Science.gov

Sample records for diet-induced obesity increases

  1. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  2. Diet-Induced Obesity Significantly Increases the Severity of Post-Traumatic Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Louer, Craig R.; Furman, Bridgette D.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Olson, Steven A.; Guilak, Farshid

    2012-01-01

    Objective Obesity and joint injury are both primary risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) that involve potential alterations in the biomechanical and inflammatory environments of the joint. Post-traumatic arthritis (PTA) is a frequent long-term complication of intra-articular fractures. Obesity has been linked to primary OA and may potentially contribute to the development of PTA by a variety of mechanisms. The objectives of this study were to determine if diet-induced obesity influences the severity of PTA in mice and to examine interrelationships between joint degeneration and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in this response. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed either normal chow (13% fat) or a high-fat diet (60% fat) starting at 4 weeks of age. At 16 weeks, half of each group received closed intra-articular fracture of the left knee. At 8 weeks post-fracture, knee osteoarthritis was assessed by cartilage and synovium histology in addition to bone morphology. Serum cytokine concentrations were determined with multiplex assay. Results Fractured knee joints of mice on a high-fat diet showed significantly increased osteoarthritic degeneration compared to non-fractured contralateral controls, while fractured knee joints of low-fat mice did not demonstrate significant differences from non-fractured contralateral controls. High-fat diet increased serum concentrations of interleukin-12p70, interleukin-6, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, while decreasing adiponectin concentrations. Systemic levels of adiponectin were inversely correlated with synovial inflammation in control limbs. Conclusion Diet-induced obesity significantly increased the severity of osteoarthritis following intra-articular fracture. Obesity and joint injury together can alter systemic levels of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-12p70. PMID:22576842

  3. Diet induced obesity increases the risk of colonic tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Sikalidis, Angelos K; Fitch, Mark D; Fleming, Sharon E

    2013-10-01

    A large body of epidemiological data indicates that obesity increases the risk of colon cancer in humans. There are limited studies using rodent models where the relationship between obesity and colon cancer has been studied. In this study, wild-type diet-induced obese (DIO) mice and lean wild-type controls were used to investigate the influence of obesity on the risk of colon cancer. We hypothesized that the obese phenotype would exhibit increased colonic tumorigenesis. Colon cancer was chemically induced by injecting the mice with azoxymethane (AOM) at levels that we experimentally determined to result in equivalent AOM concentrations in circulating blood. Risk of colon cancer was assessed via microscopic examination of entire colons for aberrant crypts, aberrant crypt foci and proliferation levels. The DIO mice were found to have significantly more aberrant crypts and aberrant crypt foci as well as increased proliferation of colonocytes per mouse compared to wild-type control mice, supporting the epidemiological data that obesity increases the risk of colonic tumorigenesis.

  4. Gastric bypass increases ethanol and water consumption in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Subrize, Mike; Delis, Foteini; Cooney, Robert N; Culnan, Derek; Sun, Mingjie; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Hajnal, Andras

    2012-12-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is an effective treatment for morbid obesity. Increased alcohol abuse after RYGB resulted in recommendations to exclude patients with alcohol abuse histories from RYGB. The purpose of our study was to examine the effects of a RYGB on ethanol intake in diet-induced obese rats (high-fat diet). The animals underwent RYGB and were habituated along with their sham-operated obese controls and with lean rats to increasing concentrations of ethanol in a two-bottle choice paradigm. RYGB rats' daily consumption of ethanol averaged 2 g/kg at 2% habituation and 3.8 g/kg at 4% habituation, twice as much as sham-operated obese controls and 50% more than normal-diet lean controls. Obese controls drank on average 1 g/kg of ethanol (2 and 4%), significantly less (50%) than lean controls did. RYGB rats when given higher ethanol concentrations (6 and 8%) or no ethanol drank significantly more water than lean and obese controls did (66 and 100%, respectively), and their enhanced total fluid intake was associated with increased food intake, which was significantly higher than in lean (66% more calories; food + alcohol) and obese controls (44% more calories). The lower alcohol intake in the obese controls than in the lean rats suggests that obesity may interfere with alcohol's rewarding effects and RYGB may remove this protective effect. The overall enhancement of consummatory behaviors (both ethanol and water) suggests that RYGB may facilitate alcohol consumption, which in vulnerable individuals could lead to abuse and addiction.

  5. Ghrelin secretion is not reduced by increased fat mass during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiang; Reed, Jason T; Wang, Guiyun; Han, Song; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2008-08-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH) secretion, adiposity, and food intake. Gastric ghrelin production and secretion are regulated by caloric intake; ghrelin secretion increases during fasting, decreases with refeeding, and is reduced by diet-induced obesity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypotheses that 1) an increase in body adiposity will play an inhibitory role in the reduction of gastric ghrelin synthesis and secretion during chronic ingestion of a high-fat (HF) diet and 2) chronic ingestion of an HF diet will suppress the rise in circulating ghrelin levels in response to acute fasting. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a standard AIN-76A (approximately 5-12% of calories from fat) or an HF (approximately 45% of calories from fat) diet. The effect of increased adiposity on gastric ghrelin homeostasis was assessed by comparison of stomach ghrelin production and plasma ghrelin levels in obese and nonobese rats fed the HF diet. HF diet-fed, nonobese rats were generated by administration of triiodothyronine to lower body fat accumulation. Our findings indicate that an increased fat mass per se does not exert an inhibitory effect on ghrelin homeostasis during ingestion of the HF diet. Additionally, the magnitude of change in plasma ghrelin in response to fasting was not blunted, indicating that a presumed, endogenous signal for activation of ingestive behavior remains intact, despite excess stored calories in HF-fed rats.

  6. Increased expression of receptors for orexigenic factors in nodose ganglion of diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Gabriel; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Knotts, Trina A; Oort, Pieter J; Newman, John W; Adams, Sean H; Raybould, Helen E

    2009-04-01

    The vagal afferent pathway is important in short-term regulation of food intake, and decreased activation of this neural pathway with long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet may contribute to hyperphagic weight gain. We tested the hypothesis that expression of genes encoding receptors for orexigenic factors in vagal afferent neurons are increased by long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet, thus supporting orexigenic signals from the gut. Obesity-prone (DIO-P) rats fed a high-fat diet showed increased body weight and hyperleptinemia compared with low-fat diet-fed controls and high-fat diet-induced obesity-resistant (DIO-R) rats. Expression of the type I cannabinoid receptor and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a in the nodose ganglia was increased in DIO-P compared with low-fat diet-fed controls or DIO-R rats. Shifts in the balance between orexigenic and anorexigenic signals within the vagal afferent pathway may influence food intake and body weight gain induced by high fat diets.

  7. Increased expression of receptors for orexigenic factors in nodose ganglion of diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Paulino, Gabriel; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Knotts, Trina A.; Oort, Pieter J.; Newman, John W.; Adams, Sean H.; Raybould, Helen E.

    2009-01-01

    The vagal afferent pathway is important in short-term regulation of food intake, and decreased activation of this neural pathway with long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet may contribute to hyperphagic weight gain. We tested the hypothesis that expression of genes encoding receptors for orexigenic factors in vagal afferent neurons are increased by long-term ingestion of a high-fat diet, thus supporting orexigenic signals from the gut. Obesity-prone (DIO-P) rats fed a high-fat diet showed increased body weight and hyperleptinemia compared with low-fat diet-fed controls and high-fat diet-induced obesity-resistant (DIO-R) rats. Expression of the type I cannabinoid receptor and growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a in the nodose ganglia was increased in DIO-P compared with low-fat diet-fed controls or DIO-R rats. Shifts in the balance between orexigenic and anorexigenic signals within the vagal afferent pathway may influence food intake and body weight gain induced by high fat diets. PMID:19190260

  8. Increasing adipocyte lipoprotein lipase improves glucose metabolism in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Walton, R Grace; Zhu, Beibei; Unal, Resat; Spencer, Michael; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Charnigo, Richard; Katz, Wendy S; Daugherty, Alan; Howatt, Deborah A; Kern, Philip A; Finlin, Brian S

    2015-05-01

    Lipid accumulation in liver and skeletal muscle contributes to co-morbidities associated with diabetes and obesity. We made a transgenic mouse in which the adiponectin (Adipoq) promoter drives expression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in adipocytes to potentially increase adipose tissue lipid storage. These mice (Adipoq-LPL) have improved glucose and insulin tolerance as well as increased energy expenditure when challenged with a high fat diet (HFD). To identify the mechanism(s) involved, we determined whether the Adipoq-LPL mice diverted dietary lipid to adipose tissue to reduce peripheral lipotoxicity, but we found no evidence for this. Instead, characterization of the adipose tissue of the male mice after HFD challenge revealed that the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and a number of PPARγ-regulated genes were higher in the epididymal fat pads of Adipoq-LPL mice than control mice. This included adiponectin, whose mRNA levels were increased, leading to increased adiponectin serum levels in the Adipoq-LPL mice. In many respects, the adipose phenotype of these animals resembles thiazolidinedione treatment except for one important difference, the Adipoq-LPL mice did not gain more fat mass on HFD than control mice and did not have increased expression of genes in adipose such as glycerol kinase, which are induced by high affinity PPAR agonists. Rather, there was selective induction of PPARγ-regulated genes such as adiponectin in the adipose of the Adipoq-LPL mice, suggesting that increasing adipose tissue LPL improves glucose metabolism in diet-induced obesity by improving the adipose tissue phenotype. Adipoq-LPL mice also have increased energy expenditure.

  9. Isolated duodenal exclusion increases energy expenditure and improves glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Rodrigo; Carmody, Jill S.; Stylopoulos, Nicholas; Davis, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) in rodent models reduces food intake (FI), increases resting energy expenditure (EE), and improves glycemic control. We have shown that mimicking the duodenal component of RYGB by implantation of a 10-cm endoluminal sleeve device (ELS-10) induces weight loss and improves glycemic control in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. We sought to determine the mechanisms and structural requirements of these effects. We examined the effects of ELS-10 devices implanted in male DIO rats on body weight, food intake (FI), meal patterns, total and resting EE, and multiple parameters of glucose homeostasis, comparing them with sham-operated (SO) rats and with SO rats weight matched to the ELS-10-treated group. To determine the extent of duodenal exclusion required to influence metabolic outcomes, we compared the effects of implanting 10-, 4-, or 1-cm ELS devices. ELS-10 rats exhibited 13% higher total and 9% higher resting EE than SO controls. ELS-10 rats also exhibited enhanced postprandial GLP-1 secretion and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity out of proportion to the effects of weight loss alone. Implantation of 4- or 1-cm ELS devices had no effect on EE and limited effects on glucose homeostasis. Complete duodenal exclusion with ELS-10 induces weight loss by decreasing FI and increasing EE and improves glycemic control through weight loss-independent mechanisms. Thus signals originating in the proximal small intestine appear to exert a direct influence on the physiological regulation of EE and glucose homeostasis. Their selective manipulation could provide effective new therapies for obesity and diabetes that mimic the benefits of RYGB. PMID:22972837

  10. Loss of Akt1 in Mice Increases Energy Expenditure and Protects against Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Min; Easton, Rachael M.; Gleason, Catherine E.; Monks, Bobby R.; Ueki, Kohjiro; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Akt is encoded by a gene family for which each isoform serves distinct but overlapping functions. Based on the phenotypes of the germ line gene disruptions, Akt1 has been associated with control of growth, whereas Akt2 has been linked to metabolic regulation. Here we show that Akt1 serves an unexpected role in the regulation of energy metabolism, as mice deficient for Akt1 exhibit protection from diet-induced obesity and its associated insulin resistance. Although skeletal muscle contributes most of the resting and exercising energy expenditure, muscle-specific deletion of Akt1 does not recapitulate the phenotype, indicating that the role of Akt1 in skeletal muscle is cell nonautonomous. These data indicate a previously unknown function of Akt1 in energy metabolism and provide a novel target for treatment of obesity. PMID:22037765

  11. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Ina; Goritz, Vincent; Doberstein, Henriette; Hiller, Grit Gesine Ruth; Rosenstock, Philip; Jahn, Janine; Pörtner, Ole; Berreis, Tobias; Mueller, Thomas; Spielmann, Julia; Kielstein, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK) cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In addition, leptin incubation decreased the expression of activating NK cell receptors. In animal studies, colon cancer growth was induced by injection of azoxymethane (AOM) in normal weight and diet-induced obese rats. Body weight and visceral fat mass were increased in obese animals compared to normal weight rats. AOM-treated obese rats showed an increased quantity, size, and weight of colon tumors compared to the normal weight tumor group. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a decreased number of NK cells in spleen and liver in obesity. Additionally, the expression levels of activating NK cell receptors were lower in spleen and liver of obese rats. The results show for the first time that the decreased number and impaired NK cell function may be one cause for the higher colon cancer risk in obesity.

  12. Diet-Induced Obesity Is Associated with an Impaired NK Cell Function and an Increased Colon Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Goritz, Vincent; Doberstein, Henriette; Hiller, Grit Gesine Ruth; Rosenstock, Philip; Jahn, Janine; Pörtner, Ole; Berreis, Tobias; Mueller, Thomas; Spielmann, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased colon cancer incidence, but underlying mechanisms remained unclear. Previous studies showed altered Natural killer (NK) cell functions in obese individuals. Therefore, we studied the impact of an impaired NK cell functionality on the increased colon cancer risk in obesity. In vitro investigations demonstrated a decreased IFN-γ secretion and cytotoxicity of human NK cells against colon tumor cells after NK cell preincubation with the adipokine leptin. In addition, leptin incubation decreased the expression of activating NK cell receptors. In animal studies, colon cancer growth was induced by injection of azoxymethane (AOM) in normal weight and diet-induced obese rats. Body weight and visceral fat mass were increased in obese animals compared to normal weight rats. AOM-treated obese rats showed an increased quantity, size, and weight of colon tumors compared to the normal weight tumor group. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated a decreased number of NK cells in spleen and liver in obesity. Additionally, the expression levels of activating NK cell receptors were lower in spleen and liver of obese rats. The results show for the first time that the decreased number and impaired NK cell function may be one cause for the higher colon cancer risk in obesity. PMID:28357137

  13. Ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle and brown fat and decreases diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Steven D; Elmore, Christopher J; Bongers, Kale S; Ebert, Scott M; Fox, Daniel K; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Adams, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle Akt activity stimulates muscle growth and imparts resistance to obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease. We recently found that ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle Akt activity and stimulates muscle growth in non-obese mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ursolic acid might increase skeletal muscle Akt activity in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. We studied mice that consumed a high fat diet lacking or containing ursolic acid. In skeletal muscle, ursolic acid increased Akt activity, as well as downstream mRNAs that promote glucose utilization (hexokinase-II), blood vessel recruitment (Vegfa) and autocrine/paracrine IGF-I signaling (Igf1). As a result, ursolic acid increased skeletal muscle mass, fast and slow muscle fiber size, grip strength and exercise capacity. Interestingly, ursolic acid also increased brown fat, a tissue that shares developmental origins with skeletal muscle. Consistent with increased skeletal muscle and brown fat, ursolic acid increased energy expenditure, leading to reduced obesity, improved glucose tolerance and decreased hepatic steatosis. These data support a model in which ursolic acid reduces obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease by increasing skeletal muscle and brown fat, and suggest ursolic acid as a potential therapeutic approach for obesity and obesity-related illness.

  14. Ursolic Acid Increases Skeletal Muscle and Brown Fat and Decreases Diet-Induced Obesity, Glucose Intolerance and Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Steven D.; Elmore, Christopher J.; Bongers, Kale S.; Ebert, Scott M.; Fox, Daniel K.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle Akt activity stimulates muscle growth and imparts resistance to obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease. We recently found that ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle Akt activity and stimulates muscle growth in non-obese mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ursolic acid might increase skeletal muscle Akt activity in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. We studied mice that consumed a high fat diet lacking or containing ursolic acid. In skeletal muscle, ursolic acid increased Akt activity, as well as downstream mRNAs that promote glucose utilization (hexokinase-II), blood vessel recruitment (Vegfa) and autocrine/paracrine IGF-I signaling (Igf1). As a result, ursolic acid increased skeletal muscle mass, fast and slow muscle fiber size, grip strength and exercise capacity. Interestingly, ursolic acid also increased brown fat, a tissue that shares developmental origins with skeletal muscle. Consistent with increased skeletal muscle and brown fat, ursolic acid increased energy expenditure, leading to reduced obesity, improved glucose tolerance and decreased hepatic steatosis. These data support a model in which ursolic acid reduces obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease by increasing skeletal muscle and brown fat, and suggest ursolic acid as a potential therapeutic approach for obesity and obesity-related illness. PMID:22745735

  15. High fat diet-induced obesity increases the formation of colon polyps induced by azoxymethane in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2015-04-01

    Obesity has been found to be associated with colon cancer. However, the mechanism of this relationship is unclear and thus a good animal model is required. Our previous research showed that some mice developed diet-induced obesity (DIO) whilst others were diet-resistant (DR) when fed a high-fat diet. In the present study, we have tested the effects of a high-fat diet on the formation of colon polyps induced by azoxymethane (AOM) in both DIO and DR mice. We found that the DIO mice have developed 2.5 times of polyps compared to the DR mice (P<0.05) and 3.4 times of polyps compared to the low fat fed mice (P<0.05). Although the DR mice tended to have more polyps than the low-fat diet fed mice, this was not statistically significant. The DIO mice could have an increased polyp formation due to obesity-related cancer risk factors and different gene expression from DR mice. DIO mice could be used as an appropriate model for studying obesity-associated colon cancer; however DR mice are not suitable because they don't show any significant weight gains to indicate obesity.

  16. Peripheral reduction of FGFR4 with antisense oligonucleotides increases metabolic rate and lowers adiposity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing Xian; Watts, Lynnetta M; Manchem, Vara Prasad; Chakravarty, Kaushik; Monia, Brett P; McCaleb, Michael L; Bhanot, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for multiple metabolic disorders. Many drugs for the treatment of obesity, which mainly act through CNS as appetite suppressants, have failed during development or been removed from the market due to unacceptable adverse effects. Thus, there are very few efficacious drugs available and remains a great unmet medical need for anti-obesity drugs that increase energy expenditure by acting on peripheral tissues without severe side effects. Here, we report a novel approach involving antisense inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) in peripheral tissues. Treatment of diet-induce obese (DIO) mice with FGFR4 antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) specifically reduced liver FGFR4 expression that not only resulted in decrease in body weight (BW) and adiposity in free-feeding conditions, but also lowered BW and adiposity under caloric restriction. In addition, combination treatment with FGFR4 ASO and rimonabant showed additive reduction in BW and adiposity. FGFR4 ASO treatment increased basal metabolic rate during free-feeding conditions and, more importantly, prevented adaptive decreases of metabolic rate induced by caloric restriction. The treatment increased fatty acid oxidation while decreased lipogenesis in both liver and fat. Mechanistic studies indicated that anti-obesity effect of FGFR4 ASO was mediated at least in part through an induction of plasma FGF15 level resulted from reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression. The anti-obesity effect was accompanied by improvement in plasma glycemia, whole body insulin sensitivity, plasma lipid levels and liver steatosis. Therefore, FGFR4 could be a potential novel target and antisense reduction of hepatic FGFR4 expression could be an efficacious therapy as an adjunct to diet restriction or to an appetite suppressant for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  17. Increased inflammatory properties of adipose tissue macrophages recruited during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N; Deyoung, Stephanie M; Bodzin, Jennifer L; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Although recent studies show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) participate in the inflammatory changes in obesity and contribute to insulin resistance, the properties of these cells are not well understood. We hypothesized that ATMs recruited to adipose tissue during a high-fat diet have unique inflammatory properties compared with resident tissue ATMs. Using a dye (PKH26) to pulse label ATMs in vivo, we purified macrophages recruited to white adipose tissue during a high-fat diet. Comparison of gene expression in recruited and resident ATMs using real-time RT-PCR and cDNA microarrays showed that recruited ATMs overexpress genes important in macrophage migration and phagocytosis, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Many of these genes were not induced in ATMs from high-fat diet-fed CCR2 knockout mice, supporting the importance of CCR2 in regulating recruitment of inflammatory ATMs during obesity. Additionally, expression of Apoe was decreased, whereas genes important in lipid metabolism, such as Pparg, Adfp, Srepf1, and Apob48r, were increased in the recruited macrophages. In agreement with this, ATMs from obese mice had increased lipid content compared with those from lean mice. These studies demonstrate that recruited ATMs in obese animals represent a subclass of macrophages with unique properties.

  18. Rutin Increases Muscle Mitochondrial Biogenesis with AMPK Activation in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sangjin; Lee, Mak-Soon; Chang, Eugene; Shin, Yoonjin; Oh, Soojung; Kim, In-Hwan; Kim, Yangha

    2015-09-22

    Decreased mitochondrial number and dysfunction in skeletal muscle are associated with obesity and the progression of obesity-associated metabolic disorders. The specific aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of rutin on mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle of high-fat diet-induced obese rats. Supplementation with rutin reduced body weight and adipose tissue mass, despite equivalent energy intake (p < 0.05). Rutin significantly increased mitochondrial size and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content as well as gene expression related to mitochondrial biogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), transcription factor A (Tfam), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent deacetylase, sirtulin1 (SIRT1) in skeletal muscle (p < 0.05). Moreover, rutin consumption increased muscle adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity by 40% (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggested at least partial involvement of muscle mitochondria and AMPK activation in the rutin-mediated beneficial effect on obesity.

  19. Adipocyte-Specific Deletion of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Protects From Diet-Induced Obesity Through Increased Mitochondrial Uncoupling and Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong Hwan; Buffolo, Márcio; Pires, Karla Maria; Pei, Shaobo; Scherer, Philipp E; Boudina, Sihem

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with oxidative stress (OS). The causal role of adipose OS in the pathogenesis of these conditions is unknown. To address this issue, we generated mice with an adipocyte-selective deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). When fed a high-fat diet (HFD), the AdSod2 knockout (KO) mice exhibited less adiposity, reduced adipocyte hypertrophy, and decreased circulating leptin. The resistance to diet-induced adiposity was the result of an increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure. Furthermore, palmitate oxidation was elevated in the white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue of AdSod2 KO mice fed an HFD, and the expression of key fatty acid oxidation genes was increased. To gain mechanistic insight into the increased fat oxidation in HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice, we quantified the mitochondrial function and mitochondrial content in WAT and found that MnSOD deletion increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and induced mitochondrial biogenesis. This effect was preserved in cultured adipocytes from AdSod2 KO mice in vitro. As expected from the enhanced fat oxidation, circulating levels of free fatty acids were reduced in the HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice. Finally, HFD-fed AdSod2 KO mice were protected from hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue inflammation, and glucose and insulin intolerance. Taken together, these results demonstrate that MnSOD deletion in adipocytes triggered an adaptive stress response that activated mitochondrial biogenesis and enhanced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, thereby preventing diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. Epigallocatechin gallate attenuates diet-induced obesity in mice by decreasing energy absorption and increasing fat oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klaus, S; Pültz, S; Thöne-Reineke, C; Wolfram, S

    2005-06-01

    To examine the antiobesity effect of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea bioactive polyphenol in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Obesity was induced in male New Zealand black mice by feeding of a high-fat diet. EGCG purified from green tea (TEAVIGO) was supplemented in the diet (0.5 and 1%). Body composition (quantitative magnetic resonance), food intake, and food digestibility were recorded over a 4-week period. Animals were killed and mRNA levels of uncoupling proteins (UCP1-3), leptin, malic enzyme (ME), stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), glucokinase (GK), and pyruvate kinase (PK) were analysed in different tissues. Also investigated were acute effects of orally administered EGCG (500 mg/kg) on body temperature, activity (transponders), and energy expenditure (indirect calorimetry). Dietary supplementation of EGCG resulted in a dose-dependent attenuation of body fat accumulation. Food intake was not affected but faeces energy content was slightly increased by EGCG, indicating a reduced food digestibility and thus reduced long-term energy absorption. Leptin and SCD1 gene expression in white fat was reduced but SCD1 and UCP1 expression in brown fat was not changed. In liver, gene expression of SCD1, ME, and GK was reduced and that of UCP2 increased. Acute oral administration of EGCG over 3 days had no effect on body temperature, activity, and energy expenditure, whereas respiratory quotient during night (activity phase) was decreased, supportive of a decreased lipogenesis and increased fat oxidation. Dietary EGCG attenuated diet-induced body fat accretion in mice. EGCG apparently promoted fat oxidation, but its fat-reducing effect could be entirely explained by its effect in reducing diet digestibility.

  1. Two-generation diet-induced obesity model producing mice with increased amount of body fat in early adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kubandová, J; Fabian, D; Burkuš, J; Cikoš, Š; Czikková, S; Mozeš, Š; Šefčíková, Z; Koppel, J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a model producing obese mice in early adulthood (4-6 weeks) based on their over-nutrition during fetal and early postnatal development. The fertilized dams of the parental generation were fed the standard diet supplemented with high-energy nutritional product Ensure Plus during gestation and lactation. Delivered weanlings were then fed with standard or supplemented diet and assessed for body fat deposits using EchoMRI at the time of early and late adulthood. Maternal over-feeding during the period before weaning had the most significant effect on obesity development in the filial generation. In weanlings, significantly higher body fat deposits and average body weight were recorded. Later, further significant increase in percentage of body fat in both male and female mice was observed. Withdrawal of the Ensure Plus supplement caused a decrease in the percentage of body fat in part of the filial generation. In offspring fed the standard diet, higher fat deposits persisted till the time of late adulthood. We conclude that this diet-induced obesity model might be used in exploration of the effects of elevated body fat on physiological functions of various organ systems during juvenile and early adulthood periods of life of a human being.

  2. High-fat Western diet-induced obesity contributes to increased tumor growth in mouse models of human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ann Marie; Burrington, Christine M; Gillaspie, Erin A; Lynch, Darin T; Horsman, Melissa J; Greene, Michael W

    2016-12-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence links colon cancer to obesity. The increasing worldwide incidence of colon cancer has been linked to the spread of the Western lifestyle, and in particular consumption of a high-fat Western diet. In this study, our objectives were to establish mouse models to examine the effects of high-fat Western diet-induced obesity on the growth of human colon cancer tumor xenografts, and to examine potential mechanisms driving obesity-linked human colon cancer tumor growth. We hypothesize that mice rendered insulin resistant due to consumption of a high-fat Western diet will show increased and accelerated tumor growth. Homozygous Rag1(tm1Mom) mice were fed either a low-fat Western diet or a high-fat Western diet (HFWD), then human colon cancer xenografts were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically. Tumors were analyzed to detect changes in receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling and expression of inflammatory-associated genes in epididymal white adipose tissue. In both models, mice fed an HFWD weighed more and had increased intra-abdominal fat, and tumor weight was greater compared with in the low-fat Western diet-fed mice. They also displayed significantly higher levels of leptin; however, there was a negative correlation between leptin levels and tumor size. In the orthotopic model, tumors and adipose tissue from the HFWD group displayed significant increases in both c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 expression, respectively. In conclusion, this study suggests that human colon cancer growth is accelerated in animals that are obese and insulin resistant due to the consumption of an HFWD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Inhibition of SOCS-3 in adipocytes of rats with diet-induced obesity increases leptin-mediated fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hailun; Liu, Li; Ma, Shuang; Liu, Yali; Ren, Yahao; Zhai, Lingling; Yu, Fei; An, Li; Yang, Jun

    2009-12-01

    Rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO) usually experience hyperleptinemia. Thus, leptin produced by adipocytes does not deplete adipocyte fat, which implying a leptin resistance in adipocytes during overnutrition. Here, we induced hyperleptinemia in rats by feeding them a diet consisting of 45% fat. In epididymal adipose tissues, the mRNA and protein levels of a putative leptin resistant factor, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS-3), were increased. The mRNA levels of SOCS-3 in adipocytes differentiated from adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) were higher in DIO rats than in rats on a 10% fat diet. Using SOCS-3 short hairpin RNA lentivirus interference, we found decreased expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA (a marker of de novo lipogenesis) and increased expression of acetyl-CoA oxidase mRNA (a marker of fat oxidation) in SOCS-3-knockdown adipocytes after incubation with 50 nM leptin for 6 h. We conclude that the SOCS-3 knockdown may have increased the leptin-mediated in situ fatty acid oxidation in the DIO adipocytes, and therefore, SOCS-3 might be an excellent target for therapeutic intervention for obesity.

  4. Junk food diet-induced obesity increases D2 receptor autoinhibition in the ventral tegmental area and reduces ethanol drinking.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jason B; Hendrickson, Linzy M; Garwood, Grant M; Toungate, Kelsey M; Nania, Christina V; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Similar to drugs of abuse, the hedonic value of food is mediated, at least in part, by the mesostriatal dopamine (DA) system. Prolonged intake of either high calorie diets or drugs of abuse both lead to a blunting of the DA system. Most studies have focused on DAergic alterations in the striatum, but little is known about the effects of high calorie diets on ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons. Since high calorie diets produce addictive-like DAergic adaptations, it is possible these diets may increase addiction susceptibility. However, high calorie diets consistently reduce psychostimulant intake and conditioned place preference in rodents. In contrast, high calorie diets can increase or decrease ethanol drinking, but it is not known how a junk food diet (cafeteria diet) affects ethanol drinking. In the current study, we administered a cafeteria diet consisting of bacon, potato chips, cheesecake, cookies, breakfast cereals, marshmallows, and chocolate candies to male Wistar rats for 3-4 weeks, producing an obese phenotype. Prior cafeteria diet feeding reduced homecage ethanol drinking over 2 weeks of testing, and transiently reduced sucrose and chow intake. Importantly, cafeteria diet had no effect on ethanol metabolism rate or blood ethanol concentrations following 2g/kg ethanol administration. In midbrain slices, we showed that cafeteria diet feeding enhances DA D2 receptor (D2R) autoinhibition in VTA DA neurons. These results show that junk food diet-induced obesity reduces ethanol drinking, and suggest that increased D2R autoinhibition in the VTA may contribute to deficits in DAergic signaling and reward hypofunction observed with obesity.

  5. Junk food diet-induced obesity increases D2 receptor autoinhibition in the ventral tegmental area and reduces ethanol drinking

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Linzy M.; Garwood, Grant M.; Toungate, Kelsey M.; Nania, Christina V.; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Similar to drugs of abuse, the hedonic value of food is mediated, at least in part, by the mesostriatal dopamine (DA) system. Prolonged intake of either high calorie diets or drugs of abuse both lead to a blunting of the DA system. Most studies have focused on DAergic alterations in the striatum, but little is known about the effects of high calorie diets on ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons. Since high calorie diets produce addictive-like DAergic adaptations, it is possible these diets may increase addiction susceptibility. However, high calorie diets consistently reduce psychostimulant intake and conditioned place preference in rodents. In contrast, high calorie diets can increase or decrease ethanol drinking, but it is not known how a junk food diet (cafeteria diet) affects ethanol drinking. In the current study, we administered a cafeteria diet consisting of bacon, potato chips, cheesecake, cookies, breakfast cereals, marshmallows, and chocolate candies to male Wistar rats for 3–4 weeks, producing an obese phenotype. Prior cafeteria diet feeding reduced homecage ethanol drinking over 2 weeks of testing, and transiently reduced sucrose and chow intake. Importantly, cafeteria diet had no effect on ethanol metabolism rate or blood ethanol concentrations following 2g/kg ethanol administration. In midbrain slices, we showed that cafeteria diet feeding enhances DA D2 receptor (D2R) autoinhibition in VTA DA neurons. These results show that junk food diet-induced obesity reduces ethanol drinking, and suggest that increased D2R autoinhibition in the VTA may contribute to deficits in DAergic signaling and reward hypofunction observed with obesity. PMID:28859110

  6. Over-Expression of Leptin Receptors in Hypothalamic POMC Neurons Increases Susceptibility to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gamber, Kevin M.; Huo, Lihong; Ha, Sangdeuk; Hairston, Joyce E.; Greeley, Sarah; Bjørbæk, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) in rodents is characterized by impaired activation of signal-transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) by leptin receptors (LepRb) within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. This signaling defect likely plays an important role in development of DIO. However, the neuro-chemical identity of the leptin-STAT3 resistant arcuate neurons has not been determined and the underlying mechanisms responsible for development of cellular leptin resistance remain unclear. To investigate this, we first measured arcuate gene expression of known key signaling components of the LepRb signaling pathway and tested whether specifically the critical arcuate pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons are resistant to LepRb-STAT3 signaling in mice given a high-fat-diet (HFD) compared to mice provided a low-fat control diet (LFD). We found that leptin-dependent STAT3 phosphorylation was decreased within POMC neurons of HFD mice. In addition, Leprb mRNA and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (Socs3) mRNA were elevated in the arcuate of HFD mice. To investigate whether increased LepRb expression per se in POMC neurons can influence development of DIO and Socs3 expression, we created mice that over-express LepRb selectively in POMC neurons (POMC-LepRb). No differences in body weight, fat mass or food intake were found between LFD POMC-LepRb mice and LFD controls. Surprisingly, body weight, fat mass and caloric intake of HFD POMC-LepRb mice was markedly higher than HFD control mice. In addition, arcuate Socs3 mRNA was increased in HFD POMC-LepRb mice compared to HFD controls. These data show that specifically POMC neurons of DIO mice are resistant to STAT3 activation by leptin, indicating that those cells might play a role in development of DIO. Furthermore, over-expression of LepRb selectively in POMC neurons increases susceptibility to the development of DIO. We propose a model where over-reactivity of the leptin-LepRb signaling system in arcuate neurons may play

  7. Erythropoietin over-expression protects against diet-induced obesity in mice through increased fat oxidation in muscles.

    PubMed

    Hojman, Pernille; Brolin, Camilla; Gissel, Hanne; Brandt, Claus; Zerahn, Bo; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Gehl, Julie

    2009-06-12

    Erythropoietin can be over-expressed in skeletal muscles by gene electrotransfer, resulting in 100-fold increase in serum EPO and significant increases in haemoglobin levels. Earlier studies have suggested that EPO improves several metabolic parameters when administered to chronically ill kidney patients. Thus we applied the EPO over-expression model to investigate the metabolic effect of EPO in vivo.At 12 weeks, EPO expression resulted in a 23% weight reduction (P<0.01) in EPO transfected obese mice; thus the mice weighed 21.9+/-0.8 g (control, normal diet,) 21.9+/-1.4 g (EPO, normal diet), 35.3+/-3.3 g (control, high-fat diet) and 28.8+/-2.6 g (EPO, high-fat diet). Correspondingly, DXA scanning revealed that this was due to a 28% reduction in adipose tissue mass.The decrease in adipose tissue mass was accompanied by a complete normalisation of fasting insulin levels and glucose tolerance in the high-fat fed mice. EPO expression also induced a 14% increase in muscle volume and a 25% increase in vascularisation of the EPO transfected muscle. Muscle force and stamina were not affected by EPO expression. PCR array analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid metabolism, thermogenesis and inflammation were increased in muscles in response to EPO expression, while genes involved in glucose metabolism were down-regulated. In addition, muscular fat oxidation was increased 1.8-fold in both the EPO transfected and contralateral muscles.In conclusion, we have shown that EPO when expressed in supra-physiological levels has substantial metabolic effects including protection against diet-induced obesity and normalisation of glucose sensitivity associated with a shift to increased fat metabolism in the muscles.

  8. Erythropoietin Over-Expression Protects against Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice through Increased Fat Oxidation in Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Hojman, Pernille; Brolin, Camilla; Gissel, Hanne; Brandt, Claus; Zerahn, Bo; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Gehl, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Erythropoietin can be over-expressed in skeletal muscles by gene electrotransfer, resulting in 100-fold increase in serum EPO and significant increases in haemoglobin levels. Earlier studies have suggested that EPO improves several metabolic parameters when administered to chronically ill kidney patients. Thus we applied the EPO over-expression model to investigate the metabolic effect of EPO in vivo. At 12 weeks, EPO expression resulted in a 23% weight reduction (P<0.01) in EPO transfected obese mice; thus the mice weighed 21.9±0.8 g (control, normal diet,) 21.9±1.4 g (EPO, normal diet), 35.3±3.3 g (control, high-fat diet) and 28.8±2.6 g (EPO, high-fat diet). Correspondingly, DXA scanning revealed that this was due to a 28% reduction in adipose tissue mass. The decrease in adipose tissue mass was accompanied by a complete normalisation of fasting insulin levels and glucose tolerance in the high-fat fed mice. EPO expression also induced a 14% increase in muscle volume and a 25% increase in vascularisation of the EPO transfected muscle. Muscle force and stamina were not affected by EPO expression. PCR array analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid metabolism, thermogenesis and inflammation were increased in muscles in response to EPO expression, while genes involved in glucose metabolism were down-regulated. In addition, muscular fat oxidation was increased 1.8-fold in both the EPO transfected and contralateral muscles. In conclusion, we have shown that EPO when expressed in supra-physiological levels has substantial metabolic effects including protection against diet-induced obesity and normalisation of glucose sensitivity associated with a shift to increased fat metabolism in the muscles. PMID:19521513

  9. Pharmacological glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase inhibition decreases food intake and adiposity and increases insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhajda, Francis P.; Tu, Yajun; Han, Wan Fang; Medghalchi, Susan M.; El Meskini, Rajaa; Landree, Leslie E.; Peterson, Jonathan M.; Daniels, Khadija; Wong, Kody; Wydysh, Edward A.; Townsend, Craig A.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2011-01-01

    Storage of excess calories as triglycerides is central to obesity and its associated disorders. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs) catalyze the initial step in acylglyceride syntheses, including triglyceride synthesis. We utilized a novel small-molecule GPAT inhibitor, FSG67, to investigate metabolic consequences of systemic pharmacological GPAT inhibition in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. FSG67 administered intraperitoneally decreased body weight and energy intake, without producing conditioned taste aversion. Daily FSG67 (5 mg/kg, 15.3 μmol/kg) produced gradual 12% weight loss in DIO mice beyond that due to transient 9- to 10-day hypophagia (6% weight loss in pair-fed controls). Continued FSG67 maintained the weight loss despite return to baseline energy intake. Weight was lost specifically from fat mass. Indirect calorimetry showed partial protection by FSG67 against decreased rates of oxygen consumption seen with hypophagia. Despite low respiratory exchange ratio due to a high-fat diet, FSG67-treated mice showed further decreased respiratory exchange ratio, beyond pair-fed controls, indicating enhanced fat oxidation. Chronic FSG67 increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in DIO mice. Chronic FSG67 decreased gene expression for lipogenic enzymes in white adipose tissue and liver and decreased lipid accumulation in white adipose, brown adipose, and liver tissues without signs of damage. RT-PCR showed decreased gene expression for orexigenic hypothalamic neuropeptides AgRP or NPY after acute and chronic systemic FSG67. FSG67 given intracerebroventricularly (100 and 320 nmol icv) produced 24-h weight loss and feeding suppression, indicating contributions from direct central nervous system sites of action. Together, these data point to GPAT as a new potential therapeutic target for the management of obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:21490364

  10. Pharmacological glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase inhibition decreases food intake and adiposity and increases insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kuhajda, Francis P; Aja, Susan; Tu, Yajun; Han, Wan Fang; Medghalchi, Susan M; El Meskini, Rajaa; Landree, Leslie E; Peterson, Jonathan M; Daniels, Khadija; Wong, Kody; Wydysh, Edward A; Townsend, Craig A; Ronnett, Gabriele V

    2011-07-01

    Storage of excess calories as triglycerides is central to obesity and its associated disorders. Glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs) catalyze the initial step in acylglyceride syntheses, including triglyceride synthesis. We utilized a novel small-molecule GPAT inhibitor, FSG67, to investigate metabolic consequences of systemic pharmacological GPAT inhibition in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. FSG67 administered intraperitoneally decreased body weight and energy intake, without producing conditioned taste aversion. Daily FSG67 (5 mg/kg, 15.3 μmol/kg) produced gradual 12% weight loss in DIO mice beyond that due to transient 9- to 10-day hypophagia (6% weight loss in pair-fed controls). Continued FSG67 maintained the weight loss despite return to baseline energy intake. Weight was lost specifically from fat mass. Indirect calorimetry showed partial protection by FSG67 against decreased rates of oxygen consumption seen with hypophagia. Despite low respiratory exchange ratio due to a high-fat diet, FSG67-treated mice showed further decreased respiratory exchange ratio, beyond pair-fed controls, indicating enhanced fat oxidation. Chronic FSG67 increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in DIO mice. Chronic FSG67 decreased gene expression for lipogenic enzymes in white adipose tissue and liver and decreased lipid accumulation in white adipose, brown adipose, and liver tissues without signs of damage. RT-PCR showed decreased gene expression for orexigenic hypothalamic neuropeptides AgRP or NPY after acute and chronic systemic FSG67. FSG67 given intracerebroventricularly (100 and 320 nmol icv) produced 24-h weight loss and feeding suppression, indicating contributions from direct central nervous system sites of action. Together, these data point to GPAT as a new potential therapeutic target for the management of obesity and its comorbidities.

  11. A combination of exercise and capsinoid supplementation additively suppresses diet-induced obesity by increasing energy expenditure in mice.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Kana; Nogusa, Yoshihito; Suzuki, Katsuya; Shinoda, Kosaku; Kajimura, Shingo; Bannai, Makoto

    2015-02-15

    Exercise effectively prevents the development of obesity and obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Capsinoids (CSNs) are capsaicin analogs found in a nonpungent pepper that increase whole body energy expenditure. Although both exercise and CSNs have antiobesity functions, the effectiveness of exercise with CSN supplementation has not yet been investigated. Here, we examined whether the beneficial effects of exercise could be further enhanced by CSN supplementation in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to four groups: 1) high-fat diet (HFD, Control), 2) HFD containing 0.3% CSNs, 3) HFD with voluntary running wheel exercise (Exercise), and 4) HFD containing 0.3% CSNs with voluntary running wheel exercise (Exercise + CSN). After 8 wk of ingestion, blood and tissues were collected and analyzed. Although CSNs significantly suppressed body weight gain under the HFD, CSN supplementation with exercise additively decreased body weight gain and fat accumulation and increased whole body energy expenditure compared with exercise alone. Exercise together with CSN supplementation robustly improved metabolic profiles, including the plasma cholesterol level. Furthermore, this combination significantly prevented diet-induced liver steatosis and decreased the size of adipocyte cells in white adipose tissue. Exercise and CSNs significantly increased cAMP levels and PKA activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT), indicating an increase of lipolysis. Moreover, they significantly activated both the oxidative phosphorylation gene program and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that CSNs efficiently promote the antiobesity effect of exercise, in part by increasing energy expenditure via the activation of fat oxidation in skeletal muscle and lipolysis in BAT. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. A combination of exercise and capsinoid supplementation additively suppresses diet-induced obesity by increasing energy expenditure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohyama, Kana; Nogusa, Yoshihito; Suzuki, Katsuya; Shinoda, Kosaku; Kajimura, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    Exercise effectively prevents the development of obesity and obesity-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes. Capsinoids (CSNs) are capsaicin analogs found in a nonpungent pepper that increase whole body energy expenditure. Although both exercise and CSNs have antiobesity functions, the effectiveness of exercise with CSN supplementation has not yet been investigated. Here, we examined whether the beneficial effects of exercise could be further enhanced by CSN supplementation in mice. Mice were randomly assigned to four groups: 1) high-fat diet (HFD, Control), 2) HFD containing 0.3% CSNs, 3) HFD with voluntary running wheel exercise (Exercise), and 4) HFD containing 0.3% CSNs with voluntary running wheel exercise (Exercise + CSN). After 8 wk of ingestion, blood and tissues were collected and analyzed. Although CSNs significantly suppressed body weight gain under the HFD, CSN supplementation with exercise additively decreased body weight gain and fat accumulation and increased whole body energy expenditure compared with exercise alone. Exercise together with CSN supplementation robustly improved metabolic profiles, including the plasma cholesterol level. Furthermore, this combination significantly prevented diet-induced liver steatosis and decreased the size of adipocyte cells in white adipose tissue. Exercise and CSNs significantly increased cAMP levels and PKA activity in brown adipose tissue (BAT), indicating an increase of lipolysis. Moreover, they significantly activated both the oxidative phosphorylation gene program and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that CSNs efficiently promote the antiobesity effect of exercise, in part by increasing energy expenditure via the activation of fat oxidation in skeletal muscle and lipolysis in BAT. PMID:25516550

  13. Circadian Rhythms in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    The biological clocks of the circadian timing system coordinate cellular and physiological processes and synchronizes these with daily cycles, feeding patterns also regulates circadian clocks. The clock genes and adipocytokines show circadian rhythmicity. Dysfunction of these genes are involved in the alteration of these adipokines during the development of obesity. Food availability promotes the stimuli associated with food intake which is a circadian oscillator outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Its circadian rhythm is arranged with the predictable daily mealtimes. Food anticipatory activity is mediated by a self-sustained circadian timing and its principal component is food entrained oscillator. However, the hypothalamus has a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance rather than food intake. Fatty acids or their metabolites can modulate neuronal activity by brain nutrient-sensing neurons involved in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. The timing of three-meal schedules indicates close association with the plasma levels of insulin and preceding food availability. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by altered timing of food intake and diet composition can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and to the development of metabolic disorders. Metabolic dysfunction is associated with circadian disturbances at both central and peripheral levels and, eventual disruption of circadian clock functioning can lead to obesity. While CLOCK expression levels are increased with high fat diet-induced obesity, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha increases the transcriptional level of brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) in obese subjects. Consequently, disruption of clock genes results in dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and obesity. Modifying the time of feeding alone can greatly affect body weight. Changes in the circadian clock are associated with temporal alterations in

  14. High vitamin D and calcium intakes reduce diet-induced obesity in mice by increasing adipose tissue apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sergeev, Igor N; Song, Qingming

    2014-06-01

    Modulation of apoptosis is emerging as a promising antiobesity strategy because removal of adipocytes through this process will result in reducing body fat. Effects of vitamin D on apoptosis are mediated via multiple signaling pathways that involve common regulators and effectors converging on cellular Ca(2+) . We have previously shown that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces the Ca(2+) signal associated with activation of Ca(2+) -dependent apoptotic proteases in mature adipocytes. In this study, a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model was used to evaluate the role of vitamin D and calcium in adiposity. DIO mice fed high vitamin D3 , high Ca, and high D3 plus high Ca diets demonstrated a decreased body and fat weight gain, improved markers of adiposity and vitamin D status (plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, adiponectin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH)), but an increased plasma Ca(2+) . High D3 and Ca intakes were associated with induction of apoptosis and activation of Ca(2+) -dependent apoptotic proteases, calpain and caspase-12, in adipose tissue of DIO mice. The combination of D3 plus Ca was more effective than D3 or Ca alone in decreasing adiposity. The results imply that high vitamin D and Ca intakes activate the Ca(2+) -mediated apoptotic pathway in adipose tissue. Targeting this pathway with vitamin D and Ca supplementation could contribute to the prevention and treatment of obesity. However, this potentially effective and affordable approach needs to be evaluated from a safety point of view. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. High-intensity exercise training increases the diversity and metabolic capacity of the mouse distal gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Denou, Emmanuel; Marcinko, Katarina; Surette, Michael G; Steinberg, Gregory R; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    Diet and exercise underpin the risk of obesity-related metabolic disease. Diet alters the gut microbiota, which contributes to aspects of metabolic disease during obesity. Repeated exercise provides metabolic benefits during obesity. We assessed whether exercise could oppose changes in the taxonomic and predicted metagenomic characteristics of the gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would counteract high-fat diet (HFD)-induced changes in the microbiota without altering obesity in mice. Compared with chow-fed mice, an obesity-causing HFD decreased the Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio and decreased the genetic capacity in the fecal microbiota for metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. After HFD-induced obesity was established, a subset of mice were HIIT for 6 wk, which increased host aerobic capacity but did not alter body or adipose tissue mass. The effects of exercise training on the microbiota were gut segment dependent and more extensive in the distal gut. HIIT increased the alpha diversity and Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio of the distal gut and fecal microbiota during diet-induced obesity. Exercise training increased the predicted genetic capacity related to the TCA cycle among other aspects of metabolism. Strikingly, the same microbial metabolism indexes that were increased by exercise were all decreased in HFD-fed vs. chow diet-fed mice. Therefore, exercise training directly opposed some of the obesity-related changes in gut microbiota, including lower metagenomic indexes of metabolism. Some host and microbial pathways appeared similarly affected by exercise. These exercise- and diet-induced microbiota interactions can be captured in feces. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. High-intensity exercise training increases the diversity and metabolic capacity of the mouse distal gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Denou, Emmanuel; Marcinko, Katarina; Surette, Michael G.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    Diet and exercise underpin the risk of obesity-related metabolic disease. Diet alters the gut microbiota, which contributes to aspects of metabolic disease during obesity. Repeated exercise provides metabolic benefits during obesity. We assessed whether exercise could oppose changes in the taxonomic and predicted metagenomic characteristics of the gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would counteract high-fat diet (HFD)-induced changes in the microbiota without altering obesity in mice. Compared with chow-fed mice, an obesity-causing HFD decreased the Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio and decreased the genetic capacity in the fecal microbiota for metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. After HFD-induced obesity was established, a subset of mice were HIIT for 6 wk, which increased host aerobic capacity but did not alter body or adipose tissue mass. The effects of exercise training on the microbiota were gut segment dependent and more extensive in the distal gut. HIIT increased the alpha diversity and Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio of the distal gut and fecal microbiota during diet-induced obesity. Exercise training increased the predicted genetic capacity related to the TCA cycle among other aspects of metabolism. Strikingly, the same microbial metabolism indexes that were increased by exercise were all decreased in HFD-fed vs. chow diet-fed mice. Therefore, exercise training directly opposed some of the obesity-related changes in gut microbiota, including lower metagenomic indexes of metabolism. Some host and microbial pathways appeared similarly affected by exercise. These exercise- and diet-induced microbiota interactions can be captured in feces. PMID:27117007

  17. TLQP-21, a VGF-derived peptide, increases energy expenditure and prevents the early phase of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Bartolomucci, A.; La Corte, G.; Possenti, R.; Locatelli, V.; Rigamonti, A. E.; Torsello, A.; Bresciani, E.; Bulgarelli, I.; Rizzi, R.; Pavone, F.; D’Amato, F. R.; Severini, C.; Mignogna, G.; Giorgi, A.; Schininà, M. E.; Elia, G.; Brancia, C.; Ferri, G.-L.; Conti, R.; Ciani, B.; Pascucci, T.; Dell’Omo, G.; Muller, E. E.; Levi, A.; Moles, A.

    2006-01-01

    The vgf gene has been identified as an energy homeostasis regulator. Vgf encodes a 617-aa precursor protein that is processed to yield an incompletely characterized panel of neuropeptides. Until now, it was an unproved assumption that VGF-derived peptides could regulate metabolism. Here, a VGF peptide designated TLQP-21 was identified in rat brain extracts by means of immunoprecipitation, microcapillary liquid chromatography–tandem MS, and database searching algorithms. Chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of TLQP-21 (15 μg/day for 14 days) increased resting energy expenditure (EE) and rectal temperature in mice. These effects were paralleled by increased epinephrine and up-regulation of brown adipose tissue β2-AR (β2 adrenergic receptor) and white adipose tissue (WAT) PPAR-δ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ), β3-AR, and UCP1 (uncoupling protein 1) mRNAs and were independent of locomotor activity and thyroid hormones. Hypothalamic gene expression of orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides was unchanged. Furthermore, in mice that were fed a high-fat diet for 14 days, TLQP-21 prevented the increase in body and WAT weight as well as hormonal changes that are associated with a high-fat regimen. Biochemical and molecular analyses suggest that TLQP-21 exerts its effects by stimulating autonomic activation of adrenal medulla and adipose tissues. In conclusion, we present here the identification in the CNS of a previously uncharacterized VGF-derived peptide and prove that its chronic i.c.v. infusion effected an increase in EE and limited the early phase of diet-induced obesity. PMID:16983076

  18. Genetic and Diet-Induced Obesity Increased Intestinal Tumorigenesis in the Double Mutant Mouse Model Multiple Intestinal Neoplasia X Obese via Disturbed Glucose Regulation and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hetland, Ragna Bogen

    2015-01-01

    We have studied how spontaneous or carcinogen-induced intestinal tumorigenesis was affected by genetic or diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6J-Apc Min/+ X C57BL/6J-Lep ob/+ mice. Obesity was induced by the obese (ob) mutation in the lep gene coding for the hormone leptin, or by a 45% fat diet. The effects of obesity were examined on spontaneous intestinal tumors caused by the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and on tumors induced by the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP). F1 ob/ob (homozygous mutated) mice had increased body weight (bw) and number of spontaneous and PhIP-induced small intestinal tumors (in Apc Min/+ mice), versus ob/wt (heterozygous mutated) and wt/wt mice (homozygous wild-type). A 45% fat diet exacerbated bw and spontaneous tumor numbers versus 10% fat, but not PhIP-induced tumors. Except for bw, ob/wt and wt/wt were not significantly different. The obesity caused hyperglucosemia and insulinemia in ob/ob mice. A 45% fat diet further increased glucose, but not insulin. Inflammation was seen as increased TNFα levels in ob/ob mice. Thus the results implicate disturbed glucose regulation and inflammation as mechanisms involved in the association between obesity and intestinal tumorigenesis. Ob/ob mice had shorter lifespan than ob/wt and wt/wt mice. PMID:26347815

  19. Increased Energy Expenditure, Ucp1 Expression, and Resistance to Diet-induced Obesity in Mice Lacking Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-related Transcription Factor-2 (Nrf2).

    PubMed

    Schneider, Kevin; Valdez, Joshua; Nguyen, Janice; Vawter, Marquis; Galke, Brandi; Kurtz, Theodore W; Chan, Jefferson Y

    2016-04-01

    The NRF2 (also known as NFE2L2) transcription factor is a critical regulator of genes involved in defense against oxidative stress. Previous studies suggest thatNrf2plays a role in adipogenesisin vitro, and deletion of theNrf2gene protects against diet-induced obesity in mice. Here, we demonstrate that resistance to diet-induced obesity inNrf2(-/-)mice is associated with a 20-30% increase in energy expenditure. Analysis of bioenergetics revealed thatNrf2(-/-)white adipose tissues exhibit greater oxygen consumption. White adipose tissue showed a >2-fold increase inUcp1gene expression. Oxygen consumption is also increased nearly 2.5-fold inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. Oxidative stress induced by glucose oxidase resulted in increasedUcp1expression. Conversely, antioxidant chemicals (such asN-acetylcysteine and Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride) and SB203580 (a known suppressor ofUcp1expression) decreasedUcp1and oxygen consumption inNrf2-deficient fibroblasts. These findings suggest that increasing oxidative stress by limitingNrf2function in white adipocytes may be a novel means to modulate energy balance as a treatment of obesity and related clinical disorders.

  20. Increased Energy Expenditure, Ucp1 Expression, and Resistance to Diet-induced Obesity in Mice Lacking Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-related Transcription Factor-2 (Nrf2)*

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kevin; Valdez, Joshua; Nguyen, Janice; Vawter, Marquis; Galke, Brandi; Kurtz, Theodore W.; Chan, Jefferson Y.

    2016-01-01

    The NRF2 (also known as NFE2L2) transcription factor is a critical regulator of genes involved in defense against oxidative stress. Previous studies suggest that Nrf2 plays a role in adipogenesis in vitro, and deletion of the Nrf2 gene protects against diet-induced obesity in mice. Here, we demonstrate that resistance to diet-induced obesity in Nrf2−/− mice is associated with a 20–30% increase in energy expenditure. Analysis of bioenergetics revealed that Nrf2−/− white adipose tissues exhibit greater oxygen consumption. White adipose tissue showed a >2-fold increase in Ucp1 gene expression. Oxygen consumption is also increased nearly 2.5-fold in Nrf2-deficient fibroblasts. Oxidative stress induced by glucose oxidase resulted in increased Ucp1 expression. Conversely, antioxidant chemicals (such as N-acetylcysteine and Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin chloride) and SB203580 (a known suppressor of Ucp1 expression) decreased Ucp1 and oxygen consumption in Nrf2-deficient fibroblasts. These findings suggest that increasing oxidative stress by limiting Nrf2 function in white adipocytes may be a novel means to modulate energy balance as a treatment of obesity and related clinical disorders. PMID:26841864

  1. Diet-induced obese mice retain endogenous leptin action.

    PubMed

    Ottaway, Nickki; Mahbod, Parinaz; Rivero, Belen; Norman, Lee Ann; Gertler, Arieh; D'Alessio, David A; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-06-02

    Obesity is characterized by hyperleptinemia and decreased response to exogenous leptin. This has been widely attributed to the development of leptin resistance, a state of impaired leptin signaling proposed to contribute to the development and persistence of obesity. To directly determine endogenous leptin activity in obesity, we treated lean and obese mice with a leptin receptor antagonist. The antagonist increased feeding and body weight (BW) in lean mice, but not in obese models of leptin, leptin receptor, or melanocortin-4 receptor deficiency. In contrast, the antagonist increased feeding and BW comparably in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) mice, an increase associated with decreased hypothalamic expression of Socs3, a primary target of leptin. These findings demonstrate that hyperleptinemic DIO mice retain leptin suppression of feeding comparable to lean mice and counter the view that resistance to endogenous leptin contributes to the persistence of DIO in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diet-induced obesity promotes myelopoiesis in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Kanakadurga; DelProposto, Jennifer; Lee Morris, David; Zamarron, Brian; Mergian, Taleen; Maley, Nidhi; Cho, Kae Won; Geletka, Lynn; Subbaiah, Perla; Muir, Lindsey; Martinez-Santibanez, Gabriel; Nien-Kai Lumeng, Carey

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an activated macrophage phenotype in multiple tissues that contributes to tissue inflammation and metabolic disease. To evaluate the mechanisms by which obesity potentiates myeloid activation, we evaluated the hypothesis that obesity activates myeloid cell production from bone marrow progenitors to potentiate inflammatory responses in metabolic tissues. High fat diet-induced obesity generated both quantitative increases in myeloid progenitors as well as a potentiation of inflammation in macrophages derived from these progenitors. In vivo, hematopoietic stem cells from obese mice demonstrated the sustained capacity to preferentially generate inflammatory CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophages after serial bone marrow transplantation. We identified that hematopoietic MyD88 was important for the accumulation of CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophage accumulation by regulating the generation of myeloid progenitors from HSCs. These findings demonstrate that obesity and metabolic signals potentiate leukocyte production and that dietary priming of hematopoietic progenitors contributes to adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:25161889

  3. Diet-induced obesity causes visceral, but not subcutaneous, lymph node hyperplasia via increases in specific immune cell populations.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, A M; Regan, D P; Fouts, J K; Booth, A D; Dow, S W; Foster, M T

    2017-10-01

    The spatial proximity of adipose depots to secondary lymph nodes allows a unique relation between the two systems. Obesity, predominately visceral adiposity, links to numerous diseases; hence, we postulate that secondary lymphatics within this region contributes to disease risk. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed standard CHOW (18% kcal fat) or Western diet (45% kcal fat) for 7 weeks. Visceral and subcutaneous lymph nodes and associated adipose depots they occupy were excised. Lymph node morphology and resident immune cell populations were characterized via histopathology, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Adipose tissue immune cell populations were also characterized. Obesity caused lymph node expansion, increased viable cell number and deviations in immune cell populations. These alterations were exclusive to visceral lymph nodes. Notably, pro-inflammatory antigen presenting cells and regulatory T cells increased in number in the visceral lymph node. Obesity, however, reduced T regulatory cells in visceral lymph nodes. The visceral adipose depot also had greater reactivity towards HFD than subcutaneous, with a greater percent of macrophages, dendritic and CD8(+) T cells. Immune cell number, in both the visceral and subcutaneous, however decreased as adipose depots enlarged. Overall, HFD has a greater influence on visceral cavity than the subcutaneous. In the visceral lymph node, but not subcutaneous, HFD-induced obesity decreased cell populations that suppressed immune function while increasing those that regulate/activate immune response. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. High vitamin D and calcium intakes increase bone mineral (Ca and P) content in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingming; Sergeev, Igor N

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone formation, mineralization, and remodeling. Recent studies demonstrated that an increased body mass can be detrimental to bone health. However, whether an increase in dietary vitamin D and calcium intakes in obesity is beneficial to bone health has not been established. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of increased vitamin D and calcium intakes, alone or in combination, on bone status in a high-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model. We hypothesized that DIO in growing mice affects bone mineral status and that high vitamin D and calcium intakes will promote mineralization of the growing bone in obesity via Ca(2+) regulatory hormones, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Male mice were fed high vitamin D3 (10 000 IU/kg), high calcium (1.2%), or high vitamin D3 plus high-calcium diets containing 60% energy as fat for 10 weeks. Bone weight, specific gravity, mineral (Ca and P), and collagen (hydroxyproline) content were measured in the femur and the tibia. Regulators of Ca(2+) metabolism and markers of bone status (PTH, 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 1,25(OH)2D3, and osteocalcin) were measured in blood plasma. Diet-induced obese mice exhibited lower bone Ca and P content and relative bone weight compared with the normal-fat control mice, whereas collagen (hydroxyproline) content was not different between the two groups. High vitamin D3 and calcium intakes significantly increased bone Ca and P content and relative bone weight in DIO mice, which was accompanied by an increase in 1,25(OH)2D3 and a decrease in PTH and osteocalcin concentrations in blood. The findings obtained indicate that increased vitamin D and calcium intakes are effective in increasing mineral (Ca and P) content in the growing bone of obese mice and that the hormonal mechanism of this effect may involve the vitamin D-PTH axis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cinnamomum cassia Prevents High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice through the Increase of Muscle Energy.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi Young; Kang, Seok Yong; Kang, Anna; Hwang, Ji Hye; Park, Yong-Ki; Jung, Hyo Won

    2017-01-01

    The cortex of Cinnamomum cassia Presl (Cinnamomi Cortex: CC) has commonly been used for weight control in traditional medicines, but without a scientific basis. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the anti-obesity effect of CC extract in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mouse model and in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a normal diet or a HFD for 16 consecutive weeks, and orally administered CC extract (100 or 300[Formula: see text]mg/kg) or metformin (250[Formula: see text]mg/kg; positive control) daily for 16 weeks. CC extract administration significantly decreased body weights, food intakes, and serum levels of glucose, insulin, total cholesterol and ALT levels, prevented oral glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, inhibited the protein expressions of MyHC and PGC1[Formula: see text] and the phosphorylation of AMPK, suppressed lipid accumulation in liver, decreased adipocyte size and increased muscle mass in obese mice. For this in vitro study, C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into the myotubes for five days, and then treated with CC extract (0.1 or 0.2[Formula: see text]mg/ml) for 24[Formula: see text]h. CC extract significantly increased ATP levels by increasing the mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis-related factors, such as, PGC1[Formula: see text], NRF-1, and Tfam, and the phosphorylations of AMPK and ACC. Our results suggest CC extract controls weight gain in obese mice by inhibiting lipid accumulation and increasing energy expenditure, and that its action mechanism involves the up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle cells.

  6. Putting the diet back into diet-induced obesity: diet-induced hypothalamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Julian G; Archer, Zoë A

    2008-05-06

    A wealth of detailed mechanistic information relating to obesity and body weight regulation has emerged from study of single gene mutation models, and continues to be generated by engineered rodent models targeting specific genes. However, as an early step in translational research, many researchers are turning to models of diet-induced obesity. Interpretation of data generated from such models is not aided by the variety of diets and rodent strains employed in these studies and a strong case could be made for rationalisation. Differences in experimental protocol, which may deploy a single obligatory solid diet, a choice of solid diets, or liquid/solid combinations, and which may or may not allow a preferred macronutrient composition to be selected, mean that different models of diet-induced obesity achieve that obesity by different routes. The priority should be to mimic the palatability- and choice-driven over-consumption that probably underlies the majority of human obesity. Some of the hypothalamic energy balance genes apparently 'recognise' developing diet-induced obesity as indicated by counter-regulatory changes in expression levels. However, substantial changes in gene expression on long-term exposure to obesogenic diets are not able to prevent weight gain. Forebrain reward systems are widely assumed to be overriding hypothalamic homeostatic energy balance systems under these circumstances. More mechanism-based research at the homeostatic/reward/diet interface may enable diets to be manipulated with therapeutic benefit, or define the contribution of these interactions to susceptibility to diet-induced obesity.

  7. Increase or decrease hydrogen sulfide exert opposite lipolysis, but reduce global insulin resistance in high fatty diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Geng, Bin; Cai, Bo; Liao, Feng; Zheng, Yang; Zeng, Qiang; Fan, Xiaofang; Gong, Yongsheng; Yang, Jichun; Cui, Qing Hua; Tang, Chaoshu; Xu, Guo Heng

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue expressed endogenous cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE)/hydrogen sulfide (H2S) system. H2S precursor inhibited catecholamine stimulated lipolysis. Thus, we hypothesized that CSE/H2S system regulates lipolysis which contributed to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We treated rat adipocyte with DL-propargylglycine (PAG, a CSE inhibitor), L-cysteine (an H2S precursor) plus pyridoxial phosphate (co-enzyme) or the H2S chronic release donor GYY4137, then the glycerol level was assayed for assessing the lipolysis. Then, the effects of PAG and GYY4137 on insulin resistance in high fatty diet (HFD) induced obese mice were investigated. Here, we found that PAG time-dependently increased basal or isoproterenol stimulated lipolysis. However, L-cysteine plus pyridoxial phosphate or GYY4137 significantly reduced it. PAG increased phosphorylated protein kinase A substrate, perilipin 1 and hormone sensitive lipase, but L-cysteine and GYY4137 decreased the parameters. In HFD induced obese mice, PAG increased adipose basal lipolysis, thus blunted fat mass increase, resulting in lowering insulin resistance evidenced by reduction of fasting glucose, insulin level, HOMA index, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) curve area and elevating the insulin tolerance test (ITT) response. GYY4137 inhibited lipolysis in vivo without increasing fat mass, but also ameliorated the insulin resistance in HFD mice. These results implicated that inhibition endogenous CSE/H2S system in adipocytes increased lipolysis by a protein kinase A-perilipin/hormone-sensitive lipase pathway, thus blunted fat mass increase and reduced insulin resistance in obese mice; giving H2S donor decreased lipolysis, also reduced insulin resistance induced by HFD. Our data showed that increase or decrease H2S induced opposite lipolysis, but had the same effect on insulin resistance. The paradoxical regulation may be resulted from different action of H2S on metabolic and endocrine function in adipocyte.

