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Sample records for dietary deficiency induces

  1. Dietary protein deficiency induces osteoporosis in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Bourrin, S; Toromanoff, A; Ammann, P; Bonjour, J P; Rizzoli, R

    2000-08-01

    Low dietary intake is common in elderly males with low femoral neck areal bone mineral density (BMD). To evaluate the selective influence of a low-protein diet in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in males and to uncover early and late adaptation of bone cells to protein deficiency, 8-month-old male rats were pair-fed a control (15% casein) or isocaloric low-protein (2.5% casein) diet for 1 or 7 months. BMD, bone ultimate strength, stiffness, and absorbed energy were measured in tibia proximal metaphysis and diaphysis. After double-labeling, histomorphometric analysis was performed at the same sites. Serum osteocalcin, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and urinary deoxypyridinoline excretion were measured. In proximal tibia, isocaloric low-protein diet significantly decreases BMD (12%), cancellous bone mass (71%), and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th; 30%), resulting in a significant reduction in ultimate strength (27%). In cortical middiaphysis, a low-protein diet decreases BMD (9%) and enlarges the medullary cavity (36%), leading to cortical thinning and lower mechanical strength (20%). In cancellous bone, protein deficiency transiently depresses the bone formation rate (BFR; 60%), osteoid seam thickness (15%), and mineral apposition rate (MAR; 20%), indicating a decrease in osteoblast recruitment and activity. Cortical loss (15%) results from an imbalance between endosteal modeling drifts with impaired BFR (70%). From the first week of protein deficiency, osteocalcin and IGF-I levels drop significantly. Bone resorption activity and urinary deoxypyridinoline remain unchanged throughout the experiment. Protein deficiency in aged male rats induces cortical and trabecular thinning, and decreases bone strength, in association with a remodeling imbalance with a bone formation impairment and a decrease in IGF-I levels.

  2. DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED MICRONUCLEUS FORMATION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory


    Dietary folate deficiency enhances arsenic-induced micronucleus formation in mice.

    Folate deficiency increases background levels ofDNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary...

  3. DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED MICRONUCLEUS FORMATION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory


    Dietary folate deficiency enhances arsenic-induced micronucleus formation in mice.

    Folate deficiency increases background levels ofDNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary...

  4. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Exaggerates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice: Involvement of Intrahepatic and Extrahepatic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency. PMID:24155903

  5. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerates ethanol-induced liver injury in mice: involvement of intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Yantao; Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency.

  6. Dietary zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the development of preneoplastic lesions in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romualdo, Guilherme Ribeiro; Goto, Renata Leme; Henrique Fernandes, Ana Angélica; Cogliati, Bruno; Barbisan, Luis Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Although there is a concomitance of zinc deficiency and high incidence/mortality for hepatocellular carcinoma in certain human populations, there are no experimental studies investigating the modifying effects of zinc on hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation alter the development of hepatocellular preneoplastic lesions (PNL). Therefore, neonatal male Balb/C mice were submitted to a diethylnitrosamine/2-acetylaminefluorene-induced hepatocarcinogenesis model. Moreover, mice were fed adequate (35 mg/kg diet), deficient (3 mg/kg) or supplemented (180 mg/kg) zinc diets. Mice were euthanized at 12 (early time-point) or 24 weeks (late time-point) after introducing the diets. At the early time-point, zinc deficiency decreased Nrf2 protein expression and GSH levels while increased p65 and p53 protein expression and the number of PNL/area. At the late time-point, zinc deficiency also decreased GSH levels while increased liver genotoxicity, cell proliferation into PNL and PNL size. In contrast, zinc supplementation increased antioxidant defense at both time-points but not altered PNL development. Our findings are the first to suggest that zinc deficiency predisposes mice to the PNL development in chemically-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. The decrease of Nrf2/GSH pathway and increase of liver genotoxicity, as well as the increase of p65/cell proliferation, are potential mechanisms to this zinc deficiency-mediated effect.

  7. Dietary selenium deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in mouse mastitis models.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhengkai; Yao, Minjun; Li, Yimeng; He, Xuexiu; Yang, Zhengtao

    2014-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient that plays a critical role in anti-inflammatory processes and antioxidant defense system. In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary selenium deficiency on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis in mouse models. Se content in the liver was assessed by fluorescent atomic absorption spectrometry. Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the blood, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, tumor necrosis actor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-1β in the supernatant of the mammary tissue were determined according to the corresponding kits. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expressions were evaluated by Western blotting. The results showed that the Se-deficient mouse model was successfully replicated, and selenium deficiency exacerbated mammary gland histopathology, increased the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β, and facilitated the activation of iNOS and COX-2 in LPS-induced mouse mastitis. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that selenium deficiency resulted in more severe inflammatory response in LPS-induced mouse mastitis.

  8. Effects on liver hydrogen peroxide metabolism induced by dietary selenium deficiency or excess in chickens.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing-Xiu; Cao, Chang-Yu; Sun, Yan-Chun; Wang, Li-Li; Li, Nan; Xu, Shi-Wen; Li, Jin-Long

    2014-06-01

    To determine the relationship between dietary selenium (Se) deficiency or excess and liver hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) metabolism in chickens, 1-day-old chickens received insufficient Se (0.028 mg Se per kg of diet) or excess Se (3.0 or 5.0 mg Se per kg of diet) in their diets for 8 weeks. Body and liver weight changes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, H2O2 content, and activities and mRNA levels of enzymes associated with H2O2 metabolism (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) 1-3) were determined in the liver. This study showed that Se deficiency or excess Se intake elicited relative severe changes. Se deficiency decreased growth, while Se excess promoted growth in chickens. Both diets vastly altered the liver function, but no obvious histopathological changes were observed in the liver. Se deficiency significantly lowered SOD and CAT activities, and the H2O2 content in the liver and serum increased. Se excess (3.0 mg/kg) decreased SOD and CAT activities with changes in their mRNA levels, and the H2O2 content increased. The larger Se excess (5.0 mg/kg) showed more serious effects but was not fatal. These results indicated that the H2O2 metabolism played a destructive role in the changes in bird liver function induced by Se deficiency or excess.

  9. Dietary zinc deficiency fuels esophageal cancer development by inducing a distinct inflammatory signature

    PubMed Central

    Taccioli, C; Chen, H; Jiang, Y; Liu, XP; Huang, K; Smalley, KJ; Farber, JL; Croce, CM; Fong, LY

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is implicated in the pathogenesis of esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). The causes of inflammation in ESCC, however, are undefined. Dietary zinc-deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of ESCC. We have previously shown that short-term ZD (6 weeks) in rats induces overexpression of the proinflammatory mediators S100a8 and S100a9 in the esophageal mucosa with accompanying esophageal epithelial hyperplasia. Here we report that prolonged ZD (21 weeks) in rats amplified this inflammation that when combined with non-carcinogenic low doses of the environmental carcinogen N-nitrosomethylbenzylamine (NMBA) elicited a 66.7% (16/24) incidence of ESCC. With zinc-sufficiency NMBA produced no cancers (0/21) (P<0.001). At tumor endpoint, the neoplastic ZD esophagus as compared with zinc-sufficient esophagus had an inflammatory gene signature with upregulation of numerous cancer-related inflammation genes (CXC and CC chemokines, chemokine receptors, cytokines, and Cox-2) in addition to S100a8 and S100a9. This signature was already activated in the earlier dysplastic stage. Additionally, time-course bioinformatics analysis of expression profiles at tumor endpoint and prior to NMBA exposure revealed that this sustained inflammation was due to ZD rather than carcinogen exposure. Importantly, zinc replenishment reversed this inflammatory signature at both the dysplastic and neoplastic stages of ESCC development, and prevented cancer formation. Thus, the molecular definition of ZD-induced inflammation as a critical factor in ESCC development has important clinical implications with regard to development and prevention of this deadly disease. PMID:22179833

  10. Dietary vitamin D3 deficiency alters intestinal mucosal defense and increases susceptibility to Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Ryz, Natasha R; Lochner, Arion; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Ma, Caixia; Huang, Tina; Bhinder, Ganive; Bosman, Else; Wu, Xiujuan; Innis, Sheila M; Jacobson, Kevan; Vallance, Bruce A

    2015-11-01

    Vitamin D deficiency affects more that 1 billion people worldwide. Although thought to increase risk of bacterial infections, the importance of vitamin D on host defense against intestinal bacterial pathogens is currently unclear since injection of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, increased susceptibility to the enteric bacterial pathogen Citrobacter rodentium by suppressing key immune/inflammatory factors. To further characterize the role of vitamin D during bacteria-induced colitis, we fed weanling mice either vitamin D3-deficient or vitamin D3-sufficient diets for 5 wk and then challenged them with C. rodentium. Vitamin D3-deficient mice lost significantly more body weight, carried higher C. rodentium burdens, and developed worsened histological damage. Vitamin D3-deficient mice also suffered greater bacterial translocation to extra-intestinal tissues, including mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Intestinal tissues of infected vitamin D3-deficient mice displayed increased inflammatory cell infiltrates as well as significantly higher gene transcript levels of inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, IL-17A, and IL-17F as well as the antimicrobial peptide REG3γ. Notably, these exaggerated inflammatory responses accelerated the loss of commensal microbes and were associated with an impaired ability to detoxify bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Overall, these studies show that dietary-induced vitamin D deficiency exacerbates intestinal inflammatory responses to infection, also impairing host defense.

  11. Dietary vitamin D3 deficiency alters intestinal mucosal defense and increases susceptibility to Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ryz, Natasha R.; Lochner, Arion; Bhullar, Kirandeep; Ma, Caixia; Huang, Tina; Bhinder, Ganive; Bosman, Else; Wu, Xiujuan; Innis, Sheila M.; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency affects more that 1 billion people worldwide. Although thought to increase risk of bacterial infections, the importance of vitamin D on host defense against intestinal bacterial pathogens is currently unclear since injection of the active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, increased susceptibility to the enteric bacterial pathogen Citrobacter rodentium by suppressing key immune/inflammatory factors. To further characterize the role of vitamin D during bacteria-induced colitis, we fed weanling mice either vitamin D3-deficient or vitamin D3-sufficient diets for 5 wk and then challenged them with C. rodentium. Vitamin D3-deficient mice lost significantly more body weight, carried higher C. rodentium burdens, and developed worsened histological damage. Vitamin D3-deficient mice also suffered greater bacterial translocation to extra-intestinal tissues, including mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. Intestinal tissues of infected vitamin D3-deficient mice displayed increased inflammatory cell infiltrates as well as significantly higher gene transcript levels of inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, TGF-β, IL-17A, and IL-17F as well as the antimicrobial peptide REG3γ. Notably, these exaggerated inflammatory responses accelerated the loss of commensal microbes and were associated with an impaired ability to detoxify bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Overall, these studies show that dietary-induced vitamin D deficiency exacerbates intestinal inflammatory responses to infection, also impairing host defense. PMID:26336925

  12. Dietary component isorhamnetin is a PPARγ antagonist and ameliorates metabolic disorders induced by diet or leptin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ming; Cai, Wujie; Yu, Lijing; Feng, Li; Zhang, Lu; Zang, Qingqing; Wang, Yahui; Wang, Dongshan; Chen, Hui; Tong, Qingchun; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-18

    Studies on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ ligands have been focused on agonists. However, PPARγ activation may induce obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), one of the most challenging medical conditions. Here, we identified that isorhamnetin, a naturally occurring compound in fruits and vegetables and the metabolite of quercetin, is a novel antagonist of PPARγ. Isorhamnetin treatment inhibited the adipocyte differentiation induced by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, reduced obesity development and ameliorated hepatic steatosis induced by both high-fat diet treatment and leptin deficiency. Our results suggest that dietary supplement of isorhamnetin may be beneficial to prevent obesity and steatosis and PPARγ antagonists may be useful to treat hepatic steatosis.

  13. Dietary component isorhamnetin is a PPARγ antagonist and ameliorates metabolic disorders induced by diet or leptin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ming; Cai, Wujie; Yu, Lijing; Feng, Li; Zhang, Lu; Zang, Qingqing; Wang, Yahui; Wang, Dongshan; Chen, Hui; Tong, Qingchun; Ji, Guang; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Studies on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ ligands have been focused on agonists. However, PPARγ activation may induce obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), one of the most challenging medical conditions. Here, we identified that isorhamnetin, a naturally occurring compound in fruits and vegetables and the metabolite of quercetin, is a novel antagonist of PPARγ. Isorhamnetin treatment inhibited the adipocyte differentiation induced by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone, reduced obesity development and ameliorated hepatic steatosis induced by both high-fat diet treatment and leptin deficiency. Our results suggest that dietary supplement of isorhamnetin may be beneficial to prevent obesity and steatosis and PPARγ antagonists may be useful to treat hepatic steatosis. PMID:26775807

  14. Influence of dietary carbohydrate on zinc-deficiency-induced changes in oxidative defense mechanisms and tissue oxidative damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, S H; Keen, C L

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of dietary carbohydrate type on the expression of zinc (Zn) deficiency in rats with respect to tissue oxidative damage and defense mechanisms. Rats were fed diets containing adequate (+Zn) or low concentrations (-Zn) of Zn. Both fructose- and glucose-based diets were tested. Pair-fed controls were also studied to evaluate changes in the oxidative defense system which are secondary to Zn-deficiency-induced anorexia. Plasma and liver Zn concentrations and CuZn superoxide dismutase activities were lower in the -Zn rats than in the +Zn rats. Liver glutathione (GSH) and disulfide glutathione concentrations were higher in the -Zn rats than in the +Zn rats; this difference was most pronounced in the fructose groups. Liver and heart selenium glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) activities were lower in the -Zn-fructose group than in the +Zn-fructose group. Liver Se-GSH-Px activity was higher in the fructose groups than in the glucose groups. Liver GSH reductase (GSH-Red) activity was lower in the -Zn-fructose group than in its control group. Liver glutamine synthetase activity was lower in the -Zn-glucose group and in the fructose groups than in the glucose control group. Liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) production was similar among the groups. Collectively, these results support the concept that Zn deficiency can result in an impaired oxidant defense system. Based on the observation that pair-fed control animals also showed evidence of oxidative damage, we suggest that one factor that contributes to the effect of Zn deficiency is the reduction in caloric intake that occurs in these animals. Fructose feeding resulted in increased activities of several of the oxidant defense enzymes. Protein oxidative damage assessed by glutamine synthetase activity was increased by both Zn deficiency and fructose feeding.

  15. Dietary Fat Interacts with PCBs to Induce Changes in Lipid Metabolism in Mice Deficient in Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Bernhard; Reiterer, Gudrun; Toborek, Michal; Matveev, Sergey V.; Daugherty, Alan; Smart, Eric; Robertson, Larry W.

    2005-01-01

    There is evidence that dietary fat can modify the cytotoxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and that coplanar PCBs can induce inflammatory processes critical in the pathology of vascular diseases. To test the hypothesis that the interaction of PCBs with dietary fat is dependent on the type of fat, low-density lipoprotein receptor–deficient (LDL-R−/−) mice were fed diets enriched with either olive oil or corn oil for 4 weeks. Half of the animals from each group were injected with PCB-77. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression in aortic arches was non-detectable in the olive-oil–fed mice but was highly expressed in the presence of PCB-77. PCB treatment increased liver neutral lipids and decreased serum fatty acid levels only in mice fed the corn-oil–enriched diet. PCB treatment increased mRNA expression of genes involved in inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress in all mice. Upon PCB treatment, mice in both olive- and corn-oil–diet groups showed induction of genes involved in fatty acid degradation but with up-regulation of different key enzymes. Genes involved in fatty acid synthesis were reduced only upon PCB treatment in corn-oil–fed mice, whereas lipid transport/export genes were altered in olive-oil–fed mice. These data suggest that dietary fat can modify changes in lipid metabolism induced by PCBs in serum and tissues. These findings have implications for understanding the interactions of nutrients with environmental contaminants on the pathology of inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. PMID:15626652

  16. Dietary zinc deficiency induces oxidative stress and promotes tumor necrosis factor-α- and interleukin-1β-induced RANKL expression in rat bone.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency on oxidative stress and bone metabolism. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups for 4 weeks: a zinc-adequate group (30 ppm); a zinc-deficient group (1 ppm); and a pair-fed group (30 ppm) that was pair-fed to the zinc-deficient group. The iron content and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level in bone were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. The mRNA expression level of osteoblastogenesis-related genes such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 and runt-related transcription factor 2 was lower in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. In contrast, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and osteoclastogenesis-related genes such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. These findings suggested that dietary zinc deficiency reduced osteoblastogenesis via a decrease in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 and increased osteoclastogenesis via enhancement of the expression of receptor for activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand induced by oxidative stress-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β.

  17. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Amber C.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.; Washington, M. Kay; Algood, Holly M. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P < 0.0001). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum ferritin values were significantly lower in H. pylori-infected gerbils than in uninfected gerbils, consistent with IDA. Leukocytosis and thrombocytosis were also detected in infected gerbils, indicating the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In comparison to uninfected gerbils, H. pylori-infected gerbils had a higher gastric pH, a higher incidence of gastric ulcers, and a higher incidence of fecal occult blood loss. Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA. PMID:27620719

  18. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Amber C; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M; Washington, M Kay; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P < 0.0001). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum ferritin values were significantly lower in H. pylori-infected gerbils than in uninfected gerbils, consistent with IDA. Leukocytosis and thrombocytosis were also detected in infected gerbils, indicating the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In comparison to uninfected gerbils, H. pylori-infected gerbils had a higher gastric pH, a higher incidence of gastric ulcers, and a higher incidence of fecal occult blood loss. Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA.

  19. Dietary Omega-3 Deficiency from Gestation Increases Spinal Cord Vulnerability to Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhe; Feng, Cameron; Agrawal, Rahul; Zhuang, Yumei; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Although traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often associated with gait deficits, the effects of TBI on spinal cord centers are poorly understood. We seek to determine the influence of TBI on the spinal cord and the potential of dietary omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids to counteract these effects. Male rodents exposed to diets containing adequate or deficient levels of n-3 since gestation received a moderate fluid percussion injury when becoming 14 weeks old. TBI reduced levels of molecular systems important for synaptic plasticity (BDNF, TrkB, and CREB) and plasma membrane homeostasis (4-HNE, iPLA2, syntaxin-3) in the lumbar spinal cord. These effects of TBI were more dramatic in the animals exposed to the n-3 deficient diet. Results emphasize the comprehensive action of TBI across the neuroaxis, and the critical role of dietary n-3 as a means to build resistance against the effects of TBI. PMID:23300842

  20. Behavioral Abnormality Induced by Enhanced Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenocortical Axis Activity under Dietary Zinc Deficiency and Its Usefulness as a Model.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Murakami, Taku

    2016-07-16

    Dietary zinc deficiency increases glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex via enhanced hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and induces neuropsychological symptoms, i.e., behavioral abnormality. Behavioral abnormality is due to the increase in glucocorticoid secretion rather than disturbance of brain zinc homeostasis, which occurs after the increase in glucocorticoid secretion. A major target of glucocorticoids is the hippocampus and their actions are often associated with disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission, which may be linked to behavioral abnormality, such as depressive symptoms and aggressive behavior under zinc deficiency. Glucocorticoid-mediated disturbance of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus is also involved in the pathophysiology of, not only psychiatric disorders, such as depression, but also neurodegenerative disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The evidence suggests that zinc-deficient animals are models for behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), as well as depression. To understand validity to apply zinc-deficient animals as a behavioral abnormality model, this paper deals with the effect of antidepressive drugs and herbal medicines on hippocampal dysfunctions and behavioral abnormality, which are induced by enhanced HPA axis activity under dietary zinc deficiency.

  1. Relationship between abnormal sperm morphology induced by dietary zinc deficiency and lipid composition in testes of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Merrells, Krystal J; Blewett, Heather; Jamieson, Jennifer A; Taylor, Carla G; Suh, Miyoung

    2009-07-01

    The present study investigated the effect of dietary Zn deficiency during sexual maturation on sperm integrity and testis phospholipid fatty acid composition. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into four dietary groups for 3 weeks: Zn control (ZC; 30 mg Zn/kg); Zn marginally deficient (ZMD; 9 mg Zn/kg); Zn deficient (ZD; < 1 mg Zn/kg); pair fed (PF; 30 mg Zn/kg) to the ZD group. Morphology of cauda epididymal sperm and lipid profiles of testis phospholipids were analysed. The rats fed the ZD diet had a lower testis weight (P < 0.02). Seminal vesicles and prostate weight were also lower in the ZD and PF groups. Rats fed the ZD diet, but not the ZMD diet, had 34-35 % more abnormal spermatozoa and 24 % shorter sperm tail length than the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.001). Testis cholesterol concentration was higher in the ZD rats compared with the ZC and PF rats (P < 0.04). Testes were highly enriched with n-6 fatty acids by showing n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratios of 27:1 in phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 23:1 in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). The dominant fatty acid in testes was docosapentaenoic acid (22 : 5n-6), comprising 15 and 24 % of PC and PE, respectively. This fatty acid was significantly lower in the ZD rats, whereas 18 : 2n-6 was higher compared with the rats in the other diet groups. These results demonstrate that severe Zn deficiency adversely affects sperm integrity and modulates testis fatty acid composition by interrupting essential fatty acid metabolism. This suggests that Zn deficiency-associated abnormal testicular function is perhaps preceded by altered membrane fatty acid composition, especially of a major fatty acid, 22 : 5n-6.

  2. [Vitamin deficiencies in breastfed children due to maternal dietary deficiency].

    PubMed

    Kollée, L A A

    2006-03-04

    Dietary deficiencies of vitamin B12 and vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation may result in health problems in exclusively breastfed infants. Vitamin-B12 deficiency in these infants results in irritability, anorexia and failure to thrive during the first 4-8 months of life. Severe and permanent neurodevelopmental disturbances may occur. The most at risk for vitamin-B12 deficiency are breast-fed infants ofveganist and vegetarian mothers. Mothers who cover their skin prevent exposure to the sun and may consequently be at risk for vitamin-D deficiency, as well as putting their offspring at risk. In prenatal and perinatal care, it is important to take the maternal dietary history in order to be able to prevent or treat these disorders. Guidelines for obstetrical and neonatal care should include the topic of vitamin deficiency.

  3. Selenium and Selenoprotein Deficiencies Induce Widespread Pyogranuloma Formation in Mice, while High Levels of Dietary Selenium Decrease Liver Tumor Size Driven by TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Nianxin; Ward, Jerrold M.; Perella, Christine M.; Hoffmann, Victoria J.; Rogers, Keith; Combs, Gerald F.; Schweizer, Ulrich; Merlino, Glenn; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dietary selenium and selenoprotein status may influence both anti- and pro-cancer pathways, making the outcome of interventions different from one study to another. To characterize such outcomes in a defined setting, we undertook a controlled hepatocarcinogenesis study involving varying levels of dietary selenium and altered selenoprotein status using mice carrying a mutant (A37G) selenocysteine tRNA transgene (TrsptG37) and/or a cancer driver TGFα transgene. The use of TrsptG37 altered selenoprotein expression in a selenoprotein and tissue specific manner and, at sufficient dietary selenium levels, separate the effect of diet and selenoprotein status. Mice were maintained on diets deficient in selenium (0.02 ppm selenium) or supplemented with 0.1, 0.4 or 2.25 ppm selenium or 30 ppm triphenylselenonium chloride (TPSC), a non-metabolized selenium compound. TrsptG37 transgenic and TGFα/TrsptG37 bi-transgenic mice subjected to selenium-deficient or TPSC diets developed a neurological phenotype associated with early morbidity and mortality prior to hepatocarcinoma development. Pathology analyses revealed widespread disseminated pyogranulomatous inflammation. Pyogranulomas occurred in liver, lungs, heart, spleen, small and large intestine, and mesenteric lymph nodes in these transgenic and bi-transgenic mice. The incidence of liver tumors was significantly increased in mice carrying the TGFα transgene, while dietary selenium and selenoprotein status did not affect tumor number and multiplicity. However, adenoma and carcinoma size and area were smaller in TGFα transgenic mice that were fed 0.4 and 2.25 versus 0.1 ppm of selenium. Thus, selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies led to widespread pyogranuloma formation, while high selenium levels inhibited the size of TGFα–induced liver tumors. PMID:23460847

  4. Dietary Silicon Deficiency Does Not Exacerbate Diet-Induced Fatty Lesions in Female ApoE Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Kessler, Katharina; Messner, Barbara; Stoiber, Martin; Pedro, Liliana D; Schima, Heinrich; Laufer, Günther; Powell, Jonathan J; Bernhard, David

    2015-07-01

    Dietary silicon has been positively linked with vascular health and protection against atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the mechanism of action is unclear. We investigated the effect of dietary silicon on 1) serum and aorta silicon concentrations, 2) the development of aortic lesions and serum lipid concentrations, and 3) the structural and biomechanic properties of the aorta. Two studies, of the same design, were conducted to address the above objectives. Female mice, lacking the apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene, and therefore susceptible to atherosclerosis, were separated into 3 groups of 10-15 mice, each exposed to a high-fat diet (21% wt milk fat and 1.5% wt cholesterol) but with differing concentrations of dietary silicon, namely: silicon-deprived (-Si; <3-μg silicon/g feed), silicon-replete in feed (+Si-feed; 100-μg silicon/g feed), and silicon-replete in drinking water (+Si-water; 115-μg silicon/mL) for 15-19 wk. Silicon supplementation was in the form of sodium metasilicate (feed) or monomethylsilanetriol (drinking water). The serum silicon concentration in the -Si group was significantly lower than in the +Si-feed (by up to 78%; P < 0.003) and the +Si-water (by up to 84%; P < 0.006) groups. The aorta silicon concentration was also lower in the -Si group than in the +Si-feed group (by 65%; P = 0.025), but not compared with the +Si-water group. There were no differences in serum and aorta silicon concentrations between the silicon-replete groups. Body weights, tissue wet weights at necropsy, and structural, biomechanic, and morphologic properties of the aorta were not affected by dietary silicon; nor were the development of fatty lesions and serum lipid concentrations. These findings suggest that dietary silicon has no effect on atherosclerosis development and vascular health in the apoE mouse model of diet-induced atherosclerosis, contrary to the reported findings in the cholesterol-fed rabbit model.

  5. Dietary Silicon Deficiency Does Not Exacerbate Diet-Induced Fatty Lesions in Female ApoE Knockout Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Kessler, Katharina; Messner, Barbara; Stoiber, Martin; Pedro, Liliana D; Schima, Heinrich; Laufer, Günther; Powell, Jonathan J; Bernhard, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dietary silicon has been positively linked with vascular health and protection against atherosclerotic plaque formation, but the mechanism of action is unclear. Objectives: We investigated the effect of dietary silicon on 1) serum and aorta silicon concentrations, 2) the development of aortic lesions and serum lipid concentrations, and 3) the structural and biomechanic properties of the aorta. Methods: Two studies, of the same design, were conducted to address the above objectives. Female mice, lacking the apolipoprotein E (apoE) gene, and therefore susceptible to atherosclerosis, were separated into 3 groups of 10–15 mice, each exposed to a high-fat diet (21% wt milk fat and 1.5% wt cholesterol) but with differing concentrations of dietary silicon, namely: silicon-deprived (−Si; <3-μg silicon/g feed), silicon-replete in feed (+Si-feed; 100-μg silicon/g feed), and silicon-replete in drinking water (+Si-water; 115-μg silicon/mL) for 15–19 wk. Silicon supplementation was in the form of sodium metasilicate (feed) or monomethylsilanetriol (drinking water). Results: The serum silicon concentration in the −Si group was significantly lower than in the +Si-feed (by up to 78%; P < 0.003) and the +Si-water (by up to 84%; P < 0.006) groups. The aorta silicon concentration was also lower in the −Si group than in the +Si-feed group (by 65%; P = 0.025), but not compared with the +Si-water group. There were no differences in serum and aorta silicon concentrations between the silicon-replete groups. Body weights, tissue wet weights at necropsy, and structural, biomechanic, and morphologic properties of the aorta were not affected by dietary silicon; nor were the development of fatty lesions and serum lipid concentrations. Conclusions: These findings suggest that dietary silicon has no effect on atherosclerosis development and vascular health in the apoE mouse model of diet-induced atherosclerosis, contrary to the reported findings in the cholesterol

  6. Dietary protein deficiency in pregnant mice and offspring.

    PubMed

    Millis, Richard M; Offiah, Godwin U

    2007-03-06

    Previous studies suggest an association between dermal contact hypersensitivity and preterm delivery. We hypothesized that dietary protein deficiency produces cell-mediated immune hypersensitivity in pregnant animals and their offspring akin to those known to produce tissue damage. We compared the effects of feeding a 20% protein diet (controls) to those of feeding a 10% protein (deficient) diet ad libitum to pregnant BALB/c mice. We measured dermal contact sensitivity to 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) by the increment in ear skin thickness (swelling) 72 h after immunization and parity by the number of viable pups delivered. Dams fed the protein-deficient diet ingested less food, gained less weight and delivered fewer viable pups than the dams fed the control diet. Greater DNFB-stimulated increment in ear skin thickness was found in the protein-deficient mothers and in their offspring than in the control mothers and their offspring. We conclude that dietary protein deficiency limits parity and induces immune hypersensitivity. These findings suggest the potential for dietary protein deficiency to activate a T-cell-mediated branch of the immune response that may put pregnant animals at risk for preterm delivery.

  7. Carboxyl ester lipase deficiency exacerbates dietary lipid absorption abnormalities and resistance to diet-induced obesity in pancreatic triglyceride lipase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Gilham, Dean; Labonté, Eric D; Rojas, Juan C; Jandacek, Ronald J; Howles, Philip N; Hui, David Y

    2007-08-24

    This study evaluated the contributions of carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) and pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PTL) in lipid nutrient absorption. Results showed PTL deficiency has minimal effect on triacylglycerol (TAG) absorption under low fat dietary conditions. Interestingly, PTL(-)(/)(-) mice displayed significantly reduced TAG absorption compared with wild type mice under high fat/high cholesterol dietary conditions (80.1 +/- 3.7 versus 91.5 +/- 0.7%, p < 0.05). Net TAG absorption was reduced further to 61.1 +/- 3.8% in mice lacking both PTL and CEL. Cholesterol absorption was 41% lower in PTL(-/-) mice compared with control mice (p < 0.05), but this difference was not exaggerated in PTL(-/-), CEL(-/-) mice. Retinyl palmitate absorption was reduced by 45 and 60% in PTL(-/-) mice (p < 0.05) and PTL(-/-), CEL(-/-) mice (p < 0.01), respectively. After 15 weeks of feeding, the high fat/high cholesterol diet, wild type, and CEL(-/-) mice gained approximately 24 g of body weight. However, body weight gain was 6.2 and 8.6 g less (p < 0.01) in PTL(-/-) and PTL(-/-), CEL(-/-) mice, respectively, despite their consumption of comparable amounts of the high fat/high cholesterol diet. The decrease body weight gain in PTL(-/-) and PTL(-/-), CEL(-/-) mice was attributed to their absorption of fewer calories from the high fat/high cholesterol diet, thereby resulting in less fat mass accumulation than that observed in wild type and CEL(-/-) mice. Thus, this study documents that PTL and CEL serve complementary functions, working together to mediate the absorption of a major portion of dietary fat and fat-soluble vitamin esters. The reduced lipid absorption efficiency due to PTL and CEL inactivation also resulted in protection against diet-induced obesity.

  8. Dietary vitamin B12 deficiency in an adolescent white boy.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, P; Holmes, D; Ramanan, A V; Bose-Haider, B; Lewis, M J; Will, A

    2002-06-01

    Dietary deficiency of cobalamin resulting in tissue deficiency in white individuals is unusual. However, several patients with dietary deficiency who were neither vegan nor Hindu have been described. This report describes the case of a 14 year old boy who was a white non-Hindu with a very low intake of cobalamin, which was not apparent until a detailed dietary assessment was performed. The patient responded rapidly to a combination of oral and parenteral B12. This case illustrates the fact that severe dietary vitamin B12 deficiency can occur in non-Hindu white individuals. Inadequate dietary content of B12 may not be apparent until a detailed dietary assessment is performed. This patient is likely to have had subclinical vitamin B12 deficiency for several years. Increased vitamin B12 requirements associated with the adolescent growth spurt may have provoked overt tissue deficiency.

  9. DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES INDUCTION OF MICRONUCLEI BY ARSENIC IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the genotoxicity of chemical agents. Arsenic, a known human carcinogen present in drinking water supplies around the world, induces chromosomal and DNA damage. The effect of dietary folate deficiency on...

  10. DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES INDUCTION OF MICRONUCLEI BY ARSENIC IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the genotoxicity of chemical agents. Arsenic, a known human carcinogen present in drinking water supplies around the world, induces chromosomal and DNA damage. The effect of dietary folate deficiency on...

  11. c-Fos expression in the parabrachial nucleus following intraoral bitter stimulation in the rat with dietary-induced zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Akiyo; Honma, Shiho; Inui-Yamamoto, Chizuko; Ito, Akira; Niwa, Hitoshi; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2017-03-15

    Zinc deficiency causes various symptoms including taste disorders. In the present study, changes in expression of c-Fos immunoreactivity in neurons of the parabrachial nucleus (PBN), one of the relay nuclei for transmission of gustatory information, after bitter stimulation to the dorsal surface of the tongue were examined in zinc-deficient rats. Experimental zinc-deficient animals were created by feeding a low-zinc diet for 4weeks, and showed the following symptoms of zinc deficiency: low body weight, low serum zinc content and behavioral changes to avoid bitter stimulation. In normal control animals, intraoral application of 1mM quinine caused increased numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive (c-Fos-IR) neurons in the external lateral subnucleus and external medial subnucleus of the PBN (elPBN and emPBN, respectively) compared with application of distilled water. However, in the zinc-deficient animals, the numbers of c-Fos-IR neurons in the elPBN and emPBN did not differ significantly between application of quinine and distilled water. After feeding the zinc-deficient animals a normal diet for 4weeks, the symptoms of zinc deficiency recovered, and the expression of c-Fos-IR neurons following intraoral bitter stimulation became identical to that in the normal control animals. The present results indicate that dietary zinc deficiency causes alterations to neuronal activities in the gustatory neural circuit, and that these neuronal alterations can be reversed by changing to a normal diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dietary choline deficiency and excess induced intestinal inflammation and alteration of intestinal tight junction protein transcription potentially by modulating NF-κB, STAT and p38 MAPK signaling molecules in juvenile Jian carp.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Zhao, Juan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of choline on intestinal mucosal immune and the possible mechanisms in fish by feeding juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian) with graded levels of dietary choline (165-1820 mg/kg diet) for 65 days. The results firstly showed that choline deficiency induced inflammatory infiltration in the proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) of fish. Meanwhile, compared with the optimal choline group, choline deficiency decreased the activities of lysozyme and acid phosphatase, contents of complement 3 and IgM in the intestine, downregulated the mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides (liver-expressed antimicrobial peptide (LEAP) 2A and defensin-3 in the PI and MI, LEAP-2B and hepcidin in the PI, MI and DI), anti-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL) 10 and transforming growth factor β2 in the PI, MI and DI), and signaling molecule IκB in the PI, MI and DI; while upregulated the mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6a and tumor necrosis factor α in the MI and DI, interferon γ2b in the PI and MI, IL-1β and IL-6b in the PI, MI and DI), and signaling molecules (Toll-like receptor 4 in the MI, myeloid differentiation primary response 88 in the PI and MI, Janus kinase 3 and tyrosine kinase 2 in the MI and DI, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) 4 and STAT5 in the PI, MI and DI) of juvenile Jian carp, further indicating that choline deficiency caused inflammation and immunity depression in the intestine of fish. But choline deficiency decreased the PI IL-6a mRNA level, and increased the DI LEAP-2A and defensin-3 mRNA levels with unknown reasons. Furthermore, dietary choline deficiency downregulated mRNA levels of tight junction (TJ) proteins (claudin 3c in the PI and MI, claudin 7, claudin 11 and occludin in the PI, MI and DI) and signaling molecule mitogen-activated protein kinases p38 in the PI, MI and DI of juvenile Jian carp, whereas

  13. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and low dietary iron alter behavior, induce iron deficiency anemia, and modulate hippocampal gene expression in female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Burns, Monika; Amaya, Aldo; Bodi, Caroline; Ge, Zhongming; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ennis, Kathleen; Wang, Timothy C; Georgieff, Michael; Fox, James G

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori), a bacterial pathogen, is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is a strong risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Environmental conditions, such as poor dietary iron resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), enhance H.pylori virulence and increases risk for gastric cancer. IDA affects billions of people worldwide, and there is considerable overlap between regions of high IDA and high H.pylori prevalence. The primary aims of our study were to evaluate the effect of H.pylori infection on behavior, iron metabolism, red blood cell indices, and behavioral outcomes following comorbid H. pylori infection and dietary iron deficiency in a mouse model. C57BL/6 female mice (n = 40) were used; half were placed on a moderately iron deficient (ID) diet immediately post-weaning, and the other half were maintained on an iron replete (IR) diet. Half were dosed with H.pylori SS1 at 5 weeks of age, and the remaining mice were sham-dosed. There were 4 study groups: a control group (-Hp, IR diet) as well as 3 experimental groups (-Hp, ID diet; +Hp, IR diet; +Hp,ID diet). All mice were tested in an open field apparatus at 8 weeks postinfection. Independent of dietary iron status, H.pylori -infected mice performed fewer exploratory behaviors in the open field chamber than uninfected mice (p<0.001). Hippocampal gene expression of myelination markers and dopamine receptor 1 was significantly downregulated in mice on an ID diet (both p<0.05), independent of infection status. At 12 months postinfection, hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration were significantly lower in +Hp, ID diet mice compared to all other study groups. H.pylori infection caused IDA in mice maintained on a marginal iron diet. The mouse model developed in this study is a useful model to study the neurologic, behavioral, and hematologic impact of the common human co-morbidity of H. pylori infection and IDA.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection and low dietary iron alter behavior, induce iron deficiency anemia, and modulate hippocampal gene expression in female C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Monika; Amaya, Aldo; Bodi, Caroline; Ge, Zhongming; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ennis, Kathleen; Wang, Timothy C.; Georgieff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori), a bacterial pathogen, is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is a strong risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Environmental conditions, such as poor dietary iron resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), enhance H.pylori virulence and increases risk for gastric cancer. IDA affects billions of people worldwide, and there is considerable overlap between regions of high IDA and high H.pylori prevalence. The primary aims of our study were to evaluate the effect of H.pylori infection on behavior, iron metabolism, red blood cell indices, and behavioral outcomes following comorbid H. pylori infection and dietary iron deficiency in a mouse model. C57BL/6 female mice (n = 40) were used; half were placed on a moderately iron deficient (ID) diet immediately post-weaning, and the other half were maintained on an iron replete (IR) diet. Half were dosed with H.pylori SS1 at 5 weeks of age, and the remaining mice were sham-dosed. There were 4 study groups: a control group (-Hp, IR diet) as well as 3 experimental groups (-Hp, ID diet; +Hp, IR diet; +Hp,ID diet). All mice were tested in an open field apparatus at 8 weeks postinfection. Independent of dietary iron status, H.pylori -infected mice performed fewer exploratory behaviors in the open field chamber than uninfected mice (p<0.001). Hippocampal gene expression of myelination markers and dopamine receptor 1 was significantly downregulated in mice on an ID diet (both p<0.05), independent of infection status. At 12 months postinfection, hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration were significantly lower in +Hp, ID diet mice compared to all other study groups. H.pylori infection caused IDA in mice maintained on a marginal iron diet. The mouse model developed in this study is a useful model to study the neurologic, behavioral, and hematologic impact of the common human co-morbidity of H. pylori infection and IDA. PMID:28355210

  16. Spontaneous liver fibrosis induced by long term dietary vitamin D deficiency in adult mice is related to chronic inflammation and enhanced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Longdong; Kong, Ming; Han, Yuan-Ping; Bai, Li; Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Sujun; Yuan, Hong; Duan, Zhongping

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed an association between vitamin D deficiency and various chronic liver diseases. However, it is not known whether lack of vitamin D can induce spontaneous liver fibrosis in an animal model. To study this, mice were fed either a control diet or a vitamin D deficient diet (VDD diet). For the positive control, liver fibrosis was induced with carbon tetrachloride. Here we show, for the first time, that liver fibrosis spontaneously developed in mice fed the VDD diet. Long-term administration of a VDD diet resulted in necro-inflammation and liver fibrosis. Inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleulin-1, interleukin-6, Toll-like-receptor 4, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were up-regulated in the livers of the mice fed the VDD diet. Conversely, the expression of Th2/M2 markers such as IL-10, IL-13, arginase 1, and heme oxygenase-1 were down-regulated in the livers of mice fed the VDD diet. Transforming growth factor-β1 and matrix metalloproteinase 13, which are important for fibrosis, were induced in the livers of mice fed the VDD diet. Moreover, the VDD diet triggered apoptosis in the parenchymal cells, in agreement with the increased levels of Fas and FasL, and decreased Bcl2 and Bclx. Thus, long-term vitamin D deficiency can provoke chronic inflammation that can induce liver apoptosis, which consequently activates hepatic stellate cells to initiate liver fibrosis.

