplified after being switched to the high-fat diet and persisted even after the obesogenic protocol was interrupted with a calorically restricted, low-fat chow diet. Accordingly, susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice is a stable phenotype that can be detected in mice shortly after weaning. Chronologically, differences in adiposity preceded those of feeding efficiency and food intake, suggesting that observed difference in leptin secretion is a factor in determining phenotypes related to food intake. Gene expression analyses of adipose tissue and hypothalamus from mice with low and high weight gain, by microarray and qRT-PCR, showed major changes in the expression of genes of Wnt signaling and tissue re-modeling in adipose tissue. In particular, elevated expression of SFRP5, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, the imprinted gene MEST and BMP3 may be causally linked to fat mass expansion, since differences in gene expression observed in biopsies of epididymal fat at 7 wk of age (before the high-fat diet) correlated with adiposity after 8 wk on a high-fat diet. We propose that C57BL/6J mice have the phenotypic characteristics suitable for a model to investigate epigenetic mechanisms within adipose tissue that underlie diet-induced obesity. PMID:16733553

  12. Changes in gene expression foreshadow diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice.

    PubMed

    Koza, Robert A; Nikonova, Larissa; Hogan, Jessica; Rim, Jong-Seop; Mendoza, Tamra; Faulk, Christopher; Skaf, Jihad; Kozak, Leslie P

    2006-05-01

    High phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J inbred mice suggests a molecular model to investigate non-genetic mechanisms of obesity. Feeding mice a high-fat diet beginning at 8 wk of age resulted in a 4-fold difference in adiposity. The phenotypes of mice characteristic of high or low gainers were evident by 6 wk of age, when mice were still on a low-fat diet; they were amplified after being switched to the high-fat diet and persisted even after the obesogenic protocol was interrupted with a calorically restricted, low-fat chow diet. Accordingly, susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice is a stable phenotype that can be detected in mice shortly after weaning. Chronologically, differences in adiposity preceded those of feeding efficiency and food intake, suggesting that observed difference in leptin secretion is a factor in determining phenotypes related to food intake. Gene expression analyses of adipose tissue and hypothalamus from mice with low and high weight gain, by microarray and qRT-PCR, showed major changes in the expression of genes of Wnt signaling and tissue re-modeling in adipose tissue. In particular, elevated expression of SFRP5, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, the imprinted gene MEST and BMP3 may be causally linked to fat mass expansion, since differences in gene expression observed in biopsies of epididymal fat at 7 wk of age (before the high-fat diet) correlated with adiposity after 8 wk on a high-fat diet. We propose that C57BL/6J mice have the phenotypic characteristics suitable for a model to investigate epigenetic mechanisms within adipose tissue that underlie diet-induced obesity.

  13. Modulation of tissue fatty acids by L-carnitine attenuates metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Ward, Leigh C; Waanders, Jennifer; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and dyslipidaemia are metabolic defects resulting from impaired lipid metabolism. These impairments are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Correcting the defects in lipid metabolism may attenuate obesity and dyslipidaemia, and reduce cardiovascular risk and liver damage. L-Carnitine supplementation was used in this study to enhance fatty acid oxidation so as to ameliorate diet-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Male Wistar rats (8-9 weeks old) were fed with either corn starch or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diets for 16 weeks. Separate groups were supplemented with L-carnitine (1.2% in food) on either diet for the last 8 weeks of the protocol. High-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats showed central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, cardiovascular remodelling and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. L-Carnitine supplementation attenuated these high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced changes, together with modifications in lipid metabolism including the inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, reduced storage of short-chain monounsaturated fatty acids in the tissues with decreased linoleic acid content and trans fatty acids stored in retroperitoneal fat. Thus, L-carnitine supplementation attenuated the signs of metabolic syndrome through inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, preferential β-oxidation of some fatty acids and increased storage of saturated fatty acids and relatively inert oleic acid in the tissues.

  14. Rosiglitazone improves insulin sensitivity and baroreflex gain in rats with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ding; McCully, Belinda H; Brooks, Virginia L

    2012-10-01

    Obesity decreases baroreflex gain (BRG); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that impaired BRG is related to the concurrent insulin resistance, and, therefore, BRG would be improved after treatment with the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Male rats fed a high-fat diet diverged into obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) groups after 2 weeks. Then, OP and OR rats, as well as control (CON) rats fed a standard diet, were treated daily for 2 to 3 weeks with rosiglitazone (3 or 6 mg/kg) or its vehicle by gavage. Compared with OR and CON rats, conscious OP rats exhibited reductions in BRG (OP, 2.9 ± 0.1 bpm/mm Hg; OR, 4.0 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; CON, 3.9 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; P < 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; OP, 6.8 ± 0.9 mg/kg · min; OR, 22.2 ± 1.2 mg/kg · min; CON, 17.7 ± 0.8 mg/kg · min; P < 0.05), which were well correlated (r(2) = 0.49; P < 0.01). In OP rats, rosiglitazone dose-dependently improved (P < 0.05) insulin sensitivity (12.8 ± 0.6 mg/kg · min at 3 mg/kg; 16.0 ± 1.5 mg/kg · min at 6 mg/kg) and BRG (3.8 ± 0.4 bpm/mm Hg at 3 mg/kg; 5.3 ± 0.7 bpm/mm Hg at 6 mg/kg). However, 6 mg/kg rosiglitazone also increased BRG in OR rats without increasing insulin sensitivity, disrupted the correlation between BRG and insulin sensitivity (r(2) = 0.08), and, in OP and OR rats, elevated BRG relative to insulin sensitivity (analysis of covariance; P < 0.05). Moreover, in OP rats, stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, to activate central baroreflex pathways, elicited markedly reduced decreases in heart rate and arterial pressure, but these responses were not improved by rosiglitazone. In conclusion, diet-induced obesity impairs BRG via a central mechanism that is related to the concurrent insulin resistance. Rosiglitazone normalizes BRG, but not by improving brain baroreflex processing or insulin sensitivity.

  15. Phloretin Prevents High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Improves Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Alsanea, Sary; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2017-02-14

    Reactive oxygen species generated as a by-product in metabolism play a central role in the development of obesity and obesity-related metabolic complications. The objective of the current study is to explore the possibility to block obesity and improve metabolic homeostasis via phloretin, a natural antioxidant product from apple tree leaves and Manchurian apricot. Both preventive and therapeutic activities of phloretin were assessed using a high-fat diet-induced obesity mouse model. Phloretin was injected intraperitoneally twice weekly into regular and obese mice fed a high-fat diet. The effects of phloretin treatment on body weight and composition, fat content in the liver, glucose and lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance were monitored and compared to the control animals. Phloretin treatment significantly blocks high-fat diet-induced weight gain but did not induce weight loss in obese animals. Phloretin improved glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity and alleviated hepatic lipid accumulation. RT-PCR analysis showed that phloretin treatment suppresses expression of macrophage markers (F4/80 and Cd68) and pro-inflammatory genes (Mcp-1 and Ccr2) and enhances adiponectin gene expression in white adipose tissue. In addition, phloretin treatment elevated the expression of fatty acid oxidation genes such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a and 1b (Cpt1a and Cpt1b) and reduced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp-1), de novo lipogenesis transcriptional factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ 2 (Pparγ2), and its target monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (Mgat-1) genes. These results provide direct evidence to support a possible use of phloretin for mitigation of obesity and maintenance of metabolic homeostasis.

  16. Does diet-induced weight change effect anxiety in overweight and obese adults?

    PubMed

    Eyres, Stacey L; Turner, Anne I; Nowson, Caryl A; Torres, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is the most prevalent type of mental disorder and a significant health concern. Cross-sectional studies have detected a positive association between obesity and anxiety. What is less clear is whether weight loss can reduce anxiety. We sought to answer three questions: 1. Can weight loss improve symptoms of anxiety in the overweight and obese population? 2. Does the macronutrient content of energy-restricted diets that induce weight loss affect anxiety? 3. Is the change in anxiety related to the amount of weight lost? We investigated the findings from seven interventional studies, which induced weight loss by dietary intervention, in overweight and obese individuals, using established anxiety assessment tools. Mean weight loss ranged from 0.7 to 18.6 kg (SD 4.5) and in three of the studies, anxiety fell by 9.2% to 11.4% and did not change in four studies. When macronutrient content was considered, only one of four interventional studies and one pilot study reported a beneficial effect of a moderate-fat diet on anxiety. There appears to be no strong evidence to indicate that diet-induced weight loss has a beneficial effect on anxiety, however, none of the diet-induced weight loss studies assessed had a detrimental effect on anxiety.

  17. Anhydroicaritin improves diet-induced obesity and hyperlipidemia and alleviates insulin resistance by suppressing SREBPs activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zu-Guo; Zhou, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Xin; Thu, Pyone Myat; Xie, Zhi-Shen; Lu, Chong; Pang, Tao; Xue, Bin; Xu, Da-Qian; Chen, Yan; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Li, Hui-Jun; Xu, Xiaojun

    2016-12-15

    SREBPs play important roles in the regulation of lipid metabolism, and are closely related to the occurrence and development of many metabolic diseases. Small molecular inhibitors of SERBPs are important tools in developing efficient treatment of metabolic diseases. However, there are no listing drug targeting SREBPs. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop highly specific small molecules that inhibit SREBPs. In this study, using a hepatocyte-based high-throughput screening, we identified anhydroicaritin (AHI) as a novel inhibitor of SREBPs. HepG2, HL-7702, and human primary hepatocytes were used to verify the effects of AHI. We explored the mechanism by which AHI blocks the binding of SCAP/SREBPs complex with Sec23α/24D via regulating LKB1/AMPK/mTOR pathway. AHI reduced liver cell lipid level by preventing de novo lipogenesis. In diet induced obese mice, AHI ameliorated obesity, insulin resistance, fatty accumulation in liver and hyperlipemia. In conclusion, AHI improves diet-induced obesity and alleviates insulin resistance by suppressing SREBPs maturation which is dependent on LKB1/AMPK/mTOR pathway. Thus, AHI can serve as a leading compound for pharmacological control of metabolic diseases.

  18. Connection of Nicotine to Diet-Induced Obesity and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Cellular and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P.; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) poses a serious health hazard affecting 20–40% of adults in the general population in the USA and over 70% of the obese and extremely obese people. In addition to obesity, nicotine is recognized as a risk factor for NAFLD, and it has been reported that nicotine can exaggerate obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. The development of NAFLD has serious clinical complications because of its potential progression from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Multiple mechanisms can be involved in nicotine plus high-fat diet-induced (HFD) hepatic steatosis. Emerging evidence now suggests that nicotine exacerbates hepatic steatosis triggered by HFD, through increased oxidative stress and hepatocellular apoptosis, decreased phosphorylation (inactivation) of adenosine-5-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and, in turn, up-regulation of sterol response-element binding protein 1-c, fatty acid synthase, and activation of acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase, leading to increased hepatic lipogenesis. There is also growing evidence that chronic endoplasmic reticulum stress through regulation of several pathways leading to oxidative stress, inflammation, perturbed hepatic lipid homeostasis, apoptosis, and autophagy can induce hepatic steatosis and its progression to NASH. Evidence also suggests a central role of the gut microbiota in obesity and its related disorders, including NAFLD. This review explores the contribution of nicotine and obesity to the development of NAFLD and its molecular underpinning. PMID:28239368

  19. Mitochondria-targeted dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP) combats high-fat-diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalinovich, A V; Mattsson, C L; Youssef, M R; Petrovic, N; Ost, M; Skulachev, V P; Shabalina, I G

    2016-01-01

    Background: A membrane-penetrating cation, dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP), facilitates the recycling of fatty acids in the artificial lipid membrane and mitochondria. C12TPP can dissipate mitochondrial membrane potential and may affect total energy expenditure and body weight in animals and humans. Methods: We investigated the metabolic effects of C12TPP in isolated brown-fat mitochondria, brown adipocyte cultures and mice in vivo. Experimental approaches included the measurement of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, western blotting, magnetic resonance imaging and bomb calorimetry. Results: In mice, C12TPP (50 μmol per (day•kg body weight)) in the drinking water significantly reduced body weight (12%, P<0.001) and body fat mass (24%, P<0.001) during the first 7 days of treatment. C12TPP did not affect water palatability and intake or the energy and lipid content in feces. The addition of C12TPP to isolated brown-fat mitochondria resulted in increased oxygen consumption. Three hours of pretreatment with C12TPP also increased oligomycin-insensitive oxygen consumption in brown adipocyte cultures (P<0.01). The effects of C12TPP on mitochondria, cells and mice were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). However, C12TPP treatment increased the mitochondrial protein levels in the brown adipose tissue of both wild-type and UCP1-knockout mice. Pair-feeding revealed that one-third of the body weight loss in C12TPP-treated mice was due to reduced food intake. C12TPP treatment elevated the resting metabolic rate (RMR) by up to 18% (P<0.05) compared with pair-fed animals. C12TPP reduced the respiratory exchange ratio, indicating enhanced fatty acid oxidation in mice. Conclusions: C12TPP combats diet-induced obesity by reducing food intake, increasing the RMR and enhancing fatty acid oxidation. PMID:27534841

  20. Yerba mate extract (Ilex paraguariensis) attenuates both central and peripheral inflammatory effects of diet-induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Gustavo D; Lira, Fábio S; Rosa, José C; Caris, Aline V; Pinheiro, Fernanda; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M; Oyama, Lila M

    2013-05-01

    To clarify the effects of natural dietary components on the metabolic consequences of obesity, we examined the effects of yerba mate extract Ilex paraguariensis on both central and peripheral inflammatory effects of diet-induced obesity and correlated the hypothalamic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level with adipose depot weight. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group (CTL) fed with chow diet, a second group fed with chow diet plus yerba mate extract (CTL+E), a third group fed with a high-fat diet rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD) and a fourth group fed with HFD plus yerba mate extract (HFD+E). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, colorimetric method and treatment by gavage were utilized as materials and methods. The HFD groups showed a significant increase in food intake (kcal), body weight, adipose tissue and leptin level in comparison to CTL and CTL+E. HFD leads to increase of both central and peripheral inflammatory effects, and deregulation of insulin pathway. In addition, yerba mate extract intake blunted the proinflammatory effects of diet-induced obesity in rats by reducing the phosphorylation of hypothalamic IKK and NFκBp65 expression and increasing the phosphorylation of IκBα, the expression of adiponectin receptor-1 and consequently the amount of IRS-2. Moreover, the increase in interleukin (IL)-6 levels in the liver and muscle and of the IL-10/TNF-α ratio in groups that received yerba mate extract showed the anti-inflammatory effects of this natural substance. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of yerba mate extract may be useful for reducing low-grade obesity-associated inflammation.

  1. Gelidium amansii extract ameliorates obesity by down-regulating adipogenic transcription factors in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Hak-Ju

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES In this study, we investigated whether Gelidium amansii extract (GAE) ameliorates obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. MATERIALS/METHODS The mice were maintained on a high-fat diet (HD) for 5 weeks to generate the DIO mouse model. And then mice fed HD plus 0.5% (GAE1), 1% (GAE2) or 2% (GAE3) for 8 weeks. RESULTS After the experimental period, GAE-supplemented groups were significantly lower than the HD group in body weight gain and liver weight. GAE supplemented groups were significantly lower than the HD group in both epididymal and mesenteric adipose tissue mass. The plasma leptin level was significantly higher in the HD group than in GAE-supplemented groups. The leptin level of HD+GAE3 group was significantly lower than that of the HD+conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) group. In contrast, plasma adiponectin level of the HD group was significantly lower than those of HD+GAE2 and HD+GAE3 groups. The expression levels of adipogenic proteins such as fatty acid synthase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α in the GAE supplemented groups were significantly decreased than those in HD group, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of HD+GAE2 and HD+GAE3 groups are significantly decreased compared to those of HD+CLA group. On the contrary, the expression levels of hormone-sensitive lipase and phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase, proteins associated with lipolysis, were significantly increased in the GAE supplemented groups compared to those in the HD group. HD+GAE3 group showed the highest level among the GAE supplemented groups. CONCLUSIONS These results suggested that GAE supplementation stimulated the expressions of lipid metabolic factors and reduced weight gain in HD-fed C57BL/6J obese mice. PMID:28194261

  2. Absence of intestinal microbiota does not protect mice from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, Christine K; Huebel, Nora; Abd El-Bary, Mohamed Mostafa; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne; Blaut, Michael

    2010-09-01

    The gut microbiota has been implicated in host nutrient absorption and energy homeostasis. We studied the influence of different diets on body composition in germ-free (GF) and conventional (CV) mice. GF and CV male adult C3H mice were fed ad libitum a semi-synthetic low-fat diet (LFD; carbohydrate-protein-fat ratio: 41:42:17; 19.8 kJ/g), a high-fat diet (HFD; 41:16:43; 21.4 kJ/g) or a commercial Western diet (WD; 41:19:41; 21.5 kJ/g). There was no difference in body weight gain between GF and CV mice on the LFD. On the HFD, GF mice gained more body weight and body fat than CV mice, and had lower energy expenditure. GF mice on the WD gained significantly less body fat than GF mice on the HFD. GF mice on both HFD and WD showed increased intestinal mRNA expression of fasting-induced adipose factor/angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Fiaf/Angptl4), but they showed no major changes in circulating Fiaf/Angptl4 compared with CV mice. The faecal microbiota composition of the CV mice differed between diets: the proportion of Firmicutes increased on both HFD and WD at the expense of the Bacteroidetes. This increase in the Firmicutes was mainly due to the proliferation of one family within this phylum: the Erysipelotrichaceae. We conclude that the absence of gut microbiota does not provide a general protection from diet-induced obesity, that intestinal production of Fiaf/Angptl4 does not play a causal role in gut microbiota-mediated effects on fat storage and that diet composition affects gut microbial composition to larger extent than previously thought.

  3. Nebivolol Ameliorates Cardiac NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in a Juvenile-Adolescent Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qihai; Wei, Tong; Huang, Chenglin; Liu, Penghao; Sun, Mengwei; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2016-09-30

    NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated whether the cardiac protective effects of nebivolol relied on attenuating NLRP3 activation in a juvenile-adolescent animal model of diet-induced obesity. Weaning male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a standard chow diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. The obese rats were subsequently subdivided into three groups: 1) HFD control group; 2) HFD with low-dose nebivolol (5 mg/kg/d); 3) HFD with high-dose nebivolol (10 mg/kg/d). Treatment with nebivolol prevented HFD-induced obesity associated excess cardiac lipid accumulation as well as myocardial mitochondrial dysfunction. Nebivolol attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in myocardium of obese rats. In parallel, nebivolol treatment of obese animals increased cardiac β3-AR expression, reversing the reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In vitro, nebivolol treatment of palmitate-incubated H9C2 cells suppressed autophagy, restored mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation, and suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Meanwhile the presence of shRNA against β3-AR or against eNOS deteriorated the protective effects of nebivolol. These data suggest the beneficial effect of nebivolol on myocardial lipotoxicity contributing to inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation possibly via improved mitochondrial dysfunction.

  4. Nebivolol Ameliorates Cardiac NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in a Juvenile-Adolescent Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qihai; Wei, Tong; Huang, Chenglin; Liu, Penghao; Sun, Mengwei; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated whether the cardiac protective effects of nebivolol relied on attenuating NLRP3 activation in a juvenile-adolescent animal model of diet-induced obesity. Weaning male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a standard chow diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. The obese rats were subsequently subdivided into three groups: 1) HFD control group; 2) HFD with low-dose nebivolol (5 mg/kg/d); 3) HFD with high-dose nebivolol (10 mg/kg/d). Treatment with nebivolol prevented HFD-induced obesity associated excess cardiac lipid accumulation as well as myocardial mitochondrial dysfunction. Nebivolol attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in myocardium of obese rats. In parallel, nebivolol treatment of obese animals increased cardiac β3-AR expression, reversing the reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In vitro, nebivolol treatment of palmitate-incubated H9C2 cells suppressed autophagy, restored mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation, and suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Meanwhile the presence of shRNA against β3-AR or against eNOS deteriorated the protective effects of nebivolol. These data suggest the beneficial effect of nebivolol on myocardial lipotoxicity contributing to inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation possibly via improved mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27686325

  5. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize development of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by performing liver biopsy in wild-type and genetically obese mice. METHODS: Male wild-type C57BL/6J (C57) mice (DIO-NASH) and male Lepob/Lepob (ob/ob) mice (ob/ob-NASH) were maintained on a diet high in trans-fat (40%), fructose (22%) and cholesterol (2%) for 26 and 12 wk, respectively. A normal chow diet served as control in C57 mice (lean chow) and ob/ob mice (ob/ob chow). After the diet-induction period, mice were liver biopsied and a blinded histological assessment of steatosis and fibrosis was conducted. Mice were then stratified into groups counterbalanced for steatosis score and fibrosis stage and continued on diet and to receive daily PO dosing of vehicle for 8 wk. Global gene expression in liver tissue was assessed by RNA sequencing and bioinformatics. Metabolic parameters, plasma liver enzymes and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides) as well as hepatic lipids and collagen content were measured by biochemical analysis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) (steatosis/inflammation/ballooning degeneration) and fibrosis were scored. Steatosis and fibrosis were also quantified using percent fractional area. RESULTS: Diet-induction for 26 and 12 wk in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice, respectively, elicited progressive metabolic perturbations characterized by increased adiposity, total cholesterol and elevated plasma liver enzymes. The diet also induced clear histological features of NASH including hepatosteatosis and fibrosis. Overall, the metabolic NASH phenotype was more pronounced in ob/ob-NASH vs DIO-NASH mice. During the eight week repeated vehicle dosing period, the metabolic phenotype was sustained in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice in conjunction with hepatomegaly and increased hepatic lipids and collagen accumulation. Histopathological scoring demonstrated significantly increased NAS of DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 4.7 ± 0.4, P < 0.001 compared to lean chow

  6. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism.

  7. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism. PMID:26914024

  8. A closed-loop synthetic gene circuit for the treatment of diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rössger, Katrin; Charpin-El-Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity is a lifestyle-associated medical condition that increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Here we report the design of a closed-loop genetic circuit that constantly monitors blood fatty acid levels in the setting of diet-associated hyperlipidemia and coordinates reversible and adjustable expression of the clinically licensed appetite-suppressing peptide hormone pramlintide. Grafting of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α onto the phloretin-responsive repressor TtgR produces a synthetic intracellular lipid-sensing receptor (LSR) that reversibly induces chimeric TtgR-specific promoters in a fatty acid-adjustable manner. Mice with diet-induced obesity in which microencapsulated cells engineered for LSR-driven expression of pramlintide are implanted show significant reduction in food consumption, blood lipid levels and body weight when put on a high-fat diet. Therapeutic designer circuits that monitor levels of pathologic metabolites and link these with the tailored expression of protein pharmaceuticals may provide new opportunities for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:24281397

  9. Vitamin D3: A Role in Dopamine Circuit Regulation, Diet-Induced Obesity, and Drug Consumption.

    PubMed

    Trinko, Joseph R; Land, Benjamin B; Solecki, Wojciech B; Wickham, Robert J; Tellez, Luis A; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; de Araujo, Ivan E; Addy, Nii A; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2016-01-01

    The influence of micronutrients on dopamine systems is not well defined. Using mice, we show a potential role for reduced dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in promoting diet-induced obesity (DIO), food intake, and drug consumption while on a high fat diet. To complement these deficiency studies, treatments with exogenous fully active vitamin D3 (calcitriol, 10 µg/kg, i.p.) were performed. Nondeficient mice that were made leptin resistant with a high fat diet displayed reduced food intake and body weight after an acute treatment with exogenous calcitriol. Dopamine neurons in the midbrain and their target neurons in the striatum were found to express vitamin D3 receptor protein. Acute calcitriol treatment led to transcriptional changes of dopamine-related genes in these regions in naive mice, enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in both naive mice and rats, and increased locomotor activity after acute amphetamine treatment (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Alternatively, mice that were chronically fed either the reduced D3 high fat or chow diets displayed less activity after acute amphetamine treatment compared with their respective controls. Finally, high fat deficient mice that were trained to orally consume liquid amphetamine (90 mg/L) displayed increased consumption, while nondeficient mice treated with calcitriol showed reduced consumption. Our findings suggest that reduced dietary D3 may be a contributing environmental factor enhancing DIO as well as drug intake while eating a high fat diet. Moreover, these data demonstrate that dopamine circuits are modulated by D3 signaling, and may serve as direct or indirect targets for exogenous calcitriol.

  10. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  11. Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice Reduces the Maintenance of Influenza-Specific CD8+ Memory T Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Sheridan, Patricia A.; Beck, Melinda A.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increasing the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but its influence on the immune response to viral infection is understudied. Memory T cells generated during a primary influenza infection are important for protection against subsequent influenza exposures. Previously, we have demonstrated that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice have increased morbidity and mortality following secondary influenza infection compared with lean mice. To determine whether the problem resided in a failure to maintain functional, influenza-specific CD8+ memory T cells, male DIO and lean mice were infected with influenza X-31. At 84 d postinfection, DIO mice had a 10% reduction in memory T cell numbers. This reduction may have resulted from significantly reduced memory T cell expression of interleukin 2 receptor β (IL-2R β, CD122), but not IL-7 receptor α (CD127), which are both required for memory cell maintenance. Peripheral leptin resistance in the DIO mice may be a contributing factor to the impairment. Indeed, leptin receptor mRNA expression was significantly reduced in the lungs of obese mice, whereas suppressor of cytokine signaling (Socs)1 and Socs3 mRNA expression were increased. It is imperative to understand how the obese state alters memory T cells, because impairment in maintenance of functional memory responses has important implications for vaccine efficacy in an obese population. PMID:20592105

  12. Berberine inhibits adipogenesis in high-fat diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueshan; Davies, Gareth E

    2010-07-01

    Our previous studies illustrated that berberine inhibited adipogenesis in murine-derived 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and human white preadipocytes. In this study, the effects of berberine on the adipogenesis of high-fat diet-induced obesity (FD) or normal diet (ND) mice and possible transcriptional impact are investigated. The results demonstrated that in FD mice, berberine reduced mouse weight gain and food intake and serum glucose, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels accompanied with a down-regulation of PPARgamma expression and an up-regulation of GATA-3 expression. Berberine had no adverse effects on ND mice. These encouraging findings suggest that berberine has excellent pharmacological potential to prevent obesity.

  13. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  14. Diet-induced obesity causes ghrelin resistance in reward processing tasks.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Sarah H; Dinan, Tara; Lawrence, Andrew J; Spencer, Sarah J; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) causes ghrelin resistance in hypothalamic Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. However, ghrelin promotes feeding through actions at both the hypothalamus and mesolimbic dopamine reward pathways. Therefore, we hypothesized that DIO would also establish ghrelin resistance in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a major site of dopaminergic cell bodies important in reward processing. We observed reduced sucrose and saccharin consumption in Ghrelin KO vs Ghrelin WT mice. Moreover, DIO reduced saccharin consumption relative to chow-fed controls. These data suggest that the deletion of ghrelin and high fat diet both cause anhedonia. To assess if these are causally related, we tested whether DIO caused ghrelin resistance in a classic model of drug reward, conditioned place preference (CPP). Chow or high fat diet (HFD) mice were conditioned with ghrelin (1mg/kg in 10ml/kg ip) in the presence or absence of food in the conditioning chamber. We observed a CPP to ghrelin in chow-fed mice but not in HFD-fed mice. HFD-fed mice still showed a CPP for cocaine (20mg/kg), indicating that they maintained the ability to develop conditioned behaviour. The absence of food availability during ghrelin conditioning sessions induced a conditioned place aversion, an effect that was still present in both chow and HFD mice. Bilateral intra-VTA ghrelin injection (0.33μg/μl in 0.5μl) robustly increased feeding in both chow-fed and high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice; however, this was correlated with body weight only in the chow-fed mice. Our results suggest that DIO causes ghrelin resistance albeit not directly in the VTA. We suggest there is impaired ghrelin sensitivity in upstream pathways regulating reward pathways, highlighting a functional role for ghrelin linking appropriate metabolic sensing with reward processing.

  15. Mediobasal hypothalamic overexpression of DEPTOR protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Alexandre; Labbé, Sébastien M.; Lanfray, Damien; Blanchard, Pierre-Gilles; Villot, Romain; Roy, Christian; Sabatini, David M.; Richard, Denis; Laplante, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine–threonine kinase that functions into distinct protein complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2) that regulate energy homeostasis. DEP-domain containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR) is part of these complexes and is known to dampen mTORC1 function, consequently reducing mTORC1 negative feedbacks and promoting insulin signaling and Akt/PKB activation in several models. Recently, we observed that DEPTOR is expressed in several structures of the brain including the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a region that regulates energy balance. Whether DEPTOR in the MBH plays a functional role in regulating energy balance and hypothalamic insulin signaling has never been tested. Methods We have generated a novel conditional transgenic mouse model based on the Cre-LoxP system allowing targeted overexpression of DEPTOR. Mice overexpressing DEPTOR in the MBH were subjected to a metabolic phenotyping and MBH insulin signaling was evaluated. Results We first report that systemic (brain and periphery) overexpression of DEPTOR prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity, improves glucose metabolism and protects against hepatic steatosis. These phenotypes were associated with a reduction in food intake and feed efficiency and an elevation in oxygen consumption. Strikingly, specific overexpression of DEPTOR in the MBH completely recapitulated these phenotypes. DEPTOR overexpression was associated with an increase in hypothalamic insulin signaling, as illustrated by elevated Akt/PKB activation. Conclusion Altogether, these results support a role for MBH DEPTOR in the regulation of energy balance and metabolism. PMID:26909318

  16. Responses of brown adipose tissue to diet-induced obesity, exercise, dietary restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Nikki; Durrant, Jessica R; Bailey, David; Yoon, Lawrence; Jordan, Holly; Barton, Joanna; Brown, Roger H; Clifton, Lisa; Milliken, Tula; Harrington, Wallace; Kimbrough, Carie; Faber, Catherine A; Cariello, Neal; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2013-07-01

    Drug-induced weight loss in humans has been associated with undesirable side effects not present in weight loss from lifestyle interventions (caloric restriction or exercise). To investigate the mechanistic differences of weight loss by drug-induced and lifestyle interventions, we examined the gene expression (mRNA) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and conducted histopathologic assessments in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice given ephedrine (18 mg/kg/day orally), treadmill exercise (10 m/min, 1-h/day), and dietary restriction (DR: 26% dietary restriction) for 7 days. Exercise and DR mice lost more body weight than controls and both ephedrine and exercise reduced percent body fat. All treatments reduced BAT and liver lipid accumulation (i.e., cytoplasmic lipids in brown adipocytes and hepatocytes) and increased oxygen consumption (VO2 ml/kg/h) compared with controls. Mitochondrial biogenesis/function-related genes (TFAM, NRF1 and GABPA) were up-regulated in the BAT of all groups. UCP-1 was up-regulated in exercise and ephedrine groups, whereas MFSD2A was up-regulated in ephedrine and DR groups. PGC-1α up-regulation was observed in exercise and DR groups but not in ephedrine group. In all experimental groups, except for ephedrine, fatty acid transport and metabolism genes were up-regulated, but the magnitude of change was higher in the DR group. PRKAA1 was up-regulated in all groups but not significantly in the ephedrine group. ADRß3 was slightly up-regulated in the DR group only, whereas ESRRA remained unchanged in all groups. Although our data suggest a common pathway of BAT activation elicited by ephedrine treatment, exercise or DR, mRNA changes were indicative of additional nutrient-sensing pathways in exercise and DR.

  17. Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Associated Metabolic Perturbations in Haploinsufficient Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Nadia; Carneiro, Lionel; Favrod, Céline; Preitner, Frédéric; Thorens, Bernard; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Dix, Laure; Pralong, François; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 or SLC16A1) is a carrier of short-chain fatty acids, ketone bodies, and lactate in several tissues. Genetically modified C57BL/6J mice were produced by targeted disruption of the mct1 gene in order to understand the role of this transporter in energy homeostasis. Null mutation was embryonically lethal, but MCT1+/− mice developed normally. However, when fed high fat diet (HFD), MCT1+/− mice displayed resistance to development of diet-induced obesity (24.8% lower body weight after 16 weeks of HFD), as well as less insulin resistance and no hepatic steatosis as compared to littermate MCT1+/+ mice used as controls. Body composition analysis revealed that reduced weight gain in MCT1+/− mice was due to decreased fat accumulation (50.0% less after 9 months of HFD) notably in liver and white adipose tissue. This phenotype was associated with reduced food intake under HFD (12.3% less over 10 weeks) and decreased intestinal energy absorption (9.6% higher stool energy content). Indirect calorimetry measurements showed ∼ 15% increase in O2 consumption and CO2 production during the resting phase, without any changes in physical activity. Determination of plasma concentrations for various metabolites and hormones did not reveal significant changes in lactate and ketone bodies levels between the two genotypes, but both insulin and leptin levels, which were elevated in MCT1+/+ mice when fed HFD, were reduced in MCT1+/− mice under HFD. Interestingly, the enhancement in expression of several genes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver of MCT1+/+ mice under high fat diet was prevented in the liver of MCT1+/− mice under the same diet, thus likely contributing to the observed phenotype. These findings uncover the critical role of MCT1 in the regulation of energy balance when animals are exposed to an obesogenic diet. PMID:24367518

  18. Effects of deoxynivalenol consumption on body weight and adiposity in the diet-induced obese mouse.

    PubMed

    Amuzie, C J; Flannery, B M; Ulrich, A M; Pestka, J J

    2011-01-01

    The potential for the obese state to alter sensitivity to toxic chemicals is poorly understood. In this study, dose-response effects of the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a common food-borne mycotoxin, were determined on body weight of diet-induced obese mice. In study 1, the effects of feeding adult female B6C3F1 mice a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal from fat) containing 0, 2, 5, or 10 ppm DON for 10 wk on body weight and adiposity were compared. Mice consuming 5 or 10 ppm DON exhibited a 15 and 24% decrease in weight gain and a 50 and 83% reduction in periuterine fat, respectively. In study 2, mice were fed HFD for 8 wk to induce obesity and the effects of consuming HFD + 0, 2, 5, or 10 ppm DON for 8 wk were then determined. Mice fed 5 or 10 ppm DON exhibited a 16 and 23% weight reduction and a 0 and 40% periuterine fat reduction, respectively. In a follow-up experiment, food consumption was measured prior to and after the transition from HFD to HFD + 10 ppm DON. Exposure to DON was found to lower HFD consumption within 1 d, with significant weight loss in DON-fed mice evident after 6 d. In both studies 1 and 2, consumption of 5 or 10 ppm DON diminished circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor acid-labile subunit. Taken together, DON consumption lowered weight gain and produced weight loss in diet-induced obese mice at higher thresholds than that observed previously in normal B6C3F1 mice.

  19. Leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity: central and peripheral actions of leptin.

    PubMed

    Sáinz, Neira; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Moreno-Aliaga, María J; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that represents one of the most serious global health burdens associated to an excess of body fat resulting from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, which is regulated by environmental and genetic interactions. The adipose-derived hormone leptin acts via a specific receptor in the brain to regulate energy balance and body weight, although this protein can also elicit a myriad of actions in peripheral tissues. Obese individuals, rather than be leptin deficient, have in most cases, high levels of circulating leptin. The failure of these high levels to control body weight suggests the presence of a resistance process to the hormone that could be partly responsible of disturbances on body weight regulation. Furthermore, leptin resistance can impair physiological peripheral functions of leptin such as lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and nutrient intestinal utilization. The present document summarizes those findings regarding leptin resistance development and the role of this hormone in the development and maintenance of an obese state. Thus, we focused on the effect of the impaired leptin action on adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle and intestinal function and the accompanying relationships with diet-induced obesity. The involvement of some inflammatory mediators implicated in the development of obesity and their roles in leptin resistance development are also discussed.

  20. The effect of isorhamnetin glycosides extracted from Opuntia ficus-indica in a mouse model of diet induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, César; Torres, Nimbe; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Noriega, Lilia G; Torre-Villalvazo, Iván; Leal-Díaz, Ana M; Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Márquez-Mota, Claudia; Ordaz, Guillermo; Chavez-Santoscoy, Rocío A; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Tovar, Armando R

    2015-03-01

    A diet rich in polyphenols can ameliorate some metabolic alterations associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) is a plant rich in isorhamnetin glycosides and is highly consumed in Mexico. The purpose of this research was to determine the metabolic effect of an OFI extract on a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and in isolated pancreatic islets. OFI extract was added to a high fat (HF) diet at a low (0.3%) or high (0.6%) dose and administered to C57BL/6 mice for 12 weeks. Mice fed the HF diet supplemented with the OFI extract gained less body weight and exhibited significantly lower circulating total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol compared to those fed the HF diet alone. The HF-OFI diet fed mice presented lower glucose and insulin concentration than the HF diet fed mice. However, the HF-OFI diet fed mice tended to have higher insulin concentration than control mice. The OFI extract stimulated insulin secretion in vitro, associated with increased glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) mRNA content. Furthermore, the OFI extract improved glucose tolerance, and additionally increased energy expenditure. These metabolic improvements were associated with reduced adipocyte size, increased hepatic IRS1 tyr-608 and S6 K thr-389 phosphorylation. OFI isorhamnetin glycosides also diminished the hepatic lipid content associated with reduced mRNA expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress markers and lipogenic enzymes and increased mRNA expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation. Overall, the OFI extract prevented the development of metabolic abnormalities associated with diet-induced obesity.

  1. Treatment with 17β-Estradiol Reduced Body Weight and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in a High-Fat Diet-Induced Animal Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chih-Yang; Jiang, Chong-He; Lin, Yueh-Min; Chung, Li-Chin; Shen, Chia-Yao; Pai, Peiying; Lin, Kuan-Ho; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Liao, Shih-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) play important roles in cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. Recently, these estrogen receptors were reconsidered as an important treatment target of obesity leading to CVD. In this study, 17β-estradiol (17β-E) replacement therapy applied to high-fat diet-induced obese C57B male mice and ovariectomized (OVX) rats were evaluated, and the protective effects against high-fat diet-induced obesity were assessed in C57B mouse hearts. The results showed that 17β-E treatment activated both ERα and ERβ, and ERβ levels increased in a dose-dependent manner in high-fat diet C57B mouse cardiomyocytes following 17β-E treatment. Notably, an almost 16% reduction in body weight was observed in the 17β-E-treated (12 μg/kg/day for 60 days) high-fat diet-induced obese C57B male mice. These results suggested that 17β-E supplements may reduce CVD risk due to obesity. PMID:28335423

  2. Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana Extracts and Purified Compounds Ameliorate Obesity in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shyr-Yi; Huang, Guan-Cheng; Hsieh, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yin-Shiou; Han, Chuan-Hsiao; Wen, Chi-Luan; Chang, Chi-I; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2015-10-28

    The increasing prevalence of obesity continues to gain more attention worldwide. In this study, diet-induced obese mice were used to evaluate the antiobesity effects of extracts, fractions, and purified compounds from Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana (VTT). The C57BL/6J mice were fed a 5-week high-fat diet (HF) concurrently with ethanol extracts (Et-ext, 80 mg/kg) from roots (R), stems (S), and leaves (L) by oral gavage daily. Only R-Et-ext interventions showed significant weight reduction in mice compared with those in the HF group; however, mouse plasma contents of total cholesterols (TC), total triglycerides (TG) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) of all three Et-ext intervened groups showed significant reductions compared with those in the HF group. Furthermore, intervention with the ethyl acetate-partitioned fraction (EA-fra, 60 mg/kg) from R-Et-ext but not the n-butanol-partitioned fraction or water fraction from R-Et-ext showed significant weight reduction in mice compared with those in the HF group. The same molecular weights of three resveratrol tetramers, (+)-hopeaphenol, (+)-vitisin A, and (-)-vitisin B, were isolated from the EA-fra of VTT-R. The (+)-vitisin A and fenofibrate (25 mg/kg) but not the (+)-hopeaphenol and (-)-vitisin B interventions showed significant weight reduction in mice compared with those in the HF group. The total feed intake among the HF groups with or without interventions showed no significant differences. The mouse plasma contents of TC, TG, LDL, free fatty acid, and plasma lipase activity of the three resveratrol tetramer-intervened groups showed reductions in the mice compared with those in the HF group. It was proposed that the lipase inhibitory activities of VTT extracts and purified resveratrol tetramers might contribute in part to the antiobesity effect, and these results suggested that VTT may be developed as functional food for achieving antiobesity objectives and requires further investigation.

  3. Ciliary neurotrophic factorAx15 alters energy homeostasis, decreases body weight, and improves metabolic control in diet-induced obese and UCP1-DTA mice.

    PubMed

    Blüher, Susann; Moschos, Stergios; Bullen, John; Kokkotou, Efi; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Wiegand, Stanley J; Sleeman, Mark W; Sleemann, Mark W; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2004-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) potently reduces appetite and body weight in rodents and humans. We studied the short- and long-term effects of CNTF(Ax15), a second-generation CNTF analog, in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice and brown adipose tissue (BAT)-deficient obese UCP1-DTA (uncoupling protein 1-diphtheria toxin A) mice. CNTF(Ax15) administration (0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 microg . g(-1) . day(-1) s.c.) for 3 or 7 days reduced food intake and body weight (mainly body fat mass). The effect of CNTF(Ax15) on food intake and body weight was more pronounced in CNTF(Ax15)-treated diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice compared with pair-fed controls and was associated with suppressed expression of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y and agouti gene-related protein. Moreover, CNTF(Ax15) increased uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression in BAT and energy expenditure in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Longitudinal observations revealed a sustained reduction in body weight for several days post-CNTF(Ax15) treatment of CNTF(Ax15)-treated but not pair-fed mice, followed by a gradual regain in body weight over 28 days. Finally, CNTF(Ax15) administration improved the metabolic profile in both diet-induced obese C57BL/6J and UCP1-DTA mice and resulted in a significantly improved glycemic response to oral glucose tolerance tests in CNTF(Ax15)-treated UCP1-DTA compared with pair-fed mice of similar body weight. These data suggest that CNTF(Ax15) may act through a pathway downstream of the putative point responsible for leptin resistance in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J and UCP1-DTA mice to alter food intake, body weight, body composition, and metabolism. CNTF(Ax15) has delayed and persistent effects in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice, which account for a reduction in body weight over and above what would be expected based on decreased foot intake alone.

  4. Effect of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb extract on high-fat diet-induced obesity and gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Nukitrangsan, Natthanan; Okabe, Takafumi; Toda, Takayoshi; Inafuku, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hironori; Oku, Hirosuke

    2012-01-01

    Supplementation of the diet with Peucedanum japonicum Thunb (PJT) powder inhibits high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. Either the fiber component or other bioactive components in the PJT powder may inhibit obesity. This study, therefore, was an attempt to identify the components, fiber or other phytochemicals of PJT that were responsible for the anti-obesity activity, and also studied the modulation of obesity-related gene expression in C57BL/6 mice. Animals were fed a modified-AIN76 diet supplemented with PJT powder or extracts of PJT in water, 50 % ethanol, or ethanol. Body weight gain, tissue weight, serum biochemical parameters, liver lipid concentrations, and gene expression in tissues were compared between the control and treatment groups. Of the extracts, the ethanol extract of PJT decreased fat accumulation and adipocyte size, reduced serum and liver triglyceride concentrations, and inhibited obesity. This finding clearly demonstrates the presence of anti-obesity phytochemicals in PJT. Ethanol extract of PJT inhibited lipase activity in vitro. Modulation of gene expression by PJT ethanol extract was largely similar to that by PJT powder in the hepatic and adipose tissues: RORC and PBEF1 were upregulated and DUSP1, INSIG2, and SERPINA12 were downregulated in the liver; FXRα and PPARγ were upregulated and PEG1/MEST, the size-marker of adipocytes, was downregulated in the adipose tissue. Furthermore, PJT ethanol extract increased the expression of the UCP3 gene in muscle. These results suggest that the anti-obesity phytochemicals in PJT lower lipid levels by inhibiting fat absorption and by modulating obesity-related gene expression in the liver, adipose tissue, and muscle.

  5. Niacin promotes revascularization and recovery of limb function in diet-induced obese mice with peripheral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pang, Dominic K T; Nong, Zengxuan; Sutherland, Brian G; Sawyez, Cynthia G; Robson, Debra L; Toma, Jelena; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-06-01

    Niacin can reduce vascular disease risk in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but in light of recent large randomized controlled trials outcomes, its biological actions and clinical utility remain controversial. Niacin can improve endothelial function, vascular inflammation, and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in various lean rodent models of vascular injury. Here, we tested whether niacin could directly improve endothelial cell angiogenic function during combined exposure to excess fatty acids and hypoxia, and whether intervention with niacin during continued feeding of western diet could improve revascularization and functional recovery in obese, hyperlipidemic mice with peripheral ischemia. Treatment with niacin (10 μmol/L) increased human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during exposure to high fatty acids and hypoxia (2% oxygen), as determined by tube formation on Matrigel. To assess revascularization in vivo, we used western diet-induced obese mice with unilateral hind limb femoral artery ligation and excision. Treatment for 14 days postinjury with once daily i.p. injections of a low dose of niacin (50 mg/kg) improved recovery of hind limb use, in association with enhanced revascularization and decreased inflammation of the tibialis anterior muscle. These effects were concomitant with decreased plasma triglycerides, but not increased plasma apoAI. Thus, niacin improves endothelial tube formation under lipotoxic and hypoxic conditions, and moreover, promotes revascularization and functional hind limb recovery following ischemic injury in diet-induced obese mice with hyperlipidemia. These data may have implications for niacin therapy in the treatment of peripheral ischemic vascular disease associated with metabolic syndrome.

  6. Diet-induced obesity modulates epigenetic responses to ionizing radiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Ishii-Ohba, Hiroko; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Both exposure to ionizing radiation and obesity have been associated with various pathologies including cancer. There is a crucial need in better understanding the interactions between ionizing radiation effects (especially at low doses) and other risk factors, such as obesity. In order to evaluate radiation responses in obese animals, C3H and C57BL/6J mice fed a control normal fat or a high fat (HF) diet were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy ×4). Bone marrow micronucleus assays did not suggest a modulation of radiation-induced genotoxicity by HF diet. Using MSP, we observed that the promoters of p16 and Dapk genes were methylated in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet (irradiated and non-irradiated); Mgmt promoter was methylated in irradiated and/or HF diet-fed mice. In addition, methylation PCR arrays identified Ep300 and Socs1 (whose promoters exhibited higher methylation levels in non-irradiated HF diet-fed mice) as potential targets for further studies. We then compared microRNA regulations after radiation exposure in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a normal or an HF diet, using microRNA arrays. Interestingly, radiation-triggered microRNA regulations observed in normal mice were not observed in obese mice. miR-466e was upregulated in non-irradiated obese mice. In vitro free fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid) administration sensitized AML12 mouse liver cells to ionizing radiation, but the inhibition of miR-466e counteracted this radio-sensitization, suggesting that the modulation of radiation responses by diet-induced obesity might involve miR-466e expression. All together, our results suggested the existence of dietary effects on radiation responses (especially epigenetic regulations) in mice, possibly in relationship with obesity-induced chronic oxidative stress.

  7. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 protects mice from diet-induced fatty liver disease and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Horvath, Angela; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Varki, Nissi M.; Brandl, Katharina; Ho, Samuel B.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and obesity are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier dysfunction. Here, we investigated the role of mucin-2 (Muc2) as the major component of the intestinal mucus layer in the development of fatty liver disease and obesity. We studied experimental fatty liver disease and obesity induced by feeding wild-type and Muc2-knockout mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Muc2 deficiency protected mice from HFD-induced fatty liver disease and obesity. Compared with wild-type mice, after a 16-wk HFD, Muc2-knockout mice exhibited better glucose homeostasis, reduced inflammation, and upregulated expression of genes involved in lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation in white adipose tissue. Compared with wild-type mice that were fed the HFD as well, Muc2-knockout mice also displayed higher intestinal and plasma levels of IL-22 and higher intestinal levels of the IL-22 target genes Reg3b and Reg3g. Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal mucus layer activates the mucosal immune system. Higher IL-22 levels protect mice from diet-induced features of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26702135

  8. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 protects mice from diet-induced fatty liver disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Horvath, Angela; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Varki, Nissi M; Brandl, Katharina; Ho, Samuel B; Schnabl, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and obesity are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier dysfunction. Here, we investigated the role of mucin-2 (Muc2) as the major component of the intestinal mucus layer in the development of fatty liver disease and obesity. We studied experimental fatty liver disease and obesity induced by feeding wild-type and Muc2-knockout mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Muc2 deficiency protected mice from HFD-induced fatty liver disease and obesity. Compared with wild-type mice, after a 16-wk HFD, Muc2-knockout mice exhibited better glucose homeostasis, reduced inflammation, and upregulated expression of genes involved in lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation in white adipose tissue. Compared with wild-type mice that were fed the HFD as well, Muc2-knockout mice also displayed higher intestinal and plasma levels of IL-22 and higher intestinal levels of the IL-22 target genes Reg3b and Reg3g. Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal mucus layer activates the mucosal immune system. Higher IL-22 levels protect mice from diet-induced features of the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Anti-apoptotic and Pro-survival Effects of Food Restriction on High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Hearts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Yuan; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Cheng, Yu-Jung; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Huang, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Kao, Chung-Lan; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lee, Shin-Da

    2017-04-01

    Food restriction and weight loss are known to prevent obesity-related heart diseases. This study investigates whether food restriction elicits anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects on high-fat diet-induced obese hearts. Histopathological analysis, TUNEL assay, and Western blotting were performed on the excised hearts from three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats which were fed with regular chow diet (CON, 13.5 % fat), a high-fat ad libitum diet (HFa, 45 % fat), or a high-fat food-restricted diet (HFr, 45 % fat, maintaining the same weight as CON) for 12 weeks. Body weight, blood pressure, heart weight, triglycerides, insulin, HOMAIR, interstitial spaces, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were increased in HFa relative to CON, whereas these parameters were decreased in HFr relative to HFa. The protein levels of cardiac Fas ligand, Fas receptors, Fas-associated death domain (FADD), activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas receptor-dependent apoptotic pathways), as well as t-Bid/Bid, Bax/Bcl-2, Bad/p-Bad, Cytochrome c, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways) in HFr were lower than those in HFa. Moreover, the Bcl-xL and IGF-1-related components of IGF-1, p-PI3 K/PI3 K, p-Akt/Akt in HFr were higher than those in HFa. Our findings suggest that a restricted high-fat diet for maintaining weight control could diminish cardiac Fas receptor-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways as well as might enhance IGF-1-related pro-survival pathways. In sum, food restriction for maintaining normal weight could elicit anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects on high-fat diet-induced obese hearts.