  8. Increase or Decrease Hydrogen Sulfide Exert Opposite Lipolysis, but Reduce Global Insulin Resistance in High Fatty Diet Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Bin; Cai, Bo; Liao, Feng; Zheng, Yang; Zeng, Qiang; Fan, Xiaofang; Gong, Yongsheng; Yang, Jichun; Cui, Qing hua; Tang, Chaoshu; Xu, Guo heng

    2013-01-01

    Objective Adipose tissue expressed endogenous cystathionine gamma lyase (CSE)/hydrogen sulfide (H2S) system. H2S precursor inhibited catecholamine stimulated lipolysis. Thus, we hypothesized that CSE/H2S system regulates lipolysis which contributed to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Methods We treated rat adipocyte with DL-propargylglycine (PAG, a CSE inhibitor), L-cysteine (an H2S precursor) plus pyridoxial phosphate (co-enzyme) or the H2S chronic release donor GYY4137, then the glycerol level was assayed for assessing the lipolysis. Then, the effects of PAG and GYY4137 on insulin resistance in high fatty diet (HFD) induced obese mice were investigated. Results Here, we found that PAG time-dependently increased basal or isoproterenol stimulated lipolysis. However, L-cysteine plus pyridoxial phosphate or GYY4137 significantly reduced it. PAG increased phosphorylated protein kinase A substrate, perilipin 1 and hormone sensitive lipase, but L-cysteine and GYY4137 decreased the parameters. In HFD induced obese mice, PAG increased adipose basal lipolysis, thus blunted fat mass increase, resulting in lowering insulin resistance evidenced by reduction of fasting glucose, insulin level, HOMA index, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) curve area and elevating the insulin tolerance test (ITT) response. GYY4137 inhibited lipolysis in vivo without increasing fat mass, but also ameliorated the insulin resistance in HFD mice. Conclusion These results implicated that inhibition endogenous CSE/H2S system in adipocytes increased lipolysis by a protein kinase A-perilipin/hormone-sensitive lipase pathway, thus blunted fat mass increase and reduced insulin resistance in obese mice; giving H2S donor decreased lipolysis, also reduced insulin resistance induced by HFD. Our data showed that increase or decrease H2S induced opposite lipolysis, but had the same effect on insulin resistance. The paradoxical regulation may be resulted from different action of H2S on metabolic and

  9. Prebiotic Effects of Wheat Arabinoxylan Related to the Increase in Bifidobacteria, Roseburia and Bacteroides/Prevotella in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Possemiers, Sam; Druart, Céline; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Backer, Fabienne; Cani, Patrice D.; Larondelle, Yvan; Delzenne, Nathalie M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Alterations in the composition of gut microbiota - known as dysbiosis - has been proposed to contribute to the development of obesity, thereby supporting the potential interest of nutrients targeting the gut with beneficial effect for host adiposity. We test the ability of a specific concentrate of water-extractable high molecular weight arabinoxylans (AX) from wheat to modulate both the gut microbiota and lipid metabolism in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese mice. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were fed either a control diet (CT) or a HF diet, or a HF diet supplemented with AX (10% w/w) during 4 weeks. AX supplementation restored the number of bacteria that were decreased upon HF feeding, i.e. Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and Roseburia spp. Importantly, AX treatment markedly increased caecal bifidobacteria content, in particular Bifidobacterium animalis lactis. This effect was accompanied by improvement of gut barrier function and by a lower circulating inflammatory marker. Interestingly, rumenic acid (C18:2 c9,t11) was increased in white adipose tissue due to AX treatment, suggesting the influence of gut bacterial metabolism on host tissue. In parallel, AX treatment decreased adipocyte size and HF diet-induced expression of genes mediating differentiation, fatty acid uptake, fatty acid oxidation and inflammation, and decreased a key lipogenic enzyme activity in the subcutaneous adipose tissue. Furthermore, AX treatment significantly decreased HF-induced adiposity, body weight gain, serum and hepatic cholesterol accumulation and insulin resistance. Correlation analysis reveals that Roseburia spp. and Bacteroides/Prevotella levels inversely correlate with these host metabolic parameters. Conclusions/Significance Supplementation of a concentrate of water-extractable high molecular weight AX in the diet counteracted HF-induced gut dysbiosis together with an improvement of obesity and lipid-lowering effects. We postulate that hypocholesterolemic, anti

  10. Precision-cut liver slices from diet-induced obese rats exposed to ethanol are susceptible to oxidative stress and increased fatty acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Duryee, Michael J; Willis, Monte S; Schaffert, Courtney S; Reidelberger, Roger D; Dusad, Anand; Anderson, Daniel R; Klassen, Lynell W; Thiele, Geoffrey M

    2014-02-01

    Oxidative stress from fat accumulation in the liver has many deleterious effects. Many believe that there is a second hit that causes relatively benign fat accumulation to transform into liver failure. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of ethanol on ex vivo precision-cut liver slice cultures (PCLS) from rats fed a high-fat diet resulting in fatty liver. Age-matched male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either high-fat (obese) (45% calories from fat, 4.73 kcal/g) or control diet for 13 mo. PCLS were prepared, incubated with 25 mM ethanol for 24, 48, and 72 h, harvested, and evaluated for ethanol metabolism, triglyceride production, oxidative stress, and cytokine expression. Ethanol metabolism and acetaldehyde production decreased in PCLS from obese rats compared with age-matched controls (AMC). Increased triglyceride and smooth muscle actin production was observed in PCLS from obese rats compared with AMC, which further increased following ethanol incubation. Lipid peroxidation, measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay, increased in response to ethanol, whereas GSH and heme oxygenase I levels were decreased. TNF-α and IL-6 levels were increased in the PCLS from obese rats and increased further with ethanol incubation. Diet-induced fatty liver increases the susceptibility of the liver to toxins such as ethanol, possibly by the increased oxidative stress and cytokine production. These findings support the concept that the development of fatty liver sensitizes the liver to the effects of ethanol and leads to the start of liver failure, necrosis, and eventually cirrhosis.

  11. Apelin-transgenic mice exhibit a resistance against diet-induced obesity by increasing vascular mass and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Habata, Yugo; Matsumoto, Yoshio; Yasuhara, Yoshitaka; Hashimoto, Tadatoshi; Hamajyo, Hitomi; Anayama, Hisashi; Fujii, Ryo; Fuse, Hiromitsu; Shintani, Yasushi; Mori, Masaaki

    2011-09-01

    Apelin is an endogenous ligand for the G-protein-coupled 7-transmembrane receptor, APJ. The administration of apelin-13, a truncated 13-amino acid apelin peptide, in diet-induced obese mice is reported to result in a decrease in adiposity due to the increase of energy expenditure with an increase in the expression of uncoupling proteins. We systematically compared the phenotype of human apelin-transgenic (apelin-Tg) mice fed standard or high-fat diets (HFD) with that of non-Tg control mice to clarify the effect of apelin on obesity. The beneficial effects of apelin were evaluated by multiple assay methods including indirect calorimetrical measurements, gene expression analysis, and immunohistochemical staining. Apelin-Tg mice inhibited HFD-induced obesity without altering food intake and exhibited increased oxygen consumption and body temperature compared to non-Tg controls. Interestingly, the mRNA expressions of angiopoietin-1 (Ang1), a key molecule for vascular maturation, and its receptor, endothelium-specific receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Tie2), were significantly upregulated in the skeletal muscle of HFD-fed apelin-Tg mice, and the areas of anti-CD31 antibody-positive endothelial cells also increased. Furthermore, both the aerobic type-I muscle fibre ratio and the DNA copy number of mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 increased 2.0- and 1.4-fold in skeletal muscle, respectively. These findings suggest that apelin stimulates energy expenditure via increase vascular mass and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Apelin is a prerequisite factor for anti-obesity by stimulating energy expenditure via regulating homeostatic energy balance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity increases adenylate cyclase of myocardial β-adrenergic system and does not compromise cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Vileigas, Danielle F; de Deus, Adriana F; da Silva, Danielle C T; de Tomasi, Loreta C; de Campos, Dijon H S; Adorni, Caroline S; de Oliveira, Scarlet M; Sant'Ana, Paula G; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos R; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which the obesity leads cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated and few studies have evaluated the relationship between obesity and proteins involved in myocardial β-adrenergic (βA) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiac function and βA pathway components in myocardium of obese rats. Male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: control (n = 17; standard diet) and obese (n = 17; saturated high-fat diet) fed for 33 weeks. Nutritional profile and comorbidities were assessed. Cardiac structure and function was evaluated by macroscopic postmortem, echocardiographic and isolated papillary muscle analyzes. Myocardial protein expression of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, Gαs protein, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) was performed by Western blot. Cardiac cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were assessed by ELISA Obese rats showed increased adiposity index (P < 0.001) and several comorbidities as hypertension, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia compared with control rats. Echocardiographic assessment revealed increased left atrium diameter (C: 4.98 ± 0.38 vs. Ob: 5.47 ± 0.53, P = 0.024) and posterior wall shortening velocity (C: 37.1 ± 3.6 vs. Ob: 41.8 ± 3.8, P = 0.007) in obese group. Papillary muscle evaluation indicated that baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation were similar between the groups. Protein expression of myocardial AC was higher in obese group than in the control (C: 1.00 ± 0.21 vs. Ob: 1.25 ± 0.10, P = 0.025), whereas the other components were unchanged. These results suggest that saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity was not effective in triggering cardiac dysfunction and impair the beta-adrenergic signaling.

  13. Altered gastric vagal mechanosensitivity in diet-induced obesity persists on return to normal chow and is accompanied by increased food intake.

    PubMed

    Kentish, S J; O'Donnell, T A; Frisby, C L; Li, H; Wittert, G A; Page, A J

    2014-05-01

    Gastric vagal afferents convey satiety signals in response to mechanical stimuli. The sensitivity of these afferents is decreased in diet-induced obesity. Leptin, secreted from gastric epithelial cells, potentiates the response of vagal afferents to mechanical stimuli in lean mice, but has an inhibitory effect in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. We sought to determine whether changes in vagal afferent function and response to leptin in obesity were reversible by returning obese mice consuming a HFD to standard laboratory chow diet (SLD). Eight-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were either fed a SLD (N=20) or HFD (N=20) for 24 weeks. A third group was fed a HFD for 12 weeks and then a SLD for a further 12 weeks (RFD, N=18). An in vitro gastro-oesophageal vagal afferent preparation was used to determine the mechanosensitivity of gastric vagal afferents and the modulatory effect of leptin (0.1-10 nM) was examined. Retrograde tracing and quantitative RT-PCR were used to determine the expression of leptin receptor (LepR) messenger RNA (mRNA) in whole nodose and specific cell bodies traced from the stomach. After 24 weeks, both the HFD and RFD mice had increased body weight, gonadal fat mass, plasma leptin, plasma insulin and daily energy consumption compared with the SLD mice. The HFD and RFD mice had reduced tension receptor mechanosensitivity and leptin further inhibited responses to tension in HFD, RFD but not SLD mice. Mucosal receptors from both the SLD and RFD mice were potentiated by leptin, an effect not seen in HFD mice. LepR expression was unchanged in the whole nodose, but was reduced in the mucosal afferents of the HFD and RFD mice. Disruption of gastric vagal afferent function by HFD-induced obesity is only partially reversible by dietary change, which provides a potential mechanism preventing maintenance of weight loss.

  14. Reproductive tissues maintain insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng; Divall, Sara; Wondisford, Fredric; Wolfe, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is associated with obesity. We previously showed that female mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) exhibit infertility and thus serve as a model of human polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We postulated that differential insulin signaling of tissues leads to reproductive dysfunction; therefore, a comparison of insulin signaling in reproductive tissues and energy storage tissues was performed. Pituitary-specific insulin receptor knockout mice were used as controls. High-fat diet-induced stress, which leads to insulin resistance, was also investigated by assaying macrophage infiltration and phosphorylated Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (pJNK) signaling. In lean mice, reproductive tissues exhibited reduced sensitivity to insulin compared with peripheral metabolic tissues. However, in obese mice, where metabolic tissues exhibited insulin resistance, the pituitary and ovary maintained insulin sensitivity. Pituitaries responded to insulin through insulin receptor substrate (IRS)2 but not IRS1, whereas in the ovary, both IRS1 and IRS2 were activated by insulin. Macrophage infiltration and pJNK signaling were not increased in the pituitary or ovary of lean mice relative to DIO mice. The lack of inflammation and cytokine signaling in the pituitary and ovary in DIO mice compared with lean mice may be one of the reasons that these tissues remained insulin sensitive. Retained sensitivity of the pituitary and ovary to insulin may contribute to the pathophysiology of PCOS.

  15. Deficiency of FcϵR1 Increases Body Weight Gain but Improves Glucose Tolerance in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Liu, Conglin; Liao, Mengyang; Sukhova, Galina K; Shirakawa, Jun; Abdennour, Meriem; Iamarene, Karine; Andre, Sebastien; Inouye, Karen; Clement, Karine; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Banks, Alexander S; Libby, Peter; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-11-01

    Prior studies demonstrated increased plasma IgE in diabetic patients, but the direct participation of IgE in diabetes or obesity remains unknown. This study found that plasma IgE levels correlated inversely with body weight, body mass index, and body fat mass among a population of randomly selected obese women. IgE receptor FcϵR1-deficient (Fcer1a(-/-)) mice and diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice demonstrated that FcϵR1 deficiency in DIO mice increased food intake, reduced energy expenditure, and increased body weight gain but improved glucose tolerance and glucose-induced insulin secretion. White adipose tissue from Fcer1a(-/-) mice showed an increased expression of phospho-AKT, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, glucose transporter-4 (Glut4), and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) but reduced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) expression, tissue macrophage accumulation, and apoptosis, suggesting that IgE reduces adipogenesis and glucose uptake but induces energy expenditure, adipocyte apoptosis, and white adipose tissue inflammation. In 3T3-L1 cells, IgE inhibited the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, and preadipocyte adipogenesis and induced adipocyte apoptosis. IgE reduced the 3T3-L1 cell expression of Glut4, phospho-AKT, and glucose uptake, which concurred with improved glucose tolerance in Fcer1a(-/-) mice. This study established two novel pathways of IgE in reducing body weight gain in DIO mice by suppressing adipogenesis and inducing adipocyte apoptosis while worsening glucose tolerance by reducing Glut4 expression, glucose uptake, and insulin secretion.

  16. Endurance exercise training increases APPL1 expression and improves insulin signaling in the hepatic tissue of diet-induced obese mice, independently of weight loss.

    PubMed

    Marinho, R; Ropelle, E R; Cintra, D E; De Souza, C T; Da Silva, A S R; Bertoli, F C; Colantonio, E; D'Almeida, V; Pauli, J R

    2012-07-01

    Hepatic insulin resistance is the major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. The protein kinase Akt plays a central role in the suppression of gluconeogenesis involving forkhead box O1 (Foxo1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), and in the control of glycogen synthesis involving the glycogen synthase kinase beta (GSK3β) in the liver. It has been demonstrated that endosomal adaptor protein APPL1 interacts with Akt and blocks the association of Akt with its endogenous inhibitor, tribbles-related protein 3 (TRB3), improving the action of insulin in the liver. Here, we demonstrated that chronic exercise increased the basal levels and insulin-induced Akt serine phosphorylation in the liver of diet-induced obese mice. Endurance training was able to increase APPL1 expression and the interaction between APPL1 and Akt. Conversely, training reduced both TRB3 expression and TRB3 and Akt association. The positive effects of exercise on insulin action are reinforced by our findings that showed that trained mice presented an increase in Foxo1 phosphorylation and Foxo1/PGC-1α association, which was accompanied by a reduction in gluconeogenic gene expressions (PEPCK and G6Pase). Finally, exercised animals demonstrated increased at basal and insulin-induced GSK3β phosphorylation levels and glycogen content at 24 h after the last session of exercise. Our findings demonstrate that exercise increases insulin action, at least in part, through the enhancement of APPL1 and the reduction of TRB3 expression in the liver of obese mice, independently of weight loss.

  17. Diet-induced obesity alters memory consolidation in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zanini, P; Arbo, B D; Niches, G; Czarnabay, D; Benetti, F; Ribeiro, M F; Cecconello, A L

    2017-10-15

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by the abnormal or excessive fat accumulation, which is caused by an energy imbalance between consumed and expended calories. Obesity leads to an inflammatory response that may result in peripheral and central metabolic changes, including insulin and leptin resistance. Insulin and leptin resistance have been associated with metabolic and cognitive dysfunctions. Obesity and some neurodegenerative diseases that lead to dementia affect mainly women. However, the effects of diet-induced obesity on memory consolidation in female rats are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a hypercaloric diet on the object recognition memory of female rats and on possible related metabolic changes. The animals submitted to the hypercaloric diet presented a higher food intake in grams and in calories, resulting in increased weight gain and liposomatic index in comparison with the animals exposed to the control diet. These animals presented a memory deficit in the object recognition test and increased serum levels of glucose and leptin. However, no significant differences were found in the serum levels of insulin, TNF-α and IL-1β, in the index of insulin resistance (HOMA), in the hippocampal levels of insulin, TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as on Akt expression or activation in the hippocampus. Our findings indicate that adult female rats submitted to a hypercaloric diet present memory consolidation impairment, which could be associated with diet-induced weight gain and leptin resistance, even without the development of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Diet-Induced Obesity in the Selenocysteine Lyase Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Christy L.; Hashimoto, Ann C.; Ogawa-Wong, Ashley N.; Berry, Marla J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Selenocysteine lyase (Scly) mediates selenocysteine decomposition. It was previously demonstrated that, upon adequate caloric intake (12% kcal fat) and selenium deficiency, disruption of Scly in mice leads to development of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigate the effect of a high-fat (45% kcal) selenium-adequate diet in Scly knockout (KO) mice on development of metabolic syndrome. Involvement of selenoproteins in energy metabolism after Scly disruption was also examined in vitro in the murine hepatoma cell line, Hepa1-6, following palmitate treatment. Results: Scly KO mice were more susceptible to diet-induced obesity than their wild-type counterparts after feeding a high-fat selenium-adequate diet. Scly KO mice had aggravated hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia, glucose, and insulin intolerance, but unchanged inflammatory cytokines and expression of most selenoproteins, except increased serum selenoprotein P (Sepp1). Scly KO mice also exhibited enhanced hepatic levels of pyruvate and enzymes involved in the regulation of pyruvate cycling, such as pyruvate carboxylase (Pcx) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh). However, in vitro silencing of Scly in Hepa1-6 cells led to diminished Sepp1 expression, and concomitant palmitate treatment decreased Pdh expression. Innovation: The role of selenium in lipid metabolism is recognized, but specific selenium-dependent mechanisms leading to obesity are unclear. This study uncovers that Scly has a remarkable effect on obesity and metabolic syndrome development triggered by high-fat exposure, independent of the expression of most selenoproteins. Conclusion: Diet-induced obesity in Scly KO mice is aggravated, with effects on pyruvate levels and consequent activation of energy metabolism independent of selenoprotein levels. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 761–774. PMID:26192035

  19. Diet-induced obesity in the selenocysteine lyase knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Seale, Lucia A; Gilman, Christy L; Hashimoto, Ann C; Ogawa-Wong, Ashley N; Berry, Marla J

    2015-10-01

    Selenocysteine lyase (Scly) mediates selenocysteine decomposition. It was previously demonstrated that, upon adequate caloric intake (12% kcal fat) and selenium deficiency, disruption of Scly in mice leads to development of metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigate the effect of a high-fat (45% kcal) selenium-adequate diet in Scly knockout (KO) mice on development of metabolic syndrome. Involvement of selenoproteins in energy metabolism after Scly disruption was also examined in vitro in the murine hepatoma cell line, Hepa1-6, following palmitate treatment. Scly KO mice were more susceptible to diet-induced obesity than their wild-type counterparts after feeding a high-fat selenium-adequate diet. Scly KO mice had aggravated hyperinsulinemia, hypercholesterolemia, glucose, and insulin intolerance, but unchanged inflammatory cytokines and expression of most selenoproteins, except increased serum selenoprotein P (Sepp1). Scly KO mice also exhibited enhanced hepatic levels of pyruvate and enzymes involved in the regulation of pyruvate cycling, such as pyruvate carboxylase (Pcx) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (Pdh). However, in vitro silencing of Scly in Hepa1-6 cells led to diminished Sepp1 expression, and concomitant palmitate treatment decreased Pdh expression. The role of selenium in lipid metabolism is recognized, but specific selenium-dependent mechanisms leading to obesity are unclear. This study uncovers that Scly has a remarkable effect on obesity and metabolic syndrome development triggered by high-fat exposure, independent of the expression of most selenoproteins. Diet-induced obesity in Scly KO mice is aggravated, with effects on pyruvate levels and consequent activation of energy metabolism independent of selenoprotein levels.

  20. Citrus aurantium and Rhodiola rosea in combination reduce visceral white adipose tissue and increase hypothalamic norepinephrine in a rat model of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Verpeut, Jessica L.; Walters, Amy L.; Bello, Nicholas T.

    2013-01-01

    Extracts from the immature fruit of Citrus aurantium are often used for weight loss but are reported to produce adverse cardiovascular effects. Root extracts of Rhodiola rosea have notable antistress properties. The hypothesis of these studies was that C aurantium (6% synephrine) and R rosea (3% rosavins, 1% salidroside) in combination would improve diet-induced obesity alterations in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. In normal-weight animals fed standard chow, acute administration of C aurantium (1-10 mg/kg) or R rosea (2-20 mg/kg) alone did not reduce deprivation-induced food intake, but C aurantium (5.6 mg/kg) + R rosea (20 mg/kg) produced a 10.5% feeding suppression. Animals maintained (13 weeks) on a high-fat diet (60% fat) were exposed to 10-day treatments of C aurantium (5.6 mg/kg) or R rosea (20 mg/kg) alone or in combination. Additional groups received vehicle (2% ethanol) or were pair fed to the C aurantium + R rosea group. Although high-fat diet intake and weight loss were not influenced, C aurantium + R rosea had a 30% decrease in visceral fat weight compared with the other treatments. Only the C aurantium group had an increased heart rate (+7%) compared with vehicle. In addition, C aurantium + R rosea administration resulted in an elevation (+15%) in hypothalamic norepinephrine and an elevation (+150%) in frontal cortex dopamine compared with the pair-fed group. These initial findings suggest that treatments of C aurantium + R rosea have actions on central monoamine pathways and have the potential to be beneficial for the treatment of obesity. PMID:23746567

  1. Gamma delta T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gamma delta T cells are resident in adipose tissue and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5-10 week high milk fat diet. The high milk fat diet resulted in significant in...

  2. Reversal of Diet-Induced Obesity Increases Insulin Transport into Cerebrospinal Fluid and Restores Sensitivity to the Anorexic Action of Central Insulin in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mul, Joram D.; Liu, Min; Reedy, Brianne M.; D'Alessio, David A.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) reduces the ability of centrally administered insulin to reduce feeding behavior and also reduces the transport of insulin from the periphery to the central nervous system (CNS). The current study was designed to determine whether reversal of high-fat DIO restores the anorexic efficacy of central insulin and whether this is accompanied by restoration of the compromised insulin transport. Adult male Long-Evans rats were initially maintained on either a low-fat chow diet (LFD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). After 22 weeks, half of the animals on the HFD were changed to the LFD, whereas the other half continued on the HFD for an additional 8 weeks, such that there were 3 groups: 1) a LFD control group (Con; n = 18), 2) a HFD-fed, DIO group (n = 17), and 3) a HFD to LFD, DIO-reversal group (DIO-rev; n = 18). The DIO reversal resulted in a significant reduction of body weight and epididymal fat weight relative to the DIO group. Acute central insulin administration (8 mU) reduced food intake and caused weight loss in Con and DIO-rev but not DIO rats. Fasting cerebrospinal fluid insulin was higher in DIO than Con animals. However, after a peripheral bolus injection of insulin, cerebrospinal fluid insulin increased in Con and DIO-rev rats but not in the DIO group. These data provide support for previous reports that DIO inhibits both the central effects of insulin and insulin's transport to the CNS. Importantly, DIO-rev restored sensitivity to the effects of central insulin on food intake and insulin transport into the CNS. PMID:23337529

  3. Diet-Induced Obesity and Circadian Disruption of Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blancas-Velazquez, Aurea; Mendoza, Jorge; Garcia, Alexandra N.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behavior shows a rhythmic daily pattern, which in nocturnal rodents is observed mainly during the dark period. This rhythmicity is under the influence of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the main biological clock. Nevertheless, various studies have shown that in rodent models of obesity, using high-energy diets, the general locomotor activity and feeding rhythms can be disrupted. Here, we review the data on the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on locomotor activity and feeding patterns, as well as the effect on the brain sites within the neural circuitry involved in metabolic and rewarding feeding behavior. In general, DIO may alter locomotor activity by decreasing total activity. On the other hand, DIO largely alters eating patterns, producing increased overall ingestion and number of eating bouts that can extend to the resting period. Furthermore, within the hypothalamic areas, little effect has been reported on the molecular circadian mechanism in DIO animals with ad libitum hypercaloric diets and little or no data exist so far on its effects on the reward system areas. We further discuss the possibility of an uncoupling of metabolic and reward systems in DIO and highlight a gap of circadian and metabolic research that may help to better understand the implications of obesity. PMID:28223912

  4. Reproductive Tissues Maintain Insulin Sensitivity in Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng; Divall, Sara; Wondisford, Fredric; Wolfe, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive dysfunction is associated with obesity. We previously showed that female mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) exhibit infertility and thus serve as a model of human polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We postulated that differential insulin signaling of tissues leads to reproductive dysfunction; therefore, a comparison of insulin signaling in reproductive tissues and energy storage tissues was performed. Pituitary-specific insulin receptor knockout mice were used as controls. High-fat diet–induced stress, which leads to insulin resistance, was also investigated by assaying macrophage infiltration and phosphorylated Jun NH2-terminal kinase (pJNK) signaling. In lean mice, reproductive tissues exhibited reduced sensitivity to insulin compared with peripheral metabolic tissues. However, in obese mice, where metabolic tissues exhibited insulin resistance, the pituitary and ovary maintained insulin sensitivity. Pituitaries responded to insulin through insulin receptor substrate (IRS)2 but not IRS1, whereas in the ovary, both IRS1 and IRS2 were activated by insulin. Macrophage infiltration and pJNK signaling were not increased in the pituitary or ovary of lean mice relative to DIO mice. The lack of inflammation and cytokine signaling in the pituitary and ovary in DIO mice compared with lean mice may be one of the reasons that these tissues remained insulin sensitive. Retained sensitivity of the pituitary and ovary to insulin may contribute to the pathophysiology of PCOS. PMID:22076926

  5. Diet-Induced Obesity and Circadian Disruption of Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Blancas-Velazquez, Aurea; Mendoza, Jorge; Garcia, Alexandra N; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2017-01-01

    Feeding behavior shows a rhythmic daily pattern, which in nocturnal rodents is observed mainly during the dark period. This rhythmicity is under the influence of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the main biological clock. Nevertheless, various studies have shown that in rodent models of obesity, using high-energy diets, the general locomotor activity and feeding rhythms can be disrupted. Here, we review the data on the effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on locomotor activity and feeding patterns, as well as the effect on the brain sites within the neural circuitry involved in metabolic and rewarding feeding behavior. In general, DIO may alter locomotor activity by decreasing total activity. On the other hand, DIO largely alters eating patterns, producing increased overall ingestion and number of eating bouts that can extend to the resting period. Furthermore, within the hypothalamic areas, little effect has been reported on the molecular circadian mechanism in DIO animals with ad libitum hypercaloric diets and little or no data exist so far on its effects on the reward system areas. We further discuss the possibility of an uncoupling of metabolic and reward systems in DIO and highlight a gap of circadian and metabolic research that may help to better understand the implications of obesity.

  6. Arginase inhibition restores endothelial function in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji Hyung; Moon, Jiyoung; Lee, Youn Sue; Chung, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Seung-Min; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2014-08-22

    Arginase may play a major role in the regulation of vascular function in various cardiovascular disorders by impairing nitric oxide (NO) production. In the current study, we investigated whether supplementation of the arginase inhibitor N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (nor-NOHA) could restore endothelial function in an animal model of diet-induced obesity. Arginase 1 expression was significantly lower in the aorta of C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) supplemented with nor-NOHA (40mgkg(-1)/day) than in mice fed HFD without nor-NOHA. Arginase inhibition led to considerable increases in eNOS expression and NO levels and significant decreases in the levels of circulating ICAM-1. These findings were further confirmed by the results of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Arg in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In conclusion, arginase inhibition can help restore dysregulated endothelial function by increasing the eNOS-dependent NO production in the endothelium, indicating that arginase could be a therapeutic target for correcting obesity-induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

  7. Leptolide Improves Insulin Resistance in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Cueto, Mercedes; Moreno, Alfredo; Perdomo, Germán

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a complex disease linked to pancreatic beta-cell failure and insulin resistance. Current antidiabetic treatment regimens for T2DM include insulin sensitizers and insulin secretagogues. We have previously demonstrated that leptolide, a member of the furanocembranolides family, promotes pancreatic beta-cell proliferation in mice. Considering the beneficial effects of leptolide in diabetic mice, in this study, we aimed to address the capability of leptolide to improve insulin resistance associated with the pathology of obesity. To this end, we tested the hypothesis that leptolide should protect against fatty acid-induced insulin resistance in hepatocytes. In a time-dependent manner, leptolide (0.1 µM) augmented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) by two-fold above vehicle-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, leptolide (0.1 µM) counteracted palmitate-induced insulin resistance by augmenting by four-fold insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB in HepG2 cells. In vivo, acute intraperitoneal administration of leptolide (0.1 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg) improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in lean mice. Likewise, prolonged leptolide treatment (0.1 mg/kg) in diet-induced obese mice improved insulin sensitivity. These effects were paralleled with an ~50% increased of insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB in liver and skeletal muscle and reduced circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines in obese mice. We concluded that leptolide significantly improves insulin sensitivity in vitro and in obese mice, suggesting that leptolide may be another potential treatment for T2DM. PMID:28914811

  8. Diet-Induced Obesity Does Not Alter Tigecycline Treatment Efficacy in Murine Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Eshghi, Azad; Anjum, Zoha; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Cameron, Caroline E.; Moriarty, Tara J.

    2017-01-01

    Obese individuals more frequently suffer from infections, as a result of increased susceptibility to a number of bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, obesity can alter antibiotic treatment efficacy due to changes in drug pharmacokinetics which can result in under-dosing. However, studies on the treatment of bacterial infections in the context of obesity are scarce. To address this research gap, we assessed efficacy of antibiotic treatment in diet-induced obese mice infected with the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi. Diet-induced obese C3H/HeN mice and normal-weight controls were infected with B. burgdorferi, and treated during the acute phase of infection with two doses of tigecycline, adjusted to the weights of diet-induced obese and normal-weight mice. Antibiotic treatment efficacy was assessed 1 month after the treatment by cultivating bacteria from tissues, measuring severity of Lyme carditis, and quantifying bacterial DNA clearance in ten tissues. In addition, B. burgdorferi-specific IgG production was monitored throughout the experiment. Tigecycline treatment was ineffective in reducing B. burgdorferi DNA copies in brain. However, diet-induced obesity did not affect antibiotic-dependent bacterial DNA clearance in any tissues, regardless of the tigecycline dose used for treatment. Production of B. burgdorferi-specific IgGs was delayed and attenuated in mock-treated diet-induced obese mice compared to mock-treated normal-weight animals, but did not differ among experimental groups following antibiotic treatment. No carditis or cultivatable B. burgdorferi were detected in any antibiotic-treated group. In conclusion, obesity was associated with attenuated and delayed humoral immune responses to B. burgdorferi, but did not affect efficacy of antibiotic treatment. PMID:28286500

  9. Addiction-like Synaptic Impairments in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robyn Mary; Kupchik, Yonatan Michael; Spencer, Sade; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Spanswick, David C; Lawrence, Andrew John; Simonds, Stephanie Elise; Schwartz, Danielle Joy; Jordan, Kelsey Ann; Jhou, Thomas Clayton; Kalivas, Peter William

    2017-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that the pathological overeating underlying some forms of obesity is compulsive in nature and therefore contains elements of an addictive disorder. However, direct physiological evidence linking obesity to synaptic plasticity akin to that occurring in addiction is lacking. We sought to establish whether the propensity to diet-induced obesity (DIO) is associated with addictive-like behavior, as well as synaptic impairments in the nucleus accumbens core considered hallmarks of addiction. Sprague Dawley rats were allowed free access to a palatable diet for 8 weeks then separated by weight gain into DIO-prone and DIO-resistant subgroups. Access to palatable food was then restricted to daily operant self-administration sessions using fixed ratio 1, 3, and 5 and progressive ratio schedules. Subsequently, nucleus accumbens brain slices were prepared, and we tested for changes in the ratio between α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate currents and the ability to exhibit long-term depression. We found that propensity to develop DIO is linked to deficits in the ability to induce long-term depression in the nucleus accumbens, as well as increased potentiation at these synapses as measured by AMPA/N-methyl-D-aspartate currents. Consistent with these impairments, we observed addictive-like behavior in DIO-prone rats, including 1) heightened motivation for palatable food; 2) excessive intake; and 3) increased food seeking when food was unavailable. Our results show overlap between the propensity for DIO and the synaptic changes associated with facets of addictive behavior, supporting partial coincident neurological underpinnings for compulsive overeating and drug addiction. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  10. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy.

  11. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gotthardt, Juliet D.; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Yeomans, Bryn L.; Yang, Jennifer A.; Yasrebi, Ali; Bello, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%–52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%–13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%–42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%–60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%–32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%–75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy. PMID:26653760

  12. Intermittent hypoxia exacerbates metabolic effects of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Drager, Luciano F; Li, Jianguo; Reinke, Christian; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2011-11-01

    Obesity causes insulin resistance (IR) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the relative contribution of sleep apnea is debatable. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a hallmark of sleep apnea, on IR and NAFLD in lean mice and mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Mice (C57BL/6J), 6-8 weeks of age were fed a high fat (n = 18) or regular (n = 16) diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to CIH or control conditions (room air) for 4 weeks. At the end of the exposure, fasting (5 h) blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, liver enzymes, and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg) were measured. In DIO mice, body weight remained stable during CIH and did not differ from control conditions. Lean mice under CIH were significantly lighter than control mice by day 28 (P = 0.002). Compared to lean mice, DIO mice had higher fasting levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, the HOMA index, and had glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis at baseline. In lean mice, CIH slightly increased HOMA index (from 1.79 ± 0.13 in control to 2.41 ± 0.26 in CIH; P = 0.05), whereas glucose tolerance was not affected. In contrast, in DIO mice, CIH doubled HOMA index (from 10.1 ± 2.1 in control to 22.5 ± 3.6 in CIH; P < 0.01), and induced severe glucose intolerance. In DIO mice, CIH induced NAFLD, inflammation, and oxidative stress, which was not observed in lean mice. In conclusion, CIH exacerbates IR and induces steatohepatitis in DIO mice, suggesting that CIH may account for metabolic dysfunction in obesity.

  13. Diet-induced obesity attenuates endotoxin-induced cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Setti, Sharay E; Littlefield, Alyssa M; Johnson, Samantha W; Kohman, Rachel A

    2015-03-15

    Activation of the immune system can impair cognitive function, particularly on hippocampus dependent tasks. Several factors such as normal aging and prenatal experiences can modify the severity of these cognitive deficits. One additional factor that may modulate the behavioral response to immune activation is obesity. Prior work has shown that obesity alters the activity of the immune system. Whether diet-induced obesity (DIO) influences the cognitive deficits associated with inflammation is currently unknown. The present study explored whether DIO alters the behavioral response to the bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Female C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat (60% fat) or control diet (10% fat) for a total of five months. After consuming their respective diets for four months, mice received an LPS or saline injection and were assessed for alterations in spatial learning. One month later, mice received a second injection of LPS or saline and tissue samples were collected to assess the inflammatory response within the periphery and central nervous system. Results showed that LPS administration impaired spatial learning in the control diet mice, but had no effect in DIO mice. This lack of a cognitive deficit in the DIO female mice is likely due to a blunted inflammatory response within the brain. While cytokine production within the periphery (i.e., plasma, adipose, and spleen) was similar between the DIO and control mice, the DIO mice failed to show an increase in IL-6 and CD74 in the brain following LPS administration. Collectively, these data indicate that DIO can reduce aspects of the neuroinflammatory response as well as blunt the behavioral reaction to an immune challenge. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Intermittent Hypoxia Exacerbates Metabolic Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Drager, Luciano F.; Li, Jianguo; Reinke, Christian; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity causes insulin resistance (IR) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), but the relative contribution of sleep apnea is debatable. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), a hallmark of sleep apnea, on IR and NAFLD in lean mice and mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Mice (C57BL/6J), 6–8 weeks of age were fed a high fat (n = 18) or regular (n = 16) diet for 12 weeks and then exposed to CIH or control conditions (room air) for 4 weeks. At the end of the exposure, fasting (5 h) blood glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, liver enzymes, and intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (1 g/kg) were measured. In DIO mice, body weight remained stable during CIH and did not differ from control conditions. Lean mice under CIH were significantly lighter than control mice by day 28 (P = 0.002). Compared to lean mice, DIO mice had higher fasting levels of blood glucose, plasma insulin, the HOMA index, and had glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis at baseline. In lean mice, CIH slightly increased HOMA index (from 1.79 ± 0.13 in control to 2.41 ± 0.26 in CIH; P = 0.05), whereas glucose tolerance was not affected. In contrast, in DIO mice, CIH doubled HOMA index (from 10.1 ± 2.1 in control to 22.5 ± 3.6 in CIH; P < 0.01), and induced severe glucose intolerance. In DIO mice, CIH induced NAFLD, inflammation, and oxidative stress, which was not observed in lean mice. In conclusion, CIH exacerbates IR and induces steatohepatitis in DIO mice, suggesting that CIH may account for metabolic dysfunction in obesity. PMID:21799478

  15. Retinaldehyde represses adipogenesis and diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Orasanu, Gabriela; Sharlach, Molly; Akiyama, Taro E; Berger, Joel P; Viereck, Jason; Hamilton, James A; Tang, Guangwen; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Vogel, Silke; Duester, Gregg; Plutzky, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    The metabolism of vitamin A and the diverse effects of its metabolites are tightly controlled by distinct retinoid-generating enzymes, retinoid-binding proteins and retinoid-activated nuclear receptors. Retinoic acid regulates differentiation and metabolism by activating the retinoic acid receptor and retinoid X receptor (RXR), indirectly influencing RXR heterodimeric partners. Retinoic acid is formed solely from retinaldehyde (Rald), which in turn is derived from vitamin A. Rald currently has no defined biologic role outside the eye. Here we show that Rald is present in rodent fat, binds retinol-binding proteins (CRBP1, RBP4), inhibits adipogenesis and suppresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-c and RXR responses. In vivo, mice lacking the Rald-catabolizing enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (Raldh1) resisted diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and showed increased energy dissipation. In ob/ob mice, administrating Rald or a Raldh inhibitor reduced fat and increased insulin sensitivity. These results identify Rald as a distinct transcriptional regulator of the metabolic responses to a high-fat diet. PMID:17529981

  16. A mouse model of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Liao, James K

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is reaching pandemic proportions in Western society. It has resulted in increasing health care burden and decreasing life expectancy. Obesity is a complex, chronic disease, involving decades of pathophysiological changes and adaptation. Therefore, it is difficult ascertain the exact mechanisms for this long-term process in humans. To circumvent some of these issues, several surrogate models are available, including murine genetic loss-of-function mutations, transgenic gain-of-function mutations, polygenic models, and different environmental exposure models. The mouse model of diet-induced obesity has become one of the most important tools for understanding the interplay of high-fat Western diets and the development of obesity. The diet-induced obesity model closely mimics the increasingly availability of the high-fat/high-density foods in modern society over the past two decades, which are main contributors to the obesity trend in human. This model has lead to many discoveries of the important signalings in obesity, such as Akt and mTOR. The chapter describes protocols for diet induced-obesity model in mice and protocols for measuring insulin resistance and sensitivity.

  17. Depressed levels of prostaglandin F2α in mice lacking Akr1b7 increase basal adiposity and predispose to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Volat, Fanny E; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Pastel, Emilie; Morio, Béatrice; Sion, Benoit; Hamard, Ghislaine; Guichardant, Michel; Colas, Romain; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2012-11-01

    Negative regulators of white adipose tissue (WAT) expansion are poorly documented in vivo. Prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) is a potent antiadipogenic factor in cultured preadipocytes, but evidence for its involvement in physiological context is lacking. We previously reported that Akr1b7, an aldo-keto reductase enriched in adipose stromal vascular fraction but absent from mature adipocytes, has antiadipogenic properties possibly supported by PGF(2α) synthase activity. To test whether lack of Akr1b7 could influence WAT homeostasis in vivo, we generated Akr1b7(-/-) mice in 129/Sv background. Akr1b7(-/-) mice displayed excessive basal adiposity resulting from adipocyte hyperplasia/hypertrophy and exhibited greater sensitivity to diet-induced obesity. Following adipose enlargement and irrespective of the diet, they developed liver steatosis and progressive insulin resistance. Akr1b7 loss was associated with decreased PGF(2α) WAT contents. Cloprostenol (PGF(2α) agonist) administration to Akr1b7(-/-) mice normalized WAT expansion by affecting both de novo adipocyte differentiation and size. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes and Akr1b7(-/-) mice with cloprostenol suggested that decreased adipocyte size resulted from inhibition of lipogenic gene expression. Hence, Akr1b7 is a major regulator of WAT development through at least two PGF(2α)-dependent mechanisms: inhibition of adipogenesis and lipogenesis. These findings provide molecular rationale to explore the status of aldo-keto reductases in dysregulations of adipose tissue homeostasis.

  18. Chronic rhein treatment improves recognition memory in high-fat diet-induced obese male mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Huang, Xu-Feng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Hongqin; Zhang, Qingsheng; Yu, Shijia; Yu, Yinghua

    2016-10-01

    High-fat (HF) diet modulates gut microbiota and increases plasma concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) which is associated with obesity and its related low-grade inflammation and cognitive decline. Rhein is the main ingredient of the rhubarb plant which has been used as an anti-inflammatory agent for several millennia. However, the potential effects of rhein against HF diet-induced obesity and its associated alteration of gut microbiota, inflammation and cognitive decline have not been studied. In this study, C57BL/6J male mice were fed an HF diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, and then treated with oral rhein (120 mg/kg body weight/day in HF diet) for a further 6 weeks. Chronic rhein treatment prevented the HF diet-induced recognition memory impairment assessed by the novel object recognition test, neuroinflammation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficits in the perirhinal cortex. Furthermore, rhein inhibited the HF diet-induced increased plasma LPS level and the proinflammatory macrophage accumulation in the colon and alteration of microbiota, including decreasing Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and Desulfovibrios spp. DNA and increasing Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. DNA. Moreover, rhein also reduced body weight and improved glucose tolerance in HF diet-induced obese mice. In conclusion, rhein improved recognition memory and prevented obesity in mice on a chronic HF diet. These beneficial effects occur via the modulation of microbiota, hypoendotoxinemia, inhibition of macrophage accumulation, anti-neuroinflammation and the improvement of BDNF expression. Therefore, supplementation with rhein-enriched food or herbal medicine could be beneficial as a preventive strategy for chronic HF diet-induced cognitive decline, microbiota alteration and neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diet-induced obesity alters myeloid cell populations in naïve and injured lung.

    PubMed

    Manicone, Anne M; Gong, Keqin; Johnston, Laura K; Giannandrea, Matthew

    2016-03-08

    There are pulmonary consequences to obesity, including increased prevalence of asthma, greater susceptibility to influenza, and possibly reduced susceptibility to lung injury. Although it is well established that obesity is associated with alterations to the immune system, little is known about obesity-associated changes to pulmonary immune cells. We hypothesized that obesity would alter the inflammatory milieu in the unchallenged lung and circulation; thereby contributing to altered susceptibility to lung injury. We used a murine model of diet-induced obesity and evaluated bone marrow and blood leukocytes at 3 months, and pulmonary leukocytes at 3 and 6 months for changes in their adhesion and chemokine receptors, markers of activation states, and cell numbers. We also evaluated the inflammatory response to LPS in obese mice. In the lung, diet-induced obesity was associated with increased leukocyte numbers over-time. Adhesion receptors were increased in a cell- and site-specific fashion, and there was an evolution of macrophage and neutrophil polarization toward M1 and N1, respectively. After LPS-challenge, obesity was associated with increased neutrophil recruitment to the lung with impaired migration into the alveolar space. Associated with these changes, obesity increased LFA-1 and ICAM-1 neutrophil expression and altered CXCL1 gradients. Our results highlight the effects of diet-induced obesity on the murine blood and lung leukocyte populations, including increases in adhesion receptor expression that may contribute to altered recruitment or retention within the lung. Translation of these findings to people with obesity will be critical for determining the basic inflammatory underpinnings of pulmonary disease susceptibility.

  20. Colesevelam improves insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity (F-DIO) rat model by increasing the release of GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Shang, Quan; Saumoy, Monica; Holst, Jens Juul; Salen, Gerald; Xu, Guorong

    2010-03-01

    Bile acid sequestrants have been shown to lower glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. To investigate how colesevelam (CL) HCl improves hyperglycemia, studies were conducted in diet-induced obesity (F-DIO) rats, which develop insulin resistance when fed a high-energy (high fat/high sucrose) diet (HE). The rats were fed HE; HE + 2% CL; HE + 0.02% SC-435 (SC), an apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter inhibitor; and regular chow (controls). After 4 wk of treatment, both in the HE group and the SC + HE group, plasma glucose and insulin levels remained elevated compared with baseline values throughout an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). In contrast, in the CL + HE group, plasma glucose levels returned to baseline by the end of the test, and insulin peaked in 15-30 min and then returned to baseline. CL induced release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) because the area under the curve of plasma total GLP-1 in the CL + HE group was significantly greater than in the HE group during the OGTT. Bile acid concentrations in the portal blood did not decrease in the HE group but declined significantly both in the CL + HE and SC + HE groups with reduced farnesoid X receptor activation compared with controls. We concluded that CL reduces plasma glucose levels by improving insulin resistance in this rat model. It is unlikely that the improvement is attributable to decreased bile acid flux to the liver but is likely secondary to induced GLP-1 secretion, which improves insulin release.

  1. Depressed Levels of Prostaglandin F2α in Mice Lacking Akr1b7 Increase Basal Adiposity and Predispose to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Volat, Fanny E.; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Pastel, Emilie; Morio, Béatrice; Sion, Benoit; Hamard, Ghislaine; Guichardant, Michel; Colas, Romain; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Negative regulators of white adipose tissue (WAT) expansion are poorly documented in vivo. Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) is a potent antiadipogenic factor in cultured preadipocytes, but evidence for its involvement in physiological context is lacking. We previously reported that Akr1b7, an aldo-keto reductase enriched in adipose stromal vascular fraction but absent from mature adipocytes, has antiadipogenic properties possibly supported by PGF2α synthase activity. To test whether lack of Akr1b7 could influence WAT homeostasis in vivo, we generated Akr1b7−/− mice in 129/Sv background. Akr1b7−/− mice displayed excessive basal adiposity resulting from adipocyte hyperplasia/hypertrophy and exhibited greater sensitivity to diet-induced obesity. Following adipose enlargement and irrespective of the diet, they developed liver steatosis and progressive insulin resistance. Akr1b7 loss was associated with decreased PGF2α WAT contents. Cloprostenol (PGF2α agonist) administration to Akr1b7−/− mice normalized WAT expansion by affecting both de novo adipocyte differentiation and size. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes and Akr1b7−/− mice with cloprostenol suggested that decreased adipocyte size resulted from inhibition of lipogenic gene expression. Hence, Akr1b7 is a major regulator of WAT development through at least two PGF2α-dependent mechanisms: inhibition of adipogenesis and lipogenesis. These findings provide molecular rationale to explore the status of aldo-keto reductases in dysregulations of adipose tissue homeostasis. PMID:22851578

  2. Effects of Dietary Fibre (Pectin) and/or Increased Protein (Casein or Pea) on Satiety, Body Weight, Adiposity and Caecal Fermentation in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Adam, Clare L; Gratz, Silvia W; Peinado, Diana I; Thomson, Lynn M; Garden, Karen E; Williams, Patricia A; Richardson, Anthony J; Ross, Alexander W

    2016-01-01

    Dietary constituents that suppress appetite, such as dietary fibre and protein, may aid weight loss in obesity. The soluble fermentable dietary fibre pectin promotes satiety and decreases adiposity in diet-induced obese rats but effects of increased protein are unknown. Adult diet-induced obese rats reared on high fat diet (45% energy from fat) were given experimental diets ad libitum for 4 weeks (n = 8/group): high fat control, high fat with high protein (40% energy) as casein or pea protein, or these diets with added 10% w/w pectin. Dietary pectin, but not high protein, decreased food intake by 23% and induced 23% body fat loss, leading to 12% lower final body weight and 44% lower total body fat mass than controls. Plasma concentrations of satiety hormones PYY and total GLP-1 were increased by dietary pectin (168% and 151%, respectively) but not by high protein. Plasma leptin was decreased by 62% on pectin diets and 38% on high pea (but not casein) protein, while plasma insulin was decreased by 44% on pectin, 38% on high pea and 18% on high casein protein diets. Caecal weight and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the caecum were increased in pectin-fed and high pea protein groups: caecal succinate was increased by pectin (900%), acetate and propionate by pectin (123% and 118%, respectively) and pea protein (147% and 144%, respectively), and butyrate only by pea protein (309%). Caecal branched-chain fatty acid concentrations were decreased by pectin (down 78%) but increased by pea protein (164%). Therefore, the soluble fermentable fibre pectin appeared more effective than high protein for increasing satiety and decreasing caloric intake and adiposity while on high fat diet, and produced a fermentation environment more likely to promote hindgut health. Altogether these data indicate that high fibre may be better than high protein for weight (fat) loss in obesity.

  3. Effects of Dietary Fibre (Pectin) and/or Increased Protein (Casein or Pea) on Satiety, Body Weight, Adiposity and Caecal Fermentation in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Clare L.; Gratz, Silvia W.; Peinado, Diana I.; Thomson, Lynn M.; Garden, Karen E.; Williams, Patricia A.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Ross, Alexander W.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary constituents that suppress appetite, such as dietary fibre and protein, may aid weight loss in obesity. The soluble fermentable dietary fibre pectin promotes satiety and decreases adiposity in diet-induced obese rats but effects of increased protein are unknown. Adult diet-induced obese rats reared on high fat diet (45% energy from fat) were given experimental diets ad libitum for 4 weeks (n = 8/group): high fat control, high fat with high protein (40% energy) as casein or pea protein, or these diets with added 10% w/w pectin. Dietary pectin, but not high protein, decreased food intake by 23% and induced 23% body fat loss, leading to 12% lower final body weight and 44% lower total body fat mass than controls. Plasma concentrations of satiety hormones PYY and total GLP-1 were increased by dietary pectin (168% and 151%, respectively) but not by high protein. Plasma leptin was decreased by 62% on pectin diets and 38% on high pea (but not casein) protein, while plasma insulin was decreased by 44% on pectin, 38% on high pea and 18% on high casein protein diets. Caecal weight and short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the caecum were increased in pectin-fed and high pea protein groups: caecal succinate was increased by pectin (900%), acetate and propionate by pectin (123% and 118%, respectively) and pea protein (147% and 144%, respectively), and butyrate only by pea protein (309%). Caecal branched-chain fatty acid concentrations were decreased by pectin (down 78%) but increased by pea protein (164%). Therefore, the soluble fermentable fibre pectin appeared more effective than high protein for increasing satiety and decreasing caloric intake and adiposity while on high fat diet, and produced a fermentation environment more likely to promote hindgut health. Altogether these data indicate that high fibre may be better than high protein for weight (fat) loss in obesity. PMID:27224646

  4. Ladder-Climbing Training Prevents Bone Loss and Microarchitecture Deterioration in Diet-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liang; Gao, Xiaohang; Yang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chentao; Wang, Xudan; Han, Yanqi; Zhao, Xinjuan; Chi, Aiping; Sun, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Resistance exercise has been proved to be effective in improving bone quality in both animal and human studies. However, the issue about whether resistance exercise can inhibit obesity-induced bone loss has not been previously investigated. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of ladder-climbing training, one of the resistance exercises, on bone mechanical properties and microarchitecture in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obese rats. Twenty-four rats were randomly assigned to the Control, HF + sedentary (HF-S) and HF + ladder-climbing training (HF-LCT) groups. Rats in the HF-LCT group performed ladder-climbing training for 8 weeks. The results showed that ladder-climbing training significantly reduced body and fat weight, and increased muscle mass along with a trend toward enhanced muscle strength in diet-induced obese rats. MicroCT analysis demonstrated that obesity-induced bone loss and architecture deterioration were significantly mitigated by ladder-climbing training, as evidenced by increased trabecular bone mineral density, bone volume over total volume, trabecular number and thickness, and decreased trabecular separation and structure model index. However, neither HF diet nor ladder-climbing training had an impact on femoral biomechanical properties. Moreover, ladder-climbing training significantly increased serum adiponectin, decreased serum leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 levels, and downregulated myostatin (MSTN) expression in diet-induced obese rats. Taken together, ladder-climbing training prevents bone loss and microarchitecture deterioration in diet-induced obese rats through multiple mechanisms including increasing mechanical loading on bone due to improved skeletal muscle mass and strength, regulating the levels of myokines and adipokines, and suppressing the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It indicates that resistance exercise may be a promising therapy for treating obesity-induced bone loss.

  5. Dietary manipulations influence sucrose acceptance in diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander W

    2012-02-01

    The current studies examined the influence of a high fat diet on sucrose acceptance in diet induced obese (DIO) mice. C57BL/6J mice were placed on either a 45 kcal% fat diet (group DIO), or a control 10% kcal fat diet (group control) for 12 weeks followed by sucrose consumption tests and dietary manipulations. After 12 weeks exposure, body weights of DIO mice significantly exceeded those of the control mice. During subsequent sucrose consumption tests, DIO mice showed suppression in the total number of licks relative to controls. In a second experiment, consumption tests with water and a variety of sucrose concentrations revealed a hypophagic phenotype in naïve DIO mice. Licking microstructure analyses were conducted on the licking behavior of all mice, which revealed a reduction in burst size and number for DIO mice. Subsequently, we examined whether 10 days exposure to regular lab chow would alter sucrose consumption and taste evaluation in DIO mice. As a result of this dietary switch, all mice showed comparable licking behavior suggesting that exposure to the high-fat diet and diet-induced obesity may reduce preferences for other tastants in C57BL/6J mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune dysfunction and increased oxidative stress state in diet-induced obese mice are reverted by nutritional supplementation with monounsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Hunsche, Caroline; Hernandez, Oskarina; Gheorghe, Alina; Díaz, Ligia Esperanza; Marcos, Ascensión; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2017-02-23

    Obesity is associated with impaired immune defences and chronic low levels of inflammation and oxidation. In addition, this condition may lead to premature aging. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a nutritional supplementation with monounsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on several functions and oxidative stress parameters in peritoneal immune cells of obese mice, as well as on the life span of these animals. Obesity was induced in adult female ICR/CD1 by the administration of a high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. During the last 6 weeks of HFD feeding, one group of obese mice received the same HFD, supplemented with 1500 mg of 2-hydroxyoleic acid (2-OHOA) and another with 3000 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Several functions and oxidative stress parameters of peritoneal leukocytes were evaluated. The groups of obese mice treated with 2-OHOA or with EPA and DHA showed a significant improvement in several functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, digestion capacity, Natural killer activity and lymphoproliferation in response to mitogens. All of these functions, which were decreased in obese mice, increased reaching similar levels to those found in non-obese controls. Both treatments also improved oxidative stress parameters such as xanthine oxidase activity, which decreased, catalase activity and glutathione levels, which increased. These data suggest that dietary supplementation with monounsaturated and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids could be an effective nutritional intervention to restore the immune response and oxidative stress state, which are impaired in obese mice.

  7. Maternal diet-induced obesity alters mitochondrial activity and redox status in mouse oocytes and zygotes.

    PubMed

    Igosheva, Natalia; Abramov, Andrey Y; Poston, Lucilla; Eckert, Judith J; Fleming, Tom P; Duchen, Michael R; McConnell, Josie

    2010-04-09

    The negative impact of obesity on reproductive success is well documented but the stages at which development of the conceptus is compromised and the mechanisms responsible for the developmental failure still remain unclear. Recent findings suggest that mitochondria may be a contributing factor. However to date no studies have directly addressed the consequences of maternal obesity on mitochondria in early embryogenesis.Using an established murine model of maternal diet induced obesity and a live cell dynamic fluorescence imaging techniques coupled with molecular biology we have investigated the underlying mechanisms of obesity-induced reduced fertility. Our study is the first to show that maternal obesity prior to conception is associated with altered mitochondria in mouse oocytes and zygotes. Specifically, maternal diet-induced obesity in mice led to an increase in mitochondrial potential, mitochondrial DNA content and biogenesis. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was raised while glutathione was depleted and the redox state became more oxidised, suggestive of oxidative stress. These altered mitochondrial properties were associated with significant developmental impairment as shown by the increased number of obese mothers who failed to support blastocyst formation compared to lean dams. We propose that compromised oocyte and early embryo mitochondrial metabolism, resulting from excessive nutrient exposure prior to and during conception, may underlie poor reproductive outcomes frequently reported in obese women.

  8. Diet-induced obesity causes metabolic impairment independent of alterations in gut barrier integrity.

    PubMed

    Kless, Caroline; Müller, Veronika Maria; Schüppel, Valentina Luise; Lichtenegger, Martina; Rychlik, Michael; Daniel, Hannelore; Klingenspor, Martin; Haller, Dirk

    2015-05-01

    The causal relationship between diet-induced obesity and metabolic disorders is not clear yet. One hypothesis is whether the obese state or high-fat diet per se affects intestinal barrier function provoking metabolic comorbidities. In three independent experiments with AKR/J, SWR/J, or BL/6J mice, we addressed the impact of genetic background, excess body fat storage, duration of high-fat feeding, and quality/quantity of dietary fat on glucose tolerance and gut barrier integrity in vivo and ex vivo. Impaired glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese BL/6J and AKR/J mice was not accompanied by an altered intestinal barrier function. Enforced dietary challenge by prolonged feeding and increasing fat quantity in BL/6J mice still failed to aggravate metabolic and intestinal deterioration. Despite a low-grade inflammatory status in adipose tissue, barrier function of BL/6J mice fed lard high-fat diet revealed no evidence for a diet-induced loss in barrier integrity. None of our results provided any evidence that gut barrier function is a subject to dietary regulation and obesity per se seems not to cause gut barrier impairment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid on a murine model of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Koganei, Megumi; Saitou, Yuri; Tsuchiya, Kyoko; Abe, Fuminori; Tanaka, Toru; Horinouchi, Izumi; Izumi, Yoshiya; Yamaji, Taketo; Takahashi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) on obesity were investigated using a murine model (diet-induced obese mice). Diet-induced obese mice were divided into 4 groups: a control group (C group), which was fed a high-fat diet; a low-5-ALA dose (10 mg/kg/day) group (10A group); a moderate-5-ALA dose (30 mg/kg/day) group (30A group); and a high-5-ALA dose (100 mg/kg/day) group (100A group). 5-ALA was administered by mixing the high fat diet for 8 weeks. Body weight increases in the 30A and 100A groups were significantly smaller compared with those of the C group. Body fat measurements by X-ray computed tomography indicated that the 100A group showed a tendency toward low visceral fat quantities during the final week of the study. Visceral fat weights in the 30A and 100A groups were slightly low. The levels of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and total cholesterol (TC) in the 10A group was slightly low, whereas the 30A and 100A groups showed significantly lower ALT and TC values. Liver lipid concentration showed a dose-dependent decrease with ALA. Thus, in this diet-induced obese murine model, administration of 5-ALA had a significantly beneficial impact on the visceral fat, serum ALT and TC, and liver lipid concentration. PMID:26388673

  10. Leucine supplementation increases SIRT1 expression and prevents mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic disorders in high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Xu, Mingjiang; Lee, Jiyeon; He, Chaoyong

    2012-01-01

    Leucine supplementation has been shown to prevent high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia in animal models, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent studies suggest that activation of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is an important mechanism to maintain energy and metabolic homeostasis. We therefore examined the involvement of SIRT1 in leucine supplementation-prevented obesity and insulin resistance. To accomplish this goal, male C57BL/6J mice were fed normal diet or HFD, supplemented with or without leucine. After 2 mo of treatment, alterations in SIRT1 expression, insulin signaling, and energy metabolism were analyzed. Eight weeks of HFD induced obesity, fatty liver, mitochondrial dysfunction, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance in mice. Addition of leucine to HFD correlated with increased expression of SIRT1 and NAMPT (nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase) as well as higher intracellular NAD+ levels, which decreased acetylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and forkhead box O1 (FoxO1). The deacetylation of PGC1α may contribute to upregulation of genes controlling mitochondrial biogenesis and fatty acid oxidation, thereby improving mitochondrial function and preventing HFD-induced obesity in mice. Moreover, decreased acetylation of FoxO1 was accompanied by decreased expression of pseudokinase tribble 3 (TRB3) and reduced the association between TRB3 and Akt, which enhanced insulin sensitivity and improved glucose metabolism. Finally, transfection of dominant negative AMPK prevented activation of SIRT1 signaling in HFD-Leu mice. These data suggest that increased expression of SIRT1 after leucine supplementation may lead to reduced acetylation of PGC1α and FoxO1, which is associated with attenuation of HFD-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, and obesity. PMID:22967499

  11. A polyphenol-rich cranberry extract protects from diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance and intestinal inflammation in association with increased Akkermansia spp. population in the gut microbiota of mice.

    PubMed

    Anhê, Fernando F; Roy, Denis; Pilon, Geneviève; Dudonné, Stéphanie; Matamoros, Sébastien; Varin, Thibault V; Garofalo, Carole; Moine, Quentin; Desjardins, Yves; Levy, Emile; Marette, André

    2015-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) demonstrates the failure of conventional treatments to curb these diseases. The gut microbiota has been put forward as a key player in the pathophysiology of diet-induced T2D. Importantly, cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton) is associated with a number of beneficial health effects. We aimed to investigate the metabolic impact of a cranberry extract (CE) on high fat/high sucrose (HFHS)-fed mice and to determine whether its consequent antidiabetic effects are related to modulations in the gut microbiota. C57BL/6J mice were fed either a chow or a HFHS diet. HFHS-fed mice were gavaged daily either with vehicle (water) or CE (200 mg/kg) for 8 weeks. The composition of the gut microbiota was assessed by analysing 16S rRNA gene sequences with 454 pyrosequencing. CE treatment was found to reduce HFHS-induced weight gain and visceral obesity. CE treatment also decreased liver weight and triglyceride accumulation in association with blunted hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation. CE administration improved insulin sensitivity, as revealed by improved insulin tolerance, lower homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and decreased glucose-induced hyperinsulinaemia during an oral glucose tolerance test. CE treatment was found to lower intestinal triglyceride content and to alleviate intestinal inflammation and oxidative stress. Interestingly, CE treatment markedly increased the proportion of the mucin-degrading bacterium Akkermansia in our metagenomic samples. CE exerts beneficial metabolic effects through improving HFHS diet-induced features of the metabolic syndrome, which is associated with a proportional increase in Akkermansia spp. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Diet-induced obesity has a differential effect on adipose tissue and macrophage inflammatory responses of young and old mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obesity and aging are both associated with increased inflammation in adipose tissue. In this study, we investigated the effect of diet-induced obesity on inflammatory status in young and old mice. Young (2-mo) and old (19-mo) C57BL/6 mice were fed a low fat (10 percent LF) or high fat (60 percent, H...

  13. Diet-induced obesity in zebrafish shares common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity.

    PubMed

    Oka, Takehiko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Zang, Liqing; Hirano, Minoru; Shimada, Yasuhito; Wang, Zhipeng; Umemoto, Noriko; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Nishimura, Norihiro; Tanaka, Toshio

    2010-10-21

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Animal models of obesity are required to help us understand the signaling pathways underlying this condition. Zebrafish possess many structural and functional similarities with humans and have been used to model various human diseases, including a genetic model of obesity. The purpose of this study was to establish a zebrafish model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Zebrafish were assigned into two dietary groups. One group of zebrafish was overfed with Artemia (60 mg dry weight/day/fish), a living prey consisting of a relatively high amount of fat. The other group of zebrafish was fed with Artemia sufficient to meet their energy requirements (5 mg dry weight/day/fish). Zebrafish were fed under these dietary protocols for 8 weeks. The zebrafish overfed with Artemia exhibited increased body mass index, which was calculated by dividing the body weight by the square of the body length, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatosteatosis, unlike the control zebrafish. Calorie restriction for 2 weeks was applied to zebrafish after the 8-week overfeeding period. The increased body weight and plasma triglyceride level were improved by calorie restriction. We also performed comparative transcriptome analysis of visceral adipose tissue from DIO zebrafish, DIO rats, DIO mice and obese humans. This analysis revealed that obese zebrafish and mammals share common pathophysiological pathways related to the coagulation cascade and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, several regulators were identified in zebrafish and mammals, including APOH, IL-6 and IL-1β in the coagulation cascade, and SREBF1, PPARα/γ, NR1H3 and LEP in lipid metabolism. We established a zebrafish model of DIO that shared common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity. The DIO zebrafish can be used to identify putative pharmacological targets and to test novel drugs for the treatment of human obesity.

  14. Diet-induced obesity in zebrafish shares common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Obesity is a multifactorial disorder influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Animal models of obesity are required to help us understand the signaling pathways underlying this condition. Zebrafish possess many structural and functional similarities with humans and have been used to model various human diseases, including a genetic model of obesity. The purpose of this study was to establish a zebrafish model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Results Zebrafish were assigned into two dietary groups. One group of zebrafish was overfed with Artemia (60 mg dry weight/day/fish), a living prey consisting of a relatively high amount of fat. The other group of zebrafish was fed with Artemia sufficient to meet their energy requirements (5 mg dry weight/day/fish). Zebrafish were fed under these dietary protocols for 8 weeks. The zebrafish overfed with Artemia exhibited increased body mass index, which was calculated by dividing the body weight by the square of the body length, hypertriglyceridemia and hepatosteatosis, unlike the control zebrafish. Calorie restriction for 2 weeks was applied to zebrafish after the 8-week overfeeding period. The increased body weight and plasma triglyceride level were improved by calorie restriction. We also performed comparative transcriptome analysis of visceral adipose tissue from DIO zebrafish, DIO rats, DIO mice and obese humans. This analysis revealed that obese zebrafish and mammals share common pathophysiological pathways related to the coagulation cascade and lipid metabolism. Furthermore, several regulators were identified in zebrafish and mammals, including APOH, IL-6 and IL-1β in the coagulation cascade, and SREBF1, PPARα/γ, NR1H3 and LEP in lipid metabolism. Conclusion We established a zebrafish model of DIO that shared common pathophysiological pathways with mammalian obesity. The DIO zebrafish can be used to identify putative pharmacological targets and to test novel drugs for the treatment of human obesity

  15. Decaffeinated green tea extract rich in epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents fatty liver disease by increased activities of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Santamarina, Aline B; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Okuda, Marcos H; Santana, Aline A; Streck, Emilio L; Seelaender, Marilia; do Nascimento, Claudia M Oller; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Lira, Fábio S; Oyama, Lila Missae

    2015-11-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has been considered the hepatic manifestation of obesity. It is unclear whether supplementation with green tea extract rich in epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) influences the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and insulin resistance in the liver. EGCG regulated hepatic mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and was capable of improving lipid metabolism, attenuating insulin resistance in obese mice. Mice were divided into four groups: control diet+water (CW) or EGCG (CE) and hyperlipidic diet+water (HFW) or EGCG (HFE). All animals received water and diets ad libitum for 16 weeks. Placebo groups received water (0.1 ml/day) and EGCG groups (0.1 ml EGCG and 50 mg/kg/day) by gavage. Cytokines concentrations were obtained by ELISA, protein expression through Western blotting and mitochondrial complex enzymatic activity by colorimetric assay of substrate degradation. HFW increased body weight gain, adiposity index, retroperitoneal and mesenteric adipose tissue relative weight, serum glucose, insulin and Homeostasis Model Assessment of Basal Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR); glucose intolerance was observed in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as well as ectopic fat liver deposition. HFE group decreased body weight gain, retroperitoneal and mesenteric adipose tissue relative weight, HOMA-IR, insulin levels and liver fat accumulation; increased complexes II-III and IV and malate dehydrogenase activities and improvement in glucose uptake in OGTT and insulin sensitivity by increased protein expression of total AKT, IRα and IRS1. We did not find alterations in inflammatory parameters analyzed. EGCG was able to prevent obesity stimulating the mitochondrial complex chain, increasing energy expenditure, particularly from the oxidation of lipid substrates, thereby contributing to the prevention of hepatic steatosis and improved insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Loss of FXR protects against diet-induced obesity and accelerates liver carcinogenesis in ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanqiao; Ge, Xuemei; Heemstra, Lydia A; Chen, Wei-Dong; Xu, Jiesi; Smith, Joseph L; Ma, Huiyan; Kasim, Neda; Edwards, Peter A; Novak, Colleen M

    2012-02-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is known to play important regulatory roles in bile acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Aged (>12 months old) Fxr(-/-) mice also develop spontaneous liver carcinomas. In this report, we used three mouse models to investigate the role of FXR deficiency in obesity. As compared with low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldlr) knockout (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, the Ldlr(-/-)Fxr(-/-) double-knockout mice were highly resistant to diet-induced obesity, which was associated with increased expression of genes involved in energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue. Such a striking effect of FXR deficiency on obesity on an Ldlr(-/-) background led us to investigate whether FXR deficiency alone is sufficient to affect obesity. As compared with wild-type mice, Fxr(-/-) mice showed resistance to diet-induced weight gain. Interestingly, only female Fxr(-/-) mice showed significant resistance to diet-induced obesity, which was accompanied by increased energy expenditure in these mice. Finally, we determined the effect of FXR deficiency on obesity in a genetically obese and diabetic mouse model. We generated ob(-/-)Fxr(-/-) mice that were deficient in both Leptin and Fxr. On a chow diet, ob(-/-)Fxr(-/-) mice gained less body weight and had reduced body fat mass as compared with ob/ob mice. In addition, we observed liver carcinomas in 43% of young (<11 months old) Ob(-/-)Fxr(-/-) mice. Together these data indicate that loss of FXR prevents diet-induced or genetic obesity and accelerates liver carcinogenesis under diabetic conditions.

  17. Heart energy metabolism impairment in Western-diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Neves, Fabiana A; Cortez, Erika; Bernardo, Amélia F; Mattos, Ana B M; Vieira, Anatalia K; Malafaia, Tayanne de O; Thole, Alessandra A; Rodrigues-Cunha, Alessandra C de S; Garcia-Souza, Erica P; Sichieri, Rosely; Moura, Anibal S

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional transition has contributed to growing obesity, mainly by changing eating habits of the population. The mechanisms by which diet-induced obesity leads to cardiac injury are not completely understood, but it is known that obesity is associated to impaired cardiac function and energy metabolism, increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, our study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying cardiac metabolism impairment related to Western diet-induced obesity. After weaning, male Swiss mice were fed a Western diet for 16 weeks in order to induce obesity. After this period, the content of proteins involved in heart energy metabolism GLUT1, cytosolic lysate and plasma membrane GLUT4, AMPK, pAMPK, IRβ, IRS-1, PGC-1α, CPT1 and UCP2 was evaluated. Also, the oxidative phosphorylation of myocardial fibers was measured by high-resolution respirometry. Mice in the Western diet group (WG) presented altered biometric parameters compared to those in control group, including higher body weight, increased myocardial lipid deposition and glucose intolerance, which demonstrate the obesogenic role of Western diet. WG presented increased CPT1 and UCP2 contents and decreased IRS-1, plasma membrane GLUT4 and PGC-1α contents. In addition, WG presented cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction and reduced biogenesis, demonstrating a lower capacity of carbohydrates and fatty acid oxidation and also decreased coupling between oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Cardiac metabolism impairment related to Western diet-induced obesity is probably due to damaged myocardial oxidative capacity, reduced mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondria uncoupling, which compromise the bioenergetic metabolism of heart. © 2014.