  17. Diethanolamine induces hepatic choline deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Gamsky, Elizabeth A; Hicks, Sarah M; Vassallo, Jeffrey D; Mar, Mei-Heng; Zeisel, Steven H

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of the present experiments was to test the hypothesis that diethanolamine (DEA), an alkanolamine shown to be hepatocarcinogenic in mice, induces hepatic choline deficiency and to determine whether altered choline homeostasis was causally related to the carcinogenic outcome. To examine this hypothesis, the biochemical and histopathological changes in male B6C3F1 mice made choline deficient by dietary deprivation were first determined. Phosphocholine (PCho), the intracellular storage form of choline was severely depleted, decreasing to about 20% of control values with 2 weeks of dietary choline deficiency. Other metabolites, including choline, glycerophosphocholine (GPC), and phosphatidylcholine (PC) also decreased. Hepatic concentrations of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) decreased, whereas levels of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) increased. Despite these biochemical changes, fatty liver, which is often associated with choline deficiency, was not observed in the mice. The dose response, reversibility, and strain-dependence of the effects of DEA on choline metabolites were studied. B6C3F1 mice were dosed dermally with DEA (0, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 160 mg/kg) for 4 weeks (5 days/week). Control animals received either no treatment or dermal application of 95% ethanol (1.8 ml/kg). PCho was most sensitive to DEA treatment, decreasing at dosages of 20 mg/kg and higher and reaching a maximum 50% depletion at 160 mg/kg/day. GPC, choline, and PC also decreased in a dose-dependent manner. At 80 and 160 mg/kg/day, SAM levels decreased while SAH levels increased in liver. A no-observed effect level (NOEL) for DEA-induced changes in choline homeostasis was 10 mg/kg/day. Choline metabolites, SAM and SAH returned to control levels in mice dosed at 160 mg/kg for 4 weeks and allowed a 2-week recovery period prior to necropsy. In a manner similar to dietary choline deficiency, no fatty change was observed in the liver of DEA-treated mice. In C57BL/6 mice, DEA treatment (160 mg

  18. Dietary restriction causing iodine-deficient goitre.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Tim; Plumb, Emma; Callaghan, James; Jackson, Michael; Michaelis, Louise

    2015-08-01

    Iodine-deficient goitre was common in some parts of the UK prior to the introduction of salt iodisation. Many contemporary salt preparations do not contain much iodine, and there are renewed concerns about the iodine status of the population. We present a boy with severe allergy who developed goitre and significant thyroid dysfunction in association with an iodine-deficient 'food-restricted' diet. The case highlights the importance of a comprehensive nutritional assessment in all children on multiple food restrictions.

  19. The disorders induced by iodine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Delange, F

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews present knowledge on the etiology, pathophysiology, complications, prevention, and therapy of the disorders induced by iodine deficiency. The recommended dietary allowances of iodine are 100 micrograms/day for adults and adolescents, 60-100 micrograms/day for children aged 1 to 10 years, and 35-40 micrograms/day in infants aged less than 1 year. When the physiological requirements of iodine are not met in a given population, a series of functional and developmental abnormalities occur including thyroid function abnormalities and, when iodine deficiency is severe, endemic goiter and cretinism, endemic mental retardation, decreased fertility rate, increased perinatal death, and infant mortality. These complications, which constitute a hindrance to the development of the affected populations, are grouped under the general heading of iodine deficiency disorders (IDD). At least one billion people are at risk of IDD. Iodine deficiency, therefore, constitutes one of the most common preventable causes of mental deficiency in the world today. Most of the affected populations live in mountainous areas in preindustrialized countries, but 50 to 100 million people are still at risk in Europe. The most important target groups to the effects of iodine deficiency from a public health point of view are pregnant mothers, fetuses, neonates, and young infants because the main complication of IDD, i.e., brain damage resulting in irreversible mental retardation, is the consequence of thyroid failure occurring during pregnancy, fetal, and early postnatal life. The main cause of endemic goiter and cretinism is an insufficient dietary supply of iodine. The additional role of naturally occurring goitrogens has been documented in the case of certain foods (milk, cassava, millet, nuts) and bacterial and chemical water pollutants. The mechanism by which the thyroid gland adapts to an insufficient iodine supply is to increase the trapping of iodide as well as the subsequent

  20. Selenium deficiency in subtropical littoral pampas: environmental and dietary aspects.

    PubMed

    Mirlean, N; Seus-Arrache, E R; Vlasova, O

    2017-04-11

    Se deficiency has a critical effect on human health. The littoral near Patos Lagoon in the south of Brazil is composed of Quaternary sandy deposits and nutrient-deficient soils, which contribute to Se deficiency in the surrounding environment. The average concentration of Se in littoral soils is six times lower than the metalloid deficiency threshold of 0.5 mg kg(-1) and is close to that in countries where Keshan disease is registered. The sediments in the Patos Estuary are also notably lower in Se than near-shore marine sediments. Foodstuffs produced in the littoral pampas are characterised by extremely low Se concentrations compared with the same alimentary products reported worldwide. The total daily dietary intake of Se in the region is 24 μg day(-1), which is half the Estimated Average Requirement for adults. Black beans in the local diet provide over 40% of daily Se intake. Prescriptive addition of Se to prevalent products seems the most effective solution to the problem of metalloid dietary deficiency in the region. Similar environmental conditions and significant concentration of the population in the littoral zone suggest that the problem of Se deficiency probably affects a large proportion of the population along the Atlantic coast of Brazil.

  1. Dietary Zinc Deficiency in Rodents: Effects on T-Cell Development, Maturation and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Blewett, Heather J.; Taylor, Carla G.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for developing disease and yet we do not have a clear understanding of the mechanisms behind the increased susceptibility to infection. This review will examine the interrelationships among the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal stress axis, p56lck, and T-cell maturation in both zinc deficiency and responses during zinc repletion. We will highlight differences between the adult mouse model (wasting malnutrition) and growing rat model (stunting malnutrition) of dietary zinc deficiency and discuss the use of various controls to separate out the effects of zinc deficiency from the associated malnutrition. Elevated serum corticosterone in both zinc deficient and pair-fed rats does not support the hypothesis that zinc deficiency per se leads to corticosterone-induced apoptosis and lymphopenia. In fact, the zinc deficient rat does not have lymphopenia. Thymocytes from zinc deficient mice and rats have elevated levels of p56lck, a signalling protein with a zinc clasp structure, but this does not appear to affect thymocyte maturation. However, post-thymic T-cell maturation appears to be altered based on the lower proportion of splenic late thymic emigrants in zinc deficient rats. Fewer new T-cells in the periphery could adversely affect the T-cell repertoire and contribute to immunodeficiency in zinc deficiency. PMID:22822446

  2. The interaction of type of dietary carbohydrates with copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fields, M; Ferretti, R J; Smith, J C; Reiser, S

    1984-02-01

    The present study was designed to determine if the more severe copper deficiency in rats fed sucrose and fructose, as compared to starch, is due to a specific effect of the fructose or to a nonspecific effect of any simple carbohydrate. Seventy weanling male rats were fed, for 9 wk, copper-deficient diets or copper-supplemented diets containing either 62% starch, fructose, or glucose. Decreased hematocrit, serum copper, and ceruloplasmin concentrations but increased heart and liver weights, total liver lipid, and hepatic iron concentrations were found in all copper-deficient rats regardless of the dietary carbohydrate. Feeding rats the high glucose diet decreased plasma albumin and liver glycogen but increased blood urea nitrogen when compared to rats fed starch. However, rats fed fructose generally exhibited a more severe copper deficiency as compared to rats fed either starch or glucose. The severity was characterized by lower (p less than 0.05) body weight, liver glycogen, hematocrit, serum copper, and albumin. Conversely, liver and heart weights, blood urea nitrogen, and plasma glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase were higher (p less than 0.05). Plasma cholesterol was increased by copper deficiency only in rats fed fructose or glucose. During the study, 17 of the 40 rats fed copper-deficient diets died; 66% of those fed fructose, 26% fed glucose, and 30% fed starch. These results suggest that the fructose moiety of sucrose is responsible for the increased severity of copper deficiency in rats fed sucrose as compared to starch.

  3. Long-Term Dietary Folate Deficiency Accelerates Progressive Hearing Loss on CBA/Ca Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Vega, Raquel; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Partearroyo, Teresa; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Pajares, María A.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary folic acid deficiency induced early hearing loss in C57BL/6J mice after 2-months, corroborates the epidemiological association previously described between vitamin deficiency and this sensory impairment. However, this strain is prone to early hearing loss, and hence we decided to analyze whether the effects exerted by folate deprivation follow the same pattern in a mouse strain such as CBA/Ca, which is resistant to hearing impairment. Here, we show results of a long-term study on hearing carried out on CBA/Ca mice subjected to dietary folate deprivation. Systemic changes included decreased serum folate levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and signs of anemia in the group fed with folate-deficient (FD) diet. Initial signs of hearing loss were detected in this strain after 8-months of vitamin deficiency, and correlated with histological damage in the cochleae. In conclusion, the data presented reinforce the importance of adequate folic acid levels for the auditory system and suggest that the impact of dietary deficiencies may depend on the genetic background. PMID:27630560

  4. Dietary pattern and nutritional deficiencies among urban adolescents.

    PubMed

    Deka, Mrigen Kr; Malhotra, Anil Kumar; Yadav, Rashmi; Gupta, Shubhanshu

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents are considered to be a nutritionally vulnerable segment of the population. There is a greater need to look into the nutritional status of adolescents but unfortunately, precise estimates of their dietary intake, dietary practices as well as nutritional deficiencies have been the least explored area. The general objective for conducting this study was to assess the dietary pattern and nutritional deficiencies among adolescents. A cross-sectional study was conducted among adolescents in schools and colleges in the urban areas of Jhansi district in Uttar Pradesh. The study sample consisted of 400 school children in the age group of 10-19 years. Food consumption of the subjects was assessed using a 3-day food intake recall method. Mean age of the adolescents was 14.16 years. More than half of the children studied had malnutrition (53.5%). Mean intake of calorie, protein, fat, iron, and vitamins A and C were lower than the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs). The habitual dietary pattern indicated poor consumption of milk, liver, and leafy vegetables. In comparison to boys (31.5%), more girls (46%) were underweight. On seeing the association, nutritional status of these adolescents within the normal limits were found to be significantly higher in those from nuclear families (P < 0.001), those with better educated parents (P < 0.000), and those from families of higher socioeconomic status (P < 0.000). Overall, among the participants, there were both macro- and micronutrients deficiencies. Therefore, there is a need to encourage people to adopt small family norms, and a need for the sensitization of both adolescents and their parents through health and nutrition education (HNE) to improve the health and nutritional status of the adolescents.

  5. Dietary nicotinic acid supplementation ameliorates chronic alcohol-induced fatty liver in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Zhang, Wenliang; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2014-07-01

    Alcohol abuse frequently causes niacin deficiency in association with the development of alcoholic liver disease. The objective of the present study was to determine whether dietary nicotinic acid (NA) deficiency exaggerates and whether dietary NA supplementation alleviates alcohol-induced fatty liver. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair-fed with 4 isocaloric liquid diets: control, ethanol (EtOH), EtOH with dietary NA deficiency, and EtOH with dietary NA supplementation, respectively, for 8 weeks. The control and EtOH diets contained normal levels of NA (7.5 mg/l). Dietary NA deficiency (0 mg NA/l) was achieved by removing NA from the vitamin mix, while NA was added to the liquid diet at 750 mg/l for dietary NA supplementation. Chronic EtOH feeding induced significant lipid accumulation in the liver, which was not worsened by dietary NA deficiency, but was ameliorated by dietary NA supplementation. Liver total NAD, NAD(+) , and NADH levels were remarkably higher in the NA supplemented group than the NA deficient or EtOH alone groups. Dietary NA supplementation to EtOH-fed rats increased the protein levels of hepatic cytochrome P450 4A1 (CYP4A1) and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 without affecting their mRNA levels. Interestingly, we found dietary NA supplementation reduced the ubiquitination level of CYP4A1. In addition, hepatic fatty acid synthase expression was reduced, while the serum β-hydroxybutyrate and adiponectin concentrations were significantly elevated by dietary NA supplementation. Moreover, dietary NA supplementation modulated EtOH-perturbed liver and serum metabolite profiles. These results demonstrate that alcoholic fatty liver was not exaggerated by dietary NA deficiency, but was ameliorated by dietary NA supplementation. Increased hepatic fatty acid oxidation and decreased hepatic de novo lipogenesis contribute to the effects of dietary NA supplementation. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. Influence of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Induced by Low Dietary Calcium, Vitamin D Deficiency, and Renal Failure on Circulating Rat PTH Molecular Forms.

    PubMed

    D'Amour, Pierre; Rousseau, Louise; Hornyak, Stephen; Yang, Zan; Cantor, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Rats(r) with secondary hyperparathyroidism were studied to define the relationship between vitamin D metabolites and rPTH levels measured by 3 different rat ELISAs. Controls and renal failure (RF) rats were on a normal diet, while 2 groups on a low-calcium (-Ca) or a vitamin D-deficient (-D) diet. RF was induced surgically. Mild RF rats had normal calcium and 25(OH)D but reduced 1,25(OH)(2)D levels (P < .001) with a 2.5-fold increased in rPTH (P < .001). Severe RF rats and those on a -Ca or -D diet had reduced calcium (P < .01) and 25(OH)D levels (P < .05), with rPTH increased by 2 (-Ca diet; P < .05), 4 (-D diet; P < .001), and 20-folds (RF; P < .001) while 1,25(OH)(2)D was high (-Ca diet: P < .001) or low (-D diet, RF: P < .001). 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)(2)D were positively and negatively related on the -Ca and -D diets, respectively. rPTH molecular forms behaved as expected in RF and on -Ca diet, but not on -D diet with more C-rPTH fragments when less were expected. This may be related to the short-time course of this study compared to prior studies.

  7. Methionine deficiency and hepatic injury in a dietary steatohepatitis model.

    PubMed

    Oz, Helieh S; Chen, Theresa S; Neuman, Manuela

    2008-03-01

    Methionine (Meth) is an essential amino acid involved in DNA methylation and glutathione biosynthesis. We examined the effect of Meth on the development of steatohepatitis. Rats were fed (five weeks) amino acid-based Meth-choline-sufficient (A-MCS) or total deficient (MCD) diets and gavaged daily (two weeks) with vehicle (B-vehicle/MCD), or Meth replacement (C-Meth/MCD). To assess the effect of short-term deficiency, after three weeks one MCS group was fed a deficient diet (D-MCS/MCD). Animals fed the deficient diet for two weeks lost (29%) weight and after five weeks weighed one third as much as those on the sufficient diet, and also developed anemia (P < 0.01). Hepatic transaminases progressively increased from two to five weeks (P < 0.01), leading to severe hepatic pathology. Meth administration normalized hematocrit, improved weight (P < 0.05), and suppressed abnormal enzymes activities (P < 0.01). Meth administration improved blood and hepatic glutathione (GSH), S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), and hepatic lesions (P < 0.01). The deficient diet significantly upregulated proinflammatory and fibrotic genes, which was ameliorated by Meth administration. These data support a pivotal role for methionine in the pathogenesis of the dietary model of Meth-choline-deficient (MCD) steatohepatitis (NASH).

  8. Role of zinc in regulating the testicular function. Part 3. Histopathological changes induced by dietary zinc deficiency in testes of male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Hafiez, A A; el-Kirdassy, Z H; el-Malkh, N M; el-Zayat, E M

    1990-01-01

    Zinc deficiency affects the testicular tissues adversely. The testes of zinc-deficient rats showed variable degrees of degeneration compared to both control and zinc-supplemented ones. Initially, there was an early pronounced spermatic arrest followed by a series of degeneration of the cellular layers constituting the seminiferous tubules in the zinc-deficient rats. Degenerative changes were additionally demonstrated in the interstitial tissue cells of the zinc-deficient rats. These histopathological observations in testes of zinc-deficient rats run in parallel provide an additional support to our previous publications in which we recorded a significant reduction in both serum and testicular levels of testosterone in the same group of animals, since spermatogenesis in rodents appeared to depend primarily on testosterone level.

  9. Testicular apoptosis after dietary zinc deficiency: ultrastructural and TUNEL studies.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepa; Nair, Neena; Bedwal, Ranveer Singh

    2011-10-01

    The present study was conducted in Wistar rats to determine whether prepubertal dietary zinc deficiency causes apoptotic changes in testes. Prepubertal male Wistar rats (40-50 gm) were divided into 3 groups: zinc control (ZC), pairfed (PF), and zinc deficient (ZD). Control and pairfed groups were given a 100 ppm zinc diet while the deficient groups received 1 ppm zinc diet for 2 and 4 weeks (w), respectively. Ultrastructural studies revealed several apoptotic features such as wavy basement membrane, displaced nuclei, chromatin condensation, plasma membrane blebbing, nuclear membrane dissolution, loss of inter-Sertoli cell junctional complexes, and intercellular bridges and deformed mitochondria. A variable spectrum of sperm defects had also been visualized e.g., acrosomal deformities such as decapitation and a ring of condensed chromatin around the nuclear periphery, deformed sperm heads with a condensed nucleus, tail-elements with superfluous cytoplasm, and damage to the mitochondrial sheath and aggregation of spermatozoa within the membrane. This was further supported by TUNEL studies. Apoptotic index, epididymal sperm concentration, motility, and fertility index also revealed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in zinc deficient groups (2 and 4 w) when compared with their respective control and pairfed groups. All the above findings are indicative that changes observed in the testes after dietary zinc deficiency are due to the onset of apoptosis. Increased apoptotic degeneration in testes may cause irreversible changes in the germ cells associated with decreased epididymal sperm concentration, motility, and fertility index which contributes to the low efficiency of spermatogenesis thereby indicating a possible role of zinc in fertility.

  10. Dietary selenium deficiency as well as excess supplementation induces multiple defects in mouse epididymal spermatozoa: understanding the role of selenium in male fertility.

    PubMed

    Shalini, Sonia; Bansal, M P

    2008-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is essential for male fertility. The present study was carried out to observe the defects associated with Se deficiency as well as excess Se supplementation by analyzing the sperm ultrastructure and chromatin organization. Different Se status mice were generated viz. Se deficient (group I), Se adequate (group II) and Se excess (group III) by feeding the respective diets for a period of 4 (group Ia, IIa and IIIa) and 8 weeks (group Ib, IIb and IIIb). Reduction in sperm concentration, motility and percentage fertility was observed in Se deficient and Se excess groups. Electron microscopy revealed mitochondrial swelling and gaps between adjacent mitochondria in mice fed Se-deficient diet for 4 weeks. At 8 weeks, several abnormalities such as loose contact of the mitochondrial helix with the plasma membrane, loss of mitochondria, retention of cytoplasmic droplet, fracturing of outer dense fibres and presence of both the midpiece and the principal piece cross-sections in a common plasma membrane were observed. In Se excess group, the predominant defect was the frequent presence of equidistant, cross-sectioned midpieces of the tail embedded in a common cytoplasm. These defects are indicative of loss of sperm motility. Spermatozoa from Se-deficient mice had incompletely condensed chromatin and indicated an increase in occurrence of DNA strand breaks. The animals fed Se excess diet also indicated increase in DNA breaks but this was significantly less than the deficient diet fed groups. Our study reveals the defects associated with Se deficiency that result in loss of reproductive ability and also reflects its possible harmful effects on spermatozoa after prolonged consumption at supranutritional level.

  11. Selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies induce widespread pyogranuloma formation in mice, while high levels of dietary selenium decrease liver tumor size driven by TGFa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Changes in dietary selenium and selenoprotein status may influence both anti- and pro-cancer pathways, making the outcome of interventions different from one study to another. To characterize such outcomes in a defined setting, we undertook a controlled hepatocarcinogenesis study involving varying l...

  12. Effect of dietary selenium deficiency on the in vitro fertilizing ability of mice spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gutiérrez, M; García-Montalvo, E A; Izquierdo-Vega, J A; Del Razo, L M

    2008-08-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for mammals, being integral part of antioxidant system. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of selenium deficiency on in vitro fertilization (IVF) capacity of spermatozoa and on oxidative stress in these cells. Male C57BL/6N mice were maintained on selenium-deficient or selenium-sufficient diets (0.02 or 0.2 ppm of selenium as selenomethionine, respectively) for 4 months. Liver glutathione peroxidase activity measurements were used to confirm selenium deficiency. Sperm quality and IVF capability among both groups were evaluated. To assess oxidative damage, lipid peroxidation as malondialdehyde production was determined in spermatozoa as well as the testes. Ultrastructural analyses of spermatozoa nuclei using transmission electron microscopy were also performed. The percentage of eggs fertilized with sperm from selenium-deficient mice was significantly decreased by approximately 67%. This reduced fertilization capacity was accompanied by increased levels of lipid peroxidation in both the testes and sperm, indicating that selenium deficiency induced oxidative stress. Consistent with this finding, spermatozoa from selenium-deficient animals exhibited altered chromatin condensation. Deficiency in dietary selenium decreases the reproductive potential of male mice and is associated with oxidative damage in spermatozoa.

  13. Iron-induced nickel deficiency in pecan

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency can occur in horticultural and agronomic crops. This study assesses impact of excessive iron (Fe) on expression of Ni deficiency in pecan [Carya illinoinensis (Wangenh.) K. Koch]. Field and greenhouse experiments found Ni deficiency to be inducible by ei...

  14. [Dietary iron intake and deficiency in elite women volleyball players].

    PubMed

    Mielgo-Ayuso, J; Urdampilleta, A; Martínez-Sanz, J M; Seco, J

    2012-01-01

    Volleyball practice requires repeated impacts on arms and feet caused by vertical jumps, falls, auctions, sudden and rapid changes of direction, which is why might raise us problems in the metabolism of iron (Fe) and the recommended intake of 18 mg/day (in the women in general), is not sufficient to meet the needs of the players of volleyball female (JVF). We analyzed the FS and IST of 10 JVF a team of Spanish SuperLeague (26.6 ± 5.9 years and height 178.05 ± 8.7 cm) in two moments of the season: Week 0 (pre-start of preseason) and week 11 (after 11 weeks of training and 6 games of the regular season). Also calculated Fe intake in this period with consumption frequency questionnaire developed and tested with food dietary records of 7 days. We observed that an intake of 25.8 mg/day of dietary Fe is not sufficient to prevent 30% of the JVF suffer pre-latent iron deficiency and 20% latent deficit (pre-anemia). It could be recommended conducting periodic blood analytical and a food education, teaching which foods containing a high content of Fe-type heme, and the factors that can interfere with absorption.

  15. Induction of renal growth and injury in the intact rat kidney by dietary deficiency of antioxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Nath, K A; Salahudeen, A K

    1990-01-01

    We report induction of renal growth and injury in the intact rat kidney using a diet deficient in vitamin E and selenium. This diet was imposed in 3-wk-old male weanling rats, and after 9 wk, enhancement of growth, characterized by increased wet weight, dry weight, protein content, and DNA content appeared. Morphometric analyses revealed increased kidney volume, tubular epithelial volume, and mean glomerular volume. There were no differences in nephron number. The animals on the deficient diet displayed increased urinary protein excretion at 9 wk. Renal injury was also characterized by an interstitial cellular infiltrate and diminutions in glomerular filtration rate. Enhanced growth and injury were antedated by increased renal ammoniagenesis. The deficient diet did not induce metabolic acidosis, potassium depletion, glucose intolerance, or elevated plasma amino acid concentration. Enhancement of renal growth and ammoniagenesis by the deficient diet was not suppressible by chronic alkali therapy. Stimulation of renal growth could not be ascribed to increased intrarenal iron, induction of ornithine decarboxylase, or alterations in glomerular hemodynamics. Stimulation of renal ammoniagenesis by dietary deficiency of antioxidants is a novel finding, as is induction of growth and injury. We suggest that increased renal ammoniagenesis contributes to induction of renal growth and injury. Images PMID:2212007

  16. Dietary taurine deficiency and dilated cardiomyopathy in the fox.

    PubMed

    Moise, N S; Pacioretty, L M; Kallfelz, F A; Stipanuk, M H; King, J M; Gilmour, R F

    1991-02-01

    Taurine deficiency has been implicated as a potential cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the relationship between taurine and myocardial function is presently unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dilated cardiomyopathy in the fox is associated with dietary taurine deficiency. A total of 68 foxes from farms with a history of death caused by dilated cardiomyopathy and 14 foxes from a farm with no history of dilated cardiomyopathy were studied. Dilated cardiomyopathy was diagnosed by echocardiography in 48% of the foxes from one farm with a positive history and in none of the foxes from the control farm. Foxes less than 9 months of age were more commonly affected than older foxes (p = 0.03). Plasma taurine concentrations were significantly less (p less than 0.01) in foxes that had dilated cardiomyopathy (26.8 +/- 16.4 nmol/ml) than in the control foxes (99.3 +/- 60.2 nmol/ml). A significantly higher (p less than 0.01) incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy was present in foxes with a history of a sibling or offspring that died of dilated cardiomyopathy than in foxes without a family history of cardiac death. In one fox with dilated cardiomyopathy that was tested, the myocardial taurine concentration was lower (1.7 mumol/gm wet weight) than that of control foxes (7.3 +/- 1.6 mumol/gm wet weight). Hepatic cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase activity was significantly less (p less than 0.001) in foxes with dilated cardiomyopathy (0.97 +/- 0.2 nmol/mm.mg protein) than in control foxes (2.11 +/- 0.07 nmol CO2/mm.mg protein).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. MicroRNA dysregulation and esophageal cancer development depend on the extent of zinc dietary deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fong, Louise Y; Taccioli, Cristian; Jing, Ruiyan; Smalley, Karl J; Alder, Hansjuerg; Jiang, Yubao; Fadda, Paolo; Farber, John L; Croce, Carlo M

    2016-03-08

    Zinc deficiency (ZD) increases the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and marginal ZD is prevalent in humans. In rats, marked-ZD (3 mg Zn/kg diet) induces a proliferative esophagus with a 5-microRNA signature (miR-31, -223, -21, -146b, -146a) and promotes ESCC. Here we report that moderate and mild-ZD (6 and 12 mg Zn/kg diet) also induced esophageal hyperplasia, albeit less pronounced than induced by marked-ZD, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, -146a). On exposure to an environmental carcinogen, ~16% of moderate/mild-ZD rats developed ESCC, a cancer incidence significantly greater than for Zn-sufficient rats (0%) (P ≤ 0.05), but lower than marked-ZD rats (68%) (P < 0.001). Importantly, the high ESCC, marked-ZD esophagus had a 15-microRNA signature, resembling the human ESCC miRNAome, with miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 as the top-up-regulated species. This signature discriminated it from the low ESCC, moderate/mild-ZD esophagus, with a 2-microRNA signature (miR-31, miR-223). Additionally, Fbxw7, Pdcd4, and Stk40 (tumor-suppressor targets of miR-223, -21, and -31) were downregulated in marked-ZD cohort. Bioinformatics analysis predicted functional relationships of the 3 tumor-suppressors with other cancer-related genes. Thus, microRNA dysregulation and ESCC progression depend on the extent of dietary Zn deficiency. Our findings suggest that even moderate ZD may promote esophageal cancer and dietary Zn has preventive properties against ESCC. Additionally, the deficiency-associated miR-223, miR-21, and miR-31 may be useful therapeutic targets in ESCC.

  18. Deficient and excess dietary selenium levels affect growth performance, blood cells apoptosis and liver HSP70 expression in juvenile yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun-Ru; Huang, Yan-Hua; Wang, Guo-Xia; Wu, Ying-Xia; Xian, Jian-An; Wang, An-Li; Cao, Jun-Ming

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the effects of deficient and excess dietary selenium (Se) on growth, blood cells apoptosis and liver heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in juvenile yellow catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco). After 8 weeks, yellow catfish (initial weight: 2.12 ± 0.01 g) fed isonitrogenous and isolipid diets containing <0.05 (deficient dietary Se) or 6.5 (excess dietary Se) mg Se/kg displayed a significantly lower weight gain ratio (WGR) than those fed a diet containing 0.23 (normal dietary Se) mg Se/kg. As dietary Se levels increased, liver Se concentration, glutathione peroxidase activity and the hepatosomatic index increased significantly. Plasma glucose concentration was highest in the normal treatment compared with the excess dietary Se treatment. Both deficient and excess dietary Se lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis ratio in blood cells, whereas only excess dietary Se increased their cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) (CF-Ca(2+)) concentration. Excess dietary Se also resulted in the highest level of HSP70 expression, thereby possibly providing a protective mechanism against oxidative stress. These results indicate that both deficient and excess dietary Se restrained the growth of juvenile yellow catfish and caused oxidative stress. The overproduction of ROS may act as a signal molecule mediate apoptosis when dietary Se deficiency. Both ROS and CF-Ca(2+) were recorded when dietary Se excess, suggesting that Ca(2+) may be activated by Se and play a major role during Se-induced oxidative stress and cell apoptosis.

  19. Dietary education and iron deficiency anaemia in the inner city

    PubMed Central

    Childs, F; Aukett, A; Darbyshire, P; Ilett, S; Livera, L

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 26 October 1996
 OBJECTIVES—To assess if a dietary health education programme could be used within existing health resources to reduce the incidence of iron deficiency anaemia in an inner city population.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study.
SETTING—Inner city areas of west and south Birmingham.
SUBJECTS—A total of 1000 children recorded on the child health computer register.
INTERVENTION—Children were recruited at birth and randomised into control and intervention groups. Families in the intervention group received specific health education information at key ages by face to face contact using a range of materials. The control group received standard health education as delivered by the health visitors at the time.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Haemoglobin estimation and iron content of the diet at 18 months of age.
RESULTS—A total of 455 children completed the study. Sixty nine (27%) of the control group and 55 (28%) of the intervention group were anaemic as defined by haemoglobin less than 110 g/l. There was no difference in the iron content of the diets offered to the two groups of children.
CONCLUSION—In this deprived population we have shown no reduction in anaemia using a targeted nutritional programme and have highlighted the difficulties in conducting health education programmes within the scope of current health resources.

 PMID:9068306

  20. Maternal dietary choline deficiency alters angiogenesis in fetal mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mehedint, Mihai G.; Craciunescu, Corneliu N.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether maternal dietary choline modulates angiogenesis in fetal brain. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice were fed either a choline-deficient (CD), control (CT), or choline-supplemented diet (CS) from days 12 to 17 (E12-17) of pregnancy and then fetal brains were studied. In CD fetal hippocampus, proliferation of endothelial cells (EC) was decreased by 32% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS) while differentiated EC clusters (expressing factor VIII related antigen (RA)) increased by 25% (p < 0.01 vs. CT or CS). These changes were associated with > 25% decrease in the number of blood vessels in CD fetal hippocampus (p < 0.01 vs. CT and CS), with no change in total cross-sectional area of these blood vessels. Expression of genes for the angiogenic signals derived from both endothelial and neuronal progenitor cells (NPC) was increased in CD fetal hippocampus VEGF C (Vegfc), 2.0-fold, p < 0.01 vs. CT and angiopoietin 2 (Angpt2), 2.1-fold, (p < 0.01 vs. CT)). Similar increased expression was observed in NPC isolated from E14 fetal mouse brains and exposed to low (5 μM), CT (70 μM), or high choline (280 μM) media for 72 h (low choline caused a 9.7-fold increase in relative gene expression of Vegfc (p < 0.001 vs. CT and high) and a 3.4-fold increase in expression of Angpt2, (p < 0.05 vs. CT and high). ANGPT2 protein was increased 42.2% (p < 0.01). Cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide islands in the proximity of the promoter areas of Vegfc and Angpt2 were hypomethylated in low choline NPC compared to CT NPC (p < 0.01). We conclude that maternal dietary choline intake alters angiogenesis in the developing fetal hippocampus. PMID:20624989

  1. Adverse effects of herbal or dietary supplements in G6PD deficiency: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Lai, Nai Ming; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Chong, David Weng Kwai

    2017-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common genetic disorder, affecting nearly 400 million individuals worldwide. Whilst it is known that a number of drugs, foods and chemicals can trigger haemolysis in G6PD deficient individuals, the association between herbal and dietary supplements and haemolysis is less clear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between herbal or dietary supplements and adverse events in G6PD deficient individuals. We searched 14 electronic databases from their inception until November 2015 for articles describing the use of herbal or dietary supplements in G6PD deficient individuals. Additional publications were identified from manually searching textbooks, conference abstracts and the grey literature. All study designs were included as long as they contained clinical information. These gathered findings were summarized narratively. Thirty-two publications met inclusion criteria. These reported on 10 herbal and dietary supplements. Overall evidence linking haemolysis to a herbal/dietary supplement was only found for henna. No evidence of harm was observed for vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin K, Gingko biloba and α-lipoic acid. The review showed that there was insufficient evidence to contravene the use of most herbal or dietary products at therapeutic doses in G6PD deficient subjects. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Tissue mineral distributions are differentially modified by dietary protein deficiency and a murine nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Tu, T; Scott, M E; Sabally, K; Koski, K G

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether mineral concentrations in the spleen, serum, and liver were modified by challenge infection with a gastrointestinal nematode, by infection dose, or by protein deficiency despite adequate dietary intakes of minerals. BALB/c mice fed protein-sufficient (PS, 24%) or protein-deficient (PD, 3%) diets were infected with 100 L3 of Heligmosomoides bakeri, drug-treated, and then re-infected with either 0, 100, or 200 L3. Protein deficiency and infection, but not dose, independently modified tissue mineral distributions. H. bakeri infection lowered serum iron concentrations in both diet groups. Despite this, PD mice had elevated iron and calcium concentrations and Ca/Zn ratio in the spleen as well as Fe/Zn ratio in liver, but they had reduced calcium, zinc, copper, and sulfur concentrations, and Cu/Zn ratio in the liver. Infection reduced calcium and iron concentrations and the Ca/Zn ratio in the spleen. We suggest that tissue mineral distribution is a consequence of Th2 immune and inflammatory responses induced by infection in PS mice and the switch to predominant Th1 inflammation in PD, nematode-infected mice.