  10. High-fat diet-induced obesity Rat model: a comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia; Meireles, Manuela; Norberto, Sónia; Leite, Joana; Freitas, Joana; Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past decades, obesity and associated metabolic complications have reached epidemic proportions. For the study of these pathologies, a number of animal models have been developed. However, a direct comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) Rat as models of high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity has not been adequately evaluated so far. Wistar and SD rats were assigned for 2 experimental groups for 17 weeks: standard (St) and high-fat (HF) diet groups. To assess some of the features of the metabolic syndrome, oral glucose tolerance tests, systolic blood pressure measurements and blood biochemical analysis were performed throughout the study. The gut microbiota composition of the animals of each group was evaluated at the end of the study by real-time PCR. HF diet increased weight gain, body fat mass, mesenteric adipocyte's size, adiponectin and leptin plasma levels and decreased oral glucose tolerance in both Wistar and SD rats. However, the majority of these effects were more pronounced or earlier detected in Wistar rats. The gut microbiota of SD rats was less abundant in Bacteroides and Prevotella but richer in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus comparatively to the gut microbiota of Wistar rats. Nevertheless, the modulation of the gut microbiota by HF diet was similar in both strains, except for Clostridium leptum that was only reduced in Wistar rats fed with HF diet. In conclusion, both Wistar and SD Rat can be used as models of HF diet-induced obesity although the metabolic effects caused by HF diet seemed to be more pronounced in Wistar Rat. Differences in the gut microbial ecology may account for the worsened metabolic scenario observed in Wistar Rat. PMID:27144092

  11. Effects of food pattern change and physical exercise on cafeteria diet-induced obesity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Goularte, Jéferson F; Ferreira, Maria B C; Sanvitto, Gilberto L

    2012-10-28

    Obesity affects a large number of people around the world and appears to be the result of changes in food intake, eating habits and physical activity levels. Changes in dietary patterns and physical exercise are therefore strongly recommended to treat obesity and its complications. The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity and metabolic changes produced by a cafeteria diet can be prevented with dietary changes and/or physical exercise. A total of fifty-six female Wistar rats underwent one of five treatments: chow diet; cafeteria diet; cafeteria diet followed by a chow diet; cafeteria diet plus exercise; cafeteria diet followed by a chow diet plus exercise. The duration of the experiment was 34 weeks. The cafeteria diet resulted in higher energy intake, weight gain, increased visceral adipose tissue and liver weight, and insulin resistance. The cafeteria diet followed by the chow diet resulted in energy intake, body weight, visceral adipose tissue and liver weight and insulin sensitivity equal to that of the controls. Exercise increased total energy intake at week 34, but produced no changes in the animals' body weight or adipose tissue mass. However, insulin sensitivity in animals subjected to exercise and the diet was similar to that of the controls. The present study found that exposure to palatable food caused obesity and insulin resistance and a diet change was sufficient to prevent cafeteria diet-induced obesity and to maintain insulin sensitivity at normal levels. In addition, exercise resulted in normal insulin sensitivity in obese rats. These results may help to develop new approaches for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Psoralea corylifolia L. Seed Extract Attenuates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunhui; Oh, Yoon Sin; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-02-06

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), along with obesity, is increasing world-wide and is one of the major causes of chronic hepatic disease. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Psoralea corylifolia L. seed (PCS) on high fat diet-induced NAFLD in C57BL/6 mice after daily administration at 300 or 500 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Treatment with PCS extract significantly reduced body weight and blood glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, PCS extract treatment significantly attenuated lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissue and reduced serum lipid and hepatic triglyceride levels. Furthermore, the expression of lipogenic genes and inflammatory genes were reduced, and the expression of fat oxidation-related genes was increased in the liver of PCS extract-treated mice compared with control mice. Our study suggests the therapeutic potential of PCS extract for NAFLD by inhibiting lipid accumulation and inflammation in liver.

  13. Psoralea corylifolia L. Seed Extract Attenuates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunhui; Oh, Yoon Sin; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), along with obesity, is increasing world-wide and is one of the major causes of chronic hepatic disease. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Psoralea corylifolia L. seed (PCS) on high fat diet-induced NAFLD in C57BL/6 mice after daily administration at 300 or 500 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Treatment with PCS extract significantly reduced body weight and blood glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, PCS extract treatment significantly attenuated lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissue and reduced serum lipid and hepatic triglyceride levels. Furthermore, the expression of lipogenic genes and inflammatory genes were reduced, and the expression of fat oxidation-related genes was increased in the liver of PCS extract-treated mice compared with control mice. Our study suggests the therapeutic potential of PCS extract for NAFLD by inhibiting lipid accumulation and inflammation in liver. PMID:26861390

  14. Detrimental Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on τ Pathology Are Independent of Insulin Resistance in τ Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leboucher, Antoine; Laurent, Cyril; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-José; Burnouf, Sylvie; Troquier, Laetitia; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Zommer, Nadège; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Breton, Christophe; Pigny, Pascal; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Staels, Bart; Hamdane, Malika; Tailleux, Anne; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2013-01-01

    The τ pathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Midlife development of obesity, a major risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, increases the risk of dementia and AD later in life. The impact of obesity on AD risk has been suggested to be related to central insulin resistance, secondary to peripheral insulin resistance. The effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on τ pathology remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated effects of a high-fat diet, given at an early pathological stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like τ pathology. We found that early and progressive obesity potentiated spatial learning deficits as well as hippocampal τ pathology at a later stage. Surprisingly, THY-Tau22 mice did not exhibit peripheral insulin resistance. Further, pathological worsening occurred while hippocampal insulin signaling was upregulated. Together, our data demonstrate that DIO worsens τ phosphorylation and learning abilities in τ transgenic mice independently from peripheral/central insulin resistance. PMID:23250356

  15. Diet-Induced Obesity and Reduced Skin Cancer Susceptibility in Matrix Metalloproteinase 19-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pendás, Alberto M.; Folgueras, Alicia R.; Llano, Elena; Caterina, John; Frerard, Françoise; Rodríguez, Francisco; Astudillo, Aurora; Noël, Agnès; Birkedal-Hansen, Henning; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP-19) is a member of the MMP family of endopeptidases that, in contrast to most MMPs, is widely expressed in human tissues under normal quiescent conditions. MMP-19 has been found to be associated with ovulation and angiogenic processes and is deregulated in diverse pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. To gain further insights into the in vivo functions of this protease, we have generated mutant mice deficient in Mmp19. These mice are viable and fertile and do not display any obvious abnormalities. However, Mmp19-null mice develop a diet-induced obesity due to adipocyte hypertrophy and exhibit decreased susceptibility to skin tumors induced by chemical carcinogens. Based on these results, we suggest that this enzyme plays an in vivo role in some of the tissue remodeling events associated with adipogenesis, as well as in pathological processes such as tumor progression. PMID:15169894

  16. Effects of grape pomace antioxidant extract on oxidative stress and inflammation in diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Shelly; Canning, Corene; Sun, Shi; Sun, Xiuxiu; Zhou, Kequan

    2010-11-10

    Norton grape is one of the most important wine grapes in Southern and Midwestern states and generates massive pomace byproducts. The objective of this study is to characterize the antioxidant compounds and activity in Norton grape pomace extract (GPE) and further assess the potential health promoting properties of Norton GPE using an animal disease model. The total phenolic content and anthocyanins in Norton GPE were 475.4 mg of gallic acid equiv/g and 156.9 mg of cyanidin 3-glucoside equiv/g, respectively. Catechin and epicatechin in GPE were 28.6 and 24.5 mg/g, respectively. Other major antioxidants in GPE included quercetin (1.6 mg/g), trans-resveratrol (60 μg/g), gallic acid (867.2 μg/g), coutaric acid (511.8 μg/g), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (408.3 μg/g), and protocatechuic acid (371.5 μg/g). The antioxidant activity of GPE was evaluated by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and was 4133 μmol of Trolox equiv/g. Male diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were randomly divided to three treatment groups (n = 12): a normal diet (ND group), a high fat diet (HF group), and the high fat diet supplemented with GPE (HFGPE group). After 12-week treatment, mice in the high fat diet groups gained 29% more weight than the ND group. The GPE supplementation (estimated 250 mg/kg bw/d) lowered plasma C-reactive protein levels by 15.5% in the high fat diet fed mice (P < 0.05), suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect by dietary GPE. However, dietary GPE did not improve oxidative stress in DIO mice as determined by plasma ORAC, glutathione peroxidase, and liver lipid peroxidation. The results showed that GPE contained significant antioxidants and dietary GPE exerted an anti-inflammatory effect in diet induced obesity.

  17. Linagliptin improves insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kern, Matthias; Klöting, Nora; Niessen, Heiko G; Thomas, Leo; Stiller, Detlef; Mark, Michael; Klein, Thomas; Blüher, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Linagliptin (TRADJENTA™) is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. DPP-4 inhibition attenuates insulin resistance and improves peripheral glucose utilization in humans. However, the effects of chronic DPP-4 inhibition on insulin sensitivity are not known. The effects of long-term treatment (3-4 weeks) with 3 mg/kg/day or 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin on insulin sensitivity and liver fat content were determined in diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. Chow-fed animals served as controls. DPP-4 activity was significantly inhibited (67-89%) by linagliptin (P<0.001). Following an oral glucose tolerance test, blood glucose concentrations (measured as area under the curve) were significantly suppressed after treatment with 3 mg/kg/day (-16.5% to -20.3%; P<0.01) or 30 mg/kg/day (-14.5% to -26.4%; P<0.05) linagliptin (both P<0.01). Liver fat content was significantly reduced by linagliptin in a dose-dependent manner (both doses P<0.001). Diet-induced obese mice treated for 4 weeks with 3 mg/kg/day or 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin had significantly improved glycated hemoglobin compared with vehicle (both P<0.001). Significant dose-dependent improvements in glucose disposal rates were observed during the steady state of the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp: 27.3 mg/kg/minute and 32.2 mg/kg/minute in the 3 mg/kg/day and 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin groups, respectively; compared with 20.9 mg/kg/minute with vehicle (P<0.001). Hepatic glucose production was significantly suppressed during the clamp: 4.7 mg/kg/minute and 2.1 mg/kg/minute in the 3 mg/kg/day and 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin groups, respectively; compared with 12.5 mg/kg/minute with vehicle (P<0.001). In addition, 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin treatment resulted in a significantly reduced number of macrophages infiltrating adipose tissue (P<0.05). Linagliptin treatment also decreased liver expression of PTP1B, SOCS3, SREBP1c, SCD-1 and FAS (P<0.05). Other tissues like muscle, heart and kidney were not significantly affected

  18. A Rat Model to Study the Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Radiation-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Takamitsu; Nishimura, Yukiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Akimoto, Kenta; Furukawa, Yuki; Fukushi, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-05-01

    A detailed understanding of the relationship between radiation-induced breast cancer and obesity is needed for appropriate risk management and to prevent the development of a secondary cancer in patients who have been treated with radiation. Our goal was to develop an animal model to study the relationship by combining two existing Sprague-Dawley rat models of radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis and diet-induced obesity. Female rats were fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks and categorized as obesity prone or obesity resistant based on their body weight at 7 weeks of age, at which time the rats were irradiated with 4 Gy. Control rats were fed a standard diet and irradiated at the same time and in the same manner. All rats were maintained on their initial diets and assessed for palpable mammary cancers once a week for the next 30 weeks. The obesity-prone rats were heavier than those in the other groups. The obesity-prone rats were also younger than the other animals at the first detection of mammary carcinomas and their carcinoma weights were greater. A tendency toward higher insulin and leptin blood levels were observed in the obesity-prone rats compared to the other two groups. Blood angiotensin II levels were elevated in the obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Genes related to translation and oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated in the carcinomas of obesity-prone rats. Expression profiles from human breast cancers were used to validate this animal model. As angiotensin is potentially an important factor in obesity-related morbidities and breast cancer, a second set of rats was fed in a similar manner, irradiated and then treated with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, losartan and candesartan. Neither blocker altered mammary carcinogenesis; analyses of losartan-treated animals indicated that expression of renin in the renal cortex and of Agtr1a (angiotensin II receptor, type 1) in cancer tissue was significantly upregulated, suggesting the presence of

  19. Genetic Targeting of Arginase-II in Mouse Prevents Renal Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ji; Rajapakse, Angana; Xiong, Yuyan; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Verrey, François; Ming, Xiu-Fen; Yang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced levels of the L-arginine:ureahydrolase, including the two isoenzymes arginase-I (Arg-I) and arginase-II (Arg-II) in vascular endothelial cells promote uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), leading to increased superoxide radical anion and decreased NO production thereby endothelial dysfunction. Arg-II but not Arg-I is abundantly expressed in kidney and the role of Arg-II in CKD is uncertain and controversial. We aimed to investigate the role of Arg-II in renal damage associated with diet-induced obesity mouse model. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient in Arg-II gene (Arg-II−/−) were fed with either a normal chow (NC) or a high-fat-diet (HFD) for 14 weeks (starting at the age of 7 weeks) to induce obesity. In WT mice, HFD feeding caused frequent renal lipid accumulation, enhancement of renal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels which could be attenuated by a NOS inhibitor, suggesting uncoupling of NOS in kidney. HFD feeding also significantly augmented renal Arg-II expression and activity. All the alterations in the kidney under HFD feeding were reduced in Arg-II−/− mice. Moreover, mesangial expansion as analyzed by Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining and renal expression of vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in HFD-fed WT mouse assessed by immunoblotting were reduced in the HFD-fed Arg-II−/− mice, although there was no significant difference in body weight and renal weight/body weight ratio between the WT and Arg-II−/− mice. Thus, Arg-II expression/activity is enhanced in kidney of diet-induced obesity mice. Genetic targeting of Arg-II prevents renal damage associated with obesity, suggesting an important role of Arg-II in obesity-associated renal disease development. PMID:27920727

  20. HPMC supplementation reduces abdominal fat content, intestinal permeability, inflammation, and insulin resistance in diet-induced obese mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a highly viscous non-fermentable soluble dietary fiber, were evaluated on adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in diet induced obese (DIO) mice fed a high fat (HF) diet supplemented with either HPMC or insoluble fiber. DIO C57BL/6J m...

  1. Leptin resistance in diet-induced obesity: the role of hypothalamic inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Git, K C G; Adan, R A H

    2015-03-01

    The consumption of Western diets, high in sugar and saturated fat, is a crucial contributor to the alarming incidence of obesity and its associated morbidities. These diets have been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, which promotes the development of central leptin resistance and obesity. This inflammatory signalling involves dynamic changes in the expression and activity of several mediators of the innate immune system, including toll-like receptor 4, IκB kinase-β/nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy defect. Although the exact cellular mechanisms remain incompletely understood, recent evidence suggests that the inflammatory response is at least mediated by interactions between neurons and non-neuronal cells such as microglia and astrocytes. Current evidence of the contribution of each inflammatory mediator to leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity (DIO), including their reciprocal interactions and cell-type-specific effects, is reviewed and integrated in a conceptual model. Based upon this model and pharmacological intervention studies, several inflammatory mediators are proposed to be promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of DIO.

  2. Popular edible seaweed, Gelidium amansii prevents against diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Seo-Young; Lima, Inês S; Ko, Seok-Chun; Kim, Young-Tae; Kim, Young-Bum; Jeung, Hee-Do; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The popular edible seaweed, Gelidium amansii is broadly used as food worldwide. To determine whether G. amansii extract (GAE) has protective effects on obesity, mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) treated with GAE (1 and 3 %) were studied. After 12 weeks of GAE treatment, body weight was greatly decreased in mice fed a high-fat diet. This effect could be due to decreased adipogenesis, as evidenced by the fact that GAE suppressed adipogenic gene expression in adipocytes. In addition, blood glucose and serum insulin levels were reduced by GAE treatment in mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting improvement in glucose metabolism. GAE supplementation also led to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. These data are further confirmed by H&E staining. Our findings indicate that Gelidium amansii prevents against the development of diet-induced obesity, and further implicate that GAE supplementation could be the therapeutical option for treatment of metabolic disorder such as obesity.

  3. Preventing diet-induced obesity in mice by adipose tissue transformation and angiogenesis using targeted nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Xue-Qing; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity, which is recognized by the American Medical Association as a disease, has nearly doubled since 1980, and obesity-related comorbidities have become a major threat to human health. Given that adipose tissue expansion and transformation require active growth of new blood vasculature, angiogenesis offers a potential target for the treatment of obesity-associated disorders. Here we construct two peptide-functionalized nanoparticle (NP) platforms to deliver either Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARgamma) activator rosiglitazone (Rosi) or prostaglandin E2 analog (16,16-dimethyl PGE2) to adipose tissue vasculature. These NPs were engineered through self-assembly of a biodegradable triblock polymer composed of end-to-end linkages between poly(lactic-coglycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) and an endothelial-targeted peptide. In this system, released Rosi promotes both transformation of white adipose tissue (WAT) into brown-like adipose tissue and angiogenesis, which facilitates the homing of targeted NPs to adipose angiogenic vessels, thereby amplifying their delivery. We show that i.v. administration of these NPs can target WAT vasculature, stimulate the angiogenesis that is required for the transformation of adipose tissue, and transform WAT into brown-like adipose tissue, by the up-regulation of angiogenesis and brown adipose tissue markers. In a diet-induced obese mouse model, these angiogenesis-targeted NPs have inhibited body weight gain and modulated several serological markers including cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin, compared with the control group. These findings suggest that angiogenesis-targeting moieties with angiogenic stimulator-loaded NPs could be incorporated into effective therapeutic regimens for clinical treatment of obesity and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27140638

  4. Combinatorial gene construct and non-viral delivery for anti-obesity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongsuk; Cho, Sungpil; Han, Yong Hwan; Janat-Amsbury, Margit M; Boudina, Sihem; Bae, You Han

    2015-06-10

    The combinatorial peptidergic therapy of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) and leptin (LEP) analogues was once an optimistic option in treating obese animals and patients. However, the need for frequent administrations and its negative side effects prevent it from being a viable choice. Here, we developed a combinatorial gene therapy of IAPP and LEP, where two genes are inserted into a single plasmid with self-cleaving furin and 2A sites to treat diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. The developed plasmid DNA (pDNA) individually produced both IAPP and LEP peptides in vitro and in vivo. The pDNA was delivered with a non-viral polymeric carrier, and its once-a-week administrations demonstrated a synergistic loss of body weight and significant reductions of fat mass, blood glucose, and lipid levels in DIO mice. The results suggest that the combinatorial gene therapy would have higher potential than the peptidergic approach for future translation due to its improved practicability.

  5. Diet-induced obesity causes innate airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and enhances ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard A; Theman, Todd A; Lu, Frank L; Terry, Raya D; Williams, Erin S; Shore, Stephanie A

    2008-06-01

    We previously reported that genetically obese mice exhibit innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and enhanced ozone (O(3))-induced pulmonary inflammation. Such genetic deficiencies in mice are rare in humans, and they may not be representative of human obesity. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary phenotype of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), which more closely mimics the cause of human obesity. Therefore, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were reared from the time of weaning until at least 30 wk of age on diets in which either 10 or 60% of the calories are derived from fat in the form of lard. Body mass was approximately 40% greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Baseline airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine, measured by forced oscillation, was greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. We also examined lung permeability and inflammation after exposure to room air or O(3) (2 parts/million for 3 h), an asthma trigger. Four hours after the exposure ended, O(3)-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, interleukin-6, KC, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10, and eotaxin were greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Innate AHR and augmented responses to O(3) were not observed in mice raised from weaning until 20-22 wk of age on a 60% fat diet. These results indicate that mice with DIO exhibit innate AHR and enhanced O(3)-induced pulmonary inflammation, similar to genetically obese mice. However, mice with DIO must remain obese for an extended period of time before this pulmonary phenotype is observed.

  6. Maternal diet-induced obesity programs cardiovascular dysfunction in adult male mouse offspring independent of current body weight.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Heather L; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Giussani, Dino A; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-10-01

    Obese pregnancies are not only associated with adverse consequences for the mother but also the long-term health of her child. Human studies have shown that individuals from obese mothers are at increased risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease (CVD), but are unable to define causality. This study aimed to determine causality using a mouse model of maternal diet-induced obesity. Obesity was induced in female C57BL/6 mice by feeding a diet rich in simple sugars and saturated fat 6 weeks prior to pregnancy and throughout pregnancy and lactation. Control females were fed laboratory chow. Male offspring from both groups were weaned onto chow and studied at 3, 5, 8, and 12 weeks of age for gross cardiac morphometry using stereology, cardiomyocyte cell area by histology, and cardiac fetal gene expression using qRT-PCR. Cardiac function was assessed by isolated Langendorff technology at 12 weeks of age and hearts were analyzed at the protein level for the expression of the β1 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic type-2 acetylcholine receptor, and proteins involved in cardiac contraction. Offspring from obese mothers develop pathologic cardiac hypertrophy associated with re-expression of cardiac fetal genes. By young adulthood these offspring developed severe systolic and diastolic dysfunction and cardiac sympathetic dominance. Importantly, cardiac dysfunction occurred in the absence of any change in corresponding body weight and despite the offspring eating a healthy low-fat diet. These findings provide a causal link to explain human observations relating maternal obesity with premature death from CVD in her offspring.

  7. Ginger extract prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice via activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ pathway.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Koichi; Hashizume, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Minegishi, Yoshihiko; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-10-01

    The initiation of obesity entails an imbalance wherein energy intake exceeds expenditure. Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is now a worldwide health problem. Food-derived peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) stimulators represent potential treatment options for obesity. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) was previously shown to regulate the PPARγ signaling pathway in adipocytes. In this study, we investigated the antiobesity effects of ginger in vivo and the mechanism of action in vitro. Energy expenditure was increased, and diet-induced obesity was attenuated in C57BL/6J mice treated with dietary ginger extract (GE). GE also increased the number of Type I muscle fibers, improved running endurance capacity and upregulated PPARδ-targeted gene expression in skeletal muscle and the liver. 6-Shogaol and 6-gingerol acted as specific PPARδ ligands and stimulated PPARδ-dependent gene expression in cultured human skeletal muscle myotubes. An analysis of cellular respiration revealed that pretreating cultured skeletal muscle myotubes with GE increased palmitate-induced oxygen consumption rate, which suggested an increase in cellular fatty acid catabolism. These results demonstrated that sustained activation of the PPARδ pathway with GE attenuated diet-induced obesity and improved exercise endurance capacity by increasing skeletal muscle fat catabolism. 6-Shogaol and 6-gingerol may be responsible for the regulatory effects of dietary ginger on PPARδ signaling.

  8. Phlorizin Supplementation Attenuates Obesity, Inflammation, and Hyperglycemia in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Kyung; Cho, Su-Jung; Jung, Un Ju; Ryu, Ri; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-02-16

    Obesity, along with its related complications, is a serious health problem worldwide. Many studies reported the anti-diabetic effect of phlorizin, while little is known about its anti-obesity effect. We investigated the beneficial effects of phlorizin on obesity and its complications, including diabetes and inflammation in obese animal. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups and fed their respective experimental diets for 16 weeks: a normal diet (ND, 5% fat, w/w), high-fat diet (HFD, 20% fat, w/w), or HFD supplemented with phlorizin (PH, 0.02%, w/w). The findings revealed that the PH group had significantly decreased visceral and total white adipose tissue (WAT) weights, and adipocyte size compared to the HFD. Plasma and hepatic lipids profiles also improved in the PH group. The decreased levels of hepatic lipids in PH were associated with decreased activities of enzymes involved in hepatic lipogenesis, cholesterol synthesis and esterification. The PH also suppressed plasma pro-inflammatory adipokines levels such as leptin, adipsin, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-γ, and interleukin-6, and prevented HFD-induced collagen accumulation in the liver and WAT. Furthermore, the PH supplementation also decreased plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels. In conclusion, phlorizin is beneficial for preventing diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as insulin resistance.

  9. Meta-Chlorophenylpiperazine enhances leptin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most forms of human obesity are characterized by impaired leptin sensitivity and, therefore, the effectiveness of anti-obesity leptin therapy in these leptin-resistant obese patients is marginal. Hence, the development of strategies to increase leptin sensitivity is of high priority in the field of ...

  10. Chronic Repression of mTOR Complex 2 Induces Changes in the Gut Microbiota of Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota play a crucial role in host physiology and metabolism; however, the molecular pathways underlying these changes in diet-induced obesity are unclear. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, we examined whether changes in the regulation of mTOR signaling induced by diet (a high-fat diet [HFD] or normal-chow diet) and/or therapeutics (resveratrol [a specific inhibitor of mTOR complex 1] or rapamycin [an inhibitor of both mTOR complex 1 and 2]) altered the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. Oral administration of resveratrol prevented glucose intolerance and fat accumulation in HFD-fed mice, whereas rapamycin significantly impaired glucose tolerance and exacerbated intestinal inflammation. The abundance of Lactococcus, Clostridium XI, Oscillibacter, and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium increased under the HFD condition; however, the abundance of these species declined after resveratrol treatment. Conversely, the abundance of unclassified Marinilabiliaceae and Turicibacter decreased in response to a HFD or rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota induced by changes in mTOR activity correlate with obese and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:27471110

  11. Intranasal leptin reduces appetite and induces weight loss in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO).

    PubMed

    Schulz, Carla; Paulus, Kerstin; Jöhren, Olaf; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to brain-mediated effects of leptin is a characteristic feature of obesity, resulting from alterations in leptin receptor signaling in hypothalamic neurons and/or transport across the blood-brain-barrier. We have shown previously, that the latter can be circumvented by intranasal (i.n.) application of leptin in lean rats. This prompted us to test i.n. leptin in animals with diet-induced obesity (DIO) as a basis for future human administration. DIO was induced in male Wistar rats by feeding a cafeteria diet for 25 or 32 wk, respectively. Consecutively, these DIO animals (seven to eight per treatment) and standard diet rats (lean) (14-15 per treatment, matched for age and diet duration) were treated with 0.1, 0.2 mg/kg leptin, or control solution i.n. daily for 4 wk before onset of dark period. Energy intake and body weight were measured daily; blood glucose, serum insulin, and leptin were measured before and after treatment. Expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. We demonstrate, for the first time, that i.n. leptin reduces appetite and induces weight loss in DIO to the same extent as in lean rats. Our findings are supported accordingly by an altered expression pattern of anorexigenic and orexigenic neuropeptides in the hypothalamus, e.g. proopiomelanocortin, cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript, neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein. It now appears clear that i.n. leptin is effectively acting in obese animals in the same fashion as in their lean counterparts. These findings now clearly warrant studies in humans and may open new perspectives in the treatment of obesity.

  12. IgG against specific bacterial antigens in obese patients with diabetes and in mice with diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Nadeem; Tang, Lihua; Jahangiri, Anisa; de Villiers, Willem; Eckhardt, Erik

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE High fat diets increase the risk for insulin resistance by promoting inflammation. The cause of inflammation is unclear, but germfree mouse studies have implicated commensal gut bacteria. We tested whether diet-induced obesity, diabetes, and inflammation are associated with anti-bacterial IgG. MATERIALS/METHODS Blood from lean and obese healthy volunteers or obese patients with diabetes were analyzed by ELISA for IgG against extracts of potentially pathogenic and pro-biotic strains of Escherichia coli (LF-82 and Nissle), Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and for circulating Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα). C57Bl/6 mice were fed low- or high- fat diets (10 or 60% kcal from fat) for 10 weeks and tested for anti-bacterial IgG, bodyweight, fasting glucose, and inflammation. RESULTS Obese diabetic patients had significantly more IgG against extracts of E. coli LF-82 compared with lean controls, whereas IgG against extracts of the other bacteria was unchanged. Circulating TNFα was elevated and correlated with IgG against the LF-82 extract. Mice fed high-fat diets had increased fasting glucose levels, elevated TNFα and neutrophils, and significantly more IgG against the LF-82 extracts. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes in obesity is characterized by increased IgG against specific bacterial antigens. Specific commensal bacteria may mediate inflammatory effects of high-fat diets. PMID:22424821

  13. Fucoidan prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in animals by suppression of fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ja; Jeon, Joseph; Lee, Jin-Sil

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the antiobesity effects of fucoidan in an animal model of diet-induced obesity. Mice were fed a standard diet or high-fat diet (HFD) for 5 weeks. After that, the mice were divided into four experimental groups, with 10 mice per group, including a standard diet group, HFD group, HFD containing 1% fucoidan (HFD + FUCO 1%) group and HFD containing 2% fucoidan (HFD + FUCO 2%) group. The fucoidan supplementation group had significantly decreased body-weight gain, food efficiency ratio and relative liver and epididymal fat mass compared with the HFD group. The mice supplemented with fucoidan showed significantly reduced triglyceride, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels in the plasma. Liver steatosis induced by the HFD improved in the fucoidan-supplemented group. Furthermore, fucoidan affected the down-regulation expression patterns of epididymal adipose tissue genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, adipose-specific fatty acid binding protein and acetyl CoA carboxylase. Therefore, fucoidan may be considered for use in improving obesity.

  14. Differential effects of prenatal stress on metabolic programming in diet-induced obese and dietary-resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Varde, Pratibha A.; Abdallah, Simon Labib; Najjar, Sonia M.; MohanKumar, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Stress during pregnancy is a known contributing factor for the development of obesity in the offspring. Since maternal obesity is on the rise, we wanted to identify the effects of prenatal stress in the offspring of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and compare them with the offspring of dietary-resistant (DR) rats. We hypothesized that prenatal stress would make both DIO and DR offspring susceptible to obesity, but the effect would be more pronounced in DIO rats. Pregnant DIO and DR rats were divided into two groups: nonstressed controls (control) and prenatal stress (subjected to restraint stress, three times/day from days 14 to 21 of gestation). After recording birth weight and weaning weight, male offspring were weaned onto a chow diet for 9 wk and shifted to a high-fat (HF) diet for 1 wk. At the end of the 10th wk the animals were euthanized, and visceral adipose mass, blood glucose, serum insulin, and C-peptide levels were measured. Prenatal stress resulted in hyperinsulinemia and higher C-peptide levels without altering caloric intake, body weight gain, or fat mass in the DIO offspring after 1 wk of HF intake, but not in DR offspring. To determine the mechanism underlying the hyperinsulinemia, we measured the levels of CEACAM1 that are responsible for insulin clearance. CEACAM1 levels in the liver were reduced in prenatally stressed DIO offspring after the HF challenge, suggesting that preexisting genetic predisposition in combination with prenatal stress increases the risk for obesity in adulthood, especially when offspring are fed a HF diet. PMID:26219866

  15. Calorie-induced ER stress suppresses uroguanylin satiety signaling in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, G W; Lin, J E; Snook, A E; Aing, A S; Merlino, D J; Li, P; Waldman, S A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The uroguanylin-GUCY2C gut–brain axis has emerged as one component regulating feeding, energy homeostasis, body mass and metabolism. Here, we explore a role for this axis in mechanisms underlying diet-induced obesity (DIO). Subjects/Methods: Intestinal uroguanylin expression and secretion, and hypothalamic GUCY2C expression and anorexigenic signaling, were quantified in mice on high-calorie diets for 14 weeks. The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in suppressing uroguanylin in DIO was explored using tunicamycin, an inducer of ER stress, and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a chemical chaperone that inhibits ER stress. The impact of consumed calories on uroguanylin expression was explored by dietary manipulation. The role of uroguanylin in mechanisms underlying obesity was examined using Camk2a-Cre-ERT2-Rosa-STOPloxP/loxP-Guca2b mice in which tamoxifen induces transgenic hormone expression in brain. Results: DIO suppressed intestinal uroguanylin expression and eliminated its postprandial secretion into the circulation. DIO suppressed uroguanylin through ER stress, an effect mimicked by tunicamycin and blocked by TUDCA. Hormone suppression by DIO reflected consumed calories, rather than the pathophysiological milieu of obesity, as a diet high in calories from carbohydrates suppressed uroguanylin in lean mice, whereas calorie restriction restored uroguanylin in obese mice. However, hypothalamic GUCY2C, enriched in the arcuate nucleus, produced anorexigenic signals mediating satiety upon exogenous agonist administration, and DIO did not impair these responses. Uroguanylin replacement by transgenic expression in brain repaired the hormone insufficiency and reconstituted satiety responses opposing DIO and its associated comorbidities, including visceral adiposity, glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. Conclusions: These studies reveal a novel pathophysiological mechanism contributing to obesity in which calorie-induced suppression

  16. Diet-induced obesity severely impairs myelinated aortic baroreceptor reflex responses.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Brooks, Virginia L; Andresen, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) attenuates the arterial cardiac baroreceptor reflex, but the mechanisms and sites of action are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that DIO impairs central aortic baroreceptor pathways. Normal chow control (CON) and high-fat-chow obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) rats were anesthetized (inactin, 120 mg/kg) and underwent sinoaortic denervation. The central end of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) was electrically stimulated to generate frequency-dependent baroreflex curves (5-100 Hz) during selective activation of myelinated (A-fiber) or combined (A- and C-fiber) ADN baroreceptors. A mild stimulus (1 V) that activates only A-fiber ADN baroreceptors induced robust, frequency-dependent depressor and bradycardic responses in CON and OR rats, but these responses were completely abolished in OP rats. Maximal activation of A fibers (3 V) elicited frequency-dependent reflexes in all groups, but a dramatic deficit was still present in OP rats. Activation of all ADN baroreceptors (20 V) evoked even larger reflex responses. Depressor responses were nearly identical among groups, but OP rats still exhibited attenuated bradycardia. In separate groups of rats, the reduced heart rate (HR) response to maximal activation of ADN A fibers (3 V) persisted in OP rats following pharmacological blockade of β(1)-adrenergic or muscarinic receptors, suggesting deficits in both parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) reflex pathways. However, the bradycardic responses to direct efferent vagal stimulation were similar among groups. Taken together, our data suggest that DIO severely impairs the central processing of myelinated aortic baroreceptor control of HR, including both PNS and SNS components.

  17. High fat diet-induced obesity modifies the methylation pattern of leptin promoter in rats.

    PubMed

    Milagro, F I; Campión, J; García-Díaz, D F; Goyenechea, E; Paternain, L; Martínez, J A

    2009-03-01

    Leptin is an adipokine involved in body weight and food intake regulation whose promoter region presents CpG islands that could be subject to dynamic methylation. This methylation process could be affected by environmental (e.g. diet) or endogenous (e.g., adipocyte differentiation, inflammation, hypoxia) factors, and could influence adipocyte leptin gene expression. The aim of this article was to study whether a high-energy diet may affect leptin gene promoter methylation in rats. A group of eleven male Wistar rats were assigned into two dietary groups, one fed on a control diet for 11 weeks and the other on a high-fat cafeteria diet. Rats fed a high-energy diet become overweight and hyperleptinemic as compared to the controls. DNA isolated from retroperitoneal adipocytes was treated with bisulfite and a distal portion of leptin promoter (from -694 to -372 bp) including 13 CpG sites was amplified by PCR and sequenced. The studied promoter portion was slightly more methylated in the cafeteria-fed animals, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05) for one of the CpG sites (located at the position -443). In obese rats, such methylation was associated to lower circulating leptin levels, suggesting that this position could be important in the regulation of leptin gene expression, probably by being a target sequence of different transcription factors. Our findings reveal, for the first time, that leptin methylation pattern can be influenced by diet-induced obesity, and suggest that epigenetic mechanisms could be involved in obesity by regulating the expression of important epiobesigenic genes.

  18. Bovine milk oligosaccharides decrease gut permeability and improve inflammation and microbial dysbiosis in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Boudry, Gaëlle; Hamilton, M Kristina; Chichlowski, Maciej; Wickramasinghe, Saumya; Barile, Daniela; Kalanetra, Karen M; Mills, David A; Raybould, Helen E

    2017-01-25

    Obesity is characterized by altered gut homeostasis, including dysbiosis and increased gut permeability closely linked to the development of metabolic disorders. Milk oligosaccharides are complex sugars that selectively enhance the growth of specific beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and could be used as prebiotics. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effects of bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO) and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. infantis (B. infantis) on restoring diet-induced obesity intestinal microbiota and barrier function defects in mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a Western diet (WD, 40% fat/kcal) or normal chow (C, 14% fat/kcal) for 7 wk. During the final 2 wk of the study, the diet of a subgroup of WD-fed mice was supplemented with BMO (7% wt/wt). Weekly gavage of B. infantis was performed in all mice starting at wk 3, yet B. infantis could not be detected in any luminal contents when mice were killed. Supplementation of the WD with BMO normalized the cecal and colonic microbiota with increased abundance of Lactobacillus compared with both WD and C mice and restoration of Allobaculum and Ruminococcus levels to that of C mice. The BMO supplementation reduced WD-induced increase in paracellular and transcellular flux in the large intestine as well as mRNA levels of the inflammatory marker tumor necrosis factor α. In conclusion, BMO are promising prebiotics to modulate gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function for enhanced health.

  19. The anti-obesity effect of fermented barley extracts with Lactobacillus plantarum dy-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayan; Xiao, Xiang; Dong, Ying; Shi, Lani; Xu, Tian; Wu, Fei

    2017-03-22

    Fermented cereals have significant potential for improving the nutritional quality and health effects of foods and ingredients. In the present study, aqueous extracts of fermented barley with either Lactobacillus plantarum dy-1 or Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated for their anti-adipogenic effects in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of an aqueous extract of fermented barley with Lactobacillus plantarum dy-1 (LFBE) significantly prevented body weight gain and fat mass increase, and improved lipid profiles and glucose tolerance in high fat diet-induced obese male rats. In contrast, an aqueous extract of fermented barley with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SFBE) had no significant anti-obesity effects. In addition, LFBE effectively inhibited adipocyte differentiation in a dose-dependent manner, but only a high dose of SFBE had similar effects. Phenolic acids (mainly vanillic acid and ferulic acid) and β-glucan in LFBE were responsible for the lipid accumulating actions and may be considered as primary anti-obesity mediators. The results showed that LFBE has more significant anti-obesity effects than SFBE. LFBE has the potential to prevent obesity and its related metabolic diseases.

  20. Effects of chronic exercise on the endocannabinoid system in Wistar rats with high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Gamelin, François-Xavier; Aucouturier, Julien; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Mazzarella, Enrico; Aveta, Teresa; Leriche, Melissa; Dupont, Erwan; Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Montel, Valérie; Bastide, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Heyman, Elsa

    2016-06-01

    The endocannabinoid system is dysregulated during obesity in tissues involved in the control of food intake and energy metabolism. We examined the effect of chronic exercise on the tissue levels of endocannabinoids (eCBs) and on the expression of genes coding for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) (Cnr1 and Cnr2, respectively) in the subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissues and in the soleus and extensor digitorim longus (EDL) muscles, in rats fed with standard or high-fat diet. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were placed on high-fat diet or standard diet (HFD and Ctl groups, respectively) during 12 weeks whereafter half of each group was submitted to an exercise training period of 12 weeks (HFD + training and Ctl + training). Tissue levels of eCBs were measured by LC-MS while expressions of genes coding for CB1 and CB2 receptors were investigated by qPCR. High-fat diet induced an increase in anandamide (AEA) levels in soleus and EDL (p < 0.02). In soleus of the HFD group, these changes were accompanied by elevated Cnr1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels (p < 0.05). In EDL, exercise training allowed to reduce significantly this diet-induced AEA increase (p < 0.005). 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) levels were decreased and increased by high-fat diet in SAT and EDL, respectively (p < 0.04), but not affected by exercise training. Unlike the HFD + training group, 2-AG levels in soleus were also decreased in the HFD group compared to Ctl (p < 0.04). The levels of eCBs and Cnr1 expression are altered in a tissue-specific manner following a high-fat diet, and chronic exercise reverses some of these alterations.

  1. Effects of diet-induced obesity and voluntary wheel running on the microstructure of the murine distal femur

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity and osteoporosis, two possibly related conditions, are rapidly expanding health concerns in modern society. Both of them are associated with sedentary life style and nutrition. To investigate the effects of diet-induced obesity and voluntary physical activity we used high resolution micro-computed tomography (μCT) together with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to examine the microstructure of the distal femoral metaphysis in mice. Methods Forty 7-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were assigned to 4 groups: control (C), control + running (CR), high-fat diet (HF), and high-fat diet + running (HFR). After a 21-week intervention, all the mice were sacrificed and the left femur dissected for pQCT and μCT measurements. Results The mice fed the high-fat diet showed a significant weight gain (over 70% for HF and 60% for HFR), with increased epididymal fat pad mass and impaired insulin sensitivity. These obese mice had significantly higher trabecular connectivity density, volume, number, thickness, area and mass, and smaller trabecular separation. At the whole bone level, they had larger bone circumference and cross-sectional area and higher density-weighted maximal, minimal, and polar moments of inertia. Voluntary wheel running decreased all the cortical bone parameters, but increased the trabecular mineral density, and decreased the pattern factor and structure model index towards a more plate-like structure. Conclusions The results suggest that in mice the femur adapts to obesity by improving bone strength both at the whole bone and micro-structural level. Adaptation to running exercise manifests itself in increased trabecular density and improved 3D structure, but in a limited overall bone growth PMID:21241467

  2. Reduction of body weight, liver steatosis and expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 by the isoflavone daidzein in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Crespillo, A; Alonso, M; Vida, M; Pavón, FJ; Serrano, A; Rivera, P; Romero-Zerbo, Y; Fernández-Llebrez, P; Martínez, A; Pérez-Valero, V; Bermúdez-Silva, FJ; Suárez, J; de Fonseca, FR

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The lack of safe and effective treatments for obesity has increased interest in natural products that may serve as alternative therapies. From this perspective, we have analysed the effects of daidzein, one of the main soy isoflavones, on diet-induced obesity in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Rats made obese after exposure to a very (60%) high fat-content diet were treated with daidzein (50 mg·kg−1) for 14 days. The dose was selected on the basis of the acute effects of this isoflavone on a feeding test. After 14 days, animals were killed and plasma, white and brown adipose tissue, muscle and liver studied for the levels and expression of metabolites, proteins and genes relevant to lipid metabolism. KEY RESULTS A single treatment (acute) with daidzein dose-dependently reduced food intake. Chronic treatment (daily for 14 days) reduced weight gain and fat content in liver, accompanied by high leptin and low adiponectin levels in plasma. While skeletal muscle was weakly affected by treatment, both adipose tissue and liver displayed marked changes after treatment with daidzein, affecting transcription factors and lipogenic enzymes, particularly stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1, a pivotal enzyme in obesity. Expression of uncoupling protein 1, an important enzyme for thermogenesis, was increased in brown adipose tissue after daidzein treatment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results support the use of isoflavones in diet-induced obesity, especially when hepatic steatosis is present and open a new field of use for these natural products. PMID:21557739

  3. Brown Adipose YY1 Deficiency Activates Expression of Secreted Proteins Linked to Energy Expenditure and Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Verdeguer, Francisco; Soustek, Meghan S.; Hatting, Maximilian; Blättler, Sharon M.; McDonald, Devin; Barrow, Joeva J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative and thermogenic functions in brown and beige adipose tissues modulate rates of energy expenditure. It is unclear, however, how beige or white adipose tissue contributes to brown fat thermogenic function or compensates for partial deficiencies in this tissue and protects against obesity. Here, we show that the transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1) in brown adipose tissue activates the canonical thermogenic and uncoupling gene expression program. In contrast, YY1 represses a series of secreted proteins, including fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), bone morphogenetic protein 8b (BMP8b), growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), angiopoietin-like 6 (Angptl6), neuromedin B, and nesfatin, linked to energy expenditure. Despite substantial decreases in mitochondrial thermogenic proteins in brown fat, mice lacking YY1 in this tissue are strongly protected against diet-induced obesity and exhibit increased energy expenditure and oxygen consumption in beige and white fat depots. The increased expression of secreted proteins correlates with elevation of energy expenditure and promotion of beige and white fat activation. These results indicate that YY1 in brown adipose tissue controls antagonistic gene expression programs associated with energy balance and maintenance of body weight. PMID:26503783

  4. Modeling Diet-Induced Obesity with Obesity-Prone Rats: Implications for Studies in Females

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Erin D.; Jackman, Matthew R.; MacLean, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a worldwide epidemic, and the comorbidities associated with obesity are numerous. Over the last two decades, we and others have employed an outbred rat model to study the development and persistence of obesity, as well as the metabolic complications that accompany excess weight. In this review, we summarize the strengths and limitations of this model and how it has been applied to further our understanding of human physiology in the context of weight loss and weight regain. We also discuss how the approach has been adapted over time for studies in females and female-specific physiological conditions, such as menopause and breast cancer. As excess weight and the accompanying metabolic complications have become common place in our society, we expect that this model will continue to provide a valuable translational tool to establish physiologically relevant connections to the basic science studies of obesity and body weight regulation. PMID:27933296

  5. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications.

  6. Protein kinase Cδ contributes to phenylephrine-mediated contraction in the aortae of high fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Limei; Liu, Jian; Gao, Yuansheng; Yu, Xiaoxing; Dou, Dou; Huang, Yu

    2014-04-18

    The down-regulation of α-adrenoceptor-mediated signaling casacade has been implicated in obesity but the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. The present study investigated whether inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor and protein kinase C (PKC) were involved in the reduction of α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine-evoked contraction in aortae of high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a rodent diet containing 45 kcal% fat for 16 weeks to induce obesity. Isolated mouse aortae were suspended in myograph for isometric force measurement. Protein phosphorylations and expressions were determined by Western blotting. In C57BL/6 mouse aortae, phenylephrine-induced contraction was partially inhibited by either IP3 receptor antagonist heparin or PKC inhibitor GFX, and the combined treatment with heparin and GFX abolished the contraction. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was significantly less in the aortae of DIO mice than those of control mice; only GFX but not heparin attenuated the contraction, indicating a diminishing role of IP3 receptor in DIO mice. Western blotting showed the reduced expression and phosphorylation of IP3 receptor and the down-regulated expression of PKC, PKCβ, PKCδ, and PKCζ in DIO mouse aortae. Importantly, PKCδ was more likely to maintain phenylephrine-mediated contraction in DIO mouse aortae because that (1) PKCδ inhibitor rottlerin but not PKCα and PKCβ inhibitor Gö6976, PKCβ inhibitor hispidin, or PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor attenuated the contraction; and (2) PKCδ phosphorylation was increased but phosphorylations of PKCα, PKCβ, and PKCζ were reduced in DIO mouse aortae. The present study thus provides additional insights into the cellular mechanisms responsible for vascular dysfunction in obesity.

  7. Adipocyte-specific deletion of Ip6k1 reduces diet-induced obesity by enhancing AMPK-mediated thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qingzhang; Ghoshal, Sarbani; Rodrigues, Ana; Gao, Su; Asterian, Alice; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Barrow, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing energy expenditure (EE) is an attractive strategy to combat obesity and diabetes. Global deletion of Ip6k1 protects mice from diet-induced obesity (DIO) and insulin resistance, but the tissue-specific mechanism by which IP6K1 regulates body weight is unknown. Here, we have demonstrated that IP6K1 regulates fat accumulation by modulating AMPK-mediated adipocyte energy metabolism. Cold exposure led to downregulation of Ip6k1 in murine inguinal and retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (IWAT and RWAT) depots. Adipocyte-specific deletion of Ip6k1 (AdKO) enhanced thermogenic EE, which protected mice from high-fat diet–induced weight gain at ambient temperature (23°C), but not at thermoneutral temperature (30°C). AdKO-induced increases in thermogenesis also protected mice from cold-induced decreases in body temperature. UCP1, PGC1α, and other markers of browning and thermogenesis were elevated in IWAT and RWAT of AdKO mice. Cold-induced activation of sympathetic signaling was unaltered, whereas AMPK was enhanced, in AdKO IWAT. Moreover, beige adipocytes from AdKO IWAT displayed enhanced browning, which was diminished by AMPK depletion. Furthermore, we determined that IP6 and IP6K1 differentially regulate upstream kinase-mediated AMPK stimulatory phosphorylation in vitro. Finally, treating mildly obese mice with the IP6K inhibitor TNP enhanced thermogenesis and inhibited progression of DIO. Thus, IP6K1 regulates energy metabolism via a mechanism that could potentially be targeted in obesity. PMID:27701146

  8. Lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) Exhibits Antidiabetic Activities in a Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Eid, Hoda M; Ouchfoun, Meriem; Brault, Antoine; Vallerand, Diane; Musallam, Lina; Arnason, John T; Haddad, Pierre S

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinium vitis-idaea, commonly known as lingonberry, has been identified among species used by the Cree of Eeyou Istchee of northern Quebec to treat symptoms of diabetes. In a previous study, the ethanol extract of berries of V. vitis-idaea enhanced glucose uptake in C2C12 muscle cells via stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of plant extract in a dietary mouse model of mild type 2 diabetes. C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD, ∼35% lipids) for 8 weeks that become obese and insulin-resistant (diet-induced obesity, DIO) were used. Treatment began by adding V. vitis-idaea extract to HFD at 3 different concentrations (125, 250, and 500 mg/Kg) for a subsequent period of 8 weeks (total HFD, 16 weeks). The plant extract significantly decreased glycemia and strongly tended to decrease insulin levels in this model. This was correlated with a significant increase in GLUT4 content and activation of the AMPK and Akt pathways in skeletal muscle. V. vitis-idaea treatment also improved hepatic steatosis by decreasing hepatic triglyceride levels and significantly activated liver AMPK and Akt pathways. The results of the present study confirm that V. vitis-idaea represents a culturally relevant treatment option for Cree diabetics and pave the way to clinical studies.

  9. Yellow pea fiber improves glycemia and reduces Clostridium leptum in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Amanda J; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A

    2014-08-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the impact of functional fibers on gut microbiota and metabolic health, but some less well-studied fibers and/or fractions of foods known to be high in fiber still warrant examination. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of yellow pea-derived fractions varying in fiber and protein content on metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in diet-induced obese rats. We hypothesized that the yellow pea fiber (PF) fraction would improve glycemia and alter gut microbiota. Rats were randomized to 1 of 5 isoenergetic dietary treatments for 6 weeks: (1) control; (2) oligofructose (OFS); (3) yellow PF; (4) yellow pea flour (PFL); or (5) yellow pea starch (PS). Glycemia, plasma gut hormones, body composition, hepatic triglyceride content, gut microbiota, and messenger RNA expression of genes related to hepatic fat metabolism were examined. Pea flour attenuated weight gain compared with control, PF, and PS (P < .05). Pea flour, PS, and OFS had significantly lower final percent body fat compared with control. Oligofructose but not the pea fraction diets reduced food intake compared with control (P < .05). Pea fiber resulted in lower fasting glucose and glucose area under the curve compared with control. Changes in gut microbiota were fraction specific and included a decrease in Firmicutes (percent) for OFS, PF, and PFL compared with control (P < .05). The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was reduced with OFS, PF, and PFL when compared with PS (P < .05). Taken together, this work suggests that yellow pea-derived fractions are able to distinctly modulate metabolic parameters and gut microbiota in obese rats.