  18. Nicotine improves obesity and hepatic steatosis and ER stress in diet-induced obese male rats.

    PubMed

    Seoane-Collazo, Patricia; Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    Nicotine, the main addictive component of tobacco, promotes body weight reduction in humans and rodents. Recent evidence has suggested that nicotine acts in the central nervous system to modulate energy balance. Specifically, nicotine modulates hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase to decrease feeding and to increase brown adipose tissue thermogenesis through the sympathetic nervous system, leading to weight loss. Of note, most of this evidence has been obtained in animal models fed with normal diet or low-fat diet (LFD). However, its effectiveness in obese models remains elusive. Because obesity causes resistance towards many factors involved in energy homeostasis, the aim of this study has been to compare the effect of nicotine in a diet-induced obese (DIO) model, namely rats fed a high-fat diet, with rats fed a LFD. Our data show that chronic peripheral nicotine treatment reduced body weight by decreasing food intake and increasing brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in both LFD and DIO rats. This overall negative energy balance was associated to decreased activation of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in both models. Furthermore, nicotine improved serum lipid profile, decreased insulin serum levels, as well as reduced steatosis, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in the liver of DIO rats but not in LFD rats. Overall, this evidence suggests that nicotine diminishes body weight and improves metabolic disorders linked to DIO and might offer a clear-cut strategy to develop new therapeutic approaches against obesity and its metabolic complications.

  19. Diet-induced obesity mediated by the JNK/DIO2 signal transduction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vernia, Santiago; Cavanagh-Kyros, Julie; Barrett, Tamera; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jason K.; Davis, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    The cJun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a key mediator of metabolic stress responses caused by consuming a high-fat diet, including the development of obesity. To test the role of JNK, we examined diet-induced obesity in mice with targeted ablation of Jnk genes in the anterior pituitary gland. These mice exhibited an increase in the pituitary expression of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), an increase in the blood concentration of thyroid hormone (T4), increased energy expenditure, and markedly reduced obesity compared with control mice. The increased amount of pituitary TSH was caused by reduced expression of type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase (Dio2), a gene that is required for T4-mediated negative feedback regulation of TSH expression. These data establish a molecular mechanism that accounts for the regulation of energy expenditure and the development of obesity by the JNK signaling pathway. PMID:24186979

  20. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  1. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, A C; Cassis, L A; Bardo, M T; Dwoskin, L P

    2013-08-01

    A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [(3)H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [(3)H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The current animal model shows that

  2. FcRγ-chain deficiency reduces the development of diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Lianne; Vroegrijk, Irene O C M; Katiraei, Saeed; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; van Dam, Andrea D; Kooijman, Sander; Rensen, Patrick C N; Koning, Frits; Verbeek, J Sjef; Willems van Dijk, Ko; van Harmelen, Vanessa

    2015-12-01

    Pathogenic immunoglobulins are produced during the development of obesity and contribute to the development of insulin resistance (IR). However, the mechanisms by which these antibodies affect IR are largely unknown. This study investigated whether Fc-receptors contribute to the development of diet-induced obesity and IR by studying FcRγ(-/-) mice that lack the γ-subunit necessary for signaling and cell surface expression of FcγR and FcεRI. FcRγ(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to induce obesity. At 4 and 11 weeks, body weight and insulin sensitivity were measured, and adipose tissue (AT) inflammation was determined. Furthermore, intestinal triglyceride (TG) uptake and plasma TG clearance were determined, and gut microbiota composition was analyzed. FcRγ(-/-) mice gained less weight after 11 weeks of HFD. They had reduced adiposity, adipose tissue inflammation, and IR. Interestingly, FcRγ(-/-) mice had higher lean mass compared to WT mice, which was associated with increased energy expenditure. Intestinal TG absorption was increased whereas plasma TG clearance was not affected in FcRγ(-/-) mice. Gut microbial composition differed significantly and might therefore have added to the observed phenotype. FcRγ-chain deficiency reduces the development of diet-induced obesity, as well as associated AT inflammation and IR at 11 weeks of HFD. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  3. Treatment with Parkinsonia aculeata combats insulin resistance-induced oxidative stress through the increase in PPARγ/CuZn-SOD axis expression in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Tiago Gomes; Oliveira, Alexandre Gabarra; Vecina, Juliana Falcato; Marin, Rodrigo Miguel; Franco, Eryvelton Souza; Abdalla Saad, Mario J; de Sousa Maia, Maria Bernadete

    2016-08-01

    Parkinsonia aculeata L. (Caesalpiniaceae) is a traditional ethnomedicine and has been used for the empiric treatment of hyperglycemia, without scientific background. Mechanistic analyses at molecular level from the antioxidant mechanism observed by P. aculeata are required. Herein the effects of the treatment by hydroethanolic extract partitioned with ethyl acetate of P. aculeata aerial parts (HEPa/EtOAc) in mice fed a high-fat diet that share many obesity phenotypes with humans were evaluated. The animals were treated orally with HEPa/EtOAc (125 and 250 mg/kg/day) and pioglitazone (5 mg/kg/day), for 16 days. After the treatment, HEPa/EtOAc reduced fasting serum glucose and insulin levels, as well as homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance. In addition, an improvement in glucose intolerance was also observed. Indeed, a reduction in the circulating levels of TNF-α and IL-6 was also observed. Furthermore, at molecular level, it was demonstrated that the HEPa/EtOAc treatment was able to improve these physiological parameters, through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) per si, as well as the enhancement of antioxidant mechanism by an increase in PPARγ/Cu(2+), Zn(2+)-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) axis expression in liver and adipose tissue. In sum, P. aculeata is effective to improve insulin resistance in a mouse model of obesity and this effect seems to involve the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms through the increase in PPARγ/CuZn-SOD axis expression.

  4. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 mediates high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance by increasing forkhead box O1 activity in a mouse model of obesity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Chang; Lee, Tzung-Yan; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Lin, Yan-Jie; Ho, Low-Tone

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic glucose production is promoted by forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) under conditions of insulin resistance. The overactivity of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) partly causes increased liver fat deposits and metabolic dysfunction in obese rodents by decreasing mitochondrial function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of FoxO1 in CB1R-mediated insulin resistance through the dysregulation of mitochondrial function in the livers of mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to groups and either fed a standard diet (STD), a HFD, or a HFD with 1-week treatment of the CB1R inverse agonist, AM251, at 1 or 5 mg/kg. For in vitro experiments, AML12 hepatocytes were incubated with FoxO1 siRNA prior to challenge with arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) or a high concentration of free fatty acids (HFFA). Plasma parameters were analyzed using colorimetric methods. Liver histopathology and hepatic status markers were examined. The HFD-fed mice exhibited an increase in CB1R levels in the liver. Moreover, in response to increased hepatic oxidative stress, the HFD-fed mice also displayed hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction, as indicated by the decreased mRNA levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1), mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and citrate synthase. On the contrary, these effects in the HFD-fed mice were reversed by treatment with 5 mg/kg AM251. The administration of AM251 suppressed the induction of FoxO1, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase) expression in the livers of the mice fed a HFD by enhancing the phosphorylation of insulin signaling cascades thus, further lowering the high level of the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA‑IR) index. In our in vitro experiments, transfection with FoxO1 siRNA prevented the HFFA- and ACEA-induced decrease in the gene expression of

  5. CD11c expression in adipose tissue and blood and its role in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huaizhu; Perrard, Xiaoyuan Dai; Wang, Qun; Perrard, Jerry L; Polsani, Venkateshwar R; Jones, Peter H; Smith, C Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2010-02-01

    To examine CD11c, a beta(2)-integrin, on adipose tissue (AT) leukocytes and blood monocytes and its role in diet-induced obesity. High-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice, CD11c-deficient mice, and obese humans were studied. CD11c, leukocytes, and chemokines/cytokines were examined in AT and/or blood by flow cytometry, RNase protection assay, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Obese C57BL/6 mice had increased CD11c in AT and blood compared with lean controls. CD11c messenger RNA positively correlated with monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in human visceral AT. Obese humans with metabolic syndrome had a higher CD11c level on blood monocytes compared with lean humans. Low-fat diet-induced weight loss reduced blood monocyte CD11c in obese mice and humans. Mouse and human monocyte CD11c levels and mouse AT CD11c messenger RNA correlated with insulin resistance. CD11c deficiency in mice did not alter weight gain but decreased inflammation, evidenced by a lower T-cell number and reduced levels of major histocompatibility complex class II, C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL5), CCL4, and interferon gamma in AT, and ameliorated insulin resistance and glucose intolerance associated with diet-induced obesity. Diet-induced obesity increased CD11c in both AT and blood in mice and humans. CD11c plays an important role in T-cell accumulation and activation in AT, and contributes to insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  6. Diet-Induced Obesity Enhances TRPV1-Mediated Neurovascular Reactions in the Dura Mater.

    PubMed

    Marics, Balázs; Peitl, Barna; Pázmándi, Kitti; Bácsi, Attila; Németh, József; Oszlács, Orsolya; Jancsó, Gábor; Dux, Mária

    2017-03-01

    Exploring the pathophysiological changes in transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor of the trigeminovascular system in high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet-induced obesity of experimental animals. Clinical and experimental observations suggest a link between obesity and migraine. Accumulating evidence indicates that metabolic and immunological alterations associated with obesity may potentially modulate trigeminovascular functions. A possible target for obesity-induced pathophysiological changes is the TRPV1/capsaicin receptor which is implicated in the pathomechanism of headaches in a complex way. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a regular (n = 25) or HFHS diet (n = 26) for 20 weeks. At the end of the dietary period, body weight of the animals was normally distributed in both groups and it was significantly higher in animals on HFHS diet. Therefore, experimental groups were regarded as control and HFHS diet-induced obese groups. Capsaicin-induced changes in meningeal blood flow and release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from dural trigeminal afferents were measured in control and obese rats. The distribution of TRPV1- and CGRP-immunoreactive meningeal sensory nerves was also compared in whole mount preparations of the dura mater. Metabolic parameters of the animals were assessed by examining glucose and insulin homeostasis as well as plasma cytokine concentrations. HFHS diet was accompanied by reduced food consumption and greater fluid and energy intakes in addition to increased body weight of the animals. HFHS diet increased fasting blood glucose and insulin concentrations as well as levels of circulating proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-6. In obese animals, dural application of the archetypal TRPV1 agonist capsaicin resulted in significantly augmented vasodilatory and vasoconstrictor responses as compared to controls. Diet-induced obesity was also associated with enhanced basal and capsaicin

  7. Leptin modulates the late fever response to LPS in diet-induced obese animals.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Joanna; Woodside, Barbara; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is an important modulator of both inflammation and energy homeostasis, making it a key interface between the inflammatory response to pathogenic stimuli and the energy status of the host. In previous studies we demonstrated that sickness responses to systemic immune challenge, including fever, are significantly exacerbated in diet induced obese animals. To investigate whether this exacerbation is functionally linked to the obesity associated increase in circulating levels of leptin, a species-specific leptin antiserum (LAS) was used to neutralize endogenous leptin in diet-induced obese adult male Wistar rats treated with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (100μg/kg). LAS significantly reduced the magnitude of the later phases of the fever response, and attenuated the circulating levels of IL-6, IL-1ra and bioactivity of leptin in the obese animals. In addition, the antiserum significantly attenuated the hypothalamic expression of IL-1ß, IκBα, COX2, SOCS3 and IL-6 in both lean and obese rats 10h after the LPS injection and NF-IL6 in the hypothalamus of obese rats only. The relatively late rise in brain IL-6 suggested a role in mediating the extended fever response in obese animals and we tested this by neutralizing brain IL-6 using an IL6-AS injected intracerebroventricularly (4μl, icv). The IL6-AS significantly but transiently (between 9h and 12h post LPS) reduced the late fever response of obese rats. These results demonstrate that leptin plays an important part in modulating the late portion of the fever response to LPS, likely through the induction of hypothalamic IL-6 in obese animals.

  8. Diet-induced obesity leads to the development of leptin resistance in vagal afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    de Lartigue, Guillaume; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Espero, Elvis; Lee, Jennifer; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-07-01

    Ingestion of high-fat, high-calorie diets is associated with hyperphagia, increased body fat, and obesity. The mechanisms responsible are currently unclear; however, altered leptin signaling may be an important factor. Vagal afferent neurons (VAN) integrate signals from the gut in response to ingestion of nutrients and express leptin receptors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance occurs in VAN in response to a high-fat diet. Sprague-Dawley rats, which exhibit a bimodal distribution of body weight gain, were used after ingestion of a high-fat diet for 8 wk. Body weight, food intake, and plasma leptin levels were measured. Leptin signaling was determined by immunohistochemical localization of phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) in cultured VAN and by quantifaction of pSTAT3 protein levels by Western blot analysis in nodose ganglia and arcuate nucleus in vivo. To determine the mechanism of leptin resistance in nodose ganglia, cultured VAN were stimulated with leptin alone or with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and SOCS-3 expression measured. SOCS-3 protein levels in VAN were measured by Western blot following leptin administration in vivo. Leptin resulted in appearance of pSTAT3 in VAN of low-fat-fed rats and rats resistant to diet-induced obesity but not diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. However, leptin signaling was normal in arcuate neurons. SOCS-3 expression was increased in VAN of DIO rats. In cultured VAN, LPS increased SOCS-3 expression and inhibited leptin-induced pSTAT3 in vivo. We conclude that VAN of diet-induced obese rats become leptin resistant; LPS and SOCS-3 may play a role in the development of leptin resistance.

  9. Cafeteria diet-induced obesity causes oxidative damage in white adipose.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy R; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Sampey, Brante P; Troester, Melissa A; Hayes, D Neil; Makowski, Liza

    2016-04-29

    Obesity continues to be one of the most prominent public health dilemmas in the world. The complex interaction among the varied causes of obesity makes it a particularly challenging problem to address. While typical high-fat purified diets successfully induce weight gain in rodents, we have described a more robust model of diet-induced obesity based on feeding rats a diet consisting of highly palatable, energy-dense human junk foods - the "cafeteria" diet (CAF, 45-53% kcal from fat). We previously reported that CAF-fed rats became hyperphagic, gained more weight, and developed more severe hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and glucose intolerance compared to the lard-based 45% kcal from fat high fat diet-fed group. In addition, the CAF diet-fed group displayed a higher degree of inflammation in adipose and liver, mitochondrial dysfunction, and an increased concentration of lipid-derived, pro-inflammatory mediators. Building upon our previous findings, we aimed to determine mechanisms that underlie physiologic findings in the CAF diet. We investigated the effect of CAF diet-induced obesity on adipose tissue specifically using expression arrays and immunohistochemistry. Genomic evidence indicated the CAF diet induced alterations in the white adipose gene transcriptome, with notable suppression of glutathione-related genes and pathways involved in mitigating oxidative stress. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated a doubling in adipose lipid peroxidation marker 4-HNE levels compared to rats that remained lean on control standard chow diet. Our data indicates that the CAF diet drives an increase in oxidative damage in white adipose tissue that may affect tissue homeostasis. Oxidative stress drives activation of inflammatory kinases that can perturb insulin signaling leading to glucose intolerance and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic high-fat diet-induced obesity decreased survival and increased hypertrophy of rats with experimental eccentric hypertrophy from chronic aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Dhahri, Wahiba; Drolet, Marie-Claude; Roussel, Elise; Couet, Jacques; Arsenault, Marie

    2014-09-24

    The composition of a diet can influence myocardial metabolism and development of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The impact of a high-fat diet in chronic left ventricular volume overload (VO) causing eccentric LVH is unknown. This study examined the effects of chronic ingestion of a high-fat diet in rats with chronic VO caused by severe aortic valve regurgitation (AR) on LVH, function and on myocardial energetics and survival. Male Wistar rats were divided in four groups: Shams on control or high-fat (HF) diet (15 rats/group) and AR rats fed with the same diets (ARC (n = 56) and ARHF (n = 32)). HF diet was started one week before AR induction and the protocol was stopped 30 weeks later. As expected, AR caused significant LV dilation and hypertrophy and this was exacerbated in the ARHF group. Moreover, survival in the ARHF group was significantly decreased compared the ARC group. Although the sham animals on HF also developed significant obesity compared to those on control diet, this was not associated with heart hypertrophy. The HF diet in AR rats partially countered the expected shift in myocardial energy substrate preference usually observed in heart hypertrophy (from fatty acids towards glucose). Systolic function was decreased in AR rats but HF diet had no impact on this parameter. The response to HF diet of different fatty acid oxidation markers as well as the increase in glucose transporter-4 translocation to the plasma membrane compared to ARC was blunted in AR animals compared to those on control diet. HF diet for 30 weeks decreased survival of AR rats and worsened eccentric hypertrophy without affecting systolic function. The expected adaptation of myocardial energetics to volume-overload left ventricle hypertrophy in AR animals seemed to be impaired by the high-fat diet suggesting less metabolic flexibility.

  11. Weight Loss Decreases Inherent and Allergic Methacholine Hyperresponsiveness in Mouse Models of Diet-Induced Obese Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ather, Jennifer L; Chung, Michael; Hoyt, Laura R; Randall, Matthew J; Georgsdottir, Anna; Daphtary, Nirav A; Aliyeva, Minara I; Suratt, Benjamin T; Bates, Jason H T; Irvin, Charles G; Russell, Sheila R; Forgione, Patrick M; Dixon, Anne E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2016-08-01

    Obese asthma presents with inherent hyperresponsiveness to methacholine or augmented allergen-driven allergic asthma, with an even greater magnitude of methacholine hyperresponsiveness. These physiologic parameters and accompanying obese asthma symptoms can be reduced by successful weight loss, yet the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We implemented mouse models of diet-induced obesity, dietary and surgical weight loss, and environmental allergen exposure to examine the mechanisms and mediators of inherent and allergic obese asthma. We report that the methacholine hyperresponsiveness in these models of inherent obese asthma and obese allergic asthma manifests in distinct anatomical compartments but that both are amenable to interventions that induce substantial weight loss. The inherent obese asthma phenotype, with characteristic increases in distal airspace tissue resistance and tissue elastance, is associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines that are reduced with dietary weight loss. Surprisingly, bariatric surgery-induced weight loss further elevates these cytokines while reducing methacholine responsiveness to levels similar to those in lean mice or in formerly obese mice rendered lean through dietary intervention. In contrast, the obese allergic asthma phenotype, with characteristic increases in central airway resistance, is not associated with increased adaptive immune responses, yet diet-induced weight loss reduces methacholine hyperresponsiveness without altering immunological variables. Diet-induced weight loss is effective in models of both inherent and allergic obese asthma, and our examination of the fecal microbiome revealed that the obesogenic Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was normalized after diet-induced weight loss. Our results suggest that structural, immunological, and microbiological factors contribute to the manifold presentations of obese asthma.

  12. Weight Loss Decreases Inherent and Allergic Methacholine Hyperresponsiveness in Mouse Models of Diet-Induced Obese Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ather, Jennifer L.; Chung, Michael; Hoyt, Laura R.; Randall, Matthew J.; Georgsdottir, Anna; Daphtary, Nirav A.; Aliyeva, Minara I.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Bates, Jason H. T.; Irvin, Charles G.; Russell, Sheila R.; Forgione, Patrick M.; Dixon, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Obese asthma presents with inherent hyperresponsiveness to methacholine or augmented allergen-driven allergic asthma, with an even greater magnitude of methacholine hyperresponsiveness. These physiologic parameters and accompanying obese asthma symptoms can be reduced by successful weight loss, yet the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We implemented mouse models of diet-induced obesity, dietary and surgical weight loss, and environmental allergen exposure to examine the mechanisms and mediators of inherent and allergic obese asthma. We report that the methacholine hyperresponsiveness in these models of inherent obese asthma and obese allergic asthma manifests in distinct anatomical compartments but that both are amenable to interventions that induce substantial weight loss. The inherent obese asthma phenotype, with characteristic increases in distal airspace tissue resistance and tissue elastance, is associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines that are reduced with dietary weight loss. Surprisingly, bariatric surgery–induced weight loss further elevates these cytokines while reducing methacholine responsiveness to levels similar to those in lean mice or in formerly obese mice rendered lean through dietary intervention. In contrast, the obese allergic asthma phenotype, with characteristic increases in central airway resistance, is not associated with increased adaptive immune responses, yet diet-induced weight loss reduces methacholine hyperresponsiveness without altering immunological variables. Diet-induced weight loss is effective in models of both inherent and allergic obese asthma, and our examination of the fecal microbiome revealed that the obesogenic Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was normalized after diet-induced weight loss. Our results suggest that structural, immunological, and microbiological factors contribute to the manifold presentations of obese asthma. PMID:27064658

  13. Overexpression of nuclear receptor SHP in adipose tissues affects diet-induced obesity and adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tabbi-Anneni, Imene; Cooksey, Robert; Gunda, Viswanath; Liu, Shiguo; Mueller, Aubrey; Song, Guisheng; McClain, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP) regulates metabolic pathways involved in hepatic bile acid production and both lipid and glucose homeostasis via the transcriptional repression of other nuclear receptors. In the present study, we generated fat-specific SHP-overexpressed transgenic (TG) mice and determined the potential role of SHP activation, specifically in adipocytes, in the regulation of adipose tissue function in response to stressors. We determined in 2 mo-old SHP TG mice body weight, fat mass index, adipose tissues morphology, thermogenic and metabolic gene expression, metabolic rates at baseline and in response to β adrenergic receptor agonists, and brown fat ultrastructural changes in response to cold exposure (6–48 h). Mice were fed a 10-wk high-fat diet (HFD; 42% fat). Weight gain, fat mass index, adipose tissues morphology, glucose tolerance, and metabolic rates were determined at the end of the feeding. Young TG mice had increased body weight and adiposity; however, their energy metabolism was increased and brown fat function was enhanced in response to cold exposure through the activation of thermogenic genes and mitochondrial biogenesis. SHP overexpression exacerbated the diet-induced obesity phenotype as evidence by marked weight gain over time, increased adiposity, and severe glucose intolerance compared with wild-type mice fed a HFD. In addition, SHP-TG mice fed HFD had decreased diet-induced adaptive thermogenesis, increased food intake, and decreased physical activity. In conclusion, SHP activation in adipocytes strongly affects weight gain and diet-induced obesity. Developing a synthetic compound to antagonize the effect of SHP may prove to be useful in treating obesity. PMID:20124506

  14. Jueming Prescription reduces body weight by increasing the mRNA expressions of beta3-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-2 in adipose tissue of diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ling; Lu, Kun; Wen, Xiu-ying; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ai-ping; Xu, Ming-wang; Zhang, Hong; Yu, Jie

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the antiobesity effect of Jueming Prescription (JMP), a Chinese herbal medicine formula, and its influence on mRNA expressions of beta3 adrenergic receptor (beta3-AR) and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) in adipose tissue of diet-induced obese rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the normal control group (n =8) that was on a standard chow diet, and the obese model group (n =42) that was on a diet of high fat chow. Two weeks after the high fat diet, 29 obese rats in the obese model group were further randomly divided into 3 groups: the untreated obese model group (n =9), the metformin group (n =10, metformin 300 mg kg⁻¹ day)⁻¹, and the JMP group (n =10, JMP 4 g kg⁻¹ day⁻¹). After 8-week treatment, body weight, wet weight of visceral fat, and percentage of body fat (PBF) were measured. The levels of fasting blood glucose, serum lipids, and insulin were assessed, and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) was calculated. The adipose tissue section was stained with hematoxylin-Eosin, and the cellular diameter and quantity of adipocytes were evaluated by light microscopy. The mRNA expressions of beta3-AR and UCP-2 from the peri-renal fat tissue were determined by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Compared with the obese model group, treatment with JMP resulted in significantly lower body weight, wet weight of visceral fat, PBF, and diameter of adipocytes, and significantly higher level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, ISI (all P<0.01), JMP increased the mRNA expressions of beta3-AR and UCP-2 from perirenal fat tissue (P <0.05, P<0.01). JMP could reduce body weight and adipocyte size; and the effect was associated with the up-regulation of beta3-AR and UCP-2 expressions in the adipose tissue and improvement of insulin sensitivity.

  15. Overexpression of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity and Regulates Adipocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Cummins, Timothy D.; Tang, Yunan; Hellmann, Jason; Holden, Candice R.; Harbeson, Matthew A.; Chen, Yang; Patel, Rakesh P.; Spite, Matthew; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Endothelial dysfunction is a characteristic feature of diabetes and obesity in animal models and humans. Deficits in nitric oxide production by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) are associated with insulin resistance, which is exacerbated by high fat diet. Nevertheless, the metabolic effects of increasing eNOS levels have not been studied. Objective The current study was designed to test whether overexpression of eNOS would prevent diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Methods and Results In db/db mice and in high fat-fed wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice, the abundance of eNOS protein in adipose tissue was decreased without significant changes in eNOS levels in skeletal muscle or aorta. Mice overexpressing eNOS (eNOS-TG mice) were resistant to diet-induced obesity and hyperinsulinemia, although systemic glucose intolerance remained largely unaffected. In comparison with WT mice, high fat-fed eNOS-TG mice displayed a higher metabolic rate and attenuated hypertrophy of white adipocytes. Overexpression of eNOS did not affect food consumption or diet-induced changes in plasma cholesterol or leptin levels, yet plasma triglycerides and fatty acids were decreased. Metabolomic analysis of adipose tissue indicated that eNOS overexpression primarily affected amino acid and lipid metabolism; subpathway analysis suggested changes in fatty acid oxidation. In agreement with these findings, adipose tissue from eNOS-TG mice showed higher levels of PPAR-α and PPAR–γ gene expression, elevated abundance of mitochondrial proteins, and a higher rate of oxygen consumption. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that increased eNOS activity prevents the obesogenic effects of high fat diet without affecting systemic insulin resistance, in part, by stimulating metabolic activity in adipose tissue. PMID:22896587

  16. ATF7 ablation prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Maekawa, Toshio; Yoshida, Keisuke; Furuse, Tamio; Kaneda, Hideki; Wakana, Shigeharu; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2016-09-16

    The activating transcription factor (ATF)2 family of transcription factors regulates a variety of metabolic processes, including adipogenesis and adaptive thermogenesis. ATF7 is a member of the ATF2 family, and mediates epigenetic changes induced by environmental stresses, such as social isolation and pathogen infection. However, the metabolic role of ATF7 remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the role of ATF7 in metabolism using ATF7-dificeint mice. Atf7(-/-) mice exhibited lower body weight and resisted diet-induced obesity. Serum triglycerides, resistin, and adipose tissue mass were all significantly lower in ATF7-deficient mice. Fasting glucose levels and glucose tolerance were unaltered, but systemic insulin sensitivity was increased, by ablation of ATF7. Indirect calorimetry revealed that oxygen consumption by Atf7(-/-) mice was comparable to that of wild-type littermates on a standard chow diet, but increased energy expenditure was observed in Atf7(-/-) mice on a high-fat diet. Hence, ATF7 ablation may impair the development and function of adipose tissue and result in elevated energy expenditure in response to high-fat-feeding obesity and insulin resistance, indicating that ATF7 is a potential therapeutic target for diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High fat diet induced obesity alters ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nteeba, J; Ross, J W; Perfield, J W; Keating, A F

    2013-12-01

    Insulin regulates ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K) signaling, important for primordial follicle viability and growth activation. This study investigated diet-induced obesity impacts on: (1) insulin receptor (Insr) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1); (2) PI3K components (Kit ligand (Kitlg), kit (c-Kit), protein kinase B alpha (Akt1) and forkhead transcription factor subfamily 3 (Foxo3a)); (3) xenobiotic biotransformation (microsomal epoxide hydrolase (Ephx1), Cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1 (Cyp2e1), Glutathione S-transferase (Gst) isoforms mu (Gstm) and pi (Gstp)) and (4) microRNA's 184, 205, 103 and 21 gene expression. INSR, GSTM and GSTP protein levels were also measured. Obese mouse ovaries had decreased Irs1, Foxo3a, Cyp2e1, MiR-103, and MiR-21 but increased Kitlg, Akt1, and miR-184 levels relative to lean littermates. These results support that diet-induced obesity potentially impairs ovarian function through aberrant gene expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High fat diet induced obesity alters ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Nteeba, J.; Ross, J.W.; Perfield, J.W.; Keating, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin regulates ovarian phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling, important for primordial follicle viability and growth activation. This study investigated diet-induced obesity impacts on: 1) insulin receptor (Insr) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (Irs1); 2) PI3K components (Kit ligand (Kitlg), kit (c-Kit), protein kinase B alpha (Akt1) and forkhead transcription factor subfamily 3 (Foxo3a)); 3) xenobiotic biotransformation (microsomal epoxide hydrolase (Ephx1), Cytochrome P450 isoform 2E1 (Cyp2e1), Glutathione S-transferase (Gst) isoforms mu (Gstm) and pi (Gstp)) and 4) microRNA’s 184, 205, 103 and 21 gene expression. INSR, GSTM and GSTP protein levels were also measured. Obese mouse ovaries had decreased Irs1, Foxo3a, Cyp2e1, MiR-103, and MiR-21 but increased Kitlg, Akt1, and miR-184 levels relative to lean littermates. These results support that diet-induced obesity potentially impairs ovarian function through aberrant gene expression. PMID:23954404

  19. Murine Hepatic miRNAs Expression and Regulation of Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Jiyun; Kim, Suna; Kwon, Dae Young; Ha, Tae Youl

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression primarily by translational repression or by messenger RNA degradation. MicroRNAs play crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little is known regarding their role in obesity. We investigated differences of microRNA (miRNA) expression in liver tissue from diet-induced obese mice and potential effects of them on gene and protein expression. We used a miRNA microarray and quantitative RT-PCR to determine miRNA expression in murine liver tissue. Gene and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Effects of miRNA by knock-down using RNAi or overexpression on putative target genes and/or proteins in a murine hepatic cell line were also investigated. MicroRNA array and qRT-PCR analsysis revealed that > 50 miRNAs were down- or upregulated more than 2-fold in the liver of diet-induced obese mice. While changes in expression of many genes were observed at the mRNA level, some were only altered at the protein level. Overexpression or knock-down of miR-107 in murine hepatic cells revealed that the expression of its putative target, fatty acid synthase, was dramatically decreased or increased, respectively. In conclusion, more than 50 hepatic miRNAs were dysregulated in diet-induced obese mice. Some of them regulate protein expression at translation level and others regulate mRNA expression at transcriptional level. MiR-107 is downregulated while FASN, a putative target of miR-107, was increased in diet-induced obese mice. These findings provide the evidence of the correlation of miRNAs and their targets in diet-induced obese mice. PMID:21120623

  20. Autoimmunity to HSP60 during diet induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Şelli, M E; Wick, G; Wraith, D C; Newby, A C

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive immunity has been implicated in adipose tissue inflammation, obesity and its adverse metabolic consequences. No obesity-related autoantigen has yet been identified, although heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) has been implicated in other autoimmune diseases. We investigated whether feeding a high-fat diet to C57BL/6J mice would cause autoimmunity to HSP60 and whether immunomodulation with peptides from HSP60 would reverse the resulting obesity or metabolic dysfunction. Obese mice had higher circulating levels of HSP60 associated with increased T-lymphocyte proliferation responses and the emergence of circulating IgG1 and IgG2c antibody levels against HSP60. Treatment with escalating doses of a mixture of three proven immunomodulatory HSP60 peptides did not reduce weight but completely reversed the increase in VLDL/LDL levels and partially reversed the glucose intolerance in obese mice. Obese mice mount an autoimmune response to HSP60, which partly underlies the resulting metabolic disturbances. PMID:27899808

  1. Argan oil reduces, in rats, the high fat diet-induced metabolic effects of obesity.

    PubMed

    Sour, S; Belarbi, M; Sari, N; Benammar, C H; Baghdad, C H; Visioli, F

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a multi-factorial disorder which is of worldwide concern. In addition to calorie control, some specific dietary components might help resolving some of the complication of obesity, by providing antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We investigated the effect of argan oil supplementation on plasma lipid profile and oxidant-antioxidant status of rats with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity compared with rats fed a normal diet (ND). We used an animal model of high fat diet-induced obesity to study the metabolic effects of argan oil and we measured several markers lipid and redox statuses. Consumption of a high-fat diet led to an increase in serum total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), and triacylglycerols (TAG) concentrations; however, argan oil blunted the increases of TC, LDL-C and TG, glucose, and insulin. Plasma total antioxidant capacity, erythrocyte catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were lower, whereas plasma hydroperoxide, thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, and susceptibility of LDL to copper-induced oxidation were higher in obese rats compared with normal rats. Administration of argan oil ameliorated all these indices of redox status. Proper diet and lifestyle should be foremost implemented to reduce the lipoprotein metabolism and oxidant/antioxidant status alterations brought about by obesity. In addition, argan oil reduces the metabolic effects of obesity and its use might be promoted within the context of a balanced diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Clostridium ramosum promotes high-fat diet-induced obesity in gnotobiotic mouse models.

    PubMed

    Woting, Anni; Pfeiffer, Nora; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne; Blaut, Michael

    2014-09-30

    The intestines of obese humans and mice are enriched with Erysipelotrichi, a class within the Firmicutes. Clostridium ramosum, a member of the Erysipelotrichi, is associated with symptoms of the metabolic syndrome in humans. To clarify the possible obesogenic potential of this bacterial species and to unravel the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of C. ramosum in obesity development in gnotobiotic mice. Mice were associated with a simplified human intestinal (SIHUMI) microbiota of eight bacterial species, including C. ramosum, with the SIHUMI microbiota except C. ramosum (SIHUMIw/oCra), or with C. ramosum only (Cra) and fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or a low-fat diet (LFD). Parameters related to the development of obesity and metabolic diseases were compared. After 4 weeks of HFD feeding, the mouse groups did not differ in energy intake, diet digestibility, gut permeability, and parameters of low-grade inflammation. However, SIHUMI and Cra mice fed the HFD gained significantly more body weight and body fat and displayed higher food efficiency than SIHUMIw/oCra mice fed the HFD. Gene expression of glucose transporter 2 (Glut2) in jejunal mucosa and of fatty acid translocase (CD36) in ileal mucosa was significantly increased in the obese SIHUMI and Cra mice compared with the less obese SIHUMIw/oCra mice. The data demonstrate that the presence of C. ramosum in SIHUMI and Cra mice enhanced diet-induced obesity. Upregulation of small intestinal glucose and fat transporters in these animals may contribute to their increased body fat deposition. Obesity is a growing health problem worldwide. Changes in the proportions of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, the two dominant phyla in the human and the murine intestinal tract, link the intestinal microbiota to obesity. Erysipelotrichi, a class within the Firmicutes, increase in response to high-fat feeding in mice. Clostridium ramosum, a member of the Erysipelotrichi, has been linked to symptoms of the metabolic syndrome

  3. Diet-induced obesity resistance of adult female mice selectively bred for increased wheel-running behavior is reversed by single perinatal exposure to a high-energy diet.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Stefano; Meyer, Neele; Przybyt, Ewa; Scheurink, Anton J W; Harmsen, Martin C; Garland, Theodore; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2016-04-01

    Female mice from independently bred lines previously selected over 50 generations for increased voluntary wheel-running behavior (S1, S2) resist high energy (HE) diet-induced obesity (DIO) at adulthood, even without actual access to running wheels, as opposed to randomly bred controls (CON). We investigated whether adult S mice without wheels remain DIO-resistant when exposed - via the mother - to the HE diet during their perinatal stage (from 2 weeks prior to conception until weaning on post-natal day 21). While S1 and S2 females subjected to HE diet either perinatally or from weaning onwards (post-weaning) resisted increased adiposity at adulthood (as opposed to CON females), they lost this resistance when challenged with HE diet during these periods combined over one single cycle of breeding. When allowed one-week access to wheels (at week 6-8 and at 10 months), however, tendency for increased wheel-running behavior of S mice was unaltered. Thus, the trait for increased wheel-running behavior remained intact following combined perinatal and post-weaning HE exposure, but apparently this did not block HE-induced weight gain. At weaning, perinatal HE diet increased adiposity in all lines, but this was only associated with hyperleptinemia in S lines irrespective of gender. Because leptin has multiple developmental effects at adolescence, we argue that a trait for increased physical activity may advance maturation in times of plenty. This would be adaptive in nature where episodes of increased nutrient availability should be exploited maximally. Associated disturbances in glucose homeostasis and related co-morbidities at adulthood are probably pleiotropic side effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Moderate physical activity promotes basal hepatic autophagy in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Caldwell, Megan E; Lee, David E; Brown, Jacob L; Brown, Lemuel A; Perry, Richard A; Greene, Elizabeth S; Carvallo Chaigneau, Francisco R; Washington, Tyrone A; Greene, Nicholas P

    2017-02-01

    Obesity is a known risk factor for the development of hepatic disease; obesity-induced fatty liver can lead to inflammation, steatosis, and cirrhosis and is associated with degeneration of the mitochondria. Lifestyle interventions such as physical activity may ameliorate this condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate regulation of mitochondrial and autophagy quality control in liver following Western diet-induced obesity and voluntary physical activity. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were fed a Western diet (WD) or normal chow (NC, control) for 4 weeks; afterwards, groups were divided into voluntary wheel running (VWR) or sedentary (SED) conditions for an additional 4 weeks. WD-SED animals had a median histology score of 2, whereas WD-VWR was not different from NC groups (median score 1). There was no difference in mRNA of inflammatory markers Il6 and Tnfa in WD animals. WD animals had 50% lower mitochondrial content (COX IV and Cytochrome C proteins), 50% lower Pgc1a mRNA content, and reduced content of mitochondrial fusion and fission markers. Markers of autophagy were increased in VWR animals, regardless of obesity, as measured by 50% greater LC3-II/I ratio and 40% lower p62 protein content. BNIP3 protein content was 30% less in WD animals compared with NC animals, regardless of physical activity. Diet-induced obesity results in derangements in mitochondrial quality control that appear to occur prior to the onset of hepatic inflammation. Moderate physical activity appears to enhance basal autophagy in the liver; increased autophagy may provide protection from hepatic fat accumulation.

  5. SIRT1 deacetylase in POMC neurons is required for homeostatic defenses against diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ramadori, Giorgio; Fujikawa, Teppei; Fukuda, Makoto; Anderson, Jason; Morgan, Donald A.; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Stuart, Ronald C.; Perello, Mario; Vianna, Claudia R.; Nillni, Eduardo A.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Coppari, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary Feeding on high-calorie (HC) diets induces serious metabolic imbalances, including obesity. Understanding the mechanisms against excessive body weight gain is critical for developing effective anti-obesity strategies. Here, we show that lack of nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons causes hypersensitivity to diet-induced obesity due to reduced energy expenditure. The ability of leptin to properly engage the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in POMC neurons and elicit remodeling of perigonadal white adipose tissue (WAT) is severely compromised in mutant mice. Also, electrophysiological and histomorphomolecular analyses indicate a selective reduction in sympathetic nerve activity and brown-fat-like characteristics in perigonadal WAT of mutant mice; suggesting a physiologically important role for POMC neurons in controlling this visceral fat depot. In summary, our results provide direct genetic evidence that SIRT1 in POMC neurons is required for normal autonomic adaptations against diet-induced obesity. PMID:20620997

  6. [Establishment of a diet-induced obesity model in zebrafish larvae].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xinchun; Liu, Li; Dai, Wencong; Wang, Kunyuan; Chen, Xiaohui; Zhao, Lingfeng; Huang, Zhibin; Hou, Jinlin

    2016-01-01

    To establish a diet-induced obesity model in zebrafish larvae. At 7 days post-fertilization (dpf), 200 zebrafish larvae with normal development were randomly allocated to two groups with the feeding quantity of 30 mg per day (normal feeding group) or 180 mg per day (overfed group) for 20 days. The weight, length, BMI, triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TCH) of each group were measured. Whole-mount Oil Red O staining, frozen Oil Red O staining and hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining were used to estimate the rate of hepatic steatosis and liver histology of the zebrafish. The dynamic change of hepatic lipid droplets and distribution of adipose tissue were observed with Nile Red staining in overfed zebrafish in vivo. The weight, length, BMI and TG of overfed zebrafish were significantly increased compared with those in normal feeding group. Whole-mount Oil Red O staining showed that the percent of hepatic steatosis in overfed group (89.4%) was markedly higher than that in normal feeding group (20.7%). Macrovesicular steatosis was observed in the liver of the overfed larvae. Nile Red staining visualized hepatic lipid droplets and the distribution of larval adipose tissue, which increased with feeding time in the overfed zebrafish. Starving larvae showed depletion of fat and hepatic lipid, and adipose tissue was induced after refeeding. We successfully established an diet-induced obesity model in zebrafish larva, in which Nile Red staining allows in vivo observation of the adipocytes and hepatic lipid droplets.

  7. Diet-induced obesity causes long QT and reduces transcription of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyan; Amin, Vaibhav; Gurin, Michael; Wan, Elaine; Thorp, Edward; Homma, Shunichi; Morrow, John P

    2013-06-01

    In humans, obesity is associated with long QT, increased frequency of premature ventricular complexes, and sudden cardiac death. The mechanisms of the pro-arrhythmic electrophysiologic remodeling of obesity are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that there is decreased expression of voltage-gated potassium channels in the obese heart, leading to long QT. Using implanted telemeters, we found that diet-induced obese (DIO) wild-type mice have impaired cardiac repolarization, demonstrated by long QT, as well as more frequent ventricular ectopy, similar to obese humans. DIO mice have reduced protein and mRNA levels of the potassium channel Kv1.5 caused by a reduction of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in DIO hearts. We found that CREB knock-down by siRNA reduces Kv1.5, CREB binds to the Kv1.5 promoter in the heart, and CREB increases transcription of mouse and human Kv1.5 promoters. The reduction in CREB protein during lipotoxicity can be rescued by inhibiting protein kinase D (PKD). Our results identify a mechanism for obesity-induced electrophysiologic remodeling in the heart, namely PKD-induced reduction of CREB, which in turn decreases expression of the potassium channel Kv1.5. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. miR-155 Deletion in Female Mice Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Andrew D.; Fonken, Laura K.; Gushchina, Liubov V.; Aubrecht, Taryn G.; Maurya, Santosh K.; Periasamy, Muthu; Nelson, Randy J.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic in developed countries. Obese individuals are susceptible to comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorder. Increasing the ability of adipose tissue to expend excess energy could improve protection from obesity. One promising target is microRNA (miR)-155-5p. We demonstrate that deletion of miR-155 (-5p and -3p) in female mice prevents diet-induced obesity. Body weight gain did not differ between wild-type (WT) and miR-155 knockout (KO) mice fed control diet (CD); however, miR-155 KO mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) gained 56% less body weight and 74% less gonadal white adipose tissue (WAT) than WT mice. Enhanced WAT thermogenic potential, brown adipose tissue differentiation, and/or insulin sensitivity might underlie this obesity resistance. Indeed, miR-155 KO mice on HFD had 21% higher heat release than WT HFD mice. Compared to WT adipocytes, miR-155 KO adipocytes upregulated brown (Ucp1, Cidea, Pparg) and white (Fabp4, Pnpla2, AdipoQ, Fasn) adipogenic genes, and glucose metabolism genes (Glut4, Irs1). miR-155 deletion abrogated HFD-induced adipocyte hypertrophy and WAT inflammation. Therefore, miR-155 deletion increases adipogenic, insulin sensitivity, and energy uncoupling machinery, while limiting inflammation in WAT, which together could restrict HFD-induced fat accumulation. Our results identify miR-155 as a novel candidate target for improving obesity resistance. PMID:26953132

  9. Dietary teasaponin ameliorates alteration of gut microbiota and cognitive decline in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Huang, Xu-Feng; Zhang, Peng; Newell, Kelly A; Wang, Hongqin; Zheng, Kuiyang; Yu, Yinghua

    2017-09-22

    A high-fat (HF) diet alters gut microbiota and promotes obesity related inflammation and cognitive impairment. Teasaponin is the major active component of tea, and has been associated with anti-inflammatory effects and improved microbiota composition. However, the potential protective effects of teasaponin, against HF diet-induced obesity and its associated alteration of gut microbiota, inflammation and cognitive decline have not been studied. In this study, obesity was induced in C57BL/6 J male mice by feeding a HF diet for 8 weeks, followed by treatment with oral teasaponin (0.5%) mixed in HF diet for a further 6 weeks. Teasaponin treatment prevented the HF diet-induced recognition memory impairment and improved neuroinflammation, gliosis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) deficits in the hippocampus. Furthermore, teasaponin attenuated the HF diet-induced endotoxemia, pro-inflammatory macrophage accumulation in the colon and gut microbiota alterations. Teasaponin also improved glucose tolerance and reduced body weight gain in HF diet-induced obese mice. The behavioral and neurochemical improvements suggest that teasaponin could limit unfavorable gut microbiota alterations and cognitive decline in HF diet-induced obesity.

  10. High Fat Diet-induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Kevin; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared to allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. Methods We used a mouse model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Results Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low fat diet (LFD), correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Conclusions Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome. PMID:27007226

  11. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared with allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. We used a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low-fat diet, correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome.

  12. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Ablates Gastric Vagal Afferent Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Vincent, Andrew D; Kennaway, David J; Wittert, Gary A; Page, Amanda J

    2016-03-16

    Rats with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity increase daytime eating, suggesting an alteration in circadian food intake mechanisms. Gastric vagal afferents (GVAs) respond to mechanical stimuli to initiate satiety. These signals are dampened in HFD mice and exhibit circadian variations inversely with food intake in lean mice. Furthermore, leptin shows circadian variation in its circulating level and is able to modulate GVA mechanosensitivity. However, whether leptin's ability to modulate GVAs occurs in a circadian manner is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether changes in the circadian intake of food in HFD-induced obesity is associated with a disruption in GVA circadian rhythms. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or a HFD for 12 weeks. A subgroup of SLD and HFD mice were housed in metabolic cages. After 12 weeks, ex vivo GVA recordings were taken at 3 h intervals starting at zeitgeber time 0 (ZT0) and stomach content was measured. After 12 weeks, HFD mice consumed more food during the light phase through larger and more frequent meals compared with SLD mice. SLD mice exhibited circadian fluctuation in stomach content, which peaked at ZT18 and reached a nadir at ZT9. At these time points, both tension and mucosal receptor mechanosensitivity were the lowest and highest, respectively. HFD mice exhibited little circadian variation in stomach content or GVA mechanosensitivity. Leptin potentiated mucosal receptor mechanosensitivity only in SLD mice and with reduced potency during the dark phase. In conclusion, loss of circadian variation in GVA signaling may underpin changes in eating behavior in HFD-induced obesity. Appropriate circadian control of food intake is vital for maintaining metabolic health. Diet-induced obesity is associated with strong circadian changes in food intake, but the contributing mechanisms have yet to be determined. Vagal afferents are involved in regulation of feeding behavior, particularly meal

  13. CD11c expression in adipose tissue and blood and its role in diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To examine CD11c, a beta(2)-integrin, on adipose tissue (AT) leukocytes, and blood monocytes and its role in diet-induced obesity. High-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice, CD11c-deficient mice, and obese humans were studied. CD11c, leukocytes, and chemokines/cytokines were examined in AT and/or blo...

  14. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  15. Honeysuckle anthocyanin supplementation prevents diet-induced obesity in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Yu, Zhuoping; Tang, Qiong; Song, Haizhao; Gao, Zichun; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the anti-obesity effects of honeysuckle anthocyanins (HA) in a high fat diet-induced mouse model. The mice were initially fed with a low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. After that, the HFD-fed mice were divided into five groups, with 12 mice in each group, including a HFD group, a HFD plus Orlistat group, and three HFD plus HA (at a dose of 50, 100, or 200 mg kg(-1)) groups, for another 8-week experiment. HA at 100 or 200 mg kg(-1) can suppress body weight gain, reduce serum and liver lipid profiles, ameliorate impaired hepatic function, and significantly increase serum adiponectin concentration while decreasing serum insulin and leptin levels. These results suggest that the anti-obesity effect of HA might be through the blockage of lipid accumulation.

  16. Diet-induced obesity suppresses ghrelin in rat gastrointestinal tract and serum.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Suleyman; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2011-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine ghrelin expression in serum and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tissues, and to measure tissue ghrelin levels and obesity-related alterations in some serum biochemical variables in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). The study included 12 male rats, 60 days old. The rats were randomly allocated to two groups (n = 6). Rats in the DIO group were fed a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity, while those in the control group were fed on standard rat pellets. After a 12 week diet program including an adaptation period all rats were decapitated, tissues were individually fixed, ghrelin expression was examined by immunohistochemistry , and tissue and serum ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum biochemical variables were measured using an autoanalyzer. When the baseline and week 12 body mass index and GIT ghrelin expression were compared between DIO and control rats, BMI had increased and ghrelin expression decreased due to obesity. The RIA results were consistent with these findings. Serum glucose, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels were elevated and HDL cholesterol significantly decreased in the DIO group. A comparison of GIT tissues between the control and obese groups demonstrated that ghrelin was decreased in all tissues of the latter. This decrease was brought about a decline in the circulating ghrelin pool. This suggests that rather than being associated with a change in a single tissue, obesity is a pathological condition in which ghrelin expression is changed in all tissues.

  17. Endothelial mineralocorticoid receptor activation mediates endothelial dysfunction in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Nicola; Lohmann, Christine; Winnik, Stephan; van Tits, Lambertus J.; Miranda, Melroy X.; Vergopoulos, Athanasios; Ruschitzka, Frank; Nussberger, Jürg; Berger, Stefan; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Verrey, François; Matter, Christian M.

    2013-01-01

    Received 22 July 2012; revised 29 January 2013; accepted 4 March 2013 Aims Aldosterone plays a crucial role in cardiovascular disease. ‘Systemic’ inhibition of its mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) decreases atherosclerosis by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Obesity, an important cardiovascular risk factor, is an inflammatory disease associated with increased plasma aldosterone levels. We have investigated the role of the ‘endothelial’ MR in obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction, the earliest stage in atherogenesis. Methods and results C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a normal chow diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) alone or in combination with the MR antagonist eplerenone (200 mg/kg/day) for 14 weeks. Diet-induced obesity impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation in response to acetylcholine, whereas eplerenone treatment of obese mice prevented this. Expression analyses in aortic endothelial cells isolated from these mice revealed that eplerenone attenuated expression of pro-oxidative NADPH oxidase (subunits p22phox, p40phox) and increased expression of antioxidative genes (glutathione peroxidase-1, superoxide dismutase-1 and -3) in obesity. Eplerenone did not affect obesity-induced upregulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 or prostacyclin synthase. Endothelial-specific MR deletion prevented endothelial dysfunction in obese (exhibiting high ‘endogenous’ aldosterone) and in ‘exogenous’ aldosterone-infused lean mice. Pre-incubation of aortic rings from aldosterone-treated animals with the COX-inhibitor indomethacin restored endothelial function. Exogenous aldosterone administration induced endothelial expression of p22phox in the presence, but not in the absence of the endothelial MR. Conclusion Obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction depends on the ‘endothelial’ MR and is mediated by an imbalance of oxidative stress-modulating mechanisms. Therefore, MR antagonists may represent an attractive therapeutic strategy in the increasing population

  18. Meta-review of protein network regulating obesity between validated obesity candidate genes in the white adipose tissue of high-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunjung; Kim, Eun Jung; Seo, Seung-Won; Hur, Cheol-Goo; McGregor, Robin A; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide obesity and related comorbidities are increasing, but identifying new therapeutic targets remains a challenge. A plethora of microarray studies in diet-induced obesity models has provided large datasets of obesity associated genes. In this review, we describe an approach to examine the underlying molecular network regulating obesity, and we discuss interactions between obesity candidate genes. We conducted network analysis on functional protein-protein interactions associated with 25 obesity candidate genes identified in a literature-driven approach based on published microarray studies of diet-induced obesity. The obesity candidate genes were closely associated with lipid metabolism and inflammation. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (Pparg) appeared to be a core obesity gene, and obesity candidate genes were highly interconnected, suggesting a coordinately regulated molecular network in adipose tissue. In conclusion, the current network analysis approach may help elucidate the underlying molecular network regulating obesity and identify anti-obesity targets for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, K. Monica; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures. - Highlights: ► Obesity modulates inflammatory markers in BAL fluid after LPS exposure. ► Obese animals have a unique transcriptional signature in lung after LPS exposure. ► Obesity elevates inflammatory stress and reduces antioxidant capacity in the lung

  20. The low density lipoprotein receptor modulates the effects of hypogonadism on diet-induced obesity and related metabolic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Constantinou, Caterina; Mpatsoulis, Diogenis; Natsos, Anastasios; Petropoulou, Peristera-Ioanna; Zvintzou, Evangelia; Traish, Abdulmaged M.; Voshol, Peter J.; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Kypreos, Kyriakos E.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we investigated how LDL receptor deficiency (Ldlr−/−) modulates the effects of testosterone on obesity and related metabolic dysfunctions. Though sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice fed Western-type diet for 12 weeks became obese and showed disturbed plasma glucose metabolism and plasma cholesterol and TG profiles, castrated mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity and had improved glucose metabolism and reduced plasma TG levels, despite a further deterioration in their plasma cholesterol profile. The effect of hypogonadism on diet-induced weight gain of Ldlr−/− mice was independent of ApoE and Lrp1. Indirect calorimetry analysis indicated that hypogonadism in Ldlr−/− mice was associated with increased metabolic rate. Indeed, mitochondrial cytochrome c and uncoupling protein 1 expression were elevated, primarily in white adipose tissue, confirming increased mitochondrial metabolic activity due to thermogenesis. Testosterone replacement in castrated Ldlr−/− mice for a period of 8 weeks promoted diet-induced obesity, indicating a direct role of testosterone in the observed phenotype. Treatment of sham-operated Ldlr−/− mice with the aromatase inhibitor exemestane for 8 weeks showed that the obesity of castrated Ldlr−/− mice is independent of estrogens. Overall, our data reveal a novel role of Ldlr as functional modulator of metabolic alterations associated with hypogonadism. PMID:24837748

  1. Diet-induced obesity alters dendritic cell function in the presence and absence of tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    James, Britnie R.; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann; Askeland, Eric J.; Kucaba, Tamara; Griffith, Thomas S.; Norian, Lyse A.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a mounting health concern in the United States, and is associated with an increased risk for developing several cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Despite this, little is known regarding the impact of obesity on antitumor immunity. As dendritic cells (DC) are critical regulators of antitumor immunity, we examined the combined effects of obesity and tumor outgrowth on DC function. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) model, DC function was evaluated in mice bearing orthotopic RCC and in tumor-free controls. Tumor-free DIO mice had profoundly altered serum cytokine and chemokine profiles, with upregulation of 15 proteins, including IL-1α, IL-17, and LIF. Tumor-free DIO mice had elevated percentages of conventional splenic DC that were impaired in their ability to stimulate naive T cell expansion, although they were phenotypically similar to normal weight (NW) controls. In DIO mice, intra-renal RCC tumor challenge in the absence of therapy led to increased local infiltration by T cell-suppressive DC and accelerated early tumor outgrowth. Following administration of a DC-dependent immunotherapy, established RCC tumors regressed in NW mice. The same immunotherapy was ineffective in DIO mice, and was characterized by an accumulation of regulatory DC in tumor-bearing kidneys, decreased local infiltration by IFNγ-producing CD8 T cells, and progressive tumor outgrowth. Our results suggest that the presence of obesity as a co-morbidity can impair the efficacy of DC-dependent antitumor immunotherapies. PMID:22745381

  2. Diet-induced obesity alters dendritic cell function in the presence and absence of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    James, Britnie R; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann; Askeland, Eric J; Kucaba, Tamara; Griffith, Thomas S; Norian, Lyse A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity is a mounting health concern in the United States and is associated with an increased risk for developing several cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Despite this, little is known regarding the impact of obesity on antitumor immunity. Because dendritic cells (DC) are critical regulators of antitumor immunity, we examined the combined effects of obesity and tumor outgrowth on DC function. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) model, DC function was evaluated in mice bearing orthotopic RCC and in tumor-free controls. Tumor-free DIO mice had profoundly altered serum cytokine and chemokine profiles, with upregulation of 15 proteins, including IL-1α, IL-17, and LIF. Tumor-free DIO mice had elevated percentages of conventional splenic DC that were impaired in their ability to stimulate naive T cell expansion, although they were phenotypically similar to normal weight (NW) controls. In DIO mice, intrarenal RCC tumor challenge in the absence of therapy led to increased local infiltration by T cell-suppressive DC and accelerated early tumor outgrowth. Following administration of a DC-dependent immunotherapy, established RCC tumors regressed in normal weight mice. The same immunotherapy was ineffective in DIO mice and was characterized by an accumulation of regulatory DC in tumor-bearing kidneys, decreased local infiltration by IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells, and progressive tumor outgrowth. Our results suggest that the presence of obesity as a comorbidity can impair the efficacy of DC-dependent antitumor immunotherapies.

  3. Infection with the Lyme disease pathogen suppresses innate immunity in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Javid, Ashkan; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Eshghi, Azad; Tang, Tian Tian; Arya, Anoop; Bansal, Anil; Matar, Fatima; Parikh, Maitry; Ebady, Rhodaba; Koh, Adeline; Gupta, Nupur; Song, Peng; Zhang, Yang; Newbigging, Susan; Wormser, Gary P; Schwartz, Ira; Inman, Robert; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a major global public health concern. Immune responses implicated in obesity also control certain infections. We investigated the effects of high-fat diet-induced obesity (DIO) on infection with the Lyme disease bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi in mice. DIO was associated with systemic suppression of neutrophil- and macrophage-based innate immune responses. These included bacterial uptake and cytokine production, and systemic, progressive impairment of bacterial clearance, and increased carditis severity. B. burgdorferi-infected mice fed normal diet also gained weight at the same rate as uninfected mice fed high-fat diet, toll-like receptor 4 deficiency rescued bacterial clearance defects, which greater in female than male mice, and killing of an unrelated bacterium (Escherichia coli) by bone marrow-derived macrophages from obese, B. burgdorferi-infected mice was also affected. Importantly, innate immune suppression increased with infection duration and depended on cooperative and synergistic interactions between DIO and B. burgdorferi infection. Thus, obesity and B. burgdorferi infection cooperatively and progressively suppressed innate immunity in mice. © 2016 The Authors Cellular Microbiology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T.; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle. PMID:26766570

  5. Serotonin Improves High Fat Diet Induced Obesity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Nakano, Tatsuya; Saito, Ryo; Akasaka, Daisuke; Saito, Kazuki; Ogasawara, Hideki; Minashima, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Kanaya, Takashi; Takakura, Ikuro; Inoue, Nao; Ikeda, Ikuo; Chen, Xiangning; Miyake, Masato; Kitazawa, Haruki; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Sato, Kan; Tahara, Kohji; Nagasawa, Yuya; Rose, Michael T; Ohwada, Shyuichi; Watanabe, Kouichi; Aso, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    There are two independent serotonin (5-HT) systems of organization: one in the central nervous system and the other in the periphery. 5-HT affects feeding behavior and obesity in the central nervous system. On the other hand, peripheral 5-HT also may play an important role in obesity, as it has been reported that 5-HT regulates glucose and lipid metabolism. Here we show that the intraperitoneal injection of 5-HT to mice inhibits weight gain, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance and completely prevented the enlargement of intra-abdominal adipocytes without having any effect on food intake when on a high fat diet, but not on a chow diet. 5-HT increased energy expenditure, O2 consumption and CO2 production. This novel metabolic effect of peripheral 5-HT is critically related to a shift in the profile of muscle fiber type from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative in soleus muscle. Additionally, 5-HT dramatically induced an increase in the mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)-b and PGC-1α-c in soleus muscle. The elevation of these gene mRNA expressions by 5-HT injection was inhibited by treatment with 5-HT receptor (5HTR) 2A or 7 antagonists. Our results demonstrate that peripheral 5-HT may play an important role in the relief of obesity and other metabolic disorders by accelerating energy consumption in skeletal muscle.

  6. Meta-chlorophenylpiperazine enhances leptin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunling; Yang, Yongjie; Saito, Kenji; Xu, Pingwen; Wang, Chunmei; Hinton, Antentor Othrell; Yan, Xiaofeng; Wu, Qi; Tong, Qingchun; Elmquist, Joel K; Fukuda, Makoto; Xu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Most forms of human obesity are characterized by impaired leptin sensitivity and, therefore, the effectiveness of anti-obesity leptin therapy in these leptin-resistant obese patients is marginal. Hence, the development of strategies to increase leptin sensitivity is of high priority in the field of obesity research. We first examined the effects of co-administration of leptin and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP), an agonist of 5-HT2C and 5-HT1B receptors, on energy balance in leptin-resistant diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. We further assessed leptin-induced phosphorylation of the STAT-3 (pSTAT3) in various brain regions of DIO mice pretreated with mCPP or in mice genetically lacking 5-HT2C receptors. Co-administration of mCPP with leptin had an additive effect on reducing body weight in DIO mice. Furthermore, mCPP pretreatment in DIO mice enhanced leptin-induced pSTAT3 in the arcuate nucleus, the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and the ventral premammillary nucleus. Finally, deletion of 5-HT2C receptors significantly blunted leptin-induced pSTAT3 in these same hypothalamic regions. Our study provides evidence that drugs, which activate 5-HT2C receptors, could function as leptin sensitizers and be used in combination with leptin to provide additional weight loss in DIO. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Codonopsis lanceolata Extract Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Kui-Jin; Kim, Young-Hyun; Kim, Dan-Bi; Shin, Gi-Hae; Cho, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Bong Kyun; Lee, Boo-Yong; Lee, Ok-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Codonopsis lanceolata extract (CLE) has been used in traditional medicine in the Asian-Pacific region for the treatment of bronchitis, cough, and inflammation. However, it is still unclear whether obesity in mice can be altered by diet supplementation with CLE. To investigate whether CLE could have preventative effects on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, male C57BL/6 mice were placed on either a normal chow diet, 60% HFD, or a HFD supplemented with CLE (60, 180, and 360 mg/kg/day) for 12 weeks. CLE decreased body weight and subcutaneous and visceral fat weights in HFD-induced obese mice. CLE group mice showed lower fat accumulation and a smaller adipocyte area in the adipose tissue compared with the HFD group mice. CLE group mice exhibited lower serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), glucose, and insulin compared with the HFD group mice. In addition, CLE decreased liver weight and lowered the increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels in HFD-induced obese mice. These results indicate that CLE can inhibit the development of diet-induced obesity and hyperlipidemia in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:25353662

  8. Meta-chlorophenylpiperazine enhances leptin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunling; Yang, Yongjie; Saito, Kenji; Xu, Pingwen; Wang, Chunmei; Hinton Jr, Antentor Othrell; Yan, Xiaofeng; Wu, Qi; Tong, Qingchun; Elmquist, Joel K; Fukuda, Makoto; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Most forms of human obesity are characterized by impaired leptin sensitivity and, therefore, the effectiveness of anti-obesity leptin therapy in these leptin-resistant obese patients is marginal. Hence, the development of strategies to increase leptin sensitivity is of high priority in the field of obesity research. Experimental Approach We first examined the effects of co-administration of leptin and meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP), an agonist of 5-HT2C and 5-HT1B receptors, on energy balance in leptin-resistant diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. We further assessed leptin-induced phosphorylation of the STAT-3 (pSTAT3) in various brain regions of DIO mice pretreated with mCPP or in mice genetically lacking 5-HT2C receptors. Results Co-administration of mCPP with leptin had an additive effect on reducing body weight in DIO mice. Furthermore, mCPP pretreatment in DIO mice enhanced leptin-induced pSTAT3 in the arcuate nucleus, the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, and the ventral premammillary nucleus. Finally, deletion of 5-HT2C receptors significantly blunted leptin-induced pSTAT3 in these same hypothalamic regions. Conclusions and Implications Our study provides evidence that drugs, which activate 5-HT2C receptors, could function as leptin sensitizers and be used in combination with leptin to provide additional weight loss in DIO. PMID:25817043

  9. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mike J F; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-08-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or 'wanting'). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened 'wanting' was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact ('liking') of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal 'hot-spots' that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation.

  10. Individual Differences in Cue-Induced Motivation and Striatal Systems in Rats Susceptible to Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mike JF; Burghardt, Paul R; Patterson, Christa M; Nobile, Cameron W; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J; Berridge, Kent C; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2015-01-01

    Pavlovian cues associated with junk-foods (caloric, highly sweet, and/or fatty foods), like the smell of brownies, can elicit craving to eat and increase the amount of food consumed. People who are more susceptible to these motivational effects of food cues may have a higher risk for becoming obese. Further, overconsumption of junk-foods leading to the development of obesity may itself heighten attraction to food cues. Here, we used a model of individual susceptibility to junk-foods diet-induced obesity to determine whether there are pre-existing and/or diet-induced increases in attraction to and motivation for sucrose-paired cues (ie, incentive salience or ‘wanting’). We also assessed diet- vs obesity-associated alterations in mesolimbic function and receptor expression. We found that rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity displayed heightened conditioned approach prior to the development of obesity. In addition, after junk-food diet exposure, those rats that developed obesity also showed increased willingness to gain access to a sucrose cue. Heightened ‘wanting’ was not due to individual differences in the hedonic impact (‘liking’) of sucrose. Neurobiologically, Mu opioid receptor mRNA expression was lower in striatal ‘hot-spots’ that generate eating or hedonic impact only in those rats that became obese. In contrast, prolonged exposure to junk-food resulted in cross-sensitization to amphetamine-induced locomotion and downregulation of striatal D2R mRNA regardless of the development of obesity. Together these data shed light on individual differences in behavioral and neurobiological consequences of exposure to junk-food diets and the potential contribution of incentive sensitization in susceptible individuals to greater food cue-triggered motivation. PMID:25761571

  11. The role of hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cota, Daniela; Matter, Emily K.; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a key regulator of several cellular functions, including cell growth and differentiation. Because hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling has been implicated as a target of leptin in the regulation of energy balance, we investigated its role in obesity-induced leptin resistance. In contrast to rats maintained on a low-fat (LF) diet for 3 weeks, rats maintained on a HF-diet had no anorexic response to icv leptin. Western blot analysis revealed that leptin was unable to modulate hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling in the HF group, whereas it significantly induced phosphorylation of both S6 Kinase 1 (S6K1) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6) in the LF group. Similar to leptin, the cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces hypophagia and increases STAT3 phosphorylation. However, CNTF and its analogue CNTFAx15 activate leptin-like pathways in the hypothalamus even in leptin-resistant states, including diet-induced obesity. Icv CNTFAx15 decreased 24-h food intake and body weight in rats on HF or LF diet and increased the phosphorylation of hypothalamic S6K1 and S6 in a comparable way on both diets. Importantly, mice lacking the expression of S6K1 (S6K1−/−) did not respond to the anorectic action of either leptin or CNTFAx15, implying a crucial role for S6K1 in modulating the actions of these two cytokines. Finally, exposure to HF diet decreased mTORC1 signaling within the hypothalamus. Overall, these findings strongly point to the possibility that reduced hypothalamic mTORC1 signaling contributes to the development of hyperphagia, weight gain and leptin resistance during diet-induced obesity. PMID:18614690

  12. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Randall H; Ko, Hwi Jin; Jung, Dae Young; Lee, Yongjin; Bortell, Rita; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Patel, Payal R; Hu, Xiaodi; Inashima, Kunikazu; Kearns, Caitlyn; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Shultz, Leonard D; Lee, Ki Won; Greiner, Dale L; Kim, Jason K

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is characterized by a dysregulated immune system, which may causally associate with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Despite widespread use of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation (SCID) mice, and SCID bearing a null mutation in the IL-2 common γ chain receptor (NSG) mice as animal models of human diseases including type 1 diabetes, the underlying metabolic effects of a genetically altered immune system are poorly understood. For this, we performed a comprehensive metabolic characterization of these mice fed chow or after 6 wk of a high-fat diet. We found that NOD mice had ∼50% less fat mass and were 2-fold more insulin sensitive, as measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, than C57BL/6 wild-type mice. SCID mice were also more insulin sensitive with increased muscle glucose metabolism and resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure (∼10%) and physical activity (∼40%) as measured by metabolic cages. NSG mice were completely protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose metabolism in peripheral organs. Our findings demonstrate an important role of genetic background, lymphocytes, and cytokine signaling in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. © FASEB.