  3. UVRAG Deficiency Exacerbates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    An, Lin; Hu, Xiao-wen; Zhang, Shasha; Hu, Xiaowen; Song, Zongpei; Naz, Amber; Zi, Zhenguo; Wu, Jian; Li, Can; Zou, Yunzeng; He, Lin; Zhu, Hongxin

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of various types of cancers. However, its clinical application has been largely limited by potential development of cardiotoxicity. Previously we have shown that ultra-violet radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), an autophagy-related protein, is essential for the maintenance of autophagic flux in the heart under physiological conditions. Here, we sought to determine the role of UVRAG-mediated autophagy in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Mouse models of acute or chronic DOX-induced cardiotoxicity were established. UVRAG deficiency exacerbated DOX-induced mortality and cardiotoxicity manifested by increased cytoplasmic vacuolization, enhanced collagen accumulation, elevated serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase and myocardial muscle creatine kinase, higher ROS levels, aggravated apoptosis and more depressed cardiac function. Autophagic flux was impaired in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. UVRAG deficiency aggravated impaired autophagic flux in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Intermittent fasting restored autophagy and ameliorated pathological alterations of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our data suggest that UVRAG deficiency exacerbates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, at least in part, through aggravation of DOX-induced impaired autophagic flux. Intermittent fasting, which restores blunted autophagic flux and ameliorates pathology in the mouse models of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, may be used as a potential preventive or therapeutic approach for DOX cardiotoxicity. PMID:28225086

  4. UVRAG Deficiency Exacerbates Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    An, Lin; Hu, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Shasha; Hu, Xiaowen; Song, Zongpei; Naz, Amber; Zi, Zhenguo; Wu, Jian; Li, Can; Zou, Yunzeng; He, Lin; Zhu, Hongxin

    2017-02-22

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of various types of cancers. However, its clinical application has been largely limited by potential development of cardiotoxicity. Previously we have shown that ultra-violet radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG), an autophagy-related protein, is essential for the maintenance of autophagic flux in the heart under physiological conditions. Here, we sought to determine the role of UVRAG-mediated autophagy in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Mouse models of acute or chronic DOX-induced cardiotoxicity were established. UVRAG deficiency exacerbated DOX-induced mortality and cardiotoxicity manifested by increased cytoplasmic vacuolization, enhanced collagen accumulation, elevated serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase and myocardial muscle creatine kinase, higher ROS levels, aggravated apoptosis and more depressed cardiac function. Autophagic flux was impaired in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. UVRAG deficiency aggravated impaired autophagic flux in DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Intermittent fasting restored autophagy and ameliorated pathological alterations of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our data suggest that UVRAG deficiency exacerbates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, at least in part, through aggravation of DOX-induced impaired autophagic flux. Intermittent fasting, which restores blunted autophagic flux and ameliorates pathology in the mouse models of DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, may be used as a potential preventive or therapeutic approach for DOX cardiotoxicity.

  5. Osteocyte-derived RANKL is a critical mediator of the increased bone resorption caused by dietary calcium deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinhu; Piemontese, Marilina; Thostenson, Jeff D.; Weinstein, Robert S.; Manolagas, Stavros C.; O’Brien, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) excess stimulates bone resorption. This effect is associated with increased expression of the osteoclastogenic cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor кB ligand (RANKL) in bone. However, several different cell types, including bone marrow stromal cells, osteocytes, and T lymphocytes, express both RANKL and the PTH receptor and it is unclear whether RANKL expression by any of these cell types is required for PTH-induced bone loss. Here we have used mice lacking the RANKL gene in osteocytes to determine whether RANKL produced by this cell type is required for the bone loss caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism induced by dietary calcium deficiency in adult mice. Thirty days of dietary calcium deficiency caused bone loss in control mice, but this effect was blunted in mice lacking RANKL in osteocytes. The increase in RANKL expression in bone and the increase in osteoclast number caused by dietary calcium deficiency were also blunted in mice lacking RANKL in osteocytes. These results demonstrate that RANKL produced by osteocytes contributes to the increased bone resorption and the bone loss caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism, strengthening the evidence that osteocytes are an important target cell for hormonal control of bone remodeling. PMID:24933342

  6. The severity of copper deficiency in rats is determined by the type of dietary carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Fields, M; Ferretti, R J; Reiser, S; Smith, J C

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the interaction between copper and dietary carbohydrates on clinical and enzymatic indices associated with copper deficiency. Copper deficiency was produced in rats by feeding diets adequate in all nutrients including selenium and chromium, but marginal in copper (1.2 micrograms/g diet) containing 62% of either starch, fructose, or glucose. During the fifth week, the fructose of the copper-deficient diet (20 rats) was replaced by either starch (10 rats) or by glucose (10 rats). The experiment was terminated after 11 weeks. Copper deficiency in rats fed fructose significantly lowered body weight and hematocrit, but increased liver weight, blood urea nitrogen, ammonia, cholesterol, and triglycerides when compared to rats fed starch or glucose. The copper metalloenzyme, superoxide dismutase, the selenoenzyme, glutathione peroxidase, and hepatic ATP were decreased in the copper-deficient rats fed fructose as compared to copper-deficient rats fed starch or glucose. These results indicate that fructose may be the dietary component which has a deleterious effect on copper and selenium status. Changing the type of dietary carbohydrate in copper-deficient rats from fructose to either starch or glucose ameliorated the severity of the deficiency. The protective effects were more pronounced with starch than with glucose.

  7. Dietary zinc modifies diabetic-induced renal pathology in rats.

    PubMed

    Elsaed, Wael M; Mohamed, Hazem Abdelhamid

    2017-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate how far dietary zinc (Zn) modifies the histomorphological alterations induced by diabetes in rat kidneys. The animals were divided into negative control group (10 rats). Diabetes was induced in thirty animals by streptozotocin. After confirming diabetes, the animals were divided into three groups (n = 10). Group II served as the positive control group (fed on standard diet), group III was fed on Zn deficient diet, and group IV was fed on Zn supplemented diet. Caspase-3 immune staining was used to estimate the caspase activity. Stereological procedures were used to measure the quantity of the immune stain and the surface area of the Bowman's space. The renal cortices of group II rats revealed apparent widening of Bowman's spaces with few apoptotic figures. The filtration barrier showed thickening of the basement membrane. The proximal convoluted tubules showed patchy loss of the apical microvilli with swollen mitochondria. The distal convoluted tubules revealed area of irregular basal enfolding. The picture was aggravated by Zn deficiency in group III besides areas of cortical interstitial fibrosis. The histopathological alterations were minimal in the cortices of group IV. A significant increase of the Bowman's space surface area in group II and IV while decrease in group III compared with group I. The expression of Caspase-3 density was significantly increased in group II and III compared with group I while in group IV was non significant. In conclusion, dietary Zn modulated renal cortical changes caused by diabetes in rats.

  8. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent.

    PubMed

    Kumssa, Diriba B; Joy, Edward J M; Ander, E Louise; Watts, Michael J; Young, Scott D; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R

    2015-06-22

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita(-1) d(-1) (± SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge.

  9. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent

    PubMed Central

    Kumssa, Diriba B.; Joy, Edward J. M.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Young, Scott D.; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita−1 d−1 (±SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge. PMID:26098577

  10. Dietary calcium and zinc deficiency risks are decreasing but remain prevalent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumssa, Diriba B.; Joy, Edward J. M.; Ander, E. Louise; Watts, Michael J.; Young, Scott D.; Walker, Sue; Broadley, Martin R.

    2015-06-01

    Globally, more than 800 million people are undernourished while >2 billion people have one or more chronic micronutrient deficiencies (MNDs). More than 6% of global mortality and morbidity burdens are associated with undernourishment and MNDs. Here we show that, in 2011, 3.5 and 1.1 billion people were at risk of calcium (Ca) and zinc (Zn) deficiency respectively due to inadequate dietary supply. The global mean dietary supply of Ca and Zn in 2011 was 684 ± 211 and 16 ± 3 mg capita-1 d-1 (±SD) respectively. Between 1992 and 2011, global risk of deficiency of Ca and Zn decreased from 76 to 51%, and 22 to 16%, respectively. Approximately 90% of those at risk of Ca and Zn deficiency in 2011 were in Africa and Asia. To our knowledge, these are the first global estimates of dietary Ca deficiency risks based on food supply. We conclude that continuing to reduce Ca and Zn deficiency risks through dietary diversification and food and agricultural interventions including fortification, crop breeding and use of micronutrient fertilisers will remain a significant challenge.

  11. Dietary deficiencies of unsaturated fatty acids and starch cause atopic dermatitis-like pruritus in hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masanori; Shimazaki, Yuki; Muto, Yoshiko; Kohno, Shigekatsu; Ohya, Susumu; Nabe, Takeshi

    2015-02-01

    Hairless mice fed with a special diet (named HR-AD) show atopic dermatitis (AD)-like pruritic skin inflammation that is almost completely resolved with the supplementation of an unsaturated fatty acid (UFA), the linoleic acid (LA). This suggests that the dietary deficiency of LA is the key cause of this dermatitis. However, because there is no appropriate control diet for HR-AD, the involvement of other dietary ingredients cannot be ruled out. Furthermore, it has not yet been tested whether only UFA deficiency can cause such AD-like pruritus. In this study, using semi-purified custom diets, we attempted to reproduce this syndrome. Four-week-old hairless mice were maintained on a widely used standard diet American Institute of Nutrition-76A (AIN-76A), its modifications, or HR-AD. Several modifications of fat and carbohydrate components revealed that dietary deficiency of both UFAs and cornstarch was required to induce severe skin barrier dysfunction as typically occurred in HR-AD-fed mice. An UFA- and cornstarch-deficient diet caused severe AD-like pruritus comparable to HR-AD, despite weak Th2 immune responses and absence of immunoglobulin E production. On the other hand, a diet lacking UFAs but containing cornstarch significantly alleviated the development of pruritic dermatitis. Furthermore, the supplementation of wheat starch similarly improved skin barrier function. In conclusion, this study showed that a lack of certain starches might also be the cause of diet-induced AD. Our findings could help to reproduce the diet-induced AD itch model and also provide evidence that certain starches can have protective and ameliorative effects on AD-like pruritus.

  12. Optimal dietary therapy of long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gillingham, Melanie B.; Connor, William E.; Matern, Dietrich; Rinaldo, Piero; Burlingame, Terry; Meeuws, Kaatje; Harding, Cary O.

    2009-01-01

    Current dietary therapy for long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCHAD) or trifunctional protein (TFP) deficiency consists of fasting avoidance, and limiting long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) intake. This study reports the relationship of dietary intake and metabolic control as measured by plasma acylcarnitine and organic acid profiles in 10 children with LCHAD or TFP deficiency followed for 1 year. Subjects consumed an average of 11% of caloric intake as dietary LCFA, 11% as MCT, 12% as protein, and 66% as carbohydrate. Plasma levels of hydroxypalmitoleic acid, hydroxyoleic, and hydroxylinoleic carnitine esters positively correlated with total LCFA intake and negatively correlated with MCT intake suggesting that as dietary intake of LCFA decreases and MCT intake increases, there is a corresponding decrease in plasma hydroxyacylcarnitines. There was no correlation between plasma acylcarnitines and level of carnitine supplementation. Dietary intake of fat-soluble vitamins E and K was deficient. Dietary intake and plasma levels of essential fatty acids, linoleic and linolenic acid, were deficient. On this dietary regimen, the majority of subjects were healthy with no episodes of metabolic decompensation. Our data suggest that an LCHAD or TFP-deficient patient should adhere to a diet providing age-appropriate protein and limited LCFA intake (10% of total energy) while providing 10–20% of energy as MCT and a daily multi-vitamin and mineral (MVM) supplement that includes all of the fat-soluble vitamins. The diet should be supplemented with vegetable oils as part of the 10% total LCFA intake to provide essential fatty acids. PMID:12809642

  13. Eats roots and leaves. Can edible horticultural crops address dietary calcium, magnesium and potassium deficiencies?

    PubMed

    Broadley, Martin R; White, Philip J

    2010-11-01

    Human individuals require at least 20 inorganic elements ('minerals') for normal functioning. However, much of the world's population is probably deficient in one or more essential minerals and at increased risk of physiological disorders. Addressing these 'hidden hungers' is a challenge for the nutrition and agriculture sectors. Mineral deficiencies among populations are typically identified from dietary surveys because (1) minerals are acquired primarily from dietary sources and (2) (bio)assays of mineral status can be unreliable. While dietary surveys are likely to under-report energy intakes, surveys show that 9% of all UK and US adults consume Ca and Mg, and 14% of adults consume K, at quantities below the UK lower reference nutrient intake, and are therefore at risk of deficiency. Low dietary Ca, Mg and K intakes can be caused by energy-malnourishment and by cultural and economic factors driving dietary conservatism. For example, cereal grains routinely displace vegetables and fruits in the diet. Cereal grains have low concentrations of several minerals, notably Ca, as a consequence of their physiology. Low grain mineral concentrations are compounded when cereal crops are grown in soils of low mineral phytoavailability and when grain is processed. In this paper, the impact of increased vegetable consumption and horticultural biofortification, i.e. enhancing crop mineral content through breeding and agronomy, on intakes of the major minerals Ca, Mg and K is assessed. Despite low energy intake from horticultural crops generally, increased vegetable consumption and biofortification would significantly improve dietary intakes of Ca, Mg and K.

  14. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  15. FOLATE DEFICIENCY ENHANCES ARSENIC-INDUCED GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Folate deficiency increases background levels of DNA damage and can enhance the mutagenicity of chemical agents. Duplicate experiments were performed to investigate the effect of dietary folate deficiency on arsenic induction of micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood cells. Male C5...

  16. Phospholipid metabolism and protein kinase C mediated protein phosphorylation in dietary protein deficiency in rat lung.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Surendra K; Kathayat, Rachna; Tyagi, Manoj; Taneja, Krishna K; Basir, Seemi F

    2005-07-01

    Nutritional deprivation of proteins decreases the protein kinase C (PKC) activity in rat lung. The activity of (PKC) is influenced by lipid metabolism. Changes in PKC activity may influence phosphorylation of its substrate proteins in the tissues. Therefore, alterations in phospholipid metabolism and PKC mediated protein phosphorylation in dietary protein deficiency in rat lung were envisaged. The study was conducted on rats fed on three different types of diet viz., casein (20% protein), deficient (4% protein, rice flour as source of protein) and supplemented (deficient diet supplemented with L-lysine and DL-threoning). Feeding of protein deficient diet caused reduction in incorporation of [3H] myo-inositol in the total phosphoinositides in lungs and an increase in total inositol phosphate pool. There was a significant reduction in the contents and turnover rate of phosphatidyl inositol and phosphatidyl inositol monophosphate. Supplementation of diet with L-lysine and DL-threonine had a reversing effect on total pool of phosphoinositides and, the metabolism of phosphatidyl inositol bisphosphate and phosphatidyl inositol. In phosphatidyl choline metabolism, the dietary protein deficiency led to a decrease in incorporation of [14C-methyl] choline-chloride in total phospholipids. In contrast, its incorporation increased in phosphatidyl choline pool. The contents of phosphatidyl choline and residue, incorporation of [14C-methyl] choline-chloride in them and their turnover rate also increased. Supplementation of diet had a reversal effect on most of these parameters. Phosphorylation of proteins of 84, 47, 35 and 16 kDa was identified to be mediated by PKC. In dietary protein deficiency, phosphorylation of all these proteins, except that of 47 kDa, increased. Supplementation of diet reversed the pattern except that of 84 kDa. The findings suggest that changes in phospholipid metabolism in dietary protein deficiency may effect the activity of PKC thereby influencing the

  17. EFFECT OF DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ON ARSENIC GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic, a human carcinogen found in drinking water supplies throughout the world, is clastogenic in human and rodent cells. An estimated ten percent of Americans are deficient in folate, a methyl donor necessary for normal nucleotide metabolism, DNA synthesis, and DNA methylatio...

  18. EFFECT OF DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ON ARSENIC GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic, a human carcinogen found in drinking water supplies throughout the world, is clastogenic in human and rodent cells. An estimated ten percent of Americans are deficient in folate, a methyl donor necessary for normal nucleotide metabolism, DNA synthesis, and DNA methylatio...

  19. Response to Dietary Phosphate Deficiency is Affected by Genetic Background in Growing Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concern over the environmental impact of phosphate (P) excretion from pig production has led to reduced dietary P supplementation. To examine how genetics influence P utilization, 94 gilts sired by 2 genetic lines (PIC337 and PIC280) were fed either a P adequate diet (PA) or a 20% P deficient diet ...

  20. Amelioration of estrogen deficiency-induced obesity by collagen hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Tsay-I; Chang, I-Chang; Lee, Hsueh-Hui; Hsieh, Kuang hui; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lai, Te-Jen; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hsu, Li-Sung; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Menopausal transition with declining estrogen levels significantly affects the physiological properties of women and consequently contributes to a series of medical conditions, including obesity. Obesity is a crucial risk factor associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and breast cancer. Increasing dietary protein content improves satiety and energy expenditure. Thus, we hypothesize that supplementing with collagen, a common dietary protein, may alleviate menopause-induced obesity. Methods: We used ovariectomized (OVX) rats to mimic a menopausal human. The body weight of OVX rats significantly increased compared with that of sham-operated rats (P<0.05), but uterus weight was decreased. Adipocyte size in perigonadal adipose tissue also increased (P<0.05). Results: By contrast, OVX rats supplemented with aqueous collagen hydrolysate (2.5 mg/mL) exhibited significant attenuation in body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement (P<0.05), but insignificant change in uterus weight. Further investigation indicated that collagen hydrolysate supplementation insignificantly affected the levels of dorsal fat, serum total cholesterol, and serum triacylglycerol. Levels of serum biochemical factors, calcium, phosphorus, and glucose were also insignificantly altered by collagen hydrolysate supplementation. Conclusion: Collagen hydrolysate supplementation reduced body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement in response to ovariectomy but slightly affected blood lipids, calcium, and glucose in both sham-operated and OVX rats. Collagen hydrolysate supplementation is beneficial in ameliorating estrogen deficiency-induced obesity and its associated risk factors. PMID:27877077

  1. Amelioration of estrogen deficiency-induced obesity by collagen hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Tsay-I; Chang, I-Chang; Lee, Hsueh-Hui; Hsieh, Kuang Hui; Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lai, Te-Jen; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Hsu, Li-Sung; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Menopausal transition with declining estrogen levels significantly affects the physiological properties of women and consequently contributes to a series of medical conditions, including obesity. Obesity is a crucial risk factor associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, and breast cancer. Increasing dietary protein content improves satiety and energy expenditure. Thus, we hypothesize that supplementing with collagen, a common dietary protein, may alleviate menopause-induced obesity. Methods: We used ovariectomized (OVX) rats to mimic a menopausal human. The body weight of OVX rats significantly increased compared with that of sham-operated rats (P<0.05), but uterus weight was decreased. Adipocyte size in perigonadal adipose tissue also increased (P<0.05). Results: By contrast, OVX rats supplemented with aqueous collagen hydrolysate (2.5 mg/mL) exhibited significant attenuation in body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement (P<0.05), but insignificant change in uterus weight. Further investigation indicated that collagen hydrolysate supplementation insignificantly affected the levels of dorsal fat, serum total cholesterol, and serum triacylglycerol. Levels of serum biochemical factors, calcium, phosphorus, and glucose were also insignificantly altered by collagen hydrolysate supplementation. Conclusion: Collagen hydrolysate supplementation reduced body weight gain and adipocyte enlargement in response to ovariectomy but slightly affected blood lipids, calcium, and glucose in both sham-operated and OVX rats. Collagen hydrolysate supplementation is beneficial in ameliorating estrogen deficiency-induced obesity and its associated risk factors.

  2. Dietary Calcium and Framingham Risk Score in Vitamin D Deficient Male (KNHANES 2009-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Jin; Yeum, Kyung-Jin; Park, Soo-Jung; Choi, Beomhee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The association between excess calcium intake and cardiovascular mortality has already been reported. In the present study, we investigated the relation between dietary calcium intake and Framingham Risk Score (FRS) according to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status. Materials and Methods A total of 7809 subjects (3452 males and 4357 female) aged over 40 years were selected for this cross-sectional study from data obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2011). Daily dietary calcium intake was categorized into <300, 300-600, 600-900, 900-1200, and >1200 mg/day and serum 25(OH)D concentration classified into <50, 50-75, >75 mmol/L. The FRS was compared by the daily dietary calcium intake categories according to 25(OH)D concentration after adjustment with relevant variables in both genders. Results Higher FRS was observed in males with both <300 mg and >1200 mg of dietary calcium intake and females with <300 mg of dietary calcium intake without adjustment. The significantly higher FRS remained in the <300 mg and >1200 mg of dietary calcium intake groups in both genders after adjustments for relevant variables. FRS was significantly higher in the group with >1200 mg of dietary calcium intake and serum 25(OH)D <50 nmol/L, which was the male only vitamin D deficient group. Conclusion Very low (<300 mg/day) and excess (>1200 mg/day) dietary calcium intake were related with higher FRS in both genders. In particular, higher FRS was observed in the excess (>1200 mg/day) dietary calcium intake male group under vitamin D deficiency (<50 nmol/L). PMID:25837195

  3. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of dietary methyl donor deficiency combined with unpredictable chronic mild stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Javelot, H; Messaoudi, M; Jacquelin, C; Bisson, J F; Rozan, P; Nejdi, A; Lazarus, C; Cassel, J C; Strazielle, C; Lalonde, R

    2014-03-15

    Methyl donor deficiencies and chronic stress cause depression independently, but their interaction has never been thoroughly evaluated. In our study, methyl donor deficient diet and chronic stress condition consisted respectively of a B2, B9, B12, and choline-free diet and a chronic mild stress procedure. Rats were randomly assigned to six groups with three "diet" conditions (free-feeding, pair-fed and methyl donor deficient diet) and two "stress" conditions (no-stress and stress) and were evaluated in the open-field, the elevated plus-maze and the forced swimming test. After the behavioral evaluation, corticosterone and homocysteine plasma levels were measured and dopamine, DOPAC, serotonin, 5HIAA concentrations were evaluated in several brain areas. Rats given a methyl donor deficient diet for 11 weeks causing elevated plasma homocysteine levels were compared to pair-fed and free-feeding rats with or without unpredictable chronic mild stress. Regardless of stress environmental conditions, the methyl donor deficient diet decreased plasma corticosterone levels and caused disinhibition in the elevated plus-maze condition relative to both control groups. However, stress potentiated the effects of the deficient regimen on rearing in the open-field and climbing in the forced swim test. The dietary changes involved in behavior and plasma corticosterone could be caused by homocysteine-induced decreases in dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine metabolites in selective brain regions and it can be noted that regardless of stress-conditions, methyl donor deficient diet decreases DOPAC/dopamine and 5HIAA/serotonin ratios in striatum and hypothalamus and selectively 5HIAA/serotonin ratio in the sensorimotor cortex. Our experimental data is particularly relevant in the context of neuropsychiatric disorders frequently associated with folate deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Early-in-life dietary zinc deficiency and supplementation and mammary tumor development in adulthood female rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Flávia R M; Grassi, Tony F; Zapaterini, Joyce R; Bidinotto, Lucas T; Barbisan, Luis F

    2017-06-01

    Zinc deficiency during pregnancy and postnatal life can adversely increase risk of developing human diseases at adulthood. The present study was designed to evaluate whether dietary zinc deficiency or supplementation during the pregnancy, lactation and juvenile stages interferes in the development of mammary tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Pregnant female SD rats were allocated into three groups: zinc-adequate diet (ZnA - 35-mg/kg chow), zinc-deficient diet (ZnD - 3-mg/kg chow) or zinc-supplemented diet (ZnS - 180-mg/kg chow) during gestational day 10 (GD 10) until the litters' weaning. Female offspring received the same diets as their dams until postnatal day (PND) 51. At PND 51, the animals received a single dose of DMBA (50 mg/kg, ig) and zinc-adequate diets. At PND 180, female were euthanized, and tumor samples were processed for histological evaluation and gene expression microarray analysis. The ZnD induced a significant reduction in female offspring body weight evolution and in mammary gland development. At late in life, the ZnD or ZnS did not alter the latency, incidence, multiplicity, volume or histological types of mammary tumors in relation to the ZnA group. However, the total tumor number in ZnS group was higher than in ZnA group, accompanied by distinct expression of 4 genes up- and 15 genes down-regulated. The present findings indicate that early-in-life dietary zinc supplementation, differently to zinc deficiency, has a potential to modify the susceptibility to the development of mammary tumors induced by DMBA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Marginal biotin deficiency can be induced experimentally in humans using a cost-effective outpatient design.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Shawna L; Henrich, Cindy L; Matthews, Nell I; Bogusiewicz, Anna; Dawson, Amanda M; Horvath, Thomas D; Owen, Suzanne N; Boysen, Gunnar; Moran, Jeffery H; Mock, Donald M

    2012-01-01

    To date, marginal, asymptomatic biotin deficiency has been successfully induced experimentally by the use of labor-intensive inpatient designs requiring rigorous dietary control. We sought to determine if marginal biotin deficiency could be induced in humans in a less expensive outpatient design incorporating a self-selected, mixed general diet. We sought to examine the efficacy of three outpatient study designs: two based on oral avidin dosing and one based on a diet high in undenatured egg white for a period of 28 d. In study design 1, participants (n = 4; 3 women) received avidin in capsules with a biotin binding capacity of 7 times the estimated dietary biotin intake of a typical self-selected diet. In study design 2, participants (n = 2; 2 women) received double the amount of avidin capsules (14 times the estimated dietary biotin intake). In study design 3, participants (n = 5; 3 women) consumed egg-white beverages containing avidin with a biotin binding capacity of 7 times the estimated dietary biotin intake. Established indices of biotin status [lymphocyte propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity; urinary excretion of 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid, 3-hydroxyisovaleryl carnitine (3HIA-carnitine), and biotin; and plasma concentration of 3HIA-carnitine] indicated that study designs 1 and 2 were not effective in inducing marginal biotin deficiency, but study design 3 was as effective as previous inpatient study designs that induced deficiency by egg-white beverage. Marginal biotin deficiency can be induced experimentally by using a cost-effective outpatient design by avidin delivery in egg-white beverages. This design should be useful to the broader nutritional research community.

  6. Pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency impairs spatial learning and memory in the cognitive holeboard task in piglets

    PubMed Central

    Antonides, Alexandra; Schoonderwoerd, Anne C.; Scholz, Gabi; Berg, Brian M.; Nordquist, Rebecca E.; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in humans, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Early-life iron deficiency can lead to irreversible deficits in learning and memory. The pig represents a promising model animal for studying such deficits, because of its similarities to humans during early development. We investigated the effects of pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency in piglets on growth, blood parameters, cognitive performance, and brain histology later in life. Four to six days after birth, 10 male sibling pairs of piglets were taken from 10 different sows. One piglet of each pair was given a 200 mg iron dextran injection and fed a control milk diet for 28 days (88 mg Fe/kg), whereas the other sibling was given a saline injection and fed an iron deficient (ID) milk diet (21 mg Fe/kg). Due to severely retarded growth of two of the ID piglets, only eight ID piglets were tested behaviorally. After dietary treatment, all piglets were fed a balanced commercial pig diet (190–240 mg Fe/kg). Starting at 7.5 weeks of age, piglets were tested in a spatial cognitive holeboard task. In this task, 4 of 16 holes contain a hidden food reward, allowing measurement of working (short-term) memory and reference (long-term) memory (RM) simultaneously. All piglets received 40–60 acquisition trials, followed by a 16-trial reversal phase. ID piglets showed permanently retarded growth and a strong decrease in blood iron parameters during dietary treatment. After treatment, ID piglets' blood iron values restored to normal levels. In the holeboard task, ID piglets showed impaired RM learning during acquisition and reversal. Iron staining at necropsy at 12 weeks of age showed that ID piglets had fewer iron-containing cells in hippocampal regions CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG). The number of iron-containing cells in CA3 correlated positively with the average RM score during acquisition across all animals. Our results support the hypothesis that early

  7. Pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency impairs spatial learning and memory in the cognitive holeboard task in piglets.

    PubMed

    Antonides, Alexandra; Schoonderwoerd, Anne C; Scholz, Gabi; Berg, Brian M; Nordquist, Rebecca E; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in humans, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Early-life iron deficiency can lead to irreversible deficits in learning and memory. The pig represents a promising model animal for studying such deficits, because of its similarities to humans during early development. We investigated the effects of pre-weaning dietary iron deficiency in piglets on growth, blood parameters, cognitive performance, and brain histology later in life. Four to six days after birth, 10 male sibling pairs of piglets were taken from 10 different sows. One piglet of each pair was given a 200 mg iron dextran injection and fed a control milk diet for 28 days (88 mg Fe/kg), whereas the other sibling was given a saline injection and fed an iron deficient (ID) milk diet (21 mg Fe/kg). Due to severely retarded growth of two of the ID piglets, only eight ID piglets were tested behaviorally. After dietary treatment, all piglets were fed a balanced commercial pig diet (190-240 mg Fe/kg). Starting at 7.5 weeks of age, piglets were tested in a spatial cognitive holeboard task. In this task, 4 of 16 holes contain a hidden food reward, allowing measurement of working (short-term) memory and reference (long-term) memory (RM) simultaneously. All piglets received 40-60 acquisition trials, followed by a 16-trial reversal phase. ID piglets showed permanently retarded growth and a strong decrease in blood iron parameters during dietary treatment. After treatment, ID piglets' blood iron values restored to normal levels. In the holeboard task, ID piglets showed impaired RM learning during acquisition and reversal. Iron staining at necropsy at 12 weeks of age showed that ID piglets had fewer iron-containing cells in hippocampal regions CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG). The number of iron-containing cells in CA3 correlated positively with the average RM score during acquisition across all animals. Our results support the hypothesis that early

  8. Global transcriptional response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in mouse liver and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alejandra; Luukkaala, Tiina; Fleming, Robert E; Britton, Robert S; Bacon, Bruce R; Parkkila, Seppo

    2009-09-29

    Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in murine liver and duodenum. Illumina arrays containing over 47,000 probes were used to study global transcriptional changes. Quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) was used to validate the microarray results. In the liver, the expression of 151 genes was altered in Hfe(-/-) mice while dietary iron overload changed the expression of 218 genes. There were 173 and 108 differentially expressed genes in the duodenum of Hfe(-/-) mice and mice with dietary iron overload, respectively. There was 93.5% concordance between the results obtained by microarray analysis and Q-RT-PCR. Overexpression of genes for acute phase reactants in the liver and a strong induction of digestive enzyme genes in the duodenum were characteristic of the Hfe-deficient genotype. In contrast, dietary iron overload caused a more pronounced change of gene expression responsive to oxidative stress. In conclusion, Hfe deficiency caused a previously unrecognized increase in gene expression of hepatic acute phase proteins and duodenal digestive enzymes.

  9. Effect of selenium and vitamin E dietary deficiencies on chick lymphoid organ development (42361)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, J.A.; Combs, G.F. Jr.; Whitacre, M.E.; Dietert, R.R.

    1986-09-01

    Diets specifically deficient in selenium (Se) and/or vitamin E or adequate in both nutrients were fed to chicks from the time of hatching. Lymphoid organs (bursa, thymus, and in some instances, spleen) were collected from chicks 7-35 days of age. Growth of the chicks fed these diets was monitored over the experimental period as was lymphoid organ growth. The development of the primary lymphoid organs was further assessed by histological techniques and the organ contents of vitamin E (..cap alpha..-tocopherol) and Se were determined. Specific deficiencies of either Se or vitamin E were found to significantly impair bursal growth as did a combined deficiency. Thymic growth was impaired only by the combined deficiency diet. Severe histopathological changes in the bursa resulted from the combined deficiency and these were detectable by 10-14 days after hatching. These changes were characterized by a gradual degeneration of the epithelium and an accompanying depletion of lymphocytes. Similar changes, although slower to develop and less severe, were observed in the thymus as a result of the combined deficiency. When both serum and tissue levels of vitamin E and Se were monitored, it was observed that these were rapidly and independently depleted by the specific deficiency diets. These data suggest that the primary lymphoid organs are major targets of Se and vitamin E dietary deficiencies and provide a possible mechanism by which immune function may be impaired.

  10. Lack of an effect of dietary fructose on severity of zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Failla, M L; Fields, M; Rose, A; Seidel, K

    1987-08-01

    Because feeding rats diets containing fructose as the carbohydrate source reduces copper and selenium status, we investigated whether the type of dietary carbohydrate also affected indices of zinc status. The experimental design was a 2 X 2 factorial study with the source of dietary carbohydrate (cornstarch or fructose) and the level of dietary zinc (0.7 or 31 micrograms Zn/g) as the variables. The experiment utilized 76 weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats randomly assigned to one of four dietary groups. Animals fed a zinc-deficient fructose diet were allowed to consume the diet ad libitum; all other groups were pair-fed to that group to ensure equivalent nutrient and energy intake. The results of the 29-d study showed that the most sensitive indices of zinc status measured, including growth, survival and the zinc concentrations of plasma, femur and testes, were not affected by the type of dietary carbohydrate. This lack of an effect of fructose on the zinc status of the experimental animals indicates that the ability of fructose to exacerbate copper and selenium deficiencies is specific, rather than representing a generalized effect of this simple sugar on the requirements and/or metabolism of all essential trace elements.

  11. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the endogenous phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, P.G.; Allen, O.B.; Bettger, W.J.

    1987-12-01

    The effect of dietary zinc deficiency on patterns of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of rat erythrocyte membrane proteins and erythrocyte filterability was examined. Weanling male Wistar rats were fed an egg white-based diet containing less than 1.1 mg zinc/kg diet ad libitum for 3 wk. Control rats were either pair-fed or ad libitum-fed the basal diet supplemented with 100 mg zinc/kg diet. Net phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of erythrocyte membrane proteins were carried out by an in vitro assay utilizing (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP. The membrane proteins were subsequently separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the /sup 32/P content of gel slices was counted by Cerenkov counting. Erythrocyte filterability was measured as the filtration time of suspensions of erythrocytes, both untreated and preincubated with diamide, under constant pressure. Erythrocyte ghosts from zinc-deficient rats demonstrated greater dephosphorylation of protein bands R1 plus R2 and R7 than pair-fed rats and greater net phosphorylation of band R2.2 than pair-fed or ad libitum-fed control rats (P less than 0.05). Erythrocytes from ad libitum-fed control rats showed significantly longer filtration times than those from zinc-deficient or pair-fed control rats. In conclusion, dietary zinc deficiency alters in vitro patterns of erythrocyte membrane protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, whereas the depression in food intake associated with the zinc deficiency increases erythrocyte filterability. 71 references.

  12. Long-term dietary nitrite and nitrate deficiency causes the metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular death in mice.

    PubMed

    Kina-Tanada, Mika; Sakanashi, Mayuko; Tanimoto, Akihide; Kaname, Tadashi; Matsuzaki, Toshihiro; Noguchi, Katsuhiko; Uchida, Taro; Nakasone, Junko; Kozuka, Chisayo; Ishida, Masayoshi; Kubota, Haruaki; Taira, Yuji; Totsuka, Yuichi; Kina, Shin-Ichiro; Sunakawa, Hajime; Omura, Junichi; Satoh, Kimio; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Shiro; Ohya, Yusuke; Matsushita, Masayuki; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Arasaki, Akira; Tsutsui, Masato

    2017-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesised not only from L-arginine by NO synthases (NOSs), but also from its inert metabolites, nitrite and nitrate. Green leafy vegetables are abundant in nitrate, but whether or not a deficiency in dietary nitrite/nitrate spontaneously causes disease remains to be clarified. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that long-term dietary nitrite/nitrate deficiency would induce the metabolic syndrome in mice. To this end, we prepared a low-nitrite/nitrate diet (LND) consisting of an amino acid-based low-nitrite/nitrate chow, in which the contents of L-arginine, fat, carbohydrates, protein and energy were identical with a regular chow, and potable ultrapure water. Nitrite and nitrate were undetectable in both the chow and the water. Three months of the LND did not affect food or water intake in wild-type C57BL/6J mice compared with a regular diet (RD). However, in comparison with the RD, 3 months of the LND significantly elicited visceral adiposity, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance. Eighteen months of the LND significantly provoked increased body weight, hypertension, insulin resistance and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine, while 22 months of the LND significantly led to death mainly due to cardiovascular disease, including acute myocardial infarction. These abnormalities were reversed by simultaneous treatment with sodium nitrate, and were significantly associated with endothelial NOS downregulation, adiponectin insufficiency and dysbiosis of the gut microbiota. These results provide the first evidence that long-term dietary nitrite/nitrate deficiency gives rise to the metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular death in mice, indicating a novel pathogenetic role of the exogenous NO production system in the metabolic syndrome and its vascular complications.