  10. LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutation confers leanness and protection from diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Tajan, Mylène; Batut, Aurélie; Cadoudal, Thomas; Deleruyelle, Simon; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Saint Laurent, Céline; Vomscheid, Maëlle; Wanecq, Estelle; Tréguer, Karine; De Rocca Serra-Nédélec, Audrey; Vinel, Claire; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Pozzo, Joffrey; Kunduzova, Oksana; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Tauber, Maithé; Raynal, Patrick; Cavé, Hélène; Edouard, Thomas; Valet, Philippe; Yart, Armelle

    2014-01-01

    LEOPARD syndrome (multiple Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormal genitalia, Retardation of growth, sensorineural Deafness; LS), also called Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML), is a rare autosomal dominant disorder associating various developmental defects, notably cardiopathies, dysmorphism, and short stature. It is mainly caused by mutations of the PTPN11 gene that catalytically inactivate the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 (Src-homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2). Besides its pleiotropic roles during development, SHP2 plays key functions in energetic metabolism regulation. However, the metabolic outcomes of LS mutations have never been examined. Therefore, we performed an extensive metabolic exploration of an original LS mouse model, expressing the T468M mutation of SHP2, frequently borne by LS patients. Our results reveal that, besides expected symptoms, LS animals display a strong reduction of adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity, associated with overall better metabolic profile. We provide evidence that LS mutant expression impairs adipogenesis, triggers energy expenditure, and enhances insulin signaling, three features that can contribute to the lean phenotype of LS mice. Interestingly, chronic treatment of LS mice with low doses of MEK inhibitor, but not rapamycin, resulted in weight and adiposity gains. Importantly, preliminary data in a French cohort of LS patients suggests that most of them have lower-than-average body mass index, associated, for tested patients, with reduced adiposity. Altogether, these findings unravel previously unidentified characteristics for LS, which could represent a metabolic benefit for patients, but may also participate to the development or worsening of some traits of the disease. Beyond LS, they also highlight a protective role of SHP2 global LS-mimicking modulation toward the development of obesity and associated disorders

  11. Undaria pinnatifida and Fucoxanthin Ameliorate Lipogenesis and Markers of Both Inflammation and Cardiovascular Dysfunction in an Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grasa-López, Ameyalli; Miliar-García, Ángel; Quevedo-Corona, Lucía; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Jaramillo-Flores, María-Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Brown algae and its carotenoids have been shown to have a positive influence on obesity and its comorbidities. This study evaluated the effect of Undaria pinnatifida and fucoxanthin on biochemical, physiological and inflammation markers related to obesity and on the expression of genes engaged on white adipose tissue lipid metabolism in a murine model of diet-induced obesity. The treatments improved energy expenditure, β-oxidation and adipogenesis by upregulating PPARα, PGC1α, PPARγ and UCP-1. Adipogenesis was also confirmed by image analysis of the retroperitoneal adipose tissue, by measuring cell area, perimeter and cellular density. Additionally, the treatments, ameliorated adipose tissue accumulation, insulin resistance, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum, and reduced lipogenesis and inflammation by downregulating acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) gene expression, increasing serum concentration and expression of adiponectin as well as downregulating IL-6 expression. Both fucoxanthin and Undaria pinnatifida may be considered for treating obesity and other diseases related. PMID:27527189

  12. Undaria pinnatifida and Fucoxanthin Ameliorate Lipogenesis and Markers of Both Inflammation and Cardiovascular Dysfunction in an Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Grasa-López, Ameyalli; Miliar-García, Ángel; Quevedo-Corona, Lucía; Paniagua-Castro, Norma; Escalona-Cardoso, Gerardo; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Jaramillo-Flores, María-Eugenia

    2016-08-03

    Brown algae and its carotenoids have been shown to have a positive influence on obesity and its comorbidities. This study evaluated the effect of Undaria pinnatifida and fucoxanthin on biochemical, physiological and inflammation markers related to obesity and on the expression of genes engaged on white adipose tissue lipid metabolism in a murine model of diet-induced obesity. The treatments improved energy expenditure, β-oxidation and adipogenesis by upregulating PPARα, PGC1α, PPARγ and UCP-1. Adipogenesis was also confirmed by image analysis of the retroperitoneal adipose tissue, by measuring cell area, perimeter and cellular density. Additionally, the treatments, ameliorated adipose tissue accumulation, insulin resistance, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides concentration in serum, and reduced lipogenesis and inflammation by downregulating acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) gene expression, increasing serum concentration and expression of adiponectin as well as downregulating IL-6 expression. Both fucoxanthin and Undaria pinnatifida may be considered for treating obesity and other diseases related.

  13. Regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptides gene expression in diet induced obesity resistant rats: possible targets for obesity prediction?

    PubMed

    Cifani, Carlo; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria V; Pucci, Mariangela; Giusepponi, Maria E; Romano, Adele; Di Francesco, Andrea; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Several factors play a role in obesity (i.e., behavior, environment, and genetics) and epigenetic regulation of gene expression has emerged as a potential contributor in the susceptibility and development of obesity. To investigate the individual sensitivity to weight gain/resistance, we here studied gene transcription regulation of several hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the control of energy balance in rats developing obesity (diet-induced obesity, DIO) or not (diet resistant, DR), when fed with a high fat diet. Rats have been followed up to 21 weeks of high fat diet exposure. After 5 weeks high fat diet exposure, the obese phenotype was developed and we observed a selective down-regulation of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) genes. No changes were observed in the expression of the agouti-related protein (AgRP), as well as for all the anorexigenic genes under study. After long-term high fat diet exposure (21 weeks), NPY and PPAR-γ, as well as most of the genes under study, resulted not be different between DIO and DR, whereas a lower expression of the anorexigenic pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) gene was observed in DIO rats when compared to DR rats. Moreover we observed that changes in NPY and POMC mRNA were inversely correlated with gene promoters DNA methylation. Our findings suggest that selective alterations in hypothalamic peptide genes regulation could contribute to the development of overweight in rats and that environmental factor, as in this animal model, might be partially responsible of these changes via epigenetic mechanism.

  14. A novel cystine based antioxidant attenuates oxidative stress and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P.; Shen, Ruoqing; Kim, H.; French, Samuel W.; Vazari, Nostrola D.; Crum, Albert; Rajavashisth, Tripathi B.; Norris, Keith C.

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common form of liver pathologies and is associated with obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which a novel cystine based glutathione precursor with added selenomethionine (F1) prevents hepatic steatosis in a moderate high fat dietary model of NAFLD. Adult (8 weeks old), male apolipoprotein E (ApoE)−/− mice were fed with a normal diet (ND) or high fat diet (HFD), consisting of 21% fat and 0.21% cholesterol, with or without dietary supplementation of F1 (3 g/kg food) for 16 weeks. Compared with ApoE−/− mice fed with ND with or without F1, ApoE−/− mice fed with HFD exhibited significant weight gain, hepatomegaly, and increased serum cholesterol and triglycerides levels with no change in serum albumin levels. High resolution light and electron microscopy revealed micro-and macro-vesicular steatosis in ApoE−/− mice fed on a HFD. HFD- induced obesity also led to increased lipogenesis, oxidative stress, activation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), perturbation of the BAX/BCL-2 rheostat, hepatocyte apoptosis, and activation of caspases 9 and 3. F1 fully prevented the adverse effects of HFD on serum triglyceride levels, body and liver weights, and hepatic steatosis and substantially attenuated HFD-induced increase in lipogenesis, oxidative stress, kinase activation, apoptotic signaling, and hepatocyte ultrastructural abnormalities. These results demonstrate that administration of F1, a glutathione precursor, ameliorates HFD-induced hepatic steatosis in ApoE−/− mice and emphasizes the role of oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity and hepatic steatosis. PMID:21570964

  15. Time-restricted feeding of a high-fat diet reduces diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reducing obesity may alleviate many medical complications including diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. It has been suggested that obesity is contributed by the disruption of the circadian rhythms in addition to increased caloric intake. Restricting feeding to particular times of the day ma...

  16. The effects of forskolin and rolipram on cAMP, cGMP and free fatty acid levels in diet induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Doseyici, S; Mehmetoglu, I; Toker, A; Yerlikaya, F H; Erbay, E

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is a major health problem. We investigated the effects of forskolin and rolipram in the diet of animals in which obesity had been induced. We used 50 female albino Wistar rats that were assigned randomly into five groups as follows: group 1, control; group 2, high fat diet; group 3, high fat diet + forskolin; group 4, high fat diet + rolipram; and group 5, high fat diet + rolipram + forskolin. The rats were fed for 10 weeks and rolipram and forskolin were administered during last two weeks. The animals were sacrificed and blood samples were obtained. Serum cAMP, cGMP and free fatty acids (FFA) levels were measured using ELISA assays. We also measured weight gain during the 10 week period. cAMP and FFA levels of groups 3, 4 and 5 were significantly higher than those of groups 1 and 2. We found no significant differences in serum cGMP levels among the groups. The weight gain in groups 3, 4 and 5 was significantly less than for group 2. We also found that the weight gain in group 5 was significantly less than in groups 3 and 4. We found that both forskolin and rolipram stimulated lipolysis and inhibited body weight increase by increasing cAMP levels. Also, combination therapy using the two agents may be more effective in preventing diet induced obesity than either agent alone. We found also that these agents did not effect cellular cGMP levels in diet induced obesity.

  17. Gut carbohydrate metabolism instead of fat metabolism regulated by gut microbes mediates high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Gu, D; Xu, N; Lei, F; Du, L; Zhang, Y; Xie, W

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms underlying the involvement of gut microbes in body weight gain of high-fat diet-fed obesity-prone (obese) and obesity-resistant (lean) mice. C57BL/6 mice were grouped into an obese group, a lean group and a normal control group. Both obese and lean mice were fed a high-fat diet while normal control mice were fed a normal diet; they were observed for six weeks. The results showed that lean mice had lower serum lipid levels, body fat and weight gain than obese mice. The ATPase, succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities in liver as well as oxygen expenditure and rectal temperature of lean mice were significantly lower than in obese mice. As compared with obese mice, the absorption of intestinal carbohydrates but not of fats or proteins was significantly attenuated in lean mice. Furthermore, 16S rRNA abundances of faecal Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were significantly reduced in lean mice. In addition, faecal β-D-galactosidase activity and short chain fatty acid levels were significantly decreased in lean mice. Expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-β in visceral adipose tissues were significantly downregulated in lean mice as compared with obese mice. Resistance to dyslipidaemia and high-fat diet-induced obesity was mediated by ineffective absorption of intestinal carbohydrates but not of fats or proteins, probably through reducing gut Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes contents and lowering of gut carbohydrate metabolism. The regulation of intestinal carbohydrates instead of fat absorption by gut microbes might be a potential treatment strategy for high-fat diet-induced obesity.

  18. Diet-Induced Obesity in Male Mice Is Associated with Reduced Fertility and Potentiation of Acrylamide-Induced Reproductive Toxicity1

    PubMed Central

    Ghanayem, Burhan I.; Bai, Re; Kissling, Grace E.; Travlos, Greg; Hoffler, Undi

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of human obesity and related chronic disorders such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer is rapidly increasing. Human studies have shown a direct relationship between obesity and infertility. The objective of the current work was to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on male fertility and the effect of obesity on susceptibility to chemical-induced reproductive toxicity. From 5 to 30 wk of age, genetically intact male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a normal diet or one in which 60% of the kilocalories were from lard. Obese mice exhibited significant differences in the mRNA of several genes within the testes in comparison to lean males. Pparg was increased 2.2-fold, whereas Crem, Sh2b1, Dhh, Igf1, and Lepr were decreased 6.7, 1.4, 3.2, 1.6, and 7.2-fold, respectively. The fertility of male mice was compared through mating with control females. Acrylamide (AA)-induced reproductive toxicity was assessed in obese or lean males treated with water or 25 mg AA kg−1 day−1 via gavage for 5 days and then mated to control females. Percent body fat and weight were significantly increased in mice fed a high-fat vs. a normal diet. Obesity resulted in significant reduction in plugs and pregnancies of control females partnered with obese vs. lean males. Serum leptin and insulin levels were each approximately 5-fold higher in obese vs. age-matched lean mice. Sperm from obese males exhibited decreased motility and reduced hyperactivated progression vs. lean mice. Treatment with AA exacerbated male infertility of obese and lean mice; however, this effect was more pronounced in obese mice. Further, females partnered with AA-treated obese mice exhibited a further decrease in the percentage of live fetuses, whereas the percentage of resorptions increased. This work demonstrated that diet-induced obesity in mice caused a significant reduction in male fertility and exacerbated AA-induced reproductive toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity. PMID:19696015

  19. Soluble Fermentable Dietary Fibre (Pectin) Decreases Caloric Intake, Adiposity and Lipidaemia in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Clare L.; Thomson, Lynn M.; Williams, Patricia A.; Ross, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of a high fat diet promotes obesity and poor metabolic health, both of which may be improved by decreasing caloric intake. Satiety-inducing ingredients such as dietary fibre may be beneficial and this study investigates in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats the effects of high or low fat diet with or without soluble fermentable fibre (pectin). In two independently replicated experiments, young adult male DIO rats that had been reared on high fat diet (HF; 45% energy from fat) were given HF, low fat diet (LF; 10% energy from fat), HF with 10% w/w pectin (HF+P), or LF with 10% w/w pectin (LF+P) ad libitum for 4 weeks (n = 8/group/experiment). Food intake, body weight, body composition (by magnetic resonance imaging), plasma hormones, and plasma and liver lipid concentrations were measured. Caloric intake and body weight gain were greatest in HF, lower in LF and HF+P, and lowest in the LF+P group. Body fat mass increased in HF, was maintained in LF, but decreased significantly in LF+P and HF+P groups. Final plasma leptin, insulin, total cholesterol and triglycerides were lower, and plasma satiety hormone PYY concentrations were higher, in LF+P and HF+P than in LF and HF groups, respectively. Total fat and triglyceride concentrations in liver were greatest in HF, lower in LF and HF+P, and lowest in the LF+P group. Therefore, the inclusion of soluble fibre in a high fat (or low fat) diet promoted increased satiety and decreased caloric intake, weight gain, adiposity, lipidaemia, leptinaemia and insulinaemia. These data support the potential of fermentable dietary fibre for weight loss and improving metabolic health in obesity. PMID:26447990

  20. Prolonged diet induced obesity has minimal effects towards brain pathology in mouse model of cerebral amyloid angiopathy: implications for studying obesity-brain interactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Freeman, Linnea R; Pepping, Jennifer K; Beckett, Tina L; Murphy, M Paul; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) occurs in nearly every individual with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down's syndrome, and is the second largest cause of intracerebral hemorrhage. Mouse models of CAA have demonstrated evidence for increased gliosis contributing to CAA pathology. Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese, with little known about the effects of obesity on the brain, although increasingly the vasculature appears to be a principle target of obesity effects on the brain. In the current study we describe for the first time whether diet induced obesity (DIO) modulates glial reactivity, amyloid levels, and inflammatory signaling in a mouse model of CAA. In these studies we identify surprisingly that DIO does not significantly increase Aβ levels, astrocyte (GFAP) or microglial (IBA-1) gliosis in the CAA mice. However, within the hippocampal gyri a localized increase in reactive microglia were increased in the CA1 and stratum oriens relative to CAA mice on a control diet. DIO was observed to selectively increase IL-6 in CAA mice, with IL-1β and TNF-α not increased in CAA mice in response to DIO. Taken together, these data show that prolonged DIO has only modest effects towards Aβ in a mouse model of CAA, but appears to elevate some localized microglial reactivity within the hippocampal gyri and selective markers of inflammatory signaling. These data are consistent with the majority of the existing literature in other models of Aβ pathology, which surprisingly show a mixed profile of DIO effects towards pathological processes in mouse models of neurodegenerative disease. The importance for considering the potential impact of ceiling effects in pathology within mouse models of Aβ pathogenesis, and the current experimental limitations for DIO in mice to fully replicate metabolic dysfunction present in human obesity, are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal Models of Disease.

  1. Does Diet-Induced Weight Loss Lead to Bone Loss in Overweight or Obese Adults? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Zibellini, Jessica; Seimon, Radhika V; Lee, Crystal M Y; Gibson, Alice A; Hsu, Michelle S H; Shapses, Sue A; Nguyen, Tuan V; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2015-12-01

    Diet-induced weight loss has been suggested to be harmful to bone health. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (using a random-effects model) to quantify the effect of diet-induced weight loss on bone. We included 41 publications involving overweight or obese but otherwise healthy adults who followed a dietary weight-loss intervention. The primary outcomes examined were changes from baseline in total hip, lumbar spine, and total body bone mineral density (BMD), as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Secondary outcomes were markers of bone turnover. Diet-induced weight loss was associated with significant decreases of 0.010 to 0.015 g/cm(2) in total hip BMD for interventions of 6, 12, or 24 (but not 3) months' duration (95% confidence intervals [CIs], -0.014 to -0.005, -0.021 to -0.008, and -0.024 to -0.000 g/cm(2), at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively). There was, however, no statistically significant effect of diet-induced weight loss on lumbar spine or whole-body BMD for interventions of 3 to 24 months' duration, except for a significant decrease in total body BMD (-0.011 g/cm(2); 95% CI, -0.018 to -0.003 g/cm(2)) after 6 months. Although no statistically significant changes occurred in serum concentrations of N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (P1NP), interventions of 2 or 3 months in duration (but not of 6, 12, or 24 months' duration) induced significant increases in serum concentrations of osteocalcin (0.26 nmol/L; 95% CI, 0.13 to 0.39 nmol/L), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX) (4.72 nmol/L; 95% CI, 2.12 to 7.30 nmol/L) or N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX) (3.70 nmol/L; 95% CI, 0.90 to 6.50 nmol/L bone collagen equivalents [BCEs]), indicating an early effect of diet-induced weight loss to promote bone breakdown. These data show that in overweight and obese individuals, a single diet-induced weight-loss intervention induces a small decrease in total hip BMD, but not lumbar spine

  2. p53-upregulated-modulator-of-apoptosis (PUMA) deficiency affects food intake but does not impact on body weight or glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed Central

    Litwak, Sara A.; Loh, Kim; Stanley, William J.; Pappas, Evan G.; Wali, Jibran A.; Selck, Claudia; Strasser, Andreas; Thomas, Helen E.; Gurzov, Esteban N.

    2016-01-01

    BCL-2 proteins have been implicated in the control of glucose homeostasis and metabolism in different cell types. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the role of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, p53-upregulated-modulator-of-apoptosis (PUMA), in metabolic changes mediated by diet-induced obesity, using PUMA deficient mice. At 10 weeks of age, knockout and wild type mice either continued consuming a low fat chow diet (6% fat), or were fed with a high fat diet (23% fat) for 14–17 weeks. We measured body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance, insulin response in peripheral tissues, energy expenditure, oxygen consumption, and respiratory exchange ratio in vivo. All these parameters were indistinguishable between wild type and knockout mice on chow diet and were modified equally by diet-induced obesity. Interestingly, we observed decreased food intake and ambulatory capacity of PUMA knockout mice on high fat diet. This was associated with increased adipocyte size and fasted leptin concentration in the blood. Our findings suggest that although PUMA is dispensable for glucose homeostasis in lean and obese mice, it can affect leptin levels and food intake during obesity. PMID:27033313

  3. Activation of muscular TrkB by its small molecular agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone sex-dependently regulates energy metabolism in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi Bun; Tse, Margaret Chui Ling; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Shuai; Schmidt, Robin; Otten, Reed; Liu, Liegang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-03-19

    Chronic activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptor TrkB is a potential method to prevent development of obesity, but the short half-life and nonbioavailable nature of BDNF hampers validation of the hypothesis. We report here that activation of muscular TrkB by the BDNF mimetic, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), is sufficient to protect the development of diet-induced obesity in female mice. Using in vitro and in vivo models, we found that 7,8-DHF treatment enhanced the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in skeletal muscle, which resulted in increased systemic energy expenditure, reduced adiposity, and improved insulin sensitivity in female mice fed a high-fat diet. This antiobesity activity of 7,8-DHF is muscular TrkB-dependent as 7,8-DHF cannot mitigate diet-induced obesity in female muscle-specific TrkB knockout mice. Hence, our data reveal that chronic activation of muscular TrkB is useful in alleviating obesity and its complications.

  4. Prevention of Diet-Induced Obesity Effects on Body Weight and Gut Microbiota in Mice Treated Chronically with Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol

    PubMed Central

    Cluny, Nina L.; Keenan, Catherine M.; Reimer, Raylene A.; Le Foll, Bernard; Sharkey, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acute administration of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists, or the ingestion of cannabis, induces short-term hyperphagia. However, the incidence of obesity is lower in frequent cannabis users compared to non-users. Gut microbiota affects host metabolism and altered microbial profiles are observed in obese states. Gut microbiota modifies adipogenesis through actions on the endocannabinoid system. This study investigated the effect of chronic THC administration on body weight and gut microbiota in diet-induced obese (DIO) and lean mice. Methods Adult male DIO and lean mice were treated daily with vehicle or THC (2mg/kg for 3 weeks and 4 mg/kg for 1 additional week). Body weight, fat mass, energy intake, locomotor activity, whole gut transit and gut microbiota were measured longitudinally. Results THC reduced weight gain, fat mass gain and energy intake in DIO but not lean mice. DIO-induced changes in select gut microbiota were prevented in mice chronically administered THC. THC had no effect on locomotor activity or whole gut transit in either lean or DIO mice. Conclusions Chronic THC treatment reduced energy intake and prevented high fat diet-induced increases in body weight and adiposity; effects that were unlikely to be a result of sedation or altered gastrointestinal transit. Changes in gut microbiota potentially contribute to chronic THC-induced actions on body weight in obesity. PMID:26633823

  5. p53-upregulated-modulator-of-apoptosis (PUMA) deficiency affects food intake but does not impact on body weight or glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Litwak, Sara A; Loh, Kim; Stanley, William J; Pappas, Evan G; Wali, Jibran A; Selck, Claudia; Strasser, Andreas; Thomas, Helen E; Gurzov, Esteban N

    2016-04-01

    BCL-2 proteins have been implicated in the control of glucose homeostasis and metabolism in different cell types. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the role of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, p53-upregulated-modulator-of-apoptosis (PUMA), in metabolic changes mediated by diet-induced obesity, using PUMA deficient mice. At 10 weeks of age, knockout and wild type mice either continued consuming a low fat chow diet (6% fat), or were fed with a high fat diet (23% fat) for 14-17 weeks. We measured body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance, insulin response in peripheral tissues, energy expenditure, oxygen consumption, and respiratory exchange ratio in vivo. All these parameters were indistinguishable between wild type and knockout mice on chow diet and were modified equally by diet-induced obesity. Interestingly, we observed decreased food intake and ambulatory capacity of PUMA knockout mice on high fat diet. This was associated with increased adipocyte size and fasted leptin concentration in the blood. Our findings suggest that although PUMA is dispensable for glucose homeostasis in lean and obese mice, it can affect leptin levels and food intake during obesity.

  6. Protective Effect of Grape Seed Proanthocyanidins against Liver Ischemic Reperfusion Injury: Particularly in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoyu; Xu, Hongde; Feng, Yanling; Li, Xiaoman; Lin, Meina; Cao, Liu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hepatic ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major complication in liver surgery, and hepatic steatosis is a primary factor aggravating cellular injury during IRI. Both pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of hepatic IRI. Ischemic preconditioning (IpreC), remote ischemia preconditioning (RIPC) and ischemic postconditioning (IpostC) have offered protections on hepatic IRI, but all these methods have their own shortcomings. Grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSP) has a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties against oxidative stress. Thus, GSP has potential protective effects against hepatic IRI. Methods: C57BL/6 mice suffering 30mins hepatic ischemia process were sacrificed after 1h reperfusion to build murine warm hepatic IRI model. The mice were injected GSP intraperitoneally 10, 20, 40mg/kg/day for 3 weeks as pharmacological preconditioning. Obese mice fed with high-fat diet for 24 weeks before used. Three pathways related to IRI, including ROS elimination, pro-inflammatory cytokines release and hypoxia responses were examined. Results: Our data show that GSP could significantly reduce hepatic IRI by protecting hepatocyte function and increasing the activity of ROS scavengers, as well as decreasing cytokines levels. At the same time, GSP also enhance the hypoxia tolerance response. Combined GSP and postconditioning can provided synergistic protection. In the obese mice suffering hepatic IRI group, GSP was more effective than postconditioning on protecting liver against IRI, and the combined strategy was obviously superior to the solo treatment. Conclusion: GSP could protect liver against IRI: particularly in high-fat diet induced obese mice. GSP used as pharmacological preconditioning and combined with other protocols have huge potential to be used in clinical. PMID:23139633

  7. Alteration of sweet taste in high-fat diet induced obese rats after 4 weeks treatment with exenatide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-juan; Wang, Yu-qing; Long, Yang; Wang, Lei; Li, Yun; Gao, Fa-bao; Tian, Hao-ming

    2013-09-01

    Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is effective in inducing weight loss. The exact mechanisms are not fully understood. Reduced appetite and food intake may play important roles. Sweet taste contributes to food palatability, which promotes appetite. Interestingly, GLP-1 and its receptor are expressed in the taste buds of rodents and their interaction has an effect on mediating sweet taste sensitivity. Our aim was to investigate whether sweet taste will be changed after long term treatment with exenatide. The results showed that high-fat diet induced obese rats (HF-C) presented metabolic disorders in food intake, body weight, blood glucose and lipid metabolism compared with long term exenatide treated obese rats (EX) and normal chow fed control rats (NC). Meanwhile, greater preference for sweet taste was observed in HF-C rats but not in EX rats. Compared with NC rats, brain activities induced by sweet taste stimulation were stronger in HF-C rats, however these stronger activities were not found in EX rats. We further found reduced sweet taste receptor T1R3 in circumvallte taste buds of HF-C rats, while GLP-1 was increased. Besides, serum leptin was evaluated in HF-C rats with decreased leptin receptor expressed in taste buds. These changes were not observed in EX rats, which suggest them to be the underlying hormone and molecular mechanisms responsible for alterations in sweet taste of HF-C rats and EX rats. In summary, our results suggest that long term treatment with exenatide could benefit dietary obese rats partially by reversing sweet taste changes.

  8. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Longbiao; Heuser-Baker, Janet; Herlea-Pana, Oana; Zhang, Nan; Szweda, Luke I.; Griffin, Timothy M.; Barlic-Dicen, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is expressed on adipocytes and macrophages in adipose tissue, but its role in this tissue remains unknown. We evaluated whether deficiency in either adipocyte or myeloid leukocyte CXCR4 affects body weight (BW) and adiposity in a mouse model of high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We found that ablation of adipocyte, but not myeloid leukocyte, CXCR4 exacerbated obesity. The HFD-fed adipocyte-specific CXCR4-knockout (AdCXCR4ko) mice, compared to wild-type C57BL/6 control mice, had increased BW (average: 52.0 g vs. 35.5 g), adiposity (average: 49.3 vs. 21.0% of total BW), and inflammatory leukocyte content in white adipose tissue (WAT), despite comparable food intake. As previously reported, HFD feeding increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression (fold increase: 3.5) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of the C57BL/6 control mice. However, no HFD-induced increase in UCP1 expression was observed in the AdCXCR4ko mice, which were cold sensitive. Thus, our study suggests that adipocyte CXCR4 limits development of obesity by preventing excessive inflammatory cell recruitment into WAT and by supporting thermogenic activity of BAT. Since CXCR4 is conserved between mouse and human, the newfound role of CXCR4 in mouse adipose tissue may parallel the role of this chemokine receptor in human adipose tissue.—Yao, L., Heuser-Baker, J., Herlea-Pana, O., Zhang, N., Szweda, L. I., Griffin, T. M., Barlic-Dicen, J. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. PMID:25016030

  9. Nootkatone, a characteristic constituent of grapefruit, stimulates energy metabolism and prevents diet-induced obesity by activating AMPK.

    PubMed

    Murase, Takatoshi; Misawa, Koichi; Haramizu, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yoshihiko; Hase, Tadashi

    2010-08-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is implicated in the control of energy metabolism and is considered to be a molecular target for the suppression of obesity and the treatment of metabolic syndrome. Here, we identified and characterized nootkatone, a constituent of grapefruit, as a naturally occurring AMPK activator. Nootkatone induced an increase in AMPKalpha1 and -alpha2 activity along with an increase in the AMP/ATP ratio and an increase the phosphorylation of AMPKalpha and the downstream target acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), in C(2)C(12) cells. Nootkatone-induced activation of AMPK was possibly mediated both by LKB1 and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase. Nootkatone also upregulated PPARgamma coactivator-1alpha in C(2)C(12) cells and C57BL/6J mouse muscle. In addition, administration of nootkatone (200 mg/kg body wt) significantly enhanced AMPK activity, accompanied by LKB1, AMPK, and ACC phosphorylation in the liver and muscle of mice. Whole body energy expenditure evaluated by indirect calorimetry was also increased by nootkatone administration. Long-term intake of diets containing 0.1% to 0.3% (wt/wt) nootkatone significantly reduced high-fat and high-sucrose diet-induced body weight gain, abdominal fat accumulation, and the development of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperleptinemia in C57BL/6J mice. Furthermore, endurance capacity, evaluated as swimming time to exhaustion in BALB/c mice, was 21% longer in mice fed 0.2% nootkatone than in control mice. These findings indicate that long-term intake of nootkatone is beneficial toward preventing obesity and improving physical performance and that these effects are due, at least in part, to enhanced energy metabolism through AMPK activation in skeletal muscle and liver.

  10. Beige differentiation of adipose depots in mice lacking prolactin receptor protects against high-fat-diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Auffret, Julien; Viengchareun, Say; Carré, Nadège; Denis, Raphaël G P; Magnan, Christophe; Marie, Pierre-Yves; Muscat, Adeline; Fève, Bruno; Lombès, Marc; Binart, Nadine

    2012-09-01

    Stimulating conversion of white fat to metabolically active adipocytes (beige fat) constitutes a promising strategy against weight gain and its deleterious associated-disorders. We provide direct evidence that prolactin (PRL), best known for its actions on the mammary gland, plays a pivotal role in energy balance through the control of adipocyte differentiation and fate. Here we show that lack of prolactin receptor (PRLR) causes resistance to high-fat-diet-induced obesity due to enhanced energy expenditure and increased metabolic rate. Mutant mice displayed reduced fat mass associated with appearance of massive brown-like adipocyte foci in perirenal and subcutaneous but not in gonadal fat depots under a high-fat diet. Positron emission tomography imaging further demonstrated the occurrence of these thermogenic brown fat depots in adult mice, providing additional support for recruitable brown-like adipocytes (beigeing) in white fat depots. Consistent with the activation of brown adipose tissue, PRLR inactivation increases expression of master genes controlling brown adipocyte fate (PRDM16) and mitochondrial function (PGC1α, UCP1). Altered pRb/Foxc2 expression suggests that this PRL-regulated pathway may contribute to beige cell commitment. Together, these results provide direct genetic evidence that PRLR affects energy balance and metabolic adaptation in rodents via effects on brown adipose tissue differentiation and function.

  11. NT-PGC-1α activation attenuates high-fat diet-induced obesity by enhancing brown fat thermogenesis and adipose tissue oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hee-Jin; Joshi, Yagini; Patil, Yuvraj; Noland, Robert C; Chang, Ji Suk

    2014-11-01

    The transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC)-1α and its splice variant N terminal (NT)-PGC-1α regulate adaptive thermogenesis by transcriptional induction of thermogenic and mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism. We previously reported that full-length PGC-1α (FL-PGC-1α) is dispensable for cold-induced nonshivering thermogenesis in FL-PGC-1α(-/-) mice, since a slightly shorter but functionally equivalent form of NT-PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α(254)) fully compensates for the loss of FL-PGC-1α in brown and white adipose tissue. In the current study, we challenged FL-PGC-1α(-/-) mice with a high-fat diet (HFD) to investigate the effects of diet-induced thermogenesis on HFD-induced obesity. Despite a large decrease in locomotor activity, FL-PGC-1α(-/-) mice exhibited the surprising ability to attenuate HFD-induced obesity. Reduced fat mass in FL-PGC-1α(-/-) mice was closely associated with an increase in body temperature, energy expenditure, and whole-body fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Mechanistically, FL-PGC-1α(-/-) brown adipose tissue had an increased capacity to oxidize fatty acids and dissipate energy as heat, in accordance with upregulation of thermogenic genes UCP1 and DIO2. Furthermore, augmented expression of FAO and lipolytic genes in FL-PGC-1α(-/-) white adipose tissue was highly correlated with decreased fat storage in adipose tissue. Collectively, our data highlight a protective effect of NT-PGC-1α on diet-induced obesity by enhancing diet-induced thermogenesis and FAO.

  12. Potential probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 prevents weight gain and glucose intolerance in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Stenman, L K; Waget, A; Garret, C; Klopp, P; Burcelin, R; Lahtinen, S

    2014-12-01

    Alterations of the gut microbiota and mucosal barrier are linked with metabolic diseases. Our aim was to investigate the potential benefit of the potential probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis 420 in reducing high-fat diet-induced body weight gain and diabetes in mice. In the obesity model, C57Bl/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (60 energy %) for 12 weeks, and gavaged daily with B. lactis 420 (109 cfu) or vehicle. In the diabetes model, mice were fed a high-fat, ketogenic diet (72 energy % fat) for 4 weeks, with a 6-week subsequent treatment with B. lactis 420 (108-1010 cfu/day) or vehicle, after which they were analysed for body composition. We also analysed glucose tolerance, plasma lipopolysaccharide and target tissue inflammation using only one of the B. lactis 420 groups (109 cfu/day). Intestinal bacterial translocation and adhesion were analysed in a separate experiment using an Escherichia coli gavage. Body fat mass was increased in both obese (10.7 ± 0.8 g (mean ± standard error of mean) vs. 1.86 ± 0.21 g, P<0.001) and diabetic mice (3.01 ± 0.4 g vs. 1.14 ± 0.15 g, P<0.001) compared to healthy controls. Treatment with B. lactis 420 significantly decreased fat mass in obese (7.83 ± 0.67 g, P=0.007 compared to obese with vehicle) and diabetic mice (1.89 ± 0.16 g, P=0.02 for highest dose). This was reflected as reduced weight gain and improved glucose tolerance. Furthermore, B. lactis 420 decreased plasma lipopolysaccharide levels (P<0.001), liver inflammation (P=0.04), and E. coli adhesion in the distal gut (P<0.05). In conclusion, B. lactis 420 reduces fat mass and glucose intolerance in both obese and diabetic mice. Reduced intestinal mucosal adherence and plasma lipopolysaccharide suggest a mechanism related to reduced translocation of gut microbes.

  13. Genetic deletion and pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase 10A protects mice from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Andrea R; Rodriguez, Carlos G; Toolan, Dawn M; Price, Olga; Henry, Melanie; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Keohane, Carol Ann; Pan, Yie; Smith, Karen M; Raheem, Izzat T; Cox, Christopher D; Hwa, Joyce; Renger, John J; Smith, Sean M

    2014-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of schizophrenia. Here we report a novel role of PDE10A in the regulation of caloric intake and energy homeostasis. PDE10A-deficient mice are resistant to diet-induced obesity (DIO) and associated metabolic disturbances. Inhibition of weight gain is due to hypophagia after mice are fed a highly palatable diet rich in fats and sugar but not a standard diet. PDE10A deficiency produces a decrease in caloric intake without affecting meal frequency, daytime versus nighttime feeding behavior, or locomotor activity. We tested THPP-6, a small molecule PDE10A inhibitor, in DIO mice. THPP-6 treatment resulted in decreased food intake, body weight loss, and reduced adiposity at doses that produced antipsychotic efficacy in behavioral models. We show that PDE10A inhibition increased whole-body energy expenditure in DIO mice fed a Western-style diet, achieving weight loss and reducing adiposity beyond the extent seen with food restriction alone. Therefore, chronic THPP-6 treatment conferred improved insulin sensitivity and reversed hyperinsulinemia. These data demonstrate that PDE10A inhibition represents a novel antipsychotic target that may have additional metabolic benefits over current medications for schizophrenia by suppressing food intake, alleviating weight gain, and reducing the risk for the development of diabetes.

  14. Effect of combined mulberry leaf and fruit extract on liver and skin cholesterol transporters in high fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Miracco, Clelia; Eo, Hyeyoon

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic disease characterized by an increased inflammatory state and chronic oxidative stress with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, obesity alters cholesterol metabolism with increases in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterols and triglycerides and decreases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterols. It has been shown that mulberry leaf and fruit ameliorated hyperglycemic and hyperlipidemic conditions in obese and diabetic subjects. We hypothesized that supplementation with mulberry leaf combined with mulberry fruit (MLFE) ameliorate cholesterol transfer proteins accompanied by reduction of oxidative stress in the high fat diet induced obesity. Mice were fed control diet (CON) or high fat diet (HF) for 9 weeks. After obesity was induced, the mice were administered either the HF or the HF with combination of equal amount of mulberry leaf and fruit extract (MLFE) at 500mg/kg/day by gavage for 12 weeks. MLFE treatment ameliorated HF induced oxidative stress demonstrated by 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and modulated the expression of 2 key proteins involved in cholesterol transfer such as scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-B1) and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) in the HF treated animals. This effect was mainly noted in liver tissue rather than in cutaneous tissue. Collectively, this study demonstrated that MLFE treatment has beneficial effects on the modulation of high fat diet-induced oxidative stress and on the regulation of cholesterol transporters. These results suggest that MLFE might be a beneficial substance for conventional therapies to treat obesity and its complications. PMID:24611101

  15. Low-dose aspartame consumption differentially affects gut microbiota-host metabolic interactions in the diet-induced obese rat.

    PubMed

    Palmnäs, Marie S A; Cowan, Theresa E; Bomhof, Marc R; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A; Vogel, Hans J; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5-7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10-12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05). Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation.

  16. Proanthocyanidins potentiate hypothalamic leptin/STAT3 signalling and Pomc gene expression in rats with diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ibars, M; Ardid-Ruiz, A; Suárez, M; Muguerza, B; Bladé, C; Aragonès, G

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Dietary obesity is usually linked with hypothalamic leptin resistance, in which the primary impact is an interference in the homeostatic control of body weight and appetite. Notably, proanthocyanidins (PACs), which are the most abundant phenolic compounds present in human diet, modulate adiposity and food intake. The aim of this study was to assess whether PACs could re-establish appropriate leptin signalling in both the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues. Design: Male Wistar rats were fed either a standard chow diet (STD group, n=7) or a cafeteria diet (CD) for 13 weeks. The CD-fed rats were treated with either grape-seed PAC extract (GSPE) at 25 mg  per kg of body weight per day (CD+GSPE group, n=7) or with the vehicle (CD group, n=7) for the last 21 days of the study period. Specific markers for intracellular leptin signalling, inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the hypothalamus, liver, mesenteric white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle were analysed using immunoblotting and quantitative PCR. Results: GSPE treatment significantly reduced the food intake but did not reverse the hyperleptinemia and body wt gain assessed. However, the animals treated with GSPE exhibited greater hypothalamic activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3, which was associated with a rise in the Pomc mRNA levels compared with the CD group. In addition, this restoration of leptin responsiveness was accompanied by lower local inflammation and increased Sirt1 gene expression. The effects of the GSPE treatment in the peripheral tissues were not as evident as those in the hypothalamus, although the GSPE treatment significantly restored the mRNA levels of Socs3 and Ptp1b in the skeletal muscle. Conclusions: The use of GSPE reduces hyperphagia and improves the central and peripheral leptin resistance associated with diet-induced obesity. Our results suggest that GSPE could exert these effects partially by increasing Sirt1 expression and

  17. Low-Dose Aspartame Consumption Differentially Affects Gut Microbiota-Host Metabolic Interactions in the Diet-Induced Obese Rat

    PubMed Central

    Palmnäs, Marie S. A.; Cowan, Theresa E.; Bomhof, Marc R.; Su, Juliet; Reimer, Raylene A.; Vogel, Hans J.; Hittel, Dustin S.; Shearer, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame consumption is implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic disease despite the intention of limiting caloric intake. The mechanisms responsible for this association remain unclear, but may involve circulating metabolites and the gut microbiota. Aims were to examine the impact of chronic low-dose aspartame consumption on anthropometric, metabolic and microbial parameters in a diet-induced obese model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into a standard chow diet (CH, 12% kcal fat) or high fat (HF, 60% kcal fat) and further into ad libitum water control (W) or low-dose aspartame (A, 5–7 mg/kg/d in drinking water) treatments for 8 week (n = 10–12 animals/treatment). Animals on aspartame consumed fewer calories, gained less weight and had a more favorable body composition when challenged with HF compared to animals consuming water. Despite this, aspartame elevated fasting glucose levels and an insulin tolerance test showed aspartame to impair insulin-stimulated glucose disposal in both CH and HF, independently of body composition. Fecal analysis of gut bacterial composition showed aspartame to increase total bacteria, the abundance of Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium leptum. An interaction between HF and aspartame was also observed for Roseburia ssp wherein HF-A was higher than HF-W (P<0.05). Within HF, aspartame attenuated the typical HF-induced increase in the Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio. Serum metabolomics analysis revealed aspartame to be rapidly metabolized and to be associated with elevations in the short chain fatty acid propionate, a bacterial end product and highly gluconeogenic substrate, potentially explaining its negative affects on insulin tolerance. How aspartame influences gut microbial composition and the implications of these changes on the development of metabolic disease require further investigation. PMID:25313461

  18. Influence of Term of Exposure to High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity on Myocardial Collagen Type I and III

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Danielle Cristina Tomaz; Lima-Leopoldo, Ana Paula; Leopoldo, André Soares; de Campos, Dijon Henrique Salomé; do Nascimento, André Ferreira; de Oliveira, Sílvio Assis; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity is a risk factor for many medical complications; medical research has shown that hemodynamic, morphological and functional abnormalities are correlated with the duration and severity of obesity. Objective Present study determined the influence of term of exposure to high-fat diet-induced obesity on myocardial collagen type I and III. Methods Thirty-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into two groups: a control (C) group fed a standard rat chow and an obese (Ob) group alternately fed one of four palatable high-fat diets. Each diet was changed daily, and the rats were maintained on their respective diets for 15 (C15 and Ob15) and 30 (C30 and Ob30) consecutive weeks. Obesity was determined by adiposity index. Results The Ob15 group was similar to the C15 group regarding the expression of myocardial collagen type I; however, expression in the Ob30 group was less than C30 group. The time of exposure to obesity was associated with a reduction in collagen type I in Ob30 when compared with Ob15. Obesity did not affect collagen type III expression. Conclusion This study showed that the time of exposure to obesity for 30 weeks induced by unsaturated high-fat diet caused a reduction in myocardial collagen type I expression in the obese rats. However, no effect was seen on myocardial collagen type III expression. PMID:24676371

  19. A novel and selective melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 antagonist ameliorates obesity and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obese rodent models.

    PubMed

    Kawata, Yayoi; Okuda, Shoki; Hotta, Natsu; Igawa, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Ikoma, Minoru; Kasai, Shizuo; Ando, Ayumi; Satomi, Yoshinori; Nishida, Mayumi; Nakayama, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Syunsuke; Nagisa, Yasutaka; Takekawa, Shiro

    2017-02-05

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a cyclic neuropeptide expressed predominantly in the lateral hypothalamus, plays an important role in the control of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. Mice lacking MCH or MCH1 receptor are resistant to diet-induced obesity (DIO) and MCH1 receptor antagonists show potent anti-obesity effects in preclinical studies, indicating that MCH1 receptor is a promising target for anti-obesity drugs. Moreover, recent studies have suggested the potential of MCH1 receptor antagonists for treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In the present study, we show the anti-obesity and anti-hepatosteatosis effect of our novel MCH1 receptor antagonist, Compound A. Repeated oral administration of Compound A resulted in dose-dependent body weight reduction and had an anorectic effect in DIO mice. The body weight lowering effect of Compound A was more potent than that of pair-feeding. Compound A also reduced lipid content and the expression level of lipogenesis-, inflammation-, and fibrosis-related genes in the liver of DIO mice. Conversely, intracerebroventricular infusion of MCH caused induction of hepatic steatosis as well as increase in body weight in high-fat diet-fed wild type mice, but not MCH1 receptor knockout mice. The pair-feeding study revealed the MCH-MCH1 receptor system affects hepatic steatosis through a mechanism that is independent of body weight change. Metabolome analysis demonstrated that Compound A upregulated lipid metabolism-related molecules, such as acylcarnitines and cardiolipins, in the liver. These findings suggest that our novel MCH1 receptor antagonist, Compound A, exerts its beneficial therapeutic effect on NAFLD and obesity through a central MCH-MCH1 receptor pathway.

  20. Sympathetic cardiac hyperinnervation and atrial autonomic imbalance in diet-induced obesity promote cardiac arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Hasan, Wohaib; Streiff, Cole T; Houle, Jennifer C; Woodward, William R; Giraud, George D; Brooks, Virginia L; Habecker, Beth A

    2013-11-15

    Obesity increases the risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that obesity-induced cardiac sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation promotes the development of arrhythmic events. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-275 g), fed a high-fat diet (33% kcal/fat), diverged into obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) groups and were compared with rats fed normal chow (13% kcal/fat; CON). In vitro experiments showed that both OR and OP rats exhibited hyperinnervation of the heart and high sympathetic outgrowth compared with CON rats, even though OR rats are not obese. Despite the hyperinnervation and outgrowth, we showed that, in vivo, OR rats were less susceptible to arrhythmic events after an intravenous epinephrine challenge compared with OP rats. On examining total and stimulus-evoked neurotransmitter levels in an ex vivo system, we demonstrate that atrial acetylcholine content and release were attenuated in OP compared with OR and CON groups. OP rats also expressed elevated atrial norepinephrine content, while norepinephrine release was suppressed. These findings suggest that the consumption of a high-fat diet, even in the absence of overt obesity, stimulates sympathetic outgrowth and hyperinnervation of the heart. However, normalized cardiac parasympathetic nervous system control may protect the heart from arrhythmic events.

  1. Anti-obesity Effect of Fermented Whey Beverage using Lactic Acid Bacteria in Diet-induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-protein fermented whey beverage (FWB) was manufactured using whey protein concentrate (WPC) and Lactobacillus plantarum DK211 isolated from kimchi. This study was designed to evaluate the anti-obesity activity of FWB in male rats fed a high-fat diet. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups (n=8 per group). The three groups differed in their diet; one group received a normal diet (ND), another, a high-fat diet (HD), and the third, a HD plus fermented whey beverage (HDFWB), for 4 wk. Supplementation with FWB (the HDFWB group) prevented weight gain and body fat accumulation. The food intake in the HDWFB group was significantly lower (p<0.05) than that of the HD group. The HDWFB group also showed a significant decrease in organ weights (p<0.05), except for the weight of the testis. There was a significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides in the HDFWB group compared with the HD group (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference in serum HDL-cholesterol levels among the experimental groups. Rats ingesting FWB (the HDFWB group) also showed a significant decrease in blood glucose levels, and plasma levels of insulin, leptin, and ghrelin compared to HD group (p<0.05). These results indicate that FWB has beneficial effects on dietary control, weight control, and reduction in fat composition and serum lipid level; consequently, it may provide antiobesity and hypolipidemic activity against high fat diet-induced obesity in rats. PMID:26761894

  2. Anti-Obesity Effect of the CB2 Receptor Agonist JWH-015 in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Verty, A N A; Stefanidis, A; McAinch, A J; Hryciw, D H; Oldfield, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is well known for its immune modulatory role. However, recent localisation of CB2 receptors in metabolically active tissue suggests that the CB2 receptor plays a significant role in energy homeostasis. This study was designed to investigate the impact of chronic CB2 receptor stimulation on food intake, body weight and mood. Lean male C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with the selective CB2 receptor agonist, JWH-015 (0.0, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg kg-1) to establish dose response parameters. Mice made obese following exposure to a diet consisting of 19.4 MJ/kg (4641 Kcal/kg) of energy (19.0% protein, 21.0% total fat, 4.7% crude fiber, and 4.7% AD fiber were given either vehicle or 10 mg/kg JWH-015. Impact on mood, food intake, body weight, plasma metabolites, expression of key metabolic proteins in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT), and markers of inflammation were measured. High dose (10 mg/kg) JWH-015 reduced food intake after 1, 2, 4, and 24 h in lean mice. When given to diet induced obese (DIO) mice, a 10 mg/kg dose of JWH-015 significantly reduced body weight compared to vehicle. This dose led to a shift in markers of lipid metabolism and inflammation in WAT consistent with lipolysis and improved immune response. Furthermore, JWH-015 (10 mg/kg) produced a transient reduction in food intake and significant reduction in fat mass and adipocyte cell size. Importantly, JWH-015 produced an anxiolytic response in the elevated plus maze while having no effect on immobility time in the forced swim test. It should be noted that though the 10 mg/kg dose produced positive effects on the obese state, the possibility that these effects are mediated via non-CB2 receptor mechanisms cannot be ruled out. These results demonstrate a role for CB2 receptors in modulating energy homeostasis and obesity associated metabolic pathologies in the absence of any adverse impact on mood.

  3. Anti-Obesity Effect of the CB2 Receptor Agonist JWH-015 in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Verty, A. N. A.; Stefanidis, A.; McAinch, A. J.; Hryciw, D. H.; Oldfield, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) is well known for its immune modulatory role. However, recent localisation of CB2 receptors in metabolically active tissue suggests that the CB2 receptor plays a significant role in energy homeostasis. This study was designed to investigate the impact of chronic CB2 receptor stimulation on food intake, body weight and mood. Lean male C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with the selective CB2 receptor agonist, JWH-015 (0.0, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg kg-1) to establish dose response parameters. Mice made obese following exposure to a diet consisting of 19.4 MJ/kg (4641 Kcal/kg) of energy (19.0% protein, 21.0% total fat, 4.7% crude fiber, and 4.7% AD fiber were given either vehicle or 10 mg/kg JWH-015. Impact on mood, food intake, body weight, plasma metabolites, expression of key metabolic proteins in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT), and markers of inflammation were measured. High dose (10 mg/kg) JWH-015 reduced food intake after 1, 2, 4, and 24 h in lean mice. When given to diet induced obese (DIO) mice, a 10 mg/kg dose of JWH-015 significantly reduced body weight compared to vehicle. This dose led to a shift in markers of lipid metabolism and inflammation in WAT consistent with lipolysis and improved immune response. Furthermore, JWH-015 (10 mg/kg) produced a transient reduction in food intake and significant reduction in fat mass and adipocyte cell size. Importantly, JWH-015 produced an anxiolytic response in the elevated plus maze while having no effect on immobility time in the forced swim test. It should be noted that though the 10 mg/kg dose produced positive effects on the obese state, the possibility that these effects are mediated via non-CB2 receptor mechanisms cannot be ruled out. These results demonstrate a role for CB2 receptors in modulating energy homeostasis and obesity associated metabolic pathologies in the absence of any adverse impact on mood. PMID:26588700

  4. Myricetin protects against diet-induced obesity and ameliorates oxidative stress in C57BL/6 mice*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hong-ming; Feng, Li-na; Zheng, Xiao-dong; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myricetin is a naturally occurring antioxidant commonly found in various plants. However, little information is available with respect to its direct anti-obesity effects. Objective: This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of myricetin on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice. Results: Administration of myricetin dramatically reduced the body weight of diet-induced obese mice compared with solely HFD-induced mice. Several parameters related to obesity including serum glucose, triglyceride, and cholesterol were significantly decreased in myricetin-treated mice. Moreover, obesity-associated oxidative stress (glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and malondialdehyde (MDA)) and inflammation (tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)) were ameliorated in myricetin-treated mice. Further investigation revealed that the protective effect of myricetin against HFD-induced obesity in mice appeared to be partially mediated through the down-regulation of mRNA expression of adipogenic transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα), and lipogenic transcription factor sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c). Conclusions: Consumption of myricetin may help to prevent obesity and obesity-related metabolic complications. PMID:27256677

  5. Administration of dried Aloe vera gel powder reduced body fat mass in diet-induced obesity (DIO) rats.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Eriko; Tanaka, Miyuki; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Nomaguchi, Kouji; Yamada, Muneo; Toida, Tomohiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-obesity effects of Aloe vera gel administration in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). SD rats at 7 wk of age were fed either a standard diet (10 kcal% fat) (StdD) or high-fat (60 kcal% fat) diet (HFD) during the experimental period. Four weeks after of HFD-feeding, DIO rats (11 wk of age) were orally administered with two doses of Aloe vera gel powder (20 and 200 mg/kg/d) for 90 d. Body weights (g) and body fat (%) of HFD fed rats were significantly higher than those of StdD-fed rats. Although a modest decrease of body weight (g) was observed with the administration of dried Aloe vera gel powder, both subcutaneous and visceral fat weight (g) and body fat (%) were reduced significantly in Aloe vera gel-treated rats. Serum lipid parameters elevated by HFD were also improved by the Aloe vera gel treatment. The oxygen consumption (VO(2)), an index of energy expenditure, was decreased in HFD-fed rats compared with that in StdD-fed rats. Administration of Aloe vera gel reversed the change in VO(2) in the HFD-fed rats. These results suggest that intake of Aloe vera gel reduced body fat accumulation, in part, by stimulation of energy expenditure. Aloe vera gel might be beneficial for the prevention and improvement of diet-induced obesity.