  13. Obesity Takes Its Toll on Visceral Pain: High-Fat Diet Induces Toll-Like Receptor 4-Dependent Visceral Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tramullas, Mónica; Finger, Beate C; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high-fat diet induces both, peripheral and central alterations in TLR4 expression. Moreover, functional TLR4 is required for the development of high-fat diet-induced obesity. Recently, central alterations in TLR4 expression have been associated with the modulation of visceral pain. However, it remains unknown whether there is a functional interaction between the role of TLR4 in diet-induced obesity and in visceral pain. In the present study we investigated the impact of long-term exposure to high-fat diet on visceral pain perception and on the levels of TLR4 and Cd11b (a microglial cell marker) protein expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. Peripheral alterations in TLR4 were assessed following the stimulation of spleenocytes with the TLR4-agonist LPS. Finally, we evaluated the effect of blocking TLR4 on visceral nociception, by administering TAK-242, a selective TLR4-antagonist. Our results demonstrated that exposure to high-fat diet induced visceral hypersensitivity. In parallel, enhanced TLR4 expression and microglia activation were found in brain areas related to visceral pain, the PFC and the hippocampus. Likewise, peripheral TLR4 activity was increased following long-term exposure to high-fat diet, resulting in an increased level of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, TLR4 blockage counteracted the hyperalgesic phenotype present in mice fed on high-fat diet. Our data reveal a role for TLR4 in visceral pain modulation in a model of diet-induced obesity, and point to TLR4 as a potential therapeutic target for the development of drugs to treat visceral hypersensitivity present in pathologies associated to fat diet consumption.

  14. Beneficial effects of milk oligosaccharides on gut permeability, microbial dysbiosis and the obese phenotype in high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: Microbial dysbiosis and increased intestinal permeability is a target for prevention or reversal of weight gain in high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity (DIO); however, it is not known whether decreased intestinal permeability is necessary or sufficient for weight loss. Prebiotic milk oligos...

  15. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Friedline, Randall H.; Ko, Hwi Jin; Jung, Dae Young; Lee, Yongjin; Bortell, Rita; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Patel, Payal R.; Hu, Xiaodi; Inashima, Kunikazu; Kearns, Caitlyn; Tsitsilianos, Nicholas; Shafiq, Umber; Shultz, Leonard D.; Lee, Ki Won; Greiner, Dale L.; Kim, Jason K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by a dysregulated immune system, which may causally associate with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Despite widespread use of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, NOD with severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) mutation (SCID) mice, and SCID bearing a null mutation in the IL-2 common γ chain receptor (NSG) mice as animal models of human diseases including type 1 diabetes, the underlying metabolic effects of a genetically altered immune system are poorly understood. For this, we performed a comprehensive metabolic characterization of these mice fed chow or after 6 wk of a high-fat diet. We found that NOD mice had ∼50% less fat mass and were 2-fold more insulin sensitive, as measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, than C57BL/6 wild-type mice. SCID mice were also more insulin sensitive with increased muscle glucose metabolism and resistant to diet-induced obesity due to increased energy expenditure (∼10%) and physical activity (∼40%) as measured by metabolic cages. NSG mice were completely protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance with significant increases in glucose metabolism in peripheral organs. Our findings demonstrate an important role of genetic background, lymphocytes, and cytokine signaling in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.—Friedline, R. H., Ko, H. J., Jung, D. Y., Lee, Y., Bortell, R., Dagdeviren, S., Patel, P. R., Hu, X., Inashima, K., Kearns, C., Tsitsilianos, N., Shafiq, U., Shultz, L. D., Lee, K. W., Greiner, D. L., Kim, J. K. Genetic ablation of lymphocytes and cytokine signaling in nonobese diabetic mice prevents diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26644351

  16. Exercise training starting at weaning age preserves cardiac pacemaker function in adulthood of diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho de Lima, Daniel; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Silveira, Simonton Andrade; Haibara, Andrea Siqueira; Coimbra, Cândido Celso

    2014-08-01

    Peripheral sympathetic overdrive in young obese subjects contributes to further aggravation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and hypertension, thus inducing worsening clinical conditions in adulthood. Exercise training has been considered a strategy to repair obesity autonomic dysfunction, thereby reducing the cardiometabolic risk. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of early exercise training, starting immediately after weaning, on cardiac autonomic control in diet-induced obese rats. Male Wistar rats (weaning) were divided into four groups: (i) a control group (n = 6); (ii) an exercise-trained control group (n = 6); (iii) a diet-induced obesity group (n = 6); and (iv) an exercise-trained diet-induced obesity group (n = 6). The development of obesity was induced by 9 weeks of palatable diet intake, and the training program was implemented in a motor-driven treadmill (5 times per week) during the same period. After this period, animals were submitted to vein and artery catheter implantation to assess cardiac autonomic balance by methylatropine (3 mg/kg) and propranolol (4 mg/kg) administration. Exercise training increased running performance in both groups (p < 0.05). Exercise training also prevented the increased resting heart rate in obese rats, which seemed to be related to cardiac pacemaker activity preservation (p < 0.05). Additionally, the training program preserved the pressure and bradycardia responses to autonomic blockade in obese rats (p < 0.05). An exercise program beginning at weaning age prevents cardiovascular dysfunction in obese rats, indicating that exercise training may be used as a nonpharmacological therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cardiometabolic diseases.

  17. Propolis prevents diet-induced hyperlipidemia and mitigates weight gain in diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Koya-Miyata, Satomi; Arai, Norie; Mizote, Akiko; Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Ushio, Shimpei; Iwaki, Kanso; Fukuda, Shigeharu

    2009-12-01

    We examined the hypolipidemic effect of propolis in a mouse obesity model induced by a high fat-diet. C57BL/6N mice were fed a high-fat diet ad libitum and given propolis extract intragastrically at 0 mg/kg (control), 5 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg twice daily for 10 d. Compared with mice in the control group, mice in the propolis extract-administrated groups displayed a reduction in all of the following parameters: body weight gain, weight of visceral adipose tissue, liver and serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and non-esterified fatty acids. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of the liver showed down-regulation of mRNA expression associated with fatty acid biosynthesis, including fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha, and sterol regulatory element binding protein in the propolis-administrated mice. Subsequently, obese C57BL/6N mice that had been administered a high-fat diet were given propolis extract at 0 mg/kg (control), 2.5 mg/kg or 25 mg/kg for 4 weeks. The propolis extract treated mice showed a decrease in weight gain, a reduction of serum non-esterified fatty acids, and lipid accumulation in the liver. These results suggest that propolis extract prevented and mitigated high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia by down-regulating the expression of genes associated with lipid metabolism.

  18. Loss of SFRP4 Alters Body Size, Food Intake, and Energy Expenditure in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Mastaitis, Jason; Eckersdorff, Mark; Min, Soo; Xin, Yurong; Cavino, Katie; Aglione, Johnpaul; Okamoto, Haruka; Na, Erqian; Stitt, Trevor; Dominguez, Melissa G; Schmahl, Jennifer P; Lin, Calvin; Gale, Nicholas W; Valenzuela, David M; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-12-01

    Secreted frizzled-related protein 4 (SFRP4) is an extracellular regulator of the wingless-type mouse mammary tumor virus integration site family (WNT) pathway. SFRP4 has been implicated in adipocyte dysfunction, obesity, insulin resistance, and impaired insulin secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the exact role of SFRP4 in regulating whole-body metabolism and glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show here that male Sfrp4(-/-) mice have increased spine length and gain more weight when fed a high-fat diet. The body composition and body mass per spine length of diet-induced obese Sfrp4(-/-) mice is similar to wild-type littermates, suggesting that the increase in body weight can be accounted for by their longer body size. The diet-induced obese Sfrp4(-/-) mice have reduced energy expenditure, food intake, and bone mineral density. Sfrp4(-/-) mice have normal glucose and insulin tolerance and β-cell mass. Diet-induced obese Sfrp4(-/-) and control mice show similar impairments of glucose tolerance and a 5-fold compensatory expansion of their β-cell mass. In summary, our data suggest that loss of SFRP4 alters body length and bone mineral density as well as energy expenditure and food intake. However, SFRP4 does not control glucose homeostasis and β-cell mass in mice.

  19. Labrador tea (Rhododendron groenlandicum) attenuates insulin resistance in a diet-induced obesity mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ouchfoun, Meriem; Eid, Hoda M; Musallam, Lina; Brault, Antoine; Li, Shilin; Vallerand, Diane; Arnason, John T; Haddad, Pierre S

    2016-04-01

    Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) mouse model, we investigated the antidiabetic effect of Labrador tea [Rhododendron groenlandicum (Oeder) Kron and Judd], a beverage and medicinal tea used by the Cree Nations of northern Quebec. C57BL6 mice were divided into five groups and given standard chow (~4 % of lipids) or high-fat diet (~35 % of lipids) for 8 weeks until they became obese and insulin resistant. Treatment began by adding the plant extract at three doses (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) to the high-fat diet for another 8 weeks. At the end of the study, insulin-sensitive tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue) were collected to investigate the plant's molecular mechanisms. Labrador tea significantly reduced blood glucose (13 %), the response to an oral glucose tolerance test (18.2 %) and plasma insulin (65 %) while preventing hepatic steatosis (42 % reduction in hepatic triglyceride levels) in DIO mice. It stimulated insulin-dependent Akt pathway (55 %) and increased the expression of GLUT4 (53 %) in skeletal muscle. In the liver, Labrador tea stimulated the insulin-dependent Akt and the insulin-independent AMP-activated protein kinase pathways. The improvement in hepatic steatosis observed in DIO-treated mice was associated with a reduction in inflammation (through the IKK α/β) and a decrease in the hepatic content of SREBP-1 (39 %). Labrador tea exerts potential antidiabetic action by improving insulin sensitivity and mitigating high-fat diet-induced obesity and hyperglycemia. They validate the safety and efficacy of this plant, a promising candidate for culturally relevant complementary treatment in Cree diabetics.

  20. Diet-induced obesity skin changes monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haluszka, Dóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Kiss, Norbert; Szipőcs, Róbert; Kuroli, Enikő; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Wikonkál, Norbert M

    2016-11-01

    Obesity related metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have severe consequences on our skin. Latest developments in nonlinear microscopy allow the use of noninvasive, label free imaging methods, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), for early diagnosis of metabolic syndrome-related skin complications by 3D imaging of the skin and the connective tissue. Our aim was to study effects of various types of diet-induced obesity in mice using these methods. We examined mice on different diets for 32 weeks. The collagen morphology was evaluated four times in vivo by SHG microscopy, and adipocytes were examined once at the end of experiment by ex vivo CARS method. A strong correlation was found between the body weight and the adipocyte size, while we found that the SHG intensity of dermal collagen reduces considerably with increasing body weight. Obese mice on high-fat diet showed worse results than those on high-fat - high-fructose diet. Animals on high-fructose diet did not gain more weight than those on ordinary diet despite of the increased calorie intake, but their collagen damage was nonetheless significant. Obesity and high sugar intake damages the skin, mainly the dermal connective tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue, which efficiently can be monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy.

  1. Inhibition of RXR and PPARγ ameliorates diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Waki, Hironori; Kamon, Junji; Murakami, Koji; Motojima, Kiyoto; Komeda, Kajuro; Miki, Hiroshi; Kubota, Naoto; Terauchi, Yasuo; Tsuchida, Atsuko; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, Nobuyo; Yamauchi, Naoko; Ide, Tomohiro; Hori, Wataru; Kato, Shigeaki; Fukayama, Masashi; Akanuma, Yasuo; Ezaki, Osamu; Itai, Akiko; Nagai, Ryozo; Kimura, Satoshi; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Shudo, Koichi; Kadowaki, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-activated transcription factor and functions as a heterodimer with a retinoid X receptor (RXR). Supraphysiological activation of PPARγ by thiazolidinediones can reduce insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, but these drugs can also cause weight gain. Quite unexpectedly, a moderate reduction of PPARγ activity observed in heterozygous PPARγ-deficient mice or the Pro12Ala polymorphism in human PPARγ, has been shown to prevent insulin resistance and obesity induced by a high-fat diet. In this study, we investigated whether functional antagonism toward PPARγ/RXR could be used to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. We show herein that an RXR antagonist and a PPARγ antagonist decrease triglyceride (TG) content in white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver. These inhibitors potentiated leptin’s effects and increased fatty acid combustion and energy dissipation, thereby ameliorating HF diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Paradoxically, treatment of heterozygous PPARγ-deficient mice with an RXR antagonist or a PPARγ antagonist depletes white adipose tissue and markedly decreases leptin levels and energy dissipation, which increases TG content in skeletal muscle and the liver, thereby leading to the re-emergence of insulin resistance. Our data suggested that appropriate functional antagonism of PPARγ/RXR may be a logical approach to protection against obesity and related diseases such as type 2 diabetes. PMID:11581301

  2. Inhibition of RXR and PPARgamma ameliorates diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, T; Waki, H; Kamon, J; Murakami, K; Motojima, K; Komeda, K; Miki, H; Kubota, N; Terauchi, Y; Tsuchida, A; Tsuboyama-Kasaoka, N; Yamauchi, N; Ide, T; Hori, W; Kato, S; Fukayama, M; Akanuma, Y; Ezaki, O; Itai, A; Nagai, R; Kimura, S; Tobe, K; Kagechika, H; Shudo, K; Kadowaki, T

    2001-10-01

    PPARgamma is a ligand-activated transcription factor and functions as a heterodimer with a retinoid X receptor (RXR). Supraphysiological activation of PPARgamma by thiazolidinediones can reduce insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes, but these drugs can also cause weight gain. Quite unexpectedly, a moderate reduction of PPARgamma activity observed in heterozygous PPARgamma-deficient mice or the Pro12Ala polymorphism in human PPARgamma, has been shown to prevent insulin resistance and obesity induced by a high-fat diet. In this study, we investigated whether functional antagonism toward PPARgamma/RXR could be used to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. We show herein that an RXR antagonist and a PPARgamma antagonist decrease triglyceride (TG) content in white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver. These inhibitors potentiated leptin's effects and increased fatty acid combustion and energy dissipation, thereby ameliorating HF diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Paradoxically, treatment of heterozygous PPARgamma-deficient mice with an RXR antagonist or a PPARgamma antagonist depletes white adipose tissue and markedly decreases leptin levels and energy dissipation, which increases TG content in skeletal muscle and the liver, thereby leading to the re-emergence of insulin resistance. Our data suggested that appropriate functional antagonism of PPARgamma/RXR may be a logical approach to protection against obesity and related diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

  3. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats.

    PubMed

    Ropelle, Eduardo R; Pauli, José R; Prada, Patrícia; Cintra, Dennys E; Rocha, Guilherme Z; Moraes, Juliana C; Frederico, Marisa J S; da Luz, Gabrielle; Pinho, Ricardo A; Carvalheira, José B C; Velloso, Licio A; Saad, Mario A; De Souza, Cláudio T

    2009-05-15

    Insulin signalling in the hypothalamus plays a role in maintaining body weight. The forkhead transcription factor Foxo1 is an important mediator of insulin signalling in the hypothalamus. Foxo1 stimulates the transcription of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y and Agouti-related protein through the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt signalling pathway, but the role of hypothalamic Foxo1 in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats. Thus, we investigated the effects of the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusion of Foxo1-antisense oligonucleotide (Foxo1-ASO) and evaluated the food consumption and weight gain in normal and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Three days of Foxo1-ASO microinfusion reduced the hypothalamic Foxo1 expression by about 85%. i.c.v. infusion of Foxo1-ASO reduced the cumulative food intake (21%), body weight change (28%), epididymal fat pad weight (22%) and fasting serum insulin levels (19%) and increased the insulin sensitivity (34%) in DIO but not in control animals. Collectively, these data showed that the Foxo1-ASO treatment blocked the orexigenic effects of Foxo1 and prevented the hyperphagic response in obese rats. Thus, pharmacological manipulation of Foxo1 may be used to prevent or treat obesity.

  4. Diet-induced obesity skin changes monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haluszka, Dóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Kiss, Norbert; Szipőcs, Róbert; Kuroli, Enikő; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Wikonkál, Norbert M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity related metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have severe consequences on our skin. Latest developments in nonlinear microscopy allow the use of noninvasive, label free imaging methods, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), for early diagnosis of metabolic syndrome-related skin complications by 3D imaging of the skin and the connective tissue. Our aim was to study effects of various types of diet-induced obesity in mice using these methods. We examined mice on different diets for 32 weeks. The collagen morphology was evaluated four times in vivo by SHG microscopy, and adipocytes were examined once at the end of experiment by ex vivo CARS method. A strong correlation was found between the body weight and the adipocyte size, while we found that the SHG intensity of dermal collagen reduces considerably with increasing body weight. Obese mice on high-fat diet showed worse results than those on high-fat - high-fructose diet. Animals on high-fructose diet did not gain more weight than those on ordinary diet despite of the increased calorie intake, but their collagen damage was nonetheless significant. Obesity and high sugar intake damages the skin, mainly the dermal connective tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue, which efficiently can be monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy. PMID:27895989

  5. Ameliorating Effect of Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii on High-fat Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Ra; Begum, Shahnaz; Oh, Deuk Sil; Wee, An Jin; Yun, Byung Sun; Sung, Chang Keun

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-obesity effects of Mycoleptodonoides aitchisonii (MA) in mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Two groups were fed either a normal control diet or an HF (45% kcal fat) diet for 12 weeks and three groups were fed an HF diet supplemented with powdered MA (MAP, 1%, 3%, and 5%) for 12 weeks. The anti-obesity effects of MAP supplementation on body weight, fat mass development, and lipid-related markers were assessed. Consumption of an HF diet resulted in increased body weight, serum lipids, relative adipose tissues weight, and liver fat accumulation. However, administration of MAP significantly decreased body weight gain, food intake, food efficiency ratio, hepatic cholesterol level, and adipose tissue weight in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with MAP significantly reduced the occurrence of fatty liver deposits and steatosis, and inhibited an HF diet-induced increase in adipocyte size. These results suggest that dietary supplementation with MAP exerts anti-obesity effects and indicate that MAP could be used as a functional food to control obesity. PMID:25054104

  6. RNA-mediated paternal heredity of diet-induced obesity and metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Valérie; Fourré, Sandra; De Abreu, Diana Andrea Fernandes; Derieppe, Marie-Alix; Remy, Jean-Jacques; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2015-12-14

    The paternal heredity of obesity and diabetes induced by a high-fat and/or high-sugar diet (Western-like diet) has been demonstrated through epidemiological analysis of human cohorts and experimental analysis, but the nature of the hereditary vector inducing this newly acquired phenotype is not yet well defined. Here, we show that microinjection of either testis or sperm RNA of male mice fed a Western-like diet into naive one-cell embryos leads to the establishment of the Western-like diet-induced metabolic phenotype in the resulting progenies, whereas RNAs prepared from healthy controls did not. Among multiple sequence differences between the testis transcriptomes of the sick and healthy fathers, we noted that several microRNAs had increased expression, which was of interest because this class of noncoding RNA is known to be involved in epigenetic control of gene expression. When microinjected into naive one-cell embryos, one of these small RNA, i.e., the microRNA miR19b, induced metabolic alterations that are similar to the diet-induced phenotype. Furthermore, this pathological phenotype was inherited by the offspring after crosses with healthy partners. Our results indicate that acquired food-induced trait inheritance might be enacted by RNA signalling.

  7. Enzymatically synthesized glycogen reduces lipid accumulation in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Furuyashiki, Takashi; Ogawa, Rui; Nakayama, Yoko; Honda, Kazuhisa; Kamisoyama, Hiroshi; Takata, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Kuriki, Takashi; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Based on a recent study indicating that enzymatically synthesized glycogen (ESG) possesses a dietary, fiber-like action, we hypothesized that ESG can reduce the risk of obesity. In this study, the antiobesity effects of ESG were investigated in a model of diet-induced obesity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups and fed a normal or high-fat diet, with or without 20% ESG, for 4 weeks. Body weight, food intake, lipid deposition in the white adipose tissues and liver, fecal lipid excretion, and plasma lipid profiles were measured. At week 3, the body fat mass was measured using an x-ray computed tomography system, which showed that ESG significantly suppressed the high-fat diet-induced lipid accumulation. Similar results were observed in the weight of the adipose tissue after the experiment. Moreover, ESG significantly suppressed the lipid accumulation in the liver but increased fecal lipid excretion. The plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol and nonesterified fatty acid were lowered after a high-fat diet, whereas the total bile acid concentration was increased by ESG. However, the hepatic messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of enzymes related to lipid metabolism were not affected by ESG. Conversely, the mRNA levels of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase were up-regulated by ESG in the muscle. These results suggest that the combined effects of increased fecal lipid excretion, increased mRNA levels of enzymes that oxidize fatty acids in the muscle, and increased total bile acid concentration in the plasma mediate the inhibitory effect of ESG on lipid accumulation.

  8. γδ T cells promote inflammation and insulin resistance during high fat diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Pooja; Nuotio-Antar, Alli Martina; Smith, C. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    γδ T cells are resident in AT and increase during diet-induced obesity. Their possible contribution to the inflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity was investigated in mice after a 5 to 10 week milk HFD. The HFD resulted in significant increases in CD44hi, CD62Llo, and TNF-α+ γδ T cells in eAT of WT mice. Mice deficient in all γδ T cells (TCRδ−/−) or only Vγ4 and Vγ6 subsets (Vγ4/6−/−) were compared with WT mice with regard to proinflammatory cytokine production and macrophage accumulation in eAT. Obesity among these mouse strains did not differ, but obese TCRδ−/− and Vγ4/6−/− mice had significantly reduced eAT expression of F4/80, a macrophage marker, and inflammatory mediators CCL2 and IL-6 compared with WT mice. Obese TCRδ−/− mice had significantly reduced CD11c+ and TNF-α+ macrophage accumulation in eAT after 5 and 10 weeks on the HFD, and obese Vγ4/6−/− mice had significantly increased CD206+ macrophages in eAT after 5 weeks on the diet and significantly reduced macrophages after 10 weeks. Obese TCRδ−/− mice had significant reductions in systemic insulin resistance and inflammation in liver and skeletal muscle after longer-term HFD feeding (10 and 24 weeks). In vitro studies revealed that isolated γδ T cells directly stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage TNF-α expression but did not stimulate inflammatory mediator expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These findings are consistent with a role for γδ T cells in the proinflammatory response that accompanies diet-induced obesity. PMID:25395302

  9. Diet-induced obesity in rats leads to a decrease in sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is rapidly becoming a worldwide epidemic that affects children and adults. Some studies have shown a relationship between obesity and infertility, but until now it remains controversial. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of high-fat diet-induced obesity on male reproductive parameters. Methods In a first experiment, male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or standard chow (SD) for 15, 30 or 45 weeks, after which they were evaluated by adiposity index, serum leptin levels, reproductive organ weights and sperm counts. In a second experiment, rats received HFD or SD only for 15 weeks, long enough to cause obesity. Sexual hormones and sexual behavior were evaluated in these animals, as well as fertility after natural mating. Another group of rats was submitted to motility analysis and fertility evaluation after in utero insemination. Results After 15, 30 or 45 weeks, HFD-fed animals presented significant increases in obesity index and serum leptin levels. Reproductive organ weights and sperm counts in the testis and epididymis were similar between the two groups at all timepoints studied. Sexual behavior was not altered by the diet regimen, and HFD fertility after natural mating was also similar to SD-fed animals. Intergroup testosterone levels were also comparable, but estradiol levels were increased in HFD rats. Furthermore, sperm quality was reduced in HFD animals as evidenced by their decreased percentage of sperm with progressive movement. This altered motility parameter was followed by a trend toward reduction in fertility potential after artificial in utero insemination. Conclusions The results reported herein showed that obesity can affect sperm quality, by reducing sperm motility, without affecting other sperm parameters. The low sperm quality caused a slight reduction in fertility potential, showing that obesity may lead to impairment in male fertility. PMID:21396114

  10. Overexpression of superoxide dismutase 3 gene blocks high-fat diet-induced obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Cui, R; Gao, M; Qu, S; Liu, D

    2014-09-01

    Oxidative stress has an important role in the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. As an endogenous antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) has the potential to affect diet-induced obesity and obesity-associated complications. In the current work, we overexpressed SOD3 in C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to study its effect on HFD-induced obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance. We demonstrated that the Sod3 gene transfer blocked HFD-induced obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance. Real-time PCR analysis of adipose and liver tissues revealed that overexpression of the Sod3 gene suppressed expression of pro-inflammatory genes in adipose tissue including F4/80, Tnfα, Cd11c, Mcp1 and Il6, and increased expression of anti-inflammatory genes such as adiponectin. In the liver, high levels of SOD3 activity in animals enhanced expression of the genes responsible for energy expenditure including Cpt1α, Cpt1β, Pgc1α, Pgc1β and Ucp2. These results suggest that overexpression of the Sod3 gene through gene transfer is an effective approach in preventing diet-induced obesity and obesity-associated complications.

  11. Exercise training attenuates sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Liu, J-Y; Zhang, H-X; Li, Q; Zhang, S-W

    2015-01-01

    It is known that excessive sympathetic activity and oxidative stress are enhanced in obesity. This study aimed to clarify whether exercise training (ET) attenuates sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in obesity. The obesity was induced by high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups: regular diet (RD) plus sedentary (RD-S), RD plus ET (RD-ET), HFD plus sedentary (HFD-S), and HFD plus ET (HFD-ET). The rats in RD-ET and HFD-ET groups were trained on a motorized treadmill for 60 min/day, five days/week for 8 weeks. The sympathetic activity was evaluated by the plasma norepinephrine (NE) level. The superoxide anion, malondialdehyde and F2-isoprostanes levels in serum and muscles were measured to evaluate oxidative stress. The ET prevented the increases in the body weight, arterial pressure and white adipose tissue mass in HFD rats. The NE level in plasma and oxidative stress related parameters got lower in HFD-ET group compared with HFD-S group. We have found decreased mRNA and protein levels of toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and TLR-4 by ET in HFD rats. These findings suggest that ET may be effective for attenuating sympathetic activation and oxidative stress in diet-induced obesity.

  12. Anti-adipogenic effect of Artemisia annua in diet-induced-obesity mice model.

    PubMed

    Baek, Hye Kyung; Shim, Hyeji; Lim, Hyunmook; Shim, Minju; Kim, Chul-Kyu; Park, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Yong Seok; Song, Ki-Duk; Kim, Sung-Jo; Yi, Sun Shin

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has increased continuously in western countries during the last several decades and recently become a problem in developing countries. Currently, anti-obesity drugs originating from natural products are being investigated for their potential to overcome adverse effects associated with chemical drugs. Artemisinic acid, which was isolated from the well-known anti-malaria herb Artemisia annua (AA) L., was recently shown to possess anti-adipogenic effects in vitro. However, the anti-adipogenic effects of AA in animal models have not yet been investigated. Therefore, we conducted daily oral administration with AA water extract in a diet-induced obesity animal model and treated 3T3-L1 cells with AA to confirm the anti-adipogenic effects in the related protein expressions. We then evaluated the physiology, adipose tissue histology and mRNA expressions of many related genes. Inhibition of adipogenesis by the AA water extract was observed in vitro. In the animal model, weight gain was significantly lower in the AA treated group, but there were no changes in food intake volume or calories. Reductions in lipid droplet size and mRNA expression associated with adipogenesis were also observed in animal epididymal fat. This study is the first to report that AA has an anti-obese effects in vivo.

  13. Anti-adipogenic effect of Artemisia annua in diet-induced-obesity mice model

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Hye Kyung; Shim, Hyeji; Lim, Hyunmook; Shim, Minju; Kim, Chul-Kyu; Park, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Yong Seok; Song, Ki-Duk; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has increased continuously in western countries during the last several decades and recently become a problem in developing countries. Currently, anti-obesity drugs originating from natural products are being investigated for their potential to overcome adverse effects associated with chemical drugs. Artemisinic acid, which was isolated from the well-known anti-malaria herb Artemisia annua (AA) L., was recently shown to possess anti-adipogenic effects in vitro. However, the anti-adipogenic effects of AA in animal models have not yet been investigated. Therefore, we conducted daily oral administration with AA water extract in a diet-induced obesity animal model and treated 3T3-L1 cells with AA to confirm the anti-adipogenic effects in the related protein expressions. We then evaluated the physiology, adipose tissue histology and mRNA expressions of many related genes. Inhibition of adipogenesis by the AA water extract was observed in vitro. In the animal model, weight gain was significantly lower in the AA treated group, but there were no changes in food intake volume or calories. Reductions in lipid droplet size and mRNA expression associated with adipogenesis were also observed in animal epididymal fat. This study is the first to report that AA has an anti-obese effects in vivo. PMID:26243598

  14. Purple Sweet Potato Attenuate Weight Gain in High Fat Diet Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Ju, Ronghui; Zheng, Shujuan; Luo, Hongxia; Wang, Changgang; Duan, Lili; Sheng, Yao; Zhao, Changhui; Xu, Wentao; Huang, Kunlun

    2017-03-01

    Purple sweet potato (PSP) is widely grown in Asia and considered as a healthy vegetable. The objective of the current study was to determine the anti-obesity effect of the PSP on high fat diet induced obese C57BL/6J mice. The mice were administrated with high fat diet supplemented with the sweet potato (SP) or PSP at the concentration of 15% and 30% for 12 wk, respectively. The results showed that the supplementation of SP or PSP at 30% significantly ameliorated high fat diet induced obesity and its associated risk factors, including reduction of body weight and fat accumulation, improvement of lipid profile and modulation of energy expenditure. Moreover, PSP also posed beneficial effect on the liver and kidney functions. These results indicate that PSP and SP have anti-obesity effect and are effective to reduce the metabolic risk.

  15. Diet-induced obesity and cardiovascular regulation in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Williams, T D; Chambers, J B; Roberts, L M; Henderson, R P; Overton, J M

    2003-10-01

    1. In the present study, we determined the effect of diet-induced obesity on cardiovascular and metabolic regulation in mice at standard laboratory temperatures (ambient temperature (Ta) = 22 degrees C) and during exposure to thermoneutrality (Ta = 30 degrees C). 2. Male C57BL/6J (B6) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFF; n = 17) or chow (CHW; n = 14) for 15 weeks were surgically instrumented with telemetry devices, housed in metabolic chambers and assigned to either control or atenolol treatment (25 mg/kg per day in drinking water) to determine the effects of obesity on baseline cardiovascular function and on the responses to thermoneutrality and 24 h fasting. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), arterial pressure and HR variability (time and frequency domain), oxygen consumption (VO2) and locomotor activity were determined. 3. The HFF mice exhibited increased bodyweight (+10.6 +/- 4.1 g), moderate light period hypertension (+8.6 +/- 2.6 mmHg), no difference in HR and increased HR variability at standard laboratory temperature compared with CHW controls. Atenolol produced less of a decrease in HR in HFF mice (-42 +/- 10 b.p.m.) compared with CHW controls (-73 +/- 15 b.p.m.). Acute exposure to thermoneutrality (Ta = 30 degrees C) reduced HR similarly in both HFF and CHW mice (approximately 175 b.p.m.), but reduced MAP less in HFF than in CHW mice (-7.3 +/- 2.5 and -15.2 +/- 1.0 mmHg), respectively. Atenolol treatment had only minor effects on the HR response to thermonuetrality (-114 +/- 13 and -129 +/- 8 b.p.m. in HFF and CHW mice, respectively). The HFF mice displayed greater fasting-induced reductions in light period MAP than did CHW mice (-10.0 +/- 1.1 vs-3.1 +/- 3.5 mmHg, respectively), whereas HR was decreased equally in both groups. Fasting-induced increases in HR variability were attenuated in HFF mice. 4. We conclude that diet-induced obesity produced generally minor changes in cardiovascular regulation in B6 mice at baseline, some of which are distinct

  16. Diet-induced obesity promotes colon tumor development in azoxymethane-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Iina; Al-Rabadi, Leina; Stavrakis, Dimitris; Karagiannides, Iordanis; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Bugni, James M

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for colon cancer in humans, and numerous studies have shown that a high fat diet enhances colon cancer development. As both increased adiposity and high fat diet can promote tumorigenesis, we examined the effect of diet-induced obesity, without ongoing high fat diet, on colon tumor development. C57BL/6J male mice were fed regular chow or high fat diet for 8 weeks. Diets were either maintained or switched resulting in four experimental groups: regular chow (R), high fat diet (H), regular chow switched to high fat diet (RH), and high fat diet switched to regular chow (HR). Mice were then administered azoxymethane to induce colon tumors. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were dramatically smaller in the R group relative to all groups that received high fat diet at any point. The effect of obesity on colon tumors could not be explained by differences in aberrant crypt foci number. Moreover, diet did not alter colonic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and interferon-γ, which were measured immediately after azoxymethane treatment. Crypt apoptosis and proliferation, which were measured at the same time, were increased in the HR relative to all other groups. Our results suggest that factors associated with obesity - independently of ongoing high fat diet and obesity - promote tumor development because HR group animals had significantly more tumors than R group, and these mice were fed the same regular chow throughout the entire carcinogenic period. Moreover, there was no difference in the number of aberrant crypt foci between these groups, and thus the effect of obesity appears to be on subsequent stages of tumor development when early preneoplastic lesions transition into adenomas.

  17. Diet-Induced Obesity Promotes Colon Tumor Development in Azoxymethane-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tuominen, Iina; Al-Rabadi, Leina; Stavrakis, Dimitris; Karagiannides, Iordanis; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Bugni, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for colon cancer in humans, and numerous studies have shown that a high fat diet enhances colon cancer development. As both increased adiposity and high fat diet can promote tumorigenesis, we examined the effect of diet-induced obesity, without ongoing high fat diet, on colon tumor development. C57BL/6J male mice were fed regular chow or high fat diet for 8 weeks. Diets were either maintained or switched resulting in four experimental groups: regular chow (R), high fat diet (H), regular chow switched to high fat diet (RH), and high fat diet switched to regular chow (HR). Mice were then administered azoxymethane to induce colon tumors. Tumor incidence and multiplicity were dramatically smaller in the R group relative to all groups that received high fat diet at any point. The effect of obesity on colon tumors could not be explained by differences in aberrant crypt foci number. Moreover, diet did not alter colonic expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and interferon-γ, which were measured immediately after azoxymethane treatment. Crypt apoptosis and proliferation, which were measured at the same time, were increased in the HR relative to all other groups. Our results suggest that factors associated with obesity – independently of ongoing high fat diet and obesity – promote tumor development because HR group animals had significantly more tumors than R group, and these mice were fed the same regular chow throughout the entire carcinogenic period. Moreover, there was no difference in the number of aberrant crypt foci between these groups, and thus the effect of obesity appears to be on subsequent stages of tumor development when early preneoplastic lesions transition into adenomas. PMID:23560112

  18. Diet-induced obesity reprograms the inflammatory response of the murine lung to inhaled endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Tilton, Susan C; Waters, Katrina M; Karin, Norman J; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Zangar, Richard C; Lee, K Monica; Bigelow, Diana J; Pounds, Joel G; Corley, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  19. Diet-Induced Obesity Reprograms the Inflammatory Response of the Murine Lung to Inhaled Endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Lee, Monika K.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    The co-occurrence of environmental factors is common in complex human diseases and, as such, understanding the molecular responses involved is essential to determine risk and susceptibility to disease. We have investigated the key biological pathways that define susceptibility for pulmonary infection during obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) and regular weight (RW) C57BL/6 mice exposed to inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS induced a strong inflammatory response in all mice as indicated by elevated cell counts of macrophages and neutrophils and levels of proinflammatory cytokines (MDC, MIP-1γ, IL-12, RANTES) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Additionally, DIO mice exhibited 50% greater macrophage cell counts, but decreased levels of the cytokines, IL-6, TARC, TNF-α, and VEGF relative to RW mice. Microarray analysis of lung tissue showed over half of the LPS-induced expression in DIO mice consisted of genes unique for obese mice, suggesting that obesity reprograms how the lung responds to subsequent insult. In particular, we found that obese animals exposed to LPS have gene signatures showing increased inflammatory and oxidative stress response and decreased antioxidant capacity compared with RW. Because signaling pathways for these responses can be common to various sources of environmentally induced lung damage, we further identified biomarkers that are indicative of specific toxicant exposure by comparing gene signatures after LPS exposure to those from a parallel study with cigarette smoke. These data show obesity may increase sensitivity to further insult and that co-occurrence of environmental stressors result in complex biosignatures that are not predicted from analysis of individual exposures.

  20. IMPLICATIONS OF CROSSTALK BETWEEN LEPTIN AND INSULIN SIGNALING DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF DIET INDUCED OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Christopher D; Huypens, Peter; Stewart, Laura K; Gettys, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Insulin and leptin play complementary roles in regulating the consumption, uptake, oxidation and storage of nutrients. Chronic consumption of diets that contain a high proportion of calories from saturated fat induces a progressive deterioration in function of both hormones. Certain rat lines and strains of mice are particularly sensitive to the obesogenic and diabetogenic effects of high fat diets, and have been used extensively to study the developmental progression of insulin and leptin resistance in relation to the increasing adiposity that is characteristic of their response to these diets. Some aspects of the diminished efficacy of each hormone are secondary to increased adiposity but a consensus is emerging to support the view that direct effects of dietary components or their metabolites, independent of the resulting obesity, play important roles in development of insulin and leptin resistance. In this minireview, we will examine the implications of crosstalk between leptin and insulin signaling during the development of diet-induced obesity, emphasizing potential interactions between pathways that occur among target sites, and exploring how these interactions may influence the progression of obesity and diabetes. PMID:18852044

  1. Altered Microbiota Contributes to Reduced Diet-Induced Obesity upon Cold Exposure.

    PubMed

    Ziętak, Marika; Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Markiewicz, Lidia H; Ståhlman, Marcus; Kozak, Leslie P; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2016-06-14

    Maintenance of body temperature in cold-exposed animals requires induction of thermogenesis and management of fuel. Here, we demonstrated that reducing ambient temperature attenuated diet-induced obesity (DIO), which was associated with increased iBAT thermogenesis and a plasma bile acid profile similar to that of germ-free mice. We observed a marked shift in the microbiome composition at the phylum and family levels within 1 day of acute cold exposure and after 4 weeks at 12°C. Gut microbiota was characterized by increased levels of Adlercreutzia, Mogibacteriaceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Desulfovibrio and reduced levels of Bacilli, Erysipelotrichaceae, and the genus rc4-4. These genera have been associated with leanness and obesity, respectively. Germ-free mice fed a high-fat diet at room temperature gained less adiposity and improved glucose tolerance when transplanted with caecal microbiota of mice housed at 12°C compared to mice transplanted with microbiota from 29°C. Thus, a microbiota-liver-BAT axis may mediate protection against obesity at reduced temperature. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Leucine supplementation of drinking water does not alter susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nairizi, Ali; She, Pengxiang; Vary, Thomas C; Lynch, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), Leu, and the signaling pathways they regulate have been reported to either improve or worsen adiposity and insulin sensitivity. Therefore, it is unclear whether dietary supplementation of Leu would be beneficial. To help address this question, we examined the effect of adding Leu (150 mmol/L; Expt. 1 and Expt. 2) or BCAA (109 mmol/L of each; Expt. 3) to the drinking water on diet-induced obesity (induced with a 60-kJ% fat diet) in singly housed C57BL6/J male mice for at least 14 wk. Liquid and solid food intakes were evaluated weekly along with body weight. During the last few weeks, several blood samples were taken at different times for plasma glucose, total cholesterol, or Leu measurements. Metabolic rate by indirect calorimetry, locomotor activity by light beam breaking, body composition by H1-NMR, and insulin tolerance were also determined. Compared with control, supplementation did not affect body weight, food intake, oxygen consumption, locomotor activity, body composition, insulin tolerance, or total cholesterol. In fed mice, this method of Leu supplementation only increased plasma Leu by 76% when the supplemented group was compared with control. On the other hand, after overnight food deprivation, the plasma Leu did not differ between these 2 groups, even though the mice in the supplemented group had continuous access to Leu-containing water during the solid food deprivation. Taken together, the results do not provide evidence that either Leu or BCAA supplementation of drinking water ameliorates diet-induced obesity in mice, although it may improve glycemia.

  3. IGF-I overexpression does not promote compensatory islet cell growth in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Katie; Dong, Jing; De Jesus, Kristine; Liu, Jun-Li

    2010-02-01

    Although IGF-I was known to stimulate the growth of pancreatic islet cells from early in vitro experiments and in vivo reports on rodents, recent gene targeting experiments have indicated that IGF-I and its receptor do not play a major role in normal islet cell growth. In our previous reports, liver- or pancreatic-specific IGF-I deficiency caused no decrease in β-cell mass; a general and β-cell-enriched IGF-I overexpression caused no change in normal islet cell growth. On the other hand, increased metabolic demands (such as in obesity and insulin resistance) result in β-cell compensation in cell number and insulin secretion. In order to test whether IGF-I could promote islet cell growth and facilitate islet compensation due to obesity-induced insulin resistance, we have challenged MT-IGF mice to a high-fat diet. After 28 weeks, both MT-IGF mice and wild-type littermates gained comparable 40-57% of body weight, with similar increases in fat masses; all mice maintained a normal sensitivity to insulin and did not become severely hyperglycemic. Nevertheless, compared to wild-type littermates, the equally obese MT-IGF mice maintained improved glucose tolerance and a diminished insulin level; similar to when fed a normal chow diet. More importantly, under IGF-I overexpression, there was no further increase in β-cell mass caused by obesity. Thus, IGF-I overexpression had no significant effect on weight gain and islet cell compensation in response to high-fat diet-induced obesity.

  4. Feeding-induced oleoylethanolamide mobilization is disrupted in the gut of diet-induced obese rodents

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Miki; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Narayanaswami, Vidya; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis by initiating neural and hormonal responses to the ingestion of nutrients. In addition to peptide hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CKK) and peptide YY (PYY), the lipid-derived mediator oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been implicated in the control of satiety. Previous studies in humans and rodent models have shown that obesity is associated with changes in CCK, PYY and other gut-derived peptide hormones, which may contribute to decreased satiety and increased energy intake. In the present study, we show that small-intestinal OEA production is disrupted in the gut of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and mice. In lean rodents, feeding or duodenal infusion of Intralipid® or pure oleic acid stimulate jejunal OEA mobilization. This response is strikingly absent in DIO rats and mice. Confirming previous reports, we found that feeding rats or mice a high-fat diet for 7 days is sufficient to suppress jejunal OEA mobilization. Surprisingly, a similar effect is elicited by feeding rats and mice a high-sucrose low-fat diet for 7 days. Collectively, our findings suggest that high fat-induced obesity is accompanied by alterations in the post-digestive machinery responsible for OEA biosynthesis, which may contribute to reduced satiety and hyperphagia. PMID:26024927

  5. Feeding-induced oleoylethanolamide mobilization is disrupted in the gut of diet-induced obese rodents.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Miki; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Narayanaswami, Vidya; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a critical role in the regulation of energy homeostasis by initiating neural and hormonal responses to the ingestion of nutrients. In addition to peptide hormones, such as cholecystokinin (CKK) and peptide YY (PYY), the lipid-derived mediator oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been implicated in the control of satiety. Previous studies in humans and rodent models have shown that obesity is associated with changes in CCK, PYY and other gut-derived peptide hormones, which may contribute to decreased satiety and increased energy intake. In the present study, we show that small-intestinal OEA production is disrupted in the gut of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and mice. In lean rodents, feeding or duodenal infusion of Intralipid® or pure oleic acid stimulates jejunal OEA mobilization. This response is strikingly absent in DIO rats and mice. Confirming previous reports, we found that feeding rats or mice a high-fat diet for 7 days is sufficient to suppress jejunal OEA mobilization. Surprisingly, a similar effect is elicited by feeding rats and mice a high-sucrose low-fat diet for 7 days. Collectively, our findings suggest that high fat-induced obesity is accompanied by alterations in the post-digestive machinery responsible for OEA biosynthesis, which may contribute to reduced satiety and hyperphagia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of canagliflozin on weight loss in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenjun; Zhao, Mei; Wang, Meng; Yan, Wenhui; Liu, Yuan; Ren, Shuting; Lu, Jun; Wang, Bing; Chen, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Canagliflozin, an inhibitor of sodium glucose co-transporter (SGLT) 2, has been shown to reduce body weight during the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this study, we sought to determine the role of canagliflozin in body weight loss and liver injury in obesity. C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet to simulate diet-induced obesity (DIO). Canagliflozin (15 and 60 mg/kg) was administered to DIO mice for 4 weeks. Orlistat (10 mg/kg) was used as a positive control. The body weight, liver weight, liver morphology, total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels were examined. Signaling molecules, including diacylgycero1 acyltransferase-2 (DGAT2), peroxisome proliferation receptor alpha-1 (PPARα1), PPARγ1, PPARγ2 mRNA levels and the protein expression of SGLT2 were evaluated. Canagliflozin reduced body weight, especially the high-dose canagliflozin, and resulted in increased body weight loss compared with orlistat. Moreover, canagliflozin reduced the liver weight and the ratio of liver weight to body weight, lowered the serum levels of TC and TG, and ameliorated liver steatosis. During the canagliflozin treatment, SGLT2, DGAT2, PPARγ1 and PPARγ2 were inhibited, and PPARα1 was elevated in the liver tissues. This finding may explain why body weight was reduced and secondary liver injury was ameliorated in response to canagliflozin. Together, the results suggest that canagliflozin may be a potential anti-obesity strategy.

  7. Adiponectin knockout accentuates high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac dysfunction: role of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yingmei; Turdi, Subat; Ren, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Adiponectin (APN), an adipose-derived adipokine, offers cardioprotective effects although the precise mechanism of action remains unclear. This study was designed to examine the role of APN in high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac pathology. Adult C57BL/6 wild-type and APN knockout mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 22weeks. After 40day feeding, mice were treated with 2mg/kg rapamycin or vehicle every other day for 42days on respective fat diet. Cardiomyocyte contractile and Ca(2+) transient properties were evaluated. Myocardial function was evaluated using echocardiography. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate adiposity. Energy expenditure, metabolic rate and physical activity were monitored using a metabolic cage. Lipid deposition, serum triglyceride, glucose tolerance, markers of autophagy and fatty acid metabolism including LC3, p62, Beclin-1, AMPK, mTOR, fatty acid synthase (FAS) were evaluated. High fat diet intake induced obesity, systemic glucose intolerance, cardiac hypertrophy, dampened metabolic ability, cardiac and intracellular Ca(2+) derangements, the effects of which were accentuated by APN knockout. Furthermore, APN deficiency augmented high fat diet-induced upregulation in the autophagy adaptor p62 and the decline in AMPK without affecting high fat diet-induced decrease in LC3II and LC3II-to-LC3I ratio. Neither high fat diet nor APN deficiency altered Beclin-1. Interestingly, rapamycin negated high fat diet-induced/APN-deficiency-accentuated obesity, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction as well as AMPK dephosphorylation, mTOR phosphorylation and p62 buildup. Our results collectively revealed that APN deficiency may aggravate high fat diet-induced obesity, metabolic derangement, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction possibly through decreased myocardial autophagy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Adiponectin knockout accentuates high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac dysfunction: Role of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yingmei; Turdi, Subat; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin (APN), an adipose-derived adipokine, offers cardioprotective effects although the precise mechanism of action remains unclear. This study was designed to examine the role of APN in high fat diet-induced obesity and cardiac pathology. Adult C57BL/6 wild-type and APN knockout mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 22 weeks. After 40 day feeding, mice were treated with 2 mg/kg rapamycin or vehicle every other day for 42 days on respective fat diet. Cardiomyocyte contractile and Ca2+ transient properties were evaluated. Myocardial function was evaluated using echocardiography. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to evaluate adiposity. Energy expenditure, metabolic rate and physical activity were monitored using a metabolic cage. Lipid deposition, serum triglyceride, glucose tolerance, markers of autophagy and fatty acid metabolism including LC3, p62, Beclin-1, AMPK, mTOR, fatty acid synthase (FAS) were evaluated. High fat diet intake induced obesity, systemic glucose intolerance, cardiac hypertrophy, dampened metabolic ability, cardiac and intracellular Ca2+ derangements, the effects of which were accentuated by APN knockout. Furthermore, APN deficiency augmented high fat diet-induced upregulation in the autophagy adaptor p62 and the decline in AMPK without affecting high fat diet-induced decrease in LC3II and LC3II-to-LC3I ratio. Neither high fat diet nor APN deficiency altered Beclin-1. Interestingly, rapamycin negated high fat diet-induced/APN-deficiency-accentuated obesity, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction as well as AMPK dephosphorylation, mTOR phosphorylation and p62 buildup. Our results collectively revealed that APN deficiency may aggravate high fat diet-induced obesity, metabolic derangement, cardiac hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction possibly through decreased myocardial autophagy. PMID:23524376

  9. Sortilin 1 knockout alters basal adipose glucose metabolism but not diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jibiao; Matye, David J; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Tiangang

    2017-04-01

    Sortilin 1 (Sort1) is a trafficking receptor that has been implicated in the regulation of plasma cholesterol in humans and mice. Here, we use metabolomics and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp approaches to obtain further understanding of the in vivo effects of Sort1 deletion on diet-induced obesity as well as on adipose lipid and glucose metabolism. Results show that Sort1 knockout (KO) does not affect Western diet-induced obesity nor adipose fatty acid and ceramide concentrations. Under the basal fasting state, chow-fed Sort1 KO mice have decreased adipose glycolytic metabolites, but Sort1 deletion does not affect insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake during the insulin clamp. These results suggest that Sort1 loss-of-function in vivo does not affect obesity development, but differentially modulates adipose glucose metabolism under fasting and insulin-stimulated states. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  10. ALTERED HYPOTHALAMIC FUNCTION IN DIET-INDUCED OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    Velloso, L A; Schwartz, M W

    2012-01-01

    Energy homeostasis involves a complex network of hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic neurons that transduce hormonal, nutrient and neuronal signals into responses that ultimately match caloric intake to energy expenditure and thereby promote stability of body fat stores. Growing evidence suggests that rather than reflecting a failure to regulate caloric intake, common forms of obesity involve fundamental changes to this homeostatic system that favor the defense of an elevated level of body adiposity. This article reviews emerging evidence that during high-fat feeding, obesity pathogenesis involves fundamental alteration of hypothalamic systems that regulate food intake and energy expenditure. PMID:21386802

  11. Cross-talk between Akkermansia muciniphila and intestinal epithelium controls diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Everard, Amandine; Belzer, Clara; Geurts, Lucie; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Druart, Céline; Bindels, Laure B; Guiot, Yves; Derrien, Muriel; Muccioli, Giulio G; Delzenne, Nathalie M; de Vos, Willem M; Cani, Patrice D

    2013-05-28

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier disruption. Microbial composition and the mechanisms of interaction with the host that affect gut barrier function during obesity and type 2 diabetes have not been elucidated. We recently isolated Akkermansia muciniphila, which is a mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the mucus layer. The presence of this bacterium inversely correlates with body weight in rodents and humans. However, the precise physiological roles played by this bacterium during obesity and metabolic disorders are unknown. This study demonstrated that the abundance of A. muciniphila decreased in obese and type 2 diabetic mice. We also observed that prebiotic feeding normalized A. muciniphila abundance, which correlated with an improved metabolic profile. In addition, we demonstrated that A. muciniphila treatment reversed high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, including fat-mass gain, metabolic endotoxemia, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance. A. muciniphila administration increased the intestinal levels of endocannabinoids that control inflammation, the gut barrier, and gut peptide secretion. Finally, we demonstrated that all these effects required viable A. muciniphila because treatment with heat-killed cells did not improve the metabolic profile or the mucus layer thickness. In summary, this study provides substantial insight into the intricate mechanisms of bacterial (i.e., A. muciniphila) regulation of the cross-talk between the host and gut microbiota. These results also provide a rationale for the development of a treatment that uses this human mucus colonizer for the prevention or treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders.

  12. Cross-talk between Akkermansia muciniphila and intestinal epithelium controls diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Everard, Amandine; Belzer, Clara; Geurts, Lucie; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Druart, Céline; Bindels, Laure B.; Guiot, Yves; Derrien, Muriel; Muccioli, Giulio G.; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; de Vos, Willem M.; Cani, Patrice D.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier disruption. Microbial composition and the mechanisms of interaction with the host that affect gut barrier function during obesity and type 2 diabetes have not been elucidated. We recently isolated Akkermansia muciniphila, which is a mucin-degrading bacterium that resides in the mucus layer. The presence of this bacterium inversely correlates with body weight in rodents and humans. However, the precise physiological roles played by this bacterium during obesity and metabolic disorders are unknown. This study demonstrated that the abundance of A. muciniphila decreased in obese and type 2 diabetic mice. We also observed that prebiotic feeding normalized A. muciniphila abundance, which correlated with an improved metabolic profile. In addition, we demonstrated that A. muciniphila treatment reversed high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders, including fat-mass gain, metabolic endotoxemia, adipose tissue inflammation, and insulin resistance. A. muciniphila administration increased the intestinal levels of endocannabinoids that control inflammation, the gut barrier, and gut peptide secretion. Finally, we demonstrated that all these effects required viable A. muciniphila because treatment with heat-killed cells did not improve the metabolic profile or the mucus layer thickness. In summary, this study provides substantial insight into the intricate mechanisms of bacterial (i.e., A. muciniphila) regulation of the cross-talk between the host and gut microbiota. These results also provide a rationale for the development of a treatment that uses this human mucus colonizer for the prevention or treatment of obesity and its associated metabolic disorders. PMID:23671105

  13. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase knockdown protects against diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Daniel; Yang, Qin; Kong, Dong; Banks, Alexander S; Zhang, Lin; Rodgers, Joseph T; Pirinen, Eija; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas C; Gong, Fengying; Wang, Ya-chin; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A; Asara, John M; Peroni, Odile D; Monia, Brett P; Bhanot, Sanjay; Alhonen, Leena; Puigserver, Pere; Kahn, Barbara B

    2014-04-10

    In obesity and type 2 diabetes, Glut4 glucose transporter expression is decreased selectively in adipocytes. Adipose-specific knockout or overexpression of Glut4 alters systemic insulin sensitivity. Here we show, using DNA array analyses, that nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (Nnmt) is the most strongly reciprocally regulated gene when comparing gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) from adipose-specific Glut4-knockout or adipose-specific Glut4-overexpressing mice with their respective controls. NNMT methylates nicotinamide (vitamin B3) using S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as a methyl donor. Nicotinamide is a precursor of NAD(+), an important cofactor linking cellular redox states with energy metabolism. SAM provides propylamine for polyamine biosynthesis and donates a methyl group for histone methylation. Polyamine flux including synthesis, catabolism and excretion, is controlled by the rate-limiting enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine-spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT; encoded by Sat1) and by polyamine oxidase (PAO), and has a major role in energy metabolism. We report that NNMT expression is increased in WAT and liver of obese and diabetic mice. Nnmt knockdown in WAT and liver protects against diet-induced obesity by augmenting cellular energy expenditure. NNMT inhibition increases adipose SAM and NAD(+) levels and upregulates ODC and SSAT activity as well as expression, owing to the effects of NNMT on histone H3 lysine 4 methylation in adipose tissue. Direct evidence for increased polyamine flux resulting from NNMT inhibition includes elevated urinary excretion and adipocyte secretion of diacetylspermine, a product of polyamine metabolism. NNMT inhibition in adipocytes increases oxygen consumption in an ODC-, SSAT- and PAO-dependent manner. Thus, NNMT is a novel regulator of histone methylation, polyamine flux and NAD(+)-dependent SIRT1 signalling, and is a unique and attractive target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  14. Resveratrol inhibits the deleterious effects of diet-induced obesity on thymic function.

    PubMed

    Gulvady, Apeksha A; Ciolino, Henry P; Cabrera, Robert M; Jolly, Christopher A

    2013-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of infectious diseases. It has been shown to have deleterious effects on cell-mediated immunity, including reducing thymocyte numbers and altering responses of thymocytes to pathogens. In the current study, we examined the efficacy of the antiobesity phytochemical resveratrol in preventing the deleterious effects of a high-fat diet on thymic anatomy and function. Compared to C57Bl/6 male mice fed a low-fat diet, mice on a high-fat diet had a significant increase in thymic weight and lipid content, and a disrupted anatomy, including a reduction of the medullary compartment and absence of a corticomedullary junction. There were a decrease in thymic cellularity and mature T-cell output, and a disrupted T-cell maturation, as evidenced by increased double-negative and decreased single- and double-positive thymocytes. Mice that had been fed resveratrol along with a high-fat diet had a dose-dependent reversal in all these parameters. Western blots from thymi showed that obese mice had lower levels of the key stimulators of lipid metabolism, phospho-5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and its downstream target, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1; this was restored to normal levels in resveratrol-fed mice. Resveratrol also reversed an increase in glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase-1, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in triglycerol synthesis. Taken together, these results indicate that resveratrol is a potent inhibitor of the deleterious effects of diet-induced obesity on thymic anatomy and function, and this may hold promise in preventing obesity-related deficits in cell-mediated immunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nicotinamide N-methyltransferase knockdown protects against diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Daniel; Yang, Qin; Kong, Dong; Banks, Alexander S.; Zhang, Lin; Rodgers, Joseph T.; Pirinen, Eija; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas C.; Gong, Fengying; Wang, Ya-chin; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Asara, John M.; Peroni, Odile D.; Monia, Brett P.; Bhanot, Sanjay; Alhonen, Leena; Puigserver, Pere; Kahn, Barbara B.

    2014-01-01

    In obesity and type 2 diabetes, Glut4 glucose transporter expression is decreased selectively in adipocytes1. Adipose-specific knockout or overexpression of Glut4 alters systemic insulin sensitivity2. Here we show, using DNA array analyses, that nicotinamide N-methyltransferase (Nnmt) is the most strongly reciprocally regulated gene when comparing gene expression in white adipose tissue (WAT) from adipose-specific Glut4-knockout or adipose-specific Glut4-overexpressing mice with their respective controls. NNMT methylates nicotinamide (vitamin B3) using S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) as a methyl donor3,4. Nicotinamide is a precursor of NAD+, an important cofactor linking cellular redox states with energy metabolism5. SAM provides propylamine for polyamine biosynthesis and donates a methyl group for histone methylation6. Polyamine flux including synthesis, catabolism and excretion, is controlled by the rate-limiting enzymes ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine–spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT; encoded by Sat1) and by polyamine oxidase (PAO), and has a major role in energy metabolism7,8. We report that NNMT expression is increased in WAT and liver of obese and diabetic mice. Nnmt knockdown in WAT and liver protects against diet-induced obesity by augmenting cellular energy expenditure. NNMT inhibition increases adipose SAM and NAD+ levels and upregulates ODC and SSAT activity as well as expression, owing to the effects of NNMT on histone H3 lysine 4 methylation in adipose tissue. Direct evidence for increased polyamine flux resulting from NNMT inhibition includes elevated urinary excretion and adipocyte secretion of diacetylspermine, a product of polyamine metabolism. NNMT inhibition in adipocytes increases oxygen consumption in an ODC-, SSAT- and PAO-dependent manner. Thus, NNMT is a novel regulator of histone methylation, polyamine flux and NAD+-dependent SIRT1 signalling, and is a unique and attractive target for treating obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID

  16. Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Motivation and Pain Behavior in an Operant Assay

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Heather L.; Luu, Anthony K.S.; Kothari, Sunny D.; Kuburas, Adisa; Neubert, John K.; Caudle, Robert M.; Recober, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with multiple chronic pain disorders, including migraine. We hypothesized that diet-induced obesity would be associated with a reduced threshold for thermal nociception in the trigeminal system. In this study, we sought to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on facial pain behavior. Mice of two different strains were fed high-fat or regular diet and tested using a well-established operant facial pain assay. We found that the effects of diet on behavior in this assay were strain and reward dependent. Obesity prone C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat diet display lower number of licks of a caloric, palatable reward (33% sweetened condensed milk or 30% sucrose) than control mice. This occurred at all temperatures, in both sexes, and was evident even before the onset of obesity. This diminished reward-seeking behavior was not observed in obesity resistant SKH1E mice. These findings suggest that diet and strain interact to modulate reward-seeking behavior. Furthermore, we observed a difference between diet groups in operant behavior with caloric, palatable rewards, but not with a non-caloric neutral reward (water). Importantly, we found no effect of diet-induced obesity on acute thermal nociception in the absence of inflammation or injury. This indicates that thermal sensation in the face is not affected by obesity-associated peripheral neuropathy as it occurs when studying pain behaviors in the rodent hindpaw. Future studies using this model may reveal whether obesity facilitates the development of chronic pain after injury or inflammation. PMID:23333672

  17. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Fagman, Johan B.; Wilhelmson, Anna S.; Motta, Benedetta M.; Pirazzi, Carlo; Alexanderson, Camilla; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Holmäng, Agneta; Anesten, Fredrik; Jansson, John-Olov; Levin, Malin; Borén, Jan; Ohlsson, Claes; Krettek, Alexandra; Romeo, Stefano; Tivesten, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Androgens have important cardiometabolic actions in males, but their metabolic role in females is unclear. To determine the physiologic androgen receptor (AR)–dependent actions of androgens on atherogenesis in female mice, we generated female AR-knockout (ARKO) mice on an atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)–deficient background. After 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, but not on a normal chow diet, atherosclerosis in aorta was increased in ARKO females (+59% vs. control apoE-deficient mice with intact AR gene). They also displayed increased body weight (+18%), body fat percentage (+62%), and hepatic triglyceride levels, reduced insulin sensitivity, and a marked atherogenic dyslipidemia (serum cholesterol, +52%). Differences in atherosclerosis, body weight, and lipid levels between ARKO and control mice were abolished in mice that were ovariectomized before puberty, consistent with a protective action of ovarian androgens mediated via the AR. Furthermore, the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone reduced atherosclerosis (−41%; thoracic aorta), subcutaneous fat mass (−44%), and cholesterol levels (−35%) in ovariectomized mice, reduced hepatocyte lipid accumulation in hepatoma cells in vitro, and regulated mRNA expression of hepatic genes pivotal for lipid homeostasis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the AR protects against diet-induced atherosclerosis in female mice and propose that this is mediated by modulation of body composition and lipid metabolism.—Fagman, J. B., Wilhelmson, A. S., Motta, B. M., Pirazzi, C., Alexanderson, C., De Gendt, K., Verhoeven, G., Holmäng, A., Anesten, F., Jansson, J.-O., Levin, M., Borén, J., Ohlsson, C., Krettek, A., Romeo, S., Tivesten, A. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice. PMID:25550469

  18. Effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissues of diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mak-Soon; Shin, Yoonjin; Jung, Sunyoon; Kim, Yangha

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol in green tea and has been considered a natural agent that can help to reduce the risk of obesity. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EGCG on thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of diet-induced obese mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were provided a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, following which they were divided into two groups: one on a high-fat control diet and the other on a 0.2% EGCG (w/w)-supplemented high-fat diet for another 8 weeks. Results: The EGCG-supplemented group showed decreased body weight gain, and plasma and liver lipids. EGCG-fed mice exhibited higher body temperature and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in BAT. The messenger RNA levels of genes related to thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in BAT were increased by EGCG. Moreover, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in BAT was stimulated by EGCG. Conclusions: The results suggest that EGCG may have anti-obesity properties through BAT thermogenesis and mitochondria biogenesis, which are partially associated with the regulation of genes related to thermogenesis and mitochondria biogenesis, and the increase in mtDNA replication and AMPK activation in BAT of diet-induced obese mice.

  19. Effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate on thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissues of diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mak-Soon; Shin, Yoonjin; Jung, Sunyoon; Kim, Yangha

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol in green tea and has been considered a natural agent that can help to reduce the risk of obesity. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of EGCG on thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of diet-induced obese mice. Methods: Male C57BL/6J mice were provided a high-fat diet for 8 weeks to induce obesity, following which they were divided into two groups: one on a high-fat control diet and the other on a 0.2% EGCG (w/w)-supplemented high-fat diet for another 8 weeks. Results: The EGCG-supplemented group showed decreased body weight gain, and plasma and liver lipids. EGCG-fed mice exhibited higher body temperature and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in BAT. The messenger RNA levels of genes related to thermogenesis and mitochondrial biogenesis in BAT were increased by EGCG. Moreover, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in BAT was stimulated by EGCG. Conclusions: The results suggest that EGCG may have anti-obesity properties through BAT thermogenesis and mitochondria biogenesis, which are partially associated with the regulation of genes related to thermogenesis and mitochondria biogenesis, and the increase in mtDNA replication and AMPK activation in BAT of diet-induced obese mice. PMID:28659734

  20. CD47 deficiency protects mice from diet-induced obesity and improves whole body glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Maimaitiyiming, Hasiyeti; Norman, Heather; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Shuxia

    2015-03-09

    CD47 is a transmembrane protein with several functions including self-recognition, immune cell communication, and cell signaling. Although it has been extensively studied in cancer and ischemia, CD47 function in obesity has never been explored. In this study, we utilized CD47 deficient mice in a high-fat diet induced obesity model to study for the first time whether CD47 plays a role in the development of obesity and metabolic complications. Male CD47 deficient and wild type (WT) control mice were fed with either low fat (LF) or high fat (HF) diets for 16 weeks. Interestingly, we found that CD47 deficient mice were protected from HF diet-induced obesity displaying decreased weight gain and reduced adiposity. This led to decreased MCP1/CCR2 dependent macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue and reduced inflammation, resulting in improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, CD47 deficiency stimulated the expression of UCP1 and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1b (CPT1b) levels in brown adipose tissue, leading to increased lipid utilization and heat production. This contributes to the increased energy utilization and reduced adiposity observed in these mice. Taken together, these data revealed a novel role for CD47 in the development of obesity and its related metabolic complications.

  1. Analysis of energy expenditure in diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Assaad, Houssein; Yao, Kang; Tekwe, Carmen D.; Feng, Shuo; Bazer, Fuller W.; Zhou, Lan; Carroll, Raymond J.; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    Development of obesity in animals is affected by energy intake, dietary composition, and metabolism. Useful models for studying this metabolic problem are Sprague-Dawley rats fed low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diets beginning at 28 days of age. Through experimental design, their dietary intakes of energy, protein, vitamins, and minerals per kg body weight (BW) do not differ in order to eliminate confounding factors in data interpretation. The 24-h energy expenditure of rats is measured using indirect calorimetry. A regression model is constructed to accurately predict BW gain based on diet, initial BW gain, and the principal component scores of respiratory quotient and heat production. Time-course data on metabolism (including energy expenditure) are analyzed using a mixed effect model that fits both fixed and random effects. Cluster analysis is employed to classify rats as normal-weight or obese. HF-fed rats are heavier than LF-fed rats, but rates of their heat production per kg non-fat mass do not differ. We conclude that metabolic conversion of dietary lipids into body fat primarily contributes to obesity in HF-fed rats. PMID:24896330

  2. Diet-induced obesity causes insulin resistance in mouse brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Toler, Carla; O'Neill, Brian T; Cypess, Aaron M

    2015-09-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) causes several pathophysiological changes in adipose tissue. Increased inflammation reduces white adipose tissue (WAT) insulin sensitivity and contributes to the development of diabetes. However, little is known about how DIO alters the function of brown adipose tissue (BAT), an organ that consumes calories by β3-adrenergic receptor (AR)-mediated thermogenesis and helps regulate energy balance. To test the effects of DIO on BAT, we fed 6-week-old C57BL/6 mice either a normal chow diet (NCD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). After 16 additional weeks, we measured body fat, WAT, and BAT mRNA expression, glucose tolerance, and rates of glucose uptake in response to insulin and the β3-AR agonist mirabegron. Compared with NCD, HFD increased body fat and impaired glucose tolerance. Both WAT and BAT had higher mRNA levels of markers of inflammation, including TNFα and F4/80. Insulin signaling in BAT and WAT was reduced, with decreased Akt phosphorylation. Diet-normalized BAT glucose uptake rates were lower in response to mirabegron. These results support a model in which DIO leads to BAT inflammation and insulin resistance, leading to a broader impairment of BAT function. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  3. A Mouse Model of Diet-Induced Obesity Resembling Most Features of Human Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Della Vedova, Maria C.; Muñoz, Marcos D.; Santillan, Lucas D.; Plateo-Pignatari, Maria G.; Germanó, Maria J.; Rinaldi Tosi, Martín E.; Garcia, Silvina; Gomez, Nidia N.; Fornes, Miguel W.; Gomez Mejiba, Sandra E.; Ramirez, Dario C.