  13. Effects of dietary polyamine deficiency on Trypanosoma gambiense infection in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K; Araki, N; Ohnishi, Y; Kozaki, S

    2001-02-01

    Nishimura, K., Araki, N., Ohnishi, Y., and Kozaki, S. 2001. Effects of dietary polyamine deficiency on Trypanosoma gambiense infection in rats. Experimental Parasitology 97, 95-101. A diet deficient in polyamines decreases the availability of dietary polyamines. We used rats infected with the Wellcome strain of Trypanosoma gambiense to examine the effects of polyamine-deficient chow (PDC) on trypanosome proliferation and symptoms of infection. Rats fed PDC showed limited increase of trypanosome and symptoms of infection and limited loss of body weight and anemia. Survival in these rats was prolonged. Before infection, the heparinized plasma concentration of spermidine in the PDC-fed rats was lower than that in control rats fed with standard chow. After infection, the content of spermidine in red blood cells increased in the control rats, but was only slightly increased in PDC-fed rats. The content of spermidine in the trypanosomes after infection was low in the PDC-fed rats. Decreases in the polyamine content of trypanosomes limited their increase. These observations suggest that a reduction in dietary polyamines may help in the regulation of trypanosome infection. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. Dietary calcium deficiency in laying ducks impairs eggshell quality by suppressing shell biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhao, Fei; Tian, Zhi Mei; Zhang, Han Xing; Ruan, Dong; Li, Yan; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Chun Tian; Lin, Ying Cai

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary calcium deficiency on the process of shell formation. Four hundred and fifty female ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) at 22 weeks were randomly assigned to three groups. Ducks were fed one of two calcium-deficient diets (containing 1.8% or 0.38% calcium, respectively) or a calcium-adequate control diet (containing 3.6% calcium) for 67 days (depletion period) and then all ducks were fed a calcium-adequate diet for an additional 67 days (repletion period). Compared with the calcium-adequate control, the average shell thickness, egg shell weight, breaking strength, mammillae density and mammillary knob thickness of shell from ducks that consumed the diet with 0.38% calcium were significantly decreased (P<0.05) during the depletion period, accompanied by reduced tibia quality. The mRNA expression of both secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1) and carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) in the uterus was decreased after feeding calcium-deficient diets (1.8% or 0.38% calcium). mRNA transcripts of calbindin 1 (CALB1), an important protein responsible for calcium transport, and the matrix protein genes ovocalyxin-32 (OCX-32) and ovocleidin-116 (OC-116) were reduced in ducks fed 0.38% calcium but not 1.8% calcium. Plasma estradiol concentration was decreased by both of the calcium-deficient diets (P<0.05). The impaired shell quality and suppressed functional proteins involved in shell formation could be reversed by repletion of dietary calcium. The results of the present study suggest that dietary calcium deficiency negatively affects eggshell quality and microarchitecture, probably by suppressing shell biomineralization. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Effect of general dietary deficiency and protein malnutrition on the fibrogenesis caused by silica dust in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, S. H.; Kaw, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    Zaidi, S. H., and Kaw, J. L. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 250-259. Effect of general dietary deficiency and protein malnutrition on the fibrogenesis caused by silica dust in rats. In order to determine whether the dietary deficiency, which may occur in miners in India, is likely to influence their response to silica dust, two experiments were carried out on rats. In both experiments rats were exposed to silica dust by intratracheal inoculation of saline suspension, the dose being sufficient to cause marked fibrosis in normal rats. In the first experiment rats were fed on a multiple deficient diet and in the second on a diet grossly deficient in protein but otherwise adequate. Although these diets caused other evidence of dietary deficiency, in neither group was there any difference in the extent of silicotic fibrosis as assessed by histological or biochemical methods. Images PMID:4317610

  16. Effects of dietary vitamin E deficiency on systematic pathological changes and oxidative stress in fish.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaiyu; Wang, Erlong; Qin, Zhenyang; Zhou, Zhen; Geng, Yi; Chen, Defang

    2016-12-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary vitamin E deficiency on systematic pathological changes and oxidative stress in fish. A total of 320 healthy common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were randomized into four groups; the control group was fed a basal diet supplemented with 100 IUkg-1 of vitamin E, while the three experimental groups were fed the same basal diet with reduced vitamin E content (0, 25, or 50 IUkg-1). Findings showed that fish in the experimental groups mainly presented with sekoke disease, exophthalmia, leprnorthsis, and ascites. Histopathological and ultrastructural changes comprised nutritional myopathy with muscle fiber denaturation and necrosis, and multi-tissue organ swelling, degeneration, and necrosis. Compared with the control group, RBC count, hemoglobin content, vitamin E concentration, and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly lower in all three experimental groups. However, malondialdehyde content was considerably higher in experimental groups than in the control group. However, there was no difference in glutathione peroxidase activity among groups. In conclusion, dietary vitamin E deficiency (<100 IUkg-1) can cause severe injury and, in particular, oxidative damage in common carp. The oxidative damage might be a main influence caused by vitamin E deficiency in fish. These findings reveal the complete systematic pathological effect of vitamin E deficiency in common carp, which may be applicable to other fish and animals.

  17. The effect of dietary modulation of sulfur amino acids on cystathionine β synthase–deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Warren D.; Gupta, Sapna

    2015-01-01

    Cystathionine β synthase (CBS) is a key enzyme in the methionine and cysteine metabolic pathway, acting as a metabolic gatekeeper to regulate the flow of fixed sulfur from methionine to cysteine. Mutations in the CBS gene cause clinical CBS deficiency, a disease characterized by elevated plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) and methionine and decreased plasma cysteine. The treatment goal for CBS-deficient patients is to normalize the metabolic values of these three metabolites using a combination of vitamin therapy and dietary manipulation. To better understand the effectiveness of nutritional treatment strategies, we have performed a series of long-term dietary manipulation studies using our previously developed Tg-I278T Cbs−/− mouse model of CBS deficiency and sibling Tg-I278T Cbs+/− controls. Tg-I278T Cbs−/− mice have undetectable levels of CBS activity, extremely elevated plasma tHcy, modestly elevated plasma methionine, and low plasma cysteine. They exhibit several easily assayable phenotypes, including osteoporosis, loss of fat mass, reduced life span, and facial alopecia. The diets used in these studies differed in the amounts of sulfur amino acids or sulfur amino acid precursors. In this review, we will discuss our findings and their relevance to CBS deficiency and the concept of gene–diet interaction. PMID:26599618

  18. Visual loss and optic nerve head swelling in thiamine deficiency without prolonged dietary deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Sean M; Lam, Byron L

    2014-01-01

    Visual loss due to optic neuropathy is a rare manifestation of thiamine deficiency. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman with a body mass index (BMI) of 29 kg/m2 who developed visual loss and bilateral optic nerve head swelling after a short, self-limited gastrointestinal illness. She was disoriented and inattentive and had absent ankle jerk reflexes, diminished sensation in both legs below the knees, and marked truncal ataxia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed increased T2-signal in the medial thalami and mammillary bodies. The serum thiamine level was 8 nmol/L (normal 8–30). The diagnosis of thiamine deficiency was made, and the patient’s vision and neurologic symptoms improved significantly with intramuscular thiamine treatment. Thiamine deficiency can occur in the absence of an obvious predisposing factor such as alcoholism or low body weight. The clinician must be aware of the factors that govern vitamin availability and maintain a high index of suspicion to make the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:24899800

  19. Perforin deficiency attenuates collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Kristin; Knipper, Annika; Tu-Rapp, Hoang; Koczan, Dirk; Kreutzer, Hans-Jürgen; Nizze, Horst; Mix, Eilhard; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Holmdahl, Rikard; Ibrahim, Saleh M

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), an approved animal model for rheumatoid arthritis, is thought to be a T cell-dependent disease. There is evidence that CD8+ T cells are a major subset controlling the pathogenesis of CIA. They probably contribute to certain features of disease, namely tissue destruction and synovial hyperplasia. In this study we examined the role of perforin (pfp), a key molecule of the cytotoxic death pathway that is expressed mainly in CD8+ T cells, for the pathogenesis of CIA. We generated DBA/1J mice suffering from mutations of the pfp molecule, DBA/1J-pfp-/-, and studied their susceptibility to arthritis. As a result, pfp-deficient mice showed a reduced incidence (DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 64%; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 54%), a slightly delayed onset (onset of disease: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 53 ± 3.6; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 59 ± 4.9 (mean ± SEM), and milder form of the disease (maximum disease score: DBA/1J-pfp+/+, 7.3 ± 1.1; DBA/1J-pfp-/-, 3.4 ± 1.4 (mean ± SEM); P < 0.05). Concomitantly, peripheral T cell proliferation in response to the specific antigen bovine collagen II was increased in pfp-/- mice compared with pfp+/+ mice, arguing for an impaired killing of autoreactive T cells caused by pfp deficiency. Thus, pfp-mediated cytotoxicity is involved in the initiation of tissue damage in arthritis, but pfp-independent cytotoxic death pathways might also contribute to CIA. PMID:15987490

  20. Influence of dietary iron level and form on biochemical, hematological, and immunological changes in copper deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Leu, H.; Gallaher, D.D.; Kramer, T.R.

    1986-03-01

    Weanling male Lewis rats (N = 10/group) were fed ad-libitum for 42 days diets based on AIN standards containing 21% casein, 5% safflower oil, deficient (0.6 ..mu..g/g) or adequate (5.6 ..mu..g/g) levels of Cu, and adequate (50 ..mu..g/g) or high (300 ..mu..g/g) levels of Fe/sup +2/ or Fe/sup +3/. Cu-deficient rats, regardless of Fe level or form, exhibited depressed (p < 0.05) serum Cu, Fe and ceruloplasmin activity, and hemoglobin levels; and elevated (p < 0.05) unsaturated serum Fe binding capacity. Except for high Fe/sup +3/ fed rats, Cu-deficient rats showed decreased hematocrits. Decreased proliferation was exhibited by concanavalin-A (Con-A) stimulated spleen lymphoid cells (SLC) of Cu-deficient rats fed adequate dietary Fe, but not by SLC of Cu-deficient rats fed high dietary Fe. High Fe fed rats exhibited reduced proliferation and increased variability in proliferation by Con-A stimulated SLC, which apparently caused a lack of difference in proliferation by SLC of Cu-deficient and Cu-adequate rats fed high Fe. Thus, high dietary Fe did not correct biochemical and hematological parameters in Cu-deficient rats, but because of lowered proliferation and increased variability of SLC proliferation, high dietary Fe did alleviate suppressed Con-A stimulated SLC proliferation in Cu-deficiency.

  1. Dietary deficiency of vitamin B12 is associated with low serum cobalamin levels in non-vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, M N; Dawson, D W; Lewis, M J

    1991-08-01

    A prospective study of 106 patients with low serum cobalamin (vitamin B12) levels showed that, in 37, it was unexplained. The dietary intake of the vitamin was assessed in these patients by questionnaire and was found to be low in 10 (37%). None of these patients was vegetarian and they were of varying age and social circumstance. Dietary deficiency may be the sole cause of a low serum cobalamin in a significant proportion of non-vegetarians. An assessment of dietary intake should be part of the investigation of cobalamin deficiency.

  2. Dietary magnesium deficiency affects gut microbiota and anxiety-like behaviour in C57BL/6N mice.

    PubMed

    Pyndt Jørgensen, Bettina; Winther, Gudrun; Kihl, Pernille; Nielsen, Dennis S; Wegener, Gregers; Hansen, Axel K; Sørensen, Dorte B

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium deficiency has been associated with anxiety in humans, and rodent studies have demonstrated the gut microbiota to impact behaviour. We investigated the impact of 6 weeks of dietary magnesium deficiency on gut microbiota composition and anxiety-like behaviour and whether there was a link between the two. A total of 20 C57BL/6 mice, fed either a standard diet or a magnesium-deficient diet for 6 weeks, were tested using the light-dark box anxiety test. Gut microbiota composition was analysed by denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis. We demonstrated that the gut microbiota composition correlated significantly with the behaviour of dietary unchallenged mice. A magnesium-deficient diet altered the gut microbiota, and was associated with altered anxiety-like behaviour, measured by decreased latency to enter the light box. Magnesium deficiency altered behavior. The duration of magnesium deficiency is suggested to influence behaviour in the evaluated test.

  3. Dietary protein deficiency and Mycobacterium bovis BCG affect interleukin-2 activity in experimental pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, D N; Mintzer, C L; Bartow, R A; Parr, R L

    1989-01-01

    Inbred strain 2 guinea pigs were vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis BCG or were left unvaccinated. They were maintained for 6 weeks on defined, isocaloric diets containing either 30% (control animals) or 10% (animals receiving low protein) ovalbumin as the sole protein source. Animals were challenged by the respiratory route with a low dose of virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv and killed 4 weeks later. Protein-malnourished animals were not protected by previous vaccination with BCG. Lymphocytes isolated from various tissues were tested in vitro for proliferative responses to mitogen (concanavalin A) and antigen (purified protein derivative [PPD]), production of interleukin-2 (IL-2), and response to exogenous recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2). Protein-malnourished guinea pigs responded only weakly to PPD skin tests, and their blood and lymph node lymphocytes exhibited impaired proliferation when cultured with PPD in vitro. IL-2 levels were consistently low in cultures of stimulated blood and spleen lymphocytes from protein-deprived animals. BCG vaccination of nutritionally normal guinea pigs, on the other hand, induced significantly more IL-2 production by PPD- and concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes. The addition of exogenous mouse rIL-2 (40 and 80 U/ml) in vitro to PPD-stimulated blood and lymph node cells from nonvaccinated, protein-deprived guinea pigs resulted in no improvement of the proliferative response. Previous vaccination of malnourished guinea pigs did not consistently enhance the response of PPD-stimulated lymphocytes to added rIL-2. Dietary protein deficiency and BCG vaccination appear to modulate antigen-driven cellular immunity in animals with tuberculosis by altering the production of, and the response to, IL-2 by PPD-stimulated lymphocytes. PMID:2788135

  4. Physiological management of dietary deficiency in n-3 fatty acids by spawning Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis).

    PubMed

    Patterson, Joshua T; Green, Christopher C

    2015-08-01

    Lipid dynamics of spawning fish are critical to the production of viable embryos and larvae. The present study utilized manipulation of dietary fatty acid (FA) profiles to examine the ability of spawning Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) to mobilize critical lipid components from somatic reserves or synthesize long-chain polyunsaturated FAs (LC-PUFAs) de novo from shorter-chain C18 precursors. An egg and multi-tissue evaluation of changes in FA concentrations across time after fish were switched from LC-PUFA-rich to LC-PUFA-deficient experimental diets was employed. The two experimental diets contained lipid sources which differed drastically in n-3 C18 FA content but had similar levels of n-6 C18 FAs. Discrete effects of dietary n-3 FAs can be analyzed because n-3 and n-6 represent distinct metabolic families which cannot be exchanged in vivo. Results indicate that a combination of mobilization and de novo synthesis is likely utilized to maintain physiologically required FA levels in critical tissues and embryos. Mobilization was supported by decreases in LC-PUFAs in somatic tissues and decreases in intraperitoneal fat content and liver mass. Evidence for biosynthesis was provided by a higher level of n-3 LC-PUFAs in the liver and ova of fish fed diets containing n-3 C18 precursors versus those fed diets with low levels of precursor FAs. The characteristic physiological plasticity of Gulf killifish is exemplified in the nutritional domain by its management of dietary FA deficiency.

  5. Effects of dietary boron in rats fed a vitamin D-deficient diet.

    PubMed Central

    Dupre, J N; Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Brudevold, A M

    1994-01-01

    Although boron has long been known to be a required nutrient for plants, it was not until recently that there was any suggestion of a nutritional requirement for animals and humans. Addition of boron to the diet of vitamin D-deficient chicks indicated that boron may play a role in animal nutrition. Studies with rats have demonstrated that supplemental dietary boron has most marked effects when the diet is deficient in known nutrients. We observed higher apparent-balance values of calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus for rats fed a vitamin D-deprived diet with dietary supplemental boron (2.72 ppm), than for rats fed the same diet without added boron (0.16 ppm). The treatment group with dietary supplemental boron demonstrated a high degree of variability in response to boron. We hypothesize that relatively large and variable vitamin D stores in weanling rats from a colony supplemented with 3000 IU vitamin D/kg diet accounted for the observed variable response. A recent, unpublished study using weanling rats from a low-vitamin D colony appears to support this hypothesis. PMID:7889882

  6. What is the effect of physical activity level on food consumption, energy deficiency, and dietary diversity?

    PubMed

    Mathiassen, Astrid; Hollema, Siemon

    2014-09-01

    Energy deficiency is observed to be at odds with other food security indicators. In wealthier urban areas, the prevalence of energy deficiency is often higher than in poorer rural areas, whereas other food security indicators, such as food diversity, perform much better in urban than in rural areas. To investigate to what extent differences in physical activity levels influence dietary quantity and quality. Central to this analysis is the construction of a household activity index, a single measure that aims to capture the collective workload of the household. This paper uses data from Nepal and Uganda expenditure surveys that contain information on food consumption, as well as detailed information on how individual household members spend their time. Energy deficiency numbers are adjusted by the activity index, and the results are compared with the standard approach for calculating energy deficiency assuming light activity levels. Regressions are estimated to discuss demand for calories and diversity given the activity level. Accounting for differences in activity level has a large effect on energy deficiency figures, particularly in rural areas. The analysis shows that a higher household activity level significantly increases the calories consumed but lessens food diversity, suggesting that households with high activity levels sacrifice diversity for quantity in order to meet their energy requirements. Physical activity levels should be taken into account when interpreting empirical differences in food consumption levels for determining the prevalence of food insecurity and making allocation decisions for food security assistance.

  7. Acute dietary zinc deficiency before conception compromises oocyte epigenetic programming and disrupts embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Tian, X; Diaz, FJ

    2013-01-01

    Recent findings show that zinc is an important factor necessary for regulating the meiotic cell cycle and ovulation. However, the role of zinc in promoting oocyte quality and developmental potential is not known. Using an in vivo model of acute dietary zinc deficiency, we show that feeding a zinc deficient diet (ZDD) for 3–5 days before ovulation (preconception) dramatically disrupts oocyte chromatin methylation and preimplantation development. There was a dramatic decrease in histone H3K4 trimethylation and global DNA methylation in zinc deficient oocytes. Moreover, there was a 3–20 fold increase in transcript abundance of repetitive elements (Iap, Line1, Sineb1, Sineb2), but a decrease in Gdf9, Zp3 and Figla mRNA. Only 53% and 8% of mature eggs reached the 2-cell stage after IVF in animals receiving a 3 and 5 day ZDD, respectively, while a 5 day ZDD in vivo reduced the proportion of 2-cells to 49%. In vivo fertilized 2-cell embryos cultured in vitro formed fewer (38%) blastocysts compared to control embryos (74%). Likewise, fewer blastocyst and expanded blastocyst were collected from the reproductive tract of zinc deficient animals on day 3.5 of pregnancy. This could be due to a decrease in Igf2 and H19 mRNA in ZDD blastocyst. Supplementation with a methyl donor (SAM) during IVM restored histone H3K4me3 and doubled the IVF success rate from 17% to 43% in oocytes from zinc deficient animals. Thus, the terminal period of oocyte development is extremely sensitive to perturbation in dietary zinc availability. PMID:23348678

  8. [Prevalence of deficiency and dietary intake of iron, zinc and copper in Chilean childbearing age women].

    PubMed

    Mujica-Coopman, María F; Borja, Angélica; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate anemia, the biochemical status and dietary adequacy of iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu), in Chilean childbearing age women. We studied a convenience sample of 86 women aged 18 to 48 years from Santiago, Chile. We determined anemia and the micronutrient status through hemoglobin (Hb) mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, zinc protoporphyrin, serum ferritin (SF), serum Zn and Cu. Dietary adequacy was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire. Of all women, 4.7% had Fe deficiency (ID) anemia, 21 % ID without anemia, 26 % depleted Fe stores and 48.3% normal Fe status. Obese women had higher SF (p<0.01) compared with those classified as having normal BMI. Also, showed higher Hb (p<0.05) concentrations compared with overweight and normal weight women. Partidipants showed 3.5 % and 2.3 % of Zn and Cu deficiency, respectively. Also, 95 %, 94 % and 99 % had adequate intake of Fe, Zn and Cu respectively, according to EAR cut points. There were no significant differences in micronutrients intake across different nutritional status. There was a low prevalence of anemia, Fe, Zn and Cu deficiency. A high percentage of women reached micronutrient adequacy. However, 47% of women had ID without anemia and Fe depleted stores.

  9. Calcium deficiency cannot induce obesity in rats.

    PubMed

    Paradis, S; Cabanac, M

    2005-06-30

    If intake of a required nutrient--here calcium--affects body weight, the effect must be mediated by a change in the body weight set-point. Thus, the controversial 'anti-obesity' influence of high calcium intake should decrease the body weight set-point. Diets differing in calcium content were assigned to three groups of rats. The effects of the diets on body weight, BMI, fat content, plasma calcium, body weight set-point, food intake, and preference for various calcium solutions were measured after 6 weeks of calcium deprivation or supplementation, and again after a further 6 weeks of recovery on a regular diet. After 6 weeks, the low-calcium diet had induced calcium deficiency but had failed to raise the body weight set-point. Nor had it produced obesity or fat accumulation. After 6 weeks of recovery, body weight and fat content were no higher in calcium-deprived rats than in the control or supplemented rats. In this experiment, low-calcium intake failed to cause obesity and did not raise the body weight set-point. The results indicate that calcium intake probably does not affect body weight.

  10. Copper deficiency potentiates ethanol induced liver damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zidenberg-Cherr, S.; Han, B.; Graham, T.W.; Keen, C.L. )

    1992-02-26

    Copper sufficient (+Cu) and deficient ({minus}Cu) rats were fed liquid diets with EtOH or dextrose at 36% of kcals for 2 mo. Consumption of either the {minus}Cu diet or EtOH resulted in lower liver CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were lowest in EtOH/{minus}Cu rats; being 20% and 50% of control values, respectively. Ethanol resulted in higher MnSOD activity in +Cu and {minus}Cu rats. Low Cu intake as well as EtOH resulted in lower mitochondrial (Mit) TBARS relative to controls. TBARS were lowest in Mit from EtOH/{minus}Cu rats. Microsomal (Micro) TBARS were lower in {minus}Cu and EtOH-fed rats than in controls. The peroxidizability index (PI) was calculated as an index of substrate availability for lipid peroxidation. Ethanol feeding resulted in lower PI's in Mit and Micro than measured in non-EtOH rats. There was a positive correlation between Micro PI's and TBARS. These results show that despite reductions in components of antioxidant defense, compensatory mechanism arise resulting in reduction in peroxidation targets and/or an increase in alternate free radical quenching factors. Histological examination demonstrated increased portal and intralobular connective tissue and cell necrosis in EtOH/{minus}Cu rats, suggesting that Cu may be a critical modulator of EtOH induced tissue damage.

  11. The effect of zinc deficiency on salt taste acuity, preference, and dietary sodium intake in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Mi; Kim, Miyeon; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Soon Bae; Chang, Jai Won; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2016-07-01

    Introduction High sodium intake is the main cause of fluid overload in hemodialysis (HD) patients, leading to increased cardiovascular mortality. High sodium intake is known to be associated with low salt taste acuity and/or high preference. As the zinc status could influence taste acuity, we analyzed the effect of zinc deficiency on salt taste acuity, preference, and dietary sodium intake in HD patients. Methods A total of 77 HD patients was enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Zinc deficiency was defined as serum zinc level with below 70 µg/mL. The patients were divided into two groups based on serum zinc level. Salt taste acuity and preference were determined by a sensory test using varying concentrations of NaCl solution, and dietary sodium intake was estimated using 3-day dietary recall surveys. Findings The mean salt recognition threshold and salt taste preference were significantly higher in the zinc deficient group than in the non-zinc deficient group. And there was significant positive correlation between salt taste preference and dietary sodium intake in zinc deficient group (r = 0.43, P = 0.002). Although, the dietary sodium intake showed a high tendency with no significance (P = 0.052), interdialytic weight gain was significantly higher in the zinc deficient group than in the non-zinc deficient group (2.68 ± 1.02 kg vs. 3.18 ± 1.02 kg; P = 0.047). Discussion Zinc deficiency may be related to low salt taste acuity and high salt preference, leading to high dietary sodium intake in HD patients.

  12. Dietary inorganic nitrate reverses features of metabolic syndrome in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Carlström, Mattias; Larsen, Filip J; Nyström, Thomas; Hezel, Michael; Borniquel, Sara; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O

    2010-10-12

    The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of risk factors of metabolic origin that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. A proposed central event in metabolic syndrome is a decrease in the amount of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Recently, an alternative pathway for NO formation in mammals was described where inorganic nitrate, a supposedly inert NO oxidation product and unwanted dietary constituent, is serially reduced to nitrite and then NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. Here we show that several features of metabolic syndrome that develop in eNOS-deficient mice can be reversed by dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate, in amounts similar to those derived from eNOS under normal conditions. In humans, this dose corresponds to a rich intake of vegetables, the dominant dietary nitrate source. Nitrate administration increased tissue and plasma levels of bioactive nitrogen oxides. Moreover, chronic nitrate treatment reduced visceral fat accumulation and circulating levels of triglycerides and reversed the prediabetic phenotype in these animals. In rats, chronic nitrate treatment reduced blood pressure and this effect was also present during NOS inhibition. Our results show that dietary nitrate fuels a nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway that can partly compensate for disturbances in endogenous NO generation from eNOS. These findings may have implications for novel nutrition-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

  13. Dietary inorganic nitrate reverses features of metabolic syndrome in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Mattias; Larsen, Filip J.; Nyström, Thomas; Hezel, Michael; Borniquel, Sara; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a clustering of risk factors of metabolic origin that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. A proposed central event in metabolic syndrome is a decrease in the amount of bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Recently, an alternative pathway for NO formation in mammals was described where inorganic nitrate, a supposedly inert NO oxidation product and unwanted dietary constituent, is serially reduced to nitrite and then NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. Here we show that several features of metabolic syndrome that develop in eNOS-deficient mice can be reversed by dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate, in amounts similar to those derived from eNOS under normal conditions. In humans, this dose corresponds to a rich intake of vegetables, the dominant dietary nitrate source. Nitrate administration increased tissue and plasma levels of bioactive nitrogen oxides. Moreover, chronic nitrate treatment reduced visceral fat accumulation and circulating levels of triglycerides and reversed the prediabetic phenotype in these animals. In rats, chronic nitrate treatment reduced blood pressure and this effect was also present during NOS inhibition. Our results show that dietary nitrate fuels a nitrate–nitrite–NO pathway that can partly compensate for disturbances in endogenous NO generation from eNOS. These findings may have implications for novel nutrition-based preventive and therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. PMID:20876122

  14. Contrasting roles of dietary selenium and selenoproteins in chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2013-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has long been known for its cancer prevention properties, but the molecular basis remains unclear. The principal questions in assessing the effect of dietary Se in cancer are whether selenoproteins, small molecule selenocompounds, or both, are involved, and under which conditions and genotypes Se may be protective. In this study, we examined diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mice lacking a subset of selenoproteins due to expression of a mutant selenocysteine tRNA gene (Trsp A37G mice). To uncouple the effects of selenocompounds and selenoproteins, these animals were examined at several levels of dietary Se. Our analysis revealed that tumorigenesis in Trsp A37G mice maintained on the adequate Se diet was increased. However, in the control, wild-type mice, both Se deficiency and high Se levels protected against tumorigenesis. We further found that the Se-deficient diet induced severe neurological phenotypes in TrspA37G mice. Surprisingly, a similar phenotype could be induced in these mice at high dietary Se intake. Overall, our results show a complex role of Se in chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis, which involves interaction among selenoproteins, selenocompounds and toxins, and depends on genotype and background of the animals. PMID:23389288

  15. Role of white adipose lipolysis in the development of NASH induced by methionine- and choline-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoki; Takahashi, Shogo; Fang, Zhong-Ze; Matsubara, Tsutomu; Krausz, Kristopher W; Qu, Aijuan; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2014-11-01

    Methionine- and choline-deficient diet (MCD) is a model for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in rodents. However, the mechanism of NASH development by dietary methionine/choline deficiency remains undetermined. To elucidate the early metabolic changes associated with MCD-NASH, serum metabolomic analysis was performed using mice treated with MCD and control diet for 3 days and 1 week, revealing significant increases in oleic and linoleic acids after MCD treatment. These increases were correlated with reduced body weight and white adipose tissue (WAT) mass, increased phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase, and up-regulation of genes encoding carboxylesterase 3 and β2-adrenergic receptor in WAT, indicating accelerated lipolysis in adipocytes. The changes in serum fatty acids and WAT by MCD treatment were reversed by methionine supplementation, and similar alterations were detected in mice fed a methionine-deficient diet (MD), thus demonstrating that dietary methionine deficiency enhances lipolysis in WAT. MD treatment decreased glucose and increased fibroblast growth factor 21 in serum, thus exhibiting a similar metabolic phenotype as the fasting response. Comparison between MCD and choline-deficient diet (CD) treatments suggested that the addition of MD-induced metabolic alterations, such as WAT lipolysis, to CD-induced hepatic steatosis promotes liver injury. Collectively, these results demonstrate an important role for dietary methionine deficiency and WAT lipolysis in the development of MCD-NASH. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Optimal management of iron deficiency anemia due to poor dietary intake

    PubMed Central

    Aspuru, Kattalin; Villa, Carlos; Bermejo, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar; López, Santiago García

    2011-01-01

    Iron is necessary for the normal development of multiple vital processes. Iron deficiency (ID) may be caused by several diseases, even by physiological situations that increase requirements for this mineral. One of its possible causes is a poor dietary iron intake, which is infrequent in developed countries, but quite common in developing areas. In these countries, dietary ID is highly prevalent and comprises a real public health problem and a challenge for health authorities. ID, with or without anemia, can cause important symptoms that are not only physical, but can also include a decreased intellectual performance. All this, together with a high prevalence, can even have negative implications for a community’s economic and social development. Treatment consists of iron supplements. Prevention of ID obviously lies in increasing the dietary intake of iron, which can be difficult in developing countries. In these regions, foods with greater iron content are scarce, and attempts are made to compensate this by fortifying staple foods with iron. The effectiveness of this strategy is endorsed by multiple studies. On the other hand, in developed countries, ID with or without anemia is nearly always associated with diseases that trigger a negative balance between iron absorption and loss. Its management will be based on the treatment of underlying diseases, as well as on oral iron supplements, although these latter are limited by their tolerance and low potency, which on occasions may compel a change to intravenous administration. Iron deficiency has a series of peculiarities in pediatric patients, in the elderly, in pregnant women, and in patients with dietary restrictions, such as celiac disease. PMID:22114518

  17. Dietary Determinants of and Possible Solutions to Iron Deficiency for Young Women Living in Industrialized Countries: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kathryn L.; Conlon, Cathryn A.; Kruger, Rozanne; Coad, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a concern in both developing and developed (industrialized) countries; and young women are particularly vulnerable. This review investigates dietary determinants of and possible solutions to iron deficiency in young women living in industrialized countries. Dietary factors including ascorbic acid and an elusive factor in animal protein foods (meat; fish and poultry) enhance iron absorption; while phytic acid; soy protein; calcium and polyphenols inhibit iron absorption. However; the effects of these dietary factors on iron absorption do not necessarily translate into an association with iron status and iron stores (serum ferritin concentration). In cross-sectional studies; only meat intake has consistently (positively) been associated with higher serum ferritin concentrations. The enhancing effects of ascorbic acid and meat on iron absorption may be negated by the simultaneous consumption of foods and nutrients which are inhibitory. Recent cross-sectional studies have considered the combination and timing of foods consumed; with mixed results. Dietary interventions using a range of focused dietary measures to improve iron status appear to be more effective than dietary approaches that focus on single nutrients or foods. Further research is needed to determine optimal dietary recommendations for both the prevention and treatment of iron deficiency. PMID:25244367

  18. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction. PMID:26296197

  19. Probucol-Induced α-Tocopherol Deficiency Protects Mice against Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Herbas, Maria Shirely; Shichiri, Mototada; Ishida, Noriko; Kume, Aiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of malaria pathogens having resistance against antimalarials implies the necessity for the development of new drugs. Recently, we have demonstrated a resistance against malaria infection of α-tocopherol transfer protein knockout mice showing undetectable plasma levels of α-tocopherol, a lipid-soluble antioxidant. However, dietary restriction induced α-tocopherol deficiency is difficult to be applied as a clinical antimalarial therapy. Here, we report on a new strategy to potentially treat malaria by using probucol, a drug that can reduce the plasma α-tocopherol concentration. Probucol pre-treatment for 2 weeks and treatment throughout the infection rescued from death of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii XL-17 or P. berghei ANKA. In addition, survival was extended when the treatment started immediately after parasite inoculation. The ratio of lipid peroxidation products to parent lipids increased in plasma after 2 weeks treatment of probucol. This indicates that the protective effect of probucol might be mediated by the oxidative stressful environment induced by α-tocopherol deficiency. Probucol in combination with dihydroartemisin suppressed the proliferation of P. yoelii XL-17. These results indicated that probucol might be a candidate for a drug against malaria infection by inducing α-tocopherol deficiency without dietary α-tocopherol restriction.

  20. Pancreatic triglyceride lipase deficiency minimally affects dietary fat absorption but dramatically decreases dietary cholesterol absorption in mice.

    PubMed

    Huggins, Kevin W; Camarota, Lisa M; Howles, Philip N; Hui, David Y

    2003-10-31

    This study generated pancreatic triglyceride lipase (PTL)-null mice to test the hypothesis that PTL-mediated hydrolysis of dietary triglyceride is necessary for efficient dietary cholesterol absorption. The PTL-/- mice grew normally and displayed similar body weight as their PTL+/+ littermates. Plasma lipid levels between animals of various PTL genotypes were similar when they were maintained on either a basal low fat diet or a western-type high fat/high cholesterol diet. Although the lack of a functional PTL delayed fat absorption during the initial hour of feeding a bolus load of olive oil containing [3H]triolein and [14C]cholesterol, the rate of [3H]triolein absorption was similar between PTL+/+ and PTL-/- mice after the initial 1-h period. Importantly, comparison of fecal fat content revealed similar overall fat absorption efficiency between PTL+/+ and PTL-/- mice. In contrast, the PTL-/- mice displayed significant decrease in both the rate and the amount of cholesterol absorbed after a single meal. The plasma appearance of [14C]cholesterol was found to be 75% lower (p < 0.0005) in PTL-/- mice compared with PTL+/+ mice after 4 h. The total amount of [14C]cholesterol excreted in the feces was 45% higher (p < 0.0004) in PTL-/- mice compared with PTL+/+ mice over a 24-h period. These results indicate that the delayed fat digestion due to PTL deficiency results in a significant reduction in cholesterol absorption, although other enzymes in the digestive tract may compensate for the lack of PTL in PTL-/- mice in fat digestion and absorption.

  1. Dietary Nitrite Restores NO Homeostasis and is Cardioprotective in eNOS Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S.; Calvert, John W.; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO) is critical for vascular homeostasis. Nitrite and nitrate are formed endogenously by the step wise oxidation of NO and have for years been regarded as inactive degradation products. As a result both anions are routinely used as surrogate markers of NO production with nitrite as a more sensitive marker. However, both nitrite and nitrate are derived from dietary sources. We sought to determine how exogenous nitrite affects steady state concentrations of NO metabolites thought to originate from NOS derived NO as well as blood pressure and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Mice deficient in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS−/−) demonstrated decreased blood and tissue nitrite, nitrate and nitroso which were further reduced by low nitrite (NOx) diet for 1 week. Nitrite supplementation (50mg/L) in the drinking water for 1 week restored NO homeostasis in eNOS−/− mice and protected against I/R injury. Nitrite failed to alter heart rate or mean arterial blood pressure at the protective dose. These data demonstrate the significant influence of dietary nitrite intake on the maintenance of steady-state NO levels. Dietary nitrite and nitrate may serve as essentials nutrient for optimal cardiovascular health and may provide a novel prevention/treatment modality for disease associated with NO insufficiency. PMID:18501719

  2. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias in tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pons, Roser; Syrengelas, Dimitris; Youroukos, Sotiris; Orfanou, Irene; Dinopoulos, Arqirios; Cormand, Bru; Ormazabal, Aida; Garzía-Cazorla, Angels; Serrano, Mercedes; Artuch, Rafael

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize levodopa (l-dopa)-induced dyskinesias in patients with tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency. Clinical observation was carried out on 6 patients who were diagnosed with tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency and were treated with escalating doses of l-dopa. All 6 patients showed l-dopa-induced dyskinesias of variable intensity early in the course of treatment and regardless of the age of initiation. l-Dopa-induced dyskinesias were precipitated by increases in the dose of l-dopa and also by febrile illnesses and stress. They caused dysfunction and distress in 2 patients. The dyskinesias were improved by decreasing the l-dopa dose or by slowing its titration upward. Increasing the dose frequency was helpful in 2 patients, and introducing amantadine was helpful in another 2 patients. l-Dopa-induced dyskinesias are a common phenomenon in tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency. The current observations show that l-dopa-induced dyskinesias are frequent in a dopamine-deficient state in the absence of nigrostriatal degeneration. Although l-dopa-induced dyskinesias in tyrosine hydroxylase deficiency are phenomenologically similar to those that occur in Parkinson's disease, they are different in a number of other respects, suggesting intrinsic differences in the pathophysiologic basis of l-dopa-induced dyskinesias in the 2 conditions. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Fetal iron deficiency induces chromatin remodeling at the Bdnf locus in adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu V; Kennedy, Bruce C; Lien, Yu-Chin; Simmons, Rebecca A; Georgieff, Michael K

    2015-02-15

    Fetal and subsequent early postnatal iron deficiency causes persistent impairments in cognitive and affective behaviors despite prompt postnatal iron repletion. The long-term cognitive impacts are accompanied by persistent downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a factor critical for hippocampal plasticity across the life span. This study determined whether early-life iron deficiency epigenetically modifies the Bdnf locus and whether dietary choline supplementation during late gestation reverses these modifications. DNA methylation and histone modifications were assessed at the Bdnf-IV promoter in the hippocampus of rats [at postnatal day (PND) 65] that were iron-deficient (ID) during the fetal-neonatal period. Iron deficiency was induced in rat pups by providing pregnant and nursing dams an ID diet (4 mg/kg Fe) from gestational day (G) 2 through PND7, after which iron deficiency was treated with an iron-sufficient (IS) diet (200 mg/kg Fe). This paradigm resulted in about 60% hippocampal iron loss on PND15 with complete recovery by PND65. For choline supplementation, pregnant rat dams were given dietary choline (5 g/kg) from G11 through G18. DNA methylation was determined by quantitative sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA, revealing a small alteration at the Bdnf-IV promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed increased HDAC1 binding accompanied by reduced binding of RNA polymerase II and USF1 at the Bdnf-IV promoter in formerly ID rats. These changes were correlated with altered histone methylations. Prenatal choline supplementation reverses these epigenetic modifications. Collectively, the findings identify epigenetic modifications as a potential mechanism to explicate the long-term repression of Bdnf following fetal and early postnatal iron deficiency. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Three successful pregnancies through dietary management of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, V; Eschrich, K; Boney, A; Sullivan, J; McDonald, M; Kishnani, P S; Koeberl, D D

    2007-10-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) deficiency (OMIM 229700) has been characterized as the cause of life-threatening hypoglycaemia and lactic acidaemia following prolonged fasting. The patient, an adult African-American woman, presented during the second trimester of her first pregnancy with recurrent episodes of lactic acidaemia and hypoglycaemia. She had recently been admitted to a nearby intensive care unit after presentation with profound hypoglycaemia and lactic acidosis, and was found to be pregnant. The history was remarkable for approximately 30 hospitalizations for hypoglycaemia and acidosis. She had previously undergone liver biopsy at another centre and was diagnosed with a 'glycogen storage disease', although no enzyme testing had been done for confirmation. Based on clinical symptoms, a diagnosis of FBPase deficiency was accomplished through gene sequencing, which revealed homozygosity for a panethnic, common mutation, 960/961insG in exon 7. The availability of mutation testing facilitated the confirmation of FBPase deficiency in this patient, obviating liver biopsy for enzyme activity confirmation. The patient underwent three successful pregnancies by strict compliance with dietary management, including nocturnal uncooked cornstarch to manage hypoglycaemia. The pregnancies were complicated by mild gestational diabetes, increased cornstarch requirements, and hypoglycaemia at the time of discharge from the hospital. The three infants had normal birth weights and experienced no complications during the neonatal period. The patient subsequently developed sensorineural hearing loss and early-onset cognitive impairment, despite compliance with the monitoring and treatment of hypoglycaemia. The experience with multiple pregnancies in this FBPase-deficient patient provides insight into the management of hypoglycaemia in inherited disorders of gluconeogenesis.