  6. Exenatide improves liver mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance by reducing oxidative stress in high fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixuan; Hou, Lin; Huang, Lanhui; Guo, Jun; Zhou, Xinli

    2017-04-22

    Oxidative stress is associated with obesity and may be accompanied by liver insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Decreased mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymatic activities and decreased insulin metabolic signaling may promote these maladaptive changes. In this context, exenatide has been reported to reduce hepatic lipid deposition, improve insulin sensitivity and improve mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesized that exenatide would attenuate mitochondrial dysfunction by reducing hepatic lipid deposition, blunting oxidant stress and promoting insulin metabolic signaling in a high fat diet-induced model of obesity and insulin resistance. Sixteen-week-old male C57BL/6 diet-induced obese (DIO) mices and age-matched standard diet (STD) mices were treated with exenatide (10 μg/kg twice a day) for 28 days. Compared with untreated STD mice, untreated DIO mice exhibited deposited excessive lipid in liver and produced the oxidative stress in conjunction with insulin resistance, abnormal hepatic cells and mitochondrial histoarchitecture, mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced organism metabolism. Exenatide reduced hepatic steatosis, decreased oxidative stress, and improved insulin resistance in DIO mice, in concert with improvements in the insulin metabolic signaling, mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymatic activation, adenine nucleotide production, organism metabolism and weight gain. Results support the hypothesis that exenatide reduces hepatic cells and mitochondrial structural anomaly and improves insulin resistance in concert with improvements in insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function activation, concomitantly with reductions in oxidative stress.

  7. Voluntary exercise improves murine dermal connective tissue status in high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Kende; Haluszka, Dóra; Kiss, Norbert; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Bánvölgyi, András; Szipőcs, Róbert; Wikonkál, Norbert M

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for several cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Its influence on the skin is less obvious, yet certain negative effects of adipose tissue inflammation on the dermis have been suggested. Excess weight is closely associated with sedentary behavior, so any increase in physical activity is considered beneficial against obesity. To investigate the effects of obesity and physical exercise on the skin, we established a mouse model in which mice were kept either on a high-fat diet or received standard chow. After the two groups achieved a significant weight difference, physical exercise was introduced to both. Animals were given the opportunity to perform voluntary exercise for 40 min daily in a hamster wheel for a period of 8 weeks. We evaluated the status of the dermis at the beginning and at the end of the exercise period by in vivo nonlinear microscopy. Obese mice kept on high-fat diet lost weight steadily after they started to exercise. In the high-fat diet group, we could detect significantly larger adipocytes and a thicker layer of subcutaneous tissue; both changes started to normalize after exercise. Nonlinear microscopy revealed an impaired collagen structure in obese mice that improved considerably after physical activity was introduced. With the ability to detect damage on collagen structure, we set out to address the question whether this process is reversible. With the use of a novel imaging method, we were able to show the reversibility of connective tissue deterioration as a benefit of physical exercise.

  8. Early cardiovascular changes occurring in diet-induced, obese insulin-resistant rats.

    PubMed

    Huisamen, Barbara; Dietrich, Daneel; Bezuidenhout, Nicole; Lopes, John; Flepisi, Brian; Blackhurst, Dee; Lochner, Amanda

    2012-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome is recognized as a cluster of disturbances associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Over the past two decades, the number of people with the metabolic syndrome has increased at an alarming rate. This increase is associated with the global epidemic of both obesity and diabetes. Cardiovascular mortality is increased among diabetics and obesity-related insulin-resistant patients, and obesity is currently recognized as independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to establish the effects of a short period of an altered diet on the heart using a rat model of hyperphagia-induced obesity (diet supplemented with sucrose and condensed milk for 8 weeks = DIO) compared to age-matched controls. Isolated, perfused hearts were subjected to global or regional ischaemia/reperfusion. Function on reperfusion was recorded and infarct size determined. A plasma lipid profile was established via HPLC-based methods and proteins involved in metabolic signalling determined either by western blotting or RT-PCR. 8 weeks of diet resulted in whole-body but not myocardial insulin resistance, increased plasma triglyceride and phospholipid levels as well as increased lipid peroxidation. Despite the similar baseline function, hearts from DIO animals showed significantly poorer postischaemic recovery than controls (41.9 % RPP recovery vs 57.9 %, P < 0.05, n = 7-11/group) but surprisingly, smaller infarct size (24.95 ± 1.97 vs 47.26 ± 4.05 % of the area at risk, P < 0.005, n = 8/group). Basal phosphorylation of PKB/Akt was elevated but IRS-1 and SERCA-2 expression severely downregulated. In conclusion, after only 8 weeks of a slight change in diet, the rat heart shows signs of metabolic remodelling. Some of these changes may be protective but others may be detrimental and eventually lead to maladaptation.

  9. Diet-induced obesity, energy metabolism and gut microbiota in C57BL/6J mice fed Western diets based on lean seafood or lean meat mixtures.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Rønnevik, Alexander; Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Fjære, Even; Fauske, Kristin Røen; Liisberg, Ulrike; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    High protein diets may protect against diet-induced obesity, but little is known regarding the effects of different protein sources consumed at standard levels. We investigated how a mixture of lean seafood or lean meat in a Western background diet modulated diet-induced obesity, energy metabolism and gut microbiota. Male C57BL/6J mice fed a Western diet (WD) containing a mixture of lean seafood (seafood WD) for 12weeks accumulated less fat mass than mice fed a WD containing a mixture of lean meat (meat WD). Meat WD-fed mice exhibited increased fasting blood glucose, impaired glucose clearance, elevated fasting plasma insulin and increased plasma and liver lipid levels. We observed no first choice preference for either of the WDs, but over time, mice fed the seafood WD consumed less energy than mice fed the meat WD. Mice fed the seafood WD exhibited higher spontaneous locomotor activity and a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) than mice fed the meat WD. Thus, higher activity together with the decreased energy intake contributed to the different phenotypes observed in mice fed the seafood WD compared to mice fed the meat WD. Comparison of the gut microbiomes of mice fed the two WDs revealed significant differences in the relative abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the orders Bacteroidales and Clostridiales, with genes involved in metabolism of aromatic amino acids exhibiting higher relative abundance in the microbiomes of mice fed the seafood WD.

  10. Chronic melatonin consumption prevents obesity-related metabolic abnormalities and protects the heart against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in a prediabetic model of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nduhirabandi, Frederic; Du Toit, Eugene F; Blackhurst, Dee; Marais, David; Lochner, Amanda

    2011-03-01

    Obesity, a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease, is associated with increased oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant status. Melatonin, a potent free radical scavenger and antioxidant, has powerful cardioprotective effects in lean animals but its efficacy in obesity is unknown. We investigated the effects of chronic melatonin administration on the development of the metabolic syndrome as well as ischemia-reperfusion injury in a rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male Wistar rats received a control diet, a control diet with melatonin, a high-calorie diet, or a high-calorie diet with melatonin (DM). Melatonin (4 mg/kg/day) was administered in the drinking water. After 16 wk, biometric and blood metabolic parameters were measured. Hearts were perfused ex vivo for the evaluation of myocardial function, infarct size (IFS) and biochemical changes [activation of PKB/Akt, ERK, p38 MAPK, AMPK, and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 expression). The high-calorie diet caused increases in body weight (BW), visceral adiposity, serum insulin and triglycerides (TRIG), with no change in glucose levels. Melatonin treatment reduced the BW gain, visceral adiposity, blood TRIG, serum insulin, homeostatic model assessment index and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the DIO group. Melatonin reduced IFS in DIO and control groups and increased percentage recovery of functional performance of DIO hearts. During reperfusion, hearts from melatonin-treated rats had increased activation of PKB/Akt, ERK42/44 and reduced p38 MAPK activation. Chronic melatonin treatment prevented the metabolic abnormalities induced by DIO and protected the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. These beneficial effects were associated with activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinases pathway.

  11. ARYL HYDROCARBON RECEPTOR DEFICIENCY PROTECTS MICE FROM DIET-INDUCED ADIPOSITY AND METABOLIC DISORDERS THROUGH INCREASED ENERGY EXPENDITURE

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Jaeger, Cassie D.; Krager, Stacey L.; Bottum, Kathleen M.; Liu, Jianghua; Liao, Duan-Fang; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Epidemics of obesity and diabetes are escalating. High-calorie/high-fat food is a major cause for these global health issues, but molecular mechanisms underlying high-fat, diet-induced obesity are still not well understood. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that acts as a xenobiotic sensor, mediates environmental toxicant-induced obesity, insulin resistance and development of diabetes. AhR also influences lipid metabolism and diet-induced obesity. The effects of AhR deficiency on diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance were examined. METHODS : Male wild type (WT), AhR null (AhR−/−) and AhR heterozygote (AhR+/−) mice were fed a normal chow diet (NCD, 10% kcal from fat) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 60% kcal from fat) for up to 14 weeks. Adiposity, adipose and liver morphology, insulin signaling, metabolic parameters and gene profiles were assessed. RESULTS AhR deficiency protected against HFD-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance and inflammation. Moreover, AhR deficiency preserved insulin signaling in major metabolic tissues. These protective effects result from a higher energy expenditure in AhR-deficient mice compared to WT. Levels of transcript for both the thermogenic gene, uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), in brown adipose tissue and mitochondrial β-oxidation genes in muscle were significantly higher in AhR−/− and AhR+/− mice compared to WT. CONCLUSIONS This work documents a physiologically relevant function for AhR in regulation of body weight, hepatic fat deposition, insulin sensitivity and energy expenditure under HFD exposure, suggesting that AhR signaling may be developed as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of obesity and metabolic disorders. PMID:25907315

  12. Perinatal Protein Malnutrition Affects Mitochondrial Function in Adult and Results in a Resistance to High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jousse, Céline; Muranishi, Yuki; Parry, Laurent; Montaurier, Christophe; Even, Patrick; Launay, Jean-Marie; Carraro, Valérie; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Averous, Julien; Chaveroux, Cédric; Bruhat, Alain; Mallet, Jacques; Morio, Béatrice; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological findings indicate that transient environmental influences during perinatal life, especially nutrition, may have deleterious heritable health effects lasting for the entire life. Indeed, the fetal organism develops specific adaptations that permanently change its physiology/metabolism and that persist even in the absence of the stimulus that initiated them. This process is termed “nutritional programming”. We previously demonstrated that mothers fed a Low-Protein-Diet (LPD) during gestation and lactation give birth to F1-LPD animals presenting metabolic consequences that are different from those observed when the nutritional stress is applied during gestation only. Compared to control mice, adult F1-LPD animals have a lower body weight and exhibit a higher food intake suggesting that maternal protein under-nutrition during gestation and lactation affects the energy metabolism of F1-LPD offspring. In this study, we investigated the origin of this apparent energy wasting process in F1-LPD and demonstrated that minimal energy expenditure is increased, due to both an increased mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle and an increased mitochondrial density in White Adipose Tissue. Importantly, F1-LPD mice are protected against high-fat-diet-induced obesity. Clearly, different paradigms of exposure to malnutrition may be associated with differences in energy expenditure, food intake, weight and different susceptibilities to various symptoms associated with metabolic syndrome. Taken together these results demonstrate that intra-uterine environment is a major contributor to the future of individuals and disturbance at a critical period of development may compromise their health. Consequently, understanding the molecular mechanisms may give access to useful knowledge regarding the onset of metabolic diseases. PMID:25118945

  13. Diet-induced ketosis increases capillary density without altered blood flow in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Puchowicz, Michelle A; Xu, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Ivy, Andre; Emancipator, Doug; LaManna, Joseph C

    2007-06-01

    It is recognized that ketone bodies, such as R-beta-hydroxybutyrate (beta-HB) and acetoacetate, are energy sources for the brain. As with glucose metabolism, monocarboxylate uptake by the brain is dependent on the function and regulation of its own transporter system. We concurrently investigated ketone body influx, blood flow, and regulation of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT-1) and glucose transporter (GLUT-1) in diet-induced ketotic (KG) rat brain. Regional blood-to-brain beta-HB influx (micromol.g(-1).min(-1)) increased 40-fold with ketosis (4.8 +/- 1.8 plasmabeta-HB; mM) in all regions compared with the nonketotic groups (standard and no-fat diets); there were no changes in regional blood flow. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that GLUT-1 density (number/mm2) in the cortex was significantly elevated (40%) in the ketotic group compared with the standard and no-fat diet groups. MCT-1 was also markedly (3-fold) upregulated in the ketotic group compared with the standard diet group. In the standard diet group, 40% of the brain capillaries stained positive for MCT-1; this amount doubled with the ketotic diet. Western blot analysis of isolated microvessels from ketotic rat brain showed an eightfold increase in GLUT-1 and a threefold increase in MCT-1 compared with the standard diet group. These data suggest that diet-induced ketosis results in increased vascular density at the blood-brain barrier without changes in blood flow. The increase in extraction fraction and capillary density with increased plasma ketone bodies indicates a significant flux of substrates available for brain energy metabolism.

  14. High-protein diet selectively reduces fat mass and improves glucose tolerance in Western-type diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Hu, Eugenia; Karasawa, Hiroshi; Pisegna, Joseph R; Taché, Yvette

    2013-09-15

    Obesity is an increasing health problem. Because drug treatments are limited, diets remain popular. High-protein diets (HPD) reduce body weight (BW), although the mechanisms are unclear. We investigated physiological mechanisms altered by switching diet induced obesity (DIO) rats from Western-type diet (WTD) to HPD. Male rats were fed standard (SD) or WTD (45% calories from fat). After developing DIO (50% of rats), they were switched to SD (15% calories from protein) or HPD (52% calories from protein) for up to 4 weeks. Food intake (FI), BW, body composition, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, and intestinal hormone plasma levels were monitored. Rats fed WTD showed an increased FI and had a 25% greater BW gain after 9 wk compared with SD (P < 0.05). Diet-induced obese rats switched from WTD to HPD reduced daily FI by 30% on day 1, which lasted to day 9 (-9%) and decreased BW during the 2-wk period compared with SD/SD (P < 0.05). During these 2 wk, WTD/HPD rats lost 72% more fat mass than WTD/SD (P < 0.05), whereas lean mass was unaltered. WTD/HPD rats had lower blood glucose than WTD/SD at 30 min postglucose gavage (P < 0.05). The increase of pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY during the 2-h dark-phase feeding was higher in WTD/HPD compared with WTD/SD (P < 0.05). These data indicate that HPD reduces BW in WTD rats, which may be related to decreased FI and the selective reduction of fat mass accompanied by improved glucose tolerance, suggesting relevant benefits of HPD in the treatment of obesity.

  15. Reversal of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inducible genetic ablation of GRK2

    PubMed Central

    Vila-Bedmar, Rocio; Cruces-Sande, Marta; Lucas, Elisa; Willemen, Hanneke L.D.M.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Mayor, Federico; Murga, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a common feature of obesity and predisposes individuals to various prevalent pathological conditions. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) integrates several signal transduction pathways and is emerging as a physiologically relevant inhibitor of insulin signaling. GRK2 abundanceis increased in humans with metabolic syndrome and in different murine models of insulin resistance. To support GRK2 as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes and obesity, we investigated whether lowering GRK2 abundance reversed an ongoing systemic insulin-resistant phenotype, using a mouse model of tamoxifen-induced GRK2 ablation after high fat diet-dependent obesity and insulin resistance. Tamoxifen-triggered GRK2 deletion impeded further body weight gain, normalized fa sting glycemia, improved glucose tolerance and was associated with preserved insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver, thereby maintaining whole body glucose homeostasis. Moreover, when continued to be fed a high fat diet, these animals displayed reduced fat mass and smaller adipocytes, were resistant to the development of liver steatosis, and showed reduced expression of pro-inflammatory markers in the liver. Our results indicate that GRK2 acts as a hub to control metabolic functions in different tissues, which is key to controlling insulin resistance development in vivo. These data suggest that inhibiting GRK2 could reverse an established insulin-resistant and obese phenotype, thereby putting forward this enzyme as a potential therapeutic target linking glucose homeostasis and regulation of adiposity. PMID:26198359

  16. Genomic Variants Associated with Resistance to High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in a Primate Model

    PubMed Central

    Harris, R. Alan; Alcott, Callison E.; Sullivan, Elinor L.; Takahashi, Diana; McCurdy, Carrie E.; Comstock, Sarah; Baquero, Karalee; Blundell, Peter; Frias, Antonio E.; Kahr, Maike; Suter, Melissa; Wesolowski, Stephanie; Friedman, Jacob E.; Grove, Kevin L.; Aagaard, Kjersti M.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity contributes to an increased risk of lifelong morbidity and mortality for both the mother and her offspring. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying these risks, we previously established and extensively characterized a primate model in Macaca fuscata (Japanese macaque). In prior studies we have demonstrated that a high fat, caloric dense maternal diet structures the offspring’s epigenome, metabolome, and intestinal microbiome. During the course of this work we have consistently observed that a 36% fat diet leads to obesity in the majority, but not all, of exposed dams. In the current study, we sought to identify the genomic loci rendering resistance to obesity despite chronic consumption of a high fat diet in macaque dams. Through extensive phenotyping together with exon capture array and targeted resequencing, we identified three novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), two in apolipoprotein B (APOB) and one in phospholipase A2 (PLA2G4A) that significantly associated with persistent weight stability and insulin sensitivity in lean macaques. By application of explicit orthogonal modeling (NOIA), we estimated the polygenic and interactive nature of these loci against multiple metabolic traits and their measures (i.e., serum LDL levels) which collectively render an obesity resistant phenotype in our adult female dams. PMID:27811965

  17. Vitamin D3: A Role in Dopamine Circuit Regulation, Diet-Induced Obesity, and Drug Consumption123

    PubMed Central

    Land, Benjamin B.; Wickham, Robert J.; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; de Araujo, Ivan E.; Addy, Nii A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The influence of micronutrients on dopamine systems is not well defined. Using mice, we show a potential role for reduced dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in promoting diet-induced obesity (DIO), food intake, and drug consumption while on a high fat diet. To complement these deficiency studies, treatments with exogenous fully active vitamin D3 (calcitriol, 10 µg/kg, i.p.) were performed. Nondeficient mice that were made leptin resistant with a high fat diet displayed reduced food intake and body weight after an acute treatment with exogenous calcitriol. Dopamine neurons in the midbrain and their target neurons in the striatum were found to express vitamin D3 receptor protein. Acute calcitriol treatment led to transcriptional changes of dopamine-related genes in these regions in naive mice, enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in both naive mice and rats, and increased locomotor activity after acute amphetamine treatment (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Alternatively, mice that were chronically fed either the reduced D3 high fat or chow diets displayed less activity after acute amphetamine treatment compared with their respective controls. Finally, high fat deficient mice that were trained to orally consume liquid amphetamine (90 mg/L) displayed increased consumption, while nondeficient mice treated with calcitriol showed reduced consumption. Our findings suggest that reduced dietary D3 may be a contributing environmental factor enhancing DIO as well as drug intake while eating a high fat diet. Moreover, these data demonstrate that dopamine circuits are modulated by D3 signaling, and may serve as direct or indirect targets for exogenous calcitriol. PMID:27257625

  18. Improvement of impaired diastolic left ventricular function after diet-induced weight reduction in severe obesity

    PubMed Central

    Karimian, Sevda; Stein, Juergen; Bauer, Boris; Teupe, Claudius

    2017-01-01

    Background/objectives Obesity is independently associated with left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction and altered cardiac morphology. Morbidity and mortality in patients with diastolic dysfunction are similar to values observed in patients with systolic heart failure. We hypothesized that dysfunctional cardiac responses in people with obesity are reversible after weight loss. Thus, we studied the effect of dietary weight reduction on LV diastolic function as well as on cardiac structure using transthoracic echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Subjects/methods Thirty-two subjects with obesity underwent a 12-week low-calorie fasting phase of a formula diet. Echocardiographic tissue Doppler indices of diastolic function and measurements of cardiac size were obtained prior to and after the fasting phase. Results A 12-week diet significantly reduced body mass index from 40.3 ± 6.6 kg/m2 to 33.2 ± 6.1 kg/m2 (p < 0.01). Weight loss was associated with a significant reduction in blood pressure and heart rate. Echocardiography revealed diastolic dysfunction in subjects with obesity, which was improved by dieting. After weight loss, trans-mitral Doppler echocardiography showed a significant reduction in A-wave velocity, from 65.8 ± 19.2 cm/s to 57.0 ± 16.8 cm/s, and an increase in E/A ratio from 1.2 ± 0.4 to 1.4 ± 0.5 (p < 0.01). TDI displayed a significantly lower a′-wave velocity (10.3 ± 2.3 cm/s and 8.9 ± 1.7 cm/s; p < 0.01). Left atrial and LV dimensions were normal and remained unchanged after weight loss. Conclusion Obesity is associated with diastolic dysfunction. A 12-week low-calorie diet with successful weight loss can reduce blood pressure and heart rate and partially normalize diastolic dysfunction. PMID:28123309

  19. Beyond the role of dietary protein and amino acids in the prevention of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Freudenberg, Anne; Klaus, Susanne

    2014-01-20

    High-protein diets have been shown to prevent the development of diet-induced obesity and can improve associated metabolic disorders in mice. Dietary leucine supplementation can partially mimic this effect. However, the molecular mechanisms triggering these preventive effects remain to be satisfactorily explained. Here we review studies showing a connection between high protein or total amino nitrogen intake and obligatory water intake. High amino nitrogen intake may possibly lower lipid storage, and prevent insulin resistance. Suggestions are made for further systematical studies to explore the relationship between water consumption, satiety, and energy expenditure. Moreover, these examinations should better distinguish between leucine-specific and unspecific effects. Research in this field can provide important information to justify dietary recommendations and strategies in promoting long-term weight loss and may help to reduce health problems associated with the comorbidities of obesity.

  20. Hepatic cyclooxygenase-2 expression protects against diet-induced steatosis, obesity, and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Francés, Daniel E; Motiño, Omar; Agrá, Noelia; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Fernández-Álvarez, Ana; Cucarella, Carme; Mayoral, Rafael; Castro-Sánchez, Luis; García-Casarrubios, Ester; Boscá, Lisardo; Carnovale, Cristina E; Casado, Marta; Valverde, Ángela M; Martín-Sanz, Paloma

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation evidence links obesity-induced inflammation as an important contributor to the development of insulin resistance, which plays a key role in the pathophysiology of obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 catalyze the first step in prostanoid biosynthesis. Because adult hepatocytes fail to induce COX-2 expression regardless of the proinflammatory stimuli used, we have evaluated whether this lack of expression under mild proinflammatory conditions might constitute a permissive condition for the onset of insulin resistance. Our results show that constitutive expression of human COX-2 (hCOX-2) in hepatocytes protects against adiposity, inflammation, and, hence, insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet, as demonstrated by decreased hepatic steatosis, adiposity, plasmatic and hepatic triglycerides and free fatty acids, increased adiponectin-to-leptin ratio, and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, together with an enhancement of insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. Furthermore, hCOX-2 transgenic mice exhibited increased whole-body energy expenditure due in part by induction of thermogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. The analysis of hepatic insulin signaling revealed an increase in insulin receptor-mediated Akt phosphorylation in hCOX-2 transgenic mice. In conclusion, our results point to COX-2 as a potential therapeutic target against obesity-associated metabolic dysfunction.

  1. Pharmacological Blockade of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Diet-Induced Obesity Regulates Mitochondrial Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase in Muscle.

    PubMed

    Arrabal, Sergio; Lucena, Miguel Angel; Canduela, Miren Josune; Ramos-Uriarte, Almudena; Rivera, Patricia; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Decara, Juan; Vargas, Antonio; Baixeras, Elena; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Márquez, Javier; Fernández-Llébrez, Pedro; De Roos, Baukje; Grandes, Pedro; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors peripherally modulate energy metabolism. Here, we investigated the role of CB1 receptors in the expression of glucose/pyruvate/tricarboxylic acid (TCA) metabolism in rat abdominal muscle. Dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD), a flavoprotein component (E3) of α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complexes with diaphorase activity in mitochondria, was specifically analyzed. After assessing the effectiveness of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (3 mg kg(-1), 14 days) on food intake and body weight, we could identified seven key enzymes from either glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle--regulated by both diet and CB1 receptor activity--through comprehensive proteomic approaches involving two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/LC-ESI trap mass spectrometry. These enzymes were glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), enolase (Eno3), lactate dehydrogenase (LDHa), glyoxalase-1 (Glo1) and the mitochondrial DLD, whose expressions were modified by AM251 in hypercaloric diet-induced obesity. Specifically, AM251 blocked high-carbohydrate diet (HCD)-induced expression of GPI, TPI, Eno3 and LDHa, suggesting a down-regulation of glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways under glucose availability. AM251 reversed the HCD-inhibited expression of Glo1 and DLD in the muscle, and the DLD and CB1 receptor expression in the mitochondrial fraction. Interestingly, we identified the presence of CB1 receptors at the membrane of striate muscle mitochondria. DLD over-expression was confirmed in muscle of CB1-/- mice. AM251 increased the pyruvate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity in C2C12 myotubes, and the diaphorase/oxidative activity in the mitochondria fraction. These results indicated an up-regulation of methylglyoxal and TCA cycle activity. Findings suggest that CB1 receptors in muscle modulate glucose/pyruvate/lactate pathways and mitochondrial oxidative activity by targeting DLD.

  2. [Effect of MDG-1, a polysaccharide from Ophiopogon japonicas, on diversity of lactobacillus in diet-induced obese mice].

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin-lin; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Yi

    2015-02-01

    For understanding the effect of MDG-1, a water-soluble β-D-fructan polysaccharide from Ophiopogon japonicas, on intestinal microecological balance, especially on the changes of lactobacillus, sixty 8-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were given a high-fat diet for six weeks and were also gavaged with saline once a day simultaneously. Then the mice which is below 30 grams or dropped more than 10% through lavage were eliminated and the rest were randomly divided into four groups: diet-induced obese (DIO) model group (n = 12, gavaged with saline), low-dose MDG-1 group (n = 12, gavaged with MDG-1, 75 mg · kg(-1)) , medial-dose MDG- 1 group (n = 12, gavaged with 150 mg · kg(-1)), and high-dose MDG-1 group (n = 12, gavaged with 300 mg · kg(-1)) according to the weight and blood glucose; the model group and MDG-1 group were placed on a high-fat diet while the normal control group (n = 12, gavaged with saline) were kept on a low-fat diet through the experiment. After 12-weeks of treatment, feces samples were collected and cultured for intestinal microecological balance analysis. Then the intestinal probiotics were cultured through traditional methods combined with modified gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method. The changes of lactobacillus in each treatment group were also detected by a statistical analysis of the total number of the intestinal flora. We have established the phylogenetic tree by 16S rDNA sequencing and use some molecular identification methods such as PCR-DGGE to analyse the changes of the dominant bacteria floras, and also get the pure culture. In conclusion, different concentrations of MDG-1 can increase the number of the intestinal probiotics, especially Taiwan lactobacillus and Lactobacillus murinus, and improve their diversity and promote proliferation in a dose-dependent way.

  3. Diet-Induced Maternal Obesity Alters Insulin Signalling in Male Mice Offspring Rechallenged with a High-Fat Diet in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    de Fante, Thaís; Simino, Laís Angélica; Reginato, Andressa; Payolla, Tanyara Baliani; Vitoréli, Débora Cristina Gustavo; de Souza, Monique; Torsoni, Márcio Alberto; Milanski, Marciane; Torsoni, Adriana Souza

    2016-01-01

    Modern lifestyle has resulted in an increase in the prevalence of obesity and its comorbidities in pregnant women and the young population. It has been well established that the consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) has many direct effects on glucose metabolism. However, it is important to assess whether maternal consumption of a HFD during critical periods of development can lead to metabolic changes in the offspring metabolism. This study evaluated the potential effects of metabolic programming on the impairment of insulin signalling in recently weaned offspring from obese dams. Additionally, we investigated if early exposure to an obesogenic environment could exacerbate the impairment of glucose metabolism in adult life in response to a HFD. Swiss female mice were fed with Standard Chow (SC) or a HFD during gestation and lactation and tissues from male offspring were analysed at d28 and d82. Offspring from obese dams had greater weight gain and higher adiposity and food intake than offspring from control dams. Furthermore, they showed impairment in insulin signalling in central and peripheral tissues, which was associated with the activation of inflammatory pathways. Adipose tissue was ultimately the most affected in adult offspring after HFD rechallenge; this may have contributed to the metabolic deregulation observed. Overall, our results suggest that diet-induced maternal obesity leads to increased susceptibility to obesity and impairment of insulin signalling in offspring in early and late life that cannot be reversed by SC consumption, but can be aggravated by HFD re-exposure. PMID:27479001

  4. Beneficial effects of Plantago albicans on high-fat diet-induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Samout, Noura; Ettaya, Amani; Bouzenna, Hafsia; Ncib, Sana; Elfeki, Abdelfattah; Hfaiedh, Najla

    2016-12-01

    Obesity is a one of the main global public health problems associated with chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease, diabetes and cancer. As a solution to obesity, we suggest Plantago albicans, which is a medicinal plant with several biological effects. This study assesses the possible anti-obesity protective properties of Plantago albicans in high fat diet-fed rats. 28 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups; a group which received normal diet (C), the second group was fed HDF diet (HDF), the third group was given normal diet supplemented with Plantago albicans (P.AL), and the fourth group received HDF supplemented with Plantago albicans (HDF+P.AL) (30mg/kg/day) for 7 weeks. Our results showed an increase in body weight of HDF rats by ∼16% as compared to the control group with an increase in the levels of total cholesterol (TC) as well as LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides (TG) in serum. Also, the concentration of TBARS increased in the liver and heart of HDF-fed rats as compared to the control group. The oral gavage of Plantago albicans extract to obese rats induced a reduction in their body weight, lipid accumulation in liver and heart tissue, compared to the high-fat diet control rats. The obtained results proved that the antioxidant potency of Plantago albicans extracts was correlated with their phenolic and flavonoid contents. The antioxidant capacity of the extract was evaluated by DPPH test (as EC50=250±2.12μg/mL) and FRAP tests (as EC50=27.77±0.14μg/mL). These results confirm the phytochemical and antioxidant impact of Plantago albicans extracts. Plantago albicans content was determined using validated HPLC methodology.

  5. Adipose-specific deletion of Kif5b exacerbates obesity and insulin resistance in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ju; Pang, Jing; Lin, Ya-Jun; Gong, Huan; Wang, Zhen-He; Li, Yun-Xuan; Li, Jin; Wang, Zai; Jiang, Ping; Dai, Da-Peng; Li, Jian; Cai, Jian-Ping; Huang, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Tie-Mei

    2017-02-27

    Recent studies have shown that KIF5B (conventional kinesin heavy chain) mediates glucose transporter type 4 translocation and adiponectin secretion in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting an involvement of KIF5B in the homeostasis of metabolism. However, the in vivo physiologic function of KIF5B in adipose tissue remains to be determined. In this study, adipose-specific Kif5b knockout (F-K5bKO) mice were generated using the Cre-LoxP strategy. F-K5bKO mice had similar body weights to controls fed on a standard chow diet. However, F-K5bKO mice had hyperlipidemia and significant glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Deletion of Kif5b aggravated the deleterious impact of a high-fat diet (HFD) on body weight gain, hepatosteatosis, glucose tolerance, and systematic insulin sensitivity. These changes were accompanied by impaired insulin signaling, decreased secretion of adiponectin, and increased serum levels of leptin and proinflammatory adipokines. F-K5bKO mice fed on a HFD exhibited lower energy expenditure and thermogenic dysfunction as a result of whitening of brown adipose due to decreased mitochondria biogenesis and down-regulation of key thermogenic gene expression. In conclusion, selective deletion of Kif5b in adipose tissue exacerbates HFD-induced obesity and its associated metabolic disorders, partly through a decrease in energy expenditure, dysregulation of adipokine secretion, and insulin signaling.-Cui, J., Pang, J., Lin, Y.-J., Gong, H., Wang, Z.-H., Li, Y.-X., Li, J., Wang, Z., Jiang, P., Dai, D.-P., Li, J., Cai, J.-P., Huang, J.-D., Zhang, T.-M. Adipose-specific deletion of Kif5b exacerbates obesity and insulin resistance in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity.

  6. Diet-induced obesity induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and insulin resistance in the amygdala of rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Gisele; C. Areias, Maria Fernanda; Weissmann, Lais; Quaresma, Paula G.F.; Katashima, Carlos K.; Saad, Mario J.A.; Prada, Patricia O.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin acts in the hypothalamus, decreasing food intake (FI) by the IR/PI3K/Akt pathway. This pathway is impaired in obese animals and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and low-grade inflammation are possible mechanisms involved in this impairment. Here, we highlighted the amygdala as an important brain region for FI regulation in response to insulin. This regulation was dependent on PI3K/AKT pathway similar to the hypothalamus. Insulin was able to decrease neuropeptide Y (NPY) and increase oxytocin mRNA levels in the amygdala via PI3K, which may contribute to hypophagia. Additionally, obese rats did not reduce FI in response to insulin and AKT phosphorylation was decreased in the amygdala, suggesting insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was associated with ER stress and low-grade inflammation in this brain region. The inhibition of ER stress with PBA reverses insulin action/signaling, decreases NPY and increases oxytocin mRNA levels in the amygdala from obese rats, suggesting that ER stress is probably one of the mechanisms that induce insulin resistance in the amygdala. PMID:24251109

  7. Protective Effect of Gymnema sylvestre Ethanol Extract on High Fat Diet-induced Obese Diabetic Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Bhandari, Uma; Tripathi, C D; Khanna, Geetika

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is associated with numerous co-morbidities such as cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and others. Therefore, the present study was planned to investigate the effect of water- soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract on biochemical and molecular alterations in obese diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single i.v. injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg) via tail vein. Obesity was induced by oral feeding of high fat diet for a period of 28 days in diabetic rats. Body weight gain, food intake, water intake, hemodynamic parameters (systolic, diastolic, mean arterial blood pressures and heart rate), serum biochemical parameters (leptin, insulin, lipid levels, apolipoprotein B and glucose), cardiomyocyte apoptosis (cardiac caspase-3, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA fragmentation) organs and visceral fat pad weight and oxidative stress parameters were measured. Oral treatment with water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extracts (120 mg/kg/p.o.) for a period of 21 days, resulted in significant reduction in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, serum leptin, insulin, apolipoprotein B, lipids, glucose, cardiac caspase-3 levels, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity and DNA laddering, visceral fat pad and organ's weight and improved the antioxidant enzymes levels in the high fat diet induced obesity in diabetic rats. The results of present study reveal that water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre ethanol extract could be useful intervention in the treatment of obesity and type-2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Anti-Obesity Effects of Aster spathulifolius Extract in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sa-Jic; Bang, Chae-Young; Guo, Yuan-Ri; Choung, Se-Young

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-obesity and antihyperlipidemic efficacy and molecular mechanisms of Aster spathulifolius Maxim extract (ASE) in rats with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Rats were separately fed a normal diet or a HFD for 8 weeks, then they were treated with ASE (62.5, 125, or 250 mg/kg) for another 4.5 weeks. The ASE supplementation significantly lowered body weight gain, visceral fat pad weights, serum lipid levels, as well as hepatic lipid levels in HFD-induced obese rats. Histological analysis showed that the ASE-treated group showed lowered numbers of lipid droplets and smaller size of adipocytes compared to the HFD group. To understand the mechanism of action of ASE, the expression of genes and proteins involved in obesity were measured in liver and skeletal muscle. The expression of fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis-related genes (e.g., PPAR-α, ACO, CPT1, UCP2, and UCP3) of HFD-induced obese rats were increased by ASE treatment. On the other hand, ASE treatment resulted in decreased expression of fat intake-related gene ACC2 and lipogenesis-related genes (e.g., SREBP-1c, ACC1, FAS, SCD1, GPATR, AGPAT, and DGAT). Furthermore, ASE treatment increased the level of phosphorylated AMPKα in obese rats. Similarly, the level of phosphorylated ACC, a target protein of AMPKα in ASE groups, was increased by ASE treatment compared with the HFD group. These results suggest that ASE attenuated visceral fat accumulation and improved hyperlipidemia in HFD-induced obese rats by increasing lipid metabolism through the regulation of AMPK activity and the expression of genes and proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis.

  9. Erythropoietin Signaling: A Novel Regulator of White Adipose Tissue Inflammation During Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Alnaeeli, Mawadda; Raaka, Bruce M.; Gavrilova, Oksana; Teng, Ruifeng; Chanturiya, Tatyana

    2014-01-01

    Obesity-induced white adipose tissue (WAT) inflammation and insulin resistance are associated with macrophage (Mф) infiltration and phenotypic shift from “anti-inflammatory” M2-like to predominantly “proinflammatory” M1-like cells. Erythropoietin (EPO), a glycoprotein hormone indispensable for erythropoiesis, has biological activities that extend to nonerythroid tissues, including antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. Using comprehensive in vivo and in vitro analyses in mice, EPO treatment inhibited WAT inflammation, normalized insulin sensitivity, and reduced glucose intolerance. We investigated EPO receptor (EPO-R) expression in WAT and characterized the role of its signaling during obesity-induced inflammation. Remarkably, and prior to any detectable changes in body weight or composition, EPO treatment reduced M1-like Mф and increased M2-like Mф in WAT, while decreasing inflammatory monocytes. These anti-inflammatory effects were found to be driven, at least in part, by direct EPO-R response in Mф via Stat3 activation, where EPO effects on M2 but not M1 Mф required interleukin-4 receptor/Stat6. Using obese ∆EpoR mice with EPO-R restricted to erythroid cells, we demonstrated an anti-inflammatory role for endogenous EPO. Collectively, our findings identify EPO-R signaling as a novel regulator of WAT inflammation, extending its nonerythroid activity to encompass effects on both Mф infiltration and subset composition in WAT. PMID:24647735

  10. Biometric Evidence of Diet-Induced Obesity in Lew/Crl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schmiedt, Chad W; Gogal, Robert M; Harvey, Stephen B; Torres, Amanda K; Jarrett, Carla L; Uhl, Elizabeth W; Hurley, David J

    2011-01-01

    Although Lew/Crl rats are central to a classic model of renal transplantation and may provide a valid system for evaluating the effect of obesity on transplantation outcomes, their response to high-fat diet has not been evaluated sufficiently. The objective of this study was to evaluate biometric and basic metabolic data of Lew/Crl rats fed a 60% kcal, lard-based, very high-fat diet (HFD) compared with those fed a 10% kcal fat control diet (CD). Rats were maintained for 17 wk; body parameters and caloric intake were monitored weekly. Biometric data were collected and calculated before and after euthanasia. Serum was evaluated for liver enzyme activity and total bilirubin, glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol, insulin, leptin, and creatinine concentrations, and urine was evaluated for protein, glucose, specific gravity, and ketones. Tissues were harvested, weighed, and evaluated histologically. Compared with CD rats, HFD rats consumed more calories and weighed more after 3 wk. After 17 wk, HFD rats had significantly increased body weight, girth, volume, epididymal fat pad weight, omental weight, and body fat. In addition, HFD rats had mild elevations in some liver enzymes and a lower serum triglyceride concentration than did CD rats. Histologic assessment and other metabolic markers of disease were not different between the 2 groups. Lew/Crl rats fed a 60% kcal HFD become obese, but they lack significant metabolic abnormalities frequently associated with obesity in other rat strains. PMID:21535923

  11. Ferulic acid improves lipid and glucose homeostasis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Naowaboot, Jarinyaporn; Piyabhan, Pritsana; Munkong, Narongsuk; Parklak, Wason; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan

    2016-02-01

    Ferulic acid (FA) is a plant phenolic acid that has several pharmacological effects including antihyperglycaemic activity. Thus, the objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FA on glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice were fed a HFD (45 kcal% fat) for 16 weeks. At the ninth week of induction, the obese mice were orally administered with daily FA doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg for the next eight weeks. The results show that FA significantly reduced the elevated blood glucose and serum leptin levels, lowered the insulin resistance, and increased the serum adiponectin level. Moreover, serum lipid level, and liver cholesterol and triglyceride accumulations were also reduced. The histological examination showed clear evidence of a decrease in the lipid droplets in liver tissues and smaller size of fat cells in the adipose tissue in the obese mice treated with FA. Interestingly, FA reduced the expression of hepatic lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). It could also up-regulate hepatic carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (CPT1a) gene and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) proteins. The FA treatment was also found to suppress the protein expressions of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In conclusion, the findings of this study demonstrate that FA improves the glucose and lipid homeostasis in HFD-induced obese mice probably via modulating the expression of lipogenic and gluconeogenic genes in liver tissues.

  12. Herbal Formula HT048 Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity by Improving Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Insulin Resistance in Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Jin, Bora; Lee, Sung Hyun; Song, MiKyung; Bae, HyeonHui; Min, Byung Jae; Park, Juyeon; Lee, Donghun; Kim, Hocheol

    2016-10-25

    It is well established that obesity causes a variety of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Despite the diligent scientific efforts to find effective ways to lower the level of obesity, the size of obese population grows continuously around the world. Here we present the results that show feeding diet containing HT048, a mixture of the extracts of Crataegus pinnatifida leaves and Citrus unshiu peel, two of the well-known traditional herbal medicines in Eastern Asia, decreases obesity in rats. We fed rats with five different diets for 10 weeks: chow diet (STD), high-fat diet (HFD), high-fat diet with 0.04% orlistat, a drug to treat obesity (HFD + Orlistat), high-fat diet with 0.2% HT048 (w/w; HFD + 0.2% HT048), and high-fat diet with 0.6% HT048 (w/w; HFD + 0.6% HT048). It was found that both body and total white adipose tissue weight of HT048 groups significantly decreased compared to those of the HFD group. Moreover, HT048 decreased serum insulin levels in HFD-fed obese rats. At the molecular level, HT048 supplementation downregulated genes involved in lipogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and adipogenesis, while the expression level of β-oxidation genes was increased. Supplementation-drug interactions are not likely as HFD and HT048-containing diet did not significantly induce genes encoding CYPs. Collectively, this study suggests that HT048 taken as dietary supplement helps to decrease obesity and insulin resistance in HFD-fed obese rats.

  13. Supplementation of a Fermented Soybean Extract Reduces Body Mass and Prevents Obesity in High Fat Diet-Induced C57BL/6J Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Yeon; Aravinthan, Adithan; Park, Young Shik; Hwang, Kyo Yeol; Seong, Su-Il; Hwang, Kwontack

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a growing health problem that many countries face, mostly due to the consumption of a Westernized diet. In this present study we observed the effects of a soybean extract fermented by Bacillus subtilis MORI (BTD-1) containing 1-deoxynojirimycin against high fat diet-induced obesity. The results obtained from this study indicated that BTD-1 reduced body weight, regulated hepatic lipid content and adipose tissue, and also affected liver antioxidant enzymes and glucose metabolism. These results suggest that administration of BTD-1 affects obesity by inhibiting hyperglycemia and free radical-mediated stress; it also reduces lipid accumulation. Therefore, BTD-1 may be potentially useful for the prevention of obesity and its related secondary complications. PMID:27752494

  14. Ski overexpression in skeletal muscle modulates genetic programs that control susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin signaling.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Marianne; Martel, Nick; Fitzsimmons, Rebecca L; Eriksson, Natalie A; Cowin, Gary J; Thomas, Gethin P; Cao, Kim-Anh Lê; Muscat, George E O; Leong, Gary M

    2012-11-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing chicken Ski (c-Ski) have marked decrease in adipose mass with skeletal muscle hypertrophy. Recent evidence indicates a role for c-Ski in lipogenesis and energy expenditure. In the present study, wild type (WT) and c-Ski mice were challenged on a high-fat (HF) diet to determine whether c-Ski mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity. During the HF feeding WT mice gained significantly more weight than chow-fed animals, while c-Ski mice were partially resistant to the effects of the HF diet on weight. Body composition analysis confirmed the decreased adipose mass in c-Ski mice compared to WT mice. c-Ski mice possess a similar metabolic rate and level of food consumption to WT littermates, despite lower activity levels and on chow diet show mild glucose intolerance relative to WT littermates. On HF diet, glucose tolerance surprisingly remained unchanged in c-Ski mice, while it became worse in WT mice. Skeletal muscle of c-Ski mice exhibit impaired insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. In concordance, gene expression profiling of skeletal muscle of chow and HF-fed mice indicated that Ski suppresses gene expression associated with insulin signaling and glucose uptake and alters gene pathways involved in myogenesis and adipogenesis. In conclusion, c-Ski mice are partially resistant to diet-induced obesity and display aberrant insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis which is associated with alterations in gene expression that inhibit lipogenesis and insulin signaling. These results suggest Ski plays a major role in skeletal muscle metabolism and adipogenesis and hence influences risk of obesity and diabetes.

  15. ALOX5AP Overexpression in Adipose Tissue Leads to LXA4 Production and Protection Against Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ivet; Ferré, Tura; Vilà, Laia; Muñoz, Sergio; Casellas, Alba; Garcia, Miquel; Molas, Maria; Agudo, Judith; Roca, Carles; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima; Franckhauser, Sylvie

    2016-08-01

    Eicosanoids, such as leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and lipoxin A4 (LXA4), may play a key role during obesity. While LTB4 is involved in adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance, LXA4 may exert anti-inflammatory effects and alleviate hepatic steatosis. Both lipid mediators derive from the same pathway, in which arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5) and its partner, arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP), are involved. ALOX5 and ALOX5AP expression is increased in humans and rodents with obesity and insulin resistance. We found that transgenic mice overexpressing ALOX5AP in adipose tissue had higher LXA4 rather than higher LTB4 levels, were leaner, and showed increased energy expenditure, partly due to browning of white adipose tissue (WAT). Upregulation of hepatic LXR and Cyp7a1 led to higher bile acid synthesis, which may have contributed to increased thermogenesis. In addition, transgenic mice were protected against diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Finally, treatment of C57BL/6J mice with LXA4, which showed browning of WAT, strongly suggests that LXA4 is responsible for the transgenic mice phenotype. Thus, our data support that LXA4 may hold great potential for the future development of therapeutic strategies for obesity and related diseases.

  16. CB1 Blockade Potentiates Down-Regulation of Lipogenic Gene Expression in Perirenal Adipose Tissue in High Carbohydrate Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gavito, Ana Luisa; Suárez, Juan; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Arrabal, Sergio; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Bautista, Dolores; Martínez, Ana; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Serrano, Antonia; Baixeras, Elena

    2014-01-01

    De novo lipogenesis and hypercaloric diets are thought to contribute to increased fat mass, particularly in abdominal fat depots. CB1 is highly expressed in adipose tissue, and CB1-mediated signalling is associated with stimulation of lipogenesis and diet-induced obesity, though its contribution to increasing fat deposition in adipose tissue is controversial. Lipogenesis is regulated by transcription factors such as liver X receptor (LXR), sterol-response element binding protein (SREBP) and carbohydrate-responsive-element-binding protein (ChREBP). We evaluated the role of CB1 in the gene expression of these factors and their target genes in relation to lipogenesis in the perirenal adipose tissue (PrAT) of rats fed a high-carbohydrate diet (HCHD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Both obesity models showed an up-regulated gene expression of CB1 and Lxrα in this adipose pad. The Srebf-1 and ChREBP gene expressions were down-regulated in HFD but not in HCHD. The expression of their target genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes showed a decrease in diet-induced obesity and was particularly dramatic in HFD. In HCHD, CB1 blockade by AM251 reduced the Srebf-1 and ChREBP expression and totally abrogated the remnant gene expression of their target lipogenic enzymes. The phosphorylated form of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK-p), which participates in the CB1-mediated signalling pathway, was markedly present in the PrAT of obese rats. ERK-p was drastically repressed by AM251 indicating that CB1 is actually functional in PrAT of obese animals, though its activation loses the ability to stimulate lipogenesis in PrAT of obese rats. Even so, the remnant expression levels of lipogenic transcription factors found in HCHD-fed rats are still dependent on CB1 activity. Hence, in HCHD-induced obesity, CB1 blockade may help to further potentiate the reduction of lipogenesis in PrAT by means of inducing down-regulation of the ChREBP and Srebf-1 gene expression, and consequently in

  17. CB1 blockade potentiates down-regulation of lipogenic gene expression in perirenal adipose tissue in high carbohydrate diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Vida, Margarita; Rivera, Patricia; Gavito, Ana Luisa; Suárez, Juan; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Arrabal, Sergio; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Bautista, Dolores; Martínez, Ana; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez; Serrano, Antonia; Baixeras, Elena

    2014-01-01

    De novo lipogenesis and hypercaloric diets are thought to contribute to increased fat mass, particularly in abdominal fat depots. CB1 is highly expressed in adipose tissue, and CB1-mediated signalling is associated with stimulation of lipogenesis and diet-induced obesity, though its contribution to increasing fat deposition in adipose tissue is controversial. Lipogenesis is regulated by transcription factors such as liver X receptor (LXR), sterol-response element binding protein (SREBP) and carbohydrate-responsive-element-binding protein (ChREBP). We evaluated the role of CB1 in the gene expression of these factors and their target genes in relation to lipogenesis in the perirenal adipose tissue (PrAT) of rats fed a high-carbohydrate diet (HCHD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). Both obesity models showed an up-regulated gene expression of CB1 and Lxrα in this adipose pad. The Srebf-1 and ChREBP gene expressions were down-regulated in HFD but not in HCHD. The expression of their target genes encoding for lipogenic enzymes showed a decrease in diet-induced obesity and was particularly dramatic in HFD. In HCHD, CB1 blockade by AM251 reduced the Srebf-1 and ChREBP expression and totally abrogated the remnant gene expression of their target lipogenic enzymes. The phosphorylated form of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK-p), which participates in the CB1-mediated signalling pathway, was markedly present in the PrAT of obese rats. ERK-p was drastically repressed by AM251 indicating that CB1 is actually functional in PrAT of obese animals, though its activation loses the ability to stimulate lipogenesis in PrAT of obese rats. Even so, the remnant expression levels of lipogenic transcription factors found in HCHD-fed rats are still dependent on CB1 activity. Hence, in HCHD-induced obesity, CB1 blockade may help to further potentiate the reduction of lipogenesis in PrAT by means of inducing down-regulation of the ChREBP and Srebf-1 gene expression, and consequently in

  18. Circadian Disruption and Diet-Induced Obesity Synergize to Promote Development of β-Cell Failure and Diabetes in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jingyi; Yeh, Bonnie; Rakshit, Kuntol; Colwell, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    There are clear epidemiological associations between circadian disruption, obesity, and pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms driving these associations are unclear. In the current study, we hypothesized that continuous exposure to constant light (LL) compromises pancreatic β-cell functional and morphological adaption to diet-induced obesity leading to development of type 2 diabetes. To address this hypothesis, we studied wild type Sprague Dawley as well as Period-1 luciferase reporter transgenic rats (Per1-Luc) for 10 weeks under standard light-dark cycle (LD) or LL with concomitant ad libitum access to either standard chow or 60% high-fat diet (HFD). Exposure to HFD led to a comparable increase in food intake, body weight, and adiposity in both LD- and LL-treated rats. However, LL rats displayed profound loss of behavioral circadian rhythms as well as disrupted pancreatic islet clock function characterized by the impairment in the amplitude and the phase islet clock oscillations. Under LD cycle, HFD did not adversely alter diurnal glycemia, diurnal insulinemia, β-cell secretory function as well as β-cell survival, indicating successful adaptation to increased metabolic demand. In contrast, concomitant exposure to LL and HFD resulted in development of hyperglycemia characterized by loss of diurnal changes in insulin secretion, compromised β-cell function, and induction of β-cell apoptosis. This study suggests that circadian disruption and diet-induced obesity synergize to promote development of β-cell failure, likely mediated as a consequence of impaired islet clock function. PMID:26348474

  19. Beneficial effects by intake of Euphausiacea pacifica on high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Sadzuka, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Ikumi; Miyashita, Michiko; Ueda, Tomohiro; Kikuchi, Sayaka; Oshiro, Eriko; Yano, Akira; Yamada, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem showing increased incidence in developed and developing countries. We examined the effect of Euphausia pacifica (E. pacifica) (Pacific Krill) on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice. No significant differences were observed in average food intake between the HFD and HFD with E. pacifica group, or the low-fat diet (LFD) and LFD with E. pacifica group for 18 weeks. The increased ratio of body weight in the HFD containing E. pacifica group was significantly reduced, being 10% lower than that with HFD group in the 18th week (HFD, 298.6±18.8% vs. HFD with E. pacifica, 267.8±16.2%; p<0.05), while the ratio for the LFD containing E. pacifica group was reduced by 4% compared with LFD group (LFD, 244.2±11.6% vs. LFD with E. pacifica, 234.1±18.0%). There were no effects of E. pacifica on total cholesterol levels in serum and liver, whereas the supplement of E. pacifica tended to decrease triglyceride levels in the HFD groups. The leptin level in serum was significantly decreased in the HFD group (p<0.01) by E. pacifica. The adipocyte area (1926±1275 μm(2)) in the HFD containing E. pacifica group was significantly reduced by 20% (p<0.001) compared with the HFD group. These results suggested that E. pacifica supplementation in the diet is beneficial for the prevention of HFD-induced obesity.