    2016-01-01

    Increased chicken-derived fat and fructose consumption in the human diet is paralleled by an increasing prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS). Herein, we aimed at developing and characterizing a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) resembling most of the key features of the human MS. To accomplish this, we fed male C57BL/6J mice for 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks with either a low-fat diet (LFD) or a high-chicken-fat diet (HFD) and tap water with or without 10% fructose (F). This experimental design resulted in the following four experimental groups: LFD, LFD + F, HFD, and HFD + F. Over the feeding period, and on a weekly basis, the HFD + F group had more caloric intake and gained more weight than the other experimental groups. Compared to the other groups, and at the end of the feeding period, the HFD + F group had a higher adipogenic index, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting basal glycemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, and atherogenic index and showed steatohepatitis and systemic oxidative stress/inflammation. A mouse model of DIO that will allow us to study the effect of MS in different organs and systems has been developed and characterized. PMID:27980421

  4. Korean solar salts reduce obesity and alter its related markers in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jaehyun; Song, Jia-Le; Park, Eui-Seong; Do, Myoung-Sool

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The aim of this experiments was to show anti-obesity effects of Korean solar salt from different salt fields in diet-induced obese mice. SUBJECTS/METHODS Diet-induced obesity (DIO) was induced by a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% cal from fat) in C57BL/6J mice for eight weeks. The mice were fed with the designated diets (chow diet for Normal, HFD for Control, 0.47%-salt-mixed HFD for purified salt (PS), Guerande solar salt from France (SS-G), solar salt from Y salt field (SS-Y), solar salts from T salt field (SS-T) and S salt field (SS-S)) for another eight weeks. We checked body weight, food efficiency ratio (FER) and tissue weights (liver and epididymal adipose tissue (EAT)), and observed serum concentrations of triacylglycerol (TG), total cholesterol (TC), leptin and insulin. We also evaluated gene expressions of adipogenic / lipogenic mRNAs of C/EBPα, PPARγ and FAS and beta-oxidation-related factors (PPARα and CPT-1) in liver and EAT. The mineral composition of salt samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). RESULTS SS-T and SS-S significantly reduced body weight gain, FER, and weight of EAT compared to control and other samples (P < 0.05). SS-T and SS-S also significantly decreased serum levels of TG, TC, leptin and insulin (P < 0.05). SS-T and SS-S suppressed expressions of adipogenic / lipogenic mRNAs in liver and EAT, while promoting expression of beta-oxidation-related factors. The lowest sodium concentration was observed in SS-T (30.30 ± 0.59%), and the lowest sodium-to-potassium (Na/K) ratio was found in SS-S (17.81). CONCLUSIONS Our study shows that well-processed Korean solar salt may have anti-obesity effects in vivo, probably owing to its differences in mineral composition and other components, presumably resulting from the manufacturing processes. Further research is needed into the mechanism and to explore optimal manufacturing processes. PMID:27909561

  5. Miglitol prevents diet-induced obesity by stimulating brown adipose tissue and energy expenditure independent of preventing the digestion of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsutomu; Shimpuku, Mayumi; Kitazumi, Tomoya; Hiraga, Haruna; Nakagawa, Yuko; Shibata, Hiroshi; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Kikuchi, Osamu; Kim, Hye-jin; Fujita, Yuki; Maruyama, Jun; Susanti, Vina Yanti; Yokota-Hashimoto, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Saito, Masayuki; Kitamura, Tadahiro

    2013-01-01

    Miglitol is an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor that improves post-prandial hyperglycemia, and it is the only drug in its class that enters the bloodstream. Anecdotally, miglitol lowers patient body weight more effectively than other alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, but the precise mechanism has not been addressed. Therefore, we analyzed the anti-obesity effects of miglitol in mice and in the HB2 brown adipocyte cell line. Miglitol prevented diet-induced obesity by stimulating energy expenditure without affecting food intake in mice. Long-term miglitol treatment dose-dependently prevented diet-induced obesity and induced mitochondrial gene expression in brown adipose tissue. The anti-obesity effect was independent of preventing carbohydrate digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. Miglitol effectively stimulated energy expenditure in mice fed a high-fat high-monocarbohydrate diet, and intraperitoneal injection of miglitol was sufficient to stimulate energy expenditure in mice. Acarbose, which is a non-absorbable alpha glucosidase inhibitor, also prevented diet-induced obesity, but through a different mechanism: it did not stimulate energy expenditure, but caused indigestion, leading to less energy absorption. Miglitol promoted adrenergic signaling in brown adipocytes in vitro. These data indicate that circulating miglitol stimulates brown adipose tissue and increases energy expenditure, thereby preventing diet-induced obesity. Further optimizing miglitol's effect on brown adipose tissue could lead to a novel anti-obesity drug.

  6. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment.

  7. Treadmill exercise alleviates impairment of cognitive function by enhancing hippocampal neuroplasticity in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Yong-Rak

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most effective methods for managing obesity, and exercise exerts positive effects on various brain functions. Excessive weight gain is known to be related to the impairment of cognitive function. High-fat diet-induced obesity impairs hippocampal neuroplasticity, which impedes cognitive function, such as learning ability and memory function. In this study, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on impairment of cognitive function in relation with hippocampal neuroplasticity using high-fat diet-induced obese mice. After obesity was induced by a 20-week high-fat (60%) diet, treadmill exercise was performed for 12 weeks. In the present results, cognitive function was impaired in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosin kinase B (TrkB) expression and cell proliferation were decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Treadmill exercise improved cognitive function through enhancing neuroplasticity, including increased expression of BDNF and TrkB and enhanced cell proliferation. The present results suggest that treadmill exercise enhances hippocampal neuroplasticity, and then potentially plays a protective role against obesity-induced cognitive impairment. PMID:27419109

  8. Diet-induced obesity and kidney disease - In search of a susceptible mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Shawna E; Nguyen, Trang-Tiffany; Breaux, Chelsea; Kruger, Claudia; Stadler, Krisztian

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease, even without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Here, we compare two mouse models that are susceptible to diet-induced obesity: the relatively renal injury resistant C57BL/6J strain and the DBA2/J strain which is more sensitive to renal injury. Our studies focused on characterizing the effects of high fat diet feeding on renal oxidative stress, albuminuria, fibrosis and podocyte loss/insulin resistance. While the C57BL/6J strain does not develop significant pathological changes in the kidney, at least on lard based diets within the time frame investigated, it does show increased renal iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels and elevated mitochondrial respiration which may be indicative of mitochondrial lipid overfueling. Restricting the high fat diet to decrease adiposity decreased the levels of cellular oxidative stress markers, indicating that adiposity-related proinflammatory changes such as increased iNOS levels may trigger similar responses in the kidney. Mitochondrial respiration remained higher, suggesting that eating excess lipids, despite normal adiposity may still lead to renal mitochondrial overfueling. In comparison, DBA/2J mice developed albuminuria on similar diets, signs of fibrosis, oxidative stress, early signs of podocyte loss (evaluated by the markers podocin and WT-1) and podocyte insulin resistance (unable to phosphorylate their glomerular Akt when insulin was given). To summarize, while the C57BL/6J strain is not particularly susceptible to renal disease, changes in its mitochondrial lipid handling combined with the easy availability of transgenic technology may be an advantage to design new knockout models related to mitochondrial lipid metabolism. The DBA/2J model could serve as a basis for studying podocyte insulin resistance and identifying early renal markers in obesity before more severe kidney disease develops. Based on our observations, we encourage further critical

  9. Pyrrolidin-2-one derivatives may reduce body weight in rats with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Magdalena; Knutelska, Joanna; Bednarski, Marek; Nowiński, Leszek; Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Kazek, Grzegorz; Mordyl, Barbara; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Zaręba, Paula; Kulig, Katarzyna; Sapa, Jacek

    2016-04-05

    Obesity affects an increasing number of individuals in the human population and significant importance is attached to research leading to the discovery of drug which would effectively reduce weight. The search for new drugs with anorectic activity and acting within the adrenergic system has attracted the interest of researchers. This study concerns the experimental effects on body weight of α2-adrenoceptor antagonists from the group of pyrrolidin-2-one derivatives in rats with diet-induced obesity. The intrinsic activity of the test compounds at the α-adrenoreceptors was tested. Obesity in rats was obtained by the use of fatty diet and then the influence of the test compounds on body weight, food and water intakes, lipid and glucose profiles and glycerol and cortisol levels were determinated. The effects of the compounds on locomotor activity, body temperature, blood pressure and heart rate were tested. One of the test compounds (1-(3-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)propyl)pyrrolidin-2-one) reduces the animal's body weight and the amount of peritoneal adipose tissue during chronic administration, at the same time it does not cause significant adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. This compound decreases temperature and elevates glycerol levels and does not change the locomotor activity and cortisol level at anti-obese dose. Some derivatives of pyrrolidin-2-one that act as antagonists of the α2-adrenoreceptor may reduce body weight. Reducing body weight for 1-(3-(4-phenylpiperazin-1-yl)propyl)pyrrolidin-2-one can be associated with decrease in food intake, body fat reduction, reduction of blood glucose, and increased thermogenesis and lipolysis. This effect cannot be the result of changes in spontaneous activity or stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Colon epithelial proliferation and carcinogenesis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Hosono, Kunihiro; Endo, Hiroki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2013-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer death in Japan and the United States and is strongly associated with obesity, especially visceral obesity. Several metabolic mediators, such as adiponectin, have been suspected to play a role in obesity-related carcinogenesis. In a previous human study, the existence of a significant correlation between the number of human dysplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and the visceral fat area was demonstrated, and also that of a significant inverse correlation between the number of dysplastic ACF and the plasma adiponectin level. Other studies have investigated the effect of adiponectin under the normal and high-fat diet conditions in a mouse model of azoxymethane-induced colon cancer. Enhanced formation of both ACF and tumors was observed in the adiponectin-deficient mice, as compared with that in the wild-type, under the high-fat diet condition but not under the normal diet condition. Furthermore, that the 5'-AMP-activated kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is involved in the promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis in adiponectin-deficient mice under the high-fat diet condition was shown. Therefore, that the 5'-AMP-activated kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis was speculated. Metformin, a biguanide derivative widely used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, has been shown to exert a suppressive effect on ACF formation in both mouse models and humans. Therefore, metformin might be a promising candidate as a safe drug for chemoprevention of colorectal carcinogenesis. Further studies with high evidence levels, such as randomized, controlled studies, are needed to clarify these relationships. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Examination of the tissue ghrelin expression of rats with diet-induced obesity using radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Suleyman; Sahin, Ibrahim; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dag, Ersel; Gunay, Ahmet; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2012-06-01

    Currently, obesity is an important health problem in all countries, both developed and developing. Dietary habits and neurohormonal imbalances play a critical role in obesity. Circulating amounts of ghrelin, which is a neurohormonal hormone, decrease with obesity and increase with weight loss. Although it is known that both mRNA and peptide version of the ghrelin hormone are expressed in almost all tissues of both humans and animals, it is not known how obesity changes the expression of this hormone in the tissues, with the exception of the gastrointestinal system tissues. Therefore, the objective of the present study is to show how diet-induced obesity in rats changes ghrelin expression in all system tissues, and thus, to shed light on the etiopathology of obesity. The study included 12 male and 12 female 2-month-old Wistar albino species rats. The animals in the control group were fed on standard rat pellet, while those in the experiment group were fed ad libitum on a cafeteria-style diet for 2 months. When their body mass index reached 1 g/cm(2), diet-induced obese (DIO) rats were sacrificed in a sterile environment after one night fasting. Ghrelin localizations in the tissues were studied immunohistochemically using avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) method, while tissue ghrelin amounts were analyzed using radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. When the ghrelin amounts in the urogenital system (with the exception of kidney tissues), sensory organs, respiratory system, immune system, skeletal muscle system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, and adipose tissue of rats analyzed by RIA method were compared to those in the control group, tissue ghrelin amounts in the DIO group were found lower. Immunohistochemical findings which showed a similar fall in ghrelin concentrations in the tissues were parallel to RIA results. In addition, ghrelin was shown to be synthesized in the cardiovascular system, heart muscle cells, tails of the sperms, hair follicles, lacrimal

  12. Sexually dimorphic myeloid inflammatory and metabolic responses to diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, C.; Lanzetta, N.; Eter, L.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known in clinical and animal studies that women and men have different disease risk as well as different disease physiology. Women of reproductive age are protected from metabolic and cardiovascular disease compared with postmenopausal women and men. Most murine studies are skewed toward the use of male mice to study obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction because of similar protection in female mice. We have investigated dietary obesity in a mouse model and have directly compared inflammatory responses in males and females. In this review we will summarize what is known about sex differences in diet-induced inflammation and will summarize our data on this topic. It is clear that sex differences in high-fat diet-induced inflammatory activation are due to cell intrinsic differences in hematopoietic responses to obesogenic cues, but further research is needed to understand what leads to sexually dimorphic responses. PMID:27252473

  13. Effects of Maternal Linseed Oil Supplementation on Metabolic Parameters in Cafeteria Diet-induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Benaissa, Nawel; Merzouk, Hafida; Merzouk, Sid Ahmed; Narce, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Because linseed oil may influence maternal and fetal metabolisms, we investigated its role in the modulation of lipid metabolism in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats and their offspring. Female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria food, which were either supplemented or not supplemented with linseed oil (5%) for 1 month before and during gestation. At parturition, serum and tissue lipids and enzyme activities were analyzed. Cafeteria diet induced adverse metabolic alterations in both mothers and offspring. Linseed oil improved metabolic status. In conclusion, linseed oil displayed health benefits by modulating tissue enzyme activities in both obese mothers and their newborns. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  14. Silymarin Ameliorates Metabolic Dysfunction Associated with Diet-Induced Obesity via Activation of Farnesyl X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ming; Zhao, Ping; Huang, Jinwen; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yahui; Li, Yin; Li, Yifei; Fan, Shengjie; Ma, Yue-Ming; Tong, Qingchun; Yang, Li; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose: Silymarin, a standardized extract of the milk thistle seeds, has been widely used to treat chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and other types of toxic liver damage. Despite increasing studies on the action of silymarin and its major active constituent, silybin in their therapeutic properties against insulin resistance, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism underlying silymarin action remains unclear. Experimental approach: C57BL/6 mice were fed high-fat diet (HFD) for 3 months to induce obesity, insulin resistance, hyperlipidaemia, and fatty liver. These mice were then continuously treated with HFD alone or mixed with silymarin at 40 mg/100 g for additional 6 weeks. Biochemical analysis was used to test the serum lipid and bile acid profiles. Farnesyl X receptor (FXR) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transactivities were analyzed in liver using a gene reporter assay based on quantitative RT-PCR. Key results: Silymarin treatment ameliorated insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and inflammation, and reconstituted the bile acid pool in liver of diet-induced obesity. Associated with this, silybin and silymarin enhanced FXR transactivity. Consistently, in HepG2 cells, silybin inhibited NF-κB signaling, which was enhanced by FXR activation. Conclusion and implications: Our results suggest that silybin is an effective component of silymarin for treating metabolic syndrome by stimulating FXR signaling. PMID:27733832

  15. Artemisia supplementation differentially affects the mucosal and luminal ileal microbiota of diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Shawna, Wicks; M., Taylor Christopher; Meng, Luo; Eugene, Blanchard IV; David, Ribnicky; T., Cefalu William; L., Mynatt Randall; A., Welsh David

    2014-01-01

    Objective The gut microbiome has been implicated in obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, most studies have focused on fecal or colonic samples. Several species of Artemisia have been reported to ameliorate insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to characterize the mucosal and luminal bacterial populations in the terminal ileum with or without supplementation with Artemisia extracts. Materials/Methods Following 4 weeks of supplementation with different Artemisia extracts (PMI 5011, Santa or Scopa), diet-induced obese mice were sacrificed and luminal and mucosal samples of terminal ileum were used to evaluate microbial community composition by pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA hypervariable regions. Results Significant differences in community structure and membership were observed between luminal and mucosal samples, irrespective of diet group. All Artemisia extracts increased the Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio in mucosal samples. This effect was not observed in the luminal compartment. There was high inter-individual variability in the phylogenetic assessments of the ileal microbiota, limiting the statistical power of this pilot investigation. Conclusions Marked differences in bacterial communities exist dependent upon the biogeographic compartment in the terminal ileum. Future studies testing the effects of Artemisia or other botanical supplements require larger sample sizes for adequate statistical power. PMID:24985102

  16. Marked alterations in the distal gut microbiome linked to diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Backhed, Fredrik; Fulton, Lucinda; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We have investigated the inter-relationship between diet, gut microbial ecology and energy balance using a mouse model of obesity produced by consumption of a prototypic Western diet. Diet-induced obesity (DIO) produced a bloom in a single uncultured clade within the Mollicutes class of the Firmicutes, which became the dominant lineage within the distal gut microbiota. This bloom was diminished by subsequent dietary manipulations that limit weight gain and reduce adiposity. Transplantation of the microbiota from mice with DIO to lean germ-free recipients produced a significantly greater increase in adiposity than transplants from lean donors. Metagenomic sequencing of the gut microbiome, biochemical assays, plus sequencing and in silico metabolic reconstructions of a related human gut-associated Mollicute (E.dolichum), revealed features that may provide a competitive advantage for members of the bloom in the Western diet nutrient milieu, including genes involved in import and metabolism of simple sugars. Our study illustrates how combining comparative metagenomics with gnotobiotic mouse models and specific dietary manipulations can disclose the niches of previously uncharacterized members of the gut microbiota. PMID:18407065

  17. Narciclasine attenuates diet-induced obesity by promoting oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sinnakannu, Joanna R.; Ge, Xiaojia; Ma, Wei; Velan, Sendhil S.; Röder, Pia V.; Zhang, Qiongyi; Sim, Choon Kiat; Wu, Jingyi; Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Xie, Wei; McFarlane, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Obesity develops when caloric intake exceeds metabolic needs. Promoting energy expenditure represents an attractive approach in the prevention of this fast-spreading epidemic. Here, we report a novel pharmacological strategy in which a natural compound, narciclasine (ncls), attenuates diet-induced obesity (DIO) in mice by promoting energy expenditure. Moreover, ncls promotes fat clearance from peripheral metabolic tissues, improves blood metabolic parameters in DIO mice, and protects these mice from the loss of voluntary physical activity. Further investigation suggested that ncls achieves these beneficial effects by promoting a shift from glycolytic to oxidative muscle fibers in the DIO mice thereby enhancing mitochondrial respiration and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the skeletal muscle. Moreover, ncls strongly activates AMPK signaling specifically in the skeletal muscle. The beneficial effects of ncls treatment in fat clearance and AMPK activation were faithfully reproduced in vitro in cultured murine and human primary myotubes. Mechanistically, ncls increases cellular cAMP concentration and ADP/ATP ratio, which further lead to the activation of AMPK signaling. Blocking AMPK signaling through a specific inhibitor significantly reduces FAO in myotubes. Finally, ncls also enhances mitochondrial membrane potential and reduces the formation of reactive oxygen species in cultured myotubes. PMID:28207742

  18. Artemisia supplementation differentially affects the mucosal and luminal ileal microbiota of diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Shawna; Taylor, Christopher M; Luo, Meng; Blanchard, Eugene; Ribnicky, David M; Cefalu, William T; Mynatt, Randall L; Welsh, David A

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiome has been implicated in obesity and metabolic syndrome; however, most studies have focused on fecal or colonic samples. Several species of Artemisia have been reported to ameliorate insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to characterize the mucosal and luminal bacterial populations in the terminal ileum with or without supplementation with Artemisia extracts. Following 4 wk of supplementation with different Artemisia extracts (PMI 5011, Santa or Scopa), diet-induced obese mice were sacrificed and luminal and mucosal samples of terminal ileum were used to evaluate microbial community composition by pyrosequencing of 16 S rDNA hypervariable regions. Significant differences in community structure and membership were observed between luminal and mucosal samples, irrespective of diet group. All Artemisia extracts increased the Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes ratio in mucosal samples. This effect was not observed in the luminal compartment. There was high interindividual variability in the phylogenetic assessments of the ileal microbiota, limiting the statistical power of this pilot investigation. Marked differences in bacterial communities exist depending on the biogeographic compartment in the terminal ileum. Future studies testing the effects of Artemisia or other botanical supplements require larger sample sizes for adequate statistical power. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pregnancy restores insulin secretion from pancreatic islets in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Vanzela, E C; Ribeiro, R A; de Oliveira, C A Machado; Rodrigues, F B; Bonfleur, M L; Carneiro, E M; Souza, K L A; Boschero, A C

    2010-02-01

    Insulin resistance during pregnancy is counteracted by enhanced insulin secretion. This condition is aggravated by obesity, which increases the risk of gestational diabetes. Therefore, pancreatic islet functionality was investigated in control nonpregnant (C) and pregnant (CP), and cafeteria diet-fed nonpregnant (Caf), and pregnant (CafP) obese rats. Isolated islets were used for measurements of insulin secretion (RIA), NAD(P)H production (MTS), glucose oxidation ((14)CO(2) production), intracellular Ca(2+) levels (fura-2 AM), and gene expression (real-time PCR). Impaired glucose tolerance was clearly established in Caf and CafP rats at the 14th wk on a diet. Insulin secretion induced by direct depolarizing agents such as KCl and tolbutamide and increasing concentrations of glucose was significantly reduced in Caf, compared with C islets. This reduction was not observed in islets from CP and CafP rats. Accordingly, the glucose oxidation and production of reduced equivalents were increased in CafP islets. The glucose-induced Ca(2+) increase was significantly lower in Caf and higher in CafP, compared with all other groups. CP and CafP islets demonstrated an increased Ca(2+) oscillation frequency, compared with both C and Caf islets, and the amplitude of oscillations was augmented in CafP, compared with Caf islets. In addition, Ca(v)alpha1.2 and SERCA2a mRNA levels were reduced in Caf islets. Ca(v)alpha1.2, but not SERCA2a, mRNA was normalized in CafP islets. In conclusion, cafeteria diet-induced obesity impairs insulin secretion. This alteration is related to the impairment of Ca(2+) handling in pancreatic islets, in especial Ca(2+) influx, a defect that is reversed during pregnancy allowing normalization of insulin secretion.

  20. Alterations in the hippocampal endocannabinoid system in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Massa, Federico; Mancini, Giacomo; Schmidt, Helmut; Steindel, Frauke; Mackie, Ken; Angioni, Carlo; Oliet, Stéphane H R; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lutz, Beat

    2010-05-05

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system plays central roles in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Its alteration in activity contributes to the development and maintenance of obesity. Stimulation of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1) receptor) increases feeding, enhances reward aspects of eating, and promotes lipogenesis, whereas its blockade decreases appetite, sustains weight loss, increases insulin sensitivity, and alleviates dysregulation of lipid metabolism. The hypothesis has been put forward that the eCB system is overactive in obesity. Hippocampal circuits are not directly involved in the neuronal control of food intake and appetite, but they play important roles in hedonic aspects of eating. We investigated the possibility whether or not diet-induced obesity (DIO) alters the functioning of the hippocampal eCB system. We found that levels of the two eCBs, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) and anandamide, were increased in the hippocampus from DIO mice, with a concomitant increase of the 2-AG synthesizing enzyme diacylglycerol lipase-alpha and increased CB(1) receptor immunoreactivity in CA1 and CA3 regions, whereas CB(1) receptor agonist-induced [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding was unchanged. eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity was changed in the CA1 region, as depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition and long-term depression of inhibitory synapses were enhanced. Functionality of CB(1) receptors in GABAergic neurons was furthermore revealed, as mice specifically lacking CB(1) receptors on this neuronal population were partly resistant to DIO. Our results show that DIO-induced changes in the eCB system affect not only tissues directly involved in the metabolic regulation but also brain regions mediating hedonic aspects of eating and influencing cognitive processes.

  1. Diet-induced obesity causes ghrelin resistance in arcuate NPY/AgRP neurons.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Dana I; Enriori, Pablo J; Lemus, Moyra B; Cowley, Michael A; Andrews, Zane B

    2010-10-01

    Circulating ghrelin is decreased in obesity, and peripheral ghrelin does not induce food intake in obese mice. We investigated whether ghrelin resistance was a centrally mediated phenomenon involving dysregulated neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) circuits. We show that diet-induced obesity (DIO) (12 wk) suppresses the neuroendocrine ghrelin system by decreasing acylated and total plasma ghrelin, decreasing ghrelin and Goat mRNA in the stomach, and decreasing expression of hypothalamic GHSR. Peripheral (ip) or central (intracerebroventricular) ghrelin injection was able to induce food intake and arcuate nucleus Fos immunoreactivity in chow-fed but not high-fat diet-fed mice. DIO decreased expression of Npy and Agrp mRNA, and central ghrelin was unable to promote expression of these genes. Ghrelin did not induce AgRP or NPY secretion in hypothalamic explants from DIO mice. Injection of NPY intracerebroventricularly increased food intake in both chow-fed and high-fat diet-fed mice, indicating that downstream NPY/AgRP neural targets are intact and that defective NPY/AgRP function is a primary cause of ghrelin resistance. Ghrelin resistance in DIO is not confined to the NPY/AgRP neurons, because ghrelin did not stimulate growth hormone secretion in DIO mice. Collectively, our data suggests that DIO causes ghrelin resistance by reducing NPY/AgRP responsiveness to plasma ghrelin and suppressing the neuroendocrine ghrelin axis to limit further food intake. Ghrelin has a number of functions in the brain aside from appetite control, including cognitive function, mood regulation, and protecting against neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, central ghrelin resistance may potentiate obesity-related cognitive decline, and restoring ghrelin sensitivity may provide therapeutic outcomes for maintaining healthy aging.

  2. Phosphorus Supplementation Recovers the Blunted Diet-Induced Thermogenesis of Overweight and Obese Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bassil, Maya S; Obeid, Omar A

    2016-12-09

    Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) is believed to be largely related to ATP production, which is dependent on phosphorus (P) availability. We aimed to test the effect of P addition on DIT of lean and overweight/obese healthy subjects. DIT was measured with or without P in 10 lean and 13 overweight/obese adults in a double-blind randomized cross-over pilot study with one week washout period. After 10 h overnight fast, resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and substrate utilization were measured at fasting and every 30 min for 3 h after subjects drank a standardized glucose solution, with P (500 mg) or placebo pills. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were assessed before and after the end of each experiment using validated visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaires. Overweight/obese subjects had a blunted DIT with placebo, while P supplementation induced a 23% increase in their DIT area under the curve (p < 0.05), which was associated with a significant increase in carbohydrate oxidation. Subjects had lower appetite following P supplementation, which was expressed as a significantly (p = 0.02) lower desire to eat a meal (4.0 ± 0.7 cm) compared with placebo (5.8 ± 0.9 cm). P supplementation recovers the blunted diet-induced thermogenesis in overweight and obese subjects and enhances their postprandial satiety.

  3. Phosphorus Supplementation Recovers the Blunted Diet-Induced Thermogenesis of Overweight and Obese Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, Maya S.; Obeid, Omar A.

    2016-01-01

    Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) is believed to be largely related to ATP production, which is dependent on phosphorus (P) availability. We aimed to test the effect of P addition on DIT of lean and overweight/obese healthy subjects. DIT was measured with or without P in 10 lean and 13 overweight/obese adults in a double-blind randomized cross-over pilot study with one week washout period. After 10 h overnight fast, resting metabolic rate, respiratory quotient, and substrate utilization were measured at fasting and every 30 min for 3 h after subjects drank a standardized glucose solution, with P (500 mg) or placebo pills. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were assessed before and after the end of each experiment using validated visual analogue scale (VAS) questionnaires. Overweight/obese subjects had a blunted DIT with placebo, while P supplementation induced a 23% increase in their DIT area under the curve (p < 0.05), which was associated with a significant increase in carbohydrate oxidation. Subjects had lower appetite following P supplementation, which was expressed as a significantly (p = 0.02) lower desire to eat a meal (4.0 ± 0.7 cm) compared with placebo (5.8 ± 0.9 cm). P supplementation recovers the blunted diet-induced thermogenesis in overweight and obese subjects and enhances their postprandial satiety. PMID:27941661

  4. Caspase-1 deficiency promotes high-fat diet-induced adipose tissue inflammation and the development of obesity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Karasawa, Tadayoshi; Usui, Fumitake; Kawashima, Akira; Endo, Yuka; Kobayashi, Motoi; Sadatomo, Ai; Nakamura, Jun; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Yada, Toshihiko; Tsutsui, Hiroko; Kasahara, Tadashi; Takahashi, Masafumi

    2016-11-01

    Caspase-1 is a cysteine protease responsible for the processing of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β and activated by the formation of inflammasome complexes. Although several investigations have found a link between diet-induced obesity and caspase-1, the relationship remains controversial. Here, we found that mice deficient in caspase-1 were susceptible to high-fat diet-induced obesity with increased adiposity as well as normal lipid and glucose metabolism. Caspase-1 deficiency clearly promoted the infiltration of inflammatory macrophages and increased the production of C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) in the adipose tissue. The dominant cellular source of CCL2 was stromal vascular fraction rather than adipocytes in the adipose tissue. These findings demonstrate a critical role of caspase-1 in macrophage-driven inflammation in the adipose tissue and the development of obesity. These data provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying inflammation in the pathophysiology of obesity. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Diet-Induced Obesity and the Mechanism of Leptin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Leptin signaling blockade by chronic overstimulation of the leptin receptor or hypothalamic pro-inflammatory responses due to elevated levels of saturated fatty acid can induce leptin resistance by activating negative feedback pathways. Although, long form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) initiates leptin signaling through more than seven different signal transduction pathways, excessive suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3) activity is a potential mechanism for the leptin resistance that characterizes human obesity. Because the leptin-responsive metabolic pathways broadly integrate with other neurons to control energy balance, the methods used to counteract the leptin resistance has extremely limited effect. In this chapter, besides the impairment of central and peripheral leptin signaling pathways, limited access of leptin to central nervous system (CNS) through blood-brain barrier, mismatch between high leptin and the amount of leptin receptor expression, contradictory effects of cellular and circulating molecules on leptin signaling, the connection between leptin signaling and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and self-regulation of leptin signaling has been discussed in terms of leptin resistance.

  6. The juxtaparanodal proteins CNTNAP2 and TAG1 regulate diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, David A.; Geisinger, Jon M.; Glazebrook, Patricia A.; Morgan, Michael G.; Spiezio, Sabrina H.; Kaiyala, Karl J.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Sakurai, Takeshi; Furley, Andrew J.; Kunze, Diana L.; Croniger, Colleen M.; Nadeau, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable effort, the identification of genes that regulate complex multigenic traits such as obesity has proven difficult with conventional methodologies. The use of a chromosome substitution strain-based mapping strategy based on deep congenic analysis over-came many of the difficulties associated with gene discovery and led to the finding that the juxtaparanodal proteins CNTNAP2 and TAG1 regulate diet-induced obesity. The effects of a mild Cntnap2 mutation on body weight were highly dependent on genetic background, as both obesity-promoting and obesity-resistant effects of Cntnap2 were observed on different genetic backgrounds. The more severe effect of complete TAG1 deficiency, by decreasing food intake, completely prevented the weight gain normally associated with high-fat-diet feeding. Together, these studies implicate two novel proteins in the regulation of diet-induced obesity. Moreover, as juxtaparanodal proteins have previously been implicated in various neurological disorders, our results suggest a potential genetic and molecular link between obesity and diseases such as autism and epilepsy. PMID:22752552

  7. Adaptation of intestinal secretomotor function and nutrient absorption in response to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Hyland, N P; Rybicka, J M; Ho, W; Pittman, Q J; Macnaughton, W K; Sharkey, K A

    2010-06-01

    The gut plays a significant role in the development of obesity, notably through peptide signaling to the brain. However, few studies have investigated intestinal function per se in a rodent model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Our aim was to investigate intestinal secretomotor function and glucose transport in DIO and diet-resistant (DR) rat jejunum. Male outbred Sprague-Dawley rats were maintained on a medium high fat diet for 9-10 weeks and split into DIO and DR groups based on weight gain. Mucosal-submucosal preparations of the proximal jejunum were mounted in Ussing chambers and voltage-clamped at 0 mV. Glucose (10 mmol L(-1)), 2-deoxy-D-glucose (10 mmol L(-1)), and leptin (10 nmol L(-1)) were added to the luminal side of the tissue and veratridine (30 micromol L(-1)), bethanechol (100 micromol L(-1)), and forskolin (10 micromol L(-1)) were added to the basolateral side of the tissue. Secretomotor responses were significantly decreased in DIO jejunum compared to DR tissues. Glucose-stimulated increases in I(sc) in DR animals, that were sensitive to leptin inhibition, were significantly reduced in DIO rats. Decreased sodium glucose transporter-1 mediated glucose transport was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the expression of jejunal glucose transporter-2. These data suggest that submucosal nerve function is compromised in DIO rats and electrogenic glucose transport is significantly decreased. The latter may represent an adaptive response to limit nutrient absorption in the jejunum from DIO rats. However, the loss of secretomotor control may lead to an altered host defense with a resultant change in intestinal flora contributing to the maintenance of obesity.

  8. Leptin Resistance in Vagal Afferent Neurons Inhibits Cholecystokinin Signaling and Satiation in Diet Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    de Lartigue, Guillaume; Barbier de la Serre, Claire; Espero, Elvis; Lee, Jennifer; Raybould, Helen E.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK) plays an important role in regulating meal size and duration by activating CCK1 receptors on vagal afferent neurons (VAN). Leptin enhances CCK signaling in VAN via an early growth response 1 (EGR1) dependent pathway thereby increasing their sensitivity to CCK. In response to a chronic ingestion of a high fat diet, VAN develop leptin resistance and the satiating effects of CCK are reduced. We tested the hypothesis that leptin resistance in VAN is responsible for reducing CCK signaling and satiation. Results Lean Zucker rats sensitive to leptin signaling, significantly reduced their food intake following administration of CCK8S (0.22 nmol/kg, i.p.), while obese Zucker rats, insensitive to leptin, did not. CCK signaling in VAN of obese Zucker rats was reduced, preventing CCK-induced up-regulation of Y2 receptor and down-regulation of melanin concentrating hormone 1 receptor (MCH1R) and cannabinoid receptor (CB1). In VAN from diet-induced obese (DIO) Sprague Dawley rats, previously shown to become leptin resistant, we demonstrated that the reduction in EGR1 expression resulted in decreased sensitivity of VAN to CCK and reduced CCK-induced inhibition of food intake. The lowered sensitivity of VAN to CCK in DIO rats resulted in a decrease in Y2 expression and increased CB1 and MCH1R expression. These effects coincided with the onset of hyperphagia in DIO rats. Conclusions Leptin signaling in VAN is required for appropriate CCK signaling and satiation. In response to high fat feeding, the onset of leptin resistance reduces the sensitivity of VAN to CCK thus reducing the satiating effects of CCK. PMID:22412960

  9. Lamp-2 deficiency prevents high-fat diet-induced obese diabetes via enhancing energy expenditure

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Yamahara, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakzu; Ugi, Satoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-09-18

    Autophagy process is essential for maintaining intracellular homeostasis and consists of autophagosome formation and subsequent fusion with lysosome for degradation. Although the role of autophagosome formation in the pathogenesis of diabetes has been recently documented, the role of the latter process remains unclear. This study analyzed high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice lacking lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (lamp-2), which is essential for the fusion with lysosome and subsequent degradation of autophagosomes. Although lamp-2 deficient mice showed little alteration in glucose metabolism under normal diet feeding, they showed a resistance against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia and tissues lipid accumulation, accompanied with higher energy expenditure. The expression levels of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue were significantly increased in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice. Of some serum factors related to energy expenditure, the serum level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 and its mRNA expression level in the liver were significantly higher in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice in an ER stress-, but not PPARα-, dependent manner. In conclusion, a lamp-2-depenedent fusion and degradation process of autophagosomes is involved in the pathogenesis of obese diabetes, providing a novel insight into autophagy and diabetes. - Highlights: • Lamp-2 is essential for autophagosome fusion with lysosome and its degradation. • Lamp-2 deficiency lead to a resistance to diet-induced obese diabetes in mice. • Lamp-2 deficiency increased whole body energy expenditure under HFD-feeding. • Lamp-2 deficiency elevated the serum level of FGF21 under HFD-feeding.

  10. Beta-aminoisobutyric acid prevents diet-induced obesity in mice with partial leptin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Begriche, Karima; Massart, Julie; Abbey-Toby, Adjé; Igoudjil, Anissa; Lettéron, Philippe; Fromenty, Bernard

    2008-09-01

    Beta-Aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA), a thymine catabolite, increases fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in liver and reduces the gain of body fat mass in Swiss (lean) mice fed a standard chow. We determined whether BAIBA could prevent obesity and related metabolic disorders in different murine models. To this end, BAIBA (100 or 500 mg/kg/day) was administered for 4 months in mice totally deficient in leptin (ob/ob). BAIBA (100 mg/kg/day) was also given for 4 months in wild-type (+/+) mice and mice partially deficient in leptin (ob/+) fed a high-calorie (HC) diet. BAIBA did not limit obesity and hepatic steatosis in ob/ob mice, but reduced liver cytolysis and inflammation. In ob/+ mice fed the HC diet, BAIBA fully prevented, or limited, the gain of body fat, steatosis and necroinflammation, glucose intolerance, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma beta-hydroxybutyrate was increased, whereas expression of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 was augmented in liver and white adipose tissue. Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was more phosphorylated, and de novo lipogenesis was less induced in liver. These favorable effects of BAIBA in ob/+ mice were associated with a restoration of plasma leptin levels. The reduction of body adiposity afforded by BAIBA was less marked in +/+ mice. Finally, BAIBA significantly stimulated the secretion of leptin in isolated ob/+ adipose cells, but not in +/+ cells. Thus, BAIBA could limit triglyceride accretion in tissues through a leptin-dependent stimulation of FAO. As partial leptin deficiency is not uncommon in the general population, supplementation with BAIBA may help to prevent diet-induced obesity and related metabolic disorders in low leptin secretors.

  11. Diet-induced changes in maternal gut microbiota and metabolomic profiles influence programming of offspring obesity risk in rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Heather A.; Bomhof, Marc R.; Vogel, Hans J.; Reimer, Raylene A.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal obesity and overnutrition during pregnancy and lactation can program an increased risk of obesity in offspring. In this context, improving maternal metabolism may help reduce the intergenerational transmission of obesity. Here we show that, in Sprague-Dawley rats, selectively altering obese maternal gut microbial composition with prebiotic treatment reduces maternal energy intake, decreases gestational weight gain, and prevents increased adiposity in dams and their offspring. Maternal serum metabolomics analysis, along with satiety hormone and gut microbiota analysis, identified maternal metabolic signatures that could be implicated in programming offspring obesity risk and highlighted the potential influence of maternal gut microbiota on maternal and offspring metabolism. In particular, the metabolomic signature of insulin resistance in obese rats normalized when dams consumed the prebiotic. In summary, prebiotic intake during pregnancy and lactation improves maternal metabolism in diet-induced obese rats in a manner that attenuates the detrimental nutritional programming of offspring associated with maternal obesity. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the maternal mechanisms influencing the developmental programming of offspring obesity and provide compelling pre-clinical evidence for a potential strategy to improve maternal and offspring metabolic outcomes in human pregnancy. PMID:26868870

  12. Diet-induced changes in maternal gut microbiota and metabolomic profiles influence programming of offspring obesity risk in rats.

    PubMed

    Paul, Heather A; Bomhof, Marc R; Vogel, Hans J; Reimer, Raylene A

    2016-02-12

    Maternal obesity and overnutrition during pregnancy and lactation can program an increased risk of obesity in offspring. In this context, improving maternal metabolism may help reduce the intergenerational transmission of obesity. Here we show that, in Sprague-Dawley rats, selectively altering obese maternal gut microbial composition with prebiotic treatment reduces maternal energy intake, decreases gestational weight gain, and prevents increased adiposity in dams and their offspring. Maternal serum metabolomics analysis, along with satiety hormone and gut microbiota analysis, identified maternal metabolic signatures that could be implicated in programming offspring obesity risk and highlighted the potential influence of maternal gut microbiota on maternal and offspring metabolism. In particular, the metabolomic signature of insulin resistance in obese rats normalized when dams consumed the prebiotic. In summary, prebiotic intake during pregnancy and lactation improves maternal metabolism in diet-induced obese rats in a manner that attenuates the detrimental nutritional programming of offspring associated with maternal obesity. Overall, these findings contribute to our understanding of the maternal mechanisms influencing the developmental programming of offspring obesity and provide compelling pre-clinical evidence for a potential strategy to improve maternal and offspring metabolic outcomes in human pregnancy.

  13. Revascularization and Muscle Adaptation to Limb Demand Ischemia in Diet Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Albadawi, Hassan; Tzika, Aria; Rask-Madsen, Christian; Crowley, Lindsey M.; Koulopoulos, Michael W.; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Watkins, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in humans which can result in lower limb demand ischemia and exercise intolerance. Exercise triggers skeletal muscle adaptation including increased vasculogenesis. The goal of this study was to determine whether demand ischemia modulates revascularization, fiber size, and signaling pathways in the ischemic hind limb muscles of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). Materials and Methods DIO mice (n=7) underwent unilateral femoral artery ligation (FAL) and recovered for 2-weeks followed by 4-weeks with daily treadmill exercise to induce demand ischemia. A parallel sedentary ischemia group (n=7) had FAL without exercise. The contralateral limb muscles of sedentary ischemia served as control. Muscles were examined for capillary density, myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA), cytokine levels, and phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2. Results Exercise significantly enhanced capillary density (p<0.01) and markedly lowered CSA (p<0.001) in demand ischemia compared to sedentary ischemia. These findings coincided with a significant increase in G-CSF (p<0.001) and IL-7 (p<0.01) levels. In addition, phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 (p<0.01) were increased while UCP-1 and MCP-1 protein levels were lower (p<0.05) without altering VEGF and TNFα protein levels. Demand ischemia increased the PGC1α mRNA (p<0.001) without augmenting PGC1α protein levels. Conclusions Exercise induced limb demands ischemia in the setting of DIO causes myofiber atrophy despite an increase in muscle capillary density. The combination of persistent increase in TNFα, lower VEGF and failure to increase PGC1α protein may reflect a deficient adaption to demand ischemia in DIO. PMID:27620999

  14. Diet-induced obesity in male mice is associated with reduced fertility and potentiation of acrylamide-induced reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ghanayem, Burhan I; Bai, Re; Kissling, Grace E; Travlos, Greg; Hoffler, Undi

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of human obesity and related chronic disorders such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer is rapidly increasing. Human studies have shown a direct relationship between obesity and infertility. The objective of the current work was to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity on male fertility and the effect of obesity on susceptibility to chemical-induced reproductive toxicity. From 5 to 30 wk of age, genetically intact male C57Bl/6J mice were fed a normal diet or one in which 60% of the kilocalories were from lard. Obese mice exhibited significant differences in the mRNA of several genes within the testes in comparison to lean males. Pparg was increased 2.2-fold, whereas Crem, Sh2b1, Dhh, Igf1, and Lepr were decreased 6.7, 1.4, 3.2, 1.6, and 7.2-fold, respectively. The fertility of male mice was compared through mating with control females. Acrylamide (AA)-induced reproductive toxicity was assessed in obese or lean males treated with water or 25 mg AA kg(-1) day(-1) via gavage for 5 days and then mated to control females. Percent body fat and weight were significantly increased in mice fed a high-fat vs. a normal diet. Obesity resulted in significant reduction in plugs and pregnancies of control females partnered with obese vs. lean males. Serum leptin and insulin levels were each approximately 5-fold higher in obese vs. age-matched lean mice. Sperm from obese males exhibited decreased motility and reduced hyperactivated progression vs. lean mice. Treatment with AA exacerbated male infertility of obese and lean mice; however, this effect was more pronounced in obese mice. Further, females partnered with AA-treated obese mice exhibited a further decrease in the percentage of live fetuses, whereas the percentage of resorptions increased. This work demonstrated that diet-induced obesity in mice caused a significant reduction in male fertility and exacerbated AA-induced reproductive toxicity and germ cell mutagenicity.

  15. Dual-specificity phosphatase 6 deficiency regulates gut microbiome and transcriptome response against diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jhen-Wei; Statt, Sarah; Huang, Chih-Ting; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Chan, Hong-Lin; Liao, Yu-Chieh; Tan, Tse-Hua; Kao, Cheng-Yuan

    2016-11-28

    The gut microbiota plays profound roles in host metabolism and the inflammatory response associated with the development of obesity. Dusp6-deficient mice have been shown to be resistant to diet-induced obesity, but the mechanism behind this remains unclear. 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis demonstrated that dusp6-deficient mice harbour unique gut microbiota with resistance to diet-induced-obesity-mediated alteration of the gut microbiome. Using a germ-free mouse model, we found that faecal/gut microbiota derived from dusp6-deficient mice significantly increased energy expenditure and reduced weight gain in recipient wild-type mice fed on a high-fat diet. On analysis of the intestinal transcriptome of dusp6-deficient mice, we found that dusp6 deficiency mainly induced biological processes involved in metabolism and the extracellular matrix, particularly the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparγ) pathway and tight-junction genes. Furthermore, dusp6-deficient mice have a high-fat-diet-specific transcriptomic response to reverse the expression of genes associated with intestinal barrier functions and mucosal immunity involved in microbiome homeostasis. This study demonstrates that dusp6 deficiency is a strong genetic factor shaping gut microbiota, and that it confers obesity protection by ameliorating the gut microbiota response to diet-mediated stress.

  16. Enhanced thermogenic program by non-viral delivery of combinatory browning genes to treat diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongsuk; Cho, Sungpil; Janat-Amsbury, Margit M; Bae, You Han

    2015-12-01

    Thermogenic program (also known as browning) is a promising and attractive anti-obesity approach. Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) and irisin have emerged as potential browning hormones that hold high potential to treat obesity. Here, we have constructed a dual browning gene system containing both IAPP and irisin (derived from fibronectin type III domain containing 5; FNDC5) combined with 2A and furin self-cleavage sites. Intraperitoneal administration of the construct complexed with a linear polyethylenimine into diet-induced obese mice demonstrated the elevation of anti-obesogenic effects characterized as the decreased body weight, adiposity, and levels of glucose and insulin. In addition, the construct delivery increased energy expenditure and the expression of core molecular determinants associated with browning. The additional advantages of the dual browning gene construct delivery compared to both single gene construct delivery and dual peptide delivery can be emphasized on efficacy and practicability. Hence, we have concluded that dual browning gene delivery makes it therapeutically attractive for diet-induced obesity treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peripheral oxytocin suppresses food intake and causes weight loss in diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Brendan S.; Reidelberger, Roger D.; Ogimoto, Kayoko; Wolden-Hanson, Tami; Baskin, Denis G.; Schwartz, Michael W.; Blevins, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that oxytocin plays an important role in the regulation of energy balance and that central oxytocin administration induces weight loss in diet-induced obese (DIO) animals. To gain a better understanding of how oxytocin mediates these effects, we examined feeding and neuronal responses to oxytocin in animals rendered obese following exposure to either a high-fat (HFD) or low-fat diet (LFD). Our findings demonstrate that peripheral administration of oxytocin dose-dependently reduces food intake and body weight to a similar extent in rats maintained on either diet. Moreover, the effect of oxytocin to induce weight loss remained intact in leptin receptor-deficient Koletsky (fak/fak) rats relative to their lean littermates. To determine whether systemically administered oxytocin activates hindbrain areas that regulate meal size, we measured neuronal c-Fos induction in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and area postrema (AP). We observed a robust neuronal response to oxytocin in these hindbrain areas that was unexpectedly increased in rats rendered obese on a HFD relative to lean, LFD-fed controls. Finally, we report that repeated daily peripheral administration of oxytocin in DIO animals elicited a sustained reduction of food intake and body weight while preventing the reduction of energy expenditure characteristic of weight-reduced animals. These findings extend recent evidence suggesting that oxytocin circumvents leptin resistance and induces weight-loss in DIO animals through a mechanism involving activation of neurons in the NTS and AP, key hindbrain areas for processing satiety-related inputs. PMID:22008455

  18. Impact of whey proteins on the systemic and local intestinal level of mice with diet induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Swiątecka, D; Złotkowska, D; Markiewicz, L H; Szyc, A M; Wróblewska, B

    2017-04-19

    Obesity is a serious public health problem and being multifactorial is difficult to tackle. Since the intestinal ecosystem's homeostasis is, at least partially, diet-dependent, its modulation may be triggered by food components that are designed to exert a modulatory action leading to a health-promoting effect. Milk whey proteins, are considered as such promising factors since they influence satiation as well as body weight and constitute the source of biologically active peptides which may modulate health status locally and systemically. This way, whey proteins are associated with obesity. Therefore, this paper is aimed at the estimation of the impact of whey proteins using a commercially available whey protein isolate on the physiological response of mice with diet-induced obesity. The physiological response was evaluated on the local-intestinal level, scrutinizing intestinal microbiota as one of the important factors in obesity and on the systemic level, analyzing the response of the organism. Whey proteins brought about the decrease of the fat mass with a simultaneous increase of the lean mass of animals with diet induced obesity, which is a promising, health-promoting effect. Whey proteins also proved to act beneficially helping restore the number of beneficial bifidobacteria in obese animals and decreasing the calorie intake and fat mass as well as the LDL level. Overall, supplementation of the high fat diet with whey proteins acted locally by restoration of the intestinal ecosystem, thus preventing dysbiosis and its effects and also acted systemically by strengthening the organism increasing the lean mass and thus hindering obesity-related detrimental effects.

  19. Diet-induced obesity differentially regulates behavioral, biomechanical, and molecular risk factors for osteoarthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis in both weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing joints. The mechanisms by which obesity influences the structural or symptomatic features of osteoarthritis are not well understood, but may include systemic inflammation associated with increased adiposity. In this study, we examined biomechanical, neurobehavioral, inflammatory, and osteoarthritic changes in C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet. Methods Female C57BL/6J mice were fed either a 10% kcal fat or a 45% kcal fat diet from 9 to 54 weeks of age. Longitudinal changes in musculoskeletal function and inflammation were compared with endpoint neurobehavioral and osteoarthritic disease states. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to determine independent associations with diet, percentage body fat, and knee osteoarthritis severity. We also examined healthy porcine cartilage explants treated with physiologic doses of leptin, alone or in combination with IL-1α and palmitic and oleic fatty acids, to determine the effects of leptin on cartilage extracellular matrix homeostasis. Results High susceptibility to dietary obesity was associated with increased osteoarthritic changes in the knee and impaired musculoskeletal force generation and motor function compared with controls. A high-fat diet also induced symptomatic characteristics of osteoarthritis, including hyperalgesia and anxiety-like behaviors. Controlling for the effects of diet and percentage body fat with a multivariate model revealed a significant association between knee osteoarthritis severity and serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and IL-1α. Physiologic doses of leptin, in the presence or absence of IL-1α and fatty acids, did not substantially alter extracellular matrix homeostasis in healthy cartilage explants. Conclusions These results indicate that diet-induced obesity increases the risk of symptomatic features of osteoarthritis through changes in

  20. Epigenetic dysregulation of the dopamine system in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Vucetic, Zivjena; Carlin, Jesse Lea; Totoki, Kathy; Reyes, Teresa M

    2012-03-01

    Chronic intake of high-fat (HF) diet is known to alter brain neurotransmitter systems that participate in the central regulation of food intake. Dopamine (DA) system changes in response to HF diet have been observed in the hypothalamus, important in the homeostatic control of food intake, as well as within the central reward circuitry [ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and pre-frontal cortex (PFC)], critical for coding the rewarding properties of palatable food and important in hedonically driven feeding behavior. Using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO), significant alterations in the expression of DA-related genes were documented in adult animals, and the general pattern of gene expression changes was opposite within the hypothalamus versus the reward circuitry (increased vs. decreased, respectively). Differential DNA methylation was identified within the promoter regions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT), and the pattern of this response was consistent with the pattern of gene expression. Behaviors consistent with increased hypothalamic DA and decreased reward circuitry DA were observed. These data identify differential DNA methylation as an epigenetic mechanism linking the chronic intake of HF diet with altered DA-related gene expression, and this response varies by brain region and DNA sequence. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  1. Flavonoid derivative exerts an antidiabetic effect via AMPK activation in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Zhang, Chang; Jin, Mei-Na; Qin, Nan; Qiao, Wei; Yue, Xiao-Long; Duan, Hong-Quan; Niu, Wen-Yan

    2016-09-01

    In our previous study, a derivative of tiliroside, 3-O-[(E)-4-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-2-oxobut-3-en-1-yl]kaempferol (Fla-OEt) significantly enhanced glucose consumption in insulin resistant HepG2 cells. This article deals with the antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic effects of Fla-OEt in diet-induced obesity (DIO) mice. Daily administration of Fla-OEt significantly decreased oral glucose tolerance test, intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test and serum lipids. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and the ratio of high-density-lipoprotein/low-density-lipoprotein with Fla-OEt treatment were increased comparing with high-fat diet (HFD) group, so lipid metabolism was improved. Histopathology examination showed that the Fla-OEt restored the damage of adipose tissues and liver in DIO mice. Moreover, compared with HFD group, Fla-OEt treatment significantly increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and ACC in adiposity tissues, liver, and muscles. The mechanism of its action might be the activation of AMPK pathway. It appears that Fla-OEt is worth further study for development as a lead compound for a potential antidiabetic agent.

  2. Synaptic input organization of the melanocortin system predicts diet-induced hypothalamic reactive gliosis and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Tamas L.; Sarman, Beatrix; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Enriori, Pablo J.; Sotonyi, Peter; Shanabrough, Marya; Borok, Erzsebet; Argente, Jesus; Chowen, Julie A.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul T.; Brönneke, Hella S.; Levin, Barry E.; Diano, Sabrina; Cowley, Michael A.; Tschöp, Matthias H.

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal circuits involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy expenditure are soft-wired, reflecting the relative activity of the postsynaptic neuronal system, including the anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing cells of the arcuate nucleus. We analyzed the synaptic input organization of the melanocortin system in lean rats that were vulnerable (DIO) or resistant (DR) to diet-induced obesity. We found a distinct difference in the quantitative and qualitative synaptology of POMC cells between DIO and DR animals, with a significantly greater number of inhibitory inputs in the POMC neurons in DIO rats compared with DR rats. When exposed to a high-fat diet (HFD), the POMC cells of DIO animals lost synapses, whereas those of DR rats recruited connections. In both DIO rats and mice, the HFD-triggered loss of synapses on POMC neurons was associated with increased glial ensheathment of the POMC perikarya. The altered synaptic organization of HFD-fed animals promoted increased POMC tone and a decrease in the stimulatory connections onto the neighboring neuropeptide Y (NPY) cells. Exposure to HFD was associated with reactive gliosis, and this affected the structure of the blood-brain barrier such that the POMC and NPY cell bodies and dendrites became less accessible to blood vessels. Taken together, these data suggest that consumption of an HFD has a major impact on the cytoarchitecture of the arcuate nucleus in vulnerable subjects, with changes that might be irreversible due to reactive gliosis. PMID:20679202

  3. Perilipin overexpression in mice protects against diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Perilipin A is the most abundant phosphoprotein on adipocyte lipid droplets and is essential for lipid storage and lipolysis. Perilipin null mice exhibit diminished adipose tissue, elevated basal lipolysis, reduced catecholamine-stimulated lipolysis, and increased insulin resistance. To understand t...

  4. Diet-induced obesity attenuates cytokine production following an immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Baumgarner, Katherine M; Setti, Sharay; Diaz, Carolyn; Littlefield, Alyssa; Jones, Amanda; Kohman, Rachel A

    2014-07-01

    Obesity increases susceptibility for numerous diseases and neurological disorders including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. One factor that may contribute to the increased risk for these conditions is the development of chronic inflammation. The current study evaluated whether diet-induced obesity (DIO) affects cognitive performance by increasing neuroinflammation and prolonging the behavioral and inflammatory response to an immune challenge. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat (60% fat) or control diet (10% fat) for 2 or 5 months. After consuming their respective diets for two months, sickness associated behaviors were assessed 4 and 24h after a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline injection. In a separate experiment, DIO and control mice were tested for spatial learning in the water maze and challenged with LPS one month later. Peripheral cytokine production was assessed in adipose and spleen samples and the neuroinflammatory response was assessed in hippocampal, cortical, and brain samples. DIO impaired acquisition of a spatial learning task relative to control mice. However, these deficits are unlikely to be related to inflammation as DIO showed no changes in basal cytokine levels within the periphery or brain. Further, in response to LPS DIO mice showed comparable or attenuated levels of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 relative to control mice. DIO also reduced hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the pre-synaptic marker synaptophysin. Presently, the data indicate that DIO suppresses aspects of the immune response and that cognitive deficits associated with DIO may be related to reduced neurotrophic support rather than inflammation.

  5. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Knockout Preserves Cardiac Homeostasis through Alleviating Akt-Mediated Myocardial Autophagy Suppression in High Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xihui; Ren, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) plays a role in the development of obesity and diabetes. However, whether MIF plays a role in fat diet-induced obesity and associated cardiac anomalies still remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of MIF knockout on high fat diet-induced obesity, obesity-associated cardiac anomalies and the underlying mechanisms involved with a focus on Akt-mediated autophagy. Methods Adult male wild-type (WT) and MIF knockout (MIF−/−) mice were placed on 45% high fat diet for 5 months. Oxygen consumption, CO2 production, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), locomotor activity, and heat generation were measured using energy calorimeter. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed. Apoptosis was examined using TUNEL staining and western blot analysis. Akt signaling pathway and autophagy markers were evaluated. Cardiomyocytes isolated from WT and MIF−/− mice were treated with recombinant mouse MIF (rmMIF). Results High fat diet feeding elicited increased body weight gain, insulin resistance, and caloric disturbance in WT and MIF−/− mice. High fat diet induced unfavorable geometric, contractile and histological changes in the heart, the effects of which were alleviated by MIF knockout. In addition, fat diet-induced cardiac anomalies were associated with Akt activation and autophagy suppression, which were nullified by MIF deficiency. In cardiomyocytes from WT mice, autophagy was inhibited by exogenous rmMIF through Akt activation. In addition, MIF knockout rescued palmitic acid-induced suppression of cardiomyocyte autophagy, the effect of which was nullified by rmMIF. Conclusions These results indicate that MIF knockout preserved obesity-associated cardiac anomalies without affecting fat diet-induced obesity, probably through restoring myocardial autophagy in an Akt-dependent manner. Our findings provide new insights for the role of MIF in obesity

  6. SRA gene knockout protects against diet-induced obesity and improves glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shannon; Sheng, Liang; Miao, Hongzhi; Saunders, Thomas L; MacDougald, Ormond A; Koenig, Ronald J; Xu, Bin

    2014-05-09

    We have recently shown that the non-coding RNA, steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), functions as a transcriptional coactivator of PPARγ and promotes adipocyte differentiation in vitro. To assess SRA function in vivo, we have generated a whole mouse Sra1 gene knock-out (SRA(-/-)). Here, we show that the Sra1 gene is an important regulator of adipose tissue mass and function. SRA is expressed at a higher level in adipose tissue than other organs in wild type mice. SRA(-/-) mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity, with decreased fat mass and increased lean content. This lean phenotype of SRA(-/-) mice is associated with decreased expression of a subset of adipocyte marker genes and reduced plasma TNFα levels. The SRA(-/-) mice are more insulin sensitive, as evidenced by reduced fasting insulin, and lower blood glucoses in response to IP glucose and insulin. In addition, the livers of SRA(-/-) mice have fewer lipid droplets after high fat diet feeding, and the expression of lipogenesis-associated genes is decreased. To our knowledge, these data are the first to indicate a functional role for SRA in adipose tissue biology and glucose homeostasis in vivo.

  7. Mice lacking ghrelin receptors resist the development of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zigman, Jeffrey M.; Nakano, Yoshihide; Coppari, Roberto; Balthasar, Nina; Marcus, Jacob N.; Lee, Charlotte E.; Jones, Juli E.; Deysher, Amy E.; Waxman, Amanda R.; White, Ryan D.; Williams, Todd D.; Lachey, Jennifer L.; Seeley, Randy J.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2005-01-01

    Ghrelin is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR; ghrelin receptor). Since its discovery, accumulating evidence has suggested that ghrelin may play a role in signaling and reversing states of energy insufficiency. For example, ghrelin levels rise following food deprivation, and ghrelin administration stimulates feeding and increases body weight and adiposity. However, recent loss-of-function studies have raised questions regarding the physiological significance of ghrelin in regulating these processes. Here, we present results of a study using a novel GHSR-null mouse model, in which ghrelin administration fails to acutely stimulate food intake or activate arcuate nucleus neurons. We show that when fed a high-fat diet, both female and male GHSR-null mice eat less food, store less of their consumed calories, preferentially utilize fat as an energy substrate, and accumulate less body weight and adiposity than control mice. Similar effects on body weight and adiposity were also observed in female, but not male, GHSR-null mice fed standard chow. GHSR deletion also affected locomotor activity and levels of glycemia. These findings support the hypothesis that ghrelin-responsive pathways are an important component of coordinated body weight control. Moreover, our data suggest that ghrelin signaling is required for development of the full phenotype of diet-induced obesity. PMID:16322794

  8. Diet-Induced Obesity Enhances Progression of Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Tenascin-C/Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Benbow, Jennifer H; Thompson, Kyle J; Cope, Heidi L; Brandon-Warner, Elizabeth; Culberson, Catherine R; Bossi, Krista L; Li, Ting; Russo, Mark W; Gersin, Keith S; McKillop, Iain H; deLemos, Andrew S; Schrum, Laura W

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for the development of liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Tenascin-C (TnC), an extracellular matrix protein, is transiently expressed during tissue injury and plays a role in fibrogenesis and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanistic role of TnC signaling in the development of HCC remains unknown. We developed a diet-induced obesity HCC mouse model and examined TnC expression and liver injury. To determine the cellular mechanism of TnC signaling in promoting inflammation and hepatocyte epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migration, we used primary hepatocytes and hepatoma and macrophage cell lines. Further, to determine whether elevated TnC expression correlated with obesity-associated HCC, we measured plasma TnC in obese patients with various levels of liver injury. Increased tissue inflammation accompanied with elevated hepatic stellate cell-derived TnC and Toll-like receptor 4 expression was observed in the diet-induced obesity HCC animal model. In vitro studies found enhanced Toll-like receptor 4 signaling activated by TnC, promoting an increased inflammatory response, hepatocyte transformation, and migration. Further, obese patients with cirrhosis alone and in combination with HCC showed significant increases in plasma TnC compared with healthy volunteers and patients with less severe liver injury. Overall, these studies suggest TnC/Toll-like receptor 4 signaling as an important regulator in HCC; inhibiting this signaling axis may be a viable therapeutic target for impeding HCC. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Deficiency of the leukotriene B4 receptor, BLT-1, protects against systemic insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Spite, Matthew; Hellmann, Jason; Tang, Yunan; Mathis, Steven P; Kosuri, Madhavi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Jala, Venkatakrishna R; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2011-08-15

    Chronic inflammation is an underlying factor linking obesity with insulin resistance. Diet-induced obesity promotes an increase in circulating levels of inflammatory monocytes and their infiltration into expanding adipose tissue. Nevertheless, the endogenous pathways that trigger and sustain chronic low-grade inflammation in obesity are incompletely understood. In this study, we report that a high-fat diet selectively increases the circulating levels of CD11b(+) monocytes in wild-type mice that express leukotriene B(4) receptor, BLT-1, and that this increase is abolished in BLT-1-null mice. The accumulation of classically activated (M1) adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (i.e., IL-6 and Ccl2) was largely blunted in adipose tissue of obese BLT-1(-/-) mice, whereas the ratio of alternatively activated (M2) ATMs to M1 ATMs was increased. Obese BLT-1(-/-) mice were protected from systemic glucose and insulin intolerance and this was associated with a decrease in inflammation in adipose tissue and liver and a decrease in hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Deletion of BLT-1 prevented high fat-induced loss of insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle. These observations elucidate a novel role of chemoattractant receptor, BLT-1, in promoting monocyte trafficking to adipose tissue and promoting chronic inflammation in obesity and could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for treating insulin resistance in obesity.

  10. Altered ghrelin secretion in mice in response to diet-induced obesity and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Aki; Zechner, Juliet F.; Mani, Bharath K.; Park, Won-mee; Aguirre, Vincent; Zigman, Jeffrey M.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined potential mechanisms for altered circulating ghrelin levels observed in diet-induced obesity (DIO) and following weight loss resulting from Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). We hypothesized that circulating ghrelin levels were altered in obesity and after weight loss through changes in ghrelin cell responsiveness to physiological cues. We confirmed lower ghrelin levels in DIO mice and demonstrated elevated ghrelin levels in mice 6 weeks post-RYGB. In both DIO and RYGB settings, these changes in ghrelin levels were associated with altered ghrelin cell responsiveness to two key physiological modulators of ghrelin secretion – glucose and norepinephrine. In DIO mice, increases in ghrelin cell density within both the stomach and duodenum and in somatostatin-immunoreactive D cell density in the duodenum were observed. Our findings provide new insights into the regulation of ghrelin secretion and its relation to circulating ghrelin within the contexts of obesity and weight loss. PMID:25353000

  11. Altered ghrelin secretion in mice in response to diet-induced obesity and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Aki; Zechner, Juliet F; Mani, Bharath K; Park, Won-Mee; Aguirre, Vincent; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2014-10-01

    The current study examined potential mechanisms for altered circulating ghrelin levels observed in diet-induced obesity (DIO) and following weight loss resulting from Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). We hypothesized that circulating ghrelin levels were altered in obesity and after weight loss through changes in ghrelin cell responsiveness to physiological cues. We confirmed lower ghrelin levels in DIO mice and demonstrated elevated ghrelin levels in mice 6 weeks post-RYGB. In both DIO and RYGB settings, these changes in ghrelin levels were associated with altered ghrelin cell responsiveness to two key physiological modulators of ghrelin secretion - glucose and norepinephrine. In DIO mice, increases in ghrelin cell density within both the stomach and duodenum and in somatostatin-immunoreactive D cell density in the duodenum were observed. Our findings provide new insights into the regulation of ghrelin secretion and its relation to circulating ghrelin within the contexts of obesity and weight loss.

  12. Cardiovascular actions of leptin in the subfornical organ are abolished by diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Smith, P M; Ferguson, A V

    2012-03-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO), a sensory circumventricular organ lacking the normal blood-brain barrier with well documented roles in cardiovascular regulation, has recently been identified as a potential site at which the adipokine, leptin, may act to influence central autonomic pathways. Systemic and central leptin administration has been shown to increase blood pressure and it has been suggested that selective leptin resistance contributes to obesity-related hypertension. Given the relationship between obesity and hypertension, the present study aimed to investigate the cardiovascular consequences of the direct administration of leptin into the SFO of young lean rats and in the diet-induced obesity (DIO) rat model, which has been shown to be leptin-resistant. Leptin administration (500 fmol) directly into the SFO of young rats resulted in rapid decreases in blood pressure (BP) [mean area under the curve (AUC) = -677.8 ± 167.1 mmHg*s; n = 9], without an effect on heart rate (mean AUC = -21.2 ± 13.4 beats; n = 9), and these effects were found to be dose-related as microinjection of 5 pmol of leptin into the SFO had a larger effect on BP (mean AUC = -972.3 ± 280.1 mmHg*s; n = 4). These BP effects were also shown to be site-specific as microinjection of leptin into non-SFO regions or into the ventricle was without effect on BP (non-SFO: mean AUC = -22.4 ± 55.3 mmHg*s; n = 4; ventricle: mean AUC = 194.0 ± 173.0 mmHg*s; n = 6). By contrast, microinjection of leptin into leptin-resistant DIO rats was without effect on BP (mean AUC = 205.2 ± 75.1 mmHg*s; n = 4). These observations suggest that the SFO may be an important relay centre through which leptin, in normal weight, leptin responsive rats, acts to maintain BP within normal physiological limits through descending autonomic pathways involved in cardiovascular control and that, in obese, leptin-resistant, rats leptin no longer influences SFO neurones, resulting in an elevated BP, thus contributing to obesity

  13. Changes in Gene Expression Foreshadow Diet-Induced Obesity in Genetically Identical Mice

    PubMed Central

    Koza, Robert A; Nikonova, Larissa; Hogan, Jessica; Rim, Jong-Seop; Mendoza, Tamra; Faulk, Christopher; Skaf, Jihad; Kozak, Leslie P

    2006-01-01

    High phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J inbred mice suggests a molecular model to investigate non-genetic mechanisms of obesity. Feeding mice a high-fat diet beginning at 8 wk of age resulted in a 4-fold difference in adiposity. The phenotypes of mice characteristic of high or low gainers were evident by 6 wk of age, when mice were still on a low-fat diet; they were amplified after being switched to the high-fat diet and persisted even after the obesogenic protocol was interrupted with a calorically restricted, low-fat chow diet. Accordingly, susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice is a stable phenotype that can be detected in mice shortly after weaning. Chronologically, differences in adiposity preceded those of feeding efficiency and food intake, suggesting that observed difference in leptin secretion is a factor in determining phenotypes related to food intake. Gene expression analyses of adipose tissue and hypothalamus from mice with low and high weight gain, by microarray and qRT-PCR, showed major changes in the expression of genes of Wnt signaling and tissue re-modeling in adipose tissue. In particular, elevated expression of SFRP5, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, the imprinted gene MEST and BMP3 may be causally linked to fat mass expansion, since differences in gene expression observed in biopsies of epididymal fat at 7 wk of age (before the high-fat diet) correlated with adiposity after 8 wk on a high-fat diet. We propose that C57BL/6J mice have the phenotypic characteristics suitable for a model to investigate epigenetic mechanisms within adipose tissue that underlie diet-induced obesity. PMID:16733553

  14. Changes in gene expression foreshadow diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice.

    PubMed

    Koza, Robert A; Nikonova, Larissa; Hogan, Jessica; Rim, Jong-Seop; Mendoza, Tamra; Faulk, Christopher; Skaf, Jihad; Kozak, Leslie P

    2006-05-01

    High phenotypic variation in diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J inbred mice suggests a molecular model to investigate non-genetic mechanisms of obesity. Feeding mice a high-fat diet beginning at 8 wk of age resulted in a 4-fold difference in adiposity. The phenotypes of mice characteristic of high or low gainers were evident by 6 wk of age, when mice were still on a low-fat diet; they were amplified after being switched to the high-fat diet and persisted even after the obesogenic protocol was interrupted with a calorically restricted, low-fat chow diet. Accordingly, susceptibility to diet-induced obesity in genetically identical mice is a stable phenotype that can be detected in mice shortly after weaning. Chronologically, differences in adiposity preceded those of feeding efficiency and food intake, suggesting that observed difference in leptin secretion is a factor in determining phenotypes related to food intake. Gene expression analyses of adipose tissue and hypothalamus from mice with low and high weight gain, by microarray and qRT-PCR, showed major changes in the expression of genes of Wnt signaling and tissue re-modeling in adipose tissue. In particular, elevated expression of SFRP5, an inhibitor of Wnt signaling, the imprinted gene MEST and BMP3 may be causally linked to fat mass expansion, since differences in gene expression observed in biopsies of epididymal fat at 7 wk of age (before the high-fat diet) correlated with adiposity after 8 wk on a high-fat diet. We propose that C57BL/6J mice have the phenotypic characteristics suitable for a model to investigate epigenetic mechanisms within adipose tissue that underlie diet-induced obesity.