  5. Dietary Components Affect the Plasma and Tissue Levels of Lutein in Aged Rats with Lutein Deficiency--A Repeated Gavage and Dietary Study.

    PubMed

    Sheshappa, Mamatha Bangera; Ranganathan, Arunkumar; Bhatiwada, Nidhi; Talahalli, Ramprasad Ravichandra; Vallikannan, Baskaran

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the influence of selected dietary components on plasma and tissue response of repeated micellar and dietary lutein in aged rats with lutein deficiency. In repeated (16 d) gavage study, micellar lutein was co-ingested with either phosphatidylcholine (PC), lyso-phosphatidylcholine (lysoPC), β-carotene, dietary fiber or vegetable fat (3% soybean oil). In dietary study, rats were fed (4 wk) semi-synthetic diet either with lutein + PC, lutein + dietary fiber or B. alba (lutein source) + PC. The post-prandial plasma and tissue response of lutein was measured by HPLC. Results showed that micellar fat, PC and lysoPC significantly (P ≤ 0.05) increased the lutein levels in plasma (31.1%, 26.8%, and 34.9%), liver (27.4%, 29.5%, and 8.6%), and eyes (63.5%, 90.2%, and 86%) compared to the control group (group gavaged micelles with no dietary components studied). Similarly, dietary study showed an enhanced plasma, liver, and eye lutein levels by 44.8%, 24.1%, and 42.0% (lutein + PC group) and 51.7%, 39.8%, and 31.7% (B.alba + PC group), respectively compared to control. The activity of antioxidant enzymes in plasma and liver of both the studies were also affected compared to control. Result reveals, that PC enhance the intestinal absorption of both micellar and dietary lutein which is either in free or bound form with food matrices in aged rats with lutein deficiency. Hence, PC at a concentration used in this study can be considered to improve the lutein bioavailability in lutein deficiency. Lutein and zeaxanthin are macular pigments acquired mostly from greens, that play an significant role in protecting vision from Age related macular degeneration (AMD). However, their biological availability is poor and affected by dietary components. This study demonstrates the positive influence of dietary PC and lyso PC in improving intestinal uptake of lutein. Our previous and present finding shows there is a possibility of developing functional

  6. High Fructose Feeding Induces Copper Deficiency in Sprague-Dawley rats: A Novel Mechanism for Obesity Related Fatty Liver

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ming; Schuschke, Dale A; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Chen, Theresa; Pierce, William M.; Wang, Renwei; Johnson, W. Thomas; McClain, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Dietary copper deficiency is associated with a variety of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including hyperlipidemia and fatty liver. Fructose feeding has been reported to exacerbate complications of copper deficiency. In this study, we investigated whether copper deficiency plays a role in fructose-induced fatty liver and explored the potential underlying mechanism(s). Methods Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either an adequate copper or a marginally copper deficient diet for 4 weeks. Deionized water or deionized water containing 30% fructose (w/v) was also given ad lib. Copper and iron status, hepatic injury and steatosis, duodenum copper transporter-1(Ctr-1) were assessed. Results Fructose feeding further impaired copper status and led to iron overload. Liver injury and fat accumulation were significantly induced in marginal copper deficient rats exposed to fructose as evidenced by robust increased plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and hepatic triglyceride. Hepatic carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase I (CPT I) expression was significantly inhibited, whereas hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS) was markedly up-regulated in marginal copper deficient rats fed with fructose. Hepatic antioxidant defense system was suppressed and lipid peroxidation was increased by marginal copper deficiency and fructose feeding. Moreover, duodenum Ctr-1 expression was significantly increased by marginal copper deficiency, whereas this increase was abrogated by fructose feeding. Conclusion Our data suggest that high fructose-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may be due, in part, to inadequate dietary copper. Impaired duodenum Ctr1 expression seen in fructose feeding may lead to decreased copper absorption, and subsequent copper deficiency. PMID:21781943

  7. High fructose feeding induces copper deficiency in Sprague-Dawley rats: a novel mechanism for obesity related fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Ming; Schuschke, Dale A; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Chen, Theresa; Pierce, William M; Wang, Renwei; Johnson, W Thomas; McClain, Craig J

    2012-02-01

    Dietary copper deficiency is associated with a variety of manifestations of the metabolic syndrome, including hyperlipidemia and fatty liver. Fructose feeding has been reported to exacerbate complications of copper deficiency. In this study, we investigated whether copper deficiency plays a role in fructose-induced fatty liver and explored the potential underlying mechanism(s). Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either an adequate copper or a marginally copper deficient diet for 4 weeks. Deionized water or deionized water containing 30% fructose (w/v) was also given ad lib. Copper and iron status, hepatic injury and steatosis, and duodenum copper transporter-1 (Ctr-1) were assessed. Fructose feeding further impaired copper status and led to iron overload. Liver injury and fat accumulation were significantly induced in marginal copper deficient rats exposed to fructose as evidenced by robustly increased plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and hepatic triglyceride. Hepatic carnitine palmitoyl-CoA transferase I (CPT I) expression was significantly inhibited, whereas hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS) was markedly up-regulated in marginal copper deficient rats fed with fructose. Hepatic antioxidant defense system was suppressed and lipid peroxidation was increased by marginal copper deficiency and fructose feeding. Moreover, duodenum Ctr-1 expression was significantly increased by marginal copper deficiency, whereas this increase was abrogated by fructose feeding. Our data suggest that high fructose-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may be due, in part, to inadequate dietary copper. Impaired duodenum Ctr-1 expression seen in fructose feeding may lead to decreased copper absorption, and subsequent copper deficiency. Copyright © 2011 European Association for the Study of the Liver. All rights reserved.

  8. Blood Donation, Being Asian, and a History of Iron Deficiency Are Stronger Predictors of Iron Deficiency than Dietary Patterns in Premenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Kathryn L.; Conlon, Cathryn A.; Heath, Anne-Louise M.; Coad, Jane; Stonehouse, Welma

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated dietary patterns and nondietary determinants of suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin < 20 μg/L) in 375 premenopausal women. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, determinants were blood donation in the past year [OR: 6.00 (95% CI: 2.81, 12.82); P < 0.001], being Asian [OR: 4.84 (95% CI: 2.29, 10.20); P < 0.001], previous iron deficiency [OR: 2.19 (95% CI: 1.16, 4.13); P = 0.016], a “milk and yoghurt” dietary pattern [one SD higher score, OR: 1.44 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.93); P = 0.012], and longer duration of menstruation [days, OR: 1.38 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.68); P = 0.002]. A one SD change in the factor score above the mean for a “meat and vegetable” dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status by 79.0% [OR: 0.21 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.50); P = 0.001] in women with children. Blood donation, Asian ethnicity, and previous iron deficiency were the strongest predictors, substantially increasing the odds of suboptimal iron status. Following a “milk and yoghurt” dietary pattern and a longer duration of menstruation moderately increased the odds of suboptimal iron status, while a “meat and vegetable” dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status in women with children. PMID:25006582

  9. Blood donation, being Asian, and a history of iron deficiency are stronger predictors of iron deficiency than dietary patterns in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Beck, Kathryn L; Conlon, Cathryn A; Kruger, Rozanne; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Matthys, Christophe; Coad, Jane; Jones, Beatrix; Stonehouse, Welma

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated dietary patterns and nondietary determinants of suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin < 20 μg/L) in 375 premenopausal women. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, determinants were blood donation in the past year [OR: 6.00 (95% CI: 2.81, 12.82); P < 0.001], being Asian [OR: 4.84 (95% CI: 2.29, 10.20); P < 0.001], previous iron deficiency [OR: 2.19 (95% CI: 1.16, 4.13); P = 0.016], a "milk and yoghurt" dietary pattern [one SD higher score, OR: 1.44 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.93); P = 0.012], and longer duration of menstruation [days, OR: 1.38 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.68); P = 0.002]. A one SD change in the factor score above the mean for a "meat and vegetable" dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status by 79.0% [OR: 0.21 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.50); P = 0.001] in women with children. Blood donation, Asian ethnicity, and previous iron deficiency were the strongest predictors, substantially increasing the odds of suboptimal iron status. Following a "milk and yoghurt" dietary pattern and a longer duration of menstruation moderately increased the odds of suboptimal iron status, while a "meat and vegetable" dietary pattern reduced the odds of suboptimal iron status in women with children.

  10. Cross-sectional dietary deficiencies among a prison population in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the dietary adequacy of prisoners of Beon Prison, Madang, Papua New Guinea in response to a report of possible nutritional deficiency. Methods We undertook an observational, cross-sectional study. All 254 male inmates (May 2010) were eligible to answer a validated interview-based questionnaire; to have a comprehensive dietary assessment; and to provide blood for biochemical analysis (α-tocopherol, β-carotene, lutein, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, homocysteine, zinc, ferritin, and vitamins A, B12 and C). Prison guards were invited to participate as a comparison group. Results 148 male prisoners (58.3%) and 13 male prison guards participated. Prison rations consisted of white rice fortified with thiamin, niacin, and iron, tinned tuna, tinned corned beef, water crackers, and black tea, with occasional intakes of fruit and vegetables. Some prisoners received supplementary food from weekend visitors. From assessment of the prisoners dietary data, median intakes of calcium (137 mg), potassium (677 mg), magnesium (182 mg), riboflavin (0.308 mg), vitamin A (54.1 μg), vitamin E (1.68 mg), vitamin C (5.7 mg) and folate (76.4 μg) were found to be below estimated average requirements (EAR). Following are the prisoners median (P25, P75) concentration of circulating nutrients and the percentage of prisoners with levels below normal reference ranges or recognized cut-off values: serum retinol 0.73 (0.40, 1.21) μmol/L, 46% below 0.7 μmol/L; plasma folate 2.0 (1.4, 2.6) nmol/L, 98% below 6.8 nmol/L; plasma vitamin C 6.3 (1.0, 19.3) μmol/L, 64% below 11.4 μmol/L; serum zinc 9.9 (8.8, 11.1) μmol/L, 66% below 10.7 μmol/L. Guards had diets with a higher dietary diversity that were associated with greater intakes of nutrients and biomarker concentrations. Conclusions The prisoners diets are likely lacking in several micronutrients and recommendations for dietary change have been made to the prison authorities. Ongoing vigilance is

  11. Vitamin A deficiency decreases and high dietary vitamin A increases disease severity in the mouse model of asthma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Th1/ Th2 paradigm has become an important issue in the pathogenesis of asthma, characterized by normal Th-1 and elevated Th-2 cytokine expression, resulting in a Th2 predominance. Vitamin A deficiency (VAD) produces a significant Th1 bias, while high-level dietary vitamin A supplementation promo...

  12. Sugarcane Molasses - A Potential Dietary Supplement in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahi; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2017-09-03

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a serious public health problem that debilitates ∼1.6 billion people globally every year, the majority being pregnant women and children from developing countries. In India, for example, in spite of several operational programs at the national level using iron-folic acid and other allopathic interventions, IDA is still prevalent. Traditional medicines, such as Ayurveda, prescribe herbal formulations containing sugarcane derivatives for the management of pandu, a condition similar to IDA. This article reviews molasses, a sugar industry by-product, as a potential raw material to develop nutraceutical products for IDA. Molasses contains iron and its absorption enhancers, such as sulfur, fructose, and copper, which make it a potential dietary supplement for IDA. More research, product development, and evidence of safety and efficacy of molasses in IDA management can provide a tasty and cost-effective dietary supplement, particularly for children. However, there are challenges, such as competition for raw material from refined sugar manufacturers, quality control, etc., that need to be overcome.

  13. Effect of dietary zinc deficiency on the accumulation of cadmium and metallothionein in selected tissues of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Waalkes, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of continuous dietary zinc deficiency on the metabolism of the toxic heavy metal cadmium has not been widely studied. This investigation was designed to assess the effects of subadequate dietary zinc intake on the accumulation of dietary cadmium and on metallothionein (MT) and zinc concentrations in target organs of cadmium toxicity. Adult male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were allowed, ad libitum, diets either adequate (60 ppm) or deficient (7 ppm) in zinc for a total of 9 wk. The zinc-deficient diet resulted in an approximately 40% reduction in plasma zinc (assessed at 3, 6, and 9 wk) in the absence of overt signs of zinc deficiency (i.e., reduced weight gain, alopecia, etc.). Separate groups of rats were also maintained on zinc-defined diets for a total of 9 wk, but cadmium was added to the diet (0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ppm) a the end of wk 3 and maintained at that level throughout the remaining 6 wk of the study, when the rats were killed. The feeding of the zinc-deficient diet markedly enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the liver, kidney, and testes. Hepatic, renal, and testicular zinc concentrations were not affected by suboptimal zinc intake alone. However, marked reductions in renal and testicular zinc concentrations were caused by zinc deficiency in concert with cadmium exposure. MT levels, when related to tissue cadmium concentrations, were elevated to a significantly lesser extent in the kidneys of zinc-deficient animals. These results indicate that marginal zinc deficiency markedly increases cadmium accumulation in various organs and reduces zinc content and MT induction in some organs.

  14. Impact of Dietary Intake on Bone Turnover in Patients with Phenylalanine Hydroxylase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Kathryn E; Felner, Eric I; Tangpricha, Vin; Wilson, Peter W F; Singh, Rani H

    2017-01-28

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) deficiency is a genetic disorder characterized by deficiency of the PAH enzyme. Patients follow a phenylalanine-restricted diet low in intact protein, and must consume synthetic medical food (MF) to supply phenylalanine-free protein. We assessed relationships between dietary intake and nutrient source (food or MF) on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers (BTM) in PAH deficiency. Blood from 44 fasted females 11-52 years of age was analyzed for plasma phenylalanine, serum BTM [CTx (resorption), P1NP (formation)], vitamin D, and parathyroid hormone (PTH). BTM ratios were calculated to assess resorption relative to formation (CTx/P1NP). Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measured total BMD and age-matched Z-scores. Three-day food records were analyzed for total nutrient intake, nutrients by source (food, MF), and compliance with MF prescription. Spearman's partial coefficients (adjusted for age, BMI, energy intake, blood phenylalanine) assessed correlations. All had normal BMD for age (Z-score >-2). Sixty-four percent had high resorption and normal formation indicating uncoupled bone turnover. CTx/P1NP was positively associated with food phenylalanine (r (2) = 0.39; p-value = 0.017), energy (r (2) = 0.41; p-value = 0.011) and zinc (r (2) = 0.41; p-value = 0.014). CTx/P1NP was negatively associated with MF fat (r (2) = -0.44; p-value = 0.008), MF compliance (r (2) = -0.34; p-value = 0.056), and positively with food sodium (r (2) = 0.43; p-value = 0.014). CTx/P1NP decreased significantly with age (p-value = 0.002) and higher PTH (p-value = 0.0002). Phenylalanine was not correlated with any bone indicator. Females with PAH deficiency had normal BMD but elevated BTM, particularly resorption. More favorable ratios were associated with nutrients from MF and compliance. Younger females had less favorable BTM ratios. Promoting micronutrient intake through compliance with MF may impact bone metabolism in

  15. A Polyamine-Deficient Diet Prevents Oxaliplatin-Induced Acute Cold and Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Pereira, Bruno; Daulhac, Laurence; Eschalier, Alain; Pezet, Denis; Moulinoux, Jacques-Philippe; Balayssac, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin is an anticancer drug used for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer, but it can also cause painful peripheral neuropathies. The pathophysiology of these neuropathies has not been yet fully elucidated, but may involve spinal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, particularly the NR2B subunit. As polyamines are positive modulators of NMDA-NR2B receptors and mainly originate from dietary intake, the modulation of polyamines intake could represent an interesting way to prevent/modulate neuropathic pain symptoms by opposing glutamate neurotransmission. Methods The effect of a polyamine deficient diet was investigated in an animal model of oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity using behavioral tests (mechanical and cold hypersensitivity). The involvement of spinal glutamate neurotransmission was monitored by using a proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy based metabolomic approach and by assessing the expression and phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Results A 7-day polyamine deficient diet totally prevented oxaliplatin-induced acute cold hypersensitivity and mechanical allodynia. Oxaliplatin-induced pain hypersensitivity was not associated with an increase in NR2B subunit expression or phosphorylation, but with an increase of glutamate level in the spinal dorsal horn which was completely prevented by a polyamine deficient diet. As a validation that the oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity could be due to an increased activity of the spinal glutamate system, an intrathecal administration of the specific NR2B antagonist, ifenprodil, totally reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical and cold hypersensitivity. Conclusion A polyamine deficient diet could represent a promising and valuable nutritional therapy to prevent oxaliplatin-induced acute pain hypersensitivity. PMID:24204988

  16. Synergistic Interaction of Dietary Cholesterol and Dietary Fat in Inducing Experimental Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Savard, Christopher; Tartaglione, Erica V.; Kuver, Rahul; Haigh, W. Geoffrey; Farrell, Geoffrey C.; Subramanian, Savitha; Chait, Alan; Yeh, Matthew M.; Quinn, LeBris S.; Ioannou, George N.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have “simple steatosis,” which is defined by hepatic steatosis in the absence of substantial inflammation or fibrosis and is considered to be benign. However, 10%–30% of patients with NAFLD progress to fibrosing nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is characterized by varying degrees of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis, in addition to hepatic steatosis, and can lead to cirrhosis. The cause(s) of progression to fibrosing steatohepatitis are unclear. We aimed to test the relative contributions of dietary fat and dietary cholesterol and their interaction on the development of NASH. We assigned C57BL/6J mice to four diets for 30 weeks: control (4% fat and 0% cholesterol); high cholesterol (HC; 4% fat and 1% cholesterol); high fat (HF; 15% fat and 0% cholesterol); and high fat, high cholesterol (HFHC; 15% fat and 1% cholesterol). The HF and HC diets led to increased hepatic fat deposition with little inflammation and no fibrosis (i.e., simple hepatic steatosis). However, the HFHC diet led to significantly more profound hepatic steatosis, substantial inflammation, and perisinusoidal fibrosis (i.e., steatohepatitis), associated with adipose tissue inflammation and a reduction in plasma adiponectin levels. In addition, the HFHC diet led to other features of human NASH, including hypercholesterolemia and obesity. Hepatic and metabolic effects induced by dietary fat and cholesterol together were more than twice as great as the sum of the separate effects of each dietary component alone, demonstrating significant positive interaction. Conclusion Dietary fat and dietary cholesterol interact synergistically to induce the metabolic and hepatic features of NASH, whereas neither factor alone is sufficient to cause NASH in mice. PMID:22508243

  17. Regional, Socioeconomic, and Dietary Risk Factors for Vitamin B-12 Deficiency Differ from Those for Folate Deficiency in Cameroonian Women and Children.

    PubMed

    Shahab-Ferdows, Setareh; Engle-Stone, Reina; Hampel, Daniela; Ndjebayi, Alex O; Nankap, Martin; Brown, Kenneth H; Allen, Lindsay H

    2015-11-01

    Representative data on folate and vitamin B-12 dietary intake and status in low-income countries are rare, despite the widespread adoption of folic acid fortification. The purpose of this study was to evaluate folate and vitamin B-12 intake, status, and risk factors for deficiency before implementation of a national fortification program in Cameroon. A nationally representative cross-sectional cluster survey was conducted in 3 ecologic zones of Cameroon (South, North, and the 2 largest cities, Yaoundé/Douala), and information on dietary intake was collected from 10 households in each of 30 randomly selected clusters per zone. In a subset of women and their 12- to 59-mo-old children (n = 396 pairs), plasma folate and vitamin B-12, as well as breast milk vitamin B-12, were analyzed. Vitamin B-12 and folate dietary intake patterns and plasma concentrations were similar for women and children. In the subsample, 18% and 29% of women and 8% and 30% of children were vitamin B-12 (≤ 221 pmol/L) and folate (< 10 nmol/L) deficient, respectively. Mean dietary folate ranged from 351 μg dietary folate equivalents/d in the North to 246 μg dietary folate equivalents/d in Yaoundé/Douala; plasma folate was negatively associated with socioeconomic status (P = 0.001). Plasma vitamin B-12 deficiency was similar in the South and North, 29% and 40%, respectively, but was only 11% in Yaoundé/Douala, and was positively associated with socioeconomic status. Mean breast milk vitamin B-12 was statistically significantly lower in the North (101 pmol/L) than in the South (296 pmol/L) or Yaoundé/Douala (349 pmol/L). Folate intake and status are inadequate among women and young children in Yaoundé/Douala, whereas low vitamin B-12 intake and status are more common in poor and rural areas, especially in the North. Different strategies may be needed to control deficiency of these nutrients in different regions of Cameroon. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Testis damage induced by zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Merker, H J; Günther, T

    1997-04-01

    Male Wistar rats were fed a Zn-deficient diet (1.2 mg/kg of Zn) for 28 days. Testes were then studied by light and electron microscopy. Zn deficiency induced necroses of precursors of germ cells leading to tubular atrophy and affected differentiation of spermatids. This was expressed by the occurrence of 2-4 axoneme-dense fibre-mitochondria complexes in one spermatid. Moreover, outer dense fibres, which normally contain 90% of sperm Zn, were "uncoiled" and flattened. The multiplication of the axoneme-dense fibre-mitochondria complexes induced by Zn deficiency might have been produced by an increase of Fe in spermatids and an increased formation of oxygen free radicals.

  19. Obesity development in neuron-specific lipoprotein lipase deficient mice is not responsive to increased dietary fat content or change in fat composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Taussig, Matthew D; DiPatrizio, Nicholas V; Bruce, Kimberley; Piomelli, Daniele; Eckel, Robert H

    2016-07-01

    We have previously reported that mice with neuron-specific LPL deficiency (NEXLPL-/-) become obese by 16weeks of age on chow. Moreover, these mice had reduced uptake of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoprotein-derived fatty acids and lower levels of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in the hypothalamus. Here, we asked whether increased dietary fat content or altered dietary composition could modulate obesity development in NEXLPL-/- mice. Male NEXLPL-/- mice and littermate controls (WT) were randomly assigned one of three synthetic diets; a high carbohydrate diet (HC, 10% fat), a high-fat diet (HF, 45% fat), or a HC diet supplemented with n-3 PUFAs (HCn-3, 10% fat, Lovaza, GSK®). After 42weeks of HC feeding, body weight and fat mass were increased in the NEXLPL-/- mice compared to WT. WT mice fed a HF diet displayed typical diet-induced obesity, but weight gain was only marginal in HF-fed NEXLPL-/- mice, with no significant difference in body composition. Dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation did not prevent obesity in NEXLPL-/- mice, but was associated with differential modifications in hypothalamic gene expression and PUFA concentration compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that neuronal LPL is involved in the regulation of body weight and composition in response to either the change in quantity (HF feeding) or quality (n-3 PUFA-enriched) of dietary fat. The precise role of LPL in lipid sensing in the brain requires further investigation.

  20. Influence of dietary phosphorus deficiency with or without addition of fumaric acid to a diet in pigs on bone parameters.

    PubMed

    Liesegang, A; Ursprung, R; Gasser, J; Sassi, M-L; Risteli, J; Riond, J-L; Wanner, M

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine if substantial bone loss occurs in weaned pigs by feeding a phosphorus-deficient diet with or without fumaric acid. Eighteen weaned pigs were used. The animals were assigned to three groups: group C (control; 0.65% P on DM basis), group LP (low phosphorus; 0.37% P on DM basis) and group LPF (low phosphorus plus fumaric acid; 0.35% P on DM basis plus 2% fumaric acid). These three diets were fed to the groups for a period of four weeks after a two-week adaptation period. Blood samples were collected once a week. Carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) in serum was used as a bone resorption marker. Osteocalcin (OC) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (bAP) were used as bone formation markers. Bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) were determined by peripheral quantitative computer tomography. BAP activities significantly increased (24%) in group LPF, and at the last sampling day group LPF had significantly increased activities in comparison to group C. In contrast, ICTP concentrations significantly increased with time in group LP and LPF, and at the last sampling day group LPF had significantly increased activities in comparison to group C. BMD and BMC in femur and tibia significantly decreased in group LP and LPF. The results show that P-deficient diets induce a bone loss. Fumaric acid did not influence the degree of bone loss. With a better understanding of its effect on bone, dietary phosphorus requirements in pigs could be more precisely defined.

  1. Dietary sodium protects fish against copper-induced olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Azizishirazi, Ali; Dew, William A; Bougas, Berenice; Bernatchez, Louis; Pyle, Greg G

    2015-04-01

    Exposure to low concentrations of copper impairs olfaction in fish. To determine the transcriptional changes in the olfactory epithelium induced by copper exposure, wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were exposed to 20 μg/L of copper for 3 and 24h. A novel yellow perch microarray with 1000 candidate genes was used to measure differential gene transcription in the olfactory epithelium. While three hours of exposure to copper changed the transcription of only one gene, the transcriptions of 70 genes were changed after 24h of exposure to copper. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the effect of exposure duration on two specific genes of interest, two sub-units of Na/K-ATPase. At 24 and 48 h, Na/K-ATPase transcription was down-regulated by copper at olfactory rosettes. As copper-induced impairment of Na/K-ATPase activity in gills can be ameliorated by increased dietary sodium, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used to determine if elevated dietary sodium was also protective against copper-induced olfactory impairment. Measurement of the olfactory response of rainbow trout using electro-olfactography demonstrated that sodium was protective of copper-induced olfactory dysfunction. This work demonstrates that the transcriptions of both subunits of Na/K-ATPase in the olfactory epithelium of fish are affected by Cu exposure, and that dietary Na protects against Cu-induced olfactory dysfunction.

  2. Bovine monocyte-derived macrophage function in induced copper deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cerone, S; Sansinanea, A; Streitenberger, S; García, C; Auza, N

    2000-03-01

    The effect of molybdenum-induced copper deficiency on monocyte-derived macrophage function was examined. Five female calves were given molybdenum (30 ppm) and sulphate (225 ppm) to induce experimental secondary copper deficiency. Oxidant production by bovine macrophages was measured after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and opsonized zymosan (OpZ). Lipoperoxidative effects inside of macrophage, superoxide dismutase activity, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide formation were determined. Copper deficiency was confirmed from decreased serum copper levels, and animals with values less than 5.9 micromol/l were considered deficient. The content of intracellular copper decreased about 40% in deficient cells compared with the controls. The respiratory burst activity determined by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction was significantly impaired with both stimulants used. Superoxide anion formation was less affected than hydrogen peroxide generation. In addition, increased lipid peroxidation was observed. It could be concluded that the effect of these changes may impair the monocyte-derived macrophage function in the immune system.

  3. Copper deficiency and hyperlipoproteinemia induced by a tetramine cupruretic agent in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hing, S A; Lei, K Y

    1991-03-01

    The effectiveness of a cupruretic agent, N,N'-bis-(2 amino ethyl)-1,3-propanediamine HCl or 2,3,2-tetramine HCl (TETA), in the induction of copper (Cu) deficiency and the ability of a Cu-deficient diet in the maintenance of the depressed Cu status 10 wk after TETA treatment were examined in this study. In the first experiment, 42 male New Zealand White rabbits, 35 d of age, were randomly divided into three dietary treatments: a copper (Cu)-deficient (2.3 mg Cu/kg diet), a Cu-adequate (13.5 mg Cu/kg diet), and a commercial ration (21.6 mg Cu/kg diet) group. A single oral dose of 100 mg of 2,3,2-tetramine HCl TETA/kg body wt/d were administered to half of the rabbits from each treatment group for 10 d while the remaining rabbits were untreated. In the second experiment, 10 similar rabbits were assigned to three treatments: Cu-deficient plus TETA (n = 4); Cu-adequate plus TETA (n = 3); and Cu-adequate alone (n = 3). The rabbits were fed a TETA dose of 100 mg/d for three 4-d periods over 3 wk, and thereafter maintained on the diets for another 10 wk. Rabbits from the first experiment fed Cu-deficient diet and treated with TETA demonstrated cardiac hypertrophy and markedly reduced plasma and liver Cu concentrations that indicated that the animals were Cu-deficient. Significant elevations (twofold) in low density lipoprotein (LDL) protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, and apolipoprotein B (apo B) concentrations were observed in TETA treated rabbits fed Cu-deficient diet. In the second experiment, the plasma LDL protein level remained elevated, the plasma Cu level was reduced 45%, and the Cu level of the heart when expressed as microgram/g dry tissue was reduced, 10 wk post TETA treatment in rabbits maintained on Cu-deficient diet. Thus, Cu deficiency and hyperlipoproteinemia was rapidly induced by TETA and was still evident 10 wk posttreatment in rabbits maintained on a Cu-deficient diet.

  4. Dietary Intake of Vitamins in Different Options of Treatment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Is There a Deficiency?

    PubMed

    Jankowska, M; Szupryczyńska, N; Dębska-Ślizień, A; Borek, P; Kaczkan, M; Rutkowski, B; Małgorzewicz, S

    2016-06-01

    The importance of diet in the management of kidney transplantation (KT), as well as other treatment options of chronic kidney disease (CKD), is generally acknowledged. However, data regarding vitamin intake are very limited. Vitamins are essential in maintaining good nutritional status and preventing many chronic complications. It is still not clear which treatment modality imposes the highest risk of dietary vitamin deficiency and whether successful KT reverses such a threat. We performed this observational study to assess dietary intake of vitamins in CKD patients: after successful KT, not yet dialyzed (ND), treated with hemodialysis (HD), and with peritoneal dialysis (PD). A total of 202 patients were recruited (45 KT, 50 ND, 45 HD, and 62 PD). Vitamin intakes were evaluated through the use of a 24-hour dietary recall and processed with the use of a computerized database. Each record was evaluated by a skilled dietitian. In general, vitamin intakes in all study groups were comparable, with KT and ND groups manifesting lower risk of deficiency than HD and PD groups. The content of fat-soluble vitamins in diet was insufficient, with remarkably high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Mean intakes of water-soluble vitamins were close to recommended, with the exception of folic acid, which was profoundly deficient in all groups. CKD patients are at risk of inadequate vitamin intake. Vitamin D and folic acid are universally deficient in diet. KT patients have the most satisfactory content of vitamins in their diet, whereas HD individuals are at highest risk of deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dietary methyl donor deficiency during pregnancy in rats shapes learning and anxiety in offspring.

    PubMed

    Konycheva, Galina; Dziadek, Marie A; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Krägeloh, Christian U; Coolen, Marcel W; Davison, Michael; Breier, Bernhard H

    2011-10-01

    Two important lines of research have enhanced our understanding of the molecular role of nutrition in influencing behavior. First, exposure to an adverse environment during early life can influence the long-term behavior of the offspring. Second, regulation of the nervous system development and functioning appears to involve epigenetic mechanisms that require a continuous supply of methyl group donors in food. We hypothesized that a maternal diet during pregnancy deficient in methyl donors (MDD) may lead to altered behavior in offspring through permanent changes in hippocampal DNA methylation. We used a rat model of prenatal dietary MDD to test this hypothesis in female offspring as they aged. Prenatal MDD reduced birth weight, litter size, and newborn viability. Aged female offspring of MDD mothers showed increased anxiety and increased learning ability in comparison with control diet group offspring. To explore the role of MDD on epigenetic mechanisms in the brain of adult offspring, we studied expression and methylation of 4 selected genes coding for glucocorticoid receptor, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 11 type 2, neuronatin, and reelin proteins in the hippocampus. No major group differences in methylation or expression of the studied genes were detected, except for a significant down-regulation of the reelin gene in the MDD female offspring. The prenatal MDD diet caused intrauterine growth restriction, associated with long-term effects on the behavior of the offspring. However, the observed behavioral differences between the MDD and control diet offspring cannot be explained by epigenetic regulation of the specific genes investigated in this study.

  6. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  7. Suppression of muscle protein turnover and amino acid degradation by dietary protein deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    To define the adaptations that conserve amino acids and muscle protein when dietary protein intake is inadequate, rats (60-70 g final wt) were fed a normal or protein-deficient (PD) diet (18 or 1% lactalbumin), and their muscles were studied in vitro. After 7 days on the PD diet, both protein degradation and synthesis fell 30-40% in skeletal muscles and atria. This fall in proteolysis did not result from reduced amino acid supply to the muscle and preceded any clear decrease in plasma amino acids. Oxidation of branched-chain amino acids, glutamine and alanine synthesis, and uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyrate also fell by 30-50% in muscles and adipose tissue of PD rats. After 1 day on the PD diet, muscle protein synthesis and amino acid uptake decreased by 25-40%, and after 3 days proteolysis and leucine oxidation fell 30-45%. Upon refeeding with the normal diet, protein synthesis also rose more rapidly (+30% by 1 day) than proteolysis, which increased significantly after 3 days (+60%). These different time courses suggest distinct endocrine signals for these responses. The high rate of protein synthesis and low rate of proteolysis during the first 3 days of refeeding a normal diet to PD rats contributes to the rapid weight gain ("catch-up growth") of such animals.

  8. Hypothalamic signaling in anorexia induced by indispensable amino acid deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinxia; Krasnow, Stephanie M.; Roth-Carter, Quinn R.; Levasseur, Peter R.; Braun, Theodore P.; Grossberg, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    Animals exhibit a rapid and sustained anorexia when fed a diet that is deficient in a single indispensable amino acid (IAA). The chemosensor for IAA deficiency resides within the anterior piriform cortex (APC). Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the APC detects IAA deficiency are well established, the efferent neural pathways that reduce feeding in response to an IAA-deficient diet remain to be fully characterized. In the present work, we investigated whether 1) central melanocortin signaling is involved in IAA deficiency-induced anorexia (IAADA) and 2) IAADA engages other key appetite-regulating neuronal populations in the hypothalamus. Rats and mice that consumed a valine-deficient diet (VDD) for 2–3 wk exhibited marked reductions in food intake, body weight, fat and lean body mass, body temperature, and white adipose tissue leptin gene expression, as well as a paradoxical increase in brown adipose tissue uncoupling protein-1 mRNA. Animals consuming the VDD had altered hypothalamic gene expression, typical of starvation. Pharmacological and genetic blockade of central melanocortin signaling failed to increase long-term food intake in this model. Chronic IAA deficiency was associated with a marked upregulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone expression in the lateral hypothalamus, particularly in the parasubthalamic nucleus, an area heavily innervated by efferent projections from the APC. Our observations indicate that the hypothalamic melanocortin system plays a minor role in acute, but not chronic, IAADA and suggest that the restraint on feeding is analogous to that observed after chronic dehydration. PMID:23047987

  9. Dietary magnesium deficiency alters gut microbiota and leads to depressive-like behaviour.

    PubMed

    Winther, Gudrun; Pyndt Jørgensen, Betina M; Elfving, Betina; Nielsen, Denis Sandris; Kihl, Pernille; Lund, Sten; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo; Wegener, Gregers

    2015-06-01

    Gut microbiota (GM) has previously been associated with alterations in rodent behaviour, and since the GM is affected by the diet, the composition of the diet may be an important factor contributing to behavioural changes. Interestingly, a magnesium restricted diet has been shown to induce anxiety and depressive-like behaviour in humans and rodents, and it could be suggested that magnesium deficiency may mediate the effects through an altered GM. The present study therefore fed C57BL/6 mice with a standard diet or a magnesium deficient diet (MgD) for 6 weeks, followed by behavioural testing in the forced swim test (FST) to evaluate depressive-like behaviour. An intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (GTT) was performed 2 day after the FST to assess metabolic alterations. Neuroinflammatory markers were analysed from hippocampus. GM composition was analysed and correlated to the behaviour and hippocampal markers. It was found that mice exposed to MgD for 6 weeks were more immobile than control mice in the FST, suggesting an increased depressive-like behaviour. No significant difference was detected in the GTT. GM composition correlated positively with the behaviour of undisturbed C57BL/6 mice, feeding MgD diet altered the microbial composition. The altered GM correlated positively to the hippocampal interleukin-6. In conclusion, we hypothesise that imbalances of the microbiota-gut-brain axis induced by consuming a MgD diet, contributes to the development of depressive-like behaviour.