  20. Erythropoietin (EPO) ameliorates obesity and glucose homeostasis by promoting thermogenesis and endocrine function of classical brown adipose tissue (BAT) in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kodo, Kazuki; Sugimoto, Satoru; Nakajima, Hisakazu; Mori, Jun; Itoh, Ikuyo; Fukuhara, Shota; Shigehara, Keiichi; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Kosaka, Kitaro; Hosoi, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), clinically used as a hematopoietic drug, has received much attention due to its nonhematopoietic effects. EPO reportedly has beneficial effects on obesity and diabetes mellitus. We investigated whether interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT: main part of classical BAT) could play a role in EPO's anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects in diet-induced obese mice. Four-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD-Con), and half were additionally given an intraperitoneal injection of recombinant human EPO (200 IU/kg) (HFD-EPO) thrice a week for four weeks. At 8 weeks, EPO-injected mice showed significantly reduced body weight with reduced epididymal and subcutaneous white fat mass and unchanged caloric intake and locomotor activity. HOMA-IR (insulin resistance index) and glucose levels during intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) were significantly lower in HFD-EPO mice than in HFD-Con mice. EPO-injected mice also showed increased oxygen consumption, indicative of metabolic rate, and skin temperature around iBAT tissue masses. EPO significantly upregulated the PRD1-BF1-RIZ1 homologous domain containing 16 (PRDM16), a transcriptional factor with a crucial role in brown adipocyte differentiation. EPO significantly increased phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is downstream of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) and known to stabilize PRDM16. EPO's suppression of myocyte enhancer factor 2c (Mef2c) and microRNA-133a (miR-133a) via β3-adrenergic receptor caused PRDM16 upregulation. EPO-mediated enhancement of EpoR/STAT3 and β-adrenergic receptor/Mef2c/miR-133 pathways dramatically increases total uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), an essential enzyme for BAT thermogenesis. Furthermore, EPO activated BAT's endocrine functions. EPO facilitated fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) production and excretion in iBAT, associated with reduction of liver gluconeogenesis-related genes. Thus, EPO

  1. Erythropoietin (EPO) ameliorates obesity and glucose homeostasis by promoting thermogenesis and endocrine function of classical brown adipose tissue (BAT) in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kodo, Kazuki; Sugimoto, Satoru; Mori, Jun; Itoh, Ikuyo; Fukuhara, Shota; Shigehara, Keiichi; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Kosaka, Kitaro; Hosoi, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), clinically used as a hematopoietic drug, has received much attention due to its nonhematopoietic effects. EPO reportedly has beneficial effects on obesity and diabetes mellitus. We investigated whether interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT: main part of classical BAT) could play a role in EPO’s anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects in diet-induced obese mice. Four-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD-Con), and half were additionally given an intraperitoneal injection of recombinant human EPO (200 IU/kg) (HFD-EPO) thrice a week for four weeks. At 8 weeks, EPO-injected mice showed significantly reduced body weight with reduced epididymal and subcutaneous white fat mass and unchanged caloric intake and locomotor activity. HOMA-IR (insulin resistance index) and glucose levels during intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) were significantly lower in HFD-EPO mice than in HFD-Con mice. EPO-injected mice also showed increased oxygen consumption, indicative of metabolic rate, and skin temperature around iBAT tissue masses. EPO significantly upregulated the PRD1-BF1-RIZ1 homologous domain containing 16 (PRDM16), a transcriptional factor with a crucial role in brown adipocyte differentiation. EPO significantly increased phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is downstream of erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) and known to stabilize PRDM16. EPO’s suppression of myocyte enhancer factor 2c (Mef2c) and microRNA-133a (miR-133a) via β3-adrenergic receptor caused PRDM16 upregulation. EPO-mediated enhancement of EpoR/STAT3 and β-adrenergic receptor/Mef2c/miR-133 pathways dramatically increases total uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), an essential enzyme for BAT thermogenesis. Furthermore, EPO activated BAT’s endocrine functions. EPO facilitated fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) production and excretion in iBAT, associated with reduction of liver gluconeogenesis-related genes. Thus, EPO

  2. Ubc13 haploinsufficiency protects against age-related insulin resistance and high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Erina; Fukushima, Toru; Harada, Norio; Reed, John C.; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation that leads to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes via Toll-like Receptor (TLR) and TNF-family cytokine receptor (TNFR) signaling pathways. Ubc13 is an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme responsible for non-canonical K63-linked polyubiquitination of TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-family adapter proteins involved in TLR and TNFR pathways. However, the relationship between Ubc13 and metabolic disease remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Ubc13 in insulin resistance and high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We compared wild-type (WT) and Ubc13 haploinsufficient (ubc13+/−) mice under normal diet (ND) and HFD, since homozygous knockout mice (ubc13−/−) are embryonic lethal. Male and female ubc13+/− mice were protected against age-related insulin resistance under ND and HFD compared to WT mice. Interestingly, only female ubc13+/− mice were protected against HFD-induced obesity and hepatic steatosis. Moreover, only female HFD-fed ubc13+/− mice showed lower expression of inflammatory cytokines that was secondary to reduction in weight gain not present in the other groups. In summary, our results indicate that suppression of Ubc13 activity may play a metabolic role independent of its inflammatory function. Thus, Ubc13 could represent a therapeutic target for insulin resistance, diet-induced obesity, and associated metabolic dysfunctions. PMID:27796312

  3. Intestine-specific Deletion of Acyl-CoA:Monoacylglycerol Acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 Protects Mice from Diet-induced Obesity and Glucose Intolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, David W.; Gao, Yu; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang Eric

    2014-01-01

    The absorption of dietary fat involves the re-esterification of digested triacylglycerol in the enterocytes, a process catalyzed by acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2. Mice without a functional gene encoding MGAT2 (Mogat2−/−) are protected from diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, these mice absorb normal amounts of dietary fat but increase their energy expenditure. MGAT2 is expressed in tissues besides intestine, including adipose tissue in both mice and humans. To test the hypothesis that intestinal MGAT2 regulates systemic energy balance, we generated and characterized mice deficient in MGAT2 specifically in the small intestine (Mogat2IKO). We found that, like Mogat2−/− mice, Mogat2IKO mice also showed a delay in fat absorption, a decrease in food intake, and a propensity to use fatty acids as fuel when first exposed to a high fat diet. Mogat2IKO mice increased energy expenditure although to a lesser degree than Mogat2−/− mice and were protected against diet-induced weight gain and associated comorbidities, including hepatic steatosis, hypercholesterolemia, and glucose intolerance. These findings illustrate that intestinal lipid metabolism plays a crucial role in the regulation of systemic energy balance and may be a feasible intervention target. In addition, they suggest that MGAT activity in extraintestinal tissues may also modulate energy metabolism. PMID:24784138

  4. SGK1 Activity is Modulated by Resistin in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and in the Aorta in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Takara A.; Babayeva, Oguljahan; Banerjee, Saswati; Zhong, Wei; Francis, Sharon C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Enhanced serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) activity contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. We evaluated SGK1 modulation in vascular smooth muscle cells by the adipokine, resistin and in aortic tissue in a murine model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Methods Modulation of SGK1 by resistin was assessed in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC) in vitro by quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analyses. To induce the lean or obese phenotype, mice were fed a 10 kcal% low-fat or 60 kcal% high-fat diet, respectively for eight weeks. Upon study completion, plasma resistin was assessed and aortic tissue was harvested to examine the effect of DIO on regulation of SGK1 in vivo. Results Resistin increased SGK1 mRNA, total protein abundance and its activation as determined by phosphorylation of its serine 422 residue (pSGK1) in HAoSMC. Resistin-mediated SGK1 phosphorylation was dependent upon phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Toll-like receptor 4. Furthermore, inhibition of SGK1 attenuated resistin-induced proliferation in HAoSMC. DIO led to upregulation of total SGK1 protein levels and pSGK1 in association with increased plasma resistin. Conclusions These data suggest that high levels of resistin observed during obesity may activate SGK1 in the vasculature and contribute to the development of obesity-related vascular disease. PMID:26833885

  5. A Novel Selective Inhibitor of Delta-5 Desaturase Lowers Insulin Resistance and Reduces Body Weight in Diet-Induced Obese C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Hiroaki; Takagahara, Shuichi; Tamura, Yumiko Okano; Miyahisa, Ikuo; Matsui, Junji; Suzuki, Hideo; Ikeda, Shota; Watanabe, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is now recognized as a state of chronic low-grade inflammation and is called as metabolic inflammation. Delta-5 desaturase (D5D) is an enzyme that metabolizes dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA) to arachidonic acid (AA). Thus, D5D inhibition increases DGLA (precursor to anti-inflammatory eicosanoids) while decreasing AA (precursor to pro-inflammatory eicosanoids), and could result in synergistic improvement in the low-grade inflammatory state. Here, we demonstrate reduced insulin resistance and the anti-obesity effect of a D5D selective inhibitor (compound-326), an orally active small-molecule, in a high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) mouse model. In vivo D5D inhibition was confirmed by determining changes in blood AA/DGLA profiles. In DIO mice, chronic treatment with compound-326 lowered insulin resistance and caused body weight loss without significant impact on cumulative calorie intake. Decreased macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue was expected from mRNA analysis. Increased daily energy expenditure was also observed following administration of compound-326, in line with sustained body weight loss. These data indicate that the novel D5D selective inhibitor, compound-326, will be a new class of drug for the treatment of obese and diabetic patients. PMID:27832159

  6. Diet-induced Obesity Alters Bone Remodeling Leading to Decreased Femoral Trabecular Bone Mass in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Body mass derived from an obesity condition may be detrimental to bone health but the mechanism is unknown. This study was to examine changes in bone structure and serum cytokines related to bone metabolism in obese mice induced by a high-fat diet(HFD). Mice fed the HFD were obese and had higher ser...

  7. The Effects of Voluntary Exercise on Oocyte Quality in a Diet-Induced Obese Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Boudoures, Anna L.; Chi, Maggie; Thompson, Alysha; Zhang, Wendy; Moley, Kelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity negatively affects many aspects of the human body, including reproductive function. In females, the root of the decline in fertility is linked to problems in the oocyte. Problems seen in oocytes that positively correlate with increasing BMI include changes to the metabolism, lipid accumulation, meiosis, and metaphase II (MII) spindle structure. Studies in mice indicate dietary interventions fail to reverse these problems [4]. How exercise affects the oocytes has not been addressed. Therefore, we hypothesized an exercise intervention would improve oocyte quality. Here we show in a mouse model of an exercise intervention can improve lipid metabolism in germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes. Oocytes significantly increased activity and transcription of the β-oxidation enzyme Hadha (Hydroxyacyl-CoA-dehydrogenase) in response to exercise training only if the mice had been fed a high fat diet (HFD). An exercise intervention also reversed the lipid accumulation seen in GV stage oocytes of HFD females. However, delays in meiosis and disorganized MII spindles remained present. Therefore, exercise is able to improve, but not reverse, damage imparted on oocytes as a result of a high fat diet and obesity. By utilizing an exercise intervention on a HFD, we determined only lipid content and lipid metabolism is changed in GV oocytes. Moving forward, interventions to improve oocyte quality may need to be more targeted to the oocyte specifically. Because of the HFD induced deficiency in β-oxidation, dietary supplementation with substrates to improve lipid utilization may be more beneficial. PMID:26700938

  8. Genetic control of de novo lipogenesis: role in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Strable, Maggie S.; Ntambi, James M.

    2010-01-01

    De novo lipogenesis (DNL) is a complex yet highly regulated metabolic pathway, and transcription factors such as liver X receptor (LXR), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), and carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) exert significant control over the de novo synthesis of fatty acids. An increase in de novo lipogenesis (DNL) is an important contributor to increased fat mass, while a reduction in lipogenesis may be protective against the development of obesity. In this review, we explore fatty acid synthesis in the context of new insights gleaned from global and tissue-specific gene knockout mouse models of enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis, namely acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, fatty acid elongase 6, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1. A disruption in fatty acid synthesis, induced by the deficiency of any one of these enzymes, affects lipid metabolism and in some cases may protect against obesity in a tissue and gene-specific manner, as discussed in detail in this review. PMID:20218765

  9. CARD9 knockout ameliorates myocardial dysfunction associated with high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Li; Qin, Xing; Peterson, Matthew R; Haller, Samantha E; Wilson, Kayla A; Hu, Nan; Lin, Xin; Nair, Sreejayan; Ren, Jun; He, Guanglong

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation which plays a critical role in the development of cardiovascular dysfunction. Because the adaptor protein caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) in macrophages regulates innate immune responses via activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, we hypothesize that CARD9 mediates the pro-inflammatory signaling associated with obesity en route to myocardial dysfunction. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and CARD9(-/-) mice were fed normal diet (ND, 12% fat) or a high fat diet (HFD, 45% fat) for 5months. At the end of 5-month HFD feeding, cardiac function was evaluated using echocardiography. Cardiomyocytes were isolated and contractile properties were measured. Immunofluorescence was performed to detect macrophage infiltration in the heart. Heart tissue homogenates, plasma, and supernatants from isolated macrophages were collected to measure the concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines using ELISA kits. Western immunoblotting analyses were performed on heart tissue homogenates and isolated macrophages to explore the underlying signaling mechanism(s). CARD9 knockout alleviated HFD-induced insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, prevented myocardial dysfunction with preserved cardiac fractional shortening and cardiomyocyte contractile properties. CARD9 knockout also significantly decreased the number of infiltrated macrophages in the heart with reduced myocardium-, plasma-, and macrophage-derived cytokines including IL-6, IL-1β and TNFα. Finally, CARD9 knockout abrogated the increase of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, the decrease of LC3BII/LC3BI ratio and the up-regulation of p62 expression in the heart induced by HFD feeding and restored cardiac autophagy signaling. In conclusion, CARD9 knockout ameliorates myocardial dysfunction associated with HFD-induced obesity, potentially through reduction of macrophage infiltration, suppression of p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and preservation of autophagy in the heart.

  10. Indomethacin Treatment Prevents High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance but Not Glucose Intolerance in C57BL/6J Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Fjære, Even; Aune, Ulrike L.; Røen, Kristin; Keenan, Alison H.; Ma, Tao; Borkowski, Kamil; Kristensen, David M.; Novotny, Guy W.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Hudson, Brian D.; Milligan, Graeme; Xi, Yannan; Newman, John W.; Haj, Fawaz G.; Liaset, Bjørn; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is closely linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. To examine how administration of the anti-inflammatory compound indomethacin, a general cyclooxygenase inhibitor, affected obesity development and insulin sensitivity, we fed obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet or a regular diet supplemented or not with indomethacin (±INDO) for 7 weeks. Development of obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance was monitored, and the effect of indomethacin on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was measured in vivo and in vitro using MIN6 β-cells. We found that supplementation with indomethacin prevented HF/HS-induced obesity and diet-induced changes in systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, HF/HS+INDO-fed mice remained insulin-sensitive. However, mice fed HF/HS+INDO exhibited pronounced glucose intolerance. Hepatic glucose output was significantly increased. Indomethacin had no effect on adipose tissue mass, glucose tolerance, or GSIS when included in a regular diet. Indomethacin administration to obese mice did not reduce adipose tissue mass, and the compensatory increase in GSIS observed in obese mice was not affected by treatment with indomethacin. We demonstrate that indomethacin did not inhibit GSIS per se, but activation of GPR40 in the presence of indomethacin inhibited glucose-dependent insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. We conclude that constitutive high hepatic glucose output combined with impaired GSIS in response to activation of GPR40-dependent signaling in the HF/HS+INDO-fed mice contributed to the impaired glucose clearance during a glucose challenge and that the resulting lower levels of plasma insulin prevented the obesogenic action of the HF/HS diet. PMID:24742673

  11. Indomethacin treatment prevents high fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance but not glucose intolerance in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Fjære, Even; Aune, Ulrike L; Røen, Kristin; Keenan, Alison H; Ma, Tao; Borkowski, Kamil; Kristensen, David M; Novotny, Guy W; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Hudson, Brian D; Milligan, Graeme; Xi, Yannan; Newman, John W; Haj, Fawaz G; Liaset, Bjørn; Kristiansen, Karsten; Madsen, Lise

    2014-06-06

    Chronic low grade inflammation is closely linked to obesity-associated insulin resistance. To examine how administration of the anti-inflammatory compound indomethacin, a general cyclooxygenase inhibitor, affected obesity development and insulin sensitivity, we fed obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice a high fat/high sucrose (HF/HS) diet or a regular diet supplemented or not with indomethacin (±INDO) for 7 weeks. Development of obesity, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance was monitored, and the effect of indomethacin on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) was measured in vivo and in vitro using MIN6 β-cells. We found that supplementation with indomethacin prevented HF/HS-induced obesity and diet-induced changes in systemic insulin sensitivity. Thus, HF/HS+INDO-fed mice remained insulin-sensitive. However, mice fed HF/HS+INDO exhibited pronounced glucose intolerance. Hepatic glucose output was significantly increased. Indomethacin had no effect on adipose tissue mass, glucose tolerance, or GSIS when included in a regular diet. Indomethacin administration to obese mice did not reduce adipose tissue mass, and the compensatory increase in GSIS observed in obese mice was not affected by treatment with indomethacin. We demonstrate that indomethacin did not inhibit GSIS per se, but activation of GPR40 in the presence of indomethacin inhibited glucose-dependent insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. We conclude that constitutive high hepatic glucose output combined with impaired GSIS in response to activation of GPR40-dependent signaling in the HF/HS+INDO-fed mice contributed to the impaired glucose clearance during a glucose challenge and that the resulting lower levels of plasma insulin prevented the obesogenic action of the HF/HS diet.

  12. Diet-induced obesity, gut microbiota and bone, including alveolar bone loss.

    PubMed

    Eaimworawuthikul, Sathima; Thiennimitr, Parameth; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2017-02-07

    Obesity is a major risk factor for several pathologies, including jaw bone resorption. The underlying mechanisms involved in pathological conditions resulting from obesity include chronic systemic inflammation and the development of insulin resistance. Although numerous studies have indicated the importance of the role of gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of inflammation and insulin resistance in obesity, only a few studies have established a relationship between obesity, gut microbiota and status of the jaw bone. This review aims to summarize current findings relating to these issues, focusing on the role of obesity and gut microbiota on jaw bone health, including possible mechanisms which can explain this link.

  13. Propensity to high-fat diet-induced obesity in rats is associated with changes in the gut microbiota and gut inflammation.

    PubMed

    de La Serre, Claire Barbier; Ellis, Collin L; Lee, Jennifer; Hartman, Amber L; Rutledge, John C; Raybould, Helen E

    2010-08-01

    Consumption of diets high in fat and calories leads to hyperphagia and obesity, which is associated with chronic "low-grade" systemic inflammation. Ingestion of a high-fat diet alters the gut microbiota, pointing to a possible role in the development of obesity. The present study used Sprague-Dawley rats that, when fed a high-fat diet, exhibit either an obesity-prone (DIO-P) or obesity-resistant (DIO-R) phenotype, to determine whether changes in gut epithelial function and microbiota are diet or obese associated. Food intake and body weight were monitored daily in rats maintained on either low- or high-fat diets. After 8 or 12 wk, tissue was removed to determine adiposity and gut epithelial function and to analyze the gut microbiota using PCR. DIO-P but not DIO-R rats exhibit an increase in toll-like receptor (TLR4) activation associated with ileal inflammation and a decrease in intestinal alkaline phosphatase, a luminal enzyme that detoxifies lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Intestinal permeability and plasma LPS were increased together with phosphorylation of myosin light chain and localization of occludin in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells. Measurement of bacterial 16S rRNA showed a decrease in total bacterial density and an increase in the relative proportion of Bacteroidales and Clostridiales orders in high-fat-fed rats regardless of phenotype; an increase in Enterobacteriales was seen in the microbiota of DIO-P rats only. Consumption of a high-fat diet induces changes in the gut microbiota, but it is the development of inflammation that is associated with the appearance of hyperphagia and an obese phenotype.

  14. Emodin improves lipid and glucose metabolism in high fat diet-induced obese mice through regulating SREBP pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinmei; Ding, Lili; Song, Baoliang; Xiao, Xu; Qi, Meng; Yang, Qiaoling; Yang, Qiming; Tang, Xiaowen; Wang, Zhengtao; Yang, Li

    2016-01-05

    Currently, obesity has become a worldwide epidemic associated with Type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease and chronic metabolic diseases. Emodin is one of the active anthraquinone derivatives from Rheum palmatum and some other Chinese herbs with anti-inflammatory, anticancer and hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we investigated the anti-obesity effects of emodin in obese mice and explore its potential pharmacological mechanisms. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with high-fat diet for 12 weeks to induce obesity. Then the obese mice were divided into four groups randomly, HFD or emodin (40mg/kg/day and 80mg/kg/day) or lovastatin (30mg/kg/ day) for another 6 weeks. Body weight and food intake were recorded every week. At the end of the treatment, the fasting blood glucose, glucose and insulin tolerance test, serum and hepatic lipid levels were assayed. The gene expressions of liver and adipose tissues were analyzed with a quantitative PCR assay. Here, we found that emodin inhibited sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) transactivity in huh7 cell line. Furthermore, emodin (80mg/kg/day) treatment blocked body weight gain, decreased blood lipids, hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride content, ameliorated insulin sensitivity, and reduced the size of white and brown adipocytes. Consistently, SREBP-1 and SREBP-2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in the liver and adipose tissue after emodin treatment. These data demonstrated that emodin could improve high-fat diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic disturbances. The underlying mechanism is probably associated with regulating SREBP pathway.

  15. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reverses the effects of diet-induced obesity to inhibit the responsiveness of central vagal motoneurones.

    PubMed

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Fortna, Samuel R; Hajnal, Andras

    2013-05-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) has been shown to alter the biophysical properties and pharmacological responsiveness of vagal afferent neurones and fibres, although the effects of DIO on central vagal neurones or vagal efferent functions have never been investigated. The aims of this study were to investigate whether high-fat diet-induced DIO also affects the properties of vagal efferent motoneurones, and to investigate whether these effects were reversed following weight loss induced by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones in thin brainstem slices. The DMV neurones from rats exposed to high-fat diet for 12-14 weeks were less excitable, with a decreased membrane input resistance and decreased ability to fire action potentials in response to direct current pulse injection. The DMV neurones were also less responsive to superfusion with the satiety neuropeptides cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reversed all of these DIO-induced effects. Diet-induced obesity also affected the morphological properties of DMV neurones, increasing their size and dendritic arborization; RYGB did not reverse these morphological alterations. Remarkably, independent of diet, RYGB also reversed age-related changes of membrane properties and occurrence of charybdotoxin-sensitive (BK) calcium-dependent potassium current. These results demonstrate that DIO also affects the properties of central autonomic neurones by decreasing the membrane excitability and pharmacological responsiveness of central vagal motoneurones and that these changes were reversed following RYGB. In contrast, DIO-induced changes in morphological properties of DMV neurones were not reversed following gastric bypass surgery, suggesting that they may be due to diet, rather than obesity. These findings represent the first direct evidence for the plausible effect of RYGB to improve vagal

  16. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reverses the effects of diet-induced obesity to inhibit the responsiveness of central vagal motoneurones

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Fortna, Samuel R; Hajnal, Andras

    2013-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) has been shown to alter the biophysical properties and pharmacological responsiveness of vagal afferent neurones and fibres, although the effects of DIO on central vagal neurones or vagal efferent functions have never been investigated. The aims of this study were to investigate whether high-fat diet-induced DIO also affects the properties of vagal efferent motoneurones, and to investigate whether these effects were reversed following weight loss induced by Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones in thin brainstem slices. The DMV neurones from rats exposed to high-fat diet for 12–14 weeks were less excitable, with a decreased membrane input resistance and decreased ability to fire action potentials in response to direct current pulse injection. The DMV neurones were also less responsive to superfusion with the satiety neuropeptides cholecystokinin and glucagon-like peptide 1. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass reversed all of these DIO-induced effects. Diet-induced obesity also affected the morphological properties of DMV neurones, increasing their size and dendritic arborization; RYGB did not reverse these morphological alterations. Remarkably, independent of diet, RYGB also reversed age-related changes of membrane properties and occurrence of charybdotoxin-sensitive (BK) calcium-dependent potassium current. These results demonstrate that DIO also affects the properties of central autonomic neurones by decreasing the membrane excitability and pharmacological responsiveness of central vagal motoneurones and that these changes were reversed following RYGB. In contrast, DIO-induced changes in morphological properties of DMV neurones were not reversed following gastric bypass surgery, suggesting that they may be due to diet, rather than obesity. These findings represent the first direct evidence for the plausible effect of RYGB to improve vagal

  17. Impact of chromium histidinate on high fat diet induced obesity in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chromium (Cr) is an essential trace element that has garnered interest for use as a weight loss aid, but its molecular mechanism in obesity is not clear. In this study, an attempt has been made to investigate the effects of chromium histidinate (CrHis) on glucose transporter-2 (GLUT-2), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65) and the oxidative stress marker 4-hydroxynonenal adducts (HNE) expressions in liver of rats fed high fat diet (HFD). Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 40, 8 wk-old) were divided into four groups. Group I was fed a standard diet (12% of calories as fat); Group II was fed a standard diet and supplemented with 110 μg CrHis/kg BW/d; Group III was fed a HFD (40% of calories as fat); Group IV was fed HFD and supplemented with 110 μg CrHis/kg BW/d. Results Rats fed HFD possessed greater serum insulin (40 vs.33 pmol/L) and glucose (158 vs. 143 mg/dL) concentration and less liver Cr (44 vs.82 μg/g) concentration than rats fed the control diet. However, rats supplemented with CrHis had greater liver Cr and serum insulin and lower glucose concentration in rats fed HFD (P < 0.05). The hepatic nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB p65) and HNE were increased in high fat group compared to control group, but reduced by the CrHis administration (P < 0.05). The levels of hepatic Nrf2 and HO-1 were increased by supplementation of CrHis (P < 0.05). Conclusion These findings demonstrate that supplementation of CrHis is protective against obesity, at least in part, through Nrf2-mediated induction of HO-1 in rats fed high fat diet. PMID:21539728

  18. HPMC supplementation reduces fatty liver, intestinal permeability, and insulin resistance with altered hepatic gene expression in diet-induced obese mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a highly viscous nonfermentable soluble dietary fiber, were evaluated on global hepatic gene profiles, steatosis and insulin resistance in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. DIO C57BL/6J mice were fed a HF diet supplemented with either ...

  19. Effects of different intermittent peptide YY (3-36) dosing strategies on food intake, body weight, and adiposity in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger D; Haver, Alvin C; Chelikani, Prasanth K; Buescher, James L

    2008-08-01

    Chronic administration of anorexigenic substances to experimental animals by injections or continuous infusion typically produces either no effect or a transient reduction in food intake and body weight. Our aim here was to identify an intermittent dosing strategy for intraperitoneal infusion of peptide YY(3-36) [PYY(3-36)] that produces a sustained reduction in daily food intake and adiposity in diet-induced obese rats. Rats (665+/-10 g body wt, 166+/-7 g body fat) with intraperitoneal catheters tethered to infusion swivels had free access to a high-fat diet. Vehicle-treated rats (n=23) had relatively stable food intake, body weight, and adiposity during the 9-wk test period. None of 15 PYY(3-36) dosing regimens administered in succession to a second group of rats (n=22) produced a sustained 15-25% reduction in daily food intake for >5 days, although body weight and adiposity were reduced across the 9-wk period by 12% (594+/-15 vs. 672+/-15 g) and 43% (96+/-7 vs. 169+/-9 g), respectively. The declining inhibitory effect of PYY(3-36) on daily food intake when the interinfusion interval was >or=3 h appeared to be due in part to an increase in food intake between infusions. The declining inhibitory effect of PYY(3-36) on daily food intake when the interinfusion interval was <3 h suggested possible receptor downregulation and tolerance to frequent PYY(3-36) administration; however, food intake significantly increased when PYY(3-36) treatments were discontinued for 1 day following apparent loss in treatment efficacies. Together, these results demonstrate the development of a potent homeostatic response to increase food intake when PYY(3-36) reduces food intake and energy reserves in diet-induced obese rats.

  20. Effects of Murine Norovirus Infection on a Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Jisun; Fierce, Yvette; Drivdahl, Rolf; Treuting, Piper M; Seamons, Audrey; Brabb, Thea; Maggio-Price, Lillian

    2010-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is prevalent in SPF mouse facilities in the United States, and we currently lack sufficient data to determine whether it should be eliminated. It is generally accepted that the virus does not cause clinical symptoms in immunocompetent mice. However, we previously reported that MNV infection alters the phenotype of a mouse model of bacteria-induced inflammatory bowel disease in part through its effects on dendritic cells. The tropism of MNV toward macrophages and dendritic cells makes MNV a potential intercurrent variable in murine models of macrophage-driven inflammatory diseases, such as obesity, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Therefore, we determined whether MNV infection altered obesity and insulin resistance phenotypes in C57BL/6 mice, a widely used model of diet-induced obesity. We found that MNV did not alter weight gain, food intake, and glucose metabolism in this model, but it did induce subtle changes in lymphoid tissue. Further studies using other models of metabolic diseases are needed to provide additional information on the potential role this ‘subclinical’ virus might have on disease progression in mouse models of inflammatory diseases. PMID:20579433

  1. Lactobacillus plantarum HAC01 regulates gut microbiota and adipose tissue accumulation in a diet-induced obesity murine model.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung; Ji, Yosep; Jung, Hoe-Yune; Park, Hyunjoon; Kang, Jihee; Choi, Sang-Haeng; Shin, Heuynkil; Hyun, Chang-Kee; Kim, Kyong-Tai; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H

    2017-02-01

    The functional features of Lactobacillus plantarum HAC01 (HAC01), isolated from fermented Korean kimchi, were studied with regard to the fat mass, immunometabolic biomarkers and dysbiosis in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) murine model. L. rhamnosus GG (LGG) served as reference strain and a PBS-treated group as control. The administration of L. plantarum HAC01 resulted in reduction of the mesenteric adipose depot, the conjunctive tissue closely associated with the gastrointestinal tract, where lipid oxidative gene expression was upregulated compared to the control group. Metagenome analysis of intestinal microbiota showed that both strains HAC01 and LGG influenced specific bacterial families such as the Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae rather than the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes as a whole. The relative abundance of the Lachnospiraceae (phylum Firmicutes) was significantly higher in both LAB-treated groups than in the control. Comparing the impact of the two Lactobacillus strains on microbial composition in the gut also suggests strain-specific effects. The study emphasises the need for deeper studies into functional specificity of a probiotic organism at the strain level. Alleviation of obesity-associated dysbiosis by modulation of the gut microbiota appears to be associated with "indicator" bacterial taxa such as the family Lachnospiraceae. This may provide further insight into mechanisms basic to the mode of probiotic action against obesity and associated dysbiosis.

  2. The saponin-rich fraction of a Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. aqueous leaf extract reduces cafeteria and high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Rama Manohar I; Latha, Pushpa B; Vijaya, Tartte; Rao, Dattatreya S

    2012-01-01

    We examined the antiobesity effect of a saponin-rich fraction of a Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. aqueous leaf extract (SGE) using cafeteria and high-fat diet-induced obese rats for a period of eight weeks. SGE was orally administered at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight once a day to the treatment group. It significantly decreased the body weight, food consumption, visceral organs weight, and the levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins, very low-density lipoproteins, atherogenic index, glucose, and increased the levels of high-density lipoproteins. There was no significant difference with respect to all parameters of the study in case of normal (N) diet and N diet + SGE rats. In vitro, SGE inhibited the pancreatic lipase activity. The present study gave clear evidence that the SGE has a significant antiobese action, supporting its use in traditional medicine, and can be used as a substitute for synthetic drugs.

  3. Effects of poly-γ-glutamic acid on serum and brain concentrations of glutamate and GABA in diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyesung; Chang, Moon-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a mucilaginous and biodegradable compound produced by Bacillus subtilis from fermented soybeans, and is found in the traditional Korean soy product, cheongkukjang. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of γ-PGA from a food source on the concentration of the neurotransmitter GABA and its metabolic precursor glutamate in diet-induced obese rats. Eight-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were used. The rats were divided into two groups and obesity was induced by providing either a 10% control fat or 45% high fat diet for 5 weeks. The rats were then blocked into 6 groups and supplemented with a 0.1% γ-PGA diet for 4 weeks. After sacrifice, brain and serum GABA and glutamate concentrations were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. The rats fed the high fat diet had significantly increased body weights. γ-PGA supplementation significantly increased serum concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the control fat diet groups while this effect was not found in the high fat groups. In the brain, glutamate concentrations were significantly higher in the γ-PGA supplemented groups both in rats fed the normal and high fat diets than in the no γ-PGA controls. GABA concentrations showed the same tendency. The results indicated that γ-PGA intake increased GABA concentrations in the serum and brain. However, the effects were not shown in obese rats. PMID:20198205

  4. Hydrodynamic delivery of interleukin 15 gene promotes resistance to high fat diet-induced obesity, fatty liver and improves glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Liu, D

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effect of hydrodynamic delivery of plasmid containing Il-15 gene on high fat diet-induced obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. We demonstrate that Il-15 gene transfer results in multiple beneficial effects, including blockade of weight gain, alleviation of fatty liver and improvement in glucose homeostasis in mice. These effects are accompanied by suppressed expression of genes involved in lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis including Scd-1, Fas, Pdk4, Pepck and G6p, and enhanced expression of genes responsible for lipolysis and glucose metabolism such as Cpt1-α, Cpt1-β, Acadm, Acadl and Glut-4. Collectively, our results suggest that Il-15 gene transfer is an effective approach in preventing diet-induced obesity and obesity-associated complications.

  5. Metabolic consequences and vulnerability to diet-induced obesity in male mice under chronic social stress.

    PubMed

    Bartolomucci, Alessandro; Cabassi, Aderville; Govoni, Paolo; Ceresini, Graziano; Cero, Cheryl; Berra, Daniela; Dadomo, Harold; Franceschini, Paolo; Dell'Omo, Giacomo; Parmigiani, Stefano; Palanza, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Social and psychological factors interact with genetic predisposition and dietary habit in determining obesity. However, relatively few pre-clinical studies address the role of psychosocial factors in metabolic disorders. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated in male mice: 1) opposite status-dependent effect on body weight gain under chronic psychosocial stress; 2) a reduction in body weight in individually housed (Ind) male mice. In the present study these observations were extended to provide a comprehensive characterization of the metabolic consequences of chronic psychosocial stress and individual housing in adult CD-1 male mice. Results confirmed that in mice fed standard diet, dominant (Dom) and Ind had a negative energy balance while subordinate (Sub) had a positive energy balance. Locomotor activity was depressed in Sub and enhanced in Dom. Hyperphagia emerged for Dom and Sub and hypophagia for Ind. Dom also showed a consistent decrease of visceral fat pads weight as well as increased norepinephrine concentration and smaller adipocytes diameter in the perigonadal fat pad. On the contrary, under high fat diet Sub and, surprisingly, Ind showed higher while Dom showed lower vulnerability to obesity associated with hyperphagia. In conclusion, we demonstrated that social status under chronic stress and individual housing deeply affect mice metabolic functions in different, sometime opposite, directions. Food intake, the hedonic response to palatable food as well as the locomotor activity and the sympathetic activation within the adipose fat pads all represent causal factors explaining the different metabolic alterations observed. Overall this study demonstrates that pre-clinical animal models offer a suitable tool for the investigation of the metabolic consequences of chronic stress exposure and associated psychopathologies.

  6. Anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic effects of brown seaweeds in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jaehoon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Seaweeds have been reported to have various health beneficial effects. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects of four types of domestic brown seaweeds in a high-fat diet-induced obese mouse model and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM). MATERIALS/METHODS Male C57BL/6N mice were fed low-fat diet (LFD), high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD containing Undaria Pinnatifida, HFD containing Laminaria Japonica (LJ), HFD containing Sargassum Fulvellum, or HFD containing Hizikia Fusiforme (HF) for 16 weeks. RESULTS Brown seaweed supplementation did not affect long-term HFD-associated changes in body weight or adiposity, although mice fed HFD + LJ or HFD + HF gained slightly less body weight compared with those fed HFD at the beginning of feeding. Despite being obese, mice fed HFD + LJ appeared to show improved insulin sensitivity compared to mice fed HFD. Consistently, we observed significantly reduced blood glucose concentrations in mice fed HFD + LJ compared with those of mice fed HFD. Although no significant differences in adipocyte size were detected among the HFD-fed groups, consumption of seaweeds decreased formation of HFD-induced crown-like structures in gonadal adipose tissue as well as plasma inflammatory cytokines. BMDM from mice fed HFDs with seaweeds showed differential regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-6 compared with BMDM from mice fed HFD by LPS stimulation. CONCLUSION Although seaweed consumption did not prevent long-term HFD-induced obesity in C57BL/6N mice, it reduced insulin resistance (IR) and circulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, seaweeds may ameliorate systemic inflammation and IR in obesity partially due to inhibition of inflammatory signaling in adipose tissue cells as well as bone marrow-derived immune cells. PMID:26865915

  7. Insulin Production and Resistance in Different Models of Diet-Induced Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alwahsh, Salamah M.; Dwyer, Benjamin J.; Forbes, Shareen; van Thiel, David H.; Starkey Lewis, Philip J.; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2017-01-01

    The role of the liver and the endocrine pancreas in development of hyperinsulinemia in different types of obesity remains unclear. Sedentary rats (160 g) were fed a low-fat-diet (LFD, chow 13% kcal fat), high-fat-diet (HFD, 35% fat), or HFD+ 30% ethanol+ 30% fructose (HF-EFr, 22% fat). Overnight-fasted rats were culled after one, four or eight weeks. Pancreatic and hepatic mRNAs were isolated for subsequent RT-PCR analysis. After eight weeks, body weights increased three-fold in the LFD group, 2.8-fold in the HFD group, and 2.4-fold in the HF-EFr (p < 0.01). HF-EFr-fed rats had the greatest liver weights and consumed less food during Weeks 4–8 (p < 0.05). Hepatic-triglyceride content increased progressively in all groups. At Week 8, HOMA-IR values, fasting serum glucose, C-peptide, and triglycerides levels were significantly increased in LFD-fed rats compared to that at earlier time points. The greatest plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and leptin were observed in the HF-EFr at Week 8. Gene expression of pancreatic-insulin was significantly greater in the HFD and HF-EFr groups versus the LFD. Nevertheless, insulin: C-peptide ratios and HOMA-IR values were substantially higher in HF-EFr. Hepatic gene-expression of insulin-receptor-substrate-1/2 was downregulated in the HF-EFr. The expression of phospho-ERK-1/2 and inflammatory-mediators were greatest in the HF-EFr-fed rats. Chronic intake of both LFD and HFD induced obesity, MetS, and intrahepatic-fat accumulation. The hyperinsulinemia is the strongest in rats with the lowest body weights, but having the highest liver weights. This accompanies the strongest increase of pancreatic insulin production and the maximal decrease of hepatic insulin signaling, which is possibly secondary to hepatic fat deposition, inflammation and other factors. PMID:28134848

  8. Peucedanum japonicum Thunb inhibits high-fat diet induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Takafumi; Toda, Takayoshi; Nukitrangsan, Natthanan; Inafuku, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hironori; Oku, Hirosuke

    2011-06-01

    This study examined the antiobese activity of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb (PJT) in mice. In the first experiment, 4-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed seven different diets containing 15% corn oil and 0-20% PJT powder for 4 weeks. Feeding the 10% and 20% PJT diet suppressed the body weight gain and the accumulation of abdominal and subcutaneous fats. PJT reduced serum and liver levels of triglyceride and serum levels of leptin in a dose-dependent manner. PJT intake decreased the proportion of saturated fatty acids and increased polyunsaturated and n-3 fatty acids in the liver. To obtain more insight into the antiobese activity of PJT, its effect on lipid absorption and enzyme activities related to lipid metabolism was studied in the second experiment. There was an increased faecal excretion of triglyceride in mice fed 5% and 10% PJT diets. Fatty acid synthase activity was decreased while carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity was increased by 10% PJT intake. These findings pointed to the usefulness of PJT for the development of a safe natural agent to reduce obesity or body weight for the first time. The rationale for the lipid lowering mechanism of PJT and the candidate compound responsible for the observations have also been discussed.

  9. Shrimp Oil Extracted from the Shrimp Processing Waste Reduces the Development of Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Phenotypes in Diet-induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Nair, Sandhya; Gagnon, Jacques; Pelletier, Claude; Tchoukanova, Nadia; Zhang, Junzeng; Ewart, H Stephen; Ewart, Vanya; Jiao, Guangling; Wang, Yanwen

    2017-03-31

    Diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose tolerance, chronic inflammation and oxidative stress represent the main features of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The present study was conducted to examine the efficacy and mechanisms of shrimp oil on glucose homeostasis in obese rats. Male CD rats fed a high-fat diet (60 kcal% fat) and 20% fructose-drinking water were divided into four groups and treated with the dietary replacement of 0, 10% (SO10), 15% (SO15), or 20% (SO20) of lard with shrimp oil for 10 weeks. Age-matched rats fed a low-fat diet (10 kcal% fat) were used as the normal control. Rats on the high-fat diet showed impaired (p < 0.05) glucose tolerance and insulin resistance compared with rats fed the low-fat diet. Shrimp oil improved (p < 0.05) oral glucose tolerance, insulin response and homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance index, decreased serum insulin, leptin and hemoglobin A1c and free fatty acids, and increased adiponectin. Shrimp oil also increased (p < 0.05) antioxidant capacity and reduced oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. The results demonstrated that shrimp oil dose-dependently improved glycemic control in obese rats through multiple mechanisms.

  10. Fat-water MRI is sensitive to local adipose tissue inflammatory changes in a diet-induced obesity mouse model at 15T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Henry H.; Webb, Corey D.; Gruen, Marnie L.; Hasty, Alyssa H.; Gore, John C.; Welch, E. B.

    2015-03-01

    In obesity, fat-water MRI (FWMRI) methods provide valuable information about adipose tissue (AT) distribution. AT is known to undergo complex metabolic and endocrine changes in association with chronic inflammation including iron overloading. Here, we investigate the potential for FWMRI parameters (fat signal fraction (FSF), local magnetic field offset, and T2*) to be sensitive to AT inflammatory changes in an established diet-induced obesity mouse model. Male C57BL/6J mice were placed on a low fat (LFD) or a high fat diet (HFD). 3D multi- gradient-echo MRI at 15.2T was performed at baseline, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after diet onset. A 3D fat-water separation algorithm and additional processing was used to generate FSF, local field offset, and T2* maps. We examined these parameters in perirenal AT ROIs from HFD and LFD mice. Results: The data suggest that FSF, local field offset, and T2* can differentiate time course behavior between inflamed and control AT (increasing FSF, decreasing local field offset, increasing followed by decreasing T2*). The biophysical mechanisms of these observed changes are not well understood and require further study. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first evidence that FWMRI can provide biomarkers sensitive to AT inflammation, and that FWMRI has the potential for longitudinal non-invasive assessment of AT inflammation in obesity.

  11. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  12. Decreased urea synthesis in cafeteria-diet-induced obesity in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, T; Viña, J R; Viña, J; Cabo, J

    1985-01-01

    Feeding rats with a cafeteria diet resulted in increases in total body weight and in epididymal-adipose-tissue weight. Those rats excreted significantly less N than did controls. The amount of N ingested by cafeteria-diet-fed rats was kept equal to that of controls. This decrease in N excretion is explained by a decrease in urinary excretion of urea. This may be due to the following facts. The rate of synthesis of urea from precursors by isolated hepatocytes from cafeteria-diet-fed rats was lower than in controls. In cafeteria-diet-fed rats the activities of all the enzymes of the urea cycle are decreased. The major percentage decreases are those of carbamoylphosphate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.16) and of argininosuccinate synthetase (EC 6.3.4.5), the enzymes probably involved in the regulation of the overall rate of the cycle. When rats are switched to normal chow diet, the enzyme activities return to normal values. The uptake of amino acids by liver of cafeteria-diet-fed rats is lower than in controls. These results contrast with those obtained previously by using other models of obesity in rat (i.e. genetic or hypothalamic), in which N excretion was increased. PMID:4062872

  13. Diet induced weight loss accelerates onset of negative alliesthesia in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Frankham, Patrick; Gosselin, Caroline; Cabanac, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological and behavioral responses to hypocaloric diet are to increase energy intake to defend a steady body weight. We utilized the method of "negative alliesthesia" for measuring the hedonic reponse to sweet stimulus before (Initial session) and 3 months after entering a weight loss program. The negative alliesthesia test is known by physiologists but few clinical data exist. It is based on the observation that repeated pleasant gustatory stimuli turn into unpleasantness in the process of alliesthesia. At first visit participants repeatedly ingested sweet stimuli until they found them unpleasant and rated quantitatively on a linear analogue scale their hedonic experience. This procedure was repeated every 3 min until participants felt displeasure to end the session. The same protocol was followed after three months of following a weight loss diet. Dieting energy intake was from 1400 – 2000 kcal/d for 8 wk. Energy composition was 50% carb:25% prot: 25% lipid. After 8 wk caloric intake increased by 50 kcal/wk, to reach daily intake of 1800 – 2400 kcal/d. Energy composition was 50% carb:22% prot: 27% lipid. We report results on the effect of slow weight loss on negative alliesthesia in ten obese female participants enrolled in a commercial diet program based on Canada's Food Guide (Mincavi®). Results Results showed that diet lowered the mean BMI (Initial session 36.8 +/- 1.8 vs. 3 mo 34.9 +/- 1.8 kg/m2). At 3 mo the onset of negative alliesthesia, time to abandon experimental session, was shortened (Initial session 33 vs. 3 mo 24 min). The same trend was observed in the time to reach indifference (Initial session 21.9 +/- 3.8 vs. 3 mo 16.2 +/-2.4 min). There was no observed difference in maximum (Initial session +79.5 +/- 11.7; 3 mo +94.5 +/- 9.9 mm) and minimum (Initial session -90.0 +/- 14.4; 3 mo -106 +/- 11.1 mm) hedonic rating. Conclusion Earlier onset of negative alliesthesia, as seen in our participants, is not consistent with previous

  14. Oleuropein aglycone enhances UCP1 expression in brown adipose tissue in high-fat-diet-induced obese rats by activating β-adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Oi-Kano, Yuriko; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kawada, Teruo; Watanabe, Kenichi; Iwai, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    Oleuropein is the pungent principle of raw olives. Oleuropein aglycone (OA) is a major phenolic compound in extra virgin olive oil and the absorbed form of oleuropein. We aimed to determine the mechanism underlying the nutritional effects of oleuropein and OA on interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) in rats with high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity by examining the agonistic activity of oleuropein and OA toward the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Four-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an HF (palm oil 30% wt:wt) diet alone or with oleuropein (HF-O, 1 g/kg diet) for 28 days. In rats fed HF-O compared to HF, urinary noradrenaline, adrenaline and UCP1 levels in IBAT were significantly higher, whereas plasma leptin levels and the total weight of the abdominal cavity adipose tissue were significantly lower. In anaesthetized 7-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats, the OA (3.8 mg of intravenous injection)-induced increase in plasma noradrenaline secretion was suppressed by TRPA1 or TRPV1 antagonist and by a β2- or β3-adrenoceptor antagonist. Furthermore, OA-activated rat and human TRPV1s expressed on HEK293 cells at the same level as zingerone (pungent component in ginger). OA also activated humanTRPA1, and its potency was approximately 10-fold stronger than that for TRPV1. These findings suggest that OA is the agonist of both TRPA1 and TRPV1 and that OA enhances UCP1 expression in IBAT with a concomitant decrease in the visceral fat mass of HF-diet-induced obese rats through enhanced noradrenaline secretion via β-adrenergic action following TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation.

  15. Intrahippocampal administration of a domain antibody that binds aggregated amyloid-β reverses cognitive deficits produced by diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Danielle M.; Fitzgerald, Dennis P.; O’Leary, Kelsey E.; Anderson, Brian M.; Lee, Christine C.; Tessier, Peter M.; McNay, Ewan C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of high fat diets (HFD), diet-induced obesity (DIO) and Type 2 diabetes continues to increase, associated with cognitive impairment in both humans and rodent models. Mechanisms transducing these impairments remain largely unknown: one possibility is that a common mechanism may be involved in the cognitive impairment seen in obese and/or diabetic states and in dementia, specifically Alzheimer’s disease (AD). DIO is well established as a risk factor for development of AD. Oligomeric amyloid-β (Aβ) is neurotoxic, and we showed that intrahippocampal oligomeric Aβ produces cognitive and metabolic dysfunction similar to that seen in DIO or diabetes. Moreover, animal models of DIO show elevated brain Aβ, a hallmark of AD, suggesting that this may be one source of cognitive impairment in both conditions. Methods Intrahippocampal administration of a novel anti-Aβ domain antibody for aggregated Aβ, or a control domain antibody, to control or HFD-induced DIO rats. Spatial learning measured in a conditioned contextual fear (CCF) task after domain antibody treatment; postmortem, hippocampal NMDAR and AMPAR were measured. Results DIO caused impairment in CCF, and this impairment was eliminated by intrahippocampal administration of the active domain antibody. Measurement of hippocampal proteins suggests that DIO causes dysregulation of hippocampal AMPA receptors, which is also reversed by acute domain antibody administration. Conclusions Our findings support the concept that oligomeric Aβ within the hippocampus of DIO animals may not only be a risk factor for development of AD but may also cause cognitive impairment before the development of dementia. General Significance and Interest Our work integrates the engineering of domain antibodies with conformational-and sequence-specificity for oligomeric amyloid beta with a clinically relevant model of diet-induced obesity in order to demonstrate not only the pervasive effects of obesity on several

  16. Effect of feeding a high-fat diet independently of caloric intake on reproductive function in diet-induced obese female rats

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mona A.; Abogresha, Noha M.; Tamany, Dalia A.; Lotfy, Mariam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Globally, the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing, predisposing females to health hazards including compromised reproductive capacity. Our objective was to investigate the effect of ad libitum, isocalorically and hypocalorically restricted high-fat diet (HFD) feeding on reproductive function in diet-induced obese female rats. Material and methods Twenty female albino Sprague Dawley rats were used; 5 rats were kept on a standard pellet animal diet to serve as a control group (A) and 15 rats were fed a HFD for 9 weeks to induce obesity. The HFD fed animals were equally divided into three groups: an ad libitum HFD group (B), an isocalorically restricted HFD group (C), and a hypocalorically restricted HFD group (D). Estrous cyclicity, hormonal levels, ovarian histopathology and caspase-3 immunoreactivity were evaluated. Results The HFD-fed rats in groups B, C and D had significant irregularity in estrous cyclicity Vs group A (p = 0.001, 0.003 and 0.034 respectively). Groups C and D had significant reduction in serum progesterone level (p = 0.006 and 0.018 Vs A). Isocaloric restriction of HFD feeding significantly increased serum LH. Groups B and C had a significant increase in caspase-3 expression in the ovary (p < 0.001). Conclusions Ad libitum HFD interfered with the normal estrous cycle and enhanced apoptosis of luteal cells in obese female rats. The HFD restriction interfered with the normal estrous cycle and caused functional insufficiency of the corpus luteum in obese female rats. These results suggest that HFD feeding determinately affects female reproductive function independently of caloric intake. PMID:27478474

  17. Enhanced amylin-mediated body weight loss in estradiol-deficient diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, James L; Turek, Victoria F; Wittmer, Carrie; Griffin, Peter S; Wilson, Julie K; Reynolds, James M; Zhao, Yu; Mack, Christine M; Parkes, David G; Roth, Jonathan D

    2010-12-01

    In rodents, ovariectomy (OVX) elicits weight gain and diminished responsiveness to homeostatic signals. Here we characterized the response of obese OVX rats to peripheral amylin. Rats received sham surgery (SHAM), OVX, or OVX with hormonal replacement (17β-estradiol, 2 μg per 4 d; OVX+E) and were infused with vehicle or amylin (50 μg/kg · d) for 28 d. Amylin reduced body weight (5.1 ± 1.1%) and food intake (10.9 ± 3.4%) in SHAM rats but was twice as efficacious in OVX rats in reducing weight (11.2 ± 1.9%) and food intake (23.0 ± 2.0%). There were no differences between amylin-treated SHAM and OVX+E rats. OVX decreased metabolic rate (∼24%) and increased respiratory exchange ratio relative to SHAM. Amylin partially normalized metabolic rate (13% increase) in OVX rats and decreased respiratory exchange ratio in OVX and SHAM rats. Regarding central mechanisms, amylin infusion corrected the OVX-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and increased immobility in the forced swim test. Additionally, amylin increased neurogenesis (∼2-fold) within the area postrema of OVX rats. To assess the contribution of endogenous leptin to amylin-mediated weight loss in OVX rats, amylin was administered to SHAM or OVX Zucker diabetic fatty rats. In SHAM rats, amylin infusion reduced food intake but not body weight, whereas in OVX Zucker diabetic fatty rats, food intake, body weight, and insulin were reduced. Overall, amylin induced greater body weight loss in the absence of estradiol via central and peripheral actions that did not require leptin. These findings support the clinical investigation of amylin in low estradiol (e.g. postmenopausal) states.