  15. Hepatocellular proliferation and hepatocarcinogen bioactivation in mice with diet-induced fatty liver and obesity.

    PubMed

    Iatropoulos, M J; Duan, J-D; Jeffrey, A M; Leach, M W; Hayes, A N; Stedman, N L; Williams, G M

    2013-05-01

    Human liver cancer is in part associated with obesity and related metabolic diseases. The present study was undertaken in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and hepatic steatosis, conditions which can be associated with hepatic neoplasia, to determine whether the rates of cell proliferation or hepatocarcinogen bioactivation were altered in ways which could facilitate hepatocarcinogenesis. DIO mice were generated by feeding C57BL/6 (B6) male mice a high-fat diet beginning at 4 weeks of age; age-matched conventional lean (LEAN) B6 mice fed a low fat diet (10% Kcal from fat) were used for comparison. Groups of 28 week old DIO and LEAN mice were dosed with the bioactivation-dependent DNA-reactive hepatocarcinogen 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), at 2.24 or 22.4 mg/kg, given by gavage 3 times per week for 31 days, or received no treatment (DIO and LEAN control groups). Compared with the LEAN control group, the DIO control group had a higher mean body weight (16.5 g), higher mean absolute (1.4 g) and mean relative (25.5%) liver weights, higher (394%) liver triglyceride concentrations, and an increased incidence and severity of hepatocellular steatosis at the end of the dosing phase. The DIO control group also had a higher mean hepatocellular replicating fraction (31% increase, determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry). Hepatocarcinogen bioactivation, based on formation of AAF DNA adducts as measured by nucleotide (32)P-postlabeling, was similar in both DIO and LEAN AAF-dosed groups. Thus, hepatocellular proliferation, but not hepatocarcinogen bioactivation, was identified as an alteration in livers of DIO mice which could contribute to their susceptibility to hepatocarcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Mice lacking δ-opioid receptors resist the development of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Czyzyk, Traci A.; Romero-Picó, Amparo; Pintar, John; McKinzie, Jaime H.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Statnick, Michael A.; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of opioid receptors alters feeding behavior. However, the individual contributions of each opioid receptor subtype on energy balance remain largely unknown. Herein, we investigated whether genetic disruption of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) also controls energy homeostasis. Mice lacking DOR and wild-type mice were fed with standard diet and high-energy diet (HED). Mice were analyzed in vivo with the indirect calorimetry system, and tissues were analyzed by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. DOR-knockout (KO) mice gained less weight (P<0.01) and had lower fat mass (P<0.01) when compared to WT mice fed an HED. Although DOR-KO mice were hyperphagic, they showed higher energy expenditure (P<0.05), which was the result of an increased activation of the thermogenic program in brown adipose tissue. The increased nonshivering thermogenesis involved the stimulation of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1; P<0.01), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator (PGC1α; P<0.05), and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21; P<0.01). DOR deficiency also led to an attenuation of triglyceride content in the liver (P<0.05) in response to an HED. These findings reveal a novel role of DOR in the control of thermogenic markers and energy expenditure, and they provide a potential new therapeutic approach for the treatment of obesity.—Czyzyk, T. A., Romero-Picó, A., Pintar, J., McKinzie, J. H., Tschöp, M. H., Statnick, M. A., Nogueiras, R. Mice lacking δ-opioid receptors resist the development of diet-induced obesity. PMID:22593549

  17. Persistence of diet-induced obesity despite access to voluntary activity in mice lacking sarcolipin.

    PubMed

    Gamu, Daniel; Trinh, Anton; Bombardier, Eric; Tupling, A Russell

    2015-09-01

    Several rodent models of obesity have been shown to develop excessive adiposity only when voluntary cage ambulation is restricted. We have previously shown that mice lacking the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump regulatory protein sarcolipin (Sln(-/-)), an uncoupler of Ca(2+) uptake, develop excessive diet-induced obesity under standard housing conditions. However, it is unclear whether this phenotype is due, in part, to the sedentary housing environment in which these animals are kept. To address this, we allowed wild-type and Sln(-/-) animals ad libitum access to voluntary wheel running while consuming a standard chow or high-fat diet for 8 weeks. During this period, wheel revolutions were monitored along with weekly mass gain. Postdiet glucose tolerance and visceral adiposity were also taken. The volume of wheel running completed was similar between genotype, regardless of diet. Although voluntary activity reduced mass gain relative to sedentary controls within each diet (P < 0.05), visceral adiposity was surprisingly unaltered with activity. However, Sln(-/-) mice developed excessive obesity (P < 0.05) and glucose intolerance (P < 0.05) with high-fat feeding relative to wild-type controls. These findings indicate that the excessive diet-induced obese phenotype previously observed in Sln(-/-) mice is not the result of severely restricted daily ambulation, but in fact the inability to recruit uncoupling of the Ca(2+)-ATPase pump.

  18. Chemical chaperones reduce ER stress and adipose tissue inflammation in high fat diet-induced mouse model of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaqin; Wu, Zhihong; Zhao, Shuiping; Xiang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, which is characteristic by chronic inflammation, is defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation in adipose tissues. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is increased in adipose tissue of obese state and is known to be strongly associated with chronic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ER stress on adipokine secretion in obese mice and explore the potential mechanisms. In this study, we found high-fat diet induced-obesity contributed to strengthened ER stress and triggered chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. Chemical chaperones, 4-PBA and TUDCA, modified metabolic disorders and decreased the levels of inflammatory cytokines in obese mice fed a high-fat diet. The alleviation of ER stress is in accordance with the decrease of free cholesterol in adipose tissue. Furthermore chemical chaperones suppress NF-κB activity in adipose tissue of obese mice in vivo. In vitro studies showed IKK/NF-κB may be involved in the signal transduction of adipokine secretion dysfunction induced by ER stress. The present study revealed the possibility that inhibition of ER stress may be a novel drug target for metabolic abnormalities associated with obesity. Further studies are now needed to characterize the initial incentive of sustained ER stress in obese. PMID:27271106

  19. No effect of high fat diet-induced obesity on spontaneous reporter gene mutations in gpt delta mice.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Shinji; Ishii, Yuji; Matsushita, Kohei; Kuroda, Ken; Kijima, Aki; Kodama, Yukio; Ogawa, Kumiko; Umemura, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A large number of epidemiological studies have demonstrated that obesity is a risk factor for several human cancers. Several animal studies using rodents with diet-induced or genetic obesity have also demonstrated that obesity can promote tumor development. However, the effects of obesity on the early stages of carcinogenesis, and especially on the spontaneous occurrence of somatic gene mutations, remain unclear. To investigate the effects of obesity on the rate of spontaneous gene mutations, we performed reporter gene mutation assays in liver, kidney, and colon, organs in which obesity appears to be associated with cancer development on the basis of epidemiological or animal studies, in mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Six-week-old male and female C57BL/6 gpt delta mice were fed HFD or standard diet (STD) for 13 or 26 weeks. At the end of the experiments, reporter gene mutation assays of liver, kidney, and colon were performed. Final body weights and serum leptin levels of male and female mice fed HFD for 13 or 26 weeks were significantly increased compared with corresponding STD-fed groups. Reporter gene mutation assays of liver, kidney, and colon revealed that there were no significant differences in gpt or Spi- mutant frequencies between STD- and HFD-fed mice in either the 13-week or 26-week groups. These results indicate that HFD treatment and consequent obesity does not appear to influence the spontaneous occurrence of somatic gene mutations.

  20. β-catenin links hepatic metabolic zonation with lipid metabolism and diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Behari, Jaideep; Li, Huanan; Liu, Shiguang; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Alonso, Laura; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Shiva, Sruti; Singamsetty, Srikanth; Watanabe, Yoshio; Singh, Vijay P; Liu, Qing

    2014-12-01

    β-catenin regulates the establishment of hepatic metabolic zonation. To elucidate the functional significance of liver metabolic zonation in the chronically overfed state in vivo, we fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to hepatocyte-specific β-catenin transgenic (TG) and knockout (KO) mice. Chow-fed TG and KO mice had normal liver histologic findings and body weight. However, HFD-fed TG mice developed prominent perivenous steatosis with periportal sparing. In contrast, HFD-fed KO mice had increased lobular inflammation and hepatocyte apoptosis. HFD-fed TG mice rapidly developed diet-induced obesity and systemic insulin resistance, but KO mice were resistant to diet-induced obesity. However, β-catenin did not directly affect hepatic insulin signaling, suggesting that the metabolic effects of β-catenin occurred via a parallel pathway. Hepatic expression of key glycolytic and lipogenic genes was higher in HFD-fed TG and lower in KO mice compared with wild-type mice. KO mice also exhibited defective hepatic fatty acid oxidation and fasting ketogenesis. Hepatic levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1α, an oxygen-sensitive transcriptional regulator of glycolysis and a known β-catenin binding partner, were higher in HFD-fed TG and lower in KO mice. KO mice had attenuated perivenous hypoxia, suggesting disruption of the normal sinusoidal oxygen gradient, a major determinant of liver carbohydrate and liver metabolism. Canonical Wnt signaling in hepatocytes is essential for the development of diet-induced fatty liver and obesity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) enhances HSP, PGC-1α expressions and improves glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Marineli, Rafaela da Silva; Moura, Carolina Soares; Moraes, Érica Aguiar; Lenquiste, Sabrina Alves; Lollo, Pablo Christiano Barboza; Morato, Priscila Neder; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime; Maróstica, Mário Roberto

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chia seed and chia oil on heat shock protein (HSP) and related parameters in diet-induced obese rats. Animals were divided in six groups: control, high-fat and high-fructose diet (HFF), and HFF with chia seed or chia oil in short (6-wk) and long (12-wk) treatments. Plasma indicators of glucose tolerance and liver damage, skeletal muscle expression of antioxidant enzymes, and proteins controlling oxidative energy metabolism were determined. The limit of significance was set at P < 0.05. The HFF diet induced glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and altered parameters related to obesity complications. The consumption of chia seed or chia oil did not reduce body weight gain or abdominal fat accumulation. However, chia seed and chia oil in both treatments improved glucose and insulin tolerance. Chia oil in both treatments induced expression of HSP70 and HSP25 in skeletal muscle. Short treatment with chia seed increased expression of HSP70, but not HSP25. Chia oil in both treatments restored superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase expression. Extended treatment with chia seed and short treatment with chia oil restored peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression. Chia oil restored the antioxidant system and induced the expression of a higher number of proteins than chia seed. The present study demonstrated new properties and molecular mechanisms associated with the beneficial effects of chia seed and chia oil consumption in diet-induced obese rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of human pregnane X receptor in high fat diet-induced obesity in pre-menopausal female mice

    PubMed Central

    Spruiell, Krisstonia; Jones, Dominique Z.; Cullen, John M.; Awumey, Emmanuel M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Gyamfi, Maxwell A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder that is more prevalent among women. Until now, the only relevant rodent models of diet-induced obesity were via the use of ovariectomized (“postmenopausal”) females. However, recent reports suggest that the xenobiotic nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR) may contribute to obesity. Therefore, we compared the roles of mouse and human PXRs in diet-induced obesity between wild type (WT) and PXR-humanized (hPXR) transgenic female mice fed either control or high-fat diets (HFD) for 16 weeks. HFD-fed hPXR mice gained weight more rapidly than controls, exhibited hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. Fundamental differences were observed between control-fed hPXR and WT females: hPXR mice possessed reduced estrogen receptor α (ERα) but enhanced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) protein expression in white adipose tissue (WAT); increased protein expression of the hepatic cytochrome P450 3A11 (CYP3A11) and key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose 6-phosphatase, and increased total cholesterol. Interestingly, HFD ingestion induced both UCP1 and glucokinase protein expression in WT mice, but inhibited these enzymes in hPXR females. Unlike WT mice, CYP3A11 protein, serum 17β-estradiol levels, and WAT ERα expression were unaffected by HFD in hPXR females. Together, these studies indicate that the hPXR gene promotes obesity and metabolic syndrome by dysregulating lipid and glucose homeostasis while inhibiting UCP1 expression. Furthermore, our studies indicate that the human PXR suppresses the protective role of estrogen in metabolic disorders. Finally, these data identify PXR-humanized mice as a promising in vivo research model for studying obesity and diabetes in women. PMID:24721462

  3. Role of human pregnane X receptor in high fat diet-induced obesity in pre-menopausal female mice.

    PubMed

    Spruiell, Krisstonia; Jones, Dominique Z; Cullen, John M; Awumey, Emmanuel M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Gyamfi, Maxwell A

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder that is more prevalent among women. Until now, the only relevant rodent models of diet-induced obesity were via the use of ovariectomized ("postmenopausal") females. However, recent reports suggest that the xenobiotic nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR) may contribute to obesity. Therefore, we compared the roles of mouse and human PXRs in diet-induced obesity between wild type (WT) and PXR-humanized (hPXR) transgenic female mice fed either control or high-fat diets (HFD) for 16 weeks. HFD-fed hPXR mice gained weight more rapidly than controls, exhibited hyperinsulinemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. Fundamental differences were observed between control-fed hPXR and WT females: hPXR mice possessed reduced estrogen receptor α (ERα) but enhanced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) protein expression in white adipose tissue (WAT); increased protein expression of the hepatic cytochrome P450 3A11 (CYP3A11) and key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose 6-phosphatase, and increased total cholesterol. Interestingly, HFD ingestion induced both UCP1 and glucokinase protein expression in WT mice, but inhibited these enzymes in hPXR females. Unlike WT mice, CYP3A11 protein, serum 17β-estradiol levels, and WAT ERα expression were unaffected by HFD in hPXR females. Together, these studies indicate that the hPXR gene promotes obesity and metabolic syndrome by dysregulating lipid and glucose homeostasis while inhibiting UCP1 expression. Furthermore, our studies indicate that the human PXR suppresses the protective role of estrogen in metabolic disorders. Finally, these data identify PXR-humanized mice as a promising in vivo research model for studying obesity and diabetes in women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Modulation of tissue fatty acids by L-carnitine attenuates metabolic syndrome in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Panchal, Sunil K; Poudyal, Hemant; Ward, Leigh C; Waanders, Jennifer; Brown, Lindsay

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and dyslipidaemia are metabolic defects resulting from impaired lipid metabolism. These impairments are associated with the development of cardiovascular disease and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Correcting the defects in lipid metabolism may attenuate obesity and dyslipidaemia, and reduce cardiovascular risk and liver damage. L-Carnitine supplementation was used in this study to enhance fatty acid oxidation so as to ameliorate diet-induced disturbances in lipid metabolism. Male Wistar rats (8-9 weeks old) were fed with either corn starch or high-carbohydrate, high-fat diets for 16 weeks. Separate groups were supplemented with L-carnitine (1.2% in food) on either diet for the last 8 weeks of the protocol. High-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-fed rats showed central obesity, dyslipidaemia, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinaemia, cardiovascular remodelling and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. L-Carnitine supplementation attenuated these high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced changes, together with modifications in lipid metabolism including the inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, reduced storage of short-chain monounsaturated fatty acids in the tissues with decreased linoleic acid content and trans fatty acids stored in retroperitoneal fat. Thus, L-carnitine supplementation attenuated the signs of metabolic syndrome through inhibition of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 activity, preferential β-oxidation of some fatty acids and increased storage of saturated fatty acids and relatively inert oleic acid in the tissues.

  5. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Gabriela F. P.; Solon, Carina; Nascimento, Lucas F.; De-Lima-Junior, Jose C.; Nogueira, Guilherme; Moura, Rodrigo; Rocha, Guilherme Z.; Fioravante, Milena; Bobbo, Vanessa; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela; Araujo, Eliana P.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic POMC is the earliest marker distinguishing obesity-prone from obesity-resistant mice. The early inhibition of hypothalamic POMC was sufficient to transform obesity-resistant in obesity-prone mice. In addition, the post-prandial change in the blood level of β-endorphin, a POMC-derived peptide, correlates with body mass gain in rodents and humans. Taken together, these results suggest that defective regulation of POMC expression, which leads to a change of β-endorphin levels, is the earliest hypothalamic defect leading to obesity. PMID:27373214

  6. Diet-induced obesity promotes murine gastric cancer growth through a nampt/sirt1/c-myc positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Jun; Che, Xiang-Ming; Zhao, Wei; He, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Zheng-Liang; Chen, Rui; Fan, Lin; Jia, Zong-Liang

    2013-11-01

    Obesity increases the risk of gastric cancer and may promote its growth, as was recently demonstrated by our novel in vivo mouse model. However, the underlying mechanisms of this correlation remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the precise effects of obesity on gastric cancer growth and to elucidate the potential molecular mechanisms. Diet-induced obese mice were insulin-resistant, glucose-intolerant and had high serum visfatin concentration. In the subcutaneous mouse model, tumors were more aggressive in diet-induced obese mice compared with lean mice. Tumor weights showed a significant positive correlation with mouse body weights, as well as serum insulin and visfatin concentrations. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression levels of iNampt, Sirt1 and c-MYC proteins were upregulated in the subcutaneous tumors from obese mice compared to those from lean animals. Furthermore, obesity not only prompted significantly murine forestomach carcinoma cell migration, proliferation, but also affected cellular apoptosis and cell cycle by endocrine mechanisms. These were associated with increased expression of the pro-survival nampt/sirt1/c-myc positive feedback loop confirmed by RT-PCR and western blotting. These results suggested that diet-induced obesity could promote murine gastric cancer growth by upregulating the expression of the nampt, sirt1 and c-myc genes.

  7. Rosiglitazone improves insulin sensitivity and baroreflex gain in rats with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ding; McCully, Belinda H; Brooks, Virginia L

    2012-10-01

    Obesity decreases baroreflex gain (BRG); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that impaired BRG is related to the concurrent insulin resistance, and, therefore, BRG would be improved after treatment with the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Male rats fed a high-fat diet diverged into obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) groups after 2 weeks. Then, OP and OR rats, as well as control (CON) rats fed a standard diet, were treated daily for 2 to 3 weeks with rosiglitazone (3 or 6 mg/kg) or its vehicle by gavage. Compared with OR and CON rats, conscious OP rats exhibited reductions in BRG (OP, 2.9 ± 0.1 bpm/mm Hg; OR, 4.0 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; CON, 3.9 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; P < 0.05) and insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp; OP, 6.8 ± 0.9 mg/kg · min; OR, 22.2 ± 1.2 mg/kg · min; CON, 17.7 ± 0.8 mg/kg · min; P < 0.05), which were well correlated (r(2) = 0.49; P < 0.01). In OP rats, rosiglitazone dose-dependently improved (P < 0.05) insulin sensitivity (12.8 ± 0.6 mg/kg · min at 3 mg/kg; 16.0 ± 1.5 mg/kg · min at 6 mg/kg) and BRG (3.8 ± 0.4 bpm/mm Hg at 3 mg/kg; 5.3 ± 0.7 bpm/mm Hg at 6 mg/kg). However, 6 mg/kg rosiglitazone also increased BRG in OR rats without increasing insulin sensitivity, disrupted the correlation between BRG and insulin sensitivity (r(2) = 0.08), and, in OP and OR rats, elevated BRG relative to insulin sensitivity (analysis of covariance; P < 0.05). Moreover, in OP rats, stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, to activate central baroreflex pathways, elicited markedly reduced decreases in heart rate and arterial pressure, but these responses were not improved by rosiglitazone. In conclusion, diet-induced obesity impairs BRG via a central mechanism that is related to the concurrent insulin resistance. Rosiglitazone normalizes BRG, but not by improving brain baroreflex processing or insulin sensitivity.

  8. Phloretin Prevents High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Improves Metabolic Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Alsanea, Sary; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2017-02-14

    Reactive oxygen species generated as a by-product in metabolism play a central role in the development of obesity and obesity-related metabolic complications. The objective of the current study is to explore the possibility to block obesity and improve metabolic homeostasis via phloretin, a natural antioxidant product from apple tree leaves and Manchurian apricot. Both preventive and therapeutic activities of phloretin were assessed using a high-fat diet-induced obesity mouse model. Phloretin was injected intraperitoneally twice weekly into regular and obese mice fed a high-fat diet. The effects of phloretin treatment on body weight and composition, fat content in the liver, glucose and lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance were monitored and compared to the control animals. Phloretin treatment significantly blocks high-fat diet-induced weight gain but did not induce weight loss in obese animals. Phloretin improved glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity and alleviated hepatic lipid accumulation. RT-PCR analysis showed that phloretin treatment suppresses expression of macrophage markers (F4/80 and Cd68) and pro-inflammatory genes (Mcp-1 and Ccr2) and enhances adiponectin gene expression in white adipose tissue. In addition, phloretin treatment elevated the expression of fatty acid oxidation genes such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a and 1b (Cpt1a and Cpt1b) and reduced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp-1), de novo lipogenesis transcriptional factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ 2 (Pparγ2), and its target monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (Mgat-1) genes. These results provide direct evidence to support a possible use of phloretin for mitigation of obesity and maintenance of metabolic homeostasis.

  9. Ginseng panaxoside Rb1 reduces body weight in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Cai, Dong-Lian; Jin, Di; Chen, Yi; Shi, Jiao-Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Crude extracts from ginseng demonstrated anti-obesity properties. Ginsenoside Rb1 is the main component of ginseng, however, there are only few studies examining its effects in obesity. In the present study, we evaluated its potential anti-obesity effects in the murine model of diet-induced obesity. Seventy male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided to consume for 12 weeks either chow diet (N = 8) or high-fat (HF) diet (N = 62). The latter mice were then divided into four groups: diet-induced obesity group (DIO; N = 10), obesity-resistant group (OR; N = 10), HF group (N = 5), and the group whose diet was changed from HF to normal diet (DC; N = 5). Intraperitoneal injections of Rb-1 were administered daily to mice in the DIO and OR groups for 3 weeks. Body weight and energy intake were monitored, and fasting blood glucose, lipids, neuropeptide Y, Y2 receptor, and peptide YY were quantified. Compared with HF group, weight gain and food intake of DIO mice with Rb-1 injection was significantly decreased (p < 0.05). Further, levels of blood glucose and some lipids were also decreased in DIO-Rb1 group compared with HF group. Furthermore, Rb1 was also found to modulate serum levels of PYY and NPY, and mRNA expression of NPY, Y2 receptor and PYY in tissue samples of DIO mice. Taken together, ginsenoside Rb1 may be useful in the treatment of obesity via modifying the serum content and mRNA expression of NPY, Y2 receptor and PYY.

  10. Loss of coiled-coil domain containing 80 negatively modulates glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Frédéric; Huard, Christine; Dow, Jessie; Gareski, Tiffany; Will, Sarah; Richard, Ann-Marie; Syed, Jameel; Bailey, Steven; Brenneman, Karrie A; Martinez, Robert V; Perreault, Mylène; Lin, Qingcong; Gimeno, Ruth E

    2012-09-01

    Coiled-coil domain containing 80 (Ccdc80) is a secreted protein highly enriched in mouse and human white adipose tissue (WAT) that plays an important role during adipocyte differentiation in vitro. To investigate the physiological function of Ccdc80 in energy and glucose homeostasis, we generated mice in which the gene encoding Ccdc80 was disrupted. Mice lacking Ccdc80 showed increased sensitivity to diet-induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance while displaying reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo. Gene expression analysis by microarray revealed that only 10 transcripts were simultaneously altered in pancreas, skeletal muscle, and WAT from Ccdc80(-/-) mice, including some components of the circadian clock. Expression of the core clock member Arntl/Bmal1 was reduced whereas that of the oscillating transcription factors Dbp and Tef was increased in all tissues examined. Furthermore, knockdown of Ccdc80 in 3T3-L1 cells led to an increase of Dbp mRNA levels during adipocyte differentiation, suggesting that Ccdc80 might be involved in the regulation of this gene in a cell-autonomous manner. Importantly, transcriptional alterations in Ccdc80(-/-) mice were associated with changes in feeding behavior, increased caloric intake, decreased energy expenditure, and obesity. Taken together, our results suggest that Ccdc80 is a novel modulator of glucose and energy homeostasis during diet-induced obesity.

  11. c-Abl inhibition mitigates diet-induced obesity through improving insulin sensitivity of subcutaneous fat in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rong; Sun, Jian-Guang; Wang, Ji-Qiu; Li, Binhua; Liu, Qingsong; Ning, Guang; Jin, Wanzhu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2017-05-01

    High-energy diets are among the main causes of the global epidemic of metabolic disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms of high-energy-diet-induced metabolic disorders are complex and largely unknown. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl plays an important role in adipogenesis in vitro but its role in vivo in the regulation of metabolism is still elusive. Hence, we sought to address the role of c-Abl in diet-induced obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance. The expression of c-Abl in different fat tissues from obese humans or mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) were first analysed by western blotting and quantitative PCR. We employed conditional deletion of the c-Abl gene (also known as Abl1) in adipose tissue using Fabp4-Cre and 6-week-old mice were fed with either a chow diet (CD) or an HFD. Age-matched wild-type mice were treated with the c-Abl inhibitor nilotinib or with vehicle and exposed to either CD or HFD, followed by analysis of body mass, fat mass, glucose and insulin tolerance. Histological staining, ELISA and biochemical analysis were used to clarify details of changes in physiology and molecular signalling. c-Abl was highly expressed in subcutaneous fat from obese humans and HFD-induced obese mice. Conditional knockout of c-Abl in adipose tissue improved insulin sensitivity and mitigated HFD-induced body mass gain, hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia. Consistently, treatment with nilotinib significantly reduced fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed mice. Further biochemical analyses suggested that c-Abl inhibition improved whole-body insulin sensitivity by reducing HFD-triggered insulin resistance and increasing adiponectin in subcutaneous fat. Our findings define a new biological role for c-Abl in the regulation of diet-induced obesity through improving insulin sensitivity of subcutaneous fat. This suggests it may become a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of metabolic disorders.

  12. Antioxidant potential of dietary chia seed and oil (Salvia hispanica L.) in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Marineli, Rafaela da Silva; Lenquiste, Sabrina Alves; Moraes, Érica Aguiar; Maróstica, Mário Roberto

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dietary chia seed and oil on plasma and liver oxidative status in diet-induced obese rats. Thirty-six Wistar rats were divided in six groups (6 animals each): control group was fed the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93M diet; HFF group was fed a high-fat and high-fructose (HFF) diet; chia seed short (6-weeks) and long (12-weeks) treatments received an HFF diet with chia seed; chia oil short (6-weeks) and long (12-weeks) treatments received an HFF diet with chia oil. Plasma and hepatic biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, endogenous enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems and antioxidant capacity were determined. HFF diet induced weight gain, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in plasma and liver of animals. Compared to HFF group chia seed and chia oil (12 and 6weeks) intake increased plasma reduced thiol (GSH) levels, plasma catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. In the liver glutathione reductase (GRd) activity was enhanced, while CAT and GPx activities did not change. There were no differences in plasma and liver superoxide dismutase activity among chia diets and HFF group. Chia (seed and oil) intake did not modify liver lipid peroxidation, but was able to reduce plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and 8-isoprostane levels increased by HFF group. Plasma and hepatic antioxidant capacity values were increased in chia seed and oil groups about 35% and 47%, respectively, compared to HFF group. Chia groups presented similar antioxidant potential, regardless of treatment time. Dietary chia seed and oil reduced oxidative stress in vivo, since it improved antioxidant status and reduced lipid peroxidation in diet-induced obese rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Does diet-induced weight change effect anxiety in overweight and obese adults?

    PubMed

    Eyres, Stacey L; Turner, Anne I; Nowson, Caryl A; Torres, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is the most prevalent type of mental disorder and a significant health concern. Cross-sectional studies have detected a positive association between obesity and anxiety. What is less clear is whether weight loss can reduce anxiety. We sought to answer three questions: 1. Can weight loss improve symptoms of anxiety in the overweight and obese population? 2. Does the macronutrient content of energy-restricted diets that induce weight loss affect anxiety? 3. Is the change in anxiety related to the amount of weight lost? We investigated the findings from seven interventional studies, which induced weight loss by dietary intervention, in overweight and obese individuals, using established anxiety assessment tools. Mean weight loss ranged from 0.7 to 18.6 kg (SD 4.5) and in three of the studies, anxiety fell by 9.2% to 11.4% and did not change in four studies. When macronutrient content was considered, only one of four interventional studies and one pilot study reported a beneficial effect of a moderate-fat diet on anxiety. There appears to be no strong evidence to indicate that diet-induced weight loss has a beneficial effect on anxiety, however, none of the diet-induced weight loss studies assessed had a detrimental effect on anxiety.

  14. Antiobesity Effects of the Ethanol Extract of Laminaria japonica Areshoung in High-Fat-Diet-Induced Obese Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Woong Sun; Choung, Se Young

    2013-01-01

    Laminaria japonica Areshoung, a widely consumed marine vegetable, has traditionally been used in Korean maternal health. The present study investigated the antiobesity effects of Laminaria japonica Areshoung ethanol extract (LE) and its molecular mechanism in high-fat-diet-induced obese rats. Six-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were separately fed a normal diet or a high-calorie high-fat diet for 6 weeks; then they were treated with LE or tea catechin for another 6 weeks. LE administration significantly decreased the body weight gain, fat-pad weights, and serum and hepatic lipid levels in HD-induced obese rats. The histological analysis revealed that LE-treated group showed a significantly decreased number of lipid droplets and size of adipocytes compared to the HD group. To elucidate the mechanism of action of LE, the levels of genes and proteins involved in obesity were measured in the liver and skeletal muscle. LE treatment resulted in an increased expression of fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis-related genes in obese rats. Conversely, the expression of the fat intake-related gene (ACC2) and lipogenesis-related genes was reduced by LE treatment. Additionally, LE treatment increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and its direct downstream protein, acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, which is one of the rate-limiting enzymes in fatty acid synthesis pathway. These findings demonstrate that LE treatment has a protective effect against a high-fat-diet-induced obesity in rats through regulation of expression of genes and proteins involved in lipolysis and lipogenesis. PMID:23365609

  15. Mitochondria-targeted dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP) combats high-fat-diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kalinovich, A V; Mattsson, C L; Youssef, M R; Petrovic, N; Ost, M; Skulachev, V P; Shabalina, I G

    2016-01-01

    Background: A membrane-penetrating cation, dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP), facilitates the recycling of fatty acids in the artificial lipid membrane and mitochondria. C12TPP can dissipate mitochondrial membrane potential and may affect total energy expenditure and body weight in animals and humans. Methods: We investigated the metabolic effects of C12TPP in isolated brown-fat mitochondria, brown adipocyte cultures and mice in vivo. Experimental approaches included the measurement of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, western blotting, magnetic resonance imaging and bomb calorimetry. Results: In mice, C12TPP (50 μmol per (day•kg body weight)) in the drinking water significantly reduced body weight (12%, P<0.001) and body fat mass (24%, P<0.001) during the first 7 days of treatment. C12TPP did not affect water palatability and intake or the energy and lipid content in feces. The addition of C12TPP to isolated brown-fat mitochondria resulted in increased oxygen consumption. Three hours of pretreatment with C12TPP also increased oligomycin-insensitive oxygen consumption in brown adipocyte cultures (P<0.01). The effects of C12TPP on mitochondria, cells and mice were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). However, C12TPP treatment increased the mitochondrial protein levels in the brown adipose tissue of both wild-type and UCP1-knockout mice. Pair-feeding revealed that one-third of the body weight loss in C12TPP-treated mice was due to reduced food intake. C12TPP treatment elevated the resting metabolic rate (RMR) by up to 18% (P<0.05) compared with pair-fed animals. C12TPP reduced the respiratory exchange ratio, indicating enhanced fatty acid oxidation in mice. Conclusions: C12TPP combats diet-induced obesity by reducing food intake, increasing the RMR and enhancing fatty acid oxidation. PMID:27534841

  16. Metformin and sulodexide restore cardiac microvascular perfusion capacity in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    van Haare, Judith; Kooi, M Eline; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W G E; Vink, Hans; Slenter, Jos; Cobelens, Hanneke; Strijkers, Gustav J; Koehn, Dennis; Post, Mark J; van Bilsen, Marc

    2017-04-11

    Disturbances in coronary microcirculatory function, such as the endothelial glycocalyx, are early hallmarks in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, in the present study myocardial microcirculatory perfusion during rest and stress was assessed following metformin or sulodexide therapy in a rat model of diet-induced obesity. Additionally, the effect of degradation of the glycocalyx on myocardial perfusion was assessed in chow-fed rats. Rats were fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks and were divided into a group without therapy, and groups that received the anti-diabetic drug metformin or the glycocalyx-stabilizing drug sulodexide in their drinking water during the last 4 weeks of the feeding period. Myocardial microvascular perfusion was determined using first-pass perfusion MRI before and after adenosine infusion. The effect of HFD on microcirculatory properties was also assessed by sidestream darkfield (SDF) imaging of the gastrocnemius muscle. In an acute experimental setting, hyaluronidase was administered to chow-fed control rats to determine the effect of enzymatical degradation of the glycocalyx on myocardial perfusion. HFD-rats developed central obesity and insulin sensitivity was reduced as evidenced by the marked reduction in insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt in both cardiac and gastrocnemius muscle. We confirmed our earlier findings that the robust increase in myocardial perfusion in chow-fed rats after an adenosine challenge (+56%, p = 0.002) is blunted in HFD rats (+8%, p = 0.68). In contrast, 4-weeks treatment with metformin or sulodexide partly restored the increase in myocardial perfusion during adenosine infusion in HFD rats (+81%, p = 0.002 and +37%, p = 0.02, respectively). Treating chow-fed rats acutely with hyaluronidase, to enzymatically degrade the glyocalyx, completely blunted the increase in myocardial perfusion during stress. In early stages of HFD-induced insulin resistance myocardial perfusion

  17. Red blood cell β-adrenergic receptors contribute to diet-induced energy expenditure by increasing O2 supply

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ran; Fan, Shengjie; Akhmedov, Dmitry; Sun, Kaiqi; Lim, Hoyong; O’Brien, William; Xu, Yuanzhong; Mangieri, Leandra R.; Zhu, Yaming; Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chung, Yeonseok; Xia, Yang; Xu, Yong; Li, Feng; Sun, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) represents the major cause for the current obesity epidemic, but the mechanism underlying DIO is unclear. β-Adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) play a major role in sympathetic nervous system–mediated (SNS-mediated) diet-induced energy expenditure (EE). Rbc express abundant β-ARs; however, a potential role for rbc in DIO remains untested. Here, we demonstrated that high-fat, high-caloric diet (HFD) feeding increased both EE and blood O2 content, and the HFD-induced increases in blood O2 level and in body weight gain were negatively correlated. Deficiency of β-ARs in rbc reduced glycolysis and ATP levels, diminished HFD-induced increases in both blood O2 content and EE, and resulted in DIO. Importantly, specific activation of cAMP signaling in rbc promoted HFD-induced EE and reduced HFD-induced tissue hypoxia independent of obesity. Both HFD and pharmacological activation cAMP signaling in rbc led to increased glycolysis and ATP levels. These results identify a previously unknown role for rbc β-ARs in mediating the SNS action on HFD-induced EE by increasing O2 supply, and they demonstrate that HFD-induced EE is limited by blood O2 availability and can be augenmented by increased O2 supply. PMID:28724789

  18. Liver immune responses to inflammatory stimuli in a diet-induced obesity model of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Forn-Cuní, Gabriel; Varela, Monica; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado M; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2015-02-01

    Obesity- and metabolic syndrome-related diseases are becoming important medical challenges for the western world. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a manifestation of these altered conditions in the liver, and inflammation appears to be a factor that is tightly connected to its evolution. In this study, we used a diet-induced obesity approach in zebrafish (Danio rerio) based on overfeeding to analyze liver transcriptomic modulation in the disease and to determine how obesity affects the immune response against an acute inflammatory stimulus such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Overfed zebrafish developed an obese phenotype, showed signs of liver steatosis, and its modulation profile resembled that observed in humans, with overexpression of tac4, col4a3, col4a5, lysyl oxidases, and genes involved in retinoid metabolism. In response to LPS, healthy fish exhibited a typical host defense reaction comparable to that which occurs in mammals, whereas there was no significant gene modulation when comparing expression in the liver of LPS-stimulated and non-stimulated obese zebrafish at the same statistical level. The stimulation of obese fish represents a double-hit to the already damaged liver and can help understand the evolution of the disease. Finally, a comparison of the differential gene activation between stimulated healthy and obese zebrafish revealed the expected difference in the metabolic state between healthy and diseased liver. The differentially modulated genes are currently being studied as putative new pathological markers in NAFLD-stimulated liver in humans. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  19. Absence of intestinal microbiota does not protect mice from diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, Christine K; Huebel, Nora; Abd El-Bary, Mohamed Mostafa; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne; Blaut, Michael

    2010-09-01

    The gut microbiota has been implicated in host nutrient absorption and energy homeostasis. We studied the influence of different diets on body composition in germ-free (GF) and conventional (CV) mice. GF and CV male adult C3H mice were fed ad libitum a semi-synthetic low-fat diet (LFD; carbohydrate-protein-fat ratio: 41:42:17; 19.8 kJ/g), a high-fat diet (HFD; 41:16:43; 21.4 kJ/g) or a commercial Western diet (WD; 41:19:41; 21.5 kJ/g). There was no difference in body weight gain between GF and CV mice on the LFD. On the HFD, GF mice gained more body weight and body fat than CV mice, and had lower energy expenditure. GF mice on the WD gained significantly less body fat than GF mice on the HFD. GF mice on both HFD and WD showed increased intestinal mRNA expression of fasting-induced adipose factor/angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Fiaf/Angptl4), but they showed no major changes in circulating Fiaf/Angptl4 compared with CV mice. The faecal microbiota composition of the CV mice differed between diets: the proportion of Firmicutes increased on both HFD and WD at the expense of the Bacteroidetes. This increase in the Firmicutes was mainly due to the proliferation of one family within this phylum: the Erysipelotrichaceae. We conclude that the absence of gut microbiota does not provide a general protection from diet-induced obesity, that intestinal production of Fiaf/Angptl4 does not play a causal role in gut microbiota-mediated effects on fat storage and that diet composition affects gut microbial composition to larger extent than previously thought.

  20. Depot-specific differences in angiogenic capacity of adipose tissue in differential susceptibility to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Song, Mun-Gyu; Lee, Hye-Jin; Jin, Bo-Yeong; Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Shin, Kyung-Ho; Choi, Sang-Hyun; Um, Sung Hee; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) expansion requires AT remodeling, which depends on AT angiogenesis. Modulation of AT angiogenesis could have therapeutic promise for the treatment of obesity. However, it is unclear how the capacity of angiogenesis in each adipose depot is affected by over-nutrition. Therefore, we investigated the angiogenic capacity (AC) of subcutaneous and visceral fats in lean and obese mice. We compared the AC of epididymal fat (EF) and inguinal fat (IF) using an angiogenesis assay in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice and diet-resistant (DR) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Furthermore, we compared the expression levels of genes related to angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and inflammation using RT-qPCR in the EF and IF of lean mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD), DIO mice, and DR mice fed a HFD. DIO mice showed a significant increase in the AC of EF only at 22 weeks of age compared to DR mice. The expression levels of genes related to angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and inflammation were significantly higher in the EF of DIO mice than in those of LFD mice and DR mice, while expression levels of genes related to macrophages and their recruitment were higher in the IF of DIO mice than in those of LFD and DR mice. Expression of genes related to angiogenesis (including Hif1a, Vegfa, Fgf1, Kdr, and Pecam1), macrophage recruitment, and inflammation (including Emr1, Ccr2, Itgax, Ccl2, Tnf, and Il1b) correlated more strongly with body weight in the EF of HFD-fed obese mice compared to that of IF. These results suggest depot-specific differences in AT angiogenesis and a potential role in the susceptibility to diet-induced obesity.

  1. Connection of Nicotine to Diet-Induced Obesity and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Cellular and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P.; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Friedman, Theodore C.

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) poses a serious health hazard affecting 20–40% of adults in the general population in the USA and over 70% of the obese and extremely obese people. In addition to obesity, nicotine is recognized as a risk factor for NAFLD, and it has been reported that nicotine can exaggerate obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. The development of NAFLD has serious clinical complications because of its potential progression from simple hepatic steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Multiple mechanisms can be involved in nicotine plus high-fat diet-induced (HFD) hepatic steatosis. Emerging evidence now suggests that nicotine exacerbates hepatic steatosis triggered by HFD, through increased oxidative stress and hepatocellular apoptosis, decreased phosphorylation (inactivation) of adenosine-5-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and, in turn, up-regulation of sterol response-element binding protein 1-c, fatty acid synthase, and activation of acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase, leading to increased hepatic lipogenesis. There is also growing evidence that chronic endoplasmic reticulum stress through regulation of several pathways leading to oxidative stress, inflammation, perturbed hepatic lipid homeostasis, apoptosis, and autophagy can induce hepatic steatosis and its progression to NASH. Evidence also suggests a central role of the gut microbiota in obesity and its related disorders, including NAFLD. This review explores the contribution of nicotine and obesity to the development of NAFLD and its molecular underpinning. PMID:28239368

  2. Yerba mate extract (Ilex paraguariensis) attenuates both central and peripheral inflammatory effects of diet-induced obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Gustavo D; Lira, Fábio S; Rosa, José C; Caris, Aline V; Pinheiro, Fernanda; Ribeiro, Eliane B; Oller do Nascimento, Cláudia M; Oyama, Lila M

    2013-05-01

    To clarify the effects of natural dietary components on the metabolic consequences of obesity, we examined the effects of yerba mate extract Ilex paraguariensis on both central and peripheral inflammatory effects of diet-induced obesity and correlated the hypothalamic tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level with adipose depot weight. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: a control group (CTL) fed with chow diet, a second group fed with chow diet plus yerba mate extract (CTL+E), a third group fed with a high-fat diet rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD) and a fourth group fed with HFD plus yerba mate extract (HFD+E). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blotting, colorimetric method and treatment by gavage were utilized as materials and methods. The HFD groups showed a significant increase in food intake (kcal), body weight, adipose tissue and leptin level in comparison to CTL and CTL+E. HFD leads to increase of both central and peripheral inflammatory effects, and deregulation of insulin pathway. In addition, yerba mate extract intake blunted the proinflammatory effects of diet-induced obesity in rats by reducing the phosphorylation of hypothalamic IKK and NFκBp65 expression and increasing the phosphorylation of IκBα, the expression of adiponectin receptor-1 and consequently the amount of IRS-2. Moreover, the increase in interleukin (IL)-6 levels in the liver and muscle and of the IL-10/TNF-α ratio in groups that received yerba mate extract showed the anti-inflammatory effects of this natural substance. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of yerba mate extract may be useful for reducing low-grade obesity-associated inflammation.

  3. Diet-induced obesity elevates colonic TNF-α in mice and is accompanied by an activation of Wnt signaling: a mechanism for obesity-associated colorectal cancer✩

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenhua; Brooks, Ryan S.; Ciappio, Eric D.; Kim, Susan J.; Crott, Jimmy W.; Bennett, Grace; Greenberg, Andrew S.; Mason, Joel B.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation associated with obesity may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether the Wnt pathway, an intracellular signaling cascade that plays a critical role in colorectal carcinogenesis, is activated by obesity-induced elevation of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Animal studies were conducted on C57BL/6 mice, and obesity was induced by utilizing a high-fat diet (60% kcal). An inflammation-specific microarray was performed, and results were confirmed with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The array revealed that diet-induced obesity increased the expression of TNF-α in the colon by 72% (P=.004) and that of interleukin-18 by 41% (P=.023). The concentration of colonic TNF-α protein, determined by ex vivo culture assay, was nearly doubled in the obese animals (P=.002). The phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), an important intermediary inhibitor of Wnt signaling and a potential target of TNF-α, was quantitated by immunohistochemistry. The inactivated (phosphorylated) form of GSK3β was elevated in the colonic mucosa of obese mice (P<.02). Moreover, β-catenin, the key effector of canonical Wnt signaling, was elevated in the colons of obese mice (P<.05), as was the expression of a downstream target gene, c-myc (P<.05). These data demonstrate that diet-induced obesity produces an elevation in colonic TNF-α and instigates a number of alterations of key components within the Wnt signaling pathway that are protransformational in nature. Thus, these observations offer evidence for a biologically plausible avenue, the Wnt pathway, by which obesity increases the risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:22209007

  4. Diet-induced obesity elevates colonic TNF-α in mice and is accompanied by an activation of Wnt signaling: a mechanism for obesity-associated colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenhua; Brooks, Ryan S; Ciappio, Eric D; Kim, Susan J; Crott, Jimmy W; Bennett, Grace; Greenberg, Andrew S; Mason, Joel B

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation associated with obesity may play a role in colorectal carcinogenesis, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated whether the Wnt pathway, an intracellular signaling cascade that plays a critical role in colorectal carcinogenesis, is activated by obesity-induced elevation of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Animal studies were conducted on C57BL/6 mice, and obesity was induced by utilizing a high-fat diet (60% kcal). An inflammation-specific microarray was performed, and results were confirmed with real-time polymerase chain reaction. The array revealed that diet-induced obesity increased the expression of TNF-α in the colon by 72% (P=.004) and that of interleukin-18 by 41% (P=.023). The concentration of colonic TNF-α protein, determined by ex vivo culture assay, was nearly doubled in the obese animals (P=.002). The phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β), an important intermediary inhibitor of Wnt signaling and a potential target of TNF-α, was quantitated by immunohistochemistry. The inactivated (phosphorylated) form of GSK3β was elevated in the colonic mucosa of obese mice (P<.02). Moreover, β-catenin, the key effector of canonical Wnt signaling, was elevated in the colons of obese mice (P<.05), as was the expression of a downstream target gene, c-myc (P<.05). These data demonstrate that diet-induced obesity produces an elevation in colonic TNF-α and instigates a number of alterations of key components within the Wnt signaling pathway that are protransformational in nature. Thus, these observations offer evidence for a biologically plausible avenue, the Wnt pathway, by which obesity increases the risk of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize development of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by performing liver biopsy in wild-type and genetically obese mice. METHODS: Male wild-type C57BL/6J (C57) mice (DIO-NASH) and male Lepob/Lepob (ob/ob) mice (ob/ob-NASH) were maintained on a diet high in trans-fat (40%), fructose (22%) and cholesterol (2%) for 26 and 12 wk, respectively. A normal chow diet served as control in C57 mice (lean chow) and ob/ob mice (ob/ob chow). After the diet-induction period, mice were liver biopsied and a blinded histological assessment of steatosis and fibrosis was conducted. Mice were then stratified into groups counterbalanced for steatosis score and fibrosis stage and continued on diet and to receive daily PO dosing of vehicle for 8 wk. Global gene expression in liver tissue was assessed by RNA sequencing and bioinformatics. Metabolic parameters, plasma liver enzymes and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides) as well as hepatic lipids and collagen content were measured by biochemical analysis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) (steatosis/inflammation/ballooning degeneration) and fibrosis were scored. Steatosis and fibrosis were also quantified using percent fractional area. RESULTS: Diet-induction for 26 and 12 wk in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice, respectively, elicited progressive metabolic perturbations characterized by increased adiposity, total cholesterol and elevated plasma liver enzymes. The diet also induced clear histological features of NASH including hepatosteatosis and fibrosis. Overall, the metabolic NASH phenotype was more pronounced in ob/ob-NASH vs DIO-NASH mice. During the eight week repeated vehicle dosing period, the metabolic phenotype was sustained in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice in conjunction with hepatomegaly and increased hepatic lipids and collagen accumulation. Histopathological scoring demonstrated significantly increased NAS of DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 4.7 ± 0.4, P < 0.001 compared to lean chow

  6. Revascularization and muscle adaptation to limb demand ischemia in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Albadawi, Hassan; Tzika, A Aria; Rask-Madsen, Christian; Crowley, Lindsey M; Koulopoulos, Michael W; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Watkins, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are major risk factors for peripheral arterial disease in humans, which can result in lower limb demand ischemia and exercise intolerance. Exercise triggers skeletal muscle adaptation including increased vasculogenesis. The goal of this study was to determine whether demand ischemia modulates revascularization, fiber size, and signaling pathways in the ischemic hind limb muscles of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). DIO mice (n = 7) underwent unilateral femoral artery ligation and recovered for 2 wks followed by 4 wks with daily treadmill exercise to induce demand ischemia. A parallel sedentary ischemia (SI) group (n = 7) had femoral artery ligation without exercise. The contralateral limb muscles of SI served as control. Muscles were examined for capillary density, myofiber cross-sectional area, cytokine levels, and phosphorylation of STAT3 and ERK1/2. Exercise significantly enhanced capillary density (P < 0.01) and markedly lowered cross-sectional area (P < 0.001) in demand ischemia compared with SI. These findings coincided with a significant increase in granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (P < 0.001) and interleukin-7 (P < 0.01) levels. In addition, phosphorylation levels of STAT3 and ERK1/2 (P < 0.01) were increased, whereas UCP1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 protein levels were lower (P < 0.05) without altering vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor alpha protein levels. Demand ischemia increased the PGC1α messenger RNA (P < 0.001) without augmenting PGC1α protein levels. Exercise-induced limb demand ischemia in the setting of DIO causes myofiber atrophy despite an increase in muscle capillary density. The combination of persistent increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha, lower vascular endothelial growth factor, and failure to increase PGC1α protein may reflect a deficient adaption to demand ischemia in DIO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A closed-loop synthetic gene circuit for the treatment of diet-induced obesity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rössger, Katrin; Charpin-El-Hamri, Ghislaine; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Diet-induced obesity is a lifestyle-associated medical condition that increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Here we report the design of a closed-loop genetic circuit that constantly monitors blood fatty acid levels in the setting of diet-associated hyperlipidemia and coordinates reversible and adjustable expression of the clinically licensed appetite-suppressing peptide hormone pramlintide. Grafting of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α onto the phloretin-responsive repressor TtgR produces a synthetic intracellular lipid-sensing receptor (LSR) that reversibly induces chimeric TtgR-specific promoters in a fatty acid-adjustable manner. Mice with diet-induced obesity in which microencapsulated cells engineered for LSR-driven expression of pramlintide are implanted show significant reduction in food consumption, blood lipid levels and body weight when put on a high-fat diet. Therapeutic designer circuits that monitor levels of pathologic metabolites and link these with the tailored expression of protein pharmaceuticals may provide new opportunities for the treatment of metabolic disorders. PMID:24281397

  8. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism.

  9. White Pitaya (Hylocereus undatus) Juice Attenuates Insulin Resistance and Hepatic Steatosis in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haizhao; Zheng, Zihuan; Wu, Jianan; Lai, Jia; Chu, Qiang; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis are the most common complications of obesity. Pitaya is an important source of phytochemicals such as polyphenols, flavonoid and vitamin C which are related to its antioxidant activity. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of white pitaya juice (WPJ) on obesity-related metabolic disorders (e.g. insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis) in high-fat diet-fed mice. Forty-eight male C57BL/6J mice were assigned into four groups and fed low-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ, or fed high-fat diet with free access to water or WPJ for 14 weeks. Our results showed that administration of WPJ improved high-fat diet-induced insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and adipose hypertrophy, but it exerted no influence on body weight gain in mice. Hepatic gene expression analysis indicated that WPJ supplement not only changed the expression profile of genes involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism (Srebp1, HMGCoR, Cpt1b, HL, Insig1 and Insig2) but also significantly increased the expression levels of FGF21-related genes (Klb, FGFR2, Egr1 and cFos). In conclusion, WPJ protected from diet-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance, which was associated with the improved FGF21 resistance and lipid metabolism. PMID:26914024

  10. Alleviation of high fat diet-induced obesity by oligofructose in gnotobiotic mice is independent of presence of Bifidobacterium longum.

    PubMed

    Woting, Anni; Pfeiffer, Nora; Hanske, Laura; Loh, Gunnar; Klaus, Susanne; Blaut, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Diet-induced obesity is associated with changes in the gut microbiota and low-grade inflammation. Oligofructose was reported to ameliorate high fat diet-induced metabolic disorders in mice by restoring the number of intestinal bifidobacteria. However, this has not been experimentally demonstrated. We fed conventional mice, germfree mice, mice associated with a simplified human gut microbiota composed of eight bacterial species including Bifidobacterium longum (SIHUMI), and mice associated with SIHUMI without B. longum a low fat diet (LFD), a high fat diet (HFD), or a HFD containing 10% oligofructose (HFD + OFS) for five weeks. We assessed body composition, bacterial cell numbers and metabolites, markers of inflammation, and gut permeability. Conventional mice fed HFD or HFD + OFS did not differ in body weight gain and glucose tolerance. The gnotobiotic mouse groups fed LFD or HFD + OFS gained less body weight and body fat, and displayed an improved glucose tolerance compared with mice fed HFD. These differences were not affected by the presence of B. longum. Mice fed HFD showed no signs of inflammation or increased intestinal permeability. The ability of oligofructose to reduce obesity and to improve glucose tolerance in gnotobiotic mice fed HFD was independent of the presence of B. longum. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Vitamin D3: A Role in Dopamine Circuit Regulation, Diet-Induced Obesity, and Drug Consumption.

    PubMed

    Trinko, Joseph R; Land, Benjamin B; Solecki, Wojciech B; Wickham, Robert J; Tellez, Luis A; Maldonado-Aviles, Jaime; de Araujo, Ivan E; Addy, Nii A; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2016-01-01

    The influence of micronutrients on dopamine systems is not well defined. Using mice, we show a potential role for reduced dietary vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) in promoting diet-induced obesity (DIO), food intake, and drug consumption while on a high fat diet. To complement these deficiency studies, treatments with exogenous fully active vitamin D3 (calcitriol, 10 µg/kg, i.p.) were performed. Nondeficient mice that were made leptin resistant with a high fat diet displayed reduced food intake and body weight after an acute treatment with exogenous calcitriol. Dopamine neurons in the midbrain and their target neurons in the striatum were found to express vitamin D3 receptor protein. Acute calcitriol treatment led to transcriptional changes of dopamine-related genes in these regions in naive mice, enhanced amphetamine-induced dopamine release in both naive mice and rats, and increased locomotor activity after acute amphetamine treatment (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Alternatively, mice that were chronically fed either the reduced D3 high fat or chow diets displayed less activity after acute amphetamine treatment compared with their respective controls. Finally, high fat deficient mice that were trained to orally consume liquid amphetamine (90 mg/L) displayed increased consumption, while nondeficient mice treated with calcitriol showed reduced consumption. Our findings suggest that reduced dietary D3 may be a contributing environmental factor enhancing DIO as well as drug intake while eating a high fat diet. Moreover, these data demonstrate that dopamine circuits are modulated by D3 signaling, and may serve as direct or indirect targets for exogenous calcitriol.

  12. Deficiency of Growth Differentiation Factor 3 Protects against Diet-Induced Obesity by Selectively Acting on White Adipose

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Joseph J.; Huang, Lihua; Li, Liunan; Jorgez, Carolina; Matzuk, Martin M.; Brown, Chester W.

    2009-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 3 (GDF3) is a member of the TGFβ superfamily. White adipose is one of the tissues in which Gdf3 is expressed, and it is the only tissue in which expression increases in response to high-fat diet. We generated Gdf3−/− mice, which were indistinguishable from wild-type mice and had normal weight curves on regular diet. However, on high-fat diet Gdf3−/− mice were resistant to the obesity that normally develops in wild-type mice. Herein we investigate the physiological and molecular mechanisms that underlie this protection from diet-induced obesity and demonstrate that GDF3 deficiency selectively affects white adipose through its influence on basal metabolic rates. Our results are consistent with a role for GDF3 in adipose tissue, with consequential effects on energy expenditure that ultimately impact adiposity. PMID:19008465

  13. Prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 plays a critical role in diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Hirohide; Ichiki, Toshihiro; Inoue, Eriko; Nomura, Masatoshi; Miyazaki, Ryohei; Hashimoto, Toru; Ikeda, Jiro; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Fong, Guo-Hua; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2013-05-28

    Recent studies suggest that the oxygen-sensing pathway consisting of transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor and prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism. However, the role of adipocyte PHD in the development of obesity has not been clarified. We examined whether deletion of PHD2, the main oxygen sensor, in adipocytes affects diet-induced obesity and associated metabolic abnormalities. To delete PHD2 in adipocyte, PHD2-floxed mice were crossed with aP2-Cre transgenic mice (Phd2(f/f)/aP2-Cre). Phd2(f/f)/aP2-Cre mice were resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity (36.7±1.7 versus 44.3±2.0 g in control; P<0.01) and showed better glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance index than control mice (3.6±1.0 versus 11.1±2.1; P<0.01). The weight of white adipose tissue was lighter (epididymal fat, 758±35 versus 1208±507 mg in control; P<0.01) with a reduction in adipocyte size. Macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue was also alleviated in Phd2(f/f)/aP2-Cre mice. Target genes of hypoxia-inducible factor, including glycolytic enzymes and adiponectin, were upregulated in adipocytes of Phd2(f/f)/aP2-Cre mice. Lipid content was decreased and uncoupling protein-1 expression was increased in brown adipose tissue of Phd2(f/f)/aP2-Cre mice. Knockdown of PHD2 in 3T3L1 adipocytes induced a decrease in the glucose level and an increase in the lactate level in the supernatant with upregulation of glycolytic enzymes and reduced lipid accumulation. PHD2 in adipose tissue plays a critical role in the development of diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance. PHD2 might be a novel target molecule for the treatment of obesity and associated metabolic abnormalities.

  14. Gelidium amansii extract ameliorates obesity by down-regulating adipogenic transcription factors in diet-induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Hye; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Hak-Ju

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES In this study, we investigated whether Gelidium amansii extract (GAE) ameliorates obesity in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. MATERIALS/METHODS The mice were maintained on a high-fat diet (HD) for 5 weeks to generate the DIO mouse model. And then mice fed HD plus 0.5% (GAE1), 1% (GAE2) or 2% (GAE3) for 8 weeks. RESULTS After the experimental period, GAE-supplemented groups were significantly lower than the HD group in body weight gain and liver weight. GAE supplemented groups were significantly lower than the HD group in both epididymal and mesenteric adipose tissue mass. The plasma leptin level was significantly higher in the HD group than in GAE-supplemented groups. The leptin level of HD+GAE3 group was significantly lower than that of the HD+conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) group. In contrast, plasma adiponectin level of the HD group was significantly lower than those of HD+GAE2 and HD+GAE3 groups. The expression levels of adipogenic proteins such as fatty acid synthase, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α in the GAE supplemented groups were significantly decreased than those in HD group, respectively. In addition, the expression levels of HD+GAE2 and HD+GAE3 groups are significantly decreased compared to those of HD+CLA group. On the contrary, the expression levels of hormone-sensitive lipase and phospho-AMP-activated protein kinase, proteins associated with lipolysis, were significantly increased in the GAE supplemented groups compared to those in the HD group. HD+GAE3 group showed the highest level among the GAE supplemented groups. CONCLUSIONS These results suggested that GAE supplementation stimulated the expressions of lipid metabolic factors and reduced weight gain in HD-fed C57BL/6J obese mice. PMID:28194261

  15. Interferon beta overexpression attenuates adipose tissue inflammation and high-fat diet-induced obesity and maintains glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Alsaggar, M; Mills, M; Liu, D

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide prevalence of obesity is increasing, raising health concerns regarding obesity-related complications. Chronic inflammation has been characterized as a major contributor to the development of obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. The purpose of the current study is to assess whether the overexpression of interferon beta (IFNβ1), an immune-modulating cytokine, will attenuate high-fat diet-induced adipose inflammation and protect animals against obesity development. Using hydrodynamic gene transfer to elevate and sustain blood concentration of IFNβ1 in mice fed a high-fat diet, we showed that the overexpression of Ifnβ1 gene markedly suppressed immune cell infiltration into adipose tissue, and attenuated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Systemically, IFNβ1 blocked adipose tissue expansion and body weight gain, independent of food intake. Possible browning of white adipose tissue might also contribute to blockade of weight gain. More importantly, IFNβ1 improved insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis. These results suggest that targeting inflammation represents a practical strategy to block the development of obesity and its related pathologies. In addition, IFNβ1-based therapies have promising potential for clinical applications for the prevention and treatment of various inflammation-driven pathologies.

  16. Nebivolol Ameliorates Cardiac NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in a Juvenile-Adolescent Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qihai; Wei, Tong; Huang, Chenglin; Liu, Penghao; Sun, Mengwei; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2016-09-30

    NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated whether the cardiac protective effects of nebivolol relied on attenuating NLRP3 activation in a juvenile-adolescent animal model of diet-induced obesity. Weaning male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a standard chow diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. The obese rats were subsequently subdivided into three groups: 1) HFD control group; 2) HFD with low-dose nebivolol (5 mg/kg/d); 3) HFD with high-dose nebivolol (10 mg/kg/d). Treatment with nebivolol prevented HFD-induced obesity associated excess cardiac lipid accumulation as well as myocardial mitochondrial dysfunction. Nebivolol attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in myocardium of obese rats. In parallel, nebivolol treatment of obese animals increased cardiac β3-AR expression, reversing the reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In vitro, nebivolol treatment of palmitate-incubated H9C2 cells suppressed autophagy, restored mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation, and suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Meanwhile the presence of shRNA against β3-AR or against eNOS deteriorated the protective effects of nebivolol. These data suggest the beneficial effect of nebivolol on myocardial lipotoxicity contributing to inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation possibly via improved mitochondrial dysfunction.

  17. Nebivolol Ameliorates Cardiac NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in a Juvenile-Adolescent Animal Model of Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qihai; Wei, Tong; Huang, Chenglin; Liu, Penghao; Sun, Mengwei; Shen, Weili; Gao, Pingjin

    2016-01-01

    NLRP3 is involved in obesity-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. In this study, we evaluated whether the cardiac protective effects of nebivolol relied on attenuating NLRP3 activation in a juvenile-adolescent animal model of diet-induced obesity. Weaning male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with either a standard chow diet (ND) or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks. The obese rats were subsequently subdivided into three groups: 1) HFD control group; 2) HFD with low-dose nebivolol (5 mg/kg/d); 3) HFD with high-dose nebivolol (10 mg/kg/d). Treatment with nebivolol prevented HFD-induced obesity associated excess cardiac lipid accumulation as well as myocardial mitochondrial dysfunction. Nebivolol attenuated pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in myocardium of obese rats. In parallel, nebivolol treatment of obese animals increased cardiac β3-AR expression, reversing the reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In vitro, nebivolol treatment of palmitate-incubated H9C2 cells suppressed autophagy, restored mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation, and suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Meanwhile the presence of shRNA against β3-AR or against eNOS deteriorated the protective effects of nebivolol. These data suggest the beneficial effect of nebivolol on myocardial lipotoxicity contributing to inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation possibly via improved mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27686325

  18. Preventing High Fat Diet-induced Obesity and Improving Insulin Sensitivity through Neuregulin 4 Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yongjie; Gao, Mingming; Liu, Dexi

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 4 (NRG4), an epidermal growth factor-like signaling molecule, plays an important role in cell-to-cell communication during tissue development. Its function to regulate energy metabolism has recently been reported. This current study was designed to assess the preventive and therapeutic effects of NRG4 overexpression on high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Using the hydrodynamic gene transfer method, we demonstrate that Nrg4 gene transfer in mice suppressed the development of diet-induced obesity, but did not affect pre-existing adiposity and body weight in obese mice. Nrg4 gene transfer curbed HFD-induced hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis and PPARγ-mediated lipid storage. Concurrently, overexpression of NRG4 reduced chronic inflammation in both preventive and treatment studies, evidenced by lower mRNA levels of macrophage marker genes including F4/80, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd11c, and macrophage chemokine Mcp1, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that overexpression of the Nrg4 gene by hydrodynamic gene delivery prevents HFD-induced weight gain and fatty liver, alleviates obesity-induced chronic inflammation and insulin resistance, and supports the health benefits of NRG4 in managing obesity and obesity-associated metabolic disorders. PMID:27184920

  19. Diet-induced obesity causes ghrelin resistance in reward processing tasks.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Sarah H; Dinan, Tara; Lawrence, Andrew J; Spencer, Sarah J; Andrews, Zane B

    2015-12-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) causes ghrelin resistance in hypothalamic Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. However, ghrelin promotes feeding through actions at both the hypothalamus and mesolimbic dopamine reward pathways. Therefore, we hypothesized that DIO would also establish ghrelin resistance in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), a major site of dopaminergic cell bodies important in reward processing. We observed reduced sucrose and saccharin consumption in Ghrelin KO vs Ghrelin WT mice. Moreover, DIO reduced saccharin consumption relative to chow-fed controls. These data suggest that the deletion of ghrelin and high fat diet both cause anhedonia. To assess if these are causally related, we tested whether DIO caused ghrelin resistance in a classic model of drug reward, conditioned place preference (CPP). Chow or high fat diet (HFD) mice were conditioned with ghrelin (1mg/kg in 10ml/kg ip) in the presence or absence of food in the conditioning chamber. We observed a CPP to ghrelin in chow-fed mice but not in HFD-fed mice. HFD-fed mice still showed a CPP for cocaine (20mg/kg), indicating that they maintained the ability to develop conditioned behaviour. The absence of food availability during ghrelin conditioning sessions induced a conditioned place aversion, an effect that was still present in both chow and HFD mice. Bilateral intra-VTA ghrelin injection (0.33μg/μl in 0.5μl) robustly increased feeding in both chow-fed and high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice; however, this was correlated with body weight only in the chow-fed mice. Our results suggest that DIO causes ghrelin resistance albeit not directly in the VTA. We suggest there is impaired ghrelin sensitivity in upstream pathways regulating reward pathways, highlighting a functional role for ghrelin linking appropriate metabolic sensing with reward processing.

  20. Mediobasal hypothalamic overexpression of DEPTOR protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Alexandre; Labbé, Sébastien M.; Lanfray, Damien; Blanchard, Pierre-Gilles; Villot, Romain; Roy, Christian; Sabatini, David M.; Richard, Denis; Laplante, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine–threonine kinase that functions into distinct protein complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2) that regulate energy homeostasis. DEP-domain containing mTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR) is part of these complexes and is known to dampen mTORC1 function, consequently reducing mTORC1 negative feedbacks and promoting insulin signaling and Akt/PKB activation in several models. Recently, we observed that DEPTOR is expressed in several structures of the brain including the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a region that regulates energy balance. Whether DEPTOR in the MBH plays a functional role in regulating energy balance and hypothalamic insulin signaling has never been tested. Methods We have generated a novel conditional transgenic mouse model based on the Cre-LoxP system allowing targeted overexpression of DEPTOR. Mice overexpressing DEPTOR in the MBH were subjected to a metabolic phenotyping and MBH insulin signaling was evaluated. Results We first report that systemic (brain and periphery) overexpression of DEPTOR prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity, improves glucose metabolism and protects against hepatic steatosis. These phenotypes were associated with a reduction in food intake and feed efficiency and an elevation in oxygen consumption. Strikingly, specific overexpression of DEPTOR in the MBH completely recapitulated these phenotypes. DEPTOR overexpression was associated with an increase in hypothalamic insulin signaling, as illustrated by elevated Akt/PKB activation. Conclusion Altogether, these results support a role for MBH DEPTOR in the regulation of energy balance and metabolism. PMID:26909318

  1. Responses of brown adipose tissue to diet-induced obesity, exercise, dietary restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Nikki; Durrant, Jessica R; Bailey, David; Yoon, Lawrence; Jordan, Holly; Barton, Joanna; Brown, Roger H; Clifton, Lisa; Milliken, Tula; Harrington, Wallace; Kimbrough, Carie; Faber, Catherine A; Cariello, Neal; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2013-07-01

    Drug-induced weight loss in humans has been associated with undesirable side effects not present in weight loss from lifestyle interventions (caloric restriction or exercise). To investigate the mechanistic differences of weight loss by drug-induced and lifestyle interventions, we examined the gene expression (mRNA) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and conducted histopathologic assessments in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice given ephedrine (18 mg/kg/day orally), treadmill exercise (10 m/min, 1-h/day), and dietary restriction (DR: 26% dietary restriction) for 7 days. Exercise and DR mice lost more body weight than controls and both ephedrine and exercise reduced percent body fat. All treatments reduced BAT and liver lipid accumulation (i.e., cytoplasmic lipids in brown adipocytes and hepatocytes) and increased oxygen consumption (VO2 ml/kg/h) compared with controls. Mitochondrial biogenesis/function-related genes (TFAM, NRF1 and GABPA) were up-regulated in the BAT of all groups. UCP-1 was up-regulated in exercise and ephedrine groups, whereas MFSD2A was up-regulated in ephedrine and DR groups. PGC-1α up-regulation was observed in exercise and DR groups but not in ephedrine group. In all experimental groups, except for ephedrine, fatty acid transport and metabolism genes were up-regulated, but the magnitude of change was higher in the DR group. PRKAA1 was up-regulated in all groups but not significantly in the ephedrine group. ADRß3 was slightly up-regulated in the DR group only, whereas ESRRA remained unchanged in all groups. Although our data suggest a common pathway of BAT activation elicited by ephedrine treatment, exercise or DR, mRNA changes were indicative of additional nutrient-sensing pathways in exercise and DR.