  10. Iron deficiency is uncommon among lactating women in urban Nepal, despite a high risk of inadequate dietary iron intake.

    PubMed

    Henjum, Sigrun; Manger, Mari; Skeie, Eli; Ulak, Manjeswori; Thorne-Lyman, Andrew L; Chandyo, Ram; Shrestha, Prakash S; Locks, Lindsey; Ulvik, Rune J; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Strand, Tor A

    2014-07-14

    The main objective of the present study was to examine the association between dietary Fe intake and dietary predictors of Fe status and Hb concentration among lactating women in Bhaktapur, Nepal. We included 500 randomly selected lactating women in a cross-sectional survey. Dietary information was obtained through three interactive 24 h recall interviews including personal recipes. Concentrations of Hb and plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptors were measured. The daily median Fe intake from food was 17·5 mg, and 70% of the women were found to be at the risk of inadequate dietary Fe intake. Approximately 90% of the women had taken Fe supplements in pregnancy. The prevalence of anaemia was 20% (Hb levels < 123 g/l) and that of Fe deficiency was 5% (plasma ferritin levels < 15 μg/l). In multiple regression analyses, there was a weak positive association between dietary Fe intake and body Fe (β 0·03, 95% CI 0·014, 0·045). Among the women with children aged < 6 months, but not those with older infants, intake of Fe supplements in pregnancy for at least 6 months was positively associated with body Fe (P for interaction < 0·01). Due to a relatively high dietary intake of non-haem Fe combined with low bioavailability, a high proportion of the women in the present study were at the risk of inadequate intake of Fe. The low prevalence of anaemia and Fe deficiency may be explained by the majority of the women consuming Fe supplements in pregnancy.

  11. Calnexin deficiency and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zuppini, Anna; Groenendyk, Jody; Cormack, Lori A; Shore, Gordon; Opas, Michal; Bleackley, R Chris; Michalak, Marek

    2002-02-26

    In this study, we used calnexin-deficient cells to investigate the role of this protein in ER stress-induced apoptosis. We found that calnexin-deficient cells are relatively resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis. However, caspase 3 and 8 cleavage and cytochrome c release were unchanged in these cells, indicating that ER to mitochondria "communication" during apoptotic stimulation is not affected in the absence of calnexin. The Bcl-2:Bax ratio was also not significantly changed in calnexin-deficient cells regardless of whether the ER stress was induced with thapsigargin or not. Ca(2+) homeostasis and ER morphology were unaffected by the lack of calnexin, but ER stress-induced Bap31 cleavage was significantly inhibited. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Bap31 forms complexes with calnexin, which may play a role in apoptosis. The results suggest that calnexin may not play a role in the initiation of the ER stress but that the protein has an effect on later apoptotic events via its influence on Bap31 function.

  12. Formate Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of Anaerobic Metabolism, Is Induced by Iron Deficiency in Barley Roots1

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuya; Itai, Reiko; Suzuki, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko-Kishi; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Mori, Satoshi

    1998-01-01

    To identify the proteins induced by Fe deficiency, we have compared the proteins of Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) roots by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Peptide sequence analysis of induced proteins revealed that formate dehydrogenase (FDH), adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, and the Ids3 gene product (for Fe deficiency-specific) increased in Fe-deficient roots. FDH enzyme activity was detected in Fe-deficient roots but not in Fe-sufficient roots. A cDNA encoding FDH (Fdh) was cloned and sequenced. Fdh expression was induced by Fe deficiency. Fdh was also expressed under anaerobic stress and its expression was more rapid than that induced by Fe deficiency. Thus, the expression of Fdh observed in Fe-deficient barley roots appeared to be a secondary effect caused by oxygen deficiency in Fe-deficient plants. PMID:9489019

  13. The effect of dietary phosphorus deficiency on the immune responses of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus L.).

    PubMed

    Jokinen, E I; Vielma, J; Aaltonen, T M; Koskela, J

    2003-08-01

    Low phosphorous (P) feeds in aquaculture are recommended to reduce eutrophication of water systems. However, the feed should be adequate for normal growth and intact immune defence. Influence of low dietary P supply on non-specific and specific immune defence of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) was studied in two trials. For Trial 1, a semi-purified, low-P diet was formulated and supplied with 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 g P kg(-1)to obtain a P gradient of 4.4-14.9 g kg(-1)diet. Diets were fed to four replicate groups of fingerling whitefish for 42 days in a flow-through, freshwater system maintained at 15 degrees C. Fish fed with the P-unsupplemented diet had significantly lower plasma immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels than fish fed with the P-fortified diets (means 2.53 vs. 3.19 mg ml(-1); P=0.047). Plasma lysozyme activity did not differ between fish fed with the P-unsupplemented diet and fish fed with the P-fortified diets (means 21.8 vs. 25.5 U ml(-1); P=0.107). For Trial 2, fish were acclimated for 49 days by feeding the lowest or highest dietary P contents, and thereafter immunised with a single intraperitoneal injection of a novel antigen, bovine gamma globulin (BGG). A clear antibody response against BGG was elicited but the antibody levels did not differ between fish fed low-P or high-P contents. Similar to Trial 1, plasma IgM was lower in fish fed low-P diets, and low-P diet did not influence plasma lysozyme activity. In both trials the growth of fish, having received low-P diet, was significantly lowered. It is concluded that P deficiency has only minor effects on the immune parameters in whitefish, and the practical aquafeed with P contents sufficient for normal growth does not compromise immune functions of this species.

  14. Effects of dietary selenium deficiency or excess on gene expression of selenoprotein N in chicken muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiu-li; Zhang, Zi-wei; Shan, An-shan; Xu, Shi-wen

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have determined the effects of dietary selenium (Se) supplementation on selenoprotein N (SelN, SEPN1), selenophosphate synthetase-1 (SPS1), and selenocysteine-synthase (SecS) mRNA abundance in chicken skeletal and cardiac muscles. To investigate collective responses of these genes to dietary Se concentrations ranging from deficiency to moderately high level in muscle tissues of chicken, 1-day-old chickens were exposed to a diet of deficient Se and supplemented with Se (0.15 mg Se/kg and 1.50 mg Se/kg) as sodium selenite in the feed for 35 days. Muscle tissues (flight, breast, leg, and cardiac muscles) were collected and examined for Se content and mRNA levels of SelN on days 1, 15, 25, and 35 days, respectively. Moreover, SPS1 and SecS mRNA levels were analyzed. The results showed that the expression of SelN gene in cardiac muscle responded to dietary Se concentrations. SelN gene was downregulated in the Se deficiency group (L group), and upregulated in the Se excess group (H group) compared with the moderate Se group (M group) (P < 0.05) in cardiac muscle. Se deficiency mainly unregulated SelN mRNA level in skeletal muscles compared with M group. Excess dietary Se mainly resulted in the upregulation of SelN mRNA level in skeletal muscles compared with the M group. SecS mRNA levels responded to dietary Se concentrations showed a similar change compared with SelN in cardiac muscle. SPS1 mRNA levels responded to dietary Se concentrations showed a downregulation in L group and upregulation in H group. However, SelN mRNA levels displayed a different expression pattern in different skeletal and cardiac muscles. Moreover, Se also regulated the levels of SPS1 and SecS mRNAs. In summary, Se regulated the expression of SelN gene and affected the mRNA levels of SecS and SPS1. The level of Se in the feed may regulate SelN biosynthesis by affecting the levels of SPS1 and SecS mRNA.

  15. Herbal and Dietary Supplement-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Ynto S; Sherker, Averell H

    2017-02-01

    The increase in the use of herbal and dietary supplements (HDSs) over the last decades has been accompanied by an increase in the reports of HDS-associated hepatotoxicity. The spectrum of HDS-induced liver injury is diverse and the outcome may vary from transient liver test increases to fulminant hepatic failure resulting in death or requiring liver transplant. There are no validated standardized tools to establish the diagnosis, but some HDS products have a typical clinical signature that may help to identify HDS-induced liver injury.

  16. CHOP deficiency inhibits methylglyoxal-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Young; Kim, Suji; Han, Jung-Hwa; Nam, Dae-Hwan; Park, Kwon Moo; Kim, Seong Yong; Woo, Chang-Hoon

    2016-11-18

    Epidemiological studies suggested that diabetic patients are susceptible to develop cardiovascular complications along with having endothelial dysfunction. It has been suggested that methylglyoxal (MGO), a glycolytic metabolite, has more detrimental effects on endothelial dysfunction rather than glucose itself. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which MGO induces endothelial dysfunction via the regulation of ER stress. Biochemical data showed that 4-PBA significantly inhibited MGO-induced protein cleavages of PARP-1 and caspase-3. In addition, it was found that high glucose-induced endothelial apoptosis was enhanced in the presence of GLO1 inhibitor, suggesting the role of endogenous MGO in high glucose-induced endothelial dysfunction. MGO-induced endothelial apoptosis was significantly diminished by the depletion of CHOP with si-RNA against human CHOP, but not by SP600125, a specific inhibitor of JNK. The physiological relevance of this signaling pathway was demonstrated in CHOP deficiency mouse model, in which instillation of osmotic pump containing MGO led to aortic endothelial dysfunction. Notably, the aortic endothelial dysfunction response to MGO infusion was significantly improved in CHOP deficiency mice compared to littermate control. Taken together, these findings indicate that MGO specifically induces endothelial dysfunction in a CHOP-dependent manner, suggesting the therapeutic potential of CHOP inhibition in diabetic cardiovascular complications.

  17. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  18. Response to dietary phosphorus deficiency is affected by genetic background in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Alexander, L S; Qu, A; Cutler, S A; Mahajan, A; Lonergan, S M; Rothschild, M F; Weber, T E; Kerr, B J; Stahl, C H

    2008-10-01

    Concern over the environmental effect of P excretion from pig production has led to reduced dietary P supplementation. To examine how genetics influence P utilization, 94 gilts sired by 2 genetic lines (PIC337 and PIC280) were housed individually and fed either a P-adequate diet (PA) or a 20% P-deficient diet (PD) for 14 wk. Initially and monthly, blood samples were collected and BW recorded after an overnight fast. Growth performance and plasma indicators of P status were determined monthly. At the end of the trial, carcass traits, meat quality, bone strength, and ash percentage were determined. Pigs fed the PD diet had decreased (P < 0.05) plasma P concentrations and poorer G:F (P < 0.05) over the length of the trial. After 4 wk on trial, pigs fed the PD diet had increased (P < 0.05) plasma 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and decreased (P < 0.05) plasma parathyroid hormone compared with those fed the PA diet. At the end of the trial, pigs fed the PD diet had decreased (P < 0.05) BW, HCW, and percentage fat-free lean and tended to have decreased LM area (P = 0.06) and marbling (P = 0.09) and greater (P = 0.12) 10th-rib backfat than pigs fed the PA diet. Additionally, animals fed the PD diet had weaker bones and also decreased (P < 0.05) ash percentage and increased (P < 0.05) concentrations of 1alpha-hydroxylase and parathyroid hormone receptor mRNA in kidney tissue. Regardless of dietary treatment, PIC337-sired pigs consumed more feed and gained more BW than their PIC280-sired counterparts (P < 0.05) during the study. The PIC337-sired pigs also had greater (P < 0.05) HCW, larger (P < 0.01) LM area, and tended to have (P = 0.07) greater dressing percentage. Meat from the PIC337-sired pigs also tended to have greater (P = 0.12) concentrations of lactate but decreased (P = 0.07) concentrations of total glucose units 24 h postslaughter. Although plasma 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) concentrations were elevated (P < 0.05) in all the animals fed the PD diet, this elevation due to P deficiency

  19. Cardiac Electrophysiological Alterations in Heart/Muscle-Specific Manganese-Superoxide Dismutase-Deficient Mice: Prevention by a Dietary Antioxidant Polyphenol

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Akio; Tagashira, Motoyuki; Kanda, Tomomasa; Nakaya, Haruaki

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiological alterations induced by chronic exposure to reactive oxygen species and protective effects of dietary antioxidant have not been thoroughly examined. We recorded surface electrocardiograms (ECG) and evaluated cellular electrophysiological abnormalities in enzymatically-dissociated left ventricular (LV) myocytes in heart/muscle-specific manganese-superoxide dismutase-deficient (H/M-Sod2−/−) mice, which exhibit dilated cardiomyopathy due to increased oxidative stress. We also investigated the influences of intake of apple polyphenols (AP) containing mainly procyanidins with potent antioxidant activity. The QRS and QT intervals of ECG recorded in H/M-Sod2−/− mice were prolonged. The effective refractory period in the LV myocardium of H/M-Sod2−/− mice was prolonged, and susceptibility to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation induced by rapid ventricular pacing was increased. Action potential duration in H/M-Sod2−/− LV myocytes was prolonged, and automaticity was enhanced. The density of the inwardly rectifier K+ current (IK1) was decreased in the LV cells of H/M-Sod2−/− mice. The AP intake partially improved these electrophysiological alterations and extended the lifespan in H/M-Sod2−/− mice. Thus, chronic exposure of the heart to oxidative stress produces a variety of electrophysiological abnormalities, increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias, and action potential changes associated with the reduced density of IK1. Dietary intake of antioxidant nutrients may prevent oxidative stress-induced electrophysiological disturbances. PMID:24772433

  20. Breast-feeding, dietary intakes and their associations with subclinical vitamin A deficiency in children in Anhui Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yewu; Tao, Fangbiao; Yin, Huiping; Zhu, Xiaoming; Ji, Guoping; Kong, Shenghua; Song, Qinhua; Chen, Jianhua; Chu, Chengzhi; Li, Zhu

    2007-07-01

    This study aimed to explore the associations between breast-feeding, dietary intakes and other related factors and subclinical vitamin A deficiency (SVAD) in children aged 0-5 years in an area in China where mild vitamin A deficiency (VAD) is found. Data were from a population-based cross-sectional study with 1052 children aged 0-5 years. SVAD cases were identified by the indicator of serum retinoldietary intakes and other factors were collected through a pre-designed questionnaire. The prevalence of SVAD in children aged 0-5 years was 6.9%. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio of SVAD for breastfeeding was 3.56 (95% confidence limits (95% CL) 2.17-5.82). After adjustment for sex, age in categories, residence, mother's education, mother's occupation, vitamin A preparation supplements, rank in siblings and diarrhoea, the odds ratio for breast-feeding fell to 2.38 (95% CL 1.13-4.95). The odds ratios for breast-feeding within children aged 1 year were 5.46 (95% CL 2.07-15.03) and 4.6 (95% CL 1.72-12.82) before and after adjustment of other confounders, respectively. The odds ratios for breast-feeding did not show statistical significance within children aged 0 or 2 years. The odds ratios decreased, but remained statically significant after further adjustments for individual dietary factor or all dietary factors. Breast-feeding was a risk factor of SVAD for children, especially for those aged 1 year. The differences in dietary intakes and other established risk factors could not fully explain the increased risk. This finding implies that prolonged breast-feeding alone may not ensure protection of children from VAD in an area with mild SVAD.

  1. Dietary antioxidants prevent alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Simet, Samantha M.; Pavlik, Jacqueline A.; Sisson, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown that chronic alcohol intake causes alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction (AICD), leading to non-responsive airway cilia. AICD likely occurs through the downregulation of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases, protein kinase G (PKG) and protein kinase A (PKA). Studies by others have shown that dietary supplementation with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and procysteine prevent other alcohol-induced lung complications. This led us to hypothesize that dietary supplementation with NAC or procysteine prevents AICD. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice drank an alcohol/water solution (20% w/v) ad libitum for 6 weeks and were concurrently fed dietary supplements of either NAC or procysteine. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured in mice tracheas, and PKG/PKA responsiveness to β-agonists and NOx levels were measured from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Long-term alcohol drinking reduced CBF, PKG and PKA responsiveness to β-agonists, and lung NOx levels in BAL fluid. In contrast, alcohol-drinking mice fed NAC or procysteine sustained ciliary function and PKG and PKA responsiveness to β-agonists. However, BAL NO levels remained low despite antioxidant supplementation. We also determined that removal of alcohol from the drinking water for as little as 1 week restored ciliary function, but not PKG and PKA responsiveness to β-agonists. We conclude that dietary supplementation with NAC or procysteine protects against AICD. In addition, alcohol removal for 1 week restores cilia function independent of PKG and PKA activity. Our findings provide a rationale for the use of antioxidants to prevent damage to airway mucociliary functions in chronic alcohol-drinking individuals. PMID:24169090

  2. Gross and histological signs of dietary deficiencies of biotin and pantothenic acid in lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush.

    PubMed

    Poston, H A; Page, J W

    1982-07-01

    We describe the pathologic changes of single or simultaneous dietary deprivations of biotin (B) and pantothenic acid (PA) in lake trout, Salvelinus namaycush. A deficiency of PA produced gross signs of anorexia, inanition, emaciation, gill abnormalities and high mortality. In B-deficient fish, growth retardation reached statistically significant levels (P less than 0.05) after week 10, but gill and liver lesions were observed earlier. Anorexia and reduced weight gain were observed earlier in fish deprived of both nutrients than in those deficient in B alone. All B-deficient trout fed PA survived the study, and were less anorexic, anemic and emaciated than were those fed B without PA. Deposition of glycogen was greater in kidney tubules of B-deficient fish than in those lacking both vitamins. However, lesions interpreted to be mitochondrial conglutination and cellular necrosis of renal tubules and pancreatic acini were more exaggerated in fish fed neither nutrient than in those deprived of only one. Both vitamins are needed for energy transfer metabolism and their absence in metabolically active tissues causes lesions that resemble those reported for cellular anoxia.

  3. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects. PMID:26835453

  4. Severe but Not Moderate Vitamin B12 Deficiency Impairs Lipid Profile, Induces Adiposity, and Leads to Adverse Gestational Outcome in Female C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra Kumar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Raghunath, Manchala

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is widely prevalent in women of childbearing age, especially in developing countries. In the present study, through dietary restriction, we have established mouse models of severe and moderate vitamin B12 deficiencies to elucidate the impact on body composition, biochemical parameters, and reproductive performance. Female weanling C57BL/6 mice were fed for 4 weeks: (a) control AIN-76A diet, (b) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with pectin as dietary fiber (severe deficiency group, as pectin inhibits vitamin B12 absorption), or (c) vitamin B12-restricted AIN-76A diet with cellulose as dietary fiber (moderate deficiency group as cellulose does not interfere with vitamin B12 absorption). After confirming deficiency, the mice were mated with male colony mice and maintained on their respective diets throughout pregnancy, lactation, and thereafter till 12 weeks. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency increased body fat% significantly, induced adiposity and altered lipid profile. Pregnant dams of both the deficient groups developed anemia. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency decreased the percentage of conception and litter size, pups were small-for-gestational-age and had significantly lower body weight at birth as well as weaning. Most of the offspring born to severely deficient dams died within 24 h of birth. Stress markers and adipocytokines were elevated in severe deficiency with concomitant decrease in antioxidant defense. The results show that severe but not moderate vitamin B12 restriction had profound impact on the physiology of C57BL/6 mice. Oxidative and corticosteroid stress, inflammation and poor antioxidant defense seem to be the probable underlying mechanisms mediating the deleterious effects.

  5. Serotonin Deficiency Exacerbates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Toxicity In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)).Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration. PMID:25631548

  6. Serotonin deficiency exacerbates acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Song, Sidong; Pang, Qing; Zhang, Ruiyao; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Sushun; Meng, Fandi; Wu, Qifei; Liu, Chang

    2015-01-29

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is a major cause of acute liver failure. Peripheral 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin, 5-HT) is a cytoprotective neurotransmitter which is also involved in the hepatic physiological and pathological process. This study seeks to investigate the mechanisms involved in APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the role of 5-HT in the liver's response to APAP toxicity. We induced APAP hepatotoxicity in mice either sufficient of serotonin (wild-type mice and TPH1-/- plus 5- Hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP)) or lacking peripheral serotonin (Tph1-/- and wild-type mice plus p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA)). Mice with sufficient 5-HT exposed to acetaminophen have a significantly lower mortality rate and a better outcome compared with mice deficient of 5-HT. This difference is at least partially attributable to a decreased level of inflammation, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, Glutathione (GSH) depletion, peroxynitrite formation, hepatocyte apoptosis, elevated hepatocyte proliferation, activation of 5-HT2B receptor, less activated c-Jun NH₂-terminal kinase (JNK) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α in the mice sufficient of 5-HT versus mice deficient of 5-HT. We thus propose a physiological function of serotonin that serotonin could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury mainly through inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis ER stress and promoting liver regeneration.

  7. Dietary fish oil inhibits bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J I; Chandler, D B; Fulmer, J D; Wert, M B; Grizzle, W E

    1989-03-01

    Intratracheal bleomycin induces pulmonary fibrosis in experimental animals, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Since altered levels of fatty acid metabolites are associated with bleomycin-induced lung injury, we examined the effects of a change in dietary fat on bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Previously we have shown that an essential fatty acid-deficient diet can reduce the severity of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The present study examined the effect of replacement of usual dietary fat with menhaden oil, rich in eicosapentaenoic acid, on the development of pulmonary fibrosis. Weanling rats were raised on a standard laboratory diet or a diet consisting of a fat-free powder to which was added 25% (w/w) of menhaden oil. After 8 weeks of feeding, the animals received either 1.5 units of bleomycin or an equivalent volume of saline intratracheally. In animals receiving the laboratory diet, bleomycin treatment produced a 44% increase in total lung protein content when compared to saline-treated controls (p less than 0.001) and a 77% increase in total lung hydroxyproline content (p less than 0.01). In contrast, bleomycin-treated animals receiving the menhaden oil diet had only small increases, which did not reach statistical significance, in protein and hydroxyproline content in the lung. Bronchoalveolar lavage cellularity did not differ among the treatment groups, but the percentage of lavage macrophages was slightly diminished in bleomycin-treated animals receiving the laboratory diet. Cellular differentials of lavage fluid did not differ significantly between bleomycin- and saline-treated animals receiving the menhaden oil diet. Bleomycin-induced histologic changes, quantitated by morphometric analysis, were significantly reduced with the menhaden oil diet. We conclude that a diet rich in eicosapentaenoic acid can significantly ameliorate bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, possibly via alterations in eicosanoid metabolism.

  8. Nutrigenomics analysis reveals that copper deficiency and dietary sucrose up-regulate inflammation, fibrosis and lipogenic pathways in a mature rat model of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tallino, Savannah; Duffy, Megan; Ralle, Martina; Cortés, María Paz; Latorre, Mauricio; Burkhead, Jason L

    2015-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) prevalence is increasing worldwide, with the affected US population estimated near 30%. Diet is a recognized risk factor in the NAFLD spectrum, which includes nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and fibrosis. Low hepatic copper (Cu) was recently linked to clinical NAFLD/NASH severity. Simple sugar consumption including sucrose and fructose is implicated in NAFLD, while consumption of these macronutrients also decreases liver Cu levels. Though dietary sugar and low Cu are implicated in NAFLD, transcript-level responses that connect diet and pathology are not established. We have developed a mature rat model of NAFLD induced by dietary Cu deficiency, human-relevant high sucrose intake (30% w/w) or both factors in combination. Compared to the control diet with adequate Cu and 10% (w/w) sucrose, rats fed either high-sucrose or low-Cu diet had increased hepatic expression of genes involved in inflammation and fibrogenesis, including hepatic stellate cell activation, while the combination of diet factors also increased ATP citrate lyase and fatty acid synthase gene transcription (fold change > 2, P < 0.02). Low dietary Cu decreased hepatic and serum Cu (P ≤ 0.05), promoted lipid peroxidation and induced NAFLD-like histopathology, while the combined factors also induced fasting hepatic insulin resistance and liver damage. Neither low Cu nor 30% sucrose in the diet led to enhanced weight gain. Taken together, transcript profiles, histological and biochemical data indicate that low Cu and high sucrose promote hepatic gene expression and physiological responses associated with NAFLD and NASH, even in the absence of obesity or severe steatosis.

  9. High Dose Zinc Supplementation Induces Hippocampal Zinc Deficiency and Memory Impairment with Inhibition of BDNF Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shou-Peng; Gu, Run-Xia; Tang, Fang-Xu; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Xiong, Yan; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Xu-Ying; Ke, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose), 60 ppm Zn (high dose) or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit. PMID:23383172

  10. High dose zinc supplementation induces hippocampal zinc deficiency and memory impairment with inhibition of BDNF signaling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jing, Xiao-Peng; Zhang, Shou-Peng; Gu, Run-Xia; Tang, Fang-Xu; Wang, Xiu-Lian; Xiong, Yan; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Xu-Ying; Ke, Dan; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Rong

    2013-01-01

    Zinc ions highly concentrate in hippocampus and play a key role in modulating spatial learning and memory. At a time when dietary fortification and supplementation of zinc have increased the zinc consuming level especially in the youth, the toxicity of zinc overdose on brain function was underestimated. In the present study, weaning ICR mice were given water supplemented with 15 ppm Zn (low dose), 60 ppm Zn (high dose) or normal lab water for 3 months, the behavior and brain zinc homeostasis were tested. Mice fed high dose of zinc showed hippocampus-dependent memory impairment. Unexpectedly, zinc deficiency, but not zinc overload was observed in hippocampus, especially in the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse. The expression levels of learning and memory related receptors and synaptic proteins such as NMDA-NR2A, NR2B, AMPA-GluR1, PSD-93 and PSD-95 were significantly decreased in hippocampus, with significant loss of dendritic spines. In keeping with these findings, high dose intake of zinc resulted in decreased hippocampal BDNF level and TrkB neurotrophic signaling. At last, increasing the brain zinc level directly by brain zinc injection induced BDNF expression, which was reversed by zinc chelating in vivo. These results indicate that zinc plays an important role in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and BDNF expression, high dose supplementation of zinc induces specific zinc deficiency in hippocampus, which further impair learning and memory due to decreased availability of synaptic zinc and BDNF deficit.

  11. Physiogenomic analysis of weight loss induced by dietary carbohydrate restriction

    PubMed Central

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; Kocherla, Mohan; Holford, Theodore; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Forsythe, Cassandra E; Wood, Richard J; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2006-01-01

    Background Diets that restrict carbohydrate (CHO) have proven to be a successful dietary treatment of obesity for many people, but the degree of weight loss varies across individuals. The extent to which genetic factors associate with the magnitude of weight loss induced by CHO restriction is unknown. We examined associations among polymorphisms in candidate genes and weight loss in order to understand the physiological factors influencing body weight responses to CHO restriction. Methods We screened for genetic associations with weight loss in 86 healthy adults who were instructed to restrict CHO to a level that induced a small level of ketosis (CHO ~10% of total energy). A total of 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from 15 candidate genes involved in fat digestion/metabolism, intracellular glucose metabolism, lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite regulation. Multiple linear regression was used to rank the SNPs according to probability of association, and the most significant associations were analyzed in greater detail. Results Mean weight loss was 6.4 kg. SNPs in the gastric lipase (LIPF), hepatic glycogen synthase (GYS2), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and galanin (GAL) genes were significantly associated with weight loss. Conclusion A strong association between weight loss induced by dietary CHO restriction and variability in genes regulating fat digestion, hepatic glucose metabolism, intravascular lipoprotein remodeling, and appetite were detected. These discoveries could provide clues to important physiologic adaptations underlying the body mass response to CHO restriction. PMID:16700901

  12. Apple juice prevents oxidative stress and impaired cognitive performance caused by genetic and dietary deficiencies in mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, E J; Milhalik, S; Orthiz, D; Shea, T B

    2004-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress contributes to the decline in cognitive performance during normal aging and in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer s disease. Dietary supplementation with fruits and vegetables that are high in antioxidant potential have in some cases compensated for dietary and/or genetic deficiencies that promote increased oxidative stress. Herein, we demonstrate that apple juice concentrate, administered ad libitum in drinking water, can compensate for the increased reactive oxygen species and decline in cognitive performance in maze trials observed when normal and transgenic mice lacking apolipoprotein E are deprived of folate and vitamin E. In addition, we demonstrate that this protective effect is not derived from the sugar content of the concentrate.

  13. Fat-specific Dicer deficiency accelerates aging and mitigates several effects of dietary restriction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Branquinho, Jéssica L. O.; Brandão, Bruna B.; Guerra, Beatriz A.; Silva, Ismael D.; Frontini, Andrea; Thomou, Thomas; Sartini, Loris; Cinti, Saverio; Kahn, C. Ronald; Festuccia, William T.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Mori, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and this can be prevented by dietary restriction (DR). We have previously shown that DR inhibits the downregulation of miRNAs and their processing enzymes - mainly Dicer - that occurs with aging in mouse white adipose tissue (WAT). Here we used fat-specific Dicer knockout mice (AdicerKO) to understand the contributions of adipose tissue Dicer to the metabolic effects of aging and DR. Metabolomic data uncovered a clear distinction between the serum metabolite profiles of Lox control and AdicerKO mice, with a notable elevation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) in AdicerKO. These profiles were associated with reduced oxidative metabolism and increased lactate in WAT of AdicerKO mice and were accompanied by structural and functional changes in mitochondria, particularly under DR. AdicerKO mice displayed increased mTORC1 activation in WAT and skeletal muscle, where Dicer expression is not affected. This was accompanied by accelerated age-associated insulin resistance and premature mortality. Moreover, DR-induced insulin sensitivity was abrogated in AdicerKO mice. This was reverted by rapamycin injection, demonstrating that insulin resistance in AdicerKO mice is caused by mTORC1 hyperactivation. Our study evidences a DR-modulated role for WAT Dicer in controlling metabolism and insulin resistance. PMID:27241713

  14. Dietary coenzyme Q10 does not protect against cigarette smoke-augmented atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Gairola, C Gary; Howatt, Deborah A; Daugherty, Alan

    2010-06-01

    Dietary coenzyme Q10 reduces spontaneous atherosclerosis in the apoE-deficient mouse model of experimental atherosclerosis. We have shown previously that exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke (SSCS) enhances atherosclerotic lesion formation in apoE-deficient mice. The aim of the present study was to determine if CoQ10 protected against SSCS-mediated atherosclerosis. Female apoE-deficient mice were fed a saturated fat-enriched diet (SFD) alone, or supplemented with 1% wt/wt coenzyme Q10 (SFD-Q10). Mice in each diet group were exposed to SSCS for 4hrs/day, 5days/week in a whole-body exposure chamber maintained at 35+/-4mg smoke particulates/m(3). Mice kept in filtered ambient air served as controls. Mice were euthanized after either 6 or 15weeks of SSCS exposure and following measurements were performed: i) lung 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity; ii) plasma cholesterol and CoQ10 concentrations; iii) aortic intimal area covered by atherosclerotic lesions; and, iv) pathological characterization of lesions. Lung EROD activity increased in SSCS mice of both diet groups, confirming SSCS exposure. Plasma concentrations of CoQ10 in SFD-Q10-fed mice were increased markedly in comparison to SFD-fed mice. Plasma cholesterol concentrations and distributions of cholesterol in lipoprotein fractions were unaffected by SSCS exposure. Dietary supplementation with CoQ10 significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesions in control mice. As reported previously, exposure to SSCS increased the size of lesions in apoE-/- mice at both time points. However, dietary supplementation with CoQ10 had no effect on atherosclerotic lesions augmented by SSCS exposure. The results suggest a role of oxidative processes in smoke-augmented atherosclerosis that are different than those mitigated by CoQ10.

  15. Contact Lens-induced Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rossen, Jennifer; Amram, Alec; Milani, Behrad; Park, Dongwook; Harthan, Jennifer; Joslin, Charlotte; McMahon, Timothy; Djalilian, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) is a pathologic condition caused by the dysfunction and/or destruction of stem cell precursors of the corneal epithelium, typified clinically by corneal conjunctivalization. The purpose of this review is to critically discuss a less well-known cause of limbal stem cell disease: contact lens (CL) wear. A literature search was conducted to include original articles containing patients with CL-induced LSCD. This review describes epidemiology, diagnostic strategies, pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, and treatment modalities for this condition.

  16. Opioidergic consequences of dietary-induced binge eating

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Patinkin, Zachary W.; Moran, Timothy H.

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous opioids are involved in the hedonic aspects of eating. Opioid impairments and alterations have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Specific contributions by Bartley G. Hoebel have furthered the understanding how cyclical caloric restriction and intermittent optional access to sugar solutions results in opioid-like forebrain neural alterations and dependency in rodents. The present study sought to investigate caudal brainstem and nodose ganglion mu-opioid receptor mRNA alterations in a rodent model of dietary-induced binge eating of sweetened fat (vegetable shortening blended with 10% sucrose). Five groups (n = 7 or 8) of adult female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to various dietary conditions for 6 weeks. As measured by in situ hybridization, there was reduced (approximately 25% from naive) mu-opioid receptor mRNA in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the binge access group, which had intermittent calorie restriction and optional limited access to the sweetened fat. A similar reduction in expression was demonstrated in the continuous access group, which has unlimited optional sweetened fat and an obese phenotype. In the nodose ganglion, mu-opioid receptor mRNA was increased (approximately 30% from groups with sweetened fat access) in rats with intermittent caloric restriction alone. Our findings and the body of work from the Hoebel laboratory suggest that dietary-induced binge eating can consequentially alter opioidergic forebrain and hindbrain feeding-related neural pathways. Future work is needed to determine whether similar alterations are involved in the maintenance and progression of binge eating and other related eating pathologies. PMID:21539852

  17. Opioidergic consequences of dietary-induced binge eating.

    PubMed

    Bello, Nicholas T; Patinkin, Zachary W; Moran, Timothy H

    2011-07-25

    Endogenous opioids are involved in the hedonic aspects of eating. Opioid impairments and alterations have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Specific contributions by Bartley G. Hoebel have furthered the understanding how cyclical caloric restriction and intermittent optional access to sugar solutions result in opioid-like forebrain neural alterations and dependency in rodents. The present study sought to investigate caudal brainstem and nodose ganglion mu-opioid receptor mRNA alterations in a rodent model of dietary-induced binge eating of sweetened fat (vegetable shortening blended with 10% sucrose). Five groups (n=7 or 8) of adult female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to various dietary conditions for 6 weeks. As measured by in situ hybridization, there was reduced (approximately 25% from naive) mu-opioid receptor mRNA in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in the binge access group, which had intermittent calorie restriction and optional limited access to the sweetened fat. A similar reduction in expression was demonstrated in the continuous access group, which has unlimited optional sweetened fat and an obese phenotype. In the nodose ganglion, mu-opioid receptor mRNA was increased (approximately 30% from groups with sweetened fat access) in rats with intermittent caloric restriction alone. Our findings and the body of work from the Hoebel laboratory suggest that dietary-induced binge eating can consequentially alter opioidergic forebrain and hindbrain feeding-related neural pathways. Future work is needed to determine whether similar alterations are involved in the maintenance and progression of binge eating and other related eating pathologies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Deamidated Lipocalin‐2 Induces Endothelial Dysfunction and Hypertension in Dietary Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Erfei; Fan, Pengcheng; Huang, Bosheng; Deng, Han‐Bing; Cheung, Bernard Man Yung; Félétou, Michel; Vilaine, Jean‐Paul; Villeneuve, Nicole; Xu, Aimin; Vanhoutte, Paul M.; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipocalin‐2 is a proinflammatory adipokine upregulated in obese humans and animals. A pathogenic role of lipocalin‐2 in hypertension has been suggested. Mice lacking lipocalin‐2 are protected from dietary obesity‐induced cardiovascular dysfunctions. Administration of lipocalin‐2 causes abnormal vasodilator responses in mice on a high‐fat diet (HFD). Methods and Results Wild‐type and lipocalin‐2 knockout mice were fed with standard chow or HFD. Immunoassays were performed for evaluating the circulating and tissue contents of lipocalin‐2. The relaxation and contraction of arteries were studied using a wire myograph. Blood pressure was monitored with implantable radio telemetry. Dietary obesity promoted the accumulation of lipocalin‐2 protein in blood and arteries. Deficiency of this adipokine protected mice from dietary obesity‐induced elevation of blood pressure. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that human and murine lipocalin‐2 were modified by polyamination. Polyaminated lipocalin‐2 was rapidly cleared from the circulation. Adipose tissue was a major site for lipocalin‐2 deamidation. The circulating levels and the arterial accumulation of deamidated lipocalin‐2 were significantly enhanced by treatment with linoleic acid (18:2n−6), which bound to lipocalin‐2 with high affinity and prevented its interactions with matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9). Combined administration of linoleic acid with lipocalin‐2 caused vascular inflammation and endothelial dysfunction and raised the blood pressure of mice receiving standard chow. A human lipocalin‐2 mutant with cysteine 87 replaced by alanine (C87A) contained less polyamines and exhibited a reduced capacity to form heterodimeric complexes with MMP9. After treatment, C87A remained in the circulation for a prolonged period of time and evoked endothelial dysfunction in the absence of linoleic acid. Conclusions Polyamination facilitates the clearance of lipocalin‐2, whereas

  19. Susceptibility to cerulein-induced pancreatitis in inducible nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Qui, B; Mei, Q B; Ma, J J; Korsten, M A

    2001-07-01

    Production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has been proposed as a pathogenic factor in acute pancreatitis, but its role has still not been fully examined. The present study explored the role of iNOS in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis using iNOS-deficient mice. Twelve- to 14-week-old male mice (C57B1/6 and iNOS-deficient) were administered cerulein by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection at hourly intervals for 7 hours and killed 24 hours later after the first dose. Pancreatic wet weight, pancreatic myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and levels of plasma nitrite and serum amylase were measured. In another experiment isosorbide dinitrate (an NO donor) was given by oral gavage every 6 hours for 24 hours beginning simultaneously with cerulein injections in iNOS-deficient mice. Cerulein administration dose-dependently increased pancreatic wet weight, myeloperoxidase activity, and levels of nitrite and amylase in C57B1/6 mice. These parameters (except nitrite levels) were significantly intensified in iNOS-deficient mice. At the dose employed, cerulein failed to increase nitrite levels in iNOS-deficient mice. The susceptibility to cerulein toxicity in iNOS-deficient mice was abolished by NO donor treatment. NO release from an iNOS source appears to play a protective role in cerulein-induced pancreatitis. At least in part, NO may prevent neutrophil accumulation after cerulein administration.