  18. Arterial insulin resistance in Yucatan micropigs with diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Lu, Li; Leitner, J. Wayne; Sarraf, Mohammad; Gianani, Roberto; Draznin, Boris; Greyson, Clifford R.; Reusch, Jane E. B.; Schwartz, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Metabolic syndrome affects a large proportion of the population and increases cardiovascular disease risk. Because metabolic syndrome often co-exists clinically with atherosclerosis, it is difficult to distinguish their respective contributions to vascular abnormalities. Accordingly, we utilized a porcine dietary model of metabolic syndrome without atherosclerosis to investigate early abnormalities of vascular function and signaling. Methods Thirty-two Yucatan micropigs were fed either a high fat, high simple sugar, high calorie (HFHS) or standard chow diet (STD) for 6 months. Neither diet contained added cholesterol. Blood pressure and flow-mediated vasodilatation were assessed at baseline and 6 months. Aortas were harvested at 6 months to assess histology, insulin signaling, and endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) phosphorylation. Results HFHS pigs developed characteristic of metabolic syndrome including obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, but without histological evidence of atherosclerosis. Although arterial intima-media thickness did not differ between groups, vascular dysfunction in HFHS was manifest by increased blood pressure and impaired flow-mediated vasodilation of the femoral artery. Compared with STD, aortas from HFHS exhibited increased p85α expression and Ser307 IRS-1 phosphorylation, and blunted insulin-stimulated IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase activity. In the absence of insulin stimulation, aortic Akt Ser473-phosphorylation was greater in HFHS than in STD. With insulin stimulation, Akt phosphorylation increased in STD, but not HFHS. Insulin-induced Ser1177-phosphorylation of eNOS was decreased in HFHS, compared with STD. Conclusions Pigs with metabolic syndrome develop early vascular dysfunction and aortic insulin signaling abnormalities, and could be a useful model for early human vascular abnormalities in this condition. PMID:23558108

  19. Role of the vagus nerve in the development and treatment of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    de Lartigue, Guillaume

    2016-10-15

    This review highlights evidence for a role of the vagus nerve in the development of obesity and how targeting the vagus nerve with neuromodulation or pharmacology can be used as a therapeutic treatment of obesity. The vagus nerve innervating the gut plays an important role in controlling metabolism. It communicates peripheral information about the volume and type of nutrients between the gut and the brain. Depending on the nutritional status, vagal afferent neurons express two different neurochemical phenotypes that can inhibit or stimulate food intake. Chronic ingestion of calorie-rich diets reduces sensitivity of vagal afferent neurons to peripheral signals and their constitutive expression of orexigenic receptors and neuropeptides. This disruption of vagal afferent signalling is sufficient to drive hyperphagia and obesity. Furthermore neuromodulation of the vagus nerve can be used in the treatment of obesity. Although the mechanisms are poorly understood, vagal nerve stimulation prevents weight gain in response to a high-fat diet. In small clinical studies, in patients with depression or epilepsy, vagal nerve stimulation has been demonstrated to promote weight loss. Vagal blockade, which inhibits the vagus nerve, results in significant weight loss. Vagal blockade is proposed to inhibit aberrant orexigenic signals arising in obesity as a putative mechanism of vagal blockade-induced weight loss. Approaches and molecular targets to develop future pharmacotherapy targeted to the vagus nerve for the treatment of obesity are proposed. In conclusion there is strong evidence that the vagus nerve is involved in the development of obesity and it is proving to be an attractive target for the treatment of obesity.

  20. Anti-obesity effect of Gymnema sylvestre extract on high fat diet-induced obesity in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Bhandari, U; Tripathi, C D; Khanna, G

    2013-12-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R. BR. (Asclepiadaceae) has been used frequently in traditional Indian folk medicine for the treatment of diabetes. Study was performed in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in murine model. Obesity was induced by oral feeding of HFD for 28 days. The anti obesity effect of water soluble fraction of Gymnema sylvestre extract (120 mg/kg, p.o. for 21 days) in HFD fed rats was evaluated by the measurement of body weight gain, food intake, hemodynamic changes (systolic, diastolic, mean blood pressure and heart rate), serum lipid profiles (triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol), leptin, insulin, glucose, apolipoproteins A1 and B, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and antioxidant enzymes such as reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels in liver tissues. Organs and visceral fat pad weight were measured. Histopathological studies were also carried out. Water soluble fraction of G. sylvestre ethanolic extract and rimonabant significantly reduced serum lipids, leptin, insulin, glucose, apolipoprotein B and LDH levels while it significantly increased the HDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1 and antioxidant enzymes levels in liver tissue as compared to the HFD fed rats. Histopathological studies of tissues showed no pathological changes. The results of this study show that water soluble fraction of G. sylvestre extract possess antiobesity effect.

  1. Cheonggukjang, a soybean paste fermented with B. licheniformis-67 prevents weight gain and improves glycemic control in high fat diet induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joo-Hee; Pichiah, P.B.Tirupathi; Kim, Min-Jung; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effects of soybean paste—Cheonggukjang, fermented with poly gamma glutamic acid producing Bacillus licheniformis-67 in diet induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Forty male C57BL/6J mice aged 4 weeks were divided into four dietary groups; normal diet control, high fat diet control, high fat diet containing 30% of unfermented soybean and high fat diet containing 30% Cheonggukjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis-67. After 13 weeks of dietary intervention the mice were sacrificed; serum and tissue samples were examined. Serum and hepatic lipid profile, blood glucose, insulin, leptin level were lower (<0.05) along with the body weight and epididymal fat pad weight in the 30% Cheonggukjang supplemented group compared with the high fat diet control group. The expression level of lipid anabolic gene was significantly decreased; whereas the expression level of lipid catabolic genes were significantly increased in the 30% Cheonggukjang supplemented group compared to the high fat diet control group. Collectively, these results suggested that intake of Cheonggukjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis-67 significantly prevents obesity related parameters. PMID:27499576

  2. The “metabolic sensor” function of rat supraoptic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons is attenuated during lactation but not in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Wanida; Song, Zhilin; Johnson, Ginger C.; MacLean, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    The oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) demonstrate characteristics of “metabolic sensors”. They express insulin receptors and glucokinase (GK). They respond to an increase in glucose and insulin with an increase in intracellular [Ca2+] and increased OT and VP release that is GK dependent. Although this is consistent with the established role of OT as an anorectic agent, how these molecules function relative to the important role of OT during lactation and whether deficits in this metabolic sensor function contribute to obesity remain to be examined. Thus, we evaluated whether insulin and glucose-induced OT and VP secretion from perifused explants of the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system are altered during lactation and by diet-induced obesity (DIO). In explants from female day 8 lactating rats, increasing glucose (Glu, 5 mM) did not alter OT or VP release. However, insulin (Ins; 3 ng/ml) increased OT release, and increasing the glucose concentration in the presence of insulin (Ins+Glu) resulted in a sustained elevation in both OT and VP release that was not prevented by alloxan, a GK inhibitor. Explants from male DIO rats also responded to Ins+Glu with an increase in OT and VP regardless of whether obesity had been induced by feeding a high-fat diet (HFD). The HFD-DIO rats had elevated body weight, plasma Ins, Glu, leptin, and triglycerides. These findings suggest that the role of SON neurons as metabolic sensors is diminished during lactation, but not in this animal model of obesity. PMID:26661099

  3. The Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Prunus yedoensis Bark Extract on Adipose Tissue in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee; Kwak, Tae-Kyung; Kim, Bo-Geun; Lee, Kyung-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic, low-grade inflammatory responses occur in obese adipose tissue and play a crucial role in the development of insulin resistance. Macrophages exposed to high glucose upregulate the expression of SRA, a macrophage-specific scavenger receptor. The present study investigated whether Prunus yedoensis (PY) bark extract affects the inflammatory response and scavenger receptor gene expression observed in a diet-induced obesity model in vivo. Oral administration of PY extract significantly reduced fasting blood glucose levels without a change in body weight in mice fed a high fat diet for 17 weeks. PY extract significantly suppressed expression of inflammatory and macrophage genes such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and F4/80 in epididymal adipose tissue. Among scavenger receptor genes, SRA expression was significantly reduced. The inhibitory responses of PY extract and its fractions were determined through evaluation of scavenger receptor expression in THP-1 cells. PY extract and its ethyl acetate fraction decreased the levels of SRA mRNA and phospho-ERK1/2 during monocyte differentiation. Our data indicate that the anti-inflammatory effects of PY extract and its downregulation of SRA seem to account for its hypoglycemic effects. PMID:26413130

  4. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-08-14

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome.

  5. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  6. Inhibition of SREBP transcriptional activity by a boron-containing compound improves lipid homeostasis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoping; Xiaoli; Zong, Haihong; Abdulla, Arian; Yang, Ellen S T; Wang, Qun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Das, Bhaskar C; Yang, Fajun

    2014-07-01

    Dysregulation of lipid homeostasis is intimately associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Sterol regulatory-element binding proteins (SREBPs) are the master regulators of lipid biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that the conserved transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex is critically required for the SREBP transcriptional activity, and recruitment of the Mediator complex to the SREBP transactivation domains (TADs) is through the MED15-KIX domain. Recently, we have synthesized several boron-containing small molecules. Among these novel compounds, BF175 can specifically block the binding of MED15-KIX to SREBP1a-TAD in vitro, resulting in an inhibition of the SREBP transcriptional activity and a decrease of SREBP target gene expression in cultured hepatocytes. Furthermore, BF175 can improve lipid homeostasis in the mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Compared with the control, BF175 treatment decreased the expression of SREBP target genes in mouse livers and decreased hepatic and blood levels of lipids. These results suggest that blocking the interaction between SREBP-TADs and the Mediator complex by small molecules may represent a novel approach for treating diseases with aberrant lipid homeostasis.

  7. High Hydrostatic Pressure Extract of Red Ginseng Attenuates Inflammation in Rats with High-fat Diet Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sunyoon; Lee, Mak-Soon; Shin, Yoonjin; Kim, Chong-Tai; Kim, In-Hwan; Kim, Yangha

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is associated with obesity. This study investigated effect of high hydrostatic pressure extract of red ginseng (HRG) on inflammation in rats with high-fat (HF) diet induced obesity. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (80~110 g) were randomly divided into two groups, and fed a 45% HF diet (HF) and a 45% HF diet containing 1.5% HRG (HF+HRG) for 14 weeks. At the end of the experiment, the serum leptin level was reduced by the HRG supplementation. The mRNA expression of genes related to adipogenesis including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and adipocyte protein 2 was down-regulated in the white adipose tissue (WAT). The mRNA levels of major inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and interleukin-6 were remarkably down-regulated by the HRG in WAT. These results suggest that HRG might be beneficial in ameliorating the inflammation-associated health complications by suppressing adipogenic and pro-inflammatory gene expression. PMID:26770912

  8. Chronic Exposure to Low Doses of Dioxin Promotes Liver Fibrosis Development in the C57BL/6J Diet-Induced Obesity Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Caroline; Teixeira-Clerc, Fatima; Leblanc, Alix F.; Touch, Sothea; Emond, Claude; Guerre-Millo, Michèle; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Barouki, Robert; Aggerbeck, Martine; Coumoul, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) has been associated with the progression of chronic liver diseases, yet the contribution of POPs to the development of fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a condition closely linked to obesity, remains poorly documented. Objectives: We investigated the effects of subchronic exposure to low doses of the POP 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand, on NAFLD progression in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a 10% low-fat (LFD) or a 45% high-fat (HFD) purified diet for 14 weeks and TCDD-exposed groups were injected once a week with 5 μg/kg TCDD or the vehicle for the last 6 weeks of the diet. Results: Liver histology and triglyceride levels showed that exposure of HFD fed mice to TCDD worsened hepatic steatosis, as compared to either HFD alone or LFD plus TCDD and the mRNA levels of key genes of hepatic lipid metabolism were strongly altered in co-treated mice. Further, increased liver collagen staining and serum transaminase levels showed that TCDD induced liver fibrosis in the HFD fed mice. TCDD in LFD fed mice increased the expression of several inflammation and fibrosis marker genes with no additional effect from a HFD. Conclusions: Exposure to TCDD amplifies the impairment of liver functions observed in mice fed an enriched fat diet as compared to a low fat diet. The results provide new evidence that environmental pollutants promote the development of liver fibrosis in obesity-related NAFLD in C57BL/6J mice. Citation: Duval C, Teixeira-Clerc F, Leblanc AF, Touch S, Emond C, Guerre-Millo M, Lotersztajn S, Barouki R, Aggerbeck M, Coumoul X. 2017. Chronic exposure to low doses of dioxin promotes liver fibrosis development in the C57BL/6J diet-induced obesity mouse model. Environ Health Perspect 125:428–436; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP316 PMID:27713108

  9. Hypolipidemic effect of methanol fraction of Aconitum heterophyllum wall ex Royle and the mechanism of action in diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Arun Koorappally; Augustine, Anu

    2012-01-01

    Aconitum heterophyllum is an endangered Himalayan plant included in “lekhaneyagana,” a pharmacological classification mentioned by Charaka in “Charakasamhita” which means reduce excess fat. The subterranean part of the plant is used for the treatment of diseases like nervous system disorders, fever, diarrhea, obesity, etc. In the present study, we are reporting the hypolipidemic effect of methanol fraction of A. heterophyllum. The methanol extract of A. heterophyllum was orally administered in diet-induced obese rats. After four weeks treatment, blood samples were collected for the estimation of serum lipids and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Liver was collected for the assay of HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR). The fecal samples were also collected to estimate the fecal fat content. The A. heterophyllum treatment markedly lowered total cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B concentrations in blood serum. It also showed positive effects (increase) on serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and apolipoprotein A1 concentrations. On the other hand, A. heterophyllum treatment lowered HMGR activity, which helps to reduce endogenous cholesterol synthesis and also activated LCAT, helping increase in HDL-c. An increase in fecal fat content is also an indication of the hypolipidemic effect of A. heterophyllum. The significant hypolipidemic effect of A. heterophyllum may be linked to its ability to inhibit HMGR activity and block intestinal fat absorption. The increase in HDL-c may be linked to its ability to activate LCAT enzyme. PMID:23378943

  10. Peripheral endocannabinoid signaling controls hyperphagia in western diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Argueta, Donovan A; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V

    2017-03-15

    The endocannabinoid system in the brain and periphery plays a major role in controlling food intake and energy balance. We reported that tasting dietary fats was met with increased levels of the endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide, in the rat upper small intestine, and pharmacological inhibition of this local signaling event dose-dependently blocked sham feeding of fats. We now investigated the contribution of peripheral endocannabinoid signaling in hyperphagia associated with chronic consumption of a western-style diet in mice ([WD] i.e., high fat and sucrose). Feeding patterns were assessed in male C57BL/6Tac mice maintained for 60days on WD or a standard rodent chow (SD), and the role for peripheral endocannabinoid signaling at CB1Rs in controlling food intake was investigated via pharmacological interventions. In addition, levels of the endocannabinoids, 2-AG and anandamide, in the upper small intestine and circulation of mice were analyzed via liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry to evaluate diet-related changes in endocannabinoid signaling and the potential impact on food intake. Mice fed WD for 60days exhibited large increases in body weight, daily caloric intake, average meal size, and rate of feeding when compared to control mice fed SD. Inhibiting peripheral CB1Rs with the peripherally-restricted neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, AM6545 (10mg/kg), significantly reduced intake of WD during a 6h test, but failed to modify intake of SD in mice. AM6545 normalized intake of WD, average meal size, and rate of feeding to levels found in SD control mice. These results suggest that endogenous activity at peripheral CB1Rs in WD mice is critical for driving hyperphagia. In support of this hypothesis, levels of 2-AG and anandamide in both, jejunum mucosa and plasma, of ad-libitum fed WD mice increased when compared to SC mice. Furthermore, expression of genes for primary components of the endocannabinoid

  11. CNS Vitamin D improves glucose tolerance, hepatic insulin sensitivity, and reverses diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low vitamin D levels have been correlated to both obesity and the development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) although no causative mechanisms have been established. Vitamin D receptors are present in the hypothalamus, a region important in both weight and glucose regulation. The role of these receptors, ...

  12. Gomisin N inhibits adipogenesis and prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Yun, Ye-Rang; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Park, Mi-Hee; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Gomisin N (GN) is a physiological lignan derived from Schisandra chinensis. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of GN on differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and the anti-obesity effects of GN in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Incubation with GN significantly inhibited the differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect primarily occurred at an early adipogenic stage through impairment of mitotic clonal expansion (MCE) caused by cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase transition. GN inhibited the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signaling in the MCE process and activated AMP-activated protein kinase. Furthermore, GN downregulated CCAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and histone H3K9 demethylase JMJD2B during early stages of adipogenesis, and therefore repressed the expression of C/EBPβ-targeted cell cycle genes. In addition, GN also repressed the expression of histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL4 and reduced PPARγ expression. Moreover, GN effectively lowered the final body weight, adipose tissue mass, and reduced the serum levels of glucose, total triglyceride, and cholesterol in the HFD-induced obese mice. GN also markedly reduced hepatic triglyceride level induced by HFD. Collectively, these findings suggest that GN has potential as a novel agent for the prevention and treatment of obesity. PMID:28067305

  13. Effect of diet-induced maternal obesity on fetal skeletal development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maternal environment, in particular nutritional status and diet composition during pregnancy, can alter the developmental trajectory of the fetus and change the risk for chronic disease processes such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes and cancer in the offspring. This knowledge suppor...

  14. Arginase inhibition ameliorates adipose tissue inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huan; Moon, Jiyoung; Chung, Ji Hyung; Kim, Oh Yoen; Yu, Rina; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-08-28

    This study examined whether oral administration of an arginase inhibitor regulates adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation in mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 30) were randomly assigned to control (CTL, n = 10), HFD only (n = 10), and HFD with arginase inhibitor N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (HFD with nor-NOHA, n = 10) groups. Plasma and mRNA levels of cytokines in epididymal adipose tissues (EAT), macrophage infiltration into EAT, and macrophage phenotype polarization were measured in the animals after 12 weeks. Additionally, the effects of nor-NOHA on adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and mRNA expression of cytokines were measured in co-cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes and RAW 264.7 macrophages. Macrophage infiltration into the adipocytes was significantly suppressed by nor-NOHA treatment in adipocyte/macrophage co-culture system and mice with HFD-induced obesity. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), were significantly downregulated, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly upregulated in nor-NOHA-treated co-cultured cells. In the mice with HFD-induced obesity, plasma and mRNA levels of MCP-1 significantly reduced after supplementation with nor-NOHA. In addition, oral supplement of nor-NOHA modified M1/M2 phenotype ratio in the EAT. Oral supplementation of an arginase inhibitor, nor-NOHA, altered M1/M2 macrophage phenotype and macrophage infiltration into HFD-induced obese adipose tissue, thereby improved adipose tissue inflammatory response. These results may indicate that arginase inhibition ameliorates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation.

  15. Quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone protects mice from diet-induced obesity and modulates adipokines expression.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anne-Sophie; Mathé, Véronique; Lafont, René; Even, Patrick; Dioh, Waly; Veillet, Stanislas; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2012-02-01

    Besides their well-known effect in the molting control in insects, ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that display potential pharmacologic and metabolic properties in mammals. The most common ecdysteroid, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) is found in many plants such as quinoa. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of quinoa extract (Q) enriched in 20E supplementation to prevent the onset of diet-induced obesity and to regulate the expression of adipocyte-specific genes in mice. Mice were fed a standard low-fat (LF) or a high-fat (HF) diet with or without supplementation by 20E-enriched Q or pure 20E for 3 weeks. Supplementation with Q reduced adipose tissue development in HF mice without modification of their body weight gain. This adipose tissue-specific effect was mainly associated with a reduced adipocyte size and a decrease in the expression of several genes involved in lipid storage, including lipoprotein lipase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Furthermore, Q-treated mice exhibited marked attenuation of mRNA levels of several inflammation markers (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, CD68) and insulin resistance (osteopontin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1)) as compared to HF mice. Q supplementation also reversed the effects of HF-induced downregulation of the uncoupling protein(s) (UCP(s)) mRNA levels in muscle. Similar results were obtained in mice fed a HF diet supplemented with similar amounts of pure 20E, suggesting that the latter accounted for most of the Q effects. Our study indicates that Q has an antiobesity activity in vivo and could be used as a nutritional supplement for the prevention and treatment of obesity and obesity-associated disorders.

  16. Thrombospondin-1 regulates adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in diet-induced obesity enhancing adipose inflammation and stimulating adipocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Gonzalez-Quesada, Carlos; Li, Na; Cavalera, Michele; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    As a typical matricellular protein, thrombospondin (TSP)-1, binds to the structural matrix and regulates cellular behavior by modulating growth factor and cytokine signaling. Obesity and diabetes are associated with marked upregulation of TSP-1 in adipose tissue. We hypothesized that endogenous TSP-1 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Accordingly, we examined the effects of TSP-1 gene disruption on weight gain, adiposity, and adipose tissue inflammation in mice receiving a high-fat diet (HFD: 60% fat, 20% carbohydrate) or a high-carbohydrate low-fat diet (HCLFD: 10% fat, 70% carbohydrate). HFD mice had significantly higher TSP-1 expression in perigonadal adipose tissue; TSP-1 was predominantly localized in the adipose interstitium. TSP-1 loss attenuated weight gain and fat accumulation in HFD and HCLFD groups. Compared with corresponding wild-type animals, TSP-1-null mice had decreased insulin levels but exhibited elevated free fatty acid and triglyceride levels, suggesting impaired fatty acid uptake. TSP-1 loss did not affect adipocyte size and had no effect on adipose vascular density. However, TSP-1-null mice exhibited attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression and reduced macrophage infiltration, suggesting a role for TSP-1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation. In vitro, TSP-1 enhanced proliferation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes but did not modulate inflammatory cytokine and chemokine synthesis. In conclusion, TSP-1 upregulation contributes to weight gain, adipose growth, and the pathogenesis of metabolic dysfunction. The effects of TSP-1 may involve stimulation of adipocyte proliferation, activation of inflammatory signaling, and facilitated fatty acid uptake by adipocytes. PMID:23757408

  17. Down-regulation of PPARα in the spinal cord contributes to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhang, Q; Zhao, L; Li, D; Fu, Z; Liang, L

    2014-10-10

    Obesity is associated with augmented peripheral inflammation and pain sensitivity in response to inflammatory stimulation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Emerging evidence has shown that activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) in the central nervous system controls peripheral inflammation and pain. We hypothesized that obesity might down-regulate PPARα in the spinal cord, leading to enhanced peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia. Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat diet (HF) for 12weeks developed metabolic disorder and displayed significantly decreased spinal PPARα expression and activity. Interestingly, intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the PPARα activator palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) in HF-fed rats for 2weeks normalized spinal PPARα expression and activity without altering metabolic parameters. HF-fed rats were more sensitive to stimulation of the inflamed paw, and exhibited more severe paw edema following carrageenan injection, whereas HF-fed rats receiving ICV PEA had similar pain sensitivity and paw edema to LF-fed rats. No difference in the expression of inflammatory mediators or nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was observed at baseline among groups. Carrageenan induced decreased PPARα expression and activity, increased spinal cord inflammatory mediator expression and NF-κB activity in both LF-and HF-fed rats. However, the increase was more pronounced in HF-fed rats and corrected by PEA. Intrathecal injection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against PPARα in HF-fed rats completely abolished PEA effects on peripheral pain sensitivity and paw edema. These findings suggest that diet-induced obesity causes down-regulation of spinal PPARα, which facilitates the susceptibility to peripheral inflammatory challenge by increasing inflammatory response in the spinal cord, contributing to augmented peripheral inflammation and inflammatory hyperalgesia in obesity.

  18. Preparation of a nano emodin transfersome and study on its anti-obesity mechanism in adipose tissue of diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the preparation of nano emodin transfersome (NET) and investigate its effect on mRNA expression of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and G0/G1 switch gene 2 (G0S2) in adipose tissue of diet-induced obese rats. Methods NET was prepared by film-ultrasonic dispersion method. The effects of emodin components at different ratios on encapsulation efficiency were investigated.The NET envelopment rate was determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The particle size and Zeta potential of NET were evaluated by Zetasizer analyzer. Sixty male SD rats were assigned to groups randomly. After 8-week treatment, body weight, wet weight of visceral fat and the percentage of body fat (PBF) were measured. Fasting blood glucose and serum lipid levels were determined. The adipose tissue section was HE stained, and the cellular diameter and quantity of adipocytes were evaluated by light microscopy. The mRNA expression of ATGL and G0S2 from the peri-renal fat tissue was assayed by RT-PCR. Results The appropriate formulation was deoxycholic acid sodium salt vs. phospholipids 1:8, cholesterol vs. phospholipids 1:3, vitamin Evs. phospholipids 1:20, and emodin vs. phospholipid 1:6. Zeta potential was −15.11 mV, and the particle size was 292.2 nm. The mean encapsulation efficiency was (69.35 ± 0.25)%. Compared with the obese model group, body weight, wet weight of visceral fat, PBF and mRNA expression of G0S2 from peri-renal fat tissue were decreased significantly after NET treatment (all P < 0.05), while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), the diameter of adipocytes and mRNA expression of ATGL from peri-renal fat tissue were increased significantly (all P < 0.05). Conclusion The preparation method is simple and reasonable. NET with negative electricity was small and uniform in particle size, with high encapsulation efficiency and stability. NET could reduce body weight and adipocyte size, and this effect was associated with the up-regulation of

  19. Epigenetic Modification of the Leptin Promoter in Diet-Induced Obese Mice and the Effects of N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wenwen; Wang, Cui; Xia, Lulu; Fan, Chaonan; Dong, Hua; Deckelbaum, Richard J.; Qi, Kemin

    2014-01-01

    We report evidence of a detailed epigenetic modification of the leptin promoter and the effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs), which is closely associated with the leptin gene transcription in obesity. In the adipose tissue of diet induced obese (DIO) mice, methylation of the CpG island and the binding of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) at the leptin promoter are increased and RNA Pol II is decreased. Additionally, histones H3 and H4 are hypoacetylated, lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4) is hypomethylated and the binding of histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1, 2 and 6 is increased at the leptin promoter in the DIO mice. These modifications may serve a feedback role to maintain leptin concentrations within a normal range. The regulation of leptin transcriptional expression by n-3 PUFAs is mediated, at least in part, by epigenetic targets, such as MBD2 and histone modifications. PMID:24923522

  20. 8-Hydroxyeicosapentaenoic Acid Decreases Plasma and Hepatic Triglycerides via Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hidetoshi; Kikuchi, Sayaka; Hakozaki, Mayuka; Motodate, Kaori; Nagahora, Nozomi; Hirose, Masamichi

    2016-01-01

    PPARs regulate the expression of genes involved in lipid homeostasis. PPARs serve as molecular sensors of fatty acids, and their activation can act against obesity and metabolic syndromes. 8-Hydroxyeicosapentaenoic acid (8-HEPE) acts as a PPAR ligand and has higher activity than EPA. However, to date, the PPAR ligand activity of 8-HEPE has only been demonstrated in vitro. Here, we investigated its ligand activity in vivo by examining the effect of 8-HEPE treatment on high fat diet-induced obesity in mice. After the 4-week treatment period, the levels of plasma and hepatic triglycerides in the 8-HEPE-fed mice were significantly lower than those in the HFD-fed mice. The expression of genes regulated by PPARα was significantly increased in 8-HEPE-fed mice compared to those that received only HFD. Additionally, the level of hepatic palmitic acid in 8-HEPE-fed mice was significantly lower than in HFD-fed mice. These results suggested that intake of 8-HEPE induced PPARα activation and increased catabolism of lipids in the liver. We found no significant differences between EPA-fed mice and HFD-fed mice. We demonstrated that 8-HEPE has a larger positive effect on metabolic syndrome than EPA and that 8-HEPE acts by inducing PPARα activation in the liver. PMID:27239345

  1. Morphological differences in adipose tissue and changes in BDNF/Trkb expression in brain and gut of a diet induced obese zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Giuseppe; Mania, Manuela; Guerrera, Maria Cristina; Abbate, Francesco; Laurà, Rosaria; Navarra, Michele; Vega, Jose A; Ciriaco, Emilia; Germanà, Antonino

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease generated by an alteration in balance between energy intake and expenditure, also dependent on genetic and non-genetic factors. Moreover, various nuclei of the hypothalamus receive and process peripheral stimuli from the gastrointestinal tract, controlling food intake and therefore energy balance. Among anorexigenic molecules, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts through the tyrosine-kinase receptor TrkB. Numerous data demonstrate that the BDNF/TrkB system has a fundamental role in the control of food intake and body weight. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry for both BDNF and TrkB were used to determine changes in levels in the brain and gastro-intestinal tract of an experimental zebrafish model of diet-induced obesity. Overfed animals showed increased weight and body mass index as well as accumulation of adipose tissue in the visceral, subcutaneous and hepatic areas. These changes were concomitant with decreased levels of BDNF mRNA in the gastro-intestinal tract and increased expression of TrkB mRNA in the brain. Overfeeding did not change the density of cells displaying immunoreactivity for BDNF or TrkB in the brain although both were significantly diminished in the gastro-intestinal tract. These results suggest an involvement of the BDNF/TrkB system in the regulation of food intake and energy balance in zebrafish, as in mammals.

  2. Dietary supplementation of grape skin extract improves glycemia and inflammation in diet-induced obese mice fed a Western high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Shelly; Canning, Corene; Sun, Shi; Sun, Xiuxiu; Kadouh, Hoda; Zhou, Kequan

    2011-04-13

    Dietary antioxidants may provide a cost-effective strategy to promote health in obesity by targeting oxidative stress and inflammation. We recently found that the antioxidant-rich grape skin extract (GSE) also exerts a novel anti-hyperglycemic activity. This study investigated whether 3-month GSE supplementation can improve oxidative stress, inflammation, and hyperglycemia associated with a Western diet-induced obesity. Young diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were randomly divided to three treatment groups (n = 12): a standard diet (S group), a Western high fat diet (W group), and the Western diet plus GSE (2.4 g GSE/kg diet, WGSE group). By week 12, DIO mice in the WGSE group gained significantly more weight (24.6 g) than the W (20.2 g) and S groups (11.2 g); the high fat diet groups gained 80% more weight than the standard diet group. Eight of 12 mice in the W group, compared to only 1 of 12 mice in the WGSE group, had fasting blood glucose levels above 140 mg/dL. Mice in the WGSE group also had 21% lower fasting blood glucose and 17.1% lower C-reactive protein levels than mice in the W group (P < 0.05). However, the GSE supplementation did not affect oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity as determined by plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity, glutathione peroxidase, and liver lipid peroxidation. Collectively, the results indicated a beneficial role of GSE supplementation for improving glycemic control and inflammation in diet-induced obesity.

  3. High-Density Lipoprotein-Associated miR-223 Is Altered after Diet-Induced Weight Loss in Overweight and Obese Males

    PubMed Central

    Tabet, Fatiha; Cuesta Torres, Luisa F.; Ong, Kwok Leung; Shrestha, Sudichhya; Choteau, Sébastien A.; Barter, Philip J.; Clifton, Peter; Rye, Kerry-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, endogenous non-coding RNAs that regulate metabolic processes, including obesity. The levels of circulating miRNAs are affected by metabolic changes in obesity, as well as in diet-induced weight loss. Circulating miRNAs are transported by high-density lipoproteins (HDL) but the regulation of HDL-associated miRNAs after diet-induced weight loss has not been studied. We aim to determine if HDL-associated miR-16, miR-17, miR-126, miR-222 and miR-223 levels are altered by diet-induced weight loss in overweight and obese males. Methods HDL were isolated from 47 subjects following 12 weeks weight loss comparing a high protein diet (HP, 30% of energy) with a normal protein diet (NP, 20% of energy). HDL-associated miRNAs (miR-16, miR-17, miR-126, miR-222 and miR-223) at baseline and after 12 weeks of weight loss were quantified by TaqMan miRNA assays. HDL particle sizes were determined by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. Serum concentrations of human HDL constituents were measured immunoturbidometrically or enzymatically. Results miR-16, miR-17, miR-126, miR-222 and miR-223 were present on HDL from overweight and obese subjects at baseline and after 12 weeks of the HP and NP weight loss diets. The HP diet induced a significant decrease in HDL-associated miR-223 levels (p = 0.015), which positively correlated with changes in body weight (r = 0.488, p = 0.032). Changes in miR-223 levels were not associated to changes in HDL composition or size. Conclusion HDL-associated miR-223 levels are significantly decreased after HP diet-induced weight loss in overweight and obese males. This is the first study reporting changes in HDL-associated miRNA levels with diet-induced weight loss. PMID:26962854

  4. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bruin, Jennifer E.; Saber, Nelly; Braun, Natalie; Fox, Jessica K.; Mojibian, Majid; Asadi, Ali; Drohan, Campbell; O’Dwyer, Shannon; Rosman-Balzer, Diana S.; Swiss, Victoria A.; Rezania, Alireza; Kieffer, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD) feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs. PMID:25801507

  5. Xanthohumol improves dysfunctional glucose and lipid metabolism in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Cristobal L; Elias, Valerie D; Hay, Joshua J; Choi, Jaewoo; Reed, Ralph L; Stevens, Jan F

    2016-06-01

    Xanthohumol (XN) is a prenylated flavonoid found in hops (Humulus lupulus) and beer. The dose-dependent effects of XN on glucose and lipid metabolism in a preclinical model of metabolic syndrome were the focus of our study. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice, 9 weeks of age, were randomly divided into three XN dose groups of 16 animals. The mice were fed a high-fat diet (60% kcal as fat) supplemented with XN at dose levels of 0, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight/day, for 12 weeks. Dietary XN caused a dose-dependent decrease in body weight gain. Plasma levels of glucose, total triglycerides, total cholesterol, and MCP-1 were significantly decreased in mice on the 60 mg/kg/day treatment regimen. Treatment with XN at 60 mg/kg/day resulted in reduced plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), IL-6, insulin and leptin levels by 80%, 78%, 42%, and 41%, respectively, compared to the vehicle control group. Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin Kexin 9 (PCSK-9) levels were 44% lower in the 60 mg/kg dose group compared to the vehicle control group (p ≤ 0.05) which may account for the LDL-C lowering activity of XN. Our results show that oral administration of XN improves markers of systemic inflammation and metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

  6. Deoxynivalenol-induced weight loss in the diet-induced obese mouse is reversible and PKR-independent.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Brenna M; He, Kaiyu; Pestka, James J

    2013-07-31

    The trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a potent ribotoxic mycotoxin produced by the cereal blight fungus Fusarium graminearum, commonly contaminates grain-based foods. Oral exposure to DON causes decreased food intake, reduced weight gain and body weight loss in experimental animals - effects that have been linked to dysregulation of hormones responsible for mediating satiety at the central nervous system level. When diet-induced obese (DIO) mice are fed DON, they consume less food, eventually achieving body weights of control diet-fed mice. Here, we extended these findings by characterizing: (1) reversibility of DON-induced body weight loss and anorexia in DIO mice and (2) the role of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) which has been previously linked to initiation of the ribotoxic stress response. The results demonstrated that DON-induced weight loss was reversible in DIO mice and this effect corresponded to initiation of a robust hyperphagic response. When DIO mice deficient in PKR were exposed to DON, they exhibited weight suppression similar to DIO wild-type fed the toxin, suggesting the toxin's weight effects were not dependent on PKR. Taken together, DON's effects on food consumption and body weight are not permanent and, furthermore, PKR is not an essential signaling molecule for DON's anorectic and weight effects.

  7. A dual epigenomic approach for the search of obesity biomarkers: DNA methylation in relation to diet-induced weight loss.

    PubMed

    Milagro, Fermin I; Campión, Javier; Cordero, Paúl; Goyenechea, Estíbaliz; Gómez-Uriz, Ana M; Abete, Itziar; Zulet, Maria A; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetics could help to explain individual differences in weight loss after an energy-restriction intervention. Here, we identify novel potential epigenetic biomarkers of weight loss, comparing DNA methylation patterns of high and low responders to a hypocaloric diet. Twenty-five overweight or obese men participated in an 8-wk caloric restriction intervention. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and treated with bisulfite. The basal and endpoint epigenetic differences between high and low responders were analyzed by methylation microarray, which was also useful in comparing epigenetic changes due to the nutrition intervention. Subsequently, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to validate several relevant CpGs and the surrounding regions. DNA methylation levels in several CpGs located in the ATP10A and CD44 genes showed statistical baseline differences depending on the weight-loss outcome. At the treatment endpoint, DNA methylation levels of several CpGs on the WT1 promoter were statistically more methylated in the high than in the low responders. Finally, different CpG sites from WT1 and ATP10A were significantly modified as a result of the intervention. In summary, hypocaloric-diet-induced weight loss in humans could alter DNA methylation status of specific genes. Moreover, baseline DNA methylation patterns may be used as epigenetic markers that could help to predict weight loss.

  8. Modulation of gut microbiota by berberine and metformin during the treatment of high-fat diet-induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Zhao, Yufeng; Xu, Jia; Xue, Zhengsheng; Zhang, Menghui; Pang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhao, Liping

    2015-09-23

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the gut microbiota is an important factor in mediating the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes. Metformin and berberine, two clinically effective drugs for treating diabetes, have recently been shown to exert their actions through modulating the gut microbiota. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin and berberine similarly shifted the overall structure of the gut microbiota in rats. Both drugs showed reverting effects on the high-fat diet-induced structural changes of gut microbiota. The diversity of gut microbiota was significantly reduced by both berberine- and metformin-treatments. Nearest shrunken centroids analysis identified 134 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) responding to the treatments, which showed close associations with the changes of obese phenotypes. Sixty out of the 134 OTUs were decreased by both drugs, while those belonging to putative short-chain fatty acids (SCFA)-producing bacteria, including Allobaculum, Bacteriodes, Blautia, Butyricoccus, and Phascolarctobacterium, were markedly increased by both berberine and, to a lesser extent, metformin. Taken together, our findings suggest that berberine and metformin showed similarity in modulating the gut microbiota, including the enrichment of SCFA-producing bacteria and reduction of microbial diversity, which may contribute to their beneficial effects to the host.

  9. High fat/carbohydrate ratio but not total energy intake induces lower striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    van de Giessen, E; la Fleur, S E; Eggels, L; de Bruin, K; van den Brink, W; Booij, J

    2013-05-01

    High-energy diets that induce obesity decrease striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (DRD2/3) availability. It is however poorly understood which components of these diets are underlying this decrease. This study assessed the role of saturated fat intake on striatal DRD2/3 availability. Forty rats were randomized to a free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet (HFHS) or a standard chow diet for 28 days. Striatal DRD2/3 availability was measured using (123)I-IBZM storage phosphor imaging at day 29. The HFHS group was split in a HFHS-high-fat (HFHS-hf) and HFHS-low-fat (HFHS-lf) group based on the percentage energy intake from fat. Rats of both HFHS subgroups had increased energy intake, abdominal fat stores and plasma leptin levels compared with controls. DRD2/3 availability in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) was significantly lower in HFHS-hf than in HFHS-lf rats, whereas it was similar for HFHS-lf and control rats. Furthermore, DRD2/3 availability in the NAcc was positively correlated with the percentage energy intake from sugar. Total energy intake was lower for HFHS-hf than for HFHS-lf rats. Together these results suggest that a diet with a high fat/carbohydrate ratio, but not total energy intake or the level of adiposity, is the best explanation for the decrease in striatal DRD2/3 availability observed in diet-induced obesity.

  10. Diet-induced obesity causes peripheral and central ghrelin resistance by promoting inflammation.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Farhana; Toshinai, Koji; Waise, T M Zaved; NamKoong, Cherl; Md Moin, Abu Saleh; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-07-01

    Ghrelin, a stomach-derived orexigenic peptide, transmits starvation signals to the hypothalamus via the vagus afferent nerve. Peripheral administration of ghrelin does not induce food intake in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. We investigated whether this ghrelin resistance was caused by dysfunction of the vagus afferent pathway. Administration (s.c.) of ghrelin did not induce food intake, suppression of oxygen consumption, electrical activity of the vagal afferent nerve, phosphorylation of ERK2 and AMP-activated protein kinase alpha in the nodose ganglion, or Fos expression in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of mice fed a HFD for 12 weeks. Administration of anti-ghrelin IgG did not induce suppression of food intake in HFD-fed mice. Expression levels of ghrelin receptor mRNA in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus of HFD-fed mice were reduced. Inflammatory responses, including upregulation of macrophage/microglia markers and inflammatory cytokines, occurred in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus of HFD-fed mice. A HFD blunted ghrelin signaling in the nodose ganglion via a mechanism involving in situ activation of inflammation. These results indicate that ghrelin resistance in the obese state may be caused by dysregulation of ghrelin signaling via the vagal afferent.

  11. G protein–coupled receptor 21 deletion improves insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Osborn, Olivia; Oh, Da Young; McNelis, Joanne; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Talukdar, Saswata; Lu, Min; Li, PingPing; Thiede, Lucinda; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Kim, Jane J.; Heinrichsdorff, Jan; Nalbandian, Sarah; Ofrecio, Jachelle M.; Scadeng, Miriam; Schenk, Simon; Hadcock, John; Bartfai, Tamas; Olefsky, Jerrold M.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation is a key component of systemic insulin resistance, which is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. A major driver of this inflammation/insulin resistance syndrome is the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue and liver. We found that the orphan GPCR Gpr21 was highly expressed in the hypothalamus and macrophages of mice and that whole-body KO of this receptor led to a robust improvement in glucose tolerance and systemic insulin sensitivity and a modest lean phenotype. The improvement in insulin sensitivity in the high-fat diet–fed (HFD-fed) Gpr21 KO mouse was traced to a marked reduction in tissue inflammation caused by decreased chemotaxis of Gpr21 KO macrophages into adipose tissue and liver. Furthermore, mice lacking macrophage expression of Gpr21 were protected from HFD-induced inflammation and displayed improved insulin sensitivity. Results of in vitro chemotaxis studies in human monocytes suggested that the defect in chemotaxis observed ex vivo and in vivo in mice is also translatable to humans. Cumulatively, our data indicate that GPR21 has a critical function in coordinating macrophage proinflammatory activity in the context of obesity-induced insulin resistance. PMID:22653059

  12. Diet-induced obesity impairs spermatogenesis: a potential role for autophagy.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yang; Yan, Wen-Jie; Yin, Tai-Lang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jie; Yang, Jing

    2017-03-09

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process that plays a crucial role in maintaining a series of cellular functions. It has been found that autophagy is closely involved in the physiological process of spermatogenesis and the regulation of sperm survival and motility. However, the role of autophagy in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced impaired spermatogenesis remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the role of autophagy in HFD-induced spermatogenesis deficiency and employed chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit autophagy and rapamycin (RAP) to induce autophagy. 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and CQ were administered via intratesticular injection in vivo. The effects of CQ and 3-MA on the parameters of spermatozoa co-cultured with palmitic acid (PA) in vitro were also investigated. Human semen samples from obese, subfertile male patients were also collected to examine the level of autophagy. The results suggested that HFD mice subjected to CQ showed improved spermatogenesis. Inhibiting autophagy with CQ improved the decreased fertility of HFD male mice. Moreover, the in vivo and in vitro results indicated that both CQ and 3-MA could suppress the pathological changes in spermatozoa caused by HFD or PA treatment. Additionally, the excessive activation of autophagy was also observed in sperm samples from obese, subfertile male patients.

  13. Diet-induced obesity impairs spermatogenesis: a potential role for autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Yang; Yan, Wen-jie; Yin, Tai-lang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jie; Yang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved process that plays a crucial role in maintaining a series of cellular functions. It has been found that autophagy is closely involved in the physiological process of spermatogenesis and the regulation of sperm survival and motility. However, the role of autophagy in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced impaired spermatogenesis remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate the role of autophagy in HFD-induced spermatogenesis deficiency and employed chloroquine (CQ) to inhibit autophagy and rapamycin (RAP) to induce autophagy. 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and CQ were administered via intratesticular injection in vivo. The effects of CQ and 3-MA on the parameters of spermatozoa co-cultured with palmitic acid (PA) in vitro were also investigated. Human semen samples from obese, subfertile male patients were also collected to examine the level of autophagy. The results suggested that HFD mice subjected to CQ showed improved spermatogenesis. Inhibiting autophagy with CQ improved the decreased fertility of HFD male mice. Moreover, the in vivo and in vitro results indicated that both CQ and 3-MA could suppress the pathological changes in spermatozoa caused by HFD or PA treatment. Additionally, the excessive activation of autophagy was also observed in sperm samples from obese, subfertile male patients. PMID:28276438

  14. Zingiber mioga reduces weight gain, insulin resistance and hepatic gluconeogenesis in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    LEE, DA-HYE; AHN, JIYUN; JANG, YOUNG JIN; HA, TAE-YOUL; JUNG, CHANG HWA

    2016-01-01

    Zingiber mioga is a perennial herb belonging to the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) that is used medicinally to treat cough and rheumatism in China and consumed throughout Japan. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-obesity effects of Z. mioga following extraction with distilled water or 70% ethanol. In 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells, Z. mioga water extract (ZMW) markedly inhibited adipogenesis, whereas the ethanol extract had no effect. In addition, we conducted ZMW feeding experiments (0.25 or 0.5% ZMW) in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice to examine the anti-obesity effects of Z. mioga in vivo. Body weight and serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels significantly decreased in the HFD + ZMW 0.5% group. Notably, ZMW decreased liver weight but not adipose tissue weight. Furthermore, insulin resistance and hepatic mRNA expression of gluconeogenic genes, such as phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and G6Pase, were improved in the HFD + ZMW 0.5% group. Furthermore, ZMW treatment decreased hepatic lipogenic gene expression; however, it did not alter adipogenesis in fat tissue, suggesting that ZMW inhibits hepatosteatosis through the suppression of lipogenesis. ZMW improved HFD-induced hepatic inflammation. Collectively, the present findings suggest that ZMW may serve as a new and promising strategy for the treatment of hepatosteatosis. PMID:27347064

  15. Cashew apple extract inhibition of fat storage and insulin resistance in the diet-induced obesity mouse model.

    PubMed

    Beejmohun, Vickram; Mignon, Cyril; Mazollier, Aude; Peytavy-Izard, Marie; Pallet, Dominique; Dornier, Manuel; Chapal, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The cashew apple is an unvalued by-product from the cashew nut industry, of which millions of tonnes are simply discarded globally. Interestingly, however, cashew apple nutrients may have beneficial effects for health even if these are still poorly described. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of a hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple (cashew apple extract; CAE; Cashewin(™)) on obesity and diabetes, in two experimental designs using the diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. First, in the preventive design, mice were treated orally with the CAE at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight from the first day under a high-fat diet (HFD) and during 8 weeks thereafter. Second, in the curative design, the animals were first maintained under the HFD for 4 weeks and then treated with the CAE for a further 4 weeks under the same regimen. For both experimental designs, body weight, peri-epididymal adipose tissue, liver weight, food consumption, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance were assessed. In both designs, the CAE significantly reduced body-weight gain and fat storage in both the peri-epididymal adipose tissue and the liver for mice under the HFD. This was achieved without modifying their energy consumption. Furthermore, glycaemia, insulinaemia and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) of the DIO mice were significantly lowered compared with the control group. Thus, a well-designed hydro-alcoholic extract of cashew apple could provide an attractive nutritional food ingredient to help support the management of body weight and associated metabolic parameters such as blood glucose and insulin levels.