  2. Resistance to Diet-Induced Obesity and Associated Metabolic Perturbations in Haploinsufficient Monocarboxylate Transporter 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Nadia; Carneiro, Lionel; Favrod, Céline; Preitner, Frédéric; Thorens, Bernard; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Dix, Laure; Pralong, François; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc

    2013-01-01

    The monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 or SLC16A1) is a carrier of short-chain fatty acids, ketone bodies, and lactate in several tissues. Genetically modified C57BL/6J mice were produced by targeted disruption of the mct1 gene in order to understand the role of this transporter in energy homeostasis. Null mutation was embryonically lethal, but MCT1+/− mice developed normally. However, when fed high fat diet (HFD), MCT1+/− mice displayed resistance to development of diet-induced obesity (24.8% lower body weight after 16 weeks of HFD), as well as less insulin resistance and no hepatic steatosis as compared to littermate MCT1+/+ mice used as controls. Body composition analysis revealed that reduced weight gain in MCT1+/− mice was due to decreased fat accumulation (50.0% less after 9 months of HFD) notably in liver and white adipose tissue. This phenotype was associated with reduced food intake under HFD (12.3% less over 10 weeks) and decreased intestinal energy absorption (9.6% higher stool energy content). Indirect calorimetry measurements showed ∼ 15% increase in O2 consumption and CO2 production during the resting phase, without any changes in physical activity. Determination of plasma concentrations for various metabolites and hormones did not reveal significant changes in lactate and ketone bodies levels between the two genotypes, but both insulin and leptin levels, which were elevated in MCT1+/+ mice when fed HFD, were reduced in MCT1+/− mice under HFD. Interestingly, the enhancement in expression of several genes involved in lipid metabolism in the liver of MCT1+/+ mice under high fat diet was prevented in the liver of MCT1+/− mice under the same diet, thus likely contributing to the observed phenotype. These findings uncover the critical role of MCT1 in the regulation of energy balance when animals are exposed to an obesogenic diet. PMID:24367518

  3. Berberine inhibits adipogenesis in high-fat diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueshan; Davies, Gareth E

    2010-07-01

    Our previous studies illustrated that berberine inhibited adipogenesis in murine-derived 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and human white preadipocytes. In this study, the effects of berberine on the adipogenesis of high-fat diet-induced obesity (FD) or normal diet (ND) mice and possible transcriptional impact are investigated. The results demonstrated that in FD mice, berberine reduced mouse weight gain and food intake and serum glucose, triglyceride, and total cholesterol levels accompanied with a down-regulation of PPARgamma expression and an up-regulation of GATA-3 expression. Berberine had no adverse effects on ND mice. These encouraging findings suggest that berberine has excellent pharmacological potential to prevent obesity.

  4. Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice Reduces the Maintenance of Influenza-Specific CD8+ Memory T Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Sheridan, Patricia A.; Beck, Melinda A.

    2010-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increasing the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease, but its influence on the immune response to viral infection is understudied. Memory T cells generated during a primary influenza infection are important for protection against subsequent influenza exposures. Previously, we have demonstrated that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice have increased morbidity and mortality following secondary influenza infection compared with lean mice. To determine whether the problem resided in a failure to maintain functional, influenza-specific CD8+ memory T cells, male DIO and lean mice were infected with influenza X-31. At 84 d postinfection, DIO mice had a 10% reduction in memory T cell numbers. This reduction may have resulted from significantly reduced memory T cell expression of interleukin 2 receptor β (IL-2R β, CD122), but not IL-7 receptor α (CD127), which are both required for memory cell maintenance. Peripheral leptin resistance in the DIO mice may be a contributing factor to the impairment. Indeed, leptin receptor mRNA expression was significantly reduced in the lungs of obese mice, whereas suppressor of cytokine signaling (Socs)1 and Socs3 mRNA expression were increased. It is imperative to understand how the obese state alters memory T cells, because impairment in maintenance of functional memory responses has important implications for vaccine efficacy in an obese population. PMID:20592105

  5. Effects of deoxynivalenol consumption on body weight and adiposity in the diet-induced obese mouse.

    PubMed

    Amuzie, C J; Flannery, B M; Ulrich, A M; Pestka, J J

    2011-01-01

    The potential for the obese state to alter sensitivity to toxic chemicals is poorly understood. In this study, dose-response effects of the trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a common food-borne mycotoxin, were determined on body weight of diet-induced obese mice. In study 1, the effects of feeding adult female B6C3F1 mice a high-fat diet (HFD; 60% kcal from fat) containing 0, 2, 5, or 10 ppm DON for 10 wk on body weight and adiposity were compared. Mice consuming 5 or 10 ppm DON exhibited a 15 and 24% decrease in weight gain and a 50 and 83% reduction in periuterine fat, respectively. In study 2, mice were fed HFD for 8 wk to induce obesity and the effects of consuming HFD + 0, 2, 5, or 10 ppm DON for 8 wk were then determined. Mice fed 5 or 10 ppm DON exhibited a 16 and 23% weight reduction and a 0 and 40% periuterine fat reduction, respectively. In a follow-up experiment, food consumption was measured prior to and after the transition from HFD to HFD + 10 ppm DON. Exposure to DON was found to lower HFD consumption within 1 d, with significant weight loss in DON-fed mice evident after 6 d. In both studies 1 and 2, consumption of 5 or 10 ppm DON diminished circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor acid-labile subunit. Taken together, DON consumption lowered weight gain and produced weight loss in diet-induced obese mice at higher thresholds than that observed previously in normal B6C3F1 mice.

  6. Transcriptional regulatory factor X6 (Rfx6) increases gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) expression in enteroendocrine K-cells and is involved in GIP hypersecretion in high fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuyo; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Kazuki; Nasteska, Daniela; Joo, Erina; Shibue, Kimitaka; Harada, Takanari; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2013-01-18

    Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin released from enteroendocrine K-cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GIP potentiates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and induces energy accumulation into adipose tissue, resulting in obesity. Plasma GIP levels are reported to be increased in the obese state. However, the molecular mechanisms of GIP secretion and high fat diet (HFD)-induced GIP hypersecretion remain unclear, primarily due to difficulties in separating K-cells from other intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. In this study, GIP-GFP knock-in mice that enable us to visualize K-cells by enhanced GFP were established. Microarray analysis of isolated K-cells from these mice revealed that transcriptional regulatory factor X6 (Rfx6) is expressed exclusively in K-cells. In vitro experiments using the mouse intestinal cell line STC-1 showed that knockdown of Rfx6 decreased mRNA expression, cellular content, and secretion of GIP. Rfx6 bound to the region in the gip promoter that regulates gip promoter activity, and overexpression of Rfx6 increased GIP mRNA expression. HFD induced obesity and GIP hypersecretion in GIP-GFP heterozygous mice in vivo. Immunohistochemical and flow cytometry analysis showed no significant difference in K-cell number between control fat diet-fed (CFD) and HFD-fed mice. However, GIP content in the upper small intestine and GIP mRNA expression in K-cells were significantly increased in HFD-fed mice compared with those in CFD-fed mice. Furthermore, expression levels of Rfx6 mRNA were increased in K-cells of HFD-fed mice. These results suggest that Rfx6 increases GIP expression and content in K-cells and is involved in GIP hypersecretion in HFD-induced obesity.

  7. Effects of exercise and diet change on cognition function and synaptic plasticity in high fat diet induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jinhee; Shin, Ki Ok; Park, So Young; Jang, Ki Soeng; Kang, Sunghwun

    2013-10-08

    Nutritional imbalance-induced obesity causes a variety of diseases and in particular is an important cause of cognitive function decline. This study was performed on Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with 13-weeks of high fat diet-induced obesity in connection to the effects of regular exercise and dietary control for 8 weeks on the synaptic plasticity and cognitive abilities of brain. Four weeks-old SD rats were adopted classified into normal-normal diet-sedentary (NNS, n = 8), obesity-high fat diet-sedentary (OHS, n = 8), obesity-high fat diet-training (OHT, n = 8), obesity-normal diet-sedentary (ONS, n = 8) and obesity- normal diet-training (ONT, n = 8). The exercise program consisted of a treadmill exercise administered at a speed of 8 m/min for 1-4 weeks, and 14 m/min for 5-8 weeks. The Western blot method was used to measure the expression of NGF, BDNF, p38MAPK and p-p38MAPK proteins in hippocampus of the brain, and expressions of NGF, BDNF, TrkA, TrkB, CREB and synapsin1 mRNA were analyzed through qRT-PCR. The results suggest cognitive function-related protein levels and mRNA expression to be significantly decreased in the hippocampus of obese rats, and synaptic plasticity as well as cognitive function signaling sub-pathway factors were also significantly decreased. In addition, 8-weeks exercises and treatment by dietary change had induced significant increase of cognitive function-related protein levels and mRNA expression as well as synaptic plasticity and cognitive function signaling sub-pathway factors in obese rats. In particular, the combined treatment had presented even more positive effect. Therefore, it was determined that the high fat diet-induced obesity decreases plasticity and cognitive function of the brain, but was identified as being improved by exercises and dietary changes. In particular, it is considered that regular exercise has positive effects on memory span and learning capacity unlike dietary control.

  8. Effects of exercise and diet change on cognition function and synaptic plasticity in high fat diet induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nutritional imbalance-induced obesity causes a variety of diseases and in particular is an important cause of cognitive function decline. This study was performed on Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with 13-weeks of high fat diet-induced obesity in connection to the effects of regular exercise and dietary control for 8 weeks on the synaptic plasticity and cognitive abilities of brain. Methods Four weeks-old SD rats were adopted classified into normal-normal diet-sedentary (NNS, n = 8), obesity-high fat diet-sedentary (OHS, n = 8), obesity-high fat diet-training (OHT, n = 8), obesity-normal diet-sedentary (ONS, n = 8) and obesity- normal diet-training (ONT, n = 8). The exercise program consisted of a treadmill exercise administered at a speed of 8 m/min for 1–4 weeks, and 14 m/min for 5–8 weeks. The Western blot method was used to measure the expression of NGF, BDNF, p38MAPK and p-p38MAPK proteins in hippocampus of the brain, and expressions of NGF, BDNF, TrkA, TrkB, CREB and synapsin1 mRNA were analyzed through qRT-PCR. Results The results suggest cognitive function-related protein levels and mRNA expression to be significantly decreased in the hippocampus of obese rats, and synaptic plasticity as well as cognitive function signaling sub-pathway factors were also significantly decreased. In addition, 8-weeks exercises and treatment by dietary change had induced significant increase of cognitive function-related protein levels and mRNA expression as well as synaptic plasticity and cognitive function signaling sub-pathway factors in obese rats. In particular, the combined treatment had presented even more positive effect. Conclusions Therefore, it was determined that the high fat diet-induced obesity decreases plasticity and cognitive function of the brain, but was identified as being improved by exercises and dietary changes. In particular, it is considered that regular exercise has positive effects on memory span and learning

  9. Adipocyte-specific deletion of Ip6k1 reduces diet-induced obesity by enhancing AMPK-mediated thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingzhang; Ghoshal, Sarbani; Rodrigues, Ana; Gao, Su; Asterian, Alice; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Barrow, James C; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2016-11-01

    Enhancing energy expenditure (EE) is an attractive strategy to combat obesity and diabetes. Global deletion of Ip6k1 protects mice from diet-induced obesity (DIO) and insulin resistance, but the tissue-specific mechanism by which IP6K1 regulates body weight is unknown. Here, we have demonstrated that IP6K1 regulates fat accumulation by modulating AMPK-mediated adipocyte energy metabolism. Cold exposure led to downregulation of Ip6k1 in murine inguinal and retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (IWAT and RWAT) depots. Adipocyte-specific deletion of Ip6k1 (AdKO) enhanced thermogenic EE, which protected mice from high-fat diet-induced weight gain at ambient temperature (23°C), but not at thermoneutral temperature (30°C). AdKO-induced increases in thermogenesis also protected mice from cold-induced decreases in body temperature. UCP1, PGC1α, and other markers of browning and thermogenesis were elevated in IWAT and RWAT of AdKO mice. Cold-induced activation of sympathetic signaling was unaltered, whereas AMPK was enhanced, in AdKO IWAT. Moreover, beige adipocytes from AdKO IWAT displayed enhanced browning, which was diminished by AMPK depletion. Furthermore, we determined that IP6 and IP6K1 differentially regulate upstream kinase-mediated AMPK stimulatory phosphorylation in vitro. Finally, treating mildly obese mice with the IP6K inhibitor TNP enhanced thermogenesis and inhibited progression of DIO. Thus, IP6K1 regulates energy metabolism via a mechanism that could potentially be targeted in obesity.

  10. Central Administration of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Attenuates Hypothalamic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulates Food Intake and Body Weight in Mice with High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongwan; Yun, Eun-Young; Quan, Fu-Shi

    2017-01-01

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor, 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), is widely used for its antiobesity and antidiabetic effects. Researchers have demonstrated that DNJ regulates body weight by increasing adiponectin levels, which affects energy intake and prevents diet-induced obesity. However, the mechanism by which centrally administered DNJ exerts anorexigenic effects has not been studied until now. We investigated the effect of DNJ in the hypothalamus of mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity. Results showed that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DNJ reduced hypothalamic ER stress, which activated the leptin-induced Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway to cause appetite suppression. We conclude that DNJ may reduce obesity by moderating feeding behavior and ER stress in the hypothalamic portion of the central nervous system (CNS). PMID:28798799

  11. Central Administration of 1-Deoxynojirimycin Attenuates Hypothalamic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Regulates Food Intake and Body Weight in Mice with High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwan; Yun, Eun-Young; Quan, Fu-Shi; Park, Seung-Won; Goo, Tae-Won

    2017-01-01

    The α-glucosidase inhibitor, 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), is widely used for its antiobesity and antidiabetic effects. Researchers have demonstrated that DNJ regulates body weight by increasing adiponectin levels, which affects energy intake and prevents diet-induced obesity. However, the mechanism by which centrally administered DNJ exerts anorexigenic effects has not been studied until now. We investigated the effect of DNJ in the hypothalamus of mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity. Results showed that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of DNJ reduced hypothalamic ER stress, which activated the leptin-induced Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway to cause appetite suppression. We conclude that DNJ may reduce obesity by moderating feeding behavior and ER stress in the hypothalamic portion of the central nervous system (CNS).

  12. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  13. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not in adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Oginsky, Max F; Maust, Joel D; Corthell, John T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. We examined differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity and basal differences in striatal neuron function in adult and in adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on "junk-food" diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine-induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In rats that became obese after eating junk-food, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ∼60 % at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals, and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats.

  14. SGK1 is modulated by resistin in vascular smooth muscle cells and in the aorta following diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Scott, Takara A; Babayeva, Oguljahan; Banerjee, Saswati; Zhong, Wei; Francis, Sharon C

    2016-03-01

    Enhanced serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (SGK1) activity contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. This study evaluated SGK1 modulation in vascular smooth muscle cells by the adipokine resistin and in aortic tissue in a murine model of diet-induced obesity (DIO). Modulation of SGK1 by resistin was assessed in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC) in vitro by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. To induce the lean or obese phenotype, mice were fed a 10 kcal% low-fat or 60 kcal% high-fat diet, respectively, for 8 weeks. Upon study completion, plasma resistin was assessed and aortic tissue was harvested to examine the effect of DIO on regulation of SGK1 in vivo. Resistin increased SGK1 mRNA, total protein abundance, and its activation as determined by phosphorylation of its serine 422 residue (pSGK1) in HAoSMC. Resistin-mediated SGK1 phosphorylation was dependent upon phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and Toll-like receptor 4. Furthermore, inhibition of SGK1 attenuated resistin-induced proliferation in HAoSMC. DIO led to up-regulation of total SGK1 protein levels and pSGK1 in association with increased plasma resistin. These data suggest that high levels of resistin observed during obesity may activate SGK1 in the vasculature and contribute to the development of obesity-related vascular disease. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  15. Exendin-4 improves thermogenic capacity by regulating fat metabolism on brown adipose tissue in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qiong; Li, Ling; Chen, Ji-an; Wang, Shao-hua; Sun, Zi-lin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the benefits of exendin-4 treatment on brown adipose tissue (BAT) in C57BL/6J mice with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We examined the effects of exendin-4 on body adiposity and the level of genes associated with adipogenesis, glucose/lipid uptake, lipolysis, and thermogenesis in mice with diet-induced obesity. Exendin-4 treatment deceased body weight, serum-free fatty acid, and triglyceride levels in HFD-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Exendin-4 treatment increased the expression of genes associated with adipogenesis, glucose/lipid uptake, lipolysis, and thermogenesis in BAT. Compared with HFD-fed mice, exendin-4 treatment also exhibited elevated energy expenditure and reduced respiratory quotient, but showed similar food intake and locomotor activity. Exendin-4 treatment reduced high-fat-induced obesity by decreasing adiposity and increasing thermogenesis. This result suggests that GLP-1 agonist may be a new approach to combat obesity by shifting the energy balance from obesogenesis to thermogenesis. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  16. The effect of isorhamnetin glycosides extracted from Opuntia ficus-indica in a mouse model of diet induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, César; Torres, Nimbe; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Noriega, Lilia G; Torre-Villalvazo, Iván; Leal-Díaz, Ana M; Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Márquez-Mota, Claudia; Ordaz, Guillermo; Chavez-Santoscoy, Rocío A; Serna-Saldivar, Sergio O; Tovar, Armando R

    2015-03-01

    A diet rich in polyphenols can ameliorate some metabolic alterations associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) is a plant rich in isorhamnetin glycosides and is highly consumed in Mexico. The purpose of this research was to determine the metabolic effect of an OFI extract on a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and in isolated pancreatic islets. OFI extract was added to a high fat (HF) diet at a low (0.3%) or high (0.6%) dose and administered to C57BL/6 mice for 12 weeks. Mice fed the HF diet supplemented with the OFI extract gained less body weight and exhibited significantly lower circulating total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol compared to those fed the HF diet alone. The HF-OFI diet fed mice presented lower glucose and insulin concentration than the HF diet fed mice. However, the HF-OFI diet fed mice tended to have higher insulin concentration than control mice. The OFI extract stimulated insulin secretion in vitro, associated with increased glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) mRNA content. Furthermore, the OFI extract improved glucose tolerance, and additionally increased energy expenditure. These metabolic improvements were associated with reduced adipocyte size, increased hepatic IRS1 tyr-608 and S6 K thr-389 phosphorylation. OFI isorhamnetin glycosides also diminished the hepatic lipid content associated with reduced mRNA expression of the endoplasmic reticulum stress markers and lipogenic enzymes and increased mRNA expression of genes related to fatty acid oxidation. Overall, the OFI extract prevented the development of metabolic abnormalities associated with diet-induced obesity.

  17. Anti-obesity effect of extract from fermented Curcuma longa L. through regulation of adipogenesis and lipolysis pathway in high-fat diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Park, Jeongjin; You, Yanghee; Kim, Kyungmi; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Lee, Jeongmin; Jun, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Background Even though Curcuma longa L. possesses various biological activities, it has strong flavor and taste, which decrease consumer palatability and limit industrial applications in food. Objective The present study investigates the effects of C. longa L. fermented with Aspergillus oryzae supplementation in 60% high-fat diet-induced obese rats measured by the activation of adipogenesis and lipolysis. Design Rats were divided into four groups (n=6 per group) after 1 week of acclimatization: a normal diet group comprised rats fed the AIN76A rodent diet; a high-fat diet-induced obese group with rats fed a 60% high-fat diet; a Garcinia cambogia treated group (positive control) with rats fed a 60% high-fat diet with G. cambogia 500 g/kg body weight (b.w.)/day; and an fermented C. longa L. 50% ethanolic extract treated group (FCE50) with rats fed a 60% high-fat diet with FCE50 500 g/kg b.w./day. Each group received the appropriate vehicle or sample daily by gastric intubation for 12 weeks. Results We found that FCE50 administration suppressed b.w. gain and reduced white adipose tissue weight, serum triglyceride (TG), and cholesterol in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. These results can be associated with the suppression of adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis with a decrease in the mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, adipocyte protein 2, and lipoprotein lipase induced by FCE50 administration. In addition, FCE50 increased lipolysis and β-oxidation by up-regulating the expression of lipases such as adipose triglyceride lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, adiponectin, and AMP-activated protein kinase. Conclusions These results suggest that FCE50 can be a candidate for the prevention of obesity via suppressing adipogenesis and promoting lipolysis. PMID:26822962

  18. Leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity: central and peripheral actions of leptin.

    PubMed

    Sáinz, Neira; Barrenetxe, Jaione; Moreno-Aliaga, María J; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease that represents one of the most serious global health burdens associated to an excess of body fat resulting from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, which is regulated by environmental and genetic interactions. The adipose-derived hormone leptin acts via a specific receptor in the brain to regulate energy balance and body weight, although this protein can also elicit a myriad of actions in peripheral tissues. Obese individuals, rather than be leptin deficient, have in most cases, high levels of circulating leptin. The failure of these high levels to control body weight suggests the presence of a resistance process to the hormone that could be partly responsible of disturbances on body weight regulation. Furthermore, leptin resistance can impair physiological peripheral functions of leptin such as lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and nutrient intestinal utilization. The present document summarizes those findings regarding leptin resistance development and the role of this hormone in the development and maintenance of an obese state. Thus, we focused on the effect of the impaired leptin action on adipose tissue, liver, skeletal muscle and intestinal function and the accompanying relationships with diet-induced obesity. The involvement of some inflammatory mediators implicated in the development of obesity and their roles in leptin resistance development are also discussed.

  19. Postprandial lysophospholipid suppresses hepatic fatty acid oxidation: the molecular link between group 1B phospholipase A2 and diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Eric D.; Pfluger, Paul T.; Cash, James G.; Kuhel, David G.; Roja, Juan C.; Magness, Daniel P.; Jandacek, Ronald J.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Hui, David Y.

    2010-01-01

    Decrease in fat catabolic rate on consuming a high-fat diet contributes to diet-induced obesity. This study used group 1B phospholipase A2 (Pla2g1b)-deficient mice, which are resistant to hyperglycemia, to test the hypothesis that Pla2g1b and its lipolytic product lysophospholipid suppress hepatic fat utilization and energy metabolism in promoting diet-induced obesity. The metabolic consequences of hypercaloric diet, including body weight gain, energy expenditure, and fatty acid oxidation, were compared between Pla2g1b+/+ and Pla2g1b−/− mice. The Pla2g1b−/− mice displayed normal energy balance when fed chow, but were resistant to obesity when challenged with a hypercaloric diet. Obesity resistance in Pla2g1b−/− mice is due to their ability to maintain elevated energy expenditure and core body temperature when subjected to hypercaloric diet, which was not observed in Pla2g1b+/+ mice. The Pla2g1b−/− mice also displayed increased postprandial hepatic fat utilization due to increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, PPAR-δ, PPAR-γ, cd36/Fat, and Ucp2, which coincided with reduced postprandial plasma lysophospholipid levels. Lysophospholipids produced by Pla2g1b hydrolysis suppress hepatic fat utilization and down-regulate energy expenditure, thereby preventing metabolically beneficial adaptation to a high-fat diet exposure in promoting diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes.—Labonté, E. D., Pfluger, P. T., Cash, J. G., Kuhel, D. G., Rojas, J. C., Magness, D. P., Jandacek, R. J., Tschöp, M. H., Hui, D. Y. Postprandial lysophospholipid suppresses hepatic fatty acid oxidation: the molecular link between group 1B phospholipase A2 and diet-induced obesity. PMID:20215528

  20. Treatment with 17β-Estradiol Reduced Body Weight and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in a High-Fat Diet-Induced Animal Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chih-Yang; Jiang, Chong-He; Lin, Yueh-Min; Chung, Li-Chin; Shen, Chia-Yao; Pai, Peiying; Lin, Kuan-Ho; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Liao, Shih-Chieh

    2017-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) play important roles in cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. Recently, these estrogen receptors were reconsidered as an important treatment target of obesity leading to CVD. In this study, 17β-estradiol (17β-E) replacement therapy applied to high-fat diet-induced obese C57B male mice and ovariectomized (OVX) rats were evaluated, and the protective effects against high-fat diet-induced obesity were assessed in C57B mouse hearts. The results showed that 17β-E treatment activated both ERα and ERβ, and ERβ levels increased in a dose-dependent manner in high-fat diet C57B mouse cardiomyocytes following 17β-E treatment. Notably, an almost 16% reduction in body weight was observed in the 17β-E-treated (12 μg/kg/day for 60 days) high-fat diet-induced obese C57B male mice. These results suggested that 17β-E supplements may reduce CVD risk due to obesity. PMID:28335423

  1. Treatment with 17β-Estradiol Reduced Body Weight and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in a High-Fat Diet-Induced Animal Model of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ting, Wei-Jen; Huang, Chih-Yang; Jiang, Chong-He; Lin, Yueh-Min; Chung, Li-Chin; Shen, Chia-Yao; Pai, Peiying; Lin, Kuan-Ho; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Liao, Shih-Chieh

    2017-03-14

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) play important roles in cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. Recently, these estrogen receptors were reconsidered as an important treatment target of obesity leading to CVD. In this study, 17β-estradiol (17β-E) replacement therapy applied to high-fat diet-induced obese C57B male mice and ovariectomized (OVX) rats were evaluated, and the protective effects against high-fat diet-induced obesity were assessed in C57B mouse hearts. The results showed that 17β-E treatment activated both ERα and ERβ, and ERβ levels increased in a dose-dependent manner in high-fat diet C57B mouse cardiomyocytes following 17β-E treatment. Notably, an almost 16% reduction in body weight was observed in the 17β-E-treated (12 μg/kg/day for 60 days) high-fat diet-induced obese C57B male mice. These results suggested that 17β-E supplements may reduce CVD risk due to obesity.

  2. RGC32 deficiency protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiao-Bing; Luan, Jun-Na; Ye, Jianping; Chen, Shi-You

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is an important independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and many other chronic diseases. Adipose tissue inflammation is a critical link between obesity and insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes and a contributor to disease susceptibility and progression. The objective of this study was to determine the role of response gene to complement 32 (RGC32) in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. WT and RGC32 knockout (Rgc32(-/-) (Rgcc)) mice were fed normal chow or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Metabolic, biochemical, and histologic analyses were performed. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were used to study the role of RGC32 in adipocytes in vitro. Rgc32(-/-) mice fed with HFD exhibited a lean phenotype with reduced epididymal fat weight compared with WT controls. Blood biochemical analysis and insulin tolerance test showed that RGC32 deficiency improved HFD-induced dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Although it had no effect on adipocyte differentiation, RGC32 deficiency ameliorated adipose tissue and systemic inflammation. Moreover, Rgc32(-/-) induced browning of adipose tissues and increased energy expenditure. Our data indicated that RGC32 plays an important role in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, and thus it may serve as a potential novel drug target for developing therapeutics to treat obesity and metabolic disorders. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Effects of flavonoids on intestinal inflammation, barrier integrity and changes in gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Gil-Cardoso, Katherine; Ginés, Iris; Pinent, Montserrat; Ardévol, Anna; Blay, Mayte; Terra, Ximena

    2016-12-01

    Diet-induced obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation, which, in most cases, leads to the development of metabolic disorders, primarily insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Although prior studies have implicated the adipose tissue as being primarily responsible for obesity-associated inflammation, the latest discoveries have correlated impairments in intestinal immune homeostasis and the mucosal barrier with increased activation of the inflammatory pathways and the development of insulin resistance. Therefore, it is essential to define the mechanisms underlying the obesity-associated gut alterations to develop therapies to prevent and treat obesity and its associated diseases. Flavonoids appear to be promising candidates among the natural preventive treatments that have been identified to date. They have been shown to protect against several diseases, including CVD and various cancers. Furthermore, they have clear anti-inflammatory properties, which have primarily been evaluated in non-intestinal models. At present, a growing body of evidence suggests that flavonoids could exert a protective role against obesity-associated pathologies by modulating inflammatory-related cellular events in the intestine and/or the composition of the microbiota populations. The present paper will review the literature to date that has described the protective effects of flavonoids on intestinal inflammation, barrier integrity and gut microbiota in studies conducted using in vivo and in vitro models.

  4. Differences in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Contribute to Sexually Dimorphic Inflammatory Responses to High Fat Diet-induced Obesity*

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Kanakadurga; Maley, Nidhi; Mergian, Taleen; DelProposto, Jennifer; Cho, Kae Won; Zamarron, Brian F.; Martinez-Santibanez, Gabriel; Geletka, Lynn; Muir, Lindsey; Wachowiak, Phillip; Demirjian, Chaghig; Lumeng, Carey N.

    2015-01-01

    Women of reproductive age are protected from metabolic disease relative to postmenopausal women and men. Most preclinical rodent studies are skewed toward the use of male mice to study obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction because of a similar protection observed in female mice. How sex differences in obesity-induced inflammatory responses contribute to these observations is unknown. We have compared and contrasted the effects of high fat diet-induced obesity on glucose metabolism and leukocyte activation in multiple depots in male and female C57Bl/6 mice. With both short term and long term high fat diet, male mice demonstrated increased weight gain and CD11c+ adipose tissue macrophage content compared with female mice despite similar degrees of adipocyte hypertrophy. Competitive bone marrow transplant studies demonstrated that obesity induced a preferential contribution of male hematopoietic cells to circulating leukocytes and adipose tissue macrophages compared with female cells independent of the sex of the recipient. Sex differences in macrophage and hematopoietic cell in vitro activation in response to obesogenic cues were observed to explain these results. In summary, this report demonstrates that male and female leukocytes and hematopoietic stem cells have cell-autonomous differences in their response to obesity that contribute to an amplified response in males compared with females. PMID:25869128

  5. Diet-Induced Obesity Reduces the Responsiveness of the Peripheral Taste Receptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maliphol, Amanda B.; Garth, Deborah J.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a growing epidemic that causes many serious health related complications. While the causes of obesity are complex, there is conclusive evidence that overconsumption coupled with a sedentary lifestyle is the primary cause of this medical condition. Dietary consumption is controlled by appetite which is in turn regulated by multiple neuronal systems, including the taste system. However, the relationship between taste and obesity has not been well defined. Growing evidence suggests that taste perception in the brain is altered in obese animals and humans, however no studies have determined if there are altered taste responses in the peripheral taste receptor cells, which is the initiation site for the detection and perception of taste stimuli. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we used C57Bl/6 mice which readily become obese when placed on a high fat diet. After ten weeks on the high fat diet, we used calcium imaging to measure how taste-evoked calcium signals were affected in the obese mice. We found that significantly fewer taste receptor cells were responsive to some appetitive taste stimuli while the numbers of taste cells that were sensitive to aversive taste stimuli did not change. Properties of the taste-evoked calcium signals were also significantly altered in the obese mice. Behavioral analyses found that mice on the high fat diet had reduced ability to detect some taste stimuli compared to their littermate controls. Conclusions/Significance Our findings demonstrate that diet-induced obesity significantly influences peripheral taste receptor cell signals which likely leads to changes in the central taste system and may cause altered taste perception. PMID:24236129

  6. Adipose tissue overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ivet; Franckhauser, Sylvie; Ferré, Tura; Vilà, Laia; Tafuro, Sabrina; Muñoz, Sergio; Roca, Carles; Ramos, David; Pujol, Anna; Riu, Efren; Ruberte, Jesús; Bosch, Fatima

    2012-07-01

    During the expansion of fat mass in obesity, vascularization of adipose tissue is insufficient to maintain tissue normoxia. Local hypoxia develops and may result in altered adipokine expression, proinflammatory macrophage recruitment, and insulin resistance. We investigated whether an increase in adipose tissue angiogenesis could protect against obesity-induced hypoxia and, consequently, insulin resistance. Transgenic mice overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) were generated. Vessel formation, metabolism, and inflammation were studied in VEGF transgenic mice and wild-type littermates fed chow or a high-fat diet. Overexpression of VEGF resulted in increased blood vessel number and size in both WAT and BAT and protection against high-fat diet-induced hypoxia and obesity, with no differences in food intake. This was associated with increased thermogenesis and energy expenditure. Moreover, whole-body insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were improved. Transgenic mice presented increased macrophage infiltration, with a higher number of M2 anti-inflammatory and fewer M1 proinflammatory macrophages than wild-type littermates, thus maintaining an anti-inflammatory milieu that could avoid insulin resistance. These studies suggest that overexpression of VEGF in adipose tissue is a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of obesity and insulin resistance.

  7. Ciliary neurotrophic factorAx15 alters energy homeostasis, decreases body weight, and improves metabolic control in diet-induced obese and UCP1-DTA mice.

    PubMed

    Blüher, Susann; Moschos, Stergios; Bullen, John; Kokkotou, Efi; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Wiegand, Stanley J; Sleeman, Mark W; Sleemann, Mark W; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2004-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) potently reduces appetite and body weight in rodents and humans. We studied the short- and long-term effects of CNTF(Ax15), a second-generation CNTF analog, in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice and brown adipose tissue (BAT)-deficient obese UCP1-DTA (uncoupling protein 1-diphtheria toxin A) mice. CNTF(Ax15) administration (0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 microg . g(-1) . day(-1) s.c.) for 3 or 7 days reduced food intake and body weight (mainly body fat mass). The effect of CNTF(Ax15) on food intake and body weight was more pronounced in CNTF(Ax15)-treated diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice compared with pair-fed controls and was associated with suppressed expression of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y and agouti gene-related protein. Moreover, CNTF(Ax15) increased uncoupling protein 1 mRNA expression in BAT and energy expenditure in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Longitudinal observations revealed a sustained reduction in body weight for several days post-CNTF(Ax15) treatment of CNTF(Ax15)-treated but not pair-fed mice, followed by a gradual regain in body weight over 28 days. Finally, CNTF(Ax15) administration improved the metabolic profile in both diet-induced obese C57BL/6J and UCP1-DTA mice and resulted in a significantly improved glycemic response to oral glucose tolerance tests in CNTF(Ax15)-treated UCP1-DTA compared with pair-fed mice of similar body weight. These data suggest that CNTF(Ax15) may act through a pathway downstream of the putative point responsible for leptin resistance in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J and UCP1-DTA mice to alter food intake, body weight, body composition, and metabolism. CNTF(Ax15) has delayed and persistent effects in diet-induced obese C57BL/6J mice, which account for a reduction in body weight over and above what would be expected based on decreased foot intake alone.

  8. Hydrolyzed casein reduces diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Lillefosse, Haldis H; Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Du, Zhen-Yu; Ditlev, Ditte B; Thorsen, Frits A; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Liaset, Bjørn

    2013-09-01

    The digestion rate of dietary protein is a regulating factor for postprandial metabolism both in humans and animal models. However, few data exist about the habitual consumption of proteins with different digestion rates with regard to the development of body mass and diet-induced obesity. Here, we used a factorial ANOVA design to investigate the effects of protein form (intact vs. hydrolyzed casein) and protein level (16 vs. 32 energy percent protein) on body mass gain and adiposity in obesity-prone male C57BL/6J mice fed Western diets with 35 energy percent fat. Mice fed the hydrolyzed casein diets had higher spontaneous locomotor activity than mice fed intact casein. During the light phase, mice fed hydrolyzed casein tended (P = 0.08) to have a lower respiratory exchange ratio, indicating lower utilization of carbohydrates as energy substrate relative to those fed intact casein. In further support of less carbohydrate oxidation, plasma concentrations of glucose and those of the glucose metabolite lactate were lower in fed mice that consumed the hydrolyzed compared with the intact casein diet. Concomitantly, the plasma insulin concentration was strongly reduced in fed mice given hydrolyzed casein relative to those given intact casein. The mice fed hydrolyzed casein had greater ex vivo inguinal white adipose tissue non-CO2 β-oxidation capacity along with induced expression of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial uncoupling. The physiological changes induced by hydrolyzed casein ingestion translated into decreased body and adipose tissue masses. We conclude that chronic consumption of extensively hydrolyzed casein reduces body mass gain and diet-induced obesity in male C57BL/6J mice.

  9. Niacin promotes revascularization and recovery of limb function in diet-induced obese mice with peripheral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pang, Dominic K T; Nong, Zengxuan; Sutherland, Brian G; Sawyez, Cynthia G; Robson, Debra L; Toma, Jelena; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Borradaile, Nica M

    2016-06-01

    Niacin can reduce vascular disease risk in individuals with metabolic syndrome, but in light of recent large randomized controlled trials outcomes, its biological actions and clinical utility remain controversial. Niacin can improve endothelial function, vascular inflammation, and vascular regeneration, independent of correcting dyslipidemia, in various lean rodent models of vascular injury. Here, we tested whether niacin could directly improve endothelial cell angiogenic function during combined exposure to excess fatty acids and hypoxia, and whether intervention with niacin during continued feeding of western diet could improve revascularization and functional recovery in obese, hyperlipidemic mice with peripheral ischemia. Treatment with niacin (10 μmol/L) increased human microvascular endothelial cell angiogenic function during exposure to high fatty acids and hypoxia (2% oxygen), as determined by tube formation on Matrigel. To assess revascularization in vivo, we used western diet-induced obese mice with unilateral hind limb femoral artery ligation and excision. Treatment for 14 days postinjury with once daily i.p. injections of a low dose of niacin (50 mg/kg) improved recovery of hind limb use, in association with enhanced revascularization and decreased inflammation of the tibialis anterior muscle. These effects were concomitant with decreased plasma triglycerides, but not increased plasma apoAI. Thus, niacin improves endothelial tube formation under lipotoxic and hypoxic conditions, and moreover, promotes revascularization and functional hind limb recovery following ischemic injury in diet-induced obese mice with hyperlipidemia. These data may have implications for niacin therapy in the treatment of peripheral ischemic vascular disease associated with metabolic syndrome.

  10. Anti-obesity Effect of Yogurt Fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum Q180 in Diet-induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the anti-obesity effects of yogurt fermented by Lactobacillus plantarum Q180 in diet-induced obese rats. To examine the effects, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on six different diets, as follows: Group A was fed an ND and orally administrated saline solution; Group B, an HFD and orally administrated saline solution; Group C, an HFD and orally administrated yogurt fermented by ABT-3 and L. plantarum Q180; Group D, an HFD and orally administrated yogurt with added Garcinia cambogia extract, fermented by ABT-3 and L. plantarum Q180; Group E, an HFD and orally administrated yogurt fermented by L. plantarum Q180; and Group F, an HFD and orally administrated yogurt with added Garcinia cambogia extract, fermented by L. plantarum Q180 for eight weeks. After eight weeks, the rate of increase in bodyweight was 5.14%, 6.5%, 3.35% and 10.81% lower in groups C, D, E and F, respectively, compared with group B; the epididymal fat weight of groups E and F was significantly lower than that of group B; and the level of triglyceride and leptin was significantly reduced in groups C, D, E and F compared to group B. In addition, the level of AST was reduced in group C compared to the other groups. To examine the effects of yogurt on the reduction of adipocyte size, the adipocyte sizes were measured. The number of large-size adipose tissue was less distributed in groups A, C, D, E and F than in group B. PMID:27499667

  11. Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana Extracts and Purified Compounds Ameliorate Obesity in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shyr-Yi; Huang, Guan-Cheng; Hsieh, Ying-Ying; Lin, Yin-Shiou; Han, Chuan-Hsiao; Wen, Chi-Luan; Chang, Chi-I; Hou, Wen-Chi

    2015-10-28

    The increasing prevalence of obesity continues to gain more attention worldwide. In this study, diet-induced obese mice were used to evaluate the antiobesity effects of extracts, fractions, and purified compounds from Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana (VTT). The C57BL/6J mice were fed a 5-week high-fat diet (HF) concurrently with ethanol extracts (Et-ext, 80 mg/kg) from roots (R), stems (S), and leaves (L) by oral gavage daily. Only R-Et-ext interventions showed significant weight reduction in mice compared with those in the HF group; however, mouse plasma contents of total cholesterols (TC), total triglycerides (TG) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) of all three Et-ext intervened groups showed significant reductions compared with those in the HF group. Furthermore, intervention with the ethyl acetate-partitioned fraction (EA-fra, 60 mg/kg) from R-Et-ext but not the n-butanol-partitioned fraction or water fraction from R-Et-ext showed significant weight reduction in mice compared with those in the HF group. The same molecular weights of three resveratrol tetramers, (+)-hopeaphenol, (+)-vitisin A, and (-)-vitisin B, were isolated from the EA-fra of VTT-R. The (+)-vitisin A and fenofibrate (25 mg/kg) but not the (+)-hopeaphenol and (-)-vitisin B interventions showed significant weight reduction in mice compared with those in the HF group. The total feed intake among the HF groups with or without interventions showed no significant differences. The mouse plasma contents of TC, TG, LDL, free fatty acid, and plasma lipase activity of the three resveratrol tetramer-intervened groups showed reductions in the mice compared with those in the HF group. It was proposed that the lipase inhibitory activities of VTT extracts and purified resveratrol tetramers might contribute in part to the antiobesity effect, and these results suggested that VTT may be developed as functional food for achieving antiobesity objectives and requires further investigation.

  12. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 protects mice from diet-induced fatty liver disease and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T; Mazagova, Magdalena; Horvath, Angela; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Varki, Nissi M; Brandl, Katharina; Ho, Samuel B; Schnabl, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and obesity are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier dysfunction. Here, we investigated the role of mucin-2 (Muc2) as the major component of the intestinal mucus layer in the development of fatty liver disease and obesity. We studied experimental fatty liver disease and obesity induced by feeding wild-type and Muc2-knockout mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Muc2 deficiency protected mice from HFD-induced fatty liver disease and obesity. Compared with wild-type mice, after a 16-wk HFD, Muc2-knockout mice exhibited better glucose homeostasis, reduced inflammation, and upregulated expression of genes involved in lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation in white adipose tissue. Compared with wild-type mice that were fed the HFD as well, Muc2-knockout mice also displayed higher intestinal and plasma levels of IL-22 and higher intestinal levels of the IL-22 target genes Reg3b and Reg3g. Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal mucus layer activates the mucosal immune system. Higher IL-22 levels protect mice from diet-induced features of the metabolic syndrome.

  13. Deficiency of intestinal mucin-2 protects mice from diet-induced fatty liver disease and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Phillipp; Seebauer, Caroline T.; Mazagova, Magdalena; Horvath, Angela; Wang, Lirui; Llorente, Cristina; Varki, Nissi M.; Brandl, Katharina; Ho, Samuel B.

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and obesity are characterized by altered gut microbiota, inflammation, and gut barrier dysfunction. Here, we investigated the role of mucin-2 (Muc2) as the major component of the intestinal mucus layer in the development of fatty liver disease and obesity. We studied experimental fatty liver disease and obesity induced by feeding wild-type and Muc2-knockout mice a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. Muc2 deficiency protected mice from HFD-induced fatty liver disease and obesity. Compared with wild-type mice, after a 16-wk HFD, Muc2-knockout mice exhibited better glucose homeostasis, reduced inflammation, and upregulated expression of genes involved in lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation in white adipose tissue. Compared with wild-type mice that were fed the HFD as well, Muc2-knockout mice also displayed higher intestinal and plasma levels of IL-22 and higher intestinal levels of the IL-22 target genes Reg3b and Reg3g. Our findings indicate that absence of the intestinal mucus layer activates the mucosal immune system. Higher IL-22 levels protect mice from diet-induced features of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26702135

  14. Canola oil rich in oleic acid improves diastolic heart function in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Raj, Pema; Louis, Xavier Lieben; Perera, Danielle; Yamanagedara, Prasanga; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Netticadan, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. It directly affects heart structure and function and contributes to heart failure. Diet is a major factor involved in the development of obesity along with genetic factors. We examined the effects of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils on cardiac structure and function in the diet-induced rodent model of obesity (DIO). Obese prone (OP) rats were fed a high-fat diet (HF; 55% of kcal) for 12 weeks; Sprague-Dawley rats fed commercial chow served as control. Echocardiography was performed to assess the cardiac structure and function in all rats at 12 weeks. OP rats fed the HF diet showed significant impairment in diastolic function compared to control rats. The HF diet containing high oleic canola oil significantly improved diastolic function of OP rats compared to the HF diet with lard. In conclusion, canola oil rich in oleic acid, when incorporated into an HF diet, prevents the development of diastolic dysfunction in DIO rats.

  15. Effect of Peucedanum japonicum Thunb extract on high-fat diet-induced obesity and gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Nukitrangsan, Natthanan; Okabe, Takafumi; Toda, Takayoshi; Inafuku, Masashi; Iwasaki, Hironori; Oku, Hirosuke

    2012-01-01

    Supplementation of the diet with Peucedanum japonicum Thunb (PJT) powder inhibits high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. Either the fiber component or other bioactive components in the PJT powder may inhibit obesity. This study, therefore, was an attempt to identify the components, fiber or other phytochemicals of PJT that were responsible for the anti-obesity activity, and also studied the modulation of obesity-related gene expression in C57BL/6 mice. Animals were fed a modified-AIN76 diet supplemented with PJT powder or extracts of PJT in water, 50 % ethanol, or ethanol. Body weight gain, tissue weight, serum biochemical parameters, liver lipid concentrations, and gene expression in tissues were compared between the control and treatment groups. Of the extracts, the ethanol extract of PJT decreased fat accumulation and adipocyte size, reduced serum and liver triglyceride concentrations, and inhibited obesity. This finding clearly demonstrates the presence of anti-obesity phytochemicals in PJT. Ethanol extract of PJT inhibited lipase activity in vitro. Modulation of gene expression by PJT ethanol extract was largely similar to that by PJT powder in the hepatic and adipose tissues: RORC and PBEF1 were upregulated and DUSP1, INSIG2, and SERPINA12 were downregulated in the liver; FXRα and PPARγ were upregulated and PEG1/MEST, the size-marker of adipocytes, was downregulated in the adipose tissue. Furthermore, PJT ethanol extract increased the expression of the UCP3 gene in muscle. These results suggest that the anti-obesity phytochemicals in PJT lower lipid levels by inhibiting fat absorption and by modulating obesity-related gene expression in the liver, adipose tissue, and muscle.

  16. Diet-induced obesity modulates epigenetic responses to ionizing radiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Ishii-Ohba, Hiroko; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Both exposure to ionizing radiation and obesity have been associated with various pathologies including cancer. There is a crucial need in better understanding the interactions between ionizing radiation effects (especially at low doses) and other risk factors, such as obesity. In order to evaluate radiation responses in obese animals, C3H and C57BL/6J mice fed a control normal fat or a high fat (HF) diet were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy ×4). Bone marrow micronucleus assays did not suggest a modulation of radiation-induced genotoxicity by HF diet. Using MSP, we observed that the promoters of p16 and Dapk genes were methylated in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet (irradiated and non-irradiated); Mgmt promoter was methylated in irradiated and/or HF diet-fed mice. In addition, methylation PCR arrays identified Ep300 and Socs1 (whose promoters exhibited higher methylation levels in non-irradiated HF diet-fed mice) as potential targets for further studies. We then compared microRNA regulations after radiation exposure in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a normal or an HF diet, using microRNA arrays. Interestingly, radiation-triggered microRNA regulations observed in normal mice were not observed in obese mice. miR-466e was upregulated in non-irradiated obese mice. In vitro free fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid) administration sensitized AML12 mouse liver cells to ionizing radiation, but the inhibition of miR-466e counteracted this radio-sensitization, suggesting that the modulation of radiation responses by diet-induced obesity might involve miR-466e expression. All together, our results suggested the existence of dietary effects on radiation responses (especially epigenetic regulations) in mice, possibly in relationship with obesity-induced chronic oxidative stress.

  17. Diet-Induced Obesity Modulates Epigenetic Responses to Ionizing Radiation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Ishii-Ohba, Hiroko; Nenoi, Mitsuru; Nakajima, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Both exposure to ionizing radiation and obesity have been associated with various pathologies including cancer. There is a crucial need in better understanding the interactions between ionizing radiation effects (especially at low doses) and other risk factors, such as obesity. In order to evaluate radiation responses in obese animals, C3H and C57BL/6J mice fed a control normal fat or a high fat (HF) diet were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy ×4). Bone marrow micronucleus assays did not suggest a modulation of radiation-induced genotoxicity by HF diet. Using MSP, we observed that the promoters of p16 and Dapk genes were methylated in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a HF diet (irradiated and non-irradiated); Mgmt promoter was methylated in irradiated and/or HF diet-fed mice. In addition, methylation PCR arrays identified Ep300 and Socs1 (whose promoters exhibited higher methylation levels in non-irradiated HF diet-fed mice) as potential targets for further studies. We then compared microRNA regulations after radiation exposure in the livers of C57BL/6J mice fed a normal or an HF diet, using microRNA arrays. Interestingly, radiation-triggered microRNA regulations observed in normal mice were not observed in obese mice. miR-466e was upregulated in non-irradiated obese mice. In vitro free fatty acid (palmitic acid, oleic acid) administration sensitized AML12 mouse liver cells to ionizing radiation, but the inhibition of miR-466e counteracted this radio-sensitization, suggesting that the modulation of radiation responses by diet-induced obesity might involve miR-466e expression. All together, our results suggested the existence of dietary effects on radiation responses (especially epigenetic regulations) in mice, possibly in relationship with obesity-induced chronic oxidative stress. PMID:25171162

  18. Response to diet-induced obesity produces time-dependent induction and progression of metabolic osteoarthritis in rat knees.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kelsey H; Hart, David A; Reimer, Raylene A; Seerattan, Ruth A; Herzog, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Obesity, and corresponding chronic-low grade inflammation, is associated with the onset and progression of knee OA. The origin of this inflammation is poorly understood. Here, the effect of high fat, high sucrose (HFS) diet induced obesity (DIO) on local (synovial fluid), and systemic (serum) inflammation is evaluated after a 12-week obesity induction and a further 16-week adaptation period. For 12-weeks of obesity induction, n = 40 DIO male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed a HFS diet while the control group (n = 14) remained on chow. DIO rats were allocated to prone (DIO-P, top 33% based on weight change) or resistant (DIO-R, bottom 33%) groups at 12-weeks. Animals were euthanized at 12- and after an additional 16-weeks on diet (28-weeks). At sacrifice, body composition and knee joints were collected and assessed. Synovial fluid and sera were profiled using cytokine array analysis. At 12-weeks, DIO-P animals demonstrated increased Modified Mankin scores compared to DIO-R and chow (p = 0.026), and DIO-R had higher Mankin scores compared to chow (p = 0.049). While numerous systemic and limited synovial fluid inflammatory markers were increased at 12-weeks in DIO animals compared to chow, by 28-weeks there were limited systemic differences but marked increases in local synovial fluid inflammatory marker concentrations. Metabolic OA may manifest from an initial systemic inflammatory disturbance. Twelve weeks of obesity induction leads to a unique inflammatory profile and induction of metabolic OA which is altered after a further 16-weeks of obesity and HFS diet intake, suggesting that obesity is a dynamic, progressive process. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1010-1018, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. High-fat diet-induced obesity Rat model: a comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley Rat

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia; Meireles, Manuela; Norberto, Sónia; Leite, Joana; Freitas, Joana; Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Ana; Calhau, Conceição

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the past decades, obesity and associated metabolic complications have reached epidemic proportions. For the study of these pathologies, a number of animal models have been developed. However, a direct comparison between Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) Rat as models of high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity has not been adequately evaluated so far. Wistar and SD rats were assigned for 2 experimental groups for 17 weeks: standard (St) and high-fat (HF) diet groups. To assess some of the features of the metabolic syndrome, oral glucose tolerance tests, systolic blood pressure measurements and blood biochemical analysis were performed throughout the study. The gut microbiota composition of the animals of each group was evaluated at the end of the study by real-time PCR. HF diet increased weight gain, body fat mass, mesenteric adipocyte's size, adiponectin and leptin plasma levels and decreased oral glucose tolerance in both Wistar and SD rats. However, the majority of these effects were more pronounced or earlier detected in Wistar rats. The gut microbiota of SD rats was less abundant in Bacteroides and Prevotella but richer in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus comparatively to the gut microbiota of Wistar rats. Nevertheless, the modulation of the gut microbiota by HF diet was similar in both strains, except for Clostridium leptum that was only reduced in Wistar rats fed with HF diet. In conclusion, both Wistar and SD Rat can be used as models of HF diet-induced obesity although the metabolic effects caused by HF diet seemed to be more pronounced in Wistar Rat. Differences in the gut microbial ecology may account for the worsened metabolic scenario observed in Wistar Rat. PMID:27144092

  20. Short-term effects of sleeve gastrectomy and caloric restriction on blood pressure in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Amaia; Becerril, Sara; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Méndez-Giménez, Leire; Ramírez, Beatriz; Lancha, Andoni; Martín, Marina; Burrell, María A; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy constitutes an effective surgical procedure for the treatment of morbid obesity. The aim of the present study was to establish the effects of sleeve gastrectomy and caloric restriction on weight loss and cardiovascular parameters in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Male Wistar DIO rats were subjected to surgical interventions (n = 30) (sham operation, sleeve gastrectomy, or pair-fed to the amount of food eaten by sleeve-gastrectomized animals and compared to lean control rats) or dietary interventions (n = 40) (fed ad libitum a normal diet (ND) or a high-fat diet or an ND with a caloric restriction of 25 %). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, and mean blood pressure values and heart rate (HR) were recorded in conscious, resting animals by noninvasive tail-cuff plethysmography before and 3 weeks after surgical or dietary interventions. Both sleeve gastrectomy and caloric restriction induced a reduction in body weight, whole-body adiposity, and serum leptin together with an increased excess weight loss in DIO rats. Sleeve gastrectomy was further associated with an improvement in insulin resistance and the lipid profile, as well as with a reduction in serum ghrelin levels. A decrease in HR and heart weight was observed in caloric-restricted groups. Sleeve-gastrectomized rats not only exhibited a reduction in HR (∆HR = -45 ± 19 bpm) but also in SBP values (∆SBP = -22 ± 10 mmHg) compared to the DIO rats (∆SBP = 14 ± 8 mmHg). Our findings provide evidence that the beneficial effects of sleeve gastrectomy on blood pressure values are beyond weight loss in rats with diet-induced obesity.

  1. Anti-apoptotic and Pro-survival Effects of Food Restriction on High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Hearts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Yuan; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Cheng, Yu-Jung; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Huang, Chih-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Kao, Chung-Lan; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lee, Shin-Da

    2017-04-01

    Food restriction and weight loss are known to prevent obesity-related heart diseases. This study investigates whether food restriction elicits anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects on high-fat diet-induced obese hearts. Histopathological analysis, TUNEL assay, and Western blotting were performed on the excised hearts from three groups of Sprague-Dawley rats which were fed with regular chow diet (CON, 13.5 % fat), a high-fat ad libitum diet (HFa, 45 % fat), or a high-fat food-restricted diet (HFr, 45 % fat, maintaining the same weight as CON) for 12 weeks. Body weight, blood pressure, heart weight, triglycerides, insulin, HOMAIR, interstitial spaces, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were increased in HFa relative to CON, whereas these parameters were decreased in HFr relative to HFa. The protein levels of cardiac Fas ligand, Fas receptors, Fas-associated death domain (FADD), activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas receptor-dependent apoptotic pathways), as well as t-Bid/Bid, Bax/Bcl-2, Bad/p-Bad, Cytochrome c, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways) in HFr were lower than those in HFa. Moreover, the Bcl-xL and IGF-1-related components of IGF-1, p-PI3 K/PI3 K, p-Akt/Akt in HFr were higher than those in HFa. Our findings suggest that a restricted high-fat diet for maintaining weight control could diminish cardiac Fas receptor-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways as well as might enhance IGF-1-related pro-survival pathways. In sum, food restriction for maintaining normal weight could elicit anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects on high-fat diet-induced obese hearts.

  2. Grp78 Heterozygosity Promotes Adaptive Unfolded Protein Response and Attenuates Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Risheng; Jung, Dae Young; Jun, John Y.; Li, Jianze; Luo, Shengzhan; Ko, Hwi Jin; Kim, Jason K.; Lee, Amy S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78/BiP in the pathogenesis of obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Male Grp78+/− mice and their wild-type littermates were subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD) regimen. Pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes was examined by multiple approaches of metabolic phenotyping. Tissue-specific insulin sensitivity was analyzed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps. Molecular mechanism was explored via immunoblotting and tissue culture manipulation. RESULTS Grp78 heterozygosity increases energy expenditure and attenuates HFD-induced obesity. Grp78+/− mice are resistant to diet-induced hyperinsulinemia, liver steatosis, white adipose tissue (WAT) inflammation, and hyperglycemia. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies revealed that Grp78 heterozygosity improves glucose metabolism independent of adiposity and following an HFD increases insulin sensitivity predominantly in WAT. As mechanistic explanations, Grp78 heterozygosity in WAT under HFD stress promotes adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), attenuates translational block, and upregulates ER degradation-enhancing α-mannosidase–like protein (EDEM) and ER chaperones, thus improving ER quality control and folding capacity. Further, overexpression of the active form of ATF6 induces protective UPR and improves insulin signaling upon ER stress. CONCLUSIONS HFD-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes are improved in Grp78+/− mice. Adaptive UPR in WAT could contribute to this improvement, linking ER homeostasis to energy balance and glucose metabolism. PMID:19808896

  3. High dietary fat intake during lactation promotes development of diet-induced obesity in male offspring of mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Yasuna; Honma, Taro; Kijima, Ryo; Ikeda, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The maternal nutritional status during pregnancy and lactation influences the risk of obesity in offspring, but the details of this phenomenon are unclear. In particular, there is little information on the influence on the offspring of the maternal nutritional status during lactation only. Therefore, in this study, we examined the influence of high dietary fat intake in dams during lactation on the risk of obesity in offspring, using C57BL/6J mice. The mice were fed a control diet (CD) during pregnancy. After birth, dams were fed a CD or a high-fat diet (HD) during lactation (3 wk). Fat and energy were significantly increased in milk from dams fed a HD during lactation. Male offspring were weaned at 3 wk old and fed a CD for 4 wk, which resulted in no significant difference in their physique. Four weeks after weaning, the offspring (7 wk old) were fed a CD or HD for 4 wk to induce obesity. High dietary fat intake in dams and offspring promoted lipid accumulation in white adipose tissue and adipocyte hypertrophy in male offspring. The underlying mechanism may involve an increase in expression of Lpl and a decrease in expression of Hsl in white adipose tissue of offspring. In conclusion, our results show that high dietary fat intake during lactation promotes development of diet-induced obesity in male offspring.

  4. Psoralea corylifolia L. Seed Extract Attenuates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunhui; Oh, Yoon Sin; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-02-06

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), along with obesity, is increasing world-wide and is one of the major causes of chronic hepatic disease. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Psoralea corylifolia L. seed (PCS) on high fat diet-induced NAFLD in C57BL/6 mice after daily administration at 300 or 500 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Treatment with PCS extract significantly reduced body weight and blood glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, PCS extract treatment significantly attenuated lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissue and reduced serum lipid and hepatic triglyceride levels. Furthermore, the expression of lipogenic genes and inflammatory genes were reduced, and the expression of fat oxidation-related genes was increased in the liver of PCS extract-treated mice compared with control mice. Our study suggests the therapeutic potential of PCS extract for NAFLD by inhibiting lipid accumulation and inflammation in liver.

  5. Psoralea corylifolia L. Seed Extract Attenuates Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Eunhui; Oh, Yoon Sin; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), along with obesity, is increasing world-wide and is one of the major causes of chronic hepatic disease. The present study evaluated the ameliorative effect of extract of Psoralea corylifolia L. seed (PCS) on high fat diet-induced NAFLD in C57BL/6 mice after daily administration at 300 or 500 mg/kg for 12 weeks. Treatment with PCS extract significantly reduced body weight and blood glucose levels and improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. In addition, PCS extract treatment significantly attenuated lipid accumulation in liver and adipose tissue and reduced serum lipid and hepatic triglyceride levels. Furthermore, the expression of lipogenic genes and inflammatory genes were reduced, and the expression of fat oxidation-related genes was increased in the liver of PCS extract-treated mice compared with control mice. Our study suggests the therapeutic potential of PCS extract for NAFLD by inhibiting lipid accumulation and inflammation in liver. PMID:26861390

  6. Diet-Induced Obesity and Reduced Skin Cancer Susceptibility in Matrix Metalloproteinase 19-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pendás, Alberto M.; Folgueras, Alicia R.; Llano, Elena; Caterina, John; Frerard, Françoise; Rodríguez, Francisco; Astudillo, Aurora; Noël, Agnès; Birkedal-Hansen, Henning; López-Otín, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 19 (MMP-19) is a member of the MMP family of endopeptidases that, in contrast to most MMPs, is widely expressed in human tissues under normal quiescent conditions. MMP-19 has been found to be associated with ovulation and angiogenic processes and is deregulated in diverse pathological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. To gain further insights into the in vivo functions of this protease, we have generated mutant mice deficient in Mmp19. These mice are viable and fertile and do not display any obvious abnormalities. However, Mmp19-null mice develop a diet-induced obesity due to adipocyte hypertrophy and exhibit decreased susceptibility to skin tumors induced by chemical carcinogens. Based on these results, we suggest that this enzyme plays an in vivo role in some of the tissue remodeling events associated with adipogenesis, as well as in pathological processes such as tumor progression. PMID:15169894

  7. Effects of food pattern change and physical exercise on cafeteria diet-induced obesity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Goularte, Jéferson F; Ferreira, Maria B C; Sanvitto, Gilberto L

    2012-10-28

    Obesity affects a large number of people around the world and appears to be the result of changes in food intake, eating habits and physical activity levels. Changes in dietary patterns and physical exercise are therefore strongly recommended to treat obesity and its complications. The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity and metabolic changes produced by a cafeteria diet can be prevented with dietary changes and/or physical exercise. A total of fifty-six female Wistar rats underwent one of five treatments: chow diet; cafeteria diet; cafeteria diet followed by a chow diet; cafeteria diet plus exercise; cafeteria diet followed by a chow diet plus exercise. The duration of the experiment was 34 weeks. The cafeteria diet resulted in higher energy intake, weight gain, increased visceral adipose tissue and liver weight, and insulin resistance. The cafeteria diet followed by the chow diet resulted in energy intake, body weight, visceral adipose tissue and liver weight and insulin sensitivity equal to that of the controls. Exercise increased total energy intake at week 34, but produced no changes in the animals' body weight or adipose tissue mass. However, insulin sensitivity in animals subjected to exercise and the diet was similar to that of the controls. The present study found that exposure to palatable food caused obesity and insulin resistance and a diet change was sufficient to prevent cafeteria diet-induced obesity and to maintain insulin sensitivity at normal levels. In addition, exercise resulted in normal insulin sensitivity in obese rats. These results may help to develop new approaches for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Effects of grape pomace antioxidant extract on oxidative stress and inflammation in diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Shelly; Canning, Corene; Sun, Shi; Sun, Xiuxiu; Zhou, Kequan

    2010-11-10

    Norton grape is one of the most important wine grapes in Southern and Midwestern states and generates massive pomace byproducts. The objective of this study is to characterize the antioxidant compounds and activity in Norton grape pomace extract (GPE) and further assess the potential health promoting properties of Norton GPE using an animal disease model. The total phenolic content and anthocyanins in Norton GPE were 475.4 mg of gallic acid equiv/g and 156.9 mg of cyanidin 3-glucoside equiv/g, respectively. Catechin and epicatechin in GPE were 28.6 and 24.5 mg/g, respectively. Other major antioxidants in GPE included quercetin (1.6 mg/g), trans-resveratrol (60 μg/g), gallic acid (867.2 μg/g), coutaric acid (511.8 μg/g), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (408.3 μg/g), and protocatechuic acid (371.5 μg/g). The antioxidant activity of GPE was evaluated by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and was 4133 μmol of Trolox equiv/g. Male diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were randomly divided to three treatment groups (n = 12): a normal diet (ND group), a high fat diet (HF group), and the high fat diet supplemented with GPE (HFGPE group). After 12-week treatment, mice in the high fat diet groups gained 29% more weight than the ND group. The GPE supplementation (estimated 250 mg/kg bw/d) lowered plasma C-reactive protein levels by 15.5% in the high fat diet fed mice (P < 0.05), suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect by dietary GPE. However, dietary GPE did not improve oxidative stress in DIO mice as determined by plasma ORAC, glutathione peroxidase, and liver lipid peroxidation. The results showed that GPE contained significant antioxidants and dietary GPE exerted an anti-inflammatory effect in diet induced obesity.