  20. Dietary manipulations influence sucrose acceptance in diet induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander W

    2012-02-01

    The current studies examined the influence of a high fat diet on sucrose acceptance in diet induced obese (DIO) mice. C57BL/6J mice were placed on either a 45 kcal% fat diet (group DIO), or a control 10% kcal fat diet (group control) for 12 weeks followed by sucrose consumption tests and dietary manipulations. After 12 weeks exposure, body weights of DIO mice significantly exceeded those of the control mice. During subsequent sucrose consumption tests, DIO mice showed suppression in the total number of licks relative to controls. In a second experiment, consumption tests with water and a variety of sucrose concentrations revealed a hypophagic phenotype in naïve DIO mice. Licking microstructure analyses were conducted on the licking behavior of all mice, which revealed a reduction in burst size and number for DIO mice. Subsequently, we examined whether 10 days exposure to regular lab chow would alter sucrose consumption and taste evaluation in DIO mice. As a result of this dietary switch, all mice showed comparable licking behavior suggesting that exposure to the high-fat diet and diet-induced obesity may reduce preferences for other tastants in C57BL/6J mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary phosphorus overload aggravates the phenotype of the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Wada, Eiji; Yoshida, Mizuko; Kojima, Yoriko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Shiozuka, Masataka; Date, Munehiro; Higashi, Tetsuo; Nishino, Ichizo; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disease with no effective treatment. Progressive muscle degeneration, increased macrophage infiltration, and ectopic calcification are characteristic features of the mdx mouse, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Because dietary phosphorus/phosphate consumption is increasing and adverse effects of phosphate overloading have been reported in several disease conditions, we examined the effects of dietary phosphorus intake in mdx mice phenotypes. On weaning, control and mdx mice were fed diets containing 0.7, 1.0, or 2.0 g phosphorus per 100 g until they were 90 days old. Dystrophic phenotypes were evaluated in cryosections of quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscles, and maximal forces and voluntary activity were measured. Ectopic calcification was analyzed by electron microscopy to determine the cells initially responsible for calcium deposition in skeletal muscle. Dietary phosphorus overload dramatically exacerbated the dystrophic phenotypes of mdx mice by increasing inflammation associated with infiltration of M1 macrophages. In contrast, minimal muscle necrosis and inflammation were observed in exercised mdx mice fed a low-phosphorus diet, suggesting potential beneficial therapeutic effects of lowering dietary phosphorus intake on disease progression. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that dietary phosphorus intake directly affects muscle pathological characteristics of mdx mice. Dietary phosphorus overloading promoted dystrophic disease progression in mdx mice, whereas restricting dietary phosphorus intake improved muscle pathological characteristics and function.

  2. Role of dietary iron and fat on vitamin E deficiency anemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Williams, M L; Shoot, R J; O'Neal, P L; Oski, F A

    1975-04-24

    Thirty-five infants weighing less than 1500 g at birth were fed four commercial formulas (A-D) varying in polyunsaturated fatty acid composition (32 per cent linoleic acid in A and B and 12 per cent linoleic acid in C and D) and in iron content (smaller than 1.0 in A and B; 12 to 12 mg per liter in B and D). Infants receiving formula B showed significantly lower hemoglobins (p smaller than 0.01) and higher reticulocyte counts (p smaller than 0.005) than infants fed the other three formulas. Infants receiving the two formulas with higher concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids (A and B) showed significantly greater hydrogen-peroxide-induced hemolysis (p smaller than 0.001) than those given diets containing lower amounts. Infants in groups A and B also had lower serum tocopherol concentrations. Infant red-cell membranes are altered by the increased amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron in the diet. It appears that the development of vitamin E deficiency anemia occurs in infants receiving iron supplementation.

  3. NAD(P)H: Quinone Oxidoreductase 1 Deficiency Conjoint with Marginal Vitamin C Deficiency Causes Cigarette Smoke Induced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Archita; Dey, Neekkan; Ghosh, Arunava; Das, Tanusree; Chatterjee, Indu B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The etiology of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is largely unknown. Exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) is reported to be associated with MDS risk. There is inconsistent evidence that deficiency of NAD(P)H-quinone: oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) increases the risk of MDS. Earlier we had shown that CS induces toxicity only in marginal vitamin C-deficient guinea pigs but not in vitamin C-sufficient ones. We therefore considered that NQO1 deficiency along with marginal vitamin C deficiency might produce MDS in CS-exposed guinea pigs. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we show that CS exposure for 21 days produces MDS in guinea pigs having deficiency of NQO1 (fed 3 mg dicoumarol/day) conjoint with marginal vitamin C deficiency (fed 0.5 mg vitamin C/day). As evidenced by morphology, histology and cytogenetics, MDS produced in the guinea pigs falls in the category of refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD): refractory anemia; refractory thrombocytopenia that is associated with ring sideroblasts, micromegakaryocytes, myeloid hyperplasia and aneuploidy. MDS is accompanied by increased CD34(+) cells and oxidative stress as shown by the formation of protein carbonyls and 8-oxodeoxyguanosine. Apoptosis precedes MDS but disappears later with marked decrease in the p53 protein. MDS produced in the guinea pigs are irreversible. MDS and all the aforesaid pathophysiological events do not occur in vitamin C-sufficient guinea pigs. However, after the onset of MDS vitamin C becomes ineffective. Conclusions and Significance CS exposure causes MDS in guinea pigs having deficiency of NQO1 conjoint with marginal vitamin C deficiency. The syndromes are not produced in singular deficiency of NQO1 or marginal vitamin C deficiency. Our results suggest that human smokers having NQO1 deficiency combined with marginal vitamin C deficiency are likely to be at high risk for developing MDS and that intake of a moderately large dose of vitamin C would prevent MDS. PMID:21655231

  4. Paradoxical zinc toxicity and oxidative stress in the mammary gland during marginal dietary zinc deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bostanci, Zeynep; Mack, Ronald P.; Lee, Sooyeon; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) regulates numerous cellular functions. Zn deficiency is common in females; ~80% of women and 40% of adolescent girls consume inadequate Zn. Zn deficiency enhances oxidative stress, inflammation and DNA damage. Oxidative stress and inflammation is associated with breast disease. We hypothesized that Zn deficiency increases oxidative stress in the mammary gland, altering the microenvironment and architecture. Zn accumulated in the mammary glands of Zn deficient mice and this was associated with macrophage infiltration, enhanced oxidative stress and over-expression of estrogen receptor α. Ductal and stromal hypercellularity was associated with aberrant collagen deposition and disorganized e-cadherin. Importantly, these microenvironmental alterations were associated with substantial impairments in ductal expansion and mammary gland development. This is the first study to show that marginal Zn deficiency creates a toxic microenvironment in the mammary gland impairing breast development. These changes are consistent with hallmarks of potential increased risk for breast disease and cancer. PMID:25088245

  5. Serum lipids in rats as related to modifications in dietary fat, fiber, and sodium with magnesium deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, C.A.; Kubena, K.S. )

    1991-03-11

    Recommendations to modify dietary intake to attenuate risk of cardiovascular disease have been released by numerous governmental and health organizations. Since magnesium is associated with lipid metabolism and normal cardiovascular function, this study was designed to determine the effect of modifications in dietary fat, fiber, and sodium with magnesium deficiency on serum lipids and tissue minerals. The control (C) diet was based upon the AIN-76 diet formulation; the American (A) diet included average fat, fiber, and sodium levels in the US; and the recommended (R) diet was lower in fat and sodium and higher in fiber. Diets contained either 1,000 or 150 (L) mg Mg/kg diet. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of the diets (C, CL, A, Al, R, RL) for six weeks. Levels of tissue Mg, Ca, Zn, and P were determined. Neither initial nor final body weights varied between groups. Serum levels of triglyceride were higher in the C and Cl groups than in the others. Serum cholesterol was lower in the R and Rl groups than in the Cl and A groups. Animals which were fed the diet modified with regard to fat, fiber, and sodium had lower serum cholesterol levels than did those fed the American diet. Magnesium deficiency was not consistently related to serum lipid levels.

  6. Metallothionein deficiency aggravates depleted uranium-induced nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yuhui; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Liu, Cong; Li, Hong; Liu, Jing; Ren, Jiong; Yang, Zhangyou; Peng, Shuangqing; Wang, Weidong; Li, Rong

    2015-09-15

    Depleted uranium (DU) has been widely used in both civilian and military activities, and the kidney is the main target organ of DU during acute high-dose exposures. In this study, the nephrotoxicity caused by DU in metallothionein-1/2-null mice (MT −/−) and corresponding wild-type (MT +/+) mice was investigated to determine any associations with MT. Each MT −/− or MT +/+ mouse was pretreated with a single dose of DU (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) or an equivalent volume of saline. After 4 days of DU administration, kidney changes were assessed. After DU exposure, serum creatinine and serum urea nitrogen in MT −/− mice significantly increased than in MT +/+ mice, with more severe kidney pathological damage. Moreover, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased, and generation of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde increased in MT −/− mice. The apoptosis rate in MT −/− mice significantly increased, with a significant increase in both Bax and caspase 3 and a decrease in Bcl-2. Furthermore, sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) and sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) were significantly reduced after DU exposure, and the change of SGLT was more evident in MT −/− mice. Finally, exogenous MT was used to evaluate the correlation between kidney changes induced by DU and MT doses in MT −/− mice. The results showed that, the pathological damage and cell apoptosis decreased, and SOD and SGLT levels increased with increasing dose of MT. In conclusion, MT deficiency aggravated DU-induced nephrotoxicity, and the molecular mechanisms appeared to be related to the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, and decreased SGLT expression. - Highlights: • MT −/− and MT +/+ mice were used to evaluate nephrotoxicity of DU. • Renal damage was more evident in the MT −/− mice after exposure to DU. • Exogenous MT also protects against DU-induced nephrotoxicity. • MT deficiency induced more ROS and apoptosis after exposure to

  7. Dietary Factors Modulate Iron Uptake in Caco-2 Cells from an Iron Ingot Used as a Home Fortificant to Prevent Iron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Ramiro, Ildefonso; Perfecto, Antonio; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2017-09-12

    Iron deficiency is a major public health concern and nutritional approaches are required to reduce its prevalence. The aim of this study was to examine the iron bioavailability of a novel home fortificant, the "Lucky Iron Fish™" (LIF) (www.luckyironfish.com/shop, Guelph, Canada) and the impact of dietary factors and a food matrix on iron uptake from LIF in Caco-2 cells. LIF released a substantial quantity of iron (about 1.2 mM) at pH 2 but this iron was only slightly soluble at pH 7 and not taken up by cells. The addition of ascorbic acid (AA) maintained the solubility of iron released from LIF (LIF-iron) at pH 7 and facilitated iron uptake by the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In vitro digestion of LIF-iron in the presence of peas increased iron uptake 10-fold. However, the addition of tannic acid to the digestion reduced the cellular iron uptake 7.5-fold. Additionally, LIF-iron induced an overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), similar to ferrous sulfate, but this effect was counteracted by the addition of AA. Overall, our data illustrate the major influence of dietary factors on iron solubility and bioavailability from LIF, and demonstrate that the addition of AA enhances iron uptake and reduces ROS in the intestinal lumen.

  8. Flavonoids, the emerging dietary supplement against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Athira, K V; Madhana, Rajaram Mohanrao; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-03-25

    The letter illustrates the emerging potential of flavonoids as dietary supplement to ameliorate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and refers to the recent article on ''Anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of naringin on cisplatin-induced renal injury in the rat'' by Chtourou et al. They demonstrated that supplementation of naringin, a flavanone glycoside, found in grape and citrus fruit species, can attenuate cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction via restoration of redox balance and suppression of inflammation, NF-κB activation and apoptosis. The chemotherapeutic efficacy of cisplatin has always compelled the researchers to find solution to ameliorate its side effects. In recent years, numerous candidates have been evaluated for their protective potential against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and flavonoids have come up with promising results. The future prospects might be promising with a proper refinement and collective integration of the preclinical and clinical research in the field of flavonoid supplementation to cisplatin therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Protein Deficiency Induces Alterations in the Distribution of T-Cell Subsets in Experimental Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Elsie S.; McMurray, David N.

    1998-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that dietary protein deficiency alters resistance to experimental pulmonary tuberculosis, in part, by affecting the distribution and trafficking of antigen-reactive T cells. In this study, guinea pigs were maintained on either a protein-deficient (10% ovalbumin) or control (30% ovalbumin) diet and infected 4 to 6 weeks later with a low dose of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv by the respiratory route. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the CD4 or CD8 markers on guinea pig lymphocytes were used in a flow cytofluorometric assay to determine the proportion of each subset in the peripheral circulation, spleen, and bronchotracheal lymph nodes at 4 weeks after infection. In uninfected guinea pigs, only the spleen exhibited an effect of diet on T-cell distribution, with small but consistent reductions in the proportions of both CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes. However, following infection, protein deficiency exerted a profound effect on T-cell distribution. Malnourished, tuberculous guinea pigs harbored only 20 and 60% of the T cells (as a proportion of total lymphoid cells) found in the spleen and blood, respectively, of their well-nourished counterparts. Normal relative proportions of CD4 and CD8 cells were observed, however. In striking contrast, the bronchotracheal lymph nodes of protein-deprived guinea pigs with tuberculosis contained more than twice the numbers of T cells of control guinea pigs, and the normal CD4-to-CD8 ratio was reversed. Peripheral T-cell function, as measured by the delayed hypersensitivity skin test to tuberculin, and antigen-induced lymphoproliferation in vitro were markedly suppressed in protein-malnourished animals. Conversely, purified protein derivative-induced (but not concanavalin A-induced) proliferation was significantly enhanced in cultures of lymph node cells from protein-deprived tuberculous animals. Taken together, these results suggest that immunological abnormalities and loss of

  10. Thiamine deficiency induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wang, B; Fan, Z; Shi, X; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2007-02-09

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency (TD) causes region selective neuronal loss in the brain; it has been used to model neurodegeneration that accompanies mild impairment of oxidative metabolism. The mechanisms for TD-induced neurodegeneration remain incompletely elucidated. Inhibition of protein glycosylation, perturbation of calcium homeostasis and reduction of disulfide bonds provoke the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and cause ER stress. Recently, ER stress has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative models. We demonstrated here that TD up-regulated several markers of ER stress, such as glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 78, growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible protein or C/EBP-homologus protein (GADD153/Chop), phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and cleavage of caspase-12 in the cerebellum and the thalamus of mice. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopic study revealed an abnormality in ER structure. To establish an in vitro model of TD in neurons, we treated cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with amprolium, a potent inhibitor of thiamine transport. Exposure to amprolium caused apoptosis and the generation of reactive oxygen species in CGNs. Similar to the observation in vivo, TD up-regulated markers for ER stress. Treatment of a selective inhibitor of caspase-12 significantly alleviated amprolium-induced death of CGNs. Thus, ER stress may play a role in TD-induced brain damage.

  11. Ferric Carboxymaltose-Mediated Attenuation of Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in an Iron Deficiency Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Rivas, Carlos; Cao, Gabriel; Giani, Jorge Fernando; Dominici, Fernando Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Since anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (AIC), a complication of anthracycline-based chemotherapies, is thought to involve iron, concerns exist about using iron for anaemia treatment in anthracycline-receiving cancer patients. This study evaluated how intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) modulates the influence of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and doxorubicin (3–5 mg per kg body weight [BW]) on oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammation, and cardiorenal function in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHR-SP) rats. FCM was given as repeated small or single total dose (15 mg iron per kg BW), either concurrent with or three days after doxorubicin. IDA (after dietary iron restriction) induced cardiac and renal oxidative stress (markers included malondialdehyde, catalase, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase), nitrosative stress (inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine), inflammation (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6), and functional/morphological abnormalities (left ventricle end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, fractional shortening, density of cardiomyocytes and capillaries, caveolin-1 expression, creatinine clearance, and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) that were aggravated by doxorubicin. Notably, iron treatment with FCM did not exacerbate but attenuated the cardiorenal effects of IDA and doxorubicin independent of the iron dosing regimen. The results of this model suggest that intravenous FCM can be used concomitantly with an anthracycline-based chemotherapy without increasing signs of AIC. PMID:24876963

  12. Therapeutic paracetamol treatment in older persons induces dietary and metabolic modifications related to sulfur amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Pickering, Gisèle; Lyan, Bernard; Ducheix, Gilles; Brandolini-Bunlon, Marion; Glomot, Françoise; Dardevet, Dominique; Dubray, Claude; Papet, Isabelle

    2012-02-01

    Sulfur amino acids are determinant for the detoxification of paracetamol (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol) through sulfate and glutathione conjugations. Long-term paracetamol treatment is common in the elderly, despite a potential cysteine/glutathione deficiency. Detoxification could occur at the expense of anti-oxidative defenses and whole body protein stores in elderly. We tested how older persons satisfy the extra demand in sulfur amino acids induced by long-term paracetamol treatment, focusing on metabolic and nutritional aspects. Effects of 3 g/day paracetamol for 14 days on fasting blood glutathione, plasma amino acids and sulfate, urinary paracetamol metabolites, and urinary metabolomic were studied in independently living older persons (five women, five men, mean (±SEM) age 74 ± 1 years). Dietary intakes were recorded before and at the end of the treatment and ingested sulfur amino acids were evaluated. Fasting blood glutathione, plasma amino acids, and sulfate were unchanged. Urinary nitrogen excretion supported a preservation of whole body proteins, but large-scale urinary metabolomic analysis revealed an oxidation of some sulfur-containing compounds. Dietary protein intake was 13% higher at the end than before paracetamol treatment. Final sulfur amino acid intake reached 37 mg/kg/day. The increase in sulfur amino acid intake corresponded to half of the sulfur excreted in urinary paracetamol conjugates. In conclusion, older persons accommodated to long-term paracetamol treatment by increasing dietary protein intake without any mobilization of body proteins, but with decreased anti-oxidative defenses. The extra demand in sulfur amino acids led to a consumption far above the corresponding population-safe recommendation.

  13. Experimentally induced thiamine deficiency in beagle dogs: clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Read, D H; Harrington, D D

    1981-06-01

    Twenty-three 2- to 5-month-old Beagle dogs were fed a purified thiamine-deficient ration (2 to 3 micrograms of thiamine/100 g of ration) at a rate of 40 to 70 g/kg of body weight/day depending on age. Eleven dogs were used as principles, 6 as pair-fed controls, and 6 as ad libitum-fed controls. Controls were treated once a week with an IM dose of 300 micrograms of thiamine hydrochloride/kg of body weight. Three stages of clinical disease occurred in the principals: (i) an initial short (18.0 +/- 7.9 days) stage of induction, during which the dogs usually grew suboptimally, but were otherwise healthy, (ii) an intermediate stage of preliminary clinical signs of deficiency, characterized by a variable period (58.5 +/- 37.0 days) of progressive inappetance, failure to grow, loss of body weight, and coprophagia, and (iii) a terminal stage, which, in most dogs, was abrupt in onset and short (7.6 +/- 6.0 days) and consisted of either a neurologic syndrome or sudden unexpected death syndrome. Eight of the principals developed the neurologic syndrome characterized by anorexia, emesis, CNS depression, paraparesis, sensory ataxia, torticollis, circling, exophthalmos, tonic-clonic convulsions, profound muscular weakness, recumbency, and then died. Common reflex abnormalities included exaggerated patella reflex, proprioceptive and supporting reflex deficits, induced torticollis and ventroflexion of head, and absent eye menace (blink) reflex. Three other principals developed the sudden unexpected death syndrome. Common signs of deficiency were inappetance and paresis. Two were found dead and 1, with severe ECG abnormalities (including elevation of ST segment and tall or deeply inverted T waves), was killed.

  14. Dietary Selenium Deficiency Partially Rescues Type 2 Diabetes–Like Phenotypes of Glutathione Peroxidase-1–Overexpressing Male Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xi; Pepper, Matthew P.; Vatamaniuk, Marko Z.; Roneker, Carol A.; Li, Li; Lei, Xin Gen

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether dietary Se deficiency precluded overproduction of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1) activity in mice overexpressing (OE) this gene and thus rescued their type 2 diabetes–like phenotypes. A total of 20 male OE and wild-type (WT) mice were fed an Se-deficient (<0.02 mg/kg) diet or an Se-supplemented (0.3 mg/kg as sodium selenite) diet from 1 to 5 mo of age. Dietary Se deficiency eliminated or attenuated (P < 0.05) genotype differences in concentrations of blood glucose, plasma insulin, and/or hepatic lipids, insulin sensitivity, and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at the end of the study. Dietary Se deficiency decreased (P < 0.05) OE islet mRNA levels of 2 key transcriptional activators (Beta2 and Foxa2) and removed genotype differences in islet mRNA levels of 7 genes (Beta2, Cfos, Foxa2, Pregluc, Ins1, p53, and Sur1) related to insulin synthesis and secretion. Compared with those of the Se-adequate OE mice, the Se-deficient OE mice had lower (P < 0.05) hepatic mRNA levels of 2 key rate-limiting enzymes for lipogenesis (Acc1) and glycolysis (Gk1), along with lower (P < 0.05) activities of hepatic glucokinase and muscle phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Dietary Se deficiency also decreased (P < 0.05) blood glucose and hepatic lipid concentrations in the WT mice. In conclusion, dietary Se deficiency precluded the overproduction of GPX1 in full-fed OE mice and partially rescued their metabolic syndromes. This alleviation resulted from modulating the expression and/or function of proinsulin genes, lipogenesis rate-limiting enzyme genes, and key glycolysis and gluconeogenesis enzymes in islets, liver, and muscle. PMID:23014491

  15. Paradoxical glucose-induced hyperkalemia. Combined aldosterone-insulin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, S; Strunk, B; Singer, I; Goldberg, M

    1975-11-01

    Severe hyperkalemia associated with spontaneous hyperglycemia as well as with the intravenous infusions of glucose occurred in an insulin-requiring diabetic patient in the absence of potassium administration, the use of diuretics which inhibit urinary potassium excretion or acidemia. Metabolic balance studies revealed, in addition to diabets, the presence of isolated aldosterone deficiency of the hyporeninemic type. Intravenous glucose infusions (0.5 g/kg body weight) produced significant hyperkalemia but desoxycortisone acetate (DOCA) therapy (10 mg/day) prevented the glucose-induced hyperkalemia. In this patient, the serum potassium concentration increases after the intravenous infusions of glucose because there is insufficient aldosterone and insulin to reverse the transfer of potassium to the extracellular fluid which normally occurs after hypertonic infusions of glucose. Although DOCA replacement modifies the distribution of potassium in the extracellular fluid and blunts the hyperkalemic effect of intravenous infusions of glucose, a rise in the insulin level is required for the usual hypokalemic response to intravenously administered glucose. These studies illustrate the risk of raising blood glucose levels in patients with combined aldosterone and insulin deficiency and the tendency towards hyperkalemia in diabetic patients under certain clinical conditions.

  16. New Compounds Induce Brassinosteroid Deficient-like Phenotypes in Rice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tadashi; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Iwasaki, Ikuko; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Oh, Keimei

    2013-08-13

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroidal plant hormones with potent plant growth promoting activity. Because BR-deficient mutants of rice exhibit altered plant architecture and important agronomic traits, we conducted a systemic search for specific inhibitors of BR biosynthesis to manipulate the BR levels in plant tissues. Although previous studies have been conducted with BR biosynthesis inhibitors in dicots, little is known regarding the effects of BR biosynthesis inhibition in monocot plants. In this work, we used potent inhibitors of BR biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, and we performed a hydroponic culture of rice seedlings to evaluate the effects of BR biosynthesis inhibition. Among the test compounds, we found that 1-[[2-(4-Chlorophenyl)-4-(phenoxymethyl)-1,3-dioxolan-2-yl]methyl]-1H-1,2,4-triazole (1) is a potent inhibitor that could induce phenotypes in rice seedlings that were similar to those observed in brassinosteroid deficient plants. The IC50 value for the retardation of plant growth in rice seedlings was approximately 1.27 ± 0.43 μM. The IC50 value for reducing the bending angle of the lamina joint was approximately 0.55 ± 0.15 μM.

  17. Dissecting iron deficiency-induced proton extrusion in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Santi, Simonetta; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Here, we have analysed the H(+)-ATPase-mediated extrusion of protons across the plasma membrane (PM) of rhizodermic cells, a process that is inducible by iron (Fe) deficiency and thought to serve in the mobilization of sparingly soluble Fe sources. The induction and function of Fe-responsive PM H(+)-ATPases in Arabidopsis roots was investigated by gene expression analysis and by using mutants defective in the expression or function of one of the isogenes. In addition, the expression of the most responsive isogenes was investigated in natural Arabidopsis accessions that have been selected for their in vivo proton extrusion activity. Our data suggest that the rhizosphere acidification in response to Fe deficiency is chiefly mediated by AHA2, while AHA1 functions as a housekeeping isoform. The aha7 knock-out mutant plants showed a reduced frequency of root hairs, suggesting an involvement of AHA7 in the differentiation of rhizodermic cells. Acidification capacity varied among Arabidopsis accessions and was associated with a high induction of AHA2 and IRT1, a high relative growth rate and a shoot-root ratio that was unaffected by the external Fe supply. An effective regulation of the Fe-responsive genes and a stable shoot-root ratio may represent important characteristics for the Fe uptake efficiency.

  18. Rice Bran Dietary Supplementation Improves Neurological Symptoms and Loss of Purkinje Cells in Vitamin E-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Toru; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Horikoshi, Yosuke; Hanaki, Takehiko; Yamakawa, Miho; Nakasone, Masato; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Koike, Taisuke; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin E (VE, α-tocopherol) is a fat-soluble vitamin and is well known as an antioxidant. A deficiency in VE induces oxidative stress in the brain and causes motor and memory dysfunction. The consumption of a VE-rich diet has been given much attention in recent years, in regards to anti-aging and the prevention of age-related neuronal disorders. Methods A VE-deficient mouse model was prepared by feeding the animals a diet lacking VE. In addition, to evaluate the effect of VE-containing rice bran (RB) on VE deficiency, a diet including RB was also provided. VE levels in the brain tissue, as well as in the RB, were measured using an HPLC system. Behavioral tests, including rotarod, wheel running activity, Y-maze, and elevated plus maze were performed. To clarify the effect of VE deficiency and RB, we investigated the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Histological studies were performed using HE staining and immunohistochemical studies were performed using antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1). Results VE in the mouse brain under a VE-deficient diet was decreased, and recovered α-tocopherol levels were observed in the brain of mice fed an RB diet. Motor behavioral scores were decreased in VE-deficient conditions, while the supplementation of RB improved motor function. HO-1, a marker of oxidative stress, was upregulated in the mouse brain under VE deficiency, however, RB supplementation inhibited the increase of HO-1. Histological analyses showed neuronal degeneration of Purkinje cells and decreased GFAP-immunoreactivity of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum. In addition, activated astrocytes and microglia were observed in mice fed the VE-deficient diet. Mice fed the RB diet showed improvement in these histological abnormalities. Conclusion A VE-deficient diet induced motor dysfunction in mice due to the degeneration of Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. Oral supplementation of RB

  19. Neurologically normal development of a patient with severe methionine adenosyltransferase I/III deficiency after continuing dietary methionine restriction.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Koichi; Shiohara, Masaaki; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Sueki, Akane; Ide, Yuichiro; Takeuchi, Koichi; Hagimoto, Rokuro; Kinoshita, Tatsuya; Yabuhara, Akihiko; Mudd, S Harvey; Koike, Kenichi

    2013-11-01

    There is not much information on established standard therapy for patients with severe methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT) I/III deficiency. We report a boy with MAT I/III deficiency, in whom plasma methionine and total homocysteine, and urinary homocystine were elevated. Molecular genetic studies showed him to have novel compound heterozygous mutations of the MAT1A gene: c.191T>A (p.M64K) and c.589delC (p.P197LfsX26). A low methionine milk diet was started at 31 days of age, and during continuing dietary methionine restriction plasma methionine levels have been maintained at less than 750 μmol/L. He is now 5 years old, and has had entirely normal physical growth and psychomotor development. Although some severely MAT I/III deficient patients have developed neurologic abnormalities, we report here the case of a boy who has remained neurologically and otherwise normal for 5 years during methionine restriction, suggesting that perhaps such management, started in early infancy, may help prevent neurological complications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency combined with type 1 diabetes mellitus - a challenge in clinical and dietary management.

    PubMed

    Grünert, Sarah C; Villavicencio-Lorini, Pablo; Wermuth, Bendicht; Lehnert, Willy; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Schwab, K Otfried

    2013-07-05

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle defect. The clinical presentation in female manifesting carriers varies both in onset and severity. We report on a female with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and recurrent episodes of hyperammonemia. Since OTC activity measured in a liver biopsy sample was within normal limits, OTC deficiency was initially excluded from the differential diagnoses of hyperammonemia. Due to moderately elevated homocitrulline excretion, hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria-syndrome was suggested, but further assays in fibroblasts showed normal ornithine utilization. Later, when mutation analysis of the OTC gene became available, a known pathogenic missense mutation (c.533C>T) in exon 5 leading to an exchange of threonine-178 by methionine (p.Thr178Met) was detected. Skewed X-inactivation was demonstrated in leukocyte DNA. In the further clinical course the girl developed marked obesity. By initiating physical activities twice a week, therapeutic control of both diabetes and OTC deficiency improved, but obesity persisted. In conclusion, our case confirms that normal hepatic OTC enzyme activity measured in a single liver biopsy sample does not exclude a clinical relevant mosaic of OTC deficiency because of skewed X-inactivation. Mutation analysis of the OTC gene in whole blood may be a simple way to establish the diagnosis of OTC deficiency. The joint occurrence of OTC deficiency and diabetes in a patient has not been reported before.

  1. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency combined with type 1 diabetes mellitus - a challenge in clinical and dietary management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle defect. The clinical presentation in female manifesting carriers varies both in onset and severity. We report on a female with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and recurrent episodes of hyperammonemia. Since OTC activity measured in a liver biopsy sample was within normal limits, OTC deficiency was initially excluded from the differential diagnoses of hyperammonemia. Due to moderately elevated homocitrulline excretion, hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria-syndrome was suggested, but further assays in fibroblasts showed normal ornithine utilization. Later, when mutation analysis of the OTC gene became available, a known pathogenic missense mutation (c.533C>T) in exon 5 leading to an exchange of threonine-178 by methionine (p.Thr178Met) was detected. Skewed X-inactivation was demonstrated in leukocyte DNA. In the further clinical course the girl developed marked obesity. By initiating physical activities twice a week, therapeutic control of both diabetes and OTC deficiency improved, but obesity persisted. In conclusion, our case confirms that normal hepatic OTC enzyme activity measured in a single liver biopsy sample does not exclude a clinical relevant mosaic of OTC deficiency because of skewed X-inactivation. Mutation analysis of the OTC gene in whole blood may be a simple way to establish the diagnosis of OTC deficiency. The joint occurrence of OTC deficiency and diabetes in a patient has not been reported before. PMID:23829977

  2. Echocardiographic evidence for myocardial failure induced by taurine deficiency in domestic cats.

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, M J; Hogan, P M; Flannigan, G

    1994-01-01

    Dietary taurine-deficiency is a cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in cats. While the incidence of clinical cases of feline DCM has markedly decreased since the association between DCM and taurine-deficiency was first recognized, not all cats maintained on taurine-deficient diets develop DCM. The objective was to temporally evaluate left ventricular (LV) function using M-mode echocardiography in 23 cats maintained on a taurine-deficient diet; 20 time-matched, taurine-supplemented cats served as controls. The duration of feeding trials ranged from 6-15 months. No diminution of myocardial function was recorded in a small number of taurine-deficient cats whereas cardiac performance in some taurine-deficient cats diminished to levels characteristic of DCM. Of the taurine-deficient cats, 17 (74%) experienced a greater than 25% reduction in fractional shortening and 21 (91%) had a greater than 25% increase in LV end-systolic short-axis diameter. On average, LV end-systolic short-axis diameter increased by 70% and fractional shortening decreased by 37% in taurine-deficient cats. Mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening was similarly reduced in taurine-deficient cats. The greatest rate of change in M-mode echocardiographic variables occurred during the first four months on the taurine-deficient diet. Dietary taurine deficiency leads to a spectrum of changes in myocardial function in domestic cats. While DCM is observed in some cats, decreased systolic pump function and increased LV end-systolic short-axis diameter are more consistent findings. PMID:8143255

  3. Thiamine Deficiency Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Bingwei; Fan, Zhiqin; Shi, Xianglin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Luo, Jia

    2007-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency (TD) causes region selective neuronal loss in the brain; it has been used to model neurodegeneration that accompanies mild impairment of oxidative metabolism. The mechanisms for TD-induced neurodegeneration remain incompletely elucidated. Inhibition of protein glycosylation, perturbation of calcium homeostasis and reduction of disulfide bonds provoke the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and cause ER stress. Recently, ER stress has been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative models. We demonstrated here that TD up-regulated several markers of ER stress, such as GRP78, GADD153/Chop, phosphorylation of eIF2α and cleavage of caspase-12 in the cerebellum and the thalamus of mice. Furthermore, ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopic study revealed an abnormality in ER structure. To establish an in vitro model of TD in neurons, we treated cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) with amprolium, a potent inhibitor of thiamine transport. Exposure to amprolium caused apoptosis and the generation of reactive oxygen species in CGNs. Similar to the observation in vivo, TD up-regulated markers for ER stress. Treatment of a selective inhibitor of caspase-12 significantly alleviated amprolium-induced death of CGNs. Thus, ER stress may play a role in TD-induced brain damage. PMID:17137721

  4. Modifying the Dietary Carbohydrate-to-Protein Ratio Alters the Postprandial Macronutrient Oxidation Pattern in Liver of AMPK-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Chalvon-Demersay, Tristan; Even, Patrick C; Chaumontet, Catherine; Piedcoq, Julien; Viollet, Benoit; Gaudichon, Claire; Tomé, Daniel; Foretz, Marc; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila

    2017-09-01

    Background: Hepatic AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) activity is sensitive to the dietary carbohydrate-to-protein ratio. However, the role of AMPK in metabolic adaptations to variations in dietary macronutrients remains poorly understood.Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the role of hepatic AMPK in the adaptation of energy metabolism in response to modulation of the dietary carbohydrate-to-protein ratio.Methods: Male 7-wk-old wild-type (WT) and liver AMPK-deficient (knockout) mice were fed either a normal-protein and normal-carbohydrate diet (NP-NC; 14% protein, 76% carbohydrate on an energy basis), a low-protein and high-carbohydrate diet (LP-HC; 5% protein, 85% carbohydrate), or a high-protein and low-carbohydrate diet (HP-LC; 55% protein, 35% carbohydrate) for 3 wk. During this period, after an overnight fast, metabolic parameters were measured and indirect calorimetry was performed in mice during the first hours after refeeding a 1-g calibrated meal of their own diet in order to investigate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism.Results: Knockout mice fed an LP-HC or HP-LC meal exhibited 24% and 8% lower amplitudes in meal-induced carbohydrate and lipid oxidation changes. By contrast, knockout mice fed an NP-NC meal displayed normal carbohydrate and lipid oxidation profiles. These mice exhibited a transient increase in hepatic triglycerides and a decrease in hepatic glycogen. These changes were associated with a 650% higher secretion of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) 2 h after refeeding.Conclusions: The consequences of hepatic AMPK deletion depend on the dietary carbohydrate-to-protein ratio. In mice fed the NP-NC diet, deletion of AMPK in the liver led to an adaptation of liver metabolism resulting in increased secretion of FGF21. These changes possibly compensated for the absence of hepatic AMPK, as these mice exhibited normal postprandial changes in carbohydrate and lipid oxidation. By contrast, in mice fed the LP-HC and HP-LC diets, the

  5. Further studies on the effects of dietary copper deficiency on rat pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mylroie, A.A.; Boseman, A.; Kyle, J.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was designed to obtain further information on the effect of Cu deficiency on the pancreas and on pancreatic SOD activity. In a series of experiments, groups of male weanling Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a Cu sufficient Cu or Cu deficient purified AIN-'76 diet. Cu levels were determined in blood and selected organs by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Serum ceruloplasmin, hemoglobin and hematocrit values were determined. Aliquots of homogenized pancreas were assayed for CuSOD, MnSOD and other pancreatic enzyme activities. Although the experimental conditions appeared to be identical to those used in previous experiments, the results were different. In the experiments reported here, even though pancreatic weights decreased by week 7 relative to controls, there was no evidence of pancreatic atrophy. There was no significant decrease in CuSOD, but an unexpected increase in MnSOD activity by week 9 in rats fed Cu-deficient diet. An examination of all data indicates that the difference in results between previous experiments and those reported here was due to the varying degree of Cu deficiency produced: Cu deficiency was less pronounced in the present study.