  16. Oral salmon calcitonin enhances insulin action and glucose metabolism in diet-induced obese streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Andreassen, Kim V; Gydesen, Sofie; Ottosen, Ida; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A; Henriksen, Kim

    2014-08-15

    We previously reported that oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT) improved energy and glucose homeostasis and attenuated diabetic progression in animal models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, although the glucoregulatory mode of action was not fully elucidated. In the present study we hypothesized that oral sCT as pharmacological intervention 1) exerted anti-hyperglycemic efficacy, and 2) enhanced insulin action in DIO-streptozotocin (DIO-STZ) diabetic rats. Diabetic hyperglycemia was induced in male selectively bred DIO rats by a single low dose (30mg/kg) injection of STZ. Oral sCT by gavage was delivered as once-daily administration with lead-in (2mg/kg) and maintenance (0.5mg/kg) dose of oral sCT for a total of 21 days. Food intake, body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin tolerance test, and parameters of insulin sensitivity were investigated. Plasma glucoregulatory hormones and pancreatic insulin content were analyzed. Oral sCT treatment induced a pronounced anorectic action during the 7 days lead-in period and markedly reduced food intake and body weight in conjunction with improved glucose homeostasis. During the maintenance period, oral sCT normalized food intake and attenuated weight loss, albeit sustained glycemic control by reducing fasting blood glucose and HbA1c levels compared to those of vehicle-treated rats at the end of study. Notably, plasma levels of insulin, glucagon, leptin and adiponectin were unaltered, albeit insulin action was enhanced in conjunction with protection of pancreatic insulin content. The results of the present study indicate that oral sCT exerts a novel insulin-sensitizing effect to improve glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  17. Genome-wide hepatic DNA methylation changes in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, AhRam; Tammen, Stephanie A.; Park, Soyoung; Choi, Sang-Woon

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES A high-fat diet (HFD) induces obesity, which is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and cancer, while a calorie-restricted diet can extend life span by reducing the risk of these diseases. It is known that health effects of diet are partially conveyed through epigenetic mechanism including DNA methylation. In this study, we investigated the genome-wide hepatic DNA methylation to identify the epigenetic effects of HFD-induced obesity. MATERIALS AND METHODS Seven-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed control diet (CD), calorie-restricted control diet (CRCD), or HFD for 16 weeks (after one week of acclimation to the control diet). Food intake, body weight, and liver weight were measured. Hepatic triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels were determined using enzymatic colorimetric methods. Changes in genome-wide DNA methylation were determined by a DNA methylation microarray method combined with methylated DNA immunoprecipitation. The level of transcription of individual genes was measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS The DNA methylation statuses of genes in biological networks related to lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis were influenced by HFD-induced obesity. In HFD group, a proinflammatory Casp1 (Caspase 1) gene had hypomethylated CpG sites at the 1.5-kb upstream region of its transcription start site (TSS), and its mRNA level was higher compared with that in CD group. Additionally, an energy metabolism-associated gene Ndufb9 (NADH dehydrogenase 1 beta subcomplex 9) in HFD group had hypermethylated CpG sites at the 2.6-kb downstream region of its TSS, and its mRNA level was lower compared with that in CRCD group. CONCLUSIONS HFD alters DNA methylation profiles in genes associated with liver lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis. The methylation statuses of Casp1 and Ndufb9 were particularly influenced by the HFD. The expression of these genes in HFD differed significantly compared with CD and CRCD, respectively, suggesting that the

  18. Vagal afferent neurons in high fat diet-induced obesity; intestinal microflora, gut inflammation and cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    de Lartigue, Guillaume; de La Serre, Claire Barbier; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-11-30

    The vagal afferent pathway is the major neural pathway by which information about ingested nutrients reaches the CNS and influences both GI function and feeding behavior. Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) express receptors for many of the regulatory peptides and molecules released from the intestinal wall, pancreas, and adipocytes that influence GI function, glucose homeostasis, and regulate food intake and body weight. As such, they play a critical role in both physiology and pathophysiology, such as obesity, where there is evidence that vagal afferent function is altered. This review will summarize recent findings on changes in vagal afferent function in response to ingestion of high fat diets and explore the hypothesis that changes in gut microbiota and integrity of the epithelium may not only be important in inducing these changes but may be the initial events that lead to dysregulation of food intake and body weight in response to high fat, high energy diets.

  19. ε-Viniferin, a resveratrol dimer, prevents diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kazuaki; Kusano, Kaori; Kitao, Sayoko; Yanai, Takaaki; Takata, Ryoji; Kanauchi, Osamu

    2015-12-25

    Red wines are thought to be one of the major dietary sources of trans-resveratrol. The beneficial effects of t-resveratrol against metabolic disorders have been well characterized, however, red wines also contain various resveratrol derivatives whose health benefits have not been completely elucidated. In this report, we investigated ε-viniferin, a resveratrol dimer, which is present at comparable concentrations to t-resveratrol in red wines, and has higher anti-adipogenesis activity in 3T3-L1 cells. In addition, ε-viniferin was more effective than t-resveratrol in its anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects in high-fat diet fed mice. These results suggested ε-viniferin may be one of the active ingredients against metabolic disorders in red wines, in addition to t-resveratrol.

  20. The DPP-IV inhibitor linagliptin and GLP-1 induce synergistic effects on body weight loss and appetite suppression in the diet-induced obese rat.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik H; Hansen, Gitte; Paulsen, Sarah; Vrang, Niels; Mark, Michael; Jelsing, Jacob; Klein, Thomas

    2014-10-15

    Linagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-IV inhibitor approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. DPP-IV inhibitors are considered weight neutral, suggesting that elevation of endogenous incretin levels is not sufficient to promote weight loss per se. Here we evaluated the effect of linagliptin in combination with subcutaneous treatment of GLP-1(7-36) on body weight regulation in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Linagliptin administered perorally (1.5mg/kg, b.i.d.), but not subcutaneously (0.5mg/kg, b.i.d.), evoked a very modest body weight loss (2.2%) after 28 days of treatment. GLP-1 (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) treatment alone induced a body weight loss of 4.1%. In contrast, combined linagliptin (1.5mg/kg, p.o., or 0.5mg/kg, s.c.) and GLP-1 (0.5mg/kg) treatment evoked a marked anorectic response with both routes of linagliptin administration being equally effective on final body weight loss (7.5-8.0%). In comparison, liraglutide monotherapy (0.2mg/kg, s.c., b.i.d.) reduced body weight by 10.1%. Interestingly, the weight lowering effect of combined linagliptin and GLP-1 treatment was associated with a marked increase in chow preference, being more pronounced as compared to liraglutide treatment. In addition, linagliptin and GLP-1 co-treatment, but not liraglutide, specifically increased prepro-dynorphin mRNA levels in the caudate-putamen, an effect not obtained with administration of the compounds individually. In conclusion, co-treatment with linagliptin and GLP-1 synergistically reduces body weight in obese rats. The anti-obesity effect was caused by appetite suppression with a concomitant change in diet preference, which may potentially be associated with increased dynorphin activity in forebrain regions involved in reward anticipation and habit learning.

  1. Diet-induced obesity progressively alters cognition, anxiety-like behavior and lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior: focus on brain indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    André, Caroline; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Ferreira, Guillaume; Layé, Sophie; Castanon, Nathalie

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of mood symptoms and cognitive dysfunctions that emerges as significant risk factors for important health complications such as cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. It is therefore important to identify the dynamic of development and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these neuropsychiatric symptoms. Obesity is also associated with peripheral low-grade inflammation and increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases. Excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines and the resulting activation of the brain tryptophan catabolizing enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) have been shown to promote neurobehavioral complications, particularly depression. In that context, questions arise about the impact of diet-induced obesity on the onset of neuropsychiatric alterations and the increased susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases displayed by obese patients, particularly through brain IDO activation. To answer these questions, we used C57Bl/6 mice exposed to standard diet or western diet (WD; consisting of palatable energy-dense food) since weaning and for 20 weeks. We then measured inflammatory and behavioral responses to a systemic immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in experimental conditions known to alter cognitive and emotional behaviors independently of any motor impairment. We first showed that in absence of LPS, 9 weeks of WD is sufficient to impair spatial recognition memory (in the Y-maze). On the other hand, 18 weeks of WD increased anxiety-like behavior (in the elevated plus-maze), but did not affect depressive-like behavior (in the tail-suspension and forced-swim tests). However, 20 weeks of WD altered LPS-induced depressive-like behavior compared to LPS-treated lean mice and exacerbated hippocampal and hypothalamic proinflammatory cytokine expression and brain IDO activation. Taken together, these results show that WD exposure alters cognition and anxiety in unstimulated

  2. Effect of tempol on peripheral neuropathy in diet-induced obese and high fat fed/low dose streptozotocin treated C57Bl6/J mice.

    PubMed

    Obrosov, Alexander; Shevalye, Hanna; Coppey, Lawrence J; Yorek, Mark A

    2017-04-04

    In this study we sought to determine the efficacy of tempol on multiple neuropathic endpoints in a diet-induced obese mouse, a model of pre-diabetes, and a high fat fed low dose streptozotocin treated mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. Tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperdine -1-oxyl) is a low molecular weight, water soluble, membrane permeable and metal independent superoxide dismutase mimetic that has been widely used in cellular studies for the removal of intracellular and extracellular superoxide. This in vivo study was designed to be an early intervention. Fourteen weeks post high fat diet (six weeks post hyperglycemia) control, obese and diabetic mice were divided into no treatment and treatment groups. The treated mice received tempol by gavage (150 mg/kg in water) while the untreated mice received vehicle. The diet-induced obese and diabetic mice were maintained on the high fat diet for the duration of the study while the control group was maintained on the standard diet. Obesity and diabetes caused slowing of motor and sensory nerve conduction, reduction in intraepidermal nerve fiber density, thermal hypoalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Treatment with tempol partially or completely protected obese and diabetic mice from these deficits. These studies suggest that tempol or other effective scavengers of reactive oxygen species may be a viable option for treating neural complications associated with obesity or type 2 diabetes.

  3. Decaffeinated green coffee bean extract attenuates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Su Jin; Choi, Sena; Park, Taesun

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether decaffeinated green coffee bean extract prevents obesity and improves insulin resistance and elucidated its mechanism of action. Male C57BL/6N mice (N = 48) were divided into six dietary groups: chow diet, HFD, HFD-supplemented with 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.9% decaffeinated green coffee bean extract, and 0.15% 5-caffeoylquinic acid. Based on the reduction in HFD-induced body weight gain and increments in plasma lipids, glucose, and insulin levels, the minimum effective dose of green coffee bean extract appears to be 0.3%. Green coffee bean extract resulted in downregulation of genes involved in WNT10b- and galanin-mediated adipogenesis and TLR4-mediated proinflammatory pathway and stimulation of GLUT4 translocation to the plasma membrane in white adipose tissue. Taken together, decaffeinated green coffee bean extract appeared to reverse HFD-induced fat accumulation and insulin resistance by downregulating the genes involved in adipogenesis and inflammation in visceral adipose tissue.

  4. Restoration of Declined Immune Responses and Hyperlipidemia by Rubus occidenalis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Youngjoo; Kim, Jiyeon; An, Jinho; Lee, Sungwon; Lee, Heetae; Kong, Hyunseok; Song, Youngcheon; Choi, Hye Ran; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Shin, Daekeun; Lee, Chong-Kil; Kim, Kyungjae

    2017-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia, which is closely associated with a fatty diet and aging, is commonly observed in the western and aged society. Therefore, a novel therapeutic approach for this disease is critical, and an immunological view has been suggested as a novel strategy, because hyperlipidemia is closely associated with inflammation and immune dysfunction. In this study, the effects of an aqueous extract of Rubus occidentalis (RO) in obese mice were investigated using immunological indexes. The mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to induce hyperlipidemia, which was confirmed by biochemical analysis and examination of the mouse physiology. Two different doses of RO and rosuvastatin, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor used as a control, were orally administered. Disturbances in immune cellularity as well as lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production were significantly normalized by oral administration of RO, which also decreased the elevated serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level and total cholesterol. The specific immune-related actions of RO comprised considerable improvement in cytotoxic T cell killing functions and regulation of antibody production to within the normal range. The immunological evidence confirms the significant cholesterol-lowering effect of RO, suggesting its potential as a novel therapeutic agent for hyperlipidemia and associated immune decline. PMID:27737523

  5. Sodium butyrate epigenetically modulates high-fat diet-induced skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptation, obesity and insulin resistance through nucleosome positioning

    PubMed Central

    Henagan, Tara M; Stefanska, Barbara; Fang, Zhide; Navard, Alexandra M; Ye, Jianping; Lenard, Natalie R; Devarshi, Prasad P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Sodium butyrate (NaB), an epigenetic modifier, is effective in promoting insulin sensitivity. The specific genomic loci and mechanisms underlying epigenetically induced obesity and insulin resistance and the targets of NaB are not fully understood. Experimental Approach The anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of NaB treatment were measured by comparing phenotypes and physiologies of C57BL/6J mice fed a low-fat diet (LF), high-fat diet (HF) or high-fat diet plus NaB (HF + NaB) for 10 weeks. We determined a possible mechanism of NaB action through induction of beneficial skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations and applied microccocal nuclease digestion with sequencing (MNase-seq) to assess whole genome differences in nucleosome occupancy or positioning and to identify associated epigenetic targets of NaB. Key Results NaB prevented HF diet-induced increases in body weight and adiposity without altering food intake or energy expenditure, improved insulin sensitivity as measured by glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and decreased respiratory exchange ratio. In skeletal muscle, NaB increased the percentage of type 1 fibres, improved acylcarnitine profiles as measured by metabolomics and produced a chromatin structure, determined by MNase-seq, similar to that seen in LF. Targeted analysis of representative nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes showed specific repositioning of the −1 nucleosome in association with altered gene expression. Conclusions and Implications NaB treatment may be an effective pharmacological approach for type 2 diabetes and obesity by inducing −1 nucleosome repositioning within nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes, causing skeletal muscle mitochondrial adaptations that result in more complete β-oxidation and a lean, insulin sensitive phenotype. PMID:25559882

  6. Defense of Elevated Body Weight Setpoint in Diet-Induced Obese Rats on Low Energy Diet Is Mediated by Loss of Melanocortin Sensitivity in the Paraventricular Hypothalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Luchtman, Dirk W; Chee, Melissa J S; Doslikova, Barbora; Marks, Daniel L; Baracos, Vickie E; Colmers, William F

    2015-01-01

    Some animals and humans fed a high-energy diet (HED) are diet-resistant (DR), remaining as lean as individuals who were naïve to HED. Other individuals become obese during HED exposure and subsequently defend the obese weight (Diet-Induced Obesity- Defenders, DIO-D) even when subsequently maintained on a low-energy diet. We hypothesized that the body weight setpoint of the DIO-D phenotype resides in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), where anorexigenic melanocortins, including melanotan II (MTII), increase presynaptic GABA release, and the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) inhibits it. After prolonged return to low-energy diet, GABA inputs to PVN neurons from DIO-D rats exhibited highly attenuated responses to MTII compared with those from DR and HED-naïve rats. In DIO-D rats, melanocortin-4 receptor expression was significantly reduced in dorsomedial hypothalamus, a major source of GABA input to PVN. Unlike melanocortin responses, NPY actions in PVN of DIO-D rats were unchanged, but were reduced in neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus; in PVN of DR rats, NPY responses were paradoxically increased. MTII-sensitivity was restored in DIO-D rats by several weeks' refeeding with HED. The loss of melanocortin sensitivity restricted to PVN of DIO-D animals, and its restoration upon prolonged refeeding with HED suggest that their melanocortin systems retain the ability to up- and downregulate around their elevated body weight setpoint in response to longer-term changes in dietary energy density. These properties are consistent with a mechanism of body weight setpoint.

  7. Anti-obesity effect of Triticum aestivum sprout extract in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Im, Ji-Young; Ki, Hyeon-Hui; Xin, Mingjie; Kwon, Se-Uk; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Dae-Ki; Hong, Sun-Pyo; Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Young-Mi

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a common disease worldwide that often results in serious conditions including hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia. Many herbal medicines have been examined with regard to ameliorating obesity. We investigated the anti-obesity effects of 50% EtOH extract of Triticum aestivum sprout (TAEE) in high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. TAEE administration (10, 50, or 200 mg/kg) for 6 weeks significantly decreased the body weights, serum total cholesterol (TC), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in HFD-fed mice. TAEE treatment reduced lipid accumulation in epididymal white adipose tissue (EWAT) and liver. Moreover, TC and lipid levels were decreased by TAEE treatment in liver. Serum leptin and adiponectin concentrations were reduced by TAEE treatment. TAEE-treated mice showed decreases in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and fatty acid synthase expression in EWAT. Furthermore, TAEE administration elevated levels of PPARα protein in the liver of HFD-induced obese mice. These results suggest that TAEE supplementation might be beneficial for the treatment and prevention of obesity and related diseases.

  8. Soy Isoflavones Regulate Lipid Metabolism through an AKT/mTORC1 Pathway in Diet-Induced Obesity (DIO) Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Pang, Dejiang; Luo, Qihui; Chen, Xiaolin; Gao, Qi; Shi, Liangqin; Liu, Wentao; Zou, Yuanfeng; Li, Lixia; Chen, Zhengli

    2016-05-03

    The pandemic tendency of obesity and its strong association with serious co-morbidities have elicited interest in the underlying mechanisms of these pathologies. Lipid homeostasis, closely involved in obesity, has been reported to be regulated by multiple pathways. mTORC1 is emerging as a critical regulator of lipid metabolism. Here, we describe that the consumption of soy isoflavones, with a structural similarity to that of estradiol, could mitigate obesity through an AKT/mTORC1 pathway. Fed with soy isoflavones, the diet-induced obesity (DIO) male rats exhibited decreased body weight, accompanied with suppressed lipogenesis and adipogenesis, as well as enhanced lipolysis and β‑oxidation. The phosphorylation of AKT and S6 were decreased after soy isoflavone treatment in vivo and in vitro, suggesting an inhibition effect of soy isoflavones on mTORC1 activity. Our study reveals a potential mechanism of soy isoflavones regulating lipid homeostasis, which will be important for obesity treatment.

  9. Ventromedial hypothalamic NPY Y2 receptor in the maintenance of body weight in diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu-Feng; Yu, Yinghua; Li, Yulin; Tim, South; Deng, Chao; Wang, Qing

    2008-09-01

    This study examined changes in neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y2 receptor binding in the brains of C57BL/6 mice in response to different levels of high-fat diets via three dietary intervention methods: high-fat diet, switching from high- to low-fat diet and finally, energy restricted high-fat diet. Forty-five C57Bl/6 male mice were fed a high-fat diet for 8 weeks and then classified as diet-induced obese (DIO) or diet-resistant (DR) mice according to the highest and lowest body weight gainers, respectively. The DIO and DR mice were then randomly divided into three groups each and either continued on their high-fat diet ad libitum (DIO-H and DR-H), changed to a low-fat diet (DIO-L and DR-L) or pair-fed via energy restricted high-fat diet (DIO-P and DR-P) for a further 6 weeks. During the course of this study, body weight, energy intake and plasma peptide YY (PYY) were measured. The study revealed that the replacement of a high-fat diet with a low-fat diet was associated with a significant lowering of ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) Y2 receptor binding in both the DIO-L and DR-L mice (-37%, -36%), and also a lowered plasma PYY level in the DIO-L mice (-25%). Despite a continued consumption of the high-fat diet, energy restricted pair feeding caused a lower VMH Y2 receptor binding in the obese mice (DIO-P) following weight loss compared to the DR-P mice (-14%). In conclusion, this study showed that changing diets from high- to low-fat can significantly lower the VMH Y2 receptor binding irrespective to the obesity phenotype. Energy restriction, even while on high-fat feeding, can cause a lower VMH Y2 receptor binding compared to DR mice even after body weight loss to similar levels. This suggests either a possible intrinsic nature of the DIO mice or a body weight set-point re-establishment to drive body weight regain.

  10. Evaluation of Aroclor 1260 exposure in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wahlang, Banrida; Song, Ming; Beier, Juliane I.; Cameron Falkner, K.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Clair, Heather B.; Prough, Russell A.; Osborne, Tanasa S.; Malarkey, David E.; Christopher States, J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatic effects of a PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, whose composition mimics human bioaccumulation patterns, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control diet or 42% high fat diet (HFD) and exposed to Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg in corn oil) for 12 weeks. A glucose tolerance test was performed; plasma/tissues were obtained at necropsy for measurements of adipocytokine levels, histology, and gene expression. Aroclor 1260 exposure was associated with decreased body fat in HFD-fed mice but had no effect on blood glucose/lipid levels. Paradoxically, Aroclor 1260 + HFD co-exposed mice demonstrated increased hepatic inflammatory foci at both doses while the degree of steatosis did not change. Serum cytokines, ALT levels and hepatic expression of IL-6 and TNFα were increased only at 20 mg/kg, suggesting an inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the 200 mg/kg exposure. Aroclor 1260 induced hepatic expression of cytochrome P450s including Cyp3a11 (Pregnane-Xenobiotic Receptor target) and Cyp2b10 (constitutive androstane receptor target) but Cyp2b10 inducibility was diminished with HFD-feeding. Cyp1a2 (aryl hydrocarbon Receptor target) was induced only at 200 mg/kg. In summary, Aroclor 1260 worsened hepatic and systemic inflammation in DIO. The results indicated a bimodal response of PCB-diet interactions in the context of inflammation which could potentially be explained by xenobiotic receptor activation. Thus, PCB exposure may be a relevant “second hit” in the transformation of steatosis to steatohepatitis. - Highlights: • Aroclor 1260 exposure decreased adiposity in mice fed with high fat diet • Aroclor 1260 exposure induced steatohepatitis in diet-induced obese mice • Aroclor 1260 (20 and 200 mg/kg) induced

  11. Effect of Dietary Cocoa Tea (Camellia ptilophylla) Supplementation on High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity, Hepatic Steatosis, and Hyperlipidemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao Rong; Wat, Elaine; Wang, Yan Ping; Ko, Chun Hay; Koon, Chi Man; Siu, Wing Sum; Gao, Si; Cheung, David Wing Shing; Lau, Clara Bik San; Ye, Chuang Xing; Leung, Ping Chung

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that green tea has the potential to protect against diet-induced obesity. The presence of caffeine within green tea has caused limitations. Cocoa tea (Camellia ptilophylla) is a naturally decaffeinated tea plant. To determine whether cocoa tea supplementation results in an improvement in high-fat diet-induced obesity, hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis, and whether such effects would be comparable to those of green tea extract, we studied six groups (n = 10) of C57BL/6 mice that were fed with (1) normal chow (N); (2) high-fat diet (21% butterfat + 0.15% cholesterol, wt/wt) (HF); (3) a high-fat diet supplemented with 2% green tea extract (HFLG); (4) a high-fat diet supplemented with 4% green tea extract (HFHG); (5) a high-fat diet supplemented with 2% cocoa tea extract (HFLC); and (6) a high-fat diet supplemented with 4% cocoa tea extract (HFHC). From the results, 2% and 4% dietary cocoa tea supplementation caused a dose-dependent decrease in (a) body weight, (b) fat pad mass, (c) liver weight, (d) total liver lipid, (e) liver triglyceride and cholesterol, and (f) plasma lipids (triglyceride and cholesterol). These data indicate that dietary cocoa tea, being naturally decaffeinated, has a beneficial effect on high-fat diet-induced obesity, hepatomegaly, hepatic steatosis, and elevated plasma lipid levels in mice, which are comparable to green tea. The present findings have provided the proof of concept that dietary cocoa tea might be of therapeutic value and could therefore provide a safer and cost effective option for patients with diet-induced metabolic syndrome. PMID:23935682

  12. Triple monoamine inhibitor tesofensine decreases food intake, body weight, and striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; de Bruin, Kora; la Fleur, Susanne E; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The novel triple monoamine inhibitor tesofensine blocks dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake and is a promising candidate for the treatment of obesity. Obesity is associated with lower striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability, which may be related to disturbed regulation of food intake. This study assesses the effects of chronic tesofensine treatment on food intake and body weight in association with changes in striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2/3R) availability of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Four groups of 15 DIO rats were randomized to one of the following treatments for 28 days: 1. tesofensine (2.0 mg/kg), 2. vehicle, 3. vehicle+restricted diet isocaloric to caloric intake of group 1, and 4. tesofensine (2.0 mg/kg)+ a treatment-free period of 28 days. Caloric intake and weight gain decreased significantly more in the tesofensine-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated rats, which confirms previous findings. After treatment discontinuation, caloric intake and body weight gain gradually increased again. Tesofensine-treated rats showed significantly lower D2/3R availability in nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum than both vehicle-treated rats and vehicle-treated rats on restricted isocaloric diet. No correlations were observed between food intake or body weight and D2/3R availability. Thus, chronic tesofensine treatment leads to decreased food intake and weight gain. However, this appears not to be directly related to the decreased striatal D2/3R availability, which is mainly a pharmacological effect.

  13. Fermented green tea extract alleviates obesity and related complications and alters gut microbiota composition in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dae-Bang; Jeong, Hyun Woo; Cho, Donghyun; Lee, Bum Jin; Lee, Ji Hae; Choi, Jae Young; Bae, Il-Hong; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between caloric intake and energy expenditure and accumulation of excess lipids in adipose tissues. Recent studies have demonstrated that green tea and its processed products (e.g., oolong and black tea) are introduced to exert beneficial effects on lipid metabolism. Here, we propose that fermented green tea (FGT) extract, as a novel processed green tea, exhibits antiobesity effects. FGT reduced body weight gain and fat mass without modifying food intake. mRNA expression levels of lipogenic and inflammatory genes were downregulated in white adipose tissue of FGT-administered mice. FGT treatment alleviated glucose intolerance and fatty liver symptoms, common complications of obesity. Notably, FGT restored the changes in gut microbiota composition (e.g., the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes and Bacteroides/Prevotella ratios), which is reported to be closely related with the development of obesity and insulin resistance, induced by high-fat diets. Collectively, FGT improves obesity and its associated symptoms and modulates composition of gut microbiota; thus, it could be used as a novel dietary component to control obesity and related symptoms.

  14. Intermittent Moderate Energy Restriction Improves Weight Loss Efficiency in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seimon, Radhika V.; Shi, Yan-Chuan; Slack, Katy; Lee, Kailun; Fernando, Hamish A.; Nguyen, Amy D.; Zhang, Lei; Lin, Shu; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Lau, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Background Intermittent severe energy restriction is popular for weight management. To investigate whether intermittent moderate energy restriction may improve this approach by enhancing weight loss efficiency, we conducted a study in mice, where energy intake can be controlled. Methods Male C57/Bl6 mice that had been rendered obese by an ad libitum diet high in fat and sugar for 22 weeks were then fed one of two energy-restricted normal chow diets for a 12-week weight loss phase. The continuous diet (CD) provided 82% of the energy intake of age-matched ad libitum chow-fed controls. The intermittent diet (ID) provided cycles of 82% of control intake for 5–6 consecutive days, and ad libitum intake for 1–3 days. Weight loss efficiency during this phase was calculated as (total weight change) ÷ [(total energy intake of mice on CD or ID)–(total average energy intake of controls)]. Subsets of mice then underwent a 3-week weight regain phase involving ad libitum re-feeding. Results Mice on the ID showed transient hyperphagia relative to controls during each 1–3-day ad libitum feeding period, and overall ate significantly more than CD mice (91.1±1.0 versus 82.2±0.5% of control intake respectively, n = 10, P<0.05). There were no significant differences between CD and ID groups at the end of the weight loss or weight regain phases with respect to body weight, fat mass, circulating glucose or insulin concentrations, or the insulin resistance index. Weight loss efficiency was significantly greater with ID than with CD (0.042±0.007 versus 0.018±0.001 g/kJ, n = 10, P<0.01). Mice on the CD exhibited significantly greater hypothalamic mRNA expression of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) relative to ID and control mice, with no differences in neuropeptide Y or agouti-related peptide mRNA expression between energy-restricted groups. Conclusion Intermittent moderate energy restriction may offer an advantage over continuous moderate energy restriction, because it induces

  15. Differential gene regulation of GHSR signaling pathway in the arcuate nucleus and NPY neurons by fasting, diet-induced obesity, and 17β-estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Yasrebi, Ali; Hsieh, Anna; Mamounis, Kyle J.; Krumm, Elizabeth A.; Yang, Jennifer A.; Magby, Jason; Hu, Pu; Roepke, Troy A.

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin’s receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), is highly expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Fasting, diet-induced obesity (DIO), and 17β-estradiol (E2) influence ARC Ghsr expression. It is unknown if these effects occur in NPY neurons. Therefore, we examined the expression of Npy, Agrp, and GHSR signaling pathway genes after fasting, DIO, and E2 replacement in ARC and pools of NPY neurons. In males, fasting increased ARC Ghsr and NPY Foxo1 but decreased NPY Ucp2. In males, DIO decreased ARC and NPY Ghsr and Cpt1c. In fed females, E2 increased Agrp, Ghsr, Cpt1c, and Foxo1 in ARC. In NPY pools, E2 decreased Foxo1 in fed females but increased Foxo1 in fasted females. DIO in females suppressed Agrp and augmented Cpt1c in NPY neurons. In summary, genes involved in GHSR signaling are differentially regulated between the ARC and NPY neurons in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:26577678

  16. Cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist treatment induces glucagon release and shows an additive therapeutic effect with GLP-1 agonist in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kartikkumar Navinchandra; Joharapurkar, Amit Arvind; Patel, Vishal; Kshirsagar, Samadhan Govind; Bahekar, Rajesh; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor antagonists reduce body weight and improve insulin sensitivity. Preclinical data indicates that an acute dose of CB1 antagonist rimonabant causes an increase in blood glucose. A stable analog of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), exendin-4 improves glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreas, and reduces appetite through activation of GLP-1 receptors in the central nervous system and liver. We hypothesized that the insulin secretagogue effect of GLP-1 agonist exendin-4 may synergize with the insulin-sensitizing action of rimonabant. Intraperitoneal as well as intracerebroventricular administration of rimonabant increased serum glucose upon glucose challenge in overnight fasted, diet-induced obese C57 mice, with concomitant rise in serum glucagon levels. Exendin-4 reversed the acute hyperglycemia induced by rimonabant. The combination of exendin-4 and rimonabant showed an additive effect in the food intake, and sustained body weight reduction upon repeated dosing. The acute efficacy of both the compounds was additive for inducing nausea-like symptoms in conditioned aversion test in mice, whereas exendin-4 treatment antagonized the effect of rimonabant on forced swim test upon chronic dosing. Thus, the addition of exendin-4 to rimonabant produces greater reduction in food intake owing to increased aversion, but reduces the other central nervous system side effects of rimonabant. The hyperglucagonemia induced by rimonabant is partially responsible for enhancing the antiobesity effect of exendin-4.

  17. Neutralizing circulating ghrelin by expressing a growth hormone secretagogue receptor-based protein protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, J; Zhu, L; Anini, Y; Wang, Q

    2015-09-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived peptide hormone that stimulates appetite and promotes adiposity through binding to the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R1a). Administration of ghrelin in rodents increases weight gain due to stimulating food intake and reducing fat utilization. Therefore, reducing circulating ghrelin levels holds the potential to reduce weight gain. We developed a GHS-R1a-fusion constructs of a decoy protein containing the ligand-binding domains of the ghrelin receptor. Intramuscular injection of the GHSR/Fc plasmid decreased circulating levels of acylated-ghrelin. When challenged with the high fat diet, treated mice displayed reduced weight gain compared with controls, which was associated with reduced fat accumulation in the peritoneum but not lean mass. Quantitative PCR with reverse transcription showed increased PPARγ and hormone sensitive lipase transcripts levels in adipose tissue of treated animals, illustrating a preference for increased fat utilization. Intra-peritoneal glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance tests showed improved glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity in GHSR/Fc treated animals. We suggest that in vivo expression of the GHSR-based fusion protein prevents diet-induced weight gain, altering adipose gene expression and improving glucose tolerance. These findings, while confirming the role of ghrelin in peripheral energy metabolism, suggest that a strategy involving neutralization of the circulation ghrelin by intramuscular injection of the GHSR1/Fc fusion construct may find clinical application in the treatment of obesity.

  18. Skin-specific deletion of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 alters skin lipid composition and protects mice from high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Harini; Flowers, Matthew T; Liu, Xueqing; Paton, Chad M; Sullivan, Ruth; Chu, Kiki; Zhao, Minghui; Ntambi, James M

    2009-07-24

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) catalyzes the synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and is an important regulator of whole body energy homeostasis. Severe cutaneous changes in mice globally deficient in SCD1 also indicate a role for SCD1 in maintaining skin lipids. We have generated mice with a skin-specific deletion of SCD1 (SKO) and report here that SKO mice display marked sebaceous gland hypoplasia and depletion of sebaceous lipids. In addition, SKO mice have significantly increased energy expenditure and are protected from high fat diet-induced obesity, thereby recapitulating the hypermetabolic phenotype of global SCD1 deficiency. Genes of fat oxidation, lipolysis, and thermogenesis, including uncoupling proteins and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator-1alpha, are up-regulated in peripheral tissues of SKO mice. However, unlike mice globally deficient in SCD1, SKO mice have an intact hepatic lipogenic response to acute high carbohydrate feeding. Despite increased basal thermogenesis, SKO mice display severe cold intolerance because of rapid depletion of fuel substrates, including hepatic glycogen, to maintain core body temperature. These data collectively indicate that SKO mice have increased cold perception because of loss of insulating factors in the skin. This results in up-regulation of thermogenic processes for temperature maintenance at the expense of fuel economy, illustrating cross-talk between the skin and peripheral tissues in maintaining energy homeostasis.

  19. Activation of Estrogen Response Element-independent ERα signaling protects female mice from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Yasrebi, Ali; Rivera, Janelle A; Krumm, Elizabeth A; Yang, Jennifer A; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-11-30

    17β-estradiol (E2) regulates central and peripheral mechanisms that control energy and glucose homeostasis predominantly through estrogen receptor α (ERα) acting via receptor binding to estrogen response elements (ERE). ERα signaling is also involved in mediating the effects of E2 on diet-induced obesity (DIO), although the roles of ERE-dependent and -independent ERα signaling in ameliorating the effects of DIO remain largely unknown. We hypothesize that ERE-dependent ERα signaling is necessary to ameliorate the effects of DIO. We addressed this question using ERαKO (KO) and ERαKIKO (KIKO) female mice; the latter expressing an ERα that lacks a functional ERE binding domain. Females were ovariectomized, fed low-fat (LFD) or high-fat (HFD) diet, and orally dosed with vehicle or estradiol benzoate (EB, 300 μg/kg). After 9 weeks, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance, peptide hormone and inflammatory cytokine levels, and hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and liver gene expression were assessed. EB reduced body weight and body fat in WT, regardless of diet, and in HFD-fed KIKO, in part by reducing energy intake and feeding efficiency. EB reduced fasting glucose levels in KIKO mice fed both diets but augmented glucose tolerance only in HFD-fed KIKO. Plasma insulin and IL-6 were elevated in KIKO and KO compared to WT on a LFD. Expression of arcuate neuropeptide and receptor genes and liver fatty acid biosynthesis genes was altered by HFD and by EB through ERE-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Therefore, ERE-independent signaling mechanisms in both the brain and peripheral organs mediate, in part, the effects of E2 during DIO.

  20. Blueberry, blackberry, and blackcurrant differentially affect plasma lipids and pro-inflammatory markers in diet-induced obesity mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bohkyung; Lee, Sang Gil; Park, Young-Ki; Ku, Chai Siah; Pham, Tho X.; Wegner, Casey J.; Yang, Yue; Koo, Sung I.; Chun, Ock K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Evidence indicates that berry anthocyanins are anti-atherogenic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory. However, berries differ vastly in their anthocyanin composition and thus potentially in their biological and metabolic effects. The present study compared hypolipidemic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties of blueberry (BB), blackberry (BK), and blackcurrant (BC) in a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. MATERIALS/METHODS Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high fat (HF; 35% fat, w/w) control diet or a HF diet supplemented with freeze-dried 5% BB, 6.3% BK or 5.7% BC for 12 weeks (10 mice/group) to achieve the same total anthocyanin content in each diet. Plasma lipids, antioxidant status and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured. The expression of genes involved in antioxidant defense, inflammation, and lipid metabolism was determined in the liver, epididymal adipose tissue, proximal intestine, and skeletal muscle. Histological analysis was performed to identify crown-like structure (CLS) in epididymal fat pads to determine macrophage infiltration. RESULTS No differences were noted between the control and any berry-fed groups in plasma levels of liver enzymes, insulin, glucose, ferric reducing antioxidant power, superoxide dismutase, and tumor necrosis factor α. However, BK significantly lowered plasma triglyceride compared with the HF control and other berries, whereas BC significantly reduced F4/80 mRNA and the number of CLS in the epididymal fat pad, indicative of less macrophage infiltration. CONCLUSIONS The present study provides evidence that BB, BK and BC with varying anthocyanin composition differentially affect plasma lipids and adipose macrophage infiltration in DIO mice, but with no differences in their antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory potential. PMID:27698956

  1. Overexpression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α in pancreatic β-cells improves glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Hogh, K-Lynn N; Uy, Christopher E; Asadi, Ali; Baker, Robert K; Riedel, Michael J; Gray, Sarah L

    2013-02-01

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in pancreatic β-cell dysfunction in obesity-induced type 2 diabetes. In vitro, activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) has been shown to protect pancreatic β-cells from the lipotoxic effects of palmitate, thereby preserving insulin secretion. Utilizing an adeno-associated virus (dsAAV8), overexpression of PPARα was induced specifically in pancreatic β-cells of adult, C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet for 20 weeks and carbohydrate metabolism and β-cell mass assessed. We show that overexpression of PPARα in pancreatic β-cells in vivo preserves β-cell function in obesity, and this improves glucose tolerance by preserving insulin secretion in comparison to control mice with diet-induced obesity. No changes in β-cell mass were observed in PPARα-overexpressing mice compared with diet-induced obese control animals. This model of β-cell-specific PPARα overexpression provides a useful in vivo model for elucidating the mechanisms underlying β-cell lipotoxicity in obesity-induced type 2 diabetes.

  2. Effects of Calorie Restriction and Diet-Induced Obesity on Murine Colon Carcinogenesis, Growth and Inflammatory Factors, and MicroRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Olivo-Marston, Susan E.; Hursting, Stephen D.; Perkins, Susan N.; Schetter, Aaron; Khan, Mohammed; Croce, Carlo; Harris, Curtis C.; Lavigne, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an established colon cancer risk factor, while preventing or reversing obesity via a calorie restriction (CR) diet regimen decreases colon cancer risk. Unfortunately, the biological mechanisms underlying these associations are poorly understood, hampering development of mechanism-based approaches for preventing obesity-related colon cancer. We tested the hypotheses that diet-induced obesity (DIO) would increase (and CR would decrease) colon tumorigenesis in the mouse azoxymethane (AOM) model. In addition, we established that changes in inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and microRNAs are associated with these energy balance-colon cancer links, and thus represent mechanism-based targets for colon cancer prevention. Mice were injected with AOM once a week for 5 weeks and randomized to: 1) control diet; 2) 30% CR diet; or 3) DIO diet. Mice were euthanized at week 5 (n = 12/group), 10 (n = 12/group), and 20 (n = 20/group) after the last AOM injection. Colon tumors were counted, and cytokines, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), adipokines, proliferation, apoptosis, and expression of microRNAs (miRs) were measured. The DIO diet regimen induced an obese phenotype (∼36% body fat), while CR induced a lean phenotype (∼14% body fat); controls were intermediate (∼26% body fat). Relative to controls, DIO increased (and CR decreased) the number of colon tumors (p = 0.01), cytokines (p<0.001), IGF-1 (p = 0.01), and proliferation (p<0.001). DIO decreased (and CR increased) IGFBP-3 and apoptosis (p<0.001). miRs including mir-425, mir-196, mir-155, mir-150, mir-351, mir-16, let-7, mir34, and mir-138 were differentially expressed between the dietary groups. We conclude that the enhancing effects of DIO and suppressive effects of CR on colon carcinogenesis are associated with alterations in several biological pathways, including inflammation, IGF-1, and microRNAs. PMID:24732966

  3. Methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 deficiency does not increase high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jung-Yoon; Cha, Hye-Na; Kim, Ki Young; Lee, Eujin; Kim, Suk-Jeong; Kim, Yong-Woon; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Lee, In-Kyu; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Kim, Hwa-Young; Park, So-Young

    2017-01-01

    Methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase (MsrA) protects against high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance due to its antioxidant effects. To determine whether its counterpart, methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase (MsrB) has similar effects, we compared MsrB1 knockout and wild-type mice using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique. High-fat feeding for eight weeks increased body weights, fat masses, and plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides to similar extents in wild-type and MsrB1 knockout mice. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test showed no difference in blood glucose levels between the two genotypes after eight weeks on the high-fat diet. The hyperglycemic-euglycemic clamp study showed that glucose infusion rates and whole body glucose uptakes were decreased to similar extents by the high-fat diet in both wild-type and MsrB1 knockout mice. Hepatic glucose production and glucose uptake of skeletal muscle were unaffected by MsrB1 deficiency. The high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscle and liver was not aggravated in MsrB1-deficient mice. Interestingly, whereas MsrB1 deficiency reduced JNK protein levels to a great extent in skeletal muscle and liver, it markedly elevated phosphorylation of JNK, suggesting the involvement of MsrB1 in JNK protein activation. However, this JNK phosphorylation based on a p-JNK/JNK level did not positively correlate with insulin resistance in MsrB1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results show that, in contrast to MsrA deficiency, MsrB1 deficiency does not increase high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance in mice.

  4. Prevention of diet-induced obesity by apple polyphenols in Wistar rats through regulation of adipocyte gene expression and DNA methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Boqué, Noemi; de la Iglesia, Rocío; de la Garza, Ana L; Milagro, Fermín I; Olivares, Mónica; Bañuelos, Oscar; Soria, Ana Cristina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Sonia; Martínez, José Alfredo; Campión, Javier

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the mechanisms implicated in the beneficial effects of apple polyphenols (APs) against diet-induced obesity in Wistar rats, described in a previous study from our group. Supplementation of high-fat sucrose diet with AP prevented adiposity increase by inhibition of adipocyte hypertrophy. Rats supplemented with AP exhibited improved glucose tolerance while adipocytes isolated from these rats showed an enhanced lipolytic response to isoproterenol. AP intake led to reduced Lep, Plin, and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (Srebf1) mRNA levels and increased aquaporin 7 (Aqp7), adipocyte enhancer binding protein 1 (Aebp1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1 alpha (Ppargc1a) mRNA levels in epididymal adipocytes. In addition, we found different methylation patterns of Aqp7, Lep, Ppargc1a, and Srebf1 promoters in adipocytes from apple-supplemented rats compared to high-fat sucrose fed rats. The administration of AP protects against body weight gain and fat deposition and improves glucose tolerance in rats. We propose that AP exerts the antiobesity effects through the regulation of genes involved in adipogenesis, lipolysis, and fatty acid oxidation, in a process that could be mediated in part by epigenetic mechanisms.

  5. A Hamster Model of Diet-Induced Obesity for Preclinical Evaluation of Anti-Obesity, Anti-Diabetic and Lipid Modulating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Gitte; Fabricius, Katrine; Hansen, Henrik B.; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Aim Unlike rats and mice, hamsters develop hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia when fed a cholesterol-rich diet. Because hyperlipidemia is a hallmark of human obesity, we aimed to develop and characterize a novel diet-induced obesity (DIO) and hypercholesterolemia Golden Syrian hamster model. Methods and Results Hamsters fed a highly palatable fat- and sugar-rich diet (HPFS) for 12 weeks showed significant body weight gain, body fat accumulation and impaired glucose tolerance. Cholesterol supplementation to the diet evoked additional hypercholesterolemia. Chronic treatment with the GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide (0.2 mg/kg, SC, BID, 27 days), normalized body weight and glucose tolerance, and lowered blood lipids in the DIO-hamster. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, linagliptin (3.0 mg/kg, PO, QD) also improved glucose tolerance. Treatment with peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36, 1.0 mg/kg/day) or neuromedin U (NMU, 1.5 mg/kg/day), continuously infused via a subcutaneous osmotic minipump for 14 days, reduced body weight and energy intake and changed food preference from HPFS diet towards chow. Co-treatment with liraglutide and PYY3-36 evoked a pronounced synergistic decrease in body weight and food intake with no lower plateau established. Treatment with the cholesterol uptake inhibitor ezetimibe (10 mg/kg, PO, QD) for 14 days lowered plasma total cholesterol with a more marked reduction of LDL levels, as compared to HDL, indicating additional sensitivity to cholesterol modulating drugs in the hyperlipidemic DIO-hamster. In conclusion, the features of combined obesity, impaired glucose tolerance and hypercholesterolemia in the DIO-hamster make this animal model useful for preclinical evaluation of novel anti-obesity, anti-diabetic and lipid modulating agents. PMID:26266945

  6. The NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Carles; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Pirinen, Eija; Youn, Dou Y; Oosterveer, Maaike H; Cen, Yana; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Andreux, Pénélope A; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Gademann, Karl; Rinsch, Chris; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A; Auwerx, Johan

    2012-06-06

    As NAD(+) is a rate-limiting cosubstrate for the sirtuin enzymes, its modulation is emerging as a valuable tool to regulate sirtuin function and, consequently, oxidative metabolism. In line with this premise, decreased activity of PARP-1 or CD38-both NAD(+) consumers-increases NAD(+) bioavailability, resulting in SIRT1 activation and protection against metabolic disease. Here we evaluated whether similar effects could be achieved by increasing the supply of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described natural NAD(+) precursor with the ability to increase NAD(+) levels, Sir2-dependent gene silencing, and replicative life span in yeast. We show that NR supplementation in mammalian cells and mouse tissues increases NAD(+) levels and activates SIRT1 and SIRT3, culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism and protection against high-fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Consequently, our results indicate that the natural vitamin NR could be used as a nutritional supplement to ameliorate metabolic and age-related disorders characterized by defective mitochondrial function.

  7. The NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside enhances oxidative metabolism and protects against high-fat diet induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Houtkooper, Riekelt H.; Pirinen, Eija; Youn, Dou Y.; Oosterveer, Maaike H.; Cen, Yana; Fernandez-Marcos, Pablo J.; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Andreux, Pénélope A.; Cettour-Rose, Philippe; Gademann, Karl; Rinsch, Chris; Schoonjans, Kristina; Sauve, Anthony A.; Auwerx, Johan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY As NAD+ is a rate-limiting co-substrate for the sirtuin enzymes, its modulation is emerging as a valuable tool to regulate sirtuin function and, consequently, oxidative metabolism. In line with this premise, decreased activity of PARP-1 or CD38 —both NAD+ consumers— increases NAD+ bioavailability, resulting in SIRT1 activation and protection against metabolic disease. Here we evaluated whether similar effects could be achieved by increasing the supply of nicotinamide riboside (NR), a recently described natural NAD+ precursor with the ability to increase NAD+ levels, Sir2-dependent gene silencing and replicative lifespan in yeast. We show that NR supplementation in mammalian cells and mouse tissues increases NAD+ levels and activates SIRT1 and SIRT3, culminating in enhanced oxidative metabolism and protection against high fat diet-induced metabolic abnormalities. Consequently, our results indicate that the natural vitamin, NR, could be used as a nutritional supplement to ameliorate metabolic and age-related disorders characterized by defective mitochondrial function. PMID:22682224

  8. Expression of new loci associated with obesity in diet-induced obese rats: from genetics to physiology.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2012-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for revealing genes associated with common human obesity. New loci associated with obesity have recently been reported, but their function and metabolic implications remain to be elucidated. In order to begin identifying the role of some of these obesity-related loci, the closest genes to the polymorphism of each locus were selected and their expression was compared in the hypothalamus, adipose tissue, liver, soleus muscle, and extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) of Long-Evans rats maintained on chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. From a total of 19 genes analyzed, seven genes (ETV5, FTO, GNPDA2, KCTD15, TMEM18, MC4R, and SH2B1) were down-regulated in the hypothalamus of HFD compared to chow-fed rats. In adipose tissue of rats fed on HFD, the mRNA levels of BCDIN3, KCTD15, and SULT1A1 were down-regulated, whereas those of MTCH2, PTER, and TUFM were up-regulated. In the liver, three genes were up-regulated (PTER, SULT1A1, and TUFM) in HFD relative to chow-fed rats, and TMEM18 was down-regulated. Finally, in soleus muscle of HFD-fed rats, BCDIN3, BDNF, and TMEM18 were down-regulated, and in the EDL muscle SH2B1 and TUFM were up-regulated. mRNA levels in the hypothalamus were compared between fed and fasted states, and only KCTD15 was down-regulated during fasting when fed a chow diet. In conclusion, novel genes found to be associated with obesity are regulated by a HFD and the mRNA levels of KCTD15 is dependent on the nutritional status. These results suggest a potential role of these genes in the regulation of energy balance.

  9. Effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus NS1 on plasma cholesterol levels in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Song, M; Park, S; Lee, H; Min, B; Jung, S; Park, S; Kim, E; Oh, S

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the probiotic properties of Lactobacillus acidophilus NS1, such as acid resistance, bile tolerance, adherence to HT-29 cells, and cholesterol assimilation activity. In an animal study, 7-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a normal diet, a high-fat diet (HFD), or an HFD with L. acidophilus NS1 (ca. 1.0×10(8) cfu/mL) for 10 wk. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were significantly lower in mice fed an HFD with L. acidophilus NS1 than in those fed an HFD only, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were similar between these 2 groups. To understand the mechanism of the cholesterol-lowering effect of L. acidophilus NS1 on the HFD-mediated increase in plasma cholesterol levels, we determined mRNA levels of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the liver. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (Srebp2) and LDL receptor (Ldlr) in the liver was dramatically reduced in mice fed a HFD compared with those fed a normal diet. When L. acidophilus NS1 was administered orally to HFD-fed mice, an HFD-induced suppression of Srebp2 and Ldlr expression in the liver was abolished. These results suggest that the oral administration of L. acidophilus NS1 to mice fed an HFD increased the expression of Srebp2 and Ldlr in the liver, which was inhibited by high fat intake, thus leading to a decrease in plasma cholesterol levels. Lactobacillus acidophilus NS1 could be a useful probiotic microorganism for cholesterol-lowering dairy products and the improvement of hyperlipidemia and hepatic lipid metabolism.

  10. Adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 transiently delayed high-fat diet-induced obesity by altering glucose, lipid and energy metabolism of male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a well-known master controller of the cellular adaptive antioxidant and detoxification response. Recent studies demonstrated altered glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in mice with a global Nrf2 knockout. In the present study, we aim to determine the effects of an adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 (ASAN) on diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male mice. The 6-week-old adipose-specific Nrf2 knockout (NK) and its Nrf2 control (NC) mice were fed with either control diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. NK mice exhibited transiently delayed body weight (BW) growth from week 5 to week 11 of HFD feeding, higher daily physical activity levels and preferential use of fat over carbohydrates as a source of energy at week 8 of the CD-feeding period. After 14 weeks of feeding, NK mice showed comparable results with NC mice with respect to the overall BW and body fat content, but exhibited reduced blood glucose, reduced number but increased size of adipocytes, accompanied with elevated expression of many genes and proteins in the visceral fat related to glucose, lipid and energy metabolism (e.g. Fgf21, Pgc1a). These results indicated that NRF2 is an important mediator for glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in adipose tissue, and ASAN could have beneficial effect for prevention of DIO during the early development of mice.

  11. Altered hepatic gene expression profiles associated with improved fatty liver, insulin resistance, and intestinal permeability after hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) supplementation in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsook; Bartley, Glenn E; Young, Scott A; Seo, Kun-Ho; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2013-07-03

    The effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on hepatic gene expression was analyzed by exon microarray and real-time PCR from livers of diet-induced obese (DIO) mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet supplemented with either 6% HPMC or 6% microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). HPMC-fed mice exhibited significantly reduced body weight gain (55% lower compared to MCC), liver weight (13%), plasma LDL-cholesterol concentration (45%), and HF diet-increased intestinal permeability (48%). HPMC significantly reduced areas under the curve for 2 h insulin and glucose responses, indicating enhanced insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism. HPMC up-regulated hepatic genes related to fatty acid oxidation, cholesterol and bile acid synthesis, and cellular activation of glucocorticoid (bile acid recycling) and down-regulated genes related to oxidative stress, triglyceride synthesis, and polyunsaturated fatty acid elongation. In conclusion, HPMC consumption ameliorates the effects of a HF diet on intestinal permeability, insulin resistance, hepatic lipid accumulation, glucocorticoid-related bile acid recycling, oxidative stress, and weight gain in DIO mice.