  9. Hypothalamic Ventromedial Lin28a Enhances Glucose Metabolism in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Dae; Toda, Chitoku; Ramírez, Cristina M; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Diano, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    The Lin28a/Let-7 axis has been studied in peripheral tissues for its role in metabolism regulation. However, its central function remains unclear. Here we found that Lin28a is highly expressed in the hypothalamus compared with peripheral tissues. Its expression is positively correlated with positive energy balance, suggesting a potential central role for Lin28a in metabolism regulation. Thus, we targeted the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH) to selectively overexpress (Lin28aKI(VMH) ) or downregulate (Lin28aKD(VMH) ) Lin28a expression in mice. With mice on a standard chow diet, body weight and glucose homeostasis were not affected in Lin28aKI(VMH) or Lin28aKD(VMH) mice. On a high-fat diet, although no differences in body weight and composition were observed, Lin28aKI(VMH) mice showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity compared with controls. Conversely, Lin28aKD(VMH) mice displayed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Changes in VMH AKT activation of diet-induced obese Lin28aKI(VMH) or Lin28aKD(VMH) mice were not associated with alterations in Let-7 levels or insulin receptor activation. Rather, we observed altered expression of TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK-1), which was found to be a direct Lin28a target mRNA. VMH-specific inhibition of TBK-1 in mice with diet-induced obesity impaired glucose metabolism and AKT activation. Altogether, our data show a TBK-1-dependent role for central Lin28a in glucose homeostasis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Linagliptin improves insulin sensitivity and hepatic steatosis in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kern, Matthias; Klöting, Nora; Niessen, Heiko G; Thomas, Leo; Stiller, Detlef; Mark, Michael; Klein, Thomas; Blüher, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Linagliptin (TRADJENTA™) is a selective dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor. DPP-4 inhibition attenuates insulin resistance and improves peripheral glucose utilization in humans. However, the effects of chronic DPP-4 inhibition on insulin sensitivity are not known. The effects of long-term treatment (3-4 weeks) with 3 mg/kg/day or 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin on insulin sensitivity and liver fat content were determined in diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. Chow-fed animals served as controls. DPP-4 activity was significantly inhibited (67-89%) by linagliptin (P<0.001). Following an oral glucose tolerance test, blood glucose concentrations (measured as area under the curve) were significantly suppressed after treatment with 3 mg/kg/day (-16.5% to -20.3%; P<0.01) or 30 mg/kg/day (-14.5% to -26.4%; P<0.05) linagliptin (both P<0.01). Liver fat content was significantly reduced by linagliptin in a dose-dependent manner (both doses P<0.001). Diet-induced obese mice treated for 4 weeks with 3 mg/kg/day or 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin had significantly improved glycated hemoglobin compared with vehicle (both P<0.001). Significant dose-dependent improvements in glucose disposal rates were observed during the steady state of the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp: 27.3 mg/kg/minute and 32.2 mg/kg/minute in the 3 mg/kg/day and 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin groups, respectively; compared with 20.9 mg/kg/minute with vehicle (P<0.001). Hepatic glucose production was significantly suppressed during the clamp: 4.7 mg/kg/minute and 2.1 mg/kg/minute in the 3 mg/kg/day and 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin groups, respectively; compared with 12.5 mg/kg/minute with vehicle (P<0.001). In addition, 30 mg/kg/day linagliptin treatment resulted in a significantly reduced number of macrophages infiltrating adipose tissue (P<0.05). Linagliptin treatment also decreased liver expression of PTP1B, SOCS3, SREBP1c, SCD-1 and FAS (P<0.05). Other tissues like muscle, heart and kidney were not significantly affected

  11. Calorie-induced ER stress suppresses uroguanylin satiety signaling in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kim, G W; Lin, J E; Snook, A E; Aing, A S; Merlino, D J; Li, P; Waldman, S A

    2016-05-23

    The uroguanylin-GUCY2C gut-brain axis has emerged as one component regulating feeding, energy homeostasis, body mass and metabolism. Here, we explore a role for this axis in mechanisms underlying diet-induced obesity (DIO). Intestinal uroguanylin expression and secretion, and hypothalamic GUCY2C expression and anorexigenic signaling, were quantified in mice on high-calorie diets for 14 weeks. The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in suppressing uroguanylin in DIO was explored using tunicamycin, an inducer of ER stress, and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a chemical chaperone that inhibits ER stress. The impact of consumed calories on uroguanylin expression was explored by dietary manipulation. The role of uroguanylin in mechanisms underlying obesity was examined using Camk2a-Cre-ER(T2)-Rosa-STOP(loxP/loxP)-Guca2b mice in which tamoxifen induces transgenic hormone expression in brain. DIO suppressed intestinal uroguanylin expression and eliminated its postprandial secretion into the circulation. DIO suppressed uroguanylin through ER stress, an effect mimicked by tunicamycin and blocked by TUDCA. Hormone suppression by DIO reflected consumed calories, rather than the pathophysiological milieu of obesity, as a diet high in calories from carbohydrates suppressed uroguanylin in lean mice, whereas calorie restriction restored uroguanylin in obese mice. However, hypothalamic GUCY2C, enriched in the arcuate nucleus, produced anorexigenic signals mediating satiety upon exogenous agonist administration, and DIO did not impair these responses. Uroguanylin replacement by transgenic expression in brain repaired the hormone insufficiency and reconstituted satiety responses opposing DIO and its associated comorbidities, including visceral adiposity, glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. These studies reveal a novel pathophysiological mechanism contributing to obesity in which calorie-induced suppression of intestinal uroguanylin impairs hypothalamic mechanisms

  12. Detrimental Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on τ Pathology Are Independent of Insulin Resistance in τ Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leboucher, Antoine; Laurent, Cyril; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-José; Burnouf, Sylvie; Troquier, Laetitia; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Demeyer, Dominique; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Zommer, Nadège; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Breton, Christophe; Pigny, Pascal; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Staels, Bart; Hamdane, Malika; Tailleux, Anne; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2013-01-01

    The τ pathology found in Alzheimer disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Midlife development of obesity, a major risk factor of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, increases the risk of dementia and AD later in life. The impact of obesity on AD risk has been suggested to be related to central insulin resistance, secondary to peripheral insulin resistance. The effects of diet-induced obesity (DIO) on τ pathology remain unknown. In this study, we evaluated effects of a high-fat diet, given at an early pathological stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like τ pathology. We found that early and progressive obesity potentiated spatial learning deficits as well as hippocampal τ pathology at a later stage. Surprisingly, THY-Tau22 mice did not exhibit peripheral insulin resistance. Further, pathological worsening occurred while hippocampal insulin signaling was upregulated. Together, our data demonstrate that DIO worsens τ phosphorylation and learning abilities in τ transgenic mice independently from peripheral/central insulin resistance. PMID:23250356

  13. Dietary fat and gut microbiota interactions determine diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kübeck, Raphaela; Bonet-Ripoll, Catalina; Hoffmann, Christina; Walker, Alesia; Müller, Veronika Maria; Schüppel, Valentina Luise; Lagkouvardos, Ilias; Scholz, Birgit; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Daniel, Hannelore; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Haller, Dirk; Clavel, Thomas; Klingenspor, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Gut microbiota may promote positive energy balance; however, germfree mice can be either resistant or susceptible to diet-induced obesity (DIO) depending on the type of dietary intervention. We here sought to identify the dietary constituents that determine the susceptibility to body fat accretion in germfree (GF) mice. GF and specific pathogen free (SPF) male C57BL/6N mice were fed high-fat diets either based on lard or palm oil for 4 wks. Mice were metabolically characterized at the end of the feeding trial. FT-ICR-MS and UPLC-TOF-MS were used for cecal as well as hepatic metabolite profiling and cecal bile acids quantification, respectively. Hepatic gene expression was examined by qRT-PCR and cecal gut microbiota of SPF mice was analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing. GF mice, but not SPF mice, were completely DIO resistant when fed a cholesterol-rich lard-based high-fat diet, whereas on a cholesterol-free palm oil-based high-fat diet, DIO was independent of gut microbiota. In GF lard-fed mice, DIO resistance was conveyed by increased energy expenditure, preferential carbohydrate oxidation, and increased fecal fat and energy excretion. Cecal metabolite profiling revealed a shift in bile acid and steroid metabolites in these lean mice, with a significant rise in 17β-estradiol, which is known to stimulate energy expenditure and interfere with bile acid metabolism. Decreased cecal bile acid levels were associated with decreased hepatic expression of genes involved in bile acid synthesis. These metabolic adaptations were largely attenuated in GF mice fed the palm-oil based high-fat diet. We propose that an interaction of gut microbiota and cholesterol metabolism is essential for fat accretion in normal SPF mice fed cholesterol-rich lard as the main dietary fat source. This is supported by a positive correlation between bile acid levels and specific bacteria of the order Clostridiales (phylum Firmicutes) as a characteristic feature of normal SPF mice

  14. Triterpene alcohols and sterols from rice bran lower postprandial glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide release and prevent diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Daisuke; Okahara, Fumiaki; Hashizume, Kohjiro; Yanagawa, Kiyotaka; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is now a worldwide health problem. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is a gut hormone that is secreted following the ingestion of food and modulates energy metabolism. Previous studies reported that lowering diet-induced GIP secretion improved energy homeostasis in animals and humans, and attenuated diet-induced obesity in mice. Therefore, food-derived GIP regulators may be used in the development of foods that prevent obesity. Rice bran oil and its components are known to have beneficial effects on health. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of the oil-soluble components of rice bran on postprandial GIP secretion and obesity in mice. Triterpene alcohols [cycloartenol (CA) and 24-methylene cycloartanol (24Me)], β-sitosterol, and campesterol decreased the diet-induced secretion of GIP in C57BL/6J mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet supplemented with a triterpene alcohol and sterol preparation (TASP) from rice bran for 23 wk gained less weight than control mice. Indirect calorimetry revealed that fat utilization was higher in TASP-fed mice than in control mice. Fatty acid oxidation-related gene expression in the muscles of mice fed a TASP-supplemented diet was enhanced, whereas fatty acid synthesis-related gene expression in the liver was suppressed. The treatment of HepG2 cells with CA and 24Me decreased the gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c. In conclusion, we clarified for the first time that triterpene alcohols and sterols from rice bran prevented diet-induced obesity by increasing fatty acid oxidation in muscles and decreasing fatty acid synthesis in the liver through GIP-dependent and GIP-independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Improvement in the high-fat diet-induced dyslipidemia and adiponectin levels by fish oil feeding combined with food restriction in obese KKAy mice.

    PubMed

    Wakutsu, Masaki; Tsunoda, Nobuyo; Mochi, Yasuki; Numajiri, Mitsuki; Shiba, Sachiko; Muraki, Etsuko; Kasono, Keizo

    2012-01-01

    The effect on weight reduction of fish oil combined with food restriction in comparison with that of beef tallow was investigated in high-fat diet-induced obese KKAy mice. Although the reduction of body and white adipose tissue weight was similar in the two groups, fish oil increased adiponectin levels in the plasma, improved dyslipidemia accompanied by suppression of lipid synthesis in the liver when compared with beef tallow.

  16. HPMC supplementation reduces abdominal fat content, intestinal permeability, inflammation, and insulin resistance in diet-induced obese mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a highly viscous non-fermentable soluble dietary fiber, were evaluated on adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in diet induced obese (DIO) mice fed a high fat (HF) diet supplemented with either HPMC or insoluble fiber. DIO C57BL/6J m...

  17. Popular edible seaweed, Gelidium amansii prevents against diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Seo-Young; Lima, Inês S; Ko, Seok-Chun; Kim, Young-Tae; Kim, Young-Bum; Jeung, Hee-Do; Choi, Kwang-Sik; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The popular edible seaweed, Gelidium amansii is broadly used as food worldwide. To determine whether G. amansii extract (GAE) has protective effects on obesity, mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) treated with GAE (1 and 3 %) were studied. After 12 weeks of GAE treatment, body weight was greatly decreased in mice fed a high-fat diet. This effect could be due to decreased adipogenesis, as evidenced by the fact that GAE suppressed adipogenic gene expression in adipocytes. In addition, blood glucose and serum insulin levels were reduced by GAE treatment in mice fed a high-fat diet, suggesting improvement in glucose metabolism. GAE supplementation also led to a significant decrease in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. These data are further confirmed by H&E staining. Our findings indicate that Gelidium amansii prevents against the development of diet-induced obesity, and further implicate that GAE supplementation could be the therapeutical option for treatment of metabolic disorder such as obesity.

  18. Leptin resistance in diet-induced obesity: the role of hypothalamic inflammation.

    PubMed

    de Git, K C G; Adan, R A H

    2015-03-01

    The consumption of Western diets, high in sugar and saturated fat, is a crucial contributor to the alarming incidence of obesity and its associated morbidities. These diets have been reported to induce an inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, which promotes the development of central leptin resistance and obesity. This inflammatory signalling involves dynamic changes in the expression and activity of several mediators of the innate immune system, including toll-like receptor 4, IκB kinase-β/nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, suppressor of cytokine signalling 3 and pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy defect. Although the exact cellular mechanisms remain incompletely understood, recent evidence suggests that the inflammatory response is at least mediated by interactions between neurons and non-neuronal cells such as microglia and astrocytes. Current evidence of the contribution of each inflammatory mediator to leptin resistance and diet-induced obesity (DIO), including their reciprocal interactions and cell-type-specific effects, is reviewed and integrated in a conceptual model. Based upon this model and pharmacological intervention studies, several inflammatory mediators are proposed to be promising therapeutic targets for the treatment of DIO.

  19. Genetic Targeting of Arginase-II in Mouse Prevents Renal Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ji; Rajapakse, Angana; Xiong, Yuyan; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Verrey, François; Ming, Xiu-Fen; Yang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced levels of the L-arginine:ureahydrolase, including the two isoenzymes arginase-I (Arg-I) and arginase-II (Arg-II) in vascular endothelial cells promote uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), leading to increased superoxide radical anion and decreased NO production thereby endothelial dysfunction. Arg-II but not Arg-I is abundantly expressed in kidney and the role of Arg-II in CKD is uncertain and controversial. We aimed to investigate the role of Arg-II in renal damage associated with diet-induced obesity mouse model. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient in Arg-II gene (Arg-II−/−) were fed with either a normal chow (NC) or a high-fat-diet (HFD) for 14 weeks (starting at the age of 7 weeks) to induce obesity. In WT mice, HFD feeding caused frequent renal lipid accumulation, enhancement of renal reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels which could be attenuated by a NOS inhibitor, suggesting uncoupling of NOS in kidney. HFD feeding also significantly augmented renal Arg-II expression and activity. All the alterations in the kidney under HFD feeding were reduced in Arg-II−/− mice. Moreover, mesangial expansion as analyzed by Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining and renal expression of vascular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in HFD-fed WT mouse assessed by immunoblotting were reduced in the HFD-fed Arg-II−/− mice, although there was no significant difference in body weight and renal weight/body weight ratio between the WT and Arg-II−/− mice. Thus, Arg-II expression/activity is enhanced in kidney of diet-induced obesity mice. Genetic targeting of Arg-II prevents renal damage associated with obesity, suggesting an important role of Arg-II in obesity-associated renal disease development. PMID:27920727

  20. Disruption of the sugar-sensing receptor T1R2 attenuates metabolic derangements associated with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathleen R; Hussain, Tania; Karimian Azari, Elnaz; Steiner, Jennifer L; Ayala, Julio E; Pratley, Richard E; Kyriazis, George A

    2016-04-15

    Sweet taste receptors (STRs) on the tongue mediate gustatory sweet sensing, but their expression in the gut, pancreas, and adipose tissue suggests a physiological contribution to whole body nutrient sensing and metabolism. However, little is known about the function and contribution of these sugar sensors during metabolic stress induced by overnutrition and subsequent obesity. Here, we investigated the effects of high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HF/LC) diet on glucose homeostasis and energy balance in mice with global disruption of the sweet taste receptor protein T1R2. We assessed body composition, energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and tissue-specific nutrient metabolism in T1R2 knockout (T1R2-KO) mice fed a HF/LC diet for 12 wk. HF/LC diet-fed T1R2-KO mice gained a similar amount of body mass as did WT mice, but had reduced fat mass and increased lean mass relative to WT mice. T1R2-KO mice were also hyperphagic and hyperactive. Ablation of the T1R2 sugar sensor protected mice from HF/LC diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and altered substrate utilization, including increased rates of glucose oxidation and decreased liver triglyceride (TG) accumulation, despite normal intestinal fat absorption. Finally, STRs (T1r2/T1r3) were upregulated in the adipose tissue of WT mice in response to HF/LC diet, and their expression positively correlated with fat mass and glucose intolerance. The chemosensory receptor T1R2, plays an important role in glucose homeostasis during diet-induced obesity through the regulation of yet to be identified molecular mechanisms that alter energy disposal and utilization in peripheral tissues. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Disruption of the sugar-sensing receptor T1R2 attenuates metabolic derangements associated with diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kathleen R.; Hussain, Tania; Karimian Azari, Elnaz; Steiner, Jennifer L.; Ayala, Julio E.; Pratley, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    Sweet taste receptors (STRs) on the tongue mediate gustatory sweet sensing, but their expression in the gut, pancreas, and adipose tissue suggests a physiological contribution to whole body nutrient sensing and metabolism. However, little is known about the function and contribution of these sugar sensors during metabolic stress induced by overnutrition and subsequent obesity. Here, we investigated the effects of high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HF/LC) diet on glucose homeostasis and energy balance in mice with global disruption of the sweet taste receptor protein T1R2. We assessed body composition, energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and tissue-specific nutrient metabolism in T1R2 knockout (T1R2-KO) mice fed a HF/LC diet for 12 wk. HF/LC diet-fed T1R2-KO mice gained a similar amount of body mass as did WT mice, but had reduced fat mass and increased lean mass relative to WT mice. T1R2-KO mice were also hyperphagic and hyperactive. Ablation of the T1R2 sugar sensor protected mice from HF/LC diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and altered substrate utilization, including increased rates of glucose oxidation and decreased liver triglyceride (TG) accumulation, despite normal intestinal fat absorption. Finally, STRs (T1r2/T1r3) were upregulated in the adipose tissue of WT mice in response to HF/LC diet, and their expression positively correlated with fat mass and glucose intolerance. The chemosensory receptor T1R2, plays an important role in glucose homeostasis during diet-induced obesity through the regulation of yet to be identified molecular mechanisms that alter energy disposal and utilization in peripheral tissues. PMID:26884387

  2. A Rat Model to Study the Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Radiation-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Takamitsu; Nishimura, Yukiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Akimoto, Kenta; Furukawa, Yuki; Fukushi, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-05-01

    A detailed understanding of the relationship between radiation-induced breast cancer and obesity is needed for appropriate risk management and to prevent the development of a secondary cancer in patients who have been treated with radiation. Our goal was to develop an animal model to study the relationship by combining two existing Sprague-Dawley rat models of radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis and diet-induced obesity. Female rats were fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks and categorized as obesity prone or obesity resistant based on their body weight at 7 weeks of age, at which time the rats were irradiated with 4 Gy. Control rats were fed a standard diet and irradiated at the same time and in the same manner. All rats were maintained on their initial diets and assessed for palpable mammary cancers once a week for the next 30 weeks. The obesity-prone rats were heavier than those in the other groups. The obesity-prone rats were also younger than the other animals at the first detection of mammary carcinomas and their carcinoma weights were greater. A tendency toward higher insulin and leptin blood levels were observed in the obesity-prone rats compared to the other two groups. Blood angiotensin II levels were elevated in the obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Genes related to translation and oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated in the carcinomas of obesity-prone rats. Expression profiles from human breast cancers were used to validate this animal model. As angiotensin is potentially an important factor in obesity-related morbidities and breast cancer, a second set of rats was fed in a similar manner, irradiated and then treated with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, losartan and candesartan. Neither blocker altered mammary carcinogenesis; analyses of losartan-treated animals indicated that expression of renin in the renal cortex and of Agtr1a (angiotensin II receptor, type 1) in cancer tissue was significantly upregulated, suggesting the presence of

  3. Preventing diet-induced obesity in mice by adipose tissue transformation and angiogenesis using targeted nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Xue-Qing; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity, which is recognized by the American Medical Association as a disease, has nearly doubled since 1980, and obesity-related comorbidities have become a major threat to human health. Given that adipose tissue expansion and transformation require active growth of new blood vasculature, angiogenesis offers a potential target for the treatment of obesity-associated disorders. Here we construct two peptide-functionalized nanoparticle (NP) platforms to deliver either Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARgamma) activator rosiglitazone (Rosi) or prostaglandin E2 analog (16,16-dimethyl PGE2) to adipose tissue vasculature. These NPs were engineered through self-assembly of a biodegradable triblock polymer composed of end-to-end linkages between poly(lactic-coglycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) and an endothelial-targeted peptide. In this system, released Rosi promotes both transformation of white adipose tissue (WAT) into brown-like adipose tissue and angiogenesis, which facilitates the homing of targeted NPs to adipose angiogenic vessels, thereby amplifying their delivery. We show that i.v. administration of these NPs can target WAT vasculature, stimulate the angiogenesis that is required for the transformation of adipose tissue, and transform WAT into brown-like adipose tissue, by the up-regulation of angiogenesis and brown adipose tissue markers. In a diet-induced obese mouse model, these angiogenesis-targeted NPs have inhibited body weight gain and modulated several serological markers including cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin, compared with the control group. These findings suggest that angiogenesis-targeting moieties with angiogenic stimulator-loaded NPs could be incorporated into effective therapeutic regimens for clinical treatment of obesity and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27140638

  4. Anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects of synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar on high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Beh, Boon Kee; Mohamad, Nurul Elyani; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ky, Huynh; Boo, Sook Yee; Chua, Joelle Yi Heng; Tan, Sheau Wei; Ho, Wan Yong; Sharifuddin, Shaiful Adzni; Long, Kamariah; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2017-07-27

    Recently, food-based bioactive ingredients, such as vinegar, have been proposed as a potential solution to overcome the global obesity epidemic. Although acetic acid has been identified as the main component in vinegar that contributes to its anti-obesity effect, reports have shown that vinegar produced from different starting materials possess different degrees of bioactivity. This study was performed to compare the anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory effects of synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar in mice fed a high-fat diet. In this work, mice were fed a high-fat diet for 33 weeks. At the start of week 24, obese mice were orally fed synthetic acetic acid vinegar or Nipa vinegar (0.08 and 2 ml/kg BW) until the end of week 33. Mice fed a standard pellet diet served as a control. Although both synthetic acetic acid vinegar and Nipa vinegar effectively reduced food intake and body weight, a high dose of Nipa vinegar more effectively reduced lipid deposition, improved the serum lipid profile, increased adipokine expression and suppressed inflammation in the obese mice. Thus, a high dose of Nipa vinegar may potentially alleviate obesity by altering the lipid metabolism, inflammation and gut microbe composition in high-fat-diet-induced obese mice.

  5. TRPV1 activation counters diet-induced obesity through sirtuin-1 activation and PRDM-16 deacetylation in brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, P; Krishnan, V; Fettel, K; Gao, P; Zhu, Z; Ren, J; Thyagarajan, B

    2017-05-01

    An imbalance between energy intake and expenditure leads to obesity. Increasing metabolism and thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) can help in overcoming obesity. Here, we investigated the effect of activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1 (TRPV1) in the upregulation of thermogenic proteins in BAT to counter diet-induced obesity. We investigated the effect of dietary supplementation of capsaicin (CAP) (TRPV1 agonist) on the expression of metabolically important thermogenic proteins in BAT of wild-type and TRPV1(-/-) mice that received either a normal chow or high-fat (±CAP; TRPV1 activator) diet by immunoblotting. We measured the metabolic activity, respiratory quotient and BAT lipolysis. CAP antagonized high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity without decreasing energy intake in mice. HFD suppressed TRPV1 expression and activity in BAT and CAP countered this effect. HFD-feeding caused glucose intolerance, hypercholesterolemia and decreased the plasma concentration of glucagon-like peptide-1 and CAP countered these effects. HFD suppressed the expression of metabolically important thermogenic genes, ucp-1, bmp8b, sirtuin-1 (SIRT-1), PPARγ coactivator 1α and PR domain containing zinc finger protein 16 (prdm-16) in BAT and CAP prevented this effect. CAP increased the phosphorylation of SIRT-1 and induced an interaction between peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) with PRDM-16. Further, CAP treatment, in vitro, decreased the acetylation of PRDM-16, which was antagonized by inhibition of TRPV1 by capsazepine, chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) by cell permeable BAPTA-AM or the inhibition of SIRT-1 by EX527. Further, CAP supplementation, post HFD, promoted weight loss and enhanced the respiratory exchange ratio. CAP did not have any effect in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Our data show that activation of TRPV1 in BAT enhances the expression of SIRT-1, which facilitates the deacetylation and interaction of PPARγ and PRDM-16. These

  6. Diet-Induced Overweight and Obesity and Periodontitis Risk: An Application of the Parametric G-Formula in the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Gustavo G; Peres, Marco A; Mittinty, Murthy N; Peres, Karen G; Do, Loc G; Horta, Bernardo L; Gigante, Denise P; Corrêa, Marcos B; Demarco, Flávio F

    2017-03-15

    We aimed to estimate hypothetical effects of habits (smoking, alcohol consumption, and fat and carbohydrates consumption) combined with diet-induced overweight/obesity on the risk of periodontitis. The risk of any periodontitis, moderate/severe periodontitis, and the combination of bleeding on probing (BOP) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) was estimated using the parametric g-formula in adults aged 31 years from the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort in Brazil. Individuals in this cohort have been followed since birth. Hypothetical conditions were set independently for each risk factor and in combination for the entire population. A total of 539 participants had oral examinations in 2013. The cumulative 31-year risk under no intervention was 33.3% for any periodontitis, 14.3%, for moderate/severe periodontitis, and 14.7%, for BOP and CAL. According to our statistical approach, diet-induced overweight/obesity increased the risk of all outcomes: 11% (overweight) and 22% (obesity) higher risk of periodontitis; 12% (overweight) and 27% (obesity) higher risk of moderate/severe periodontitis; 21% (overweight) and 57% (obesity) higher risk of CAL and BOP. When overweight/obesity was combined with other unhealthy habits, the risk was even greater. Our findings suggest that the combination of diet-induced obesity with other risk factors may increase the risk of periodontitis. Further research in the field is required to corroborate our study. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Effects of diet-induced obesity on colitis-associated colon tumor formation in A/J mice.

    PubMed

    Park, S-Y; Kim, J-S; Seo, Y-R; Sung, M-K

    2012-02-01

    Studies have indicated that obesity is associated with a higher risk of colorectal cancer. This study was performed to determine the effect of diet-induced obesity on the formation of azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colon tumors and to identify adiposity-related mechanisms. Male A/J mice were placed on either a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% of total calories from fat) or a normal diet (ND; 15% of calories from fat) for 12 weeks. To induce colon tumors, AOM was administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight, followed by two cycles of DSS supply. Study results indicated that the HFD group had twofold higher numbers of colonic tumors, as compared with the ND group. The HFD group also had significantly increased body weight and epididymal fat weight, which were associated with increases of serum insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, leptin, epididymal fat pad leptin mRNA and colonic leptin receptor (Ob-R) mRNA. Animals on HFD showed higher expressions of Ob-R, insulin receptor, phosphorylated Akt, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1 proteins in the colon. The results suggest that HFD-induced obesity facilitates colon tumor formation, possibly by regulating downstream targets of circulating adiposity-related factors via receptor-mediated signaling of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

  8. Suppression of GHS-R in AgRP Neurons Mitigates Diet-Induced Obesity by Activating Thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Shan; Bongmba, Odelia Y N; Yue, Jing; Lee, Jong Han; Lin, Ligen; Saito, Kenji; Pradhan, Geetali; Li, De-Pei; Pan, Hui-Lin; Xu, Allison; Guo, Shaodong; Xu, Yong; Sun, Yuxiang

    2017-04-14

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic hormone released primarily from the gut, signals the hypothalamus to stimulate growth hormone release, enhance appetite and promote weight gain. The ghrelin receptor, aka Growth Hormone Secretagogue Receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in the brain, with highest expression in Agouti-Related Peptide (AgRP) neurons of the hypothalamus. We recently reported that neuron-specific deletion of GHS-R completely prevents diet-induced obesity (DIO) in mice by activating non-shivering thermogenesis. To further decipher the specific neuronal circuits mediating the metabolic effects of GHS-R, we generated AgRP neuron-specific GHS-R knockout mice (AgRP-Cre;Ghsr(f/f)). Our data showed that GHS-R in AgRP neurons is required for ghrelin's stimulatory effects on growth hormone secretion, acute food intake and adiposity, but not for long-term total food intake. Importantly, deletion of GHS-R in AgRP neurons attenuated diet-induced obesity (DIO) and enhanced cold-resistance in mice fed high fat diet (HFD). The HFD-fed knockout mice showed increased energy expenditure, and exhibited enhanced thermogenic activation in both brown and subcutaneous fat; this implies that GHS-R suppression in AgRP neurons enhances sympathetic outflow. In summary, our results suggest that AgRP neurons are key site for GHS-R mediated thermogenesis, and demonstrate that GHS-R in AgRP neurons plays crucial roles in governing energy utilization and pathogenesis of DIO.

  9. Combinatorial gene construct and non-viral delivery for anti-obesity in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hongsuk; Cho, Sungpil; Han, Yong Hwan; Janat-Amsbury, Margit M; Boudina, Sihem; Bae, You Han

    2015-06-10

    The combinatorial peptidergic therapy of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) and leptin (LEP) analogues was once an optimistic option in treating obese animals and patients. However, the need for frequent administrations and its negative side effects prevent it from being a viable choice. Here, we developed a combinatorial gene therapy of IAPP and LEP, where two genes are inserted into a single plasmid with self-cleaving furin and 2A sites to treat diet-induced obese (DIO) mice. The developed plasmid DNA (pDNA) individually produced both IAPP and LEP peptides in vitro and in vivo. The pDNA was delivered with a non-viral polymeric carrier, and its once-a-week administrations demonstrated a synergistic loss of body weight and significant reductions of fat mass, blood glucose, and lipid levels in DIO mice. The results suggest that the combinatorial gene therapy would have higher potential than the peptidergic approach for future translation due to its improved practicability.

  10. The effects of diet induced obesity on breast cancer associated pathways in mice deficient in SFRP1.

    PubMed

    Gauger, Kelly J; Bassa, Lotfi M; Henchey, Elizabeth M; Wyman, Josephine; Ser-Dolansky, Jennifer; Shimono, Akihiko; Schneider, Sallie S

    2014-05-22

    Secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs) are a family of proteins that block the Wnt signaling pathway and loss of Sfrp1 expression is observed in breast cancer. The molecular mechanisms by which obesity contributes to breast tumorigenesis are not well defined, but involve increased inflammation. Mice deficient in Sfrp1 show enhanced mammary gland inflammation in response to diet induced obesity (DIO). Furthermore, mammary glands from Sfrp1-/- mice exhibit increased Wnt signaling, decreased cell death responses, and excessive hyper branching. The work described here was initiated to investigate whether obesity exacerbates the aforementioned pathways, as they each play a key roles in the development of breast cancer. Wnt signaling is significantly affected by DIO and Sfrp1-/- loss as revealed by analysis of Myc mRNA expression and active β-catenin protein expression. Furthermore, Sfrp1-/- mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) exhibit an increase in mammary cell proliferation. The death response is also impaired in the mammary gland of Sfrp1-/- mice fed a normal diet (ND) as well as a HFD. In response to γ-irradiation, mammary glands from Sfrp1-/- mice express significantly less Bax and Bbc3 mRNA, caspase-3 positive cells, and p53 protein. The expression of Wnt4 and Tnfs11 are critical for normal progesterone mediated mammary gland development and in response to obesity, Sfrp1-/- mice express significantly more Wnt4 and Tnfs11 mRNA expression. Evaluation of progesterone receptor (PR) expression showed that DIO increases the number of PR positive cells. Our data indicate that the expression of Sfrp1 is a critical factor required for maintaining appropriate cellular homeostasis in response to the onset of obesity.

  11. Maternal diet-induced obesity programs cardiovascular dysfunction in adult male mouse offspring independent of current body weight.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Heather L; Niu, Youguo; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Giussani, Dino A; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-10-01

    Obese pregnancies are not only associated with adverse consequences for the mother but also the long-term health of her child. Human studies have shown that individuals from obese mothers are at increased risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease (CVD), but are unable to define causality. This study aimed to determine causality using a mouse model of maternal diet-induced obesity. Obesity was induced in female C57BL/6 mice by feeding a diet rich in simple sugars and saturated fat 6 weeks prior to pregnancy and throughout pregnancy and lactation. Control females were fed laboratory chow. Male offspring from both groups were weaned onto chow and studied at 3, 5, 8, and 12 weeks of age for gross cardiac morphometry using stereology, cardiomyocyte cell area by histology, and cardiac fetal gene expression using qRT-PCR. Cardiac function was assessed by isolated Langendorff technology at 12 weeks of age and hearts were analyzed at the protein level for the expression of the β1 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic type-2 acetylcholine receptor, and proteins involved in cardiac contraction. Offspring from obese mothers develop pathologic cardiac hypertrophy associated with re-expression of cardiac fetal genes. By young adulthood these offspring developed severe systolic and diastolic dysfunction and cardiac sympathetic dominance. Importantly, cardiac dysfunction occurred in the absence of any change in corresponding body weight and despite the offspring eating a healthy low-fat diet. These findings provide a causal link to explain human observations relating maternal obesity with premature death from CVD in her offspring.

  12. Impaired intestinal afferent nerve satiety signalling and vagal afferent excitability in diet induced obesity in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Donna M; Park, Sung Jin; Valinsky, William C; Beyak, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal vagal afferents transmit satiety signals to the brain via both chemical and mechanical mechanisms. There is indirect evidence that these signals may be attenuated in obesity. We hypothesized that responses to satiety mediators and distension of the gut would be attenuated after induction of diet induced obesity. Obesity was induced by feeding a high fat diet (60% kcal from fat). Low fat fed mice (10% kcal from fat) served as a control. High fat fed mice were obese, with increased visceral fat, but were not hyperglycaemic. Recordings from jejunal afferents demonstrated attenuated responses to the satiety mediators cholecystokinin (CCK, 100 nm) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 10 μm), as was the response to low intensity jejunal distension, while responses to higher distension pressures were preserved. We performed whole cell patch clamp recordings on nodose ganglion neurons, both unlabelled, and those labelled by fast blue injection into the wall of the jejunum. The cell membrane of both labelled and unlabelled nodose ganglion neurons was less excitable in HFF mice, with an elevated rheobase and decreased number of action potentials at twice rheobase. Input resistance of HFF neurons was also significantly decreased. Calcium imaging experiments revealed reduced proportion of nodose ganglion neurons responding to CCK and 5-HT in obese mice. These results demonstrate a marked reduction in afferent sensitivity to satiety related stimuli after a chronic high fat diet. A major mechanism underlying this change is reduced excitability of the neuronal cell membrane. This may explain the development of hyperphagia when a high fat diet is consumed. Improving sensitivity of gastrointestinal afferent nerves may prove useful to limit food intake in obesity. PMID:21486762

  13. Diet-induced obesity causes innate airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and enhances ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard A; Theman, Todd A; Lu, Frank L; Terry, Raya D; Williams, Erin S; Shore, Stephanie A

    2008-06-01

    We previously reported that genetically obese mice exhibit innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and enhanced ozone (O(3))-induced pulmonary inflammation. Such genetic deficiencies in mice are rare in humans, and they may not be representative of human obesity. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary phenotype of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), which more closely mimics the cause of human obesity. Therefore, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were reared from the time of weaning until at least 30 wk of age on diets in which either 10 or 60% of the calories are derived from fat in the form of lard. Body mass was approximately 40% greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Baseline airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine, measured by forced oscillation, was greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. We also examined lung permeability and inflammation after exposure to room air or O(3) (2 parts/million for 3 h), an asthma trigger. Four hours after the exposure ended, O(3)-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, interleukin-6, KC, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10, and eotaxin were greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Innate AHR and augmented responses to O(3) were not observed in mice raised from weaning until 20-22 wk of age on a 60% fat diet. These results indicate that mice with DIO exhibit innate AHR and enhanced O(3)-induced pulmonary inflammation, similar to genetically obese mice. However, mice with DIO must remain obese for an extended period of time before this pulmonary phenotype is observed.

  14. Genetic Dissection of Tissue-Specific Apolipoprotein E Function for Hypercholesterolemia and Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tobias; Bartelt, Alexander; Schlein, Christian; Heeren, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    ApoE deficiency in mice (Apoe-/-) results in severe hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. In diet-induced obesity, Apoe-/- display steatohepatitis but reduced accumulation of triacylglycerides and enhanced insulin sensitivity in white adipose tissue (WAT). Although the vast majority of apoE is expressed by hepatocytes apoE is also abundantly expressed in WAT. As liver and adipose tissue play important roles for metabolism, this study aims to outline functions of both hepatocyte- and adipocyte-derived apoE separately by investigating a novel mouse model of tissue-specific apoE deficiency. Therefore we generated transgenic mice carrying homozygous floxed Apoe alleles. Mice lacking apoE either in hepatocytes (ApoeΔHep) or in adipose tissue (ApoeΔAT) were fed experimental diets. ApoeΔHep exhibited slightly higher body weights, adiposity and liver weights on diabetogenic high fat diet (HFD). Accordingly, hepatic steatosis and markers of inflammation were more pronounced compared to controls. Hypercholesterolemia evoked by lipoprotein remnant accumulation was present in ApoeΔHep mice fed a Western type diet (WTD). Lipidation of VLDL particles and tissue uptake of VLDL were disturbed in ApoeΔHep while the plasma clearance rate remained unaltered. ApoeΔAT did not display any detectable phenotype, neither on HFD nor on WTD. In conclusion, our novel conditional apoE deletion model has proven here the role of hepatocyte apoE for VLDL production and diet-induced dyslipidemia. Specific deletion of apoE in adipocytes cannot reproduce the adipose phenotype of global Apoe-/- mice, suggesting that apoE produced in other cell types than hepatocytes or adipocytes explains the lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype described for Apoe-/- mice.

  15. Genetic Dissection of Tissue-Specific Apolipoprotein E Function for Hypercholesterolemia and Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Schlein, Christian; Heeren, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    ApoE deficiency in mice (Apoe−/−) results in severe hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. In diet-induced obesity, Apoe−/− display steatohepatitis but reduced accumulation of triacylglycerides and enhanced insulin sensitivity in white adipose tissue (WAT). Although the vast majority of apoE is expressed by hepatocytes apoE is also abundantly expressed in WAT. As liver and adipose tissue play important roles for metabolism, this study aims to outline functions of both hepatocyte- and adipocyte-derived apoE separately by investigating a novel mouse model of tissue-specific apoE deficiency. Therefore we generated transgenic mice carrying homozygous floxed Apoe alleles. Mice lacking apoE either in hepatocytes (ApoeΔHep) or in adipose tissue (ApoeΔAT) were fed experimental diets. ApoeΔHep exhibited slightly higher body weights, adiposity and liver weights on diabetogenic high fat diet (HFD). Accordingly, hepatic steatosis and markers of inflammation were more pronounced compared to controls. Hypercholesterolemia evoked by lipoprotein remnant accumulation was present in ApoeΔHep mice fed a Western type diet (WTD). Lipidation of VLDL particles and tissue uptake of VLDL were disturbed in ApoeΔHep while the plasma clearance rate remained unaltered. ApoeΔAT did not display any detectable phenotype, neither on HFD nor on WTD. In conclusion, our novel conditional apoE deletion model has proven here the role of hepatocyte apoE for VLDL production and diet-induced dyslipidemia. Specific deletion of apoE in adipocytes cannot reproduce the adipose phenotype of global Apoe−/− mice, suggesting that apoE produced in other cell types than hepatocytes or adipocytes explains the lean and insulin-sensitive phenotype described for Apoe−/− mice. PMID:26695075

  16. Nutritional compensation to exercise- vs. diet-induced acute energy deficit in adolescents with obesity.

    PubMed

    Thivel, David; Doucet, Eric; Julian, Valérie; Cardenoux, Charlotte; Boirie, Yves; Duclos, Martine

    2017-07-01

    To compare the energy and macronutrient intake responses to equivalent energy deficits induced by diet (food restriction) and exercise in adolescents with obesity. Fourteen 12-15years old obese adolescents completed three experimental conditions (08:00am to 07:30pm) in a randomized crossover design: i) control session (CON); ii) diet-induced 25% energy depletion (Def-EI), iii) and an exercise-induced 25% energy depletion (Def-EX). The sessions order was either CON/Def-EI/Def-EX or CON/Def-EX/Def-EI as the deficit corresponded to 25% of the energy ingested at lunch on the control day (CON) and was imposed either by exercise (Def-EX) or diet (Def-EI). Ad libitum EI and macronutrients preferences were assessed at dinner and appetite sensations assessed using visual analogue scales. Mean BMI was 36.6±5.0kg/m(2) (z-BMI: 2.40±0.29). The individually calibrated 25% energy deficit represented 254±92kcal. Ad libitum EI was significantly higher during both Def-EX (971±225kcal) and Def-EI (949±246kcal) compared with CON (742±297) (p<0.05). The relative energy ingested derived from fat was significantly higher on both Def-EX (36.6±10.9%) and Def-EI (36.9±13.1%) compared with CON (21.6±7.8%) (p<0.05). The energy derived from carbohydrates was significantly lower on both Def-EX (48.3±9.0%) and Def-EI (44.4±17.3%) compare with CON (61.1±10.1%) (p<0.05). Appetite sensations were not different between conditions. The induced energy deficit was negatively correlated with the ad libitum EI difference between the exercise and the control session (EI Def-EX - EI CON) (r=-0,643 p<0.05) and positively correlated with the EI difference between the dietary restriction and the control session (EI Def-EI - EI CON) (r=0,569 p<0.05). Equicaloric exercise- or diet-induced energy deficits could lead to similar EI compensation in obese adolescents but this EI compensation might be influenced by the magnitude of the deficit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ginger extract prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice via activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ pathway.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Koichi; Hashizume, Kojiro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Minegishi, Yoshihiko; Hase, Tadashi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-10-01

    The initiation of obesity entails an imbalance wherein energy intake exceeds expenditure. Obesity is increasing in prevalence and is now a worldwide health problem. Food-derived peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) stimulators represent potential treatment options for obesity. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) was previously shown to regulate the PPARγ signaling pathway in adipocytes. In this study, we investigated the antiobesity effects of ginger in vivo and the mechanism of action in vitro. Energy expenditure was increased, and diet-induced obesity was attenuated in C57BL/6J mice treated with dietary ginger extract (GE). GE also increased the number of Type I muscle fibers, improved running endurance capacity and upregulated PPARδ-targeted gene expression in skeletal muscle and the liver. 6-Shogaol and 6-gingerol acted as specific PPARδ ligands and stimulated PPARδ-dependent gene expression in cultured human skeletal muscle myotubes. An analysis of cellular respiration revealed that pretreating cultured skeletal muscle myotubes with GE increased palmitate-induced oxygen consumption rate, which suggested an increase in cellular fatty acid catabolism. These results demonstrated that sustained activation of the PPARδ pathway with GE attenuated diet-induced obesity and improved exercise endurance capacity by increasing skeletal muscle fat catabolism. 6-Shogaol and 6-gingerol may be responsible for the regulatory effects of dietary ginger on PPARδ signaling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Global deletion of lipocalin 2 does not reverse high-fat diet-induced obesity resistance in stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 skin-specific knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Nicholas J; Burhans, Maggie S; Ade, Lacmbouh; O'Neill, Lucas M; Chen, Xiaoli; Ntambi, James M

    2014-03-14

    Over the past century, obesity has developed into a paramount health issue that affects millions of people worldwide. Obese individuals have an increased risk to develop other metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, among others. Previously we determined that mice lacking stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) enzyme specifically in the skin (SKO) were lean and protected from high-fat diet induced adiposity. Additionally, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) mRNA was found to be 27-fold higher in the skin of SKO mice compared to control mice. Given reports suggesting that Lcn2 plays a role in protection against diet-induced weight gain, adiposity and insulin resistance, we hypothesized that deletion of Lcn2 alongside the skin-specific SCD1 deficiency would diminish the obesity resistance observed in SKO mice. To test this, we developed mice lacking SCD1 expression in the skin and also lacking Lcn2 expression globally and surprisingly, these mice did not gain significantly more weight than the SKO mice under high-fat diet conditions. Therefore, we conclude that Lcn2 does not mediate the protection against high-fat diet-induced adiposity observed in SKO mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Global deletion of lipocalin 2 does not reverse high-fat diet-induced obesity resistance in stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 skin-specific knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Nicholas J.; Burhans, Maggie S.; Ade, Lacmbouh; O’Neill, Lucas M.; Chen, Xiaoli; Ntambi, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, obesity has developed into a paramount health issue that affects millions of people worldwide. Obese individuals have an increased risk to develop other metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, among others. Previously we determined that mice lacking stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) enzyme specifically in the skin (SKO) were lean and protected from high-fat diet induced adiposity. Additionally, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2) mRNA was found to be 27-fold higher in the skin of SKO mice compared to control mice. Given reports suggesting that Lcn2 plays a role in protection against diet-induced weight gain, adiposity and insulin resistance, we hypothesized that deletion of Lcn2 alongside the skin-specific SCD1 deficiency would diminish the obesity resistance observed in SKO mice. To test this, we developed mice lacking SCD1 expression in the skin and also lacking Lcn2 expression globally and surprisingly, these mice did not gain significantly more weight than the SKO mice under high-fat diet conditions. Therefore, we conclude that Lcn2 does not mediate the protection against high-fat diet-induced adiposity observed in SKO mice. PMID:24548407

  20. Intranasal leptin reduces appetite and induces weight loss in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO).

    PubMed

    Schulz, Carla; Paulus, Kerstin; Jöhren, Olaf; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to brain-mediated effects of leptin is a characteristic feature of obesity, resulting from alterations in leptin receptor signaling in hypothalamic neurons and/or transport across the blood-brain-barrier. We have shown previously, that the latter can be circumvented by intranasal (i.n.) application of leptin in lean rats. This prompted us to test i.n. leptin in animals with diet-induced obesity (DIO) as a basis for future human administration. DIO was induced in male Wistar rats by feeding a cafeteria diet for 25 or 32 wk, respectively. Consecutively, these DIO animals (seven to eight per treatment) and standard diet rats (lean) (14-15 per treatment, matched for age and diet duration) were treated with 0.1, 0.2 mg/kg leptin, or control solution i.n. daily for 4 wk before onset of dark period. Energy intake and body weight were measured daily; blood glucose, serum insulin, and leptin were measured before and after treatment. Expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. We demonstrate, for the first time, that i.n. leptin reduces appetite and induces weight loss in DIO to the same extent as in lean rats. Our findings are supported accordingly by an altered expression pattern of anorexigenic and orexigenic neuropeptides in the hypothalamus, e.g. proopiomelanocortin, cocaine and amphetamine-related transcript, neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein. It now appears clear that i.n. leptin is effectively acting in obese animals in the same fashion as in their lean counterparts. These findings now clearly warrant studies in humans and may open new perspectives in the treatment of obesity.

  1. Decreased plasma levels of ceruloplasmin after diet-induced weight loss in obese women.

    PubMed

    Tajik, N; Golpaie, A; Keshavarz, S A; Djalali, M; Sehat, M; Masoudkabir, F; Ahmadivand, Z; Fatehi, F; Zare, M; Yazdani, T

    2012-06-01

    Plasma ceruloplasmin (Cp) has been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and also to be associated with obesity. However, it is not known whether weight loss could decrease the plasma Cp levels. To investigate the effect of diet-induced weight loss on plasma Cp in obese women. Sixty-seven healthy obese women [age =33.4±8.7 yr, body mass index (BMI) =36.0±4.8 kg/m2] were entered into a medically supervised program aimed at reducing body weight by 10% or more. Weight loss was achieved through a diet providing a daily energy deficit of 500-1000 kcal/day. In addition, all patients were prescribed to use 50 g of a fiber supplement per day. For all subjects, assessment of dietary intake, anthropometric indices, and plasma levels of C-reactive protein and Cp was performed at the first visit and repeated at 12th week of follow-up. By completing the program, weight (Δ=-9.5%, p<0.0001), BMI (Δ=-9.7%, p<0.0001), waist-circumference (Δ=-6.1%, p<0.0001), and triceps skinfold thickness (Δ=-14.9%, p<0.0001) significantly decreased. Plasma Cp significantly decreased after 12 weeks of dietary intervention (33.6±5.6 mg/dl vs 25.2±5.8 mg/dl, p<0.0001). Percent change in Cp was correlated with percent change in waist-circumference (r=446, p=0.015). Our study suggests that an improved body composition induced by restriction of energy intake is associated with decreased serum concentrations of Cp in obese women which in turn might have reduced the subjects' risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

  2. Fucoidan prevents high-fat diet-induced obesity in animals by suppression of fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ja; Jeon, Joseph; Lee, Jin-Sil

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the antiobesity effects of fucoidan in an animal model of diet-induced obesity. Mice were fed a standard diet or high-fat diet (HFD) for 5 weeks. After that, the mice were divided into four experimental groups, with 10 mice per group, including a standard diet group, HFD group, HFD containing 1% fucoidan (HFD + FUCO 1%) group and HFD containing 2% fucoidan (HFD + FUCO 2%) group. The fucoidan supplementation group had significantly decreased body-weight gain, food efficiency ratio and relative liver and epididymal fat mass compared with the HFD group. The mice supplemented with fucoidan showed significantly reduced triglyceride, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels in the plasma. Liver steatosis induced by the HFD improved in the fucoidan-supplemented group. Furthermore, fucoidan affected the down-regulation expression patterns of epididymal adipose tissue genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, adipose-specific fatty acid binding protein and acetyl CoA carboxylase. Therefore, fucoidan may be considered for use in improving obesity.

  3. Astrocytic leptin-receptor knockout mice show partial rescue of leptin resistance in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Jayaram, Bhavaani; Pan, Weihong; Wang, Yuping; Hsuchou, Hung; Mace, Aurelien; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine G; Mishra, Pramod K; Koza, Robert A; Kastin, Abba J

    2013-03-15

    To determine how astrocytic leptin signaling regulates the physiological response of mice to diet-induced obesity (DIO), we performed metabolic analyses and hypothalamic leptin signaling assays on astrocytic leptin-receptor knockout (ALKO) mice in which astrocytes lack functional leptin receptor (ObR) signaling. ALKO mice and wild-type (WT) littermate controls were studied at different stages of DIO with measurement of body wt, percent fat, metabolic activity, and biochemical parameters. When fed regular chow, the ALKO mice had similar body wt, percent fat, food intake, heat dissipation, respiratory exchange ratio, and activity as their WT littermates. There was no change in blood concentrations of triglyceride, soluble leptin receptor (sObR), mRNA for leptin and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in adipose tissue, and insulin sensitivity. Unexpectedly, in response to a high-fat diet the ALKO mice had attenuated hyperleptinemia and sObR, a lower level of leptin mRNA in subcutaneous fat, and a paradoxical increase in UCP1 mRNA. Thus, ALKO mice did not show the worsening of obesity that occurs with normal WT mice and the neuronal ObR mutation that results in morbid obesity. The findings are consistent with a competing, counterregulatory model between neuronal and astrocytic leptin signaling.

  4. Regulation of adipose tissue T cell subsets by Stat3 is crucial for diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Priceman, Saul J; Kujawski, Maciej; Shen, Shudan; Cherryholmes, Gregory A; Lee, Heehyoung; Zhang, Chunyan; Kruper, Laura; Mortimer, Joanne; Jove, Richard; Riggs, Arthur D; Yu, Hua

    2013-08-06

    Dysregulated inflammation in adipose tissue, marked by increased proinflammatory T-cell accumulation and reduced regulatory T cells (Tregs), contributes to obesity-associated insulin resistance. The molecular mechanisms underlying T-cell-mediated inflammation in adipose tissue remain largely unknown, however. Here we show a crucial role for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in T cells in skewing adaptive immunity in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), thereby contributing to diet-induced obesity (DIO) and insulin resistance. Stat3 activity is elevated in obese VAT and in VAT-resident T cells. Functional ablation of Stat3 in T cells reduces DIO, improves insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, and suppresses VAT inflammation. Importantly, Stat3 ablation reverses the high Th1/Treg ratio in VAT of DIO mice that is likely secondary to elevated IL-6 production, leading in turn to suppression of Tregs. In addition, Stat3 in T cells in DIO mice affects adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and M2 phenotype. Our study identifies Stat3 in VAT-resident T cells as an important mediator and direct target for regulating adipose tissue inflammation, DIO, and its associated metabolic dysfunctions.

  5. Chronic Repression of mTOR Complex 2 Induces Changes in the Gut Microbiota of Diet-induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Mi-Ja; Lee, Jina; Shin, Na-Ri; Kim, Min-Soo; Hyun, Dong-Wook; Yun, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Pil Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the gut microbiota play a crucial role in host physiology and metabolism; however, the molecular pathways underlying these changes in diet-induced obesity are unclear. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is associated with metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Therefore, we examined whether changes in the regulation of mTOR signaling induced by diet (a high-fat diet [HFD] or normal-chow diet) and/or therapeutics (resveratrol [a specific inhibitor of mTOR complex 1] or rapamycin [an inhibitor of both mTOR complex 1 and 2]) altered the composition of the gut microbiota in mice. Oral administration of resveratrol prevented glucose intolerance and fat accumulation in HFD-fed mice, whereas rapamycin significantly impaired glucose tolerance and exacerbated intestinal inflammation. The abundance of Lactococcus, Clostridium XI, Oscillibacter, and Hydrogenoanaerobacterium increased under the HFD condition; however, the abundance of these species declined after resveratrol treatment. Conversely, the abundance of unclassified Marinilabiliaceae and Turicibacter decreased in response to a HFD or rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrated that changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota induced by changes in mTOR activity correlate with obese and diabetic phenotypes. PMID:27471110

  6. Oral Administration of Alkylglycerols Differentially Modulates High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingshun; Sun, Shuna; Tang, Ning; Cai, Wei; Qian, Linxi

    2013-01-01

    Alkylglycerols (AKGs) from shark liver oil (SLO) were demonstrated to have strong potency to stimulate immune response. However, no study has been conducted on the effects of AKGs on diet-induced obesity and metabolic inflammatory disorder. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of two AKGs isoforms on obesity and insulin resistance in mice fed high-fat (HF) diet. Forty-eight C57BL/6 mice were divided into normal, HF, HF + 20 mg/kg selachyl alcohol (SA), HF + 200 mg/kg SA, HF + 20 mg/kg batyl alcohol (BA), and HF + 200 mg/kg BA groups. Body weight, fasting glucose, lipids, insulin and leptin levels, serum IL-1β, and TNF-α levels were compared among different groups. Our results showed that high-dose SA decreased body weight, serum triglyceride, cholesterol, fasting glucose level, insulin level, and serum leptin level of the HF fed mice, while high-dose BA increased fasting insulin level of the HF fed mice. Pretreatment of primary adipocytes with 10 μM SA or BA differentially modulates LPS-mediated MAPK and NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrated that oral administration of AKGs has differential effects on HF-induced obesity and metabolic inflammatory disorder in mice. PMID:23864898

  7. Phlorizin Supplementation Attenuates Obesity, Inflammation, and Hyperglycemia in Diet-Induced Obese Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Kyung; Cho, Su-Jung; Jung, Un Ju; Ryu, Ri; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-02-16

    Obesity, along with its related complications, is a serious health problem worldwide. Many studies reported the anti-diabetic effect of phlorizin, while little is known about its anti-obesity effect. We investigated the beneficial effects of phlorizin on obesity and its complications, including diabetes and inflammation in obese animal. Male C57BL/6J mice were divided into three groups and fed their respective experimental diets for 16 weeks: a normal diet (ND, 5% fat, w/w), high-fat diet (HFD, 20% fat, w/w), or HFD supplemented with phlorizin (PH, 0.02%, w/w). The findings revealed that the PH group had significantly decreased visceral and total white adipose tissue (WAT) weights, and adipocyte size compared to the HFD. Plasma and hepatic lipids profiles also improved in the PH group. The decreased levels of hepatic lipids in PH were associated with decreased activities of enzymes involved in hepatic lipogenesis, cholesterol synthesis and esterification. The PH also suppressed plasma pro-inflammatory adipokines levels such as leptin, adipsin, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interferon-γ, and interleukin-6, and prevented HFD-induced collagen accumulation in the liver and WAT. Furthermore, the PH supplementation also decreased plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels. In conclusion, phlorizin is beneficial for preventing diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis, as well as insulin resistance.

  8. The kielin/chordin-like protein (KCP) attenuates high-fat diet-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Soofi, Abdul; Wolf, Katherine I; Emont, Margo P; Qi, Nathan; Martinez-Santibanez, Gabriel; Grimley, Edward; Ostwani, Wesam; Dressler, Gregory R

    2017-06-02

    Obesity and its associated complications such as insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are reaching epidemic proportions. In mice, the TGF-β superfamily is implicated in the regulation of white and brown adipose tissue differentiation. The kielin/chordin-like protein (KCP) is a secreted regulator of the TGF-β superfamily pathways that can inhibit both TGF-β and activin signals while enhancing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. However, KCP's effects on metabolism and obesity have not been studied in animal models. Therefore, we examined the effects of KCP loss or gain of function in mice that were maintained on either a regular or a high-fat diet. KCP loss sensitized the mice to obesity and associated complications such as glucose intolerance and adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis. In contrast, transgenic mice that expressed KCP in the kidney, liver, and adipose tissues were resistant to developing high-fat diet-induced obesity and had significantly reduced white adipose tissue. Moreover, KCP overexpression shifted the pattern of SMAD signaling in vivo, increasing the levels of phospho (P)-SMAD1 and decreasing P-SMAD3. Adipocytes in culture showed a cell-autonomous effect in response to added TGF-β1 or BMP7. Metabolic profiling indicated increased energy expenditure in KCP-overexpressing mice and reduced expenditure in the KCP mutants with no effect on food intake or activity. These findings demonstrate that shifting the TGF-β superfamily signaling with a secreted protein can alter the physiology and thermogenic properties of adipose tissue to reduce obesity even when mice are fed a high-fat diet. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Meta-Chlorophenylpiperazine enhances leptin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most forms of human obesity are characterized by impaired leptin sensitivity and, therefore, the effectiveness of anti-obesity leptin therapy in these leptin-resistant obese patients is marginal. Hence, the development of strategies to increase leptin sensitivity is of high priority in the field of ...

  10. Early intake of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids preserves brain structure and function in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Arnoldussen, Ilse A C; Zerbi, Valerio; Wiesmann, Maximilian; Noordman, Rikko H J; Bolijn, Simone; Mutsaers, Martina P C; Dederen, Pieter J W C; Kleemann, Robert; Kooistra, Teake; van Tol, Eric A F; Gross, Gabriele; Schoemaker, Marieke H; Heerschap, Arend; Wielinga, Peter Y; Kiliaan, Amanda J

    2016-04-01

    Worldwide, the incidence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate, and the number of children with obesity is especially worrisome. These developments raise concerns about the physical, psychosocial and cognitive consequences of obesity. It was shown that early dietary intake of arachidonic acid (ARA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can reduce the detrimental effects of later obesogenic feeding on lipid metabolism and adipogenesis in an animal model of mild obesity. In the present study, the effects of early dietary ARA and DHA on cognition and brain structure were examined in mildly obesogenic ApoE*3Leiden mouse model. We used cognitive tests and neuroimaging during early and later life. During their early development after weaning (4-13weeks of age), mice were fed a chow diet or ARA and DHA diet for 8 weeks and then switched to a high-fat and high-carbohydrate (HFHC) diet for 12weeks (14-26weeks of age). An HFHC-diet led to increased energy storage in white adipose tissue, increased cholesterol levels, decreased triglycerides levels, increased cerebral blood flow and decreased functional connectivity between brain regions as well as cerebrovascular and gray matter integrity. ARA and DHA intake reduced the HFHC-diet-induced increase in body weight, attenuated plasma triglycerides levels and improved cerebrovasculature, gray matter integrity and functional connectivity in later life. In conclusion, an HFHC diet causes adverse structural brain and metabolic adaptations, most of which can be averted by dietary ARA and DHA intake early in life supporting metabolic flexibility and cerebral integrity later in life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. IgG against specific bacterial antigens in obese patients with diabetes and in mice with diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Nadeem; Tang, Lihua; Jahangiri, Anisa; de Villiers, Willem; Eckhardt, Erik

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE High fat diets increase the risk for insulin resistance by promoting inflammation. The cause of inflammation is unclear, but germfree mouse studies have implicated commensal gut bacteria. We tested whether diet-induced obesity, diabetes, and inflammation are associated with anti-bacterial IgG. MATERIALS/METHODS Blood from lean and obese healthy volunteers or obese patients with diabetes were analyzed by ELISA for IgG against extracts of potentially pathogenic and pro-biotic strains of Escherichia coli (LF-82 and Nissle), Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and for circulating Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα). C57Bl/6 mice were fed low- or high- fat diets (10 or 60% kcal from fat) for 10 weeks and tested for anti-bacterial IgG, bodyweight, fasting glucose, and inflammation. RESULTS Obese diabetic patients had significantly more IgG against extracts of E. coli LF-82 compared with lean controls, whereas IgG against extracts of the other bacteria was unchanged. Circulating TNFα was elevated and correlated with IgG against the LF-82 extract. Mice fed high-fat diets had increased fasting glucose levels, elevated TNFα and neutrophils, and significantly more IgG against the LF-82 extracts. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes in obesity is characterized by increased IgG against specific bacterial antigens. Specific commensal bacteria may mediate inflammatory effects of high-fat diets. PMID:22424821

  12. Effects of chronic exercise on the endocannabinoid system in Wistar rats with high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Gamelin, François-Xavier; Aucouturier, Julien; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Mazzarella, Enrico; Aveta, Teresa; Leriche, Melissa; Dupont, Erwan; Cieniewski-Bernard, Caroline; Montel, Valérie; Bastide, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Heyman, Elsa

    2016-06-01

    The endocannabinoid system is dysregulated during obesity in tissues involved in the control of food intake and energy metabolism. We examined the effect of chronic exercise on the tissue levels of endocannabinoids (eCBs) and on the expression of genes coding for cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) (Cnr1 and Cnr2, respectively) in the subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissues and in the soleus and extensor digitorim longus (EDL) muscles, in rats fed with standard or high-fat diet. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were placed on high-fat diet or standard diet (HFD and Ctl groups, respectively) during 12 weeks whereafter half of each group was submitted to an exercise training period of 12 weeks (HFD + training and Ctl + training). Tissue levels of eCBs were measured by LC-MS while expressions of genes coding for CB1 and CB2 receptors were investigated by qPCR. High-fat diet induced an increase in anandamide (AEA) levels in soleus and EDL (p < 0.02). In soleus of the HFD group, these changes were accompanied by elevated Cnr1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels (p < 0.05). In EDL, exercise training allowed to reduce significantly this diet-induced AEA increase (p < 0.005). 2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) levels were decreased and increased by high-fat diet in SAT and EDL, respectively (p < 0.04), but not affected by exercise training. Unlike the HFD + training group, 2-AG levels in soleus were also decreased in the HFD group compared to Ctl (p < 0.04). The levels of eCBs and Cnr1 expression are altered in a tissue-specific manner following a high-fat diet, and chronic exercise reverses some of these alterations.

  13. Differential effects of prenatal stress on metabolic programming in diet-induced obese and dietary-resistant rats

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Varde, Pratibha A.; Abdallah, Simon Labib; Najjar, Sonia M.; MohanKumar, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Stress during pregnancy is a known contributing factor for the development of obesity in the offspring. Since maternal obesity is on the rise, we wanted to identify the effects of prenatal stress in the offspring of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and compare them with the offspring of dietary-resistant (DR) rats. We hypothesized that prenatal stress would make both DIO and DR offspring susceptible to obesity, but the effect would be more pronounced in DIO rats. Pregnant DIO and DR rats were divided into two groups: nonstressed controls (control) and prenatal stress (subjected to restraint stress, three times/day from days 14 to 21 of gestation). After recording birth weight and weaning weight, male offspring were weaned onto a chow diet for 9 wk and shifted to a high-fat (HF) diet for 1 wk. At the end of the 10th wk the animals were euthanized, and visceral adipose mass, blood glucose, serum insulin, and C-peptide levels were measured. Prenatal stress resulted in hyperinsulinemia and higher C-peptide levels without altering caloric intake, body weight gain, or fat mass in the DIO offspring after 1 wk of HF intake, but not in DR offspring. To determine the mechanism underlying the hyperinsulinemia, we measured the levels of CEACAM1 that are responsible for insulin clearance. CEACAM1 levels in the liver were reduced in prenatally stressed DIO offspring after the HF challenge, suggesting that preexisting genetic predisposition in combination with prenatal stress increases the risk for obesity in adulthood, especially when offspring are fed a HF diet. PMID:26219866

  14. Diet-induced obesity severely impairs myelinated aortic baroreceptor reflex responses.

    PubMed

    McCully, Belinda H; Brooks, Virginia L; Andresen, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) attenuates the arterial cardiac baroreceptor reflex, but the mechanisms and sites of action are unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that DIO impairs central aortic baroreceptor pathways. Normal chow control (CON) and high-fat-chow obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) rats were anesthetized (inactin, 120 mg/kg) and underwent sinoaortic denervation. The central end of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN) was electrically stimulated to generate frequency-dependent baroreflex curves (5-100 Hz) during selective activation of myelinated (A-fiber) or combined (A- and C-fiber) ADN baroreceptors. A mild stimulus (1 V) that activates only A-fiber ADN baroreceptors induced robust, frequency-dependent depressor and bradycardic responses in CON and OR rats, but these responses were completely abolished in OP rats. Maximal activation of A fibers (3 V) elicited frequency-dependent reflexes in all groups, but a dramatic deficit was still present in OP rats. Activation of all ADN baroreceptors (20 V) evoked even larger reflex responses. Depressor responses were nearly identical among groups, but OP rats still exhibited attenuated bradycardia. In separate groups of rats, the reduced heart rate (HR) response to maximal activation of ADN A fibers (3 V) persisted in OP rats following pharmacological blockade of β(1)-adrenergic or muscarinic receptors, suggesting deficits in both parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) reflex pathways. However, the bradycardic responses to direct efferent vagal stimulation were similar among groups. Taken together, our data suggest that DIO severely impairs the central processing of myelinated aortic baroreceptor control of HR, including both PNS and SNS components.

  15. High fat diet-induced obesity modifies the methylation pattern of leptin promoter in rats.

    PubMed

    Milagro, F I; Campión, J; García-Díaz, D F; Goyenechea, E; Paternain, L; Martínez, J A

    2009-03-01

    Leptin is an adipokine involved in body weight and food intake regulation whose promoter region presents CpG islands that could be subject to dynamic methylation. This methylation process could be affected by environmental (e.g. diet) or endogenous (e.g., adipocyte differentiation, inflammation, hypoxia) factors, and could influence adipocyte leptin gene expression. The aim of this article was to study whether a high-energy diet may affect leptin gene promoter methylation in rats. A group of eleven male Wistar rats were assigned into two dietary groups, one fed on a control diet for 11 weeks and the other on a high-fat cafeteria diet. Rats fed a high-energy diet become overweight and hyperleptinemic as compared to the controls. DNA isolated from retroperitoneal adipocytes was treated with bisulfite and a distal portion of leptin promoter (from -694 to -372 bp) including 13 CpG sites was amplified by PCR and sequenced. The studied promoter portion was slightly more methylated in the cafeteria-fed animals, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05) for one of the CpG sites (located at the position -443). In obese rats, such methylation was associated to lower circulating leptin levels, suggesting that this position could be important in the regulation of leptin gene expression, probably by being a target sequence of different transcription factors. Our findings reveal, for the first time, that leptin methylation pattern can be influenced by diet-induced obesity, and suggest that epigenetic mechanisms could be involved in obesity by regulating the expression of important epiobesigenic genes.

  16. Calorie-induced ER stress suppresses uroguanylin satiety signaling in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, G W; Lin, J E; Snook, A E; Aing, A S; Merlino, D J; Li, P; Waldman, S A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: The uroguanylin-GUCY2C gut–brain axis has emerged as one component regulating feeding, energy homeostasis, body mass and metabolism. Here, we explore a role for this axis in mechanisms underlying diet-induced obesity (DIO). Subjects/Methods: Intestinal uroguanylin expression and secretion, and hypothalamic GUCY2C expression and anorexigenic signaling, were quantified in mice on high-calorie diets for 14 weeks. The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in suppressing uroguanylin in DIO was explored using tunicamycin, an inducer of ER stress, and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a chemical chaperone that inhibits ER stress. The impact of consumed calories on uroguanylin expression was explored by dietary manipulation. The role of uroguanylin in mechanisms underlying obesity was examined using Camk2a-Cre-ERT2-Rosa-STOPloxP/loxP-Guca2b mice in which tamoxifen induces transgenic hormone expression in brain. Results: DIO suppressed intestinal uroguanylin expression and eliminated its postprandial secretion into the circulation. DIO suppressed uroguanylin through ER stress, an effect mimicked by tunicamycin and blocked by TUDCA. Hormone suppression by DIO reflected consumed calories, rather than the pathophysiological milieu of obesity, as a diet high in calories from carbohydrates suppressed uroguanylin in lean mice, whereas calorie restriction restored uroguanylin in obese mice. However, hypothalamic GUCY2C, enriched in the arcuate nucleus, produced anorexigenic signals mediating satiety upon exogenous agonist administration, and DIO did not impair these responses. Uroguanylin replacement by transgenic expression in brain repaired the hormone insufficiency and reconstituted satiety responses opposing DIO and its associated comorbidities, including visceral adiposity, glucose intolerance and hepatic steatosis. Conclusions: These studies reveal a novel pathophysiological mechanism contributing to obesity in which calorie-induced suppression

  17. Bovine milk oligosaccharides decrease gut permeability and improve inflammation and microbial dysbiosis in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Boudry, Gaëlle; Hamilton, M Kristina; Chichlowski, Maciej; Wickramasinghe, Saumya; Barile, Daniela; Kalanetra, Karen M; Mills, David A; Raybould, Helen E

    2017-01-25

    Obesity is characterized by altered gut homeostasis, including dysbiosis and increased gut permeability closely linked to the development of metabolic disorders. Milk oligosaccharides are complex sugars that selectively enhance the growth of specific beneficial bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract and could be used as prebiotics. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the effects of bovine milk oligosaccharides (BMO) and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. infantis (B. infantis) on restoring diet-induced obesity intestinal microbiota and barrier function defects in mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a Western diet (WD, 40% fat/kcal) or normal chow (C, 14% fat/kcal) for 7 wk. During the final 2 wk of the study, the diet of a subgroup of WD-fed mice was supplemented with BMO (7% wt/wt). Weekly gavage of B. infantis was performed in all mice starting at wk 3, yet B. infantis could not be detected in any luminal contents when mice were killed. Supplementation of the WD with BMO normalized the cecal and colonic microbiota with increased abundance of Lactobacillus compared with both WD and C mice and restoration of Allobaculum and Ruminococcus levels to that of C mice. The BMO supplementation reduced WD-induced increase in paracellular and transcellular flux in the large intestine as well as mRNA levels of the inflammatory marker tumor necrosis factor α. In conclusion, BMO are promising prebiotics to modulate gut microbiota and intestinal barrier function for enhanced health.

  18. Effects of a nonnutritive sweetener on body adiposity and energy metabolism in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Mitsutomi, Kimihiko; Masaki, Takayuki; Shimasaki, Takanobu; Gotoh, Koro; Chiba, Seiichi; Kakuma, Tetsuya; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    Nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) have been studied in terms of their potential roles in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and related metabolic disorders. Several studies have suggested that NNSs have several specific effects on metabolism such as reduced postprandial hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. However, the detailed effects of NNSs on body adiposity and energy metabolism have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the effects of an NNS on energy metabolism in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO). DIO mice were divided into NNS-administered (4% NNS in drinking water), sucrose-administered (33% sucrose in drinking water), and control (normal water) groups. After supplementation for 4 weeks, metabolic parameters, including uncoupling protein (UCP) levels and energy expenditure, were assessed. Sucrose supplementation increased hyperglycemia, body adiposity, and body weight compared to the NNS-administered and control groups (P<0.05 for each). In addition, NNS supplementation decreased hyperglycemia compared to the sucrose-administered group (P<0.05). Interestingly, NNS supplementation increased body adiposity, which was accompanied by hyperinsulinemia, compared to controls (P<0.05 for each). NNS also increased leptin levels in white adipose tissue and triglyceride levels in tissues compared to controls (P<0.05 for each). Notably, compared to controls, NNS supplementation decreased the UCP1 level in brown adipose tissue and decreased O2 consumption in the dark phase. NNSs may be good sugar substitutes for people with hyperglycemia, but appear to influence