  12. Adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 transiently delayed high-fat diet-induced obesity by altering glucose, lipid and energy metabolism of male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a well-known master controller of the cellular adaptive antioxidant and detoxification response. Recent studies demonstrated altered glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in mice with a global Nrf2 knockout. In the present study, we aim to determine the effects of an adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 (ASAN) on diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male mice. The 6-week-old adipose-specific Nrf2 knockout (NK) and its Nrf2 control (NC) mice were fed with either control diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. NK mice exhibited transiently delayed body weight (BW) growth from week 5 to week 11 of HFD feeding, higher daily physical activity levels and preferential use of fat over carbohydrates as a source of energy at week 8 of the CD-feeding period. After 14 weeks of feeding, NK mice showed comparable results with NC mice with respect to the overall BW and body fat content, but exhibited reduced blood glucose, reduced number but increased size of adipocytes, accompanied with elevated expression of many genes and proteins in the visceral fat related to glucose, lipid and energy metabolism (e.g. Fgf21, Pgc1a). These results indicated that NRF2 is an important mediator for glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in adipose tissue, and ASAN could have beneficial effect for prevention of DIO during the early development of mice. PMID:28078004

  13. Chronic IL-6 Administration Desensitizes IL-6 Response in Liver, Causes Hyperleptinemia and Aggravates Steatosis in Diet-Induced-Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gavito, Ana Luisa; Bautista, Dolores; Suarez, Juan; Badran, Samir; Arco, Rocío; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Rivera, Patricia; Decara, Juan; Cuesta, Antonio Luis; Rodríguez-de-Fonseca, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) is associated with fatty liver and elevated IL-6 circulating levels. IL-6 administration in rodents has yielded contradictory results regarding its effects on steatosis progression. In some models of fatty liver disease, high doses of human IL-6 ameliorate the liver steatosis, whereas restoration of IL-6 in DIO IL-6-/- mice up-regulates hepatic lipogenic enzymes and aggravates steatosis. We further examined the effects of chronic low doses of murine IL-6 on hepatic lipid metabolism in WT mice in DIO. IL-6 was delivered twice daily in C57BL/6J DIO mice for 15 days. The status and expression of IL-6-signalling mediators and targets were investigated in relation to the steatosis and lipid content in blood and in liver. IL-6 administration in DIO mice markedly raised circulating levels of lipids, glucose and leptin, elevated fat liver content and aggravated steatosis. Under IL-6 treatment there was hepatic Stat3 activation and increased gene expression of Socs3 and Tnf-alpha whereas the gene expression of endogenous IL-6, IL-6-receptor, Stat3, Cpt1 and the enzymes involved in lipogenesis was suppressed. These data further implicate IL-6 in fatty liver disease modulation in the context of DIO, and indicate that continuous stimulation with IL-6 attenuates the IL-6-receptor response, which is associated with high serum levels of leptin, glucose and lipids, the lowering levels of lipogenic and Cpt1 hepatic enzymes and with increased Tnf-alpha hepatic expression, a scenario evoking that observed in IL-6-/- mice exposed to DIO and in obese Zucker rats. PMID:27333268

  14. Activation of hindbrain neurons in response to gastrointestinal lipid is attenuated by high fat, high energy diets in mice prone to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Michael J; Paulino, Gabriel; Raybould, Helen E

    2009-01-12

    Food intake is controlled by peripheral signals from the gastrointestinal tract and adipocytes, which are integrated within the central nervous system. There is evidence that signals from the GI tract are modulated by long term changes in diet, possibly leading to hyperphagia and increased body weight. We tested the hypothesis that diet-induced obese-prone (DIO-P) and obese-resistant (DIO-R) mice strains differ in the long term adaptive response of the gut-brain pathway to a high fat diet. Immunochemical detection of Fos protein was used as a measure of neuronal activation in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in response to intragastric administration of lipid in DIO-P (C57Bl6) and DIO-R (129sv) mouse strains maintained on chow or high fat, high energy diets (45% or 60% kcal from fat). Intragastric lipid administration activated neurons in the NTS in both DIO-P and DIO-R mice; the number of activated neurons was significantly greater in DIO-P than in DIO-R mice (P<0.001). However, lipid-induced activation of NTS neurons in DIO-P mice was attenuated by approximately 30% after maintenance on either 45% or 60% HF diet, for 4 or 8 weeks, compared to chow fed controls (P<0.05). In contrast, in DIO-R mice, maintenance on a HF diet (45% or 60%) had no effect on lipid-induced activation of NTS neurons. These results demonstrate that DIO-P and DIO-R mice strains differ in the adaptation of the pathway to long term ingestion of high fat diets, which may contribute to decrease satiation and increased food intake.

  15. Adult-onset deficiency of acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 protects mice from diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance[S

    PubMed Central

    Banh, Taylor; Nelson, David W.; Gao, Yu; Huang, Ting-Ni; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang E.

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 catalyzes triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, required in intestinal fat absorption. We previously demonstrated that mice without a functional MGAT2-coding gene (Mogat2−/−) exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to obesity induced by excess calories. One critical question raised is whether lacking MGAT2 during early development is required for the metabolic phenotypes in adult mice. In this study, we found that Mogat2−/− pups grew slower than wild-type littermates during the suckling period. To determine whether inactivating MGAT2 in adult mice is sufficient to confer resistance to diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with an inducible Mogat2-inactivating mutation. Mice with adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency (Mogat2AKO) exhibited a transient decrease in food intake like Mogat2−/− mice when fed a high-fat diet and a moderate increase in energy expenditure after acclimatization. They gained less weight than littermate controls, but the difference was smaller than that between wild-type and Mogat2−/− mice. The moderate reduction in weight gain was associated with reduced hepatic TAG and improved glucose tolerance. Similar protective effects were also observed in mice that had gained weight on a high-fat diet before inactivating MGAT2. These findings suggest that adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency mitigates metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding and that MGAT2 modulates early postnatal nutrition and may program metabolism later in life. PMID:25535286

  16. Chronic IL-6 Administration Desensitizes IL-6 Response in Liver, Causes Hyperleptinemia and Aggravates Steatosis in Diet-Induced-Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Gavito, Ana Luisa; Bautista, Dolores; Suarez, Juan; Badran, Samir; Arco, Rocío; Pavón, Francisco Javier; Serrano, Antonia; Rivera, Patricia; Decara, Juan; Cuesta, Antonio Luis; Rodríguez-de-Fonseca, Fernando; Baixeras, Elena

    2016-01-01

    High-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) is associated with fatty liver and elevated IL-6 circulating levels. IL-6 administration in rodents has yielded contradictory results regarding its effects on steatosis progression. In some models of fatty liver disease, high doses of human IL-6 ameliorate the liver steatosis, whereas restoration of IL-6 in DIO IL-6-/- mice up-regulates hepatic lipogenic enzymes and aggravates steatosis. We further examined the effects of chronic low doses of murine IL-6 on hepatic lipid metabolism in WT mice in DIO. IL-6 was delivered twice daily in C57BL/6J DIO mice for 15 days. The status and expression of IL-6-signalling mediators and targets were investigated in relation to the steatosis and lipid content in blood and in liver. IL-6 administration in DIO mice markedly raised circulating levels of lipids, glucose and leptin, elevated fat liver content and aggravated steatosis. Under IL-6 treatment there was hepatic Stat3 activation and increased gene expression of Socs3 and Tnf-alpha whereas the gene expression of endogenous IL-6, IL-6-receptor, Stat3, Cpt1 and the enzymes involved in lipogenesis was suppressed. These data further implicate IL-6 in fatty liver disease modulation in the context of DIO, and indicate that continuous stimulation with IL-6 attenuates the IL-6-receptor response, which is associated with high serum levels of leptin, glucose and lipids, the lowering levels of lipogenic and Cpt1 hepatic enzymes and with increased Tnf-alpha hepatic expression, a scenario evoking that observed in IL-6-/- mice exposed to DIO and in obese Zucker rats.

  17. A novel benzenediamine derivative FC98 reduces insulin resistance in high fat diet-induced obese mice by suppression of metaflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changmai; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Hengfei; Zhuo, Yujie; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Aihua; Hou, Yayi; Xiang Tan, Ren; Li, Erguang

    2015-08-15

    Chronic low-grade metabolic inflammation (metaflammation) is a hallmark of metabolic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a newly identified benzenediamine derivative (FC98, PubChem CID: 14989837) against metaflammation and insulin resistance using a high fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) murine model. LPS and free fatty acids (FFAs)-induced gene expression and signaling was determined in cell culture systems. Inflammasome activation was determined by measuring IL-1β release with ELISA. The in vivo activity was assayed in C57BL/6J mice fed with a high fat diet (HFD) by measuring body weight gains, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. The effect was also evaluated by H&E and IHC staining, by measuring gene expression and cytokine production, and by analysis of F4/80(+)CD11b(+) macrophage infiltration. FC98 exhibited anti-inflammatory activity against LPS- and FFAs-induced IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α gene expression and JNK and p38 activation. The IC50 for FC98 to inhibit NO production was determined at 6.8μM. FC98 also dose-dependently inhibited IL-1β secretion. In DIO mice, FC98 at 10 and 20mg/kg significantly improved metabolic parameters, including body weight, fat mass, glucose disposal and insulin sensitivity. The reduction in adipocyte area, F4/80(+)CD11b(+) macrophage infiltration, proinflammatory gene expression, along with JNK activation, was also significant in those groups. Additionally, FC98-treated animals had increased AKT phosphorylation in response to insulin stimulation. FC98 inhibits metaflammation and ameliorates insulin resistance mainly by inhibiting signaling pathways of proinflammatory response in DIO animals. This study highlights the significance of targeting metaflammation for obesity-attributive metabolic syndrome.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia and diet-induced obesity: effects on oxidative status, sympathetic tone, plasma glucose and insulin levels, and arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Olea, Elena; Agapito, Maria Teresa; Gallego-Martin, Teresa; Rocher, Asuncion; Gomez-Niño, Angela; Obeso, Ana; Gonzalez, Constancio; Yubero, Sara

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) consists of sleep-related repetitive obstructions of upper airways that generate episodes of recurrent or intermittent hypoxia (IH). OSA commonly generates cardiovascular and metabolic pathologies defining the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Literature usually links OSA-associated pathologies to IH episodes that would cause an oxidative status and a carotid body-mediated sympathetic hyperactivity. Because cardiovascular and metabolic pathologies in obese patients and those with OSAS are analogous, we used models (24-wk-old Wistar rats) of IH (applied from weeks 22 to 24) and diet-induced obesity (O; animals fed a high-fat diet from weeks 12 to 24) to define the effect of each individual maneuver and their combination on the oxidative status and sympathetic tone of animals, and to quantify cardiovascular and metabolic parameters and their deviation from normality. We found that IH and O cause an oxidative status (increased lipid peroxides and diminished activities of superoxide dismutases), an inflammatory status (augmented C-reactive protein and nuclear factor kappa-B activation), and sympathetic hyperactivity (augmented plasma and renal artery catecholamine levels and synthesis rate); combined treatments worsened those alterations. IH and O augmented liver lipid content and plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, glycemia, insulin levels, and HOMA index, and caused hypertension; most of these parameters were aggravated when IH and O were combined. IH diminished ventilatory response to hypoxia, and hypercapnia and O created a restrictive ventilatory pattern; a combination of treatments led to restrictive hypoventilation. Data demonstrate that IH and O cause comparable metabolic and cardiovascular pathologies via misregulation of the redox status and sympathetic hyperactivity.

  19. Carnosic acid as a major bioactive component in rosemary extract ameliorates high-fat-diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Sedighi, Rashin; Wang, Pei; Chen, Huadong; Zhu, Yingdong; Sang, Shengmin

    2015-05-20

    In this study, we investigated the preventive effects of carnosic acid (CA) as a major bioactive component in rosemary extract (RE) on high-fat-diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome in mice. The mice were given a low-fat diet, a high-fat diet or a high-fat diet supplemented with either 0.14% or 0.28% (w/w) CA-enriched RE (containing 80% CA, RE#1L and RE#1H), or 0.5% (w/w) RE (containing 45% CA, RE#2), for a period of 16 weeks. There was the same CA content in the RE#1H and RE#2 diets and half of this amount in the RE#1L diet. The dietary RE supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, percent of fat, plasma ALT, AST, glucose, insulin levels, liver weight, liver triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels in comparison with the mice fed with a HF diet without RE treatment. RE administration also decreased the levels of plasma and liver malondialdehyde, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and the liver expression of receptor for AGE (RAGE) in comparison with those for mice of the HF group. Histological analyses of liver samples showed decreased lipid accumulation in hepatocytes in mice administrated with RE in comparison with that of HF-diet-fed mice. Meanwhile, RE administration enhanced fecal lipid excretion to inhibit lipid absorption and increased the liver GSH/GSSG ratio to perform antioxidant activity compared with HF group. Our results demonstrate that rosemary is a promising dietary agent to reduce the risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  20. Effects of exendin-4 alone and with peptide YY(3-36) on food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Reidelberger, Roger D; Haver, Alvin C; Apenteng, Bettye A; Anders, Krista L; Steenson, Sharalyn M

    2011-01-01

    Significant weight loss following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) in obese humans correlates with enhanced secretion of anorexigenic gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY(3-36) (PYY(3-36)). Our aim here was to identify a dosing strategy for intraperitoneal (IP) infusion of GLP-1 homologue exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) that produces a sustained reduction in daily food intake and body weight in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. We tested 12 exendin-4 strategies over 10 weeks. Exendin-4 infused during the first and last 3 h of the dark period at 15-20 pmol/h (0.15 nmol/kg/day) produced a sustained 24 ± 1% reduction in daily food intake for 17 days, and decreased body weight by 7%. In a separate group of DIO rats, none of seven dosing strategies combining exendin-4 and PYY(3-36) produced a similar reduction in daily food intake for >10 days. The subsequent decline in efficacies of exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) on food intake and body weight in each experiment suggested possible receptor downregulation and tolerance to treatments. However, when treatments were discontinued for 1 day following losses in efficacies, daily food intake significantly increased. Together, these results demonstrate that (i) intermittent IP infusion of a low dose of exendin-4 can produce a relatively prolonged reduction in daily food intake and body weight in DIO rats, (ii) co-infusion of exendin-4 and PYY(3-36) does not further prolong this response, and (iii) activation of an orexigenic mechanism gradually occurs to counteract the inhibitory effects of exendin-4 alone and with PYY(3-36) on food intake and body weight.

  1. ACE2 Deficiency Worsens Epicardial Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Cardiac Dysfunction in Response to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaibhav B.; Mori, Jun; McLean, Brent A.; Basu, Ratnadeep; Das, Subhash K.; Ramprasath, Tharmarajan; Parajuli, Nirmal; Penninger, Josef M.; Grant, Maria B.; Lopaschuk, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; angiotensin (Ang)-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. We studied the role of ACE2 in obesity-mediated cardiac dysfunction. ACE2 null (ACE2KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a control diet and studied at 6 months of age. Loss of ACE2 resulted in decreased weight gain but increased glucose intolerance, epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) inflammation, and polarization of macrophages into a proinflammatory phenotype in response to HFD. Similarly, human EAT in patients with obesity and heart failure displayed a proinflammatory macrophage phenotype. Exacerbated EAT inflammation in ACE2KO-HFD mice was associated with decreased myocardial adiponectin, decreased phosphorylation of AMPK, increased cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, and myocardial insulin resistance, which worsened heart function. Ang 1-7 (24 µg/kg/h) administered to ACE2KO-HFD mice resulted in ameliorated EAT inflammation and reduced cardiac steatosis and lipotoxicity, resulting in normalization of heart failure. In conclusion, ACE2 plays a novel role in heart disease associated with obesity wherein ACE2 negatively regulates obesity-induced EAT inflammation and cardiac insulin resistance. PMID:26224885

  2. Chronic blockade of angiotensin AT1 receptors improves cardinal symptoms of metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obesity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Fielitz, Helge; Hübel, Nils; Mildner, Martin; Vogt, Florian M; Barkhausen, Jörg; Raasch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose AT1 receptor antagonists decrease body weight gain in models of murine obesity. However, fewer data are available concerning the anti-obesity effects of these antagonists, given as a treatment after obesity had been established. Experimental Approach In spontaneously hypertensive rats, obesity was established by cafeteria diet (CD) feeding for 19 weeks. Rats were then were treated with telmisartan (8 mg·kg−1·d−1) or amlodipine (10 mg·kg−1·d−1; serving as blood pressure control) or telmisartan + amlodipine (2 + 10 mg·kg−1·d−1; to control for dose-dependency) for 17 weeks. Rats receiving only chow (Cchow) or CD-fed rats treated with vehicle (CCD) served as controls. Key Results The CD feeding induced obesity, hyperphagia, hyperlipidaemia, and leptin and insulin resistance. Telmisartan reduced the CD-induced increase in body weight and abdominal fat mass. Whereas energy intake was higher rather than lower, the respiratory ratio was lower. After telmisartan, leptin-induced energy intake was reduced and respiratory ratio was increased compared with CCD rats. Telmisartan also decreased plasma levels of triglycerides, free fatty acids and low-density lipoprotein. Amlodipine alone or the combination telmisartan + amlodipine did not affect body weight and eating behaviour. Telmisartan, but not amlodipine and telmisartan + amlodipine, improved glucose utilization. The decrease in BP reduction was almost the same in all treatment groups. Conclusions and Implications Telmisartan exerted anti-obesity effects and restored leptin sensitivity, given as a treatment to rats with obesity. Such effects required high doses of telmisartan and were independent of the decrease in blood pressure. PMID:24490862

  3. Synergistic Effects of a GPR119 Agonist with Metformin on Weight Loss in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Al-Barazanji, Kamal; McNulty, Judi; Binz, Jane; Generaux, Claudia; Benson, William; Young, Andrew; Chen, Lihong

    2015-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed predominantly in pancreatic β-cells and gastrointestinal enteroendocrine cells. Metformin is a first-line treatment of type 2 diabetes, with minimal weight loss in humans. In this study, we investigated the effects of GSK2041706 [2-([(1S)-1-(1-[3-(1-methylethyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]-4-piperidinyl)ethyl]oxy)-5-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]pyrazine], a GPR119 agonist, and metformin as monotherapy or in combination on body weight in a diet-induced obese (DIO) mouse model. Relative to vehicle controls, 14-day treatment with GSK2041706 (30 mg/kg b.i.d.) or metformin at 30 and 100 mg/kg b.i.d. alone caused a 7.4%, 3.5%, and 4.4% (all P < 0.05) weight loss, respectively. The combination of GSK2041706 with metformin at 30 or 100 mg/kg resulted in a 9.5% and 16.7% weight loss, respectively. The combination of GSK2041706 and metformin at 100 mg/kg caused a significantly greater weight loss than the projected additive weight loss of 11.8%. This body weight effect was predominantly due to a loss of fat. Cumulative food intake was reduced by 17.1% with GSK2041706 alone and 6.6% and 8.7% with metformin at 30 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. The combination of GSK2041706 with metformin caused greater reductions in cumulative food intake (22.2% at 30 mg/kg and 37.5% at 100 mg/kg) and higher fed plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 and peptide tyrosine tyrosine levels and decreased plasma insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide levels compared with their monotherapy groups. In addition, we characterized the effect of GSK2041706 and metformin as monotherapy or in combination on neuronal activation in the appetite regulating centers in fasted DIO mice. In conclusion, our data demonstrate the beneficial effects of combining a GPR119 agonist with metformin in the regulation of body weight in DIO mice.

  4. Cardiolipin profiles as a potential biomarker of mitochondrial health in diet-induced obese mice subjected to exercise, diet-restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Faber, Catherine; Zhu, Zhaohai J; Castellino, Stephen; Wagner, David S; Brown, Roger H; Peterson, Richard A; Gates, Lisa; Barton, Joanna; Bickett, Mark; Hagerty, Laura; Kimbrough, Carie; Sola, Mario; Bailey, David; Jordan, Holly; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2014-11-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is crucial for mitochondrial energy metabolism and structural integrity. Alterations in CL quantity or CL species have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in several pathological conditions and diseases, including mitochondrial dysfunction-related compound attrition and post-market withdrawal of promising drugs. Here we report alterations in the CL profiles in conjunction with morphology of soleus muscle (SM) and brown adipose tissue (BAT) in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, subjected to ephedrine treatment (EPH: 200 mg kg(-1)  day(-1) orally), treadmill exercise (EX: 10 meters per min, 1 h per day), or dietary restriction (DR: 25% less of mean food consumed by the EX group) for 7 days. Mice from the DR and EPH groups had a significant decrease in percent body weight and reduced fat mass compared with DIO controls. Morphologic alterations in the BAT included brown adipocytes with reduced cytoplasmic lipid droplets and increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia in the EX, DR and EPH groups. Increased cytoplasmic eosinophilia in the BAT was ultrastructurally manifested by increased mitochondrial cristae, fenestration of mitochondrial cristae, increased electron density of mitochondrial matrix, and increased complexity of shape and elongation of mitochondria. Mitochondrial ultrastructural alterations in the SM of the EX and DR groups included increased mitochondrial cristae, cup-shaped mitochondria and mitochondrial degeneration. All four CL species (tri-linoleoyl-mono-docosahexaenoyl, tetralinoleoyl, tri-linoleoyl-mono-oleoyl, and di-linoleoyl-di-oleoyl) were increased in the BAT of the DR and EPH groups and in the SM of the EPH and EX groups. In conclusion, cardiolipin profiling supported standard methods for assessing mitochondrial biogenesis and health, and may serve as a potential marker of mitochondrial dysfunction in preclinical toxicity studies.

  5. Inhibition of 72 kDa inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase E improves insulin signal transduction in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Daniela F; Coope, Andressa; Caricilli, Andrea M; Prada, Patricia O; Saad, Mario J; Velloso, Licio A; Araujo, Eliana P

    2013-05-01

    The 72 kDa inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase E (72k-5ptase) controls signal transduction through the catalytic dephosphorylation of the 5-position of membrane-bound phosphoinositides. The reduction of 72k-5ptase expression in the hypothalamus results in improved hypothalamic insulin signal transduction and reduction of food intake and body mass. Here, we evaluated the tissue distribution and the impact of obesity on the expression of 72k-5ptase in peripheral tissues of experimental animals. In addition, insulin signal transduction and action were determined in an animal model of obesity and insulin resistance treated with an antisense (AS) oligonucleotide that reduces 72k-5ptase expression. In lean Wistar rats, 72k-5ptase mRNA and protein are found in highest levels in heart, skeletal muscle, and white adipose tissue. In three distinct models of obesity, Wistar rats, Swiss mice fed on high-fat diet, and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, the expression of 72k-5ptase is increased in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. The treatment of obese Wistar rats with an anti-72k-5ptase AS oligonucleotide results in significant reduction of 72k-5ptase catalytic activity, which is accompanied by reduced food intake and body mass and improved insulin signal transduction and action as determined by immunoblotting and clamp studies respectively. 72k-5ptase expression is increased in obesity and its AS inhibition resulted in a significant improvement in insulin signal transduction and restoration of glucose homeostasis.

  6. The Antiobesity Effect of Polygonum aviculare L. Ethanol Extract in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yoon, Taesook; Yang, Won-Kyung; Kim, Seung Ju; Kim, Dong-Seon; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    The antiobesity effects of a P. aviculare ethanol extract (PAE) in high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced obese mice were investigated. The mice were fed an HFD or an HFD supplemented with PAE (400 mg/kg/day) for 6.5 weeks. The increased body weights, adipose tissue weight, and adipocyte area as well as serum total triglyceride, leptin, and malondialdehyde concentrations were decreased in PAE-treated HFD-induced obese mice relative to the same measurements in untreated obese mice. Furthermore, PAE significantly suppressed the elevated mRNA expression levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, fatty acid synthase, and adipocyte protein 2 in the white adipose tissue of obese mice. In addition, PAE treatment of 3T3-L1 cells inhibited adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that PAE exerts antiobesity effects in HFD-induced obese mice through the suppression of lipogenesis in adipose tissue and increased antioxidant activity. PMID:23431342

  7. Corepressor SMRT promotes oxidative phosphorylation in adipose tissue and protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Sungsoon; Suh, Jae Myoung; Atkins, Annette R.; Hong, Suk-Hyun; Leblanc, Mathias; Nofsinger, Russell R.; Yu, Ruth T.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The ligand-dependent competing actions of nuclear receptor (NR)-associated transcriptional corepressor and coactivator complexes allow for the precise regulation of NR-dependent gene expression in response to both temporal and environmental cues. Here we report the mouse model termed silencing mediator of retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT)mRID1 in which targeted disruption of the first receptor interaction domain (RID) of the nuclear corepressor SMRT disrupts interactions with a subset of NRs and leads to diet-induced superobesity associated with a depressed respiratory exchange ratio, decreased ambulatory activity, and insulin resistance. Although apparently normal when chow fed, SMRTmRID1 mice develop multiple metabolic dysfunctions when challenged by a high-fat diet, manifested by marked lipid accumulation in white and brown adipose tissue and the liver. The increased weight gain of SMRTmRID1 mice on a high-fat diet occurs predominantly in fat with adipocyte hypertrophy evident in both visceral and s.c. depots. Importantly, increased inflammatory gene expression was detected only in the visceral depots. SMRTmRID1 mice are both insulin-insensitive and refractory to the glucose-lowering effects of TZD and AICAR. Increased serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels were observed, accompanied by increased leptin and decreased adiponectin levels. Aberrant storage of lipids in the liver occurred as triglycerides and cholesterol significantly compromised hepatic function. Lipid accumulation in brown adipose tissue was associated with reduced thermogenic capacity and mitochondrial biogenesis. Collectively, these studies highlight the essential role of NR corepressors in maintaining metabolic homeostasis and describe an essential role for SMRT in regulating the progression, severity, and therapeutic outcome of metabolic diseases. PMID:21300871

  8. Chrysobalanus icaco L. Leaves Normalizes Insulin Sensitivity and Blood Glucose and Inhibits Weight Gain in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    White, Pollyanna A S; Araújo, Jessica M D; Cercato, Luana M; Souza, Lucas A; Barbosa, Ana Paula Oliveira; Quintans-Junior, Lucindo José; Machado, Ubiratan F; Camargo, Enilton A; Brito, Luciana C; Santos, Marcio Roberto V

    2016-02-01

    Chrysobalanus icaco L. is a medicinal plant present in the Brazilian coastline and known for its hypoglicemic and antioxidant properties. Here, we assessed the beneficial metabolic effects of the aqueous extract of C. icaco (AECI) leaves in diet-induced obese mice. Swiss mice were fed standard chow (SC used as controls) or high-fat diet (HFD) to induce obesity. After 10 weeks, mice on each diet were divided into two groups with one group used as control while the other group treated with AECI for 4 weeks resulting in four groups of mice: SC; SC treated with AECI (SC + AECI); HFD; and HFD treated with AECI (HFD + AECI). AECI was administered drinking water at about 200 mg/kg. AECI was able to normalize insulin (13,682 ± 1090 vs. 9828 ± 485 AU, P < .05) and fasting blood glucose (192.8 ± 14.2 vs. 132.3 ± 6.4 mg/dL, P < .05) and inhibit weight gain (39 ± 5.7%) and fat storage in liver (72.60 ± 3.83%, P < .0001), despite the high-fat intake. These findings reinforce the use of AECI in hyperglycemia and highlight the potential extract's effect in preventing weight gain and fat accumulation in liver of diet-induced obese mice.

  9. Diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance spur tumor growth and cancer cachexia in rats bearing the Yoshida sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Honors, Mary Ann; Kinzig, Kimberly P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with increased risk of cancer and cancer mortality. However, it is currently unknown whether they contribute to the development of cancer cachexia, a syndrome that contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality in individuals with cancer. The present experiment addresses the question of whether preexisting obesity and insulin resistance alter tumor growth and cancer cachexia symptoms in Yoshida sarcoma bearing male rats. Obesity and insulin resistance were induced through 5 weeks of high-fat (HF) diet feeding and insulin resistance was confirmed by intraperitoneal glucose tolerance testing. Chow-fed animals were used as a control group. Following the establishment of insulin resistance, HF- and chow-fed animals were implanted with fragments of the Yoshida sarcoma or received a sham surgery. Tumor growth rate was greater in HF-fed animals, resulting in larger tumors. In addition, cancer cachexia symptoms developed in HF-fed animals but not chow-fed animals during the 18-day experiment. These results support a stimulatory effect of obesity and insulin resistance on tumor growth and cancer cachexia development in Yoshida sarcoma-bearing rats. Future research should investigate the relationship between obesity, insulin resistance, and cancer cachexia in human subjects.

  10. Anti-obesity effect of Solidago virgaurea var. g igantea extract through regulation of adipogenesis and lipogenesis pathways in high-fat diet-induced obese mice (C57BL/6N)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Kim, Ju Hee; Jang, Young Soo; Kim, Chea Ha; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity is associated with an increase in adipogenesis and is becoming a serious health problem in modern society. Objective: The effects of various Solidago virgaurea var. gigantean (SV) ethanolic aqueous extracts on anti-adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells were investigated. In addition, the effect of SV 10% ethanolic extract (SV10E) on preventing obesity was studied in high-fat diet-induced obese mice (C57BL/6 N). Design: The effect of SV10E on preventing obesity was studied in mice (n = 6): normal-fat diet, high-fat diet (HFD), HFD supplemented with 1% (10 g/kg) Garcinia cambogia extract of 60% (–)-hydroxycitric acid (positive control), HFD supplemented with 0.5% (5 g/kg) SV10E, and HFD supplemented with 2% (20 g/kg) SV10E. Results: SV10E showed the highest anti-adipogenic activity in vitro and reduced body weight gain, adipose tissue size, and liver weight, without affecting food intake in vivo. SV10E administration decreased the levels of total triacylglycerol and cholesterol in serum, and lipid metabolites in liver. Adipogenic and lipogenic genes such as PPAR-γ, C/EBP-α, aP2, FAS, SCD-1, SREBP-1c, and CD36 in white adipose tissue and liver were suppressed by SV10E administration. Conclusion: SV10E can be a potent functional food ingredient for preventing HFD-induced obesity by suppressing adipogenesis and lipogenesis. PMID:28326002

  11. Adipose Tissue Overexpression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Protects Against Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Ivet; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Ferré, Tura; Vilà, Laia; Tafuro, Sabrina; Muñoz, Sergio; Roca, Carles; Ramos, David; Pujol, Anna; Riu, Efren; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2012-01-01

    During the expansion of fat mass in obesity, vascularization of adipose tissue is insufficient to maintain tissue normoxia. Local hypoxia develops and may result in altered adipokine expression, proinflammatory macrophage recruitment, and insulin resistance. We investigated whether an increase in adipose tissue angiogenesis could protect against obesity-induced hypoxia and, consequently, insulin resistance. Transgenic mice overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) were generated. Vessel formation, metabolism, and inflammation were studied in VEGF transgenic mice and wild-type littermates fed chow or a high-fat diet. Overexpression of VEGF resulted in increased blood vessel number and size in both WAT and BAT and protection against high-fat diet–induced hypoxia and obesity, with no differences in food intake. This was associated with increased thermogenesis and energy expenditure. Moreover, whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were improved. Transgenic mice presented increased macrophage infiltration, with a higher number of M2 anti-inflammatory and fewer M1 proinflammatory macrophages than wild-type littermates, thus maintaining an anti-inflammatory milieu that could avoid insulin resistance. These studies suggest that overexpression of VEGF in adipose tissue is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:22522611

  12. Differential effect of weight loss with low-fat diet or high-fat diet restriction on inflammation in the liver and adipose tissue of mice with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of weight loss induced by either a low-fat normal diet or restriction of high-fat diet on hepatic steatosis, inflammation in the liver and adipose tissue, and blood monocytes of obese mice. In mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity, weight loss was achieved by switching from ...

  13. Role of adiponectin in the metabolic effects of cannabinoid type 1 receptor blockade in mice with diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Godlewski, Grzegorz; Earley, Brian J.; Zhou, Liang; Jourdan, Tony; Szanda, Gergö; Cinar, Resat; Kunos, George

    2013-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone adiponectin promotes fatty acid oxidation and improves insulin sensitivity and thus plays a key role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism and energy homeostasis. Chronic cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor blockade also increases lipid oxidation and improves insulin sensitivity in obese individuals or animals, resulting in reduced cardiometabolic risk. Chronic CB1 blockade reverses the obesity-related decline in serum adiponectin levels, which has been proposed to account for the metabolic effects of CB1 antagonists. Here, we investigated the metabolic actions of the CB1 inverse agonist rimonabant in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese adiponectin knockout (Adipo−/−) mice and their wild-type littermate controls (Adipo+/+). HFD-induced obesity and its hormonal/metabolic consequences were indistinguishable in the two strains. Daily treatment of obese mice with rimonabant for 7 days resulted in significant and comparable reductions in body weight, serum leptin, free fatty acid, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in the two strains. Rimonabant treatment improved glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity to the same extent in Adipo+/+ and Adipo−/− mice, whereas it reversed the HFD-induced hepatic steatosis, fibrosis, and hepatocellular damage only in the former. The adiponectin-dependent, antisteatotic effect of rimonabant was mediated by reduced uptake and increased β-oxidation of fatty acids in the liver. We conclude that reversal of the HFD-induced hepatic steatosis and fibrosis by chronic CB1 blockade, but not the parallel reduction in adiposity and improved glycemic control, is mediated by adiponectin. PMID:24381003

  14. Magnolia Extract (BL153) Ameliorates Kidney Damage in a High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenpeng; Wang, Yangwei; Chen, Qiang; Sun, Weixia; Cai, Lu; Tan, Yi; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Ki Ho; Kim, Young Heui

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrated that obesity is a risk factor for renal structural and functional changes, leading to the end-stage renal disease which imposes a heavy economic burden on the community. However, no effective therapeutic method for obesity-associated kidney disease is available. In the present study, we explored the therapeutic potential of a magnolia extract (BL153) for treating obesity-associated kidney damage in a high fat diet- (HFD-) induced mouse model. The results showed that inflammation markers (tumor necrosis factor-α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) and oxidative stress markers (3-nitrotyrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal) were all significantly increased in the kidney of HFD-fed mice compared to mice fed with a low fat diet (LFD). Additionally, proteinuria and renal structure changes in HFD-fed mice were much more severe than that in LFD-fed mice. However, all these alterations were attenuated by BL153 treatment, accompanied by upregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and hexokinase II (HK II) expression in the kidney. The present study indicates that BL153 administration may be a novel approach for renoprotection in obese individuals by antiinflammation and anti-oxidative stress most likely via upregulation of PGC-1α and HK II signal in the kidney. PMID:24381715

  15. Proteomic Identification of Target Proteins of Thiodigalactoside in White Adipose Tissue from Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Parray, Hilal Ahmad; Yun, Jong Won

    2015-06-25

    Previously, galectin-1 (GAL1) was found to be up-regulated in obesity-prone subjects, suggesting that use of a GAL1 inhibitor could be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of obesity. We evaluated thiodigalactoside (TDG) as a potent inhibitor of GAL1 and identified target proteins of TDG by performing comparative proteome analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) from control and TDG-treated rats fed a high fat diet (HFD) using two dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with MALDI-TOF-MS. Thirty-two spots from a total of 356 matched spots showed differential expression between control and TDG-treated rats, as identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. These proteins were categorized into groups such as carbohydrate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, signal transduction, cytoskeletal, and mitochondrial proteins based on functional analysis using Protein Annotation Through Evolutionary Relationship (PANTHER) and Database for Annotation, Visualization, Integrated Discovery (DAVID) classification. One of the most striking findings of this study was significant changes in Carbonic anhydrase 3 (CA3), Voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP1), annexin A2 (ANXA2) and lactate dehydrogenase A chain (LDHA) protein levels between WAT from control and TDG-treated groups. In addition, we confirmed increased expression of thermogenic proteins as well as reduced expression of lipogenic proteins in response to TDG treatment. These results suggest that TDG may effectively prevent obesity, and TDG-responsive proteins can be used as novel target proteins for obesity treatment.

  16. Impaired compensation to femoral artery ligation in diet-induced obese mice is primarily mediated via suppression of collateral growth by Nox2 and p47phox

    PubMed Central

    DiStasi, Matthew R.; Mund, Julie A.; Bohlen, H. Glenn; Miller, Steven J.; Ingram, David A.; Dalsing, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish the role of NADPH oxidase (Nox) in impaired vascular compensation to arterial occlusion that occurs in the presence of risk factors associated with oxidative stress. Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice characterized by multiple comorbidities including diabetes and hyperlipidemia were used as a preclinical model. Arterial occlusion was induced by distal femoral artery ligation in lean and DIO mice. Proximal collateral arteries were identified as the site of major (∼70%) vascular resistance to calf perfusion by distal arterial pressures, which decreased from ∼80 to ∼30 mmHg with ligation in both lean and DIO mice. Two weeks after ligation, significant vascular compensation occurred in lean but not DIO mice as evidenced by increased perfusion (147 ± 48% vs. 49 ± 29%) and collateral diameter (151 ± 30% vs. 44 ± 17%). Vascular mRNA expression of p22phox, Nox2, Nox4, and p47phox were all increased in DIO mice. Treatment of DIO mice with either apocynin or Nox2ds-tat or with whole body ablation of either Nox2 or p47phox ameliorated the impairment in both collateral growth and hindlimb perfusion. Multiparametric flow cytometry analysis demonstrated elevated levels of circulating monocytes in DIO mice without impaired mobilization and demargination after femoral artery ligation. These results establish collateral resistance as the major limitation to calf perfusion in this preclinical model, demonstrate than monocyte mobilization and demarginatin is not suppressed, implicate Nox2-p47phox interactions in the impairment of vascular compensation to arterial occlusion in DIO mice, and suggest that selective Nox component suppression/inhibition may be effective as either primary or adjuvant therapy for claudicants. PMID:26297224

  17. Evaluation of Aroclor 1260 exposure in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Song, Ming; Beier, Juliane I.; Falkner, K. Cameron; Al-Eryani, Laila; Clair, Heather B.; Prough, Russell A.; Osborne, Tanasa S.; Malarkey, David E.; States, J. Christopher; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in epidemiologic studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatic effects of a PCB mixture, Aroclor 1260, whose composition mimics human bioaccumulation patterns, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed control diet or 42% high fat diet (HFD) and exposed to Aroclor 1260 (20 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg in corn oil) for 12 weeks. A glucose tolerance test was performed; plasma/tissues were obtained at necropsy for measurements of adipocytokine levels, histology, and gene expression. Aroclor 1260 exposure was associated with decreased body fat in HFD-fed mice but had no effect on blood glucose/lipid levels. Paradoxically, Aroclor 1260 + HFD co-exposed mice demonstrated increased hepatic inflammatory foci at both doses while the degree of steatosis did not change. Serum cytokines, ALT levels and hepatic expression of IL-6 and TNFα were increased only at 20 mg/kg, suggesting an inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production at the 200 mg/kg exposure. Aroclor 1260 induced hepatic expression of cytochrome P450s including Cyp3a11 (Pregnane-Xenobiotic Receptor target) and Cyp2b10 (constitutive androstane receptor target) but Cyp2b10 inducibility was diminished with HFD-feeding. Cyp1a2 (aryl hydrocarbon Receptor target) was induced only at 200 mg/kg. In summary, Aroclor 1260 worsened hepatic and systemic inflammation in DIO. The results indicated a bimodal response of PCB-diet interactions in the context of inflammation which could potentially be explained by xenobiotic receptor activation. Thus, PCB exposure may be a relevant “second hit” in the transformation of steatosis to steatohepatitis. PMID:24998970

  18. Effect of the Capsicoside G-rich Fraction from Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Seeds on High-fat Diet-induced Obesity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jeehye; Jeong, Heon Sang; Lee, Junsoo

    2016-11-01

    Obesity is one of the most common metabolic syndromes and is a major threat to human health worldwide. Given the size of this problem, there is growing interest in natural agents that may decrease obesity. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect of a capsicoside G-rich fraction (CRF; 13.35% capsicoside G) isolated from pepper seeds in diet-induced obese mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed either a normal diet or a high-fat diet (HFD), with or without CRF (HFD + CRF; 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight). The body weight and food efficiency ratio of mice fed HFD + CRF were lower in comparison to that of mice fed only an HFD. Epididymal adipose tissue weight and adipocyte hypertrophy were significantly lower in HFD + CRF mice than in HFD mice. The fat deposition in the liver of mice fed HFD + CRF was lower compared to that of mice fed only an HFD. CRF significantly reversed the HFD-induced elevation of the expression of key adipocyte differentiation regulators, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c, and their target genes. These results suggest that CRF could be used as dietary therapy for the prevention of obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The crude extract from puerariae flower exerts antiobesity and antifatty liver effects in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Sameshima-Kamiya, Mayu; Nagamine, Rika; Tsubata, Masahito; Ikeguchi, Motoya; Takagaki, Kinya; Shimada, Tsutomu; Aburada, Masaki

    2012-01-01

    Kudzu, a leguminous plant, has long been used in folk medicine. In particular, its flowers are used in Japanese and Chinese folk medicine for treating hangovers. We focused on the flower of Kudzu (Puerariae thomsonii), and we previously reported the antiobesity effect of Puerariae thomsonii flower extract (PFE) in humans. In this study, we conducted an animal study to investigate the effect of PFE on visceral fat and hepatic lipid levels in mice with diet-induced obesity. In addition, we focused on gene expression profiles to investigate the antiobesity mechanism of PFE. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or an HFD supplemented with 5% PFE for 14 days. PFE supplementation significantly reduced body weight and white adipose tissue (WAT) weight. Moreover, in the histological analysis, PFE supplementation improved fatty liver. Hepatic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that PFE supplementation downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase expression. For adipose tissue, the expressions of hormone-sensitive lipase in WAT and uncoupling protein 1 in brown adipose tissue (BAT) were significantly upregulated. These results suggest that PFE exerts antiobesity and antifatty liver effects in high-fat diet-induced obese mice through suppressing lipogenesis in the liver, stimulating lipolysis in WAT, and promoting thermogenesis in BAT.

  20. MyD88 signaling in the CNS is required for development of fatty acid induced leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinridders, André; Schenten, Dominik; Könner, A. Christine; Belgardt, Bengt F.; Mauer, Jan; Okamura, Tomoo; Wunderlich, F. Thomas; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Brüning, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Obesity-associated activation of inflammatory pathways represents a key step in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral organs, partially via activation of TLR-4 signaling by fatty acids. Here we demonstrate that palmitate acting in the central nervous system (CNS) inhibits leptin-induced anorexia and Stat-3 activation. To determine the functional significance of TLR signaling in the CNS in the development of leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity in vivo, we have characterized mice deficient for the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 in the CNS (MyD88ΔCNS). Compared to control mice, MyD88ΔCNS mice are protected from high-fat diet (HFD)-induced weight gain, from the development of HFD-induced leptin resistance and from the induction of leptin resistance by acute central application of palmitate. Moreover, CNS-restricted MyD88 deletion protects from HFD- and icv palmitate-induced impairment of peripheral glucose metabolism. Thus, we define neuronal MyD88-dependent signaling as a key regulator of diet-induced leptin and insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:19808018

  1. Glucose and insulin modify thrombospondin 1 expression and secretion in primary adipocytes from diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Diaz, Diego F; Arellano, Arianna V; Milagro, Fermin I; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria Jesus; Portillo, Maria Puy; Martinez, J Alfredo; Campion, Javier

    2011-09-01

    Thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1), an antiangiogenic factor and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β activity regulator, has been recently recognized as an adipokine that correlates with obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance processes. In the present study, epididymal adipocytes of rats that were fed a chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 50 days were isolated and incubated (24-72 h) in low (5.6 mM) or high (HG; 25 mM) glucose, in the presence or absence of 1.6 nM insulin. Rats fed the HF diet showed an established obesity state. Serum TSP-1 levels and TSP-1 mRNA basal expression of adipocytes from HFD rats were higher than those from controls. Adipocytes from HFD animals presented an insulin resistance state, as suggested by the lower insulin-stimulated glucose uptake as compared to controls. TSP-1 expression in culture was higher in adipocytes from obese animals at 24 h, but when the adipocytes were treated with HG, these expression levels dropped dramatically. Later at 72 h, TSP-1 expression was lower in adipocytes from HFD rats, and no effects of the other treatments were observed. Surprisingly, the secretion levels of this protein at 72 h were increased significantly by the HG treatment in both types of adipocytes, although they were even higher in adipocytes from obese animals. Finally, cell viability was significantly reduced by HG treatment in both types of adipocytes. In summary, TSP-1 expression/secretion was modulated in an in vitro model of insulin-resistant adipocytes. The difference between expression and secretion patterns suggests a posttranscriptional regulation. The present study confirms that TPS-1 is closely associated with obesity-related mechanisms.

  2. Extract of okra lowers blood glucose and serum lipids in high-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shengjie; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qinhu; Yu, Lijing; Li, Mingxia; Zheng, Bin; Wu, Ximin; Yang, Baican; Li, Yiming; Huang, Cheng

    2014-07-01

    Okra is an important tropical vegetable and source of dietary medicine. Here, we assayed the effects of an ethanol extract of okra (EO) and its major flavonoids isoquercitrin and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside on metabolic disorders in high-fat diet-induced obese mouse. We found that treatment with EO, isoquercitrin and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside reduced blood glucose and serum insulin levels and improved glucose tolerance in obese mice. Meanwhile, serum triglyceride levels and liver morphology in the mice were significantly ameliorated by EO and isoquercitrin treatment. Total cholesterol levels in isoquercitrin and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside treated mice were also reduced. We also found that EO inhibited the expression of nuclear receptor transcription factor PPARγ, which is an important regulator of lipid and glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, we determined that EO and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside have antioxidant activity in vitro. Our results indicate that okra may serve as a dietary therapy for hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. Effects of dumb-bell exercise with and without energy restriction on resting metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and body composition in mildly obese women.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, T; Suzuki, M

    1999-06-01

    The effects of dumb-bell exercise (aerobic-resistance exercise) with and without low calorie diet (LCD) therapy on resting metabolic rate (RMR), diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and body composition were studied in 12 mildly obese women aged 19-20 years. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: dumb-bell exercise with LCD (DEx + LCD group), and dumb-bell exercise only (DEx group). The subjects performed dumb-bell exercises with pairs of 2 kg dumb-bells every day after dinner for approximately 20 min. In the DEx + LCD group, subjects also received a liquid-formula diet based on a commercially available diet supplement, Micro Diet, for two of their three daily meals. Thus, they were restricted to approximately 4.18 MJ of energy intake per day for 12 weeks. Subjects underwent several measurements (body composition, RMR and DIT tests) before commencing the experiment and again after 12 weeks while still dieting. During the 12 week experimental period, body weight and body fat decreased significantly in both the DEx + LCD and the DEx groups without reducing fat free mass (FFM). The decreases in body weight and body fat were significantly larger in the LCD + DEx group than in the DEx group. These results suggest that dumb-bell exercise decreases body weight and body fat without reducing FFM in relation to increasing RMR and DIT. Micro Diet LCD may strengthen the effect of dumb-bell exercise on body weight and body fat, but weaken the effects on RMR and DIT.

  4. Direct control of peripheral lipid deposition by CNS GLP-1 receptor signaling is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and blunted in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nogueiras, Ruben; Pérez-Tilve, Diego; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Morgan, Donald A; Varela, Luis; Haynes, William G; Patterson, James T; Disse, Emmanuel; Pfluger, Paul T; López, Miguel; Woods, Stephen C; DiMarchi, Richard; Diéguez, Carlos; Rahmouni, Kamal; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2009-05-06

    We investigated a possible role of the central glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) receptor system as an essential brain circuit regulating adiposity through effects on nutrient partitioning and lipid metabolism independent from feeding behavior. Both lean and diet-induced obesity mice were used for our experiments. GLP-1 (7-36) amide was infused in the brain for 2 or 7 d. The expression of key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism was measured by real-time PCR or Western blot. To test the hypothesis that the sympathetic nervous system may be responsible for informing adipocytes about changes in CNS GLP-1 tone, we have performed direct recording of sympathetic nerve activity combined with experiments in genetically manipulated mice lacking beta-adrenergic receptors. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GLP-1 in mice directly and potently decreases lipid storage in white adipose tissue. These effects are independent from nutrient intake. Such CNS control of adipocyte metabolism was found to depend partially on a functional sympathetic nervous system. Furthermore, the effects of CNS GLP-1 on adipocyte metabolism were blunted in diet-induced obese mice. The CNS GLP-1 system decreases fat storage via direct modulation of adipocyte metabolism. This CNS GLP-1 control of adipocyte lipid metabolism appears to be mediated at least in part by the sympathetic nervous system and is independent of parallel changes in food intake and body weight. Importantly, the CNS GLP-1 system loses the capacity to modulate adipocyte metabolism in obese states, suggesting an obesity-induced adipocyte resistance to CNS GLP-1.

  5. Protective Effects of Tamarillo (Cyphomandra betacea) Extract against High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Kadir, Noor Atiqah Aizan; Rahmat, Asmah; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the protective effect of Cyphomandra betacea in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats fed with high fat diet. Rats were fed on either normal chow or high fat diet for 10 weeks for obesity induction phase and subsequently received C. betacea extract at low dose (150 mg kg−1), medium dose (200 mg kg−1), or high dose (300 mg kg−1) or placebo via oral gavages for another 7 weeks for treatment phase. Treatment of obese rats with C. betacea extracts led to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and significant increase in HDL-C (p < 0.05). Also there was a trend of positive reduction in blood glucose, triglyceride, and LDL-C with positive reduction of body weight detected in medium and high dosage of C. betacea extract. Interestingly, C. betacea treated rats showed positive improvement of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity along with a significant increase of total antioxidant status (TAS) (p < 0.05). Further, rats treated with C. betacea show significantly lower in TNF-α and IL-6 activities (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates the potential use of Cyphomandra betacea extract for weight maintenance and complimentary therapy to suppress some obesity complication signs. PMID:26171246

  6. Weight loss following diet-induced obesity does not alter colon tumorigenesis in the AOM mouse model.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Kandy T; Enos, Reilly T; Carson, Meredith S; Cranford, Taryn L; Bader, Jackie E; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Singh, Udai P; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Davis, J Mark; Carson, James A; Murphy, E Angela

    2016-10-01

    Obesity presents a significant public health concern given its association with increased cancer incidence, unfavorable prognosis, and metastasis. However, there is very little literature on the effects of weight loss, following obesity, on risk for colon cancer or liver cancer. Therefore, we sought to study whether intentional weight loss through diet manipulation was capable of mitigating colon and liver cancer in mice. We fed mice with a high-fat diet (HFD) comprised of 47% carbohydrates, 40% fat, and 13% protein for 20 wk to mimic human obesity. Subsequently, azoxymethane (AOM) was used to promote colon and liver carcinogenesis. A subset of obese mice was then switched to a low-fat diet (LFD) containing 67.5% carbohydrate, 12.2% fat, and 20% protein to promote intentional weight loss. Body weight loss and excess fat reduction did not protect mice from colon cancer progression and liver dysplastic lesion in the AOM-chemical-cancer model even though these mice had improved blood glucose and leptin levels. Intentional weight loss in AOM-treated mice actually produced histological changes that resemble dysplastic alterations in the liver and presented a higher percentage of F4/80(+)CD206(+) macrophages and activated T cells (CD4(+)CD69(+)) in the spleen and lymph nodes, respectively. In addition, the liver of AOM-treated mice exposed to a HFD during the entire period of the experiment exhibited a marked increase in proliferation and pNF-κB activation. Altogether, these data suggest that intentional weight loss following chemical-induced carcinogenesis does not affect colon tumorigenesis but may in fact negatively impact liver repair mechanisms.

  7. Effect of Green Tea Extract on Systemic Metabolic Homeostasis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Determined via RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji-Young; Kim, Ye Jin; Ryu, Ri; Cho, Su-Jung; Kwon, Eun-Young; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Green tea (GT) has various health effects, including anti-obesity properties. However, the multiple molecular mechanisms of the effects have not been fully determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the anti-obesity effects of GT via the analysis of its metabolic and transcriptional responses based on RNA-seq profiles. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal, high-fat (60% energy as fat), or high-fat + 0.25% (w/w) GT diet for 12 weeks. The GT extract ameliorated obesity, hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. GT supplementation resulted in