  6. Increased folate uptake prevents dietary development of folate deficiency in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    McMartin, K.E.; Collins, T.D.; Eisenga, B.H.; Bhandari, S.D. )

    1990-02-26

    Folic acid and folate deficiency have been implicated in disorders of the central nervous system. In a study of the mechanism for the effects of chronic ethanol on folate homeostasis, the uptake of {sup 3}H-folic acid by the rat brain has been studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed sulfonamide-supplemented folate-sufficient and folate-deficient liquid diets containing either ethanol or isoenergic carbohydrate as a control. After 16 weeks, severe folate depletion occurred in tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, lung intestine, testes), but not in the brain. Tissue retention of {sup 3}H-folic acid was increased four-fold in the brain of folate-deficient rats. A smaller increase in uptake was observed in the other tissues, except for the liver, in which the retention of {sup 3}H-folic acid was slightly decreased. Chronic ethanol feeding decreased hepatic folate uptake, but not that by the increase the uptake of folate from the plasma of folate-deficient rats, thereby inhibiting the development of brain folate deficiency.

  7. Dietary thyroxine induces molt in chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Bass, P D; Hooge, D M; Koutsos, E A

    2007-03-01

    Thyroxine increases during a molt in wild and captive birds, and thyroidectomy prevents induction of molt. This trial examined the effect of dietary thyroxine on molt induction molt in chickens (laying hens, 59 weeks of age). In a completely randomized design (n=15 hens/replication; 6 replications/treatment), hens were randomly assigned to either a traditional molting program consisting of feed withdrawal (FWD), or to diets containing 40 mg thyroxine/kg diet (HT), 20 mg thyroxine/kg diet (LT), or 40 mg thyroxine from thyroactive iodinated casein/kg diet (TIC). The molting treatment lasted 7-13 d, until egg production reached 0%. After molt induction, birds had ad libitum access to the same diet, until egg production was re-initiated and maximized ( approximately 56 d). All treatments induced molt, based upon cessation of egg laying and regression of ovary and oviduct. Birds on FWD treatment lost more body weight during the molting period, but gained more after molt compared to thyroxine treatments (P<0.01 for each), although all body weights were similar when egg production was maximized. Data demonstrate that oral thyroxine, in purified or non-purified form, induces a molt and may enhance animal well-being by reducing the need for FWD.

  8. Prevalence of iron deficiency in 12-mo-old infants from 11 European areas and influence of dietary factors on iron status (Euro-Growth study).

    PubMed

    Male, C; Persson, L A; Freeman, V; Guerra, A; van't Hof, M A; Haschke, F

    2001-05-01

    A prospective longitudinal cohort study was performed to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency in European infants at 12 mo of age, and to study the influence of socio-economic status, dietary factors, growth and morbidity on iron status. The cohort consisted of 488 normal term infants from primary healthcare centres in 11 European areas. Assessed were socio-economic variables, dietary intake, anthropometry and morbidity at regular intervals from birth to 12 mo, and haemoglobin, serum ferritin, mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation and serum transferrin receptor concentrations at age 12 mo. The prevalence of anaemia was 9.4%, of iron deficiency 7.2%, and of iron deficiency anaemia 2.3%. More than 40% of anaemia was associated with normal iron status and associated with an increased frequency of recent infections. Iron deficiency anaemia was significantly more frequent with low (5.1%) than high socio-economic status (0%). Dietary factors accounted for most of this variation in multiple regression analysis. Early introduction of cows' milk was the strongest negative determinant of iron status. Feeding of iron-fortified formula was the main factor positively influencing iron status. Other dietary factors, including breastfeeding, did not play a significant role as determinants of iron status at age 12 mo. Conclusion. Iron deficiency anaemia is present in 2.3% of 12-mo-old European infants. The prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia varies strongly with socio-economic status. Avoidance of cows' milk feeding during the first year of life is the key measure in the prevention of iron deficiency.

  9. Interactive effects of dietary fat/carbohydrate ratio and body mass index on iron deficiency anemia among Taiwanese women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung-Su; Chen, Yi-Chun; Owaga, Eddy; Palupi, Khairizka Citra; Pan, Wen-Harn; Bai, Chyi-Huey

    2014-09-24

    Whether being overweight or obese is associated with increased risk of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) remains controversial. We evaluated the dietary intakes and risk for IDA in relation to body mass index (BMI). One thousand two hundred and seventy-four females aged ≥ 19 years, enrolled in the third Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT) 2005-2008, were selected. Half of the women were either overweight (24.0%) or obese (25.3%). The overall prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency and IDA among adult women was 19.5%, 8.6% and 6.2%. BMI showed a protective effect on IDA: overweight (odds ratio, OR: 0.365 (0.181-0.736)) and obese (OR: 0.480 (0.259-0.891)) when compared with normal weight. Univariate analysis identified increased IDA risk for overweight/obese women who consumed higher dietary fat but lower carbohydrate (CHO) (OR: 10.119 (1.267-80.79)). No such relationship was found in IDA women with normal weight (OR: 0.375 (0.036-4.022)). Analysis of interaction(s) showed individuals within the highest BMI tertile (T3) had the lowest risk for IDA and the risk increased with increasing tertile groups of fat/CHO ratio; OR 0.381 (0.144-1.008; p = 0.051), 0.370 (0.133-1.026; p = 0.056) and 0.748 (0.314-1.783; p = 0.513); for T1, T2 and T3, respectively. In conclusion, a protective effect of BMI on IDA may be attenuated in women who had increased fat/CHO ratio.

  10. Prostaglandin E₂ is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-10-17

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three "D's": diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation.

  11. Dimethylthiourea inhibits heart weight and hematocrit changes caused by dietary copper deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, J.T. )

    1991-03-11

    Feeding antioxidants to rats in a copper (Cu)-deficient diet can partially inhibit the cardiac enlargement and anemia caused by Cu deficiency. This study was done to determine whether an antioxidant which bypassed the gastrointestinal tract was also protective and whether an agent more potent than previously used was more effective in this inhibition. Male, weanling rats were fed diets deficient or sufficient in Cu for 4 wks. Dimethylthiourea (DMTU) or saline was injected (ip) 4 times a week; minimum amount of DMTU retained during the experiment was estimated to be 250 mg/kg. Unlike other antioxidants, DMTU completely prevented the increase in heart wt/body wt ratio; like the other agents, it only partially inhibited the anemia of Cu deficiency. DMTU did not affect plasma or liver Cu content of CuD rats; however, heart copper of CuD rats was significantly increased by DMTU. The effects of DMTU on heart size and hematocrit (Hct) may be attributed to its antioxidant function, but the possibility of altered mineral status must also be considered.

  12. Adaptive regulation of riboflavin transport in heart: effect of dietary riboflavin deficiency in cardiovascular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udhayabanu, Tamilarasan; Karthi, Sellamuthu; Mahesh, Ayyavu; Varalakshmi, Perumal; Manole, Andreea; Houlden, Henry; Ashokkumar, Balasubramaniem

    2017-08-23

    Deficiency or defective transport of riboflavin (RF) is known to cause neurological disorders, cataract, cardiovascular anomalies, and various cancers by altering the biochemical pathways. Mechanisms and regulation of RF uptake process is well characterized in the cells of intestine, liver, kidney, and brain origin, while very little is known in the heart. Hence, we aimed to understand the expression and regulation of RF transporters (rRFVT-1 and rRFVT-2) in cardiomyocytes during RF deficiency and also investigated the role of RF in ischemic cardiomyopathy and mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. Riboflavin uptake assay revealed that RF transport in H9C2 is (1) significantly higher at pH 7.5, (2) independent of Na(+) and (3) saturable with a Km of 3.746 µM. For in vivo studies, male Wistar rats (110-130 g) were provided riboflavin deficient food containing 0.3 ± 0.05 mg/kg riboflavin for 7 weeks, which resulted in over expression of both RFVTs in mRNA and protein level. RF deprivation resulted in the accumulation of cardiac biomarkers, histopathological abnormalities, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential which evidenced the key role of RF in the development of cardiovascular pathogenesis. Besides, adaptive regulation of RF transporters upon RF deficiency signifies that RFVTs can be considered as an effective delivery system for drugs against cardiac diseases.

  13. Dietary blueberries sttenuate atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice by upregulating antioxidant enzymes expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blueberries (BB) contain high levels of polyphenols and exhibit high antioxidant capacity. In this study, protective effects of BB against atherosclerosis and possible underlying mechanisms in reducing oxidative stress were examined in ApoE deficient (apoE-/-) mice. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G die...

  14. Copper, iron, and selenium dietary deficiencies negatively impact skeletal integrity: A review.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Denis M

    2016-06-01

    Nutrients have been known to have a significant role in maintaining the health of the skeleton, both bone and cartilage. The nutrients that have received the majority of the attention are Vitamin D and calcium. However, limited attention has been directed toward three trace elements that may have mechanistic impact upon the skeletal tissues and could compromise skeletal health resulting from inadequate intakes of copper, iron, and selenium. The role of copper and selenium has been known, but the role of iron has only received recent attention. Copper deficiency is thought to impact bone health by a decrease in lysyl oxidase, a copper-containing enzyme, which facilitates collagen fibril crosslinking. Iron deficiency impact upon bone has only recently been discovered but the exact mechanism on how the deficient states enhance bone pathology is speculative. Selenium deficiency has an impact on cartilage thereby having an indirect impact on bone. However, several studies suggest that a mycotoxin when consumed by humans is the culprit in some cartilage disorders and the presence of selenium could attenuate the pathology. This review summarizes the current knowledge base with respect to skeletal integrity when each of these three trace elements are inadequate in diets of both animals and humans. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  15. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a reactive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary Zinc (Zn) deficiency affects approximately 30% of the world’s population. Zinc is a vital micronutrient and is important for the body’s ability to function. To date, accurate biological markers of the Zn subject’s status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chicken mod...

  16. TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    David R. Geter', Tanya M. Moore', Michael H. George', Steve R. Kilburn', Gloria Huggins-Clark', James W. Allen', and Anthony B. DeAngelo' 'National H...

  17. TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    David R. Geter', Tanya M. Moore', Michael H. George', Steve R. Kilburn', Gloria Huggins-Clark', James W. Allen', and Anthony B. DeAngelo' 'National H...

  18. Developmental vitamin D deficiency alters MK-801-induced behaviours in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Kesby, James P; O'Loan, Jonathan C; Alexander, Suzanne; Deng, Chao; Huang, Xu-Feng; McGrath, John J; Eyles, Darryl W; Burne, Thomas H J

    2012-04-01

    Developmental vitamin D (DVD) deficiency is a candidate risk factor for developing schizophrenia in humans. In rodents DVD deficiency induces subtle changes in the way the brain develops. This early developmental insult leads to select behavioural changes in the adult, such as an enhanced response to amphetamine-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats but not in male DVD-deficient rats and an enhanced locomotor response to the N-methyl-D: -aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801, in male DVD-deficient rats. However, the response to MK-801-induced locomotion in female DVD-deficient rats is unknown. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to further examine this behavioural finding in male and female rats and assess NMDA receptor density. DVD-deficient Sprague Dawley rats were assessed for locomotion, ataxia, acoustic startle response (ASR) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the ASR to multiple doses of MK-801. The NMDA receptor density in relevant brain regions was assessed in a drug-naive cohort. DVD deficiency increased locomotion in response to MK-801 in both sexes. DVD-deficient rats also showed an enhanced ASR compared with control rats, but PPI was normal. Moreover, DVD deficiency decreased NMDA receptor density in the caudate putamen of both sexes. These results suggest that a transient prenatal vitamin D deficiency has a long-lasting effect on NMDA-mediated signalling in the rodent brain and may be a plausible candidate risk factor for schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Dietary fructose-induced hepatocellular carcinoma development manifested in mice lacking apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM).

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takayuki; Maehara, Natsumi; Kai, Toshihiro; Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

    2016-12-01

    The consumption of fructose, including the use of high-fructose corn syrup as a sweetener, has increased continuously in recent decades. Although the involvement of fructose in the development of metabolic diseases has been emphasized recently, whether fructose intake increases susceptibility to steatosis-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is unclear. Here, we investigated this issue using mice lacking a circulating protein, apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage (AIM, encoded by cd5l). AIM does not induce carcinogenesis of hepatocytes, but provokes necrotic death specifically in AIM-bound cancer cells through complement cascade activation, thereby preventing HCC tumor development in wild-type mice. When subjected to a high-fructose diet (HFrD), AIM-deficient (AIM(-/-) ) mice showed liver steatosis and subsequent liver inflammation as well as fibrosis, but at much milder levels compared with mice fed a high-fat diet. However, AIM(-/-) mice were markedly susceptible to HCC tumor development, whereas no wild-type mice developed the disease. Systemic metabolic states, including obesity and insulin resistance, were similar in both types of mice after HFrD challenge, indicating no influence of AIM on HFrD-induced metabolic changes. Our results suggest that dietary fructose increases the risk for liver carcinogenesis and that individuals with low blood AIM levels may be susceptible to HCC under chronic fructose intake. © 2016 The Authors. Genes to Cells published by Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Dietary restriction, polyamines and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hacker, A D

    1993-06-22

    Dietary restriction (DR), i.e. reduction of total caloric intake, has been shown to result in protection against monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH). Restriction of the diet to 8 g/rat/day instead of the usual intake (18 g/rat/day), inhibits the progression of cardiopulmonary changes and prolongs survival after a single dose of MCT. We have shown previously that the development of MCT-induced pulmonary hypertension is associated with inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis in the lungs of MCT-treated rats. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that DR provides protection against the development of chronic PH in the rat by limiting increases in polyamine and DNA synthesis. We randomly divided animals into four groups each (MCT, MCT + DR, control, and control + DR). We injected rats with a single dose of MCT (60 mg/kg, s.c.) and a corresponding number of control rats with vehicle. Animals in all groups were given free access to food and water prior to administration of MCT. Immediately following injection of MCT both the MCT and control groups were given free access to food and water, while the other groups (MCT + DR and control + DR) we given the restricted diet (8 g/rat/day). Daily measurements were made of body weight and of water and food intake. Animals were killed in each group at 1, 4, 7, 14, and 21 days post MCT to determine right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH), lung wet weight, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity, and polyamine and DNA contents. We measured DNA synthesis 7 days after MCT by determining [3H]thymidine incorporation into the whole lung DNA. We found that 7 days after MCT treatment DNA synthesis increased compared to control. However, DR (MCT + DR) treatmen prevented the increase in DNA synthesis following MCT. Right ventricular hypertrophy, lung wet weight, ODC activity and lung polyamine levels were increased following MCT. Treatment with DR (MCT + DR) prevented increases in RVH, lung wet weight, ODC activity and

  1. Interleukin-17A deficiency ameliorates streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zan; Liu, Weihuang; Yan, Huichao; Dong, Chen

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a cytokine with critical functions in multiple autoimmune diseases. However, its roles in type I diabetes and the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. In the current study, we investigated the impact of IL-17 deficiency on streptozotocin (STZ) -induced diabetes. Il-17(-/-) mice exhibited attenuated hyperglycaemia and insulitis after STZ treatment compared with control mice. The Il-17(-/-) mice had fewer CD8(+) cells infiltrating the pancreas than wild-type controls after STZ injection. Wild-type mice showed increased percentage and number of splenic CD8(+) cells and decreased Gr1(+)  CD11b(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) after STZ treatment, but Il-17(-/-) mice maintained the percentages and numbers of splenic CD8(+) cells and MDSC, suggesting that IL-17 is implicated in STZ-induced cellular immune responses in the spleen. We further purified the MDSC from spleens of STZ-treated mice. Il-17(-/-) MDSC showed increased ability to suppress CD8(+) cell proliferation in vitro compared with wild-type MDSC. Transfer of MDSC to diabetic mice showed that MDSC from Il-17(-/-) mice could ameliorate hyperglycaemia. Moreover, recipients with MDSC from Il-17(-/-) mice had a decreased percentage of CD8(+) cell in the spleen compared with recipients with MDSC from wild-type mice. These data suggest that IL-17 is required in splenic MDSC function after STZ delivery. In summary, our study has revealed a pathogenic role of IL-17 in an STZ-induced diabetes model with important implications for our understanding of IL-17 function in autoimmune diseases.

  2. Differential effects of dietary Oenothera, Zizyphus mistol, and corn oils, and essential fatty acid deficiency on the progression of a murine mammary gland adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, S E; Piegari, M; Guzmán, C A; Eynard, A R

    1999-03-01

    The modulating effect of dietary enrichment in mistol seed oil (MO) containing 25% of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), evening primrose oil (EPO) enriched in gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) and corn oil (CO) as sources of omega-6 and omega-9 fatty acids on the growth parameters of one transplantable mammary tumor were compared. Mice fed on different lipid formulae were inoculated with a mammary gland adenocarcinoma and different growth development tumor parameters were recorded. Results showed that corn oil feeding slowed down most of the tumor growth parameters, as did the EPO diet. MO also showed antitumor activity. Olein feeding, which induces an essential fatty acid deficiency (EFAD), increased the incidence and the multiplicity of metastases when compared with the controls. It may be concluded that a diet enriched in omega-6 fatty acids did not behave as a tumor promoter in this mammary gland tumor model. The antitumor activities of EPO and MO are corroborated in present experiments, suggesting that both oils may be of value in nutritional approaches of mammary gland tumor therapies. In addition, present data add further experimental proof about the proposed protumorigenic proneness induced by the EFAD state.

  3. Increased adiposity induced by high dietary butter oil increases vertebrae trabecular structural indices in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obesity has been associated with both improved and impaired bone health, and other dietary factors apparently affect the nature of the association. An experiment was performed to determine whether increased adiposity induced by high dietary butter oil impairs bone structure and whether that effect ...

  4. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  5. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  6. Pre- and postnatal dietary protein deficiency influences anxiety, memory and social behaviour in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys dilectus chakae.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Neville; Rimbach, Rebecca; Rymer, Tasmin

    2016-07-01

    Dietary protein deficiency influences the behavioural phenotypes of mammals. We studied whether protein deficiency during gestation and/or post-weaning heightened anxiety, reduced memory recall and influenced competitive ability in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys dilectus chakae. Mice were subjected to five protein diet treatments, which they received continuously, or were raised on one diet to weaning and switched to an alternate diet post-weaning (Day 16): 1) HP-HP: high protein (24%); first letter pair indicates maternal diet and the second pair indicates offspring diet post-weaning; 2) BP-BP: baseline protein (19%); 3) LP-LP: low protein (10%); 4) HP-LP: switched from high to low protein diet; and 5) LP-HP: switched from low protein to high protein diet. From Day 70, when mice were sexually mature, 20 individuals (10 males, 10 females) per treatment were subjected to three successive experiments, in which we tested their anxiety responses in: 1) an open field arena (time spent in the centre of the open field); 2) novel object recognition (time spent exploring a novel object); and 3) social interactions (excluding BP-BP) in age-matched same-sex dyadic encounters (aggressive, amicable and avoidance behaviours). LP-LP and LP-HP treatment mice spent the least amount of time in the centre of the open field, did not demonstrate object preference compared to the other treatments, and were the most aggressive in dyadic encounters. Our study shows that the systemic effects of protein-deficient diets during early life shapes the behavioural phenotype in R. d. chakae, possibly through early organisation of neuro-biological pathways or competition among littermates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of coprophagy in masking dietary deficiencies of cystine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kwong, E; Barnes, R H

    1975-11-01

    When a diet containing raw soybean was fed to rats, there was an increase in the synthesis of pancreatic protein, presumably exocrine protein, as evidenced by an increased uptake of [35S]cystine. There was also an increased transsulfuration of methionine sulfur as indicated by labeled sulfur transformation from methionine to cystine. This same pattern of events was produced in rats receiving a casein-containing diet when 50 mg of crystalline trypsin inhibitor was administered by gavage. However, if coprophagy was prevented, the increased uptake of [35S]cystine and [35S]methionine transsulfuration under both dietary conditions was blocked. It was found that prevention of coprophagy was without effect upon these two processes if supplementary dietary cystine was provided or if a dietary protein source with adequate cystine, i.e., heat-treated soybean, was provided. It was concluded that by practicing coprophagy, sufficient fecal cystine was being returned to the upper intestinal tract to permit some synthesis of pancreatic exocrine protein and with this stimulation of synthesis, transulfuration could proceed. This assumes that the biosynthesis of cystine is dependent upon the availability of sufficient cystine to permit active protein synthesis. In another situation where cystine requirement is high, namely, the rapidly growing rat, a limited amount of cystine was fed by providing a 12% casein diet. Either supplementary cystine or methionine was provided and it was found that both amino acids gave optimal growth in conventional rats, but when coprophagy was prevented, optimal growth was achieved only with the cystine-supplemented diet.

  8. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis in children with 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Annamaria; Brunetti, Giacomina; Colucci, Silvia; Oranger, Angela; Ladisa, Filomena; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Faienza, Maria Felicia

    2013-01-01

    21-Hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), resulting from deletions or mutations of the P450 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). Children with 21-OHD need chronic glucocorticoid (cGC) therapy, both to replace congenital deficit in cortisol synthesis and to reduce androgen secretion by adrenal cortex. GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis that results in an early, transient increase in bone resorption accompanied by a decrease in bone formation, maintained for the duration of GC therapy. Despite the conflicting results in the literature about the bone status on GC-treated patients with 21-OHD, many reports consider these subjects to be at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. In bone cells, at the molecular level, GCs regulate various functions including osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and the apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes. In this paper, we focus on the physiology and biosynthesis of endogenous steroid hormones as well as on the effects of GCs on bone cells, highlighting the pathogenetic mechanism of GIO in children with 21-OHD.

  9. Nitrous oxide–induced vitamin B12 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Cameron; Seago, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Nitrous oxide is a gas that is odorless, colorless, and has a sweet taste at room temperature. Nitrous oxide has several uses, including in surgery and dentistry (referred to as “laughing gas”), in automotive racing, and in aerosol spray propellants. The aerosol spray propellants that typically use nitrous oxide are whipped cream canisters and cooking sprays. Unfortunately, these over-the-counter household items are a source of nitrous oxide that can be used for recreational use. The most popular is the use of industrial-grade canisters having the slang term “whippets.” The nitrous oxide can be extracted by pushing the nozzle down slightly to the side and catching the released gas with a balloon. The contents of the balloon can then be directly inhaled, giving an instant feeling of euphoria. This is not a benign means to achieve a euphoric state but can cause severe nitrous oxide–induced B12 deficiency, which is presented in this case report. PMID:28405070

  10. Persistent optically induced magnetism in oxygen-deficient strontium titanate.

    PubMed

    Rice, W D; Ambwani, P; Bombeck, M; Thompson, J D; Haugstad, G; Leighton, C; Crooker, S A

    2014-05-01

    Strontium titanate (SrTiO3) is a foundational material in the emerging field of complex oxide electronics. Although its bulk electronic and optical properties are rich and have been studied for decades, SrTiO3 has recently become a renewed focus of materials research catalysed in part by the discovery of superconductivity and magnetism at interfaces between SrTiO3 and other non-magnetic oxides. Here we illustrate a new aspect to the phenomenology of magnetism in SrTiO3 by reporting the observation of an optically induced and persistent magnetization in slightly oxygen-deficient bulk SrTiO3-δ crystals using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. This zero-field magnetization appears below ~18 K, persists for hours below 10 K, and is tunable by means of the polarization and wavelength of sub-bandgap (400-500 nm) light. These effects occur only in crystals containing oxygen vacancies, revealing a detailed interplay between magnetism, lattice defects, and light in an archetypal complex oxide material.

  11. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis in Children with 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Annamaria; Brunetti, Giacomina; Colucci, Silvia; Oranger, Angela; Ladisa, Filomena; Cavallo, Luciano; Grano, Maria; Faienza, Maria Felicia

    2013-01-01

    21-Hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), resulting from deletions or mutations of the P450 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). Children with 21-OHD need chronic glucocorticoid (cGC) therapy, both to replace congenital deficit in cortisol synthesis and to reduce androgen secretion by adrenal cortex. GC-induced osteoporosis (GIO) is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis that results in an early, transient increase in bone resorption accompanied by a decrease in bone formation, maintained for the duration of GC therapy. Despite the conflicting results in the literature about the bone status on GC-treated patients with 21-OHD, many reports consider these subjects to be at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. In bone cells, at the molecular level, GCs regulate various functions including osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and the apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes. In this paper, we focus on the physiology and biosynthesis of endogenous steroid hormones as well as on the effects of GCs on bone cells, highlighting the pathogenetic mechanism of GIO in children with 21-OHD. PMID:23484098

  12. Modelling primaquine-induced haemolysis in G6PD deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Watson, James; Taylor, Walter RJ; Menard, Didier; Kheng, Sim; White, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Primaquine is the only drug available to prevent relapse in vivax malaria. The main adverse effect of primaquine is erythrocyte age and dose-dependent acute haemolytic anaemia in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDd). As testing for G6PDd is often unavailable, this limits the use of primaquine for radical cure. A compartmental model of the dynamics of red blood cell production and destruction was designed to characterise primaquine-induced haemolysis using a holistic Bayesian analysis of all published data and was used to predict a safer alternative to the currently recommended once weekly 0.75 mg/kg regimen for G6PDd. The model suggests that a step-wise increase in daily administered primaquine dose would be relatively safe in G6PDd. If this is confirmed, then were this regimen to be recommended for radical cure patients would not require testing for G6PDd in areas where G6PDd Viangchan or milder variants are prevalent. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23061.001 PMID:28155819

  13. RAGE deficiency predisposes mice to virus-induced paucigranulocytic asthma

    PubMed Central

    Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, Md Ashik; Short, Kirsty Renfree; Zhang, Vivan; Gan, Wan Jun; Loh, Zhixuan; Werder, Rhiannon B; Simpson, Jennifer; Sly, Peter D; Mazzone, Stuart B; Spann, Kirsten M; Ferreira, Manuel AR; Upham, John W; Sukkar, Maria B; Phipps, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although many patients with asthma develop type-2 dominated eosinophilic inflammation, a number of individuals develop paucigranulocytic asthma, which occurs in the absence of eosinophilia or neutrophilia. The aetiology of paucigranulocytic asthma is unknown. However, both respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and mutations in the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) are risk factors for asthma development. Here, we show that RAGE deficiency impairs anti-viral immunity during an early-life infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; a murine analogue of RSV). The elevated viral load was associated with the release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) which triggered airway smooth muscle remodelling in early-life. Re-infection with PVM in later-life induced many of the cardinal features of asthma in the absence of eosinophilic or neutrophilic inflammation. Anti-HMGB1 mitigated both early-life viral disease and asthma-like features, highlighting HMGB1 as a possible novel therapeutic target. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21199.001 PMID:28099113

  14. Dietary tryptophan alleviates dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis through aryl hydrocarbon receptor in mice.

    PubMed

    Islam, Jahidul; Sato, Shoko; Watanabe, Kouichi; Watanabe, Takaya; Ardiansyah; Hirahara, Keisuke; Aoyama, Yukihide; Tomita, Shuhei; Aso, Hisashi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Ulcerative colitis is the typical progression of chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Amino acids, particularly tryptophan, have been reported to exert a protective effect against colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), but the precise underlying mechanisms remain incompletely clarified. Tryptophan metabolites are recognized to function as endogenous ligands for aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), which is a critical regulator of inflammation and immunity. Thus, we conducted this study to investigate whether dietary tryptophan supplementation protects against DSS-induced colitis by acting through Ahr. Female wild-type (WT) and Ahr-deficient (knockout; KO) mice (10-12 weeks old) were divided into four groups and fed either a control or 0.5% tryptophan diet. The tryptophan diet ameliorated DSS-induced colitis symptoms and severity in WT mice but not in KO mice, and the diet reduced the mRNA expression of Il-6, Tnfα, Il-1β and the chemokines Ccl2, Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 in the WT groups. Furthermore, Il-22 and Stat3 mRNA expression in the colon was elevated in WT mice fed with the tryptophan diet, which mainly protected epithelial layer integrity, and Ahr also modulated immune homeostasis by regulating Foxp3 and Il-17 mRNA expression. These data suggest that tryptophan-containing diet might ameliorate DSS-induced acute colitis and regulate epithelial homeostasis through Ahr. Thus, tryptophan could serve as a promising preventive agent in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Helicobacter cinaedi induced typhlocolitis in Rag-2-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Rickman, Barry; Fox, James G

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi, an enterohepatic helicobacter species (EHS), is an important human pathogen and is associated with a wide range of diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients. It has been convincingly demonstrated that innate immune response to certain pathogenic enteric bacteria is sufficient to initiate colitis and colon carcinogenesis in recombinase-activating gene (Rag)-2-deficient mice model. To better understand the mechanisms of human IBD and its association with development of colon cancer, we investigated whether H. cinaedi could induce pathological changes noted with murine enterohepatic helicobacter infections in the Rag2(-/-) mouse model. Sixty 129SvEv Rag2(-/-) mice mouse were experimentally or sham infected orally with H. cinaedi strain CCUG 18818. Gastrointestinal pathology and immune responses in infected and control mice were analyzed at 3, 6 and 9 months postinfection (MPI). H. cinaedi colonized the cecum, colon, and stomach in infected mice. H. cinaedi induced typhlocolitis in Rag2(-/-) mice by 3 MPI and intestinal lesions became more severe by 9 MPI. H. cinaedi was also associated with the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon-γ, tumor-necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-10; iNOS mRNA levels were also upregulated in the cecum of infected mice. However, changes in IL-4, IL-6, Cox-2, and c-myc mRNA expressions were not detected. Our results indicated that the Rag2(-/-) mouse model will be useful to continue investigating the pathogenicity of H. cinaedi, and to study the association of host immune responses in IBD caused by EHS. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Helicobacter cinaedi Induced Typhlocolitis in Rag-2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zeli; Feng, Yan; Rickman, Barry; Fox, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Helicobacter cinaedi, an enterohepatic helicobacter species (EHS), is an important human pathogen and is associated with a wide range of diseases, especially in immunocompromised patients. It has been convincingly demonstrated that innate immune response to certain pathogenic enteric bacteria is sufficient to initiate colitis and colon carcinogenesis in recombinase-activating gene (Rag)-2-deficient mice model. To better understand the mechanisms of human IBD and its association with development of colon cancer, we investigated whether H. cinaedi could induce pathological changes noted with murine enterohepatic helicobacter infections in the Rag2−/− mouse model. Materials and Methods Sixty 129SvEv Rag2−/− mice mouse were experimentally or sham infected orally with H. cinaedi strain CCUG 18818. Gastrointestinal pathology and immune responses in infected and control mice were analyzed at 3, 6 and 9 months postinfection (MPI). H. cinaedi colonized the cecum, colon, and stomach in infected mice. Results H. cinaedi induced typhlocolitis in Rag2−/− mice by 3 MPI and intestinal lesions became more severe by 9 MPI. H. cinaedi was also associated with the elevation of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon-γ, tumor-necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-10; iNOS mRNA levels were also upregulated in the cecum of infected mice. However, changes in IL-4, IL-6, Cox-2, and c-myc mRNA expressions were not detected. Conclusions Our results indicated that the Rag2−/− mouse model will be useful to continue investigating the pathogenicity of H. cinaedi, and to study the association of host immune responses in IBD caused by EHS. PMID:25381744

  17. Thiamine deficiency induces anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Alimov, A P; Wang, H; Frank, J A; Katz, W; Xu, M; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2014-05-16

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by ninefolds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17-24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight.

  18. MPK3/MPK6 are involved in iron deficiency-induced ethylene production in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingxiao; Li, Lin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Shoudong; Li, Sen; Du, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun; Shou, Huixia

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient that participates in various biological processes important for plant growth. Ethylene production induced by Fe deficiency plays important roles in plant tolerance to stress induced by Fe deficiency. However, the activation and regulatory mechanisms of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) genes in this response are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that Fe deficiency increased the abundance of ACS2, ACS6, ACS7, and ACS11 transcripts in both leaves and roots as well as the abundance of ACS8 transcripts in leaves and ACS9 transcripts in roots. Furthermore, we investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 and 6 (MPK3/MPK6)-regulated ACS2/6 activation in Fe deficiency-induced ethylene production. Our results showed that MPK3/MPK6 transcript abundance and MPK3/MPK6 phosphorylation are elevated under conditions of Fe deficiency. Furthermore, mpk3 and mpk6 mutants show a lesser induction of ethylene production under Fe deficiency and a greater sensitivity to Fe deficiency. Finally, in mpk3, mpk6, and acs2 mutants under conditions of Fe deficiency, induction of transcript expression of the Fe-deficiency response genes FRO2, IRT1, and FIT is partially compromised. Taken together, our results suggest that the MPK3/MPK6 and ACS2 are part of the Fe starvation-induced ethylene production signaling pathway.

  19. The impact of systematic dietary counseling during the first year of life on prevalence rates of anemia and iron deficiency at 12-16 months.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Vitolo, Márcia Regina

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact that a program based on maternal dietary counseling covering breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding had on the prevalence of iron deficiency, anemia and iron deficiency anemia in children aged 12 to 16 months. Newborn infants were randomized at birth to an intervention or a control group. Mothers in the intervention group received home visits during the children's first year of life on a monthly basis up to 6 months, and at 8, 10 and 12 months. The mothers in the control group received visits for data collection when children reached 6 and 12 months. All children were visited at ages between 12 and 16 months and 24-hour dietary recalls and hemoglobin and ferritin tests were conducted. There was no evidence that the intervention had an effect on anemia incidence, which was 66.5% in the intervention group and 61.8% in the control group. There was also no evidence of any difference between the groups in the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia or of iron deficiency. However, a higher percentage of children in the intervention group were exclusively breastfed at 4 and 6 months, and breastfed at 6 and 12 months. Intervention group children also consumed more meat and were fed diets with better iron bioavailability and consumed less cow's milk and calcium than children from the control group. This intervention had no effect on the prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia. Clinical trial registry identification number: NCT00629629.

  20. Dietary vitamin D supplementation does not reduce the incidence or severity of asbestos-induced mesothelioma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Cleo; Woo, Samantha; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that vitamin and mineral intake is associated with cancer incidence. A prevention strategy based on diet or dietary supplementation could have enormous benefit, both directly, by preventing disease, and indirectly by alleviating fear in millions of people worldwide who have been exposed to asbestos. We have previously shown that dietary supplementation with the antioxidants vitamins A, E, and selenium does not affect overall survival nor the time to progression of asbestos-induced mesothelioma in MexTAg mice. Here we have extended our analysis to vitamin D. We compared survival of asbestos-exposed MexTAg mice provided with diets that were deficient or supplemented with 4500 IU/kg vitamin D (cholecalciferol). Survival of supplemented mice was significantly shorter than mice given a standard AIN93 diet containing 1000 IU/kg cholecalciferol (median survival was 29 and 32.5 weeks respectively). However, mice deficient in vitamin D had the same rate of mesothelioma development as control mice. Neither the latency time from asbestos exposure to diagnosis nor disease progression after diagnosis were significantly different between mice on these diets. We conclude that vitamin D is unlikely to moderate the incidence of disease in asbestos-exposed populations or to ameliorate the pathology in patients with established mesothelioma.

  1. Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis of Dietary-Induced Hyperlipidemia Gene Expression Profiles in Miniature Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Junko; Waki, Shiori; Matsumoto, Rena; Odake, Junji; Miyaji, Takayuki; Tottori, Junichi; Iwanaga, Takehiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperlipidemia animal models have been established, but complete gene expression profiles of the transition from normal lipid levels have not been obtained. Miniature pigs are useful model animals for gene expression studies on dietary-induced hyperlipidemia because they have a similar anatomy and digestive physiology to humans, and blood samples can be obtained from them repeatedly. Methodology Two typical dietary treatments were used for dietary-induced hyperlipidemia models, by using specific pathogen-free (SPF) Clawn miniature pigs. One was a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet (HFCD) and the other was a high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-sucrose diet (HFCSD). Microarray analyses were conducted from whole blood samples during the dietary period and from white blood cells at the end of the dietary period to evaluate the transition of expression profiles of the two dietary models. Principal Findings Variations in whole blood gene expression intensity within the HFCD or the HFCSD group were in the same range as the controls provide with normal diet at all periods. This indicates uniformity of dietary-induced hyperlipidemia for our dietary protocols. Gene ontology- (GO) based functional analyses revealed that characteristics of the common changes between HFCD and HFCSD were involved in inflammatory responses and reproduction. The correlation coefficient between whole blood and white blood cell expression profiles at 27 weeks with the HFCSD diet was significantly lower than that of the control and HFCD diet groups. This may be due to the effects of RNA originating from the tissues and/or organs. Conclusions No statistically significant differences in fasting plasma lipids and glucose levels between the HFCD and HFCSD groups were observed. However, blood RNA analyses revealed different characteristics corresponding to the dietary protocols. In this study, whole blood RNA analyses proved to be a useful tool to evaluate transitions in dietary-induced

  2. Effects of dietary sodium on reactive oxygen species formation and endothelial dysfunction in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice on high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Ketonen, Juha; Mervaala, Eero

    2008-11-01

    Hypertension and high serum cholesterol level are important risk factors for atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. In the present study we tested the hypothesis whether high sodium intake, when given in combination with Western type high-fat diet, induces endothelial dysfunction and promotes atherosclerosis. Furthermore, the role and enzyme sources of increased oxidative stress were examined. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice (LDLR(-/-)) and control C57Bl/6 mice received either high-fat, normal-sodium diet (fat 18% and cholesterol 0.5%; NaCl 0.7%; w/w) or high-fat, high-sodium diet (7% NaCl w/w) for 12 weeks. Superoxide formation was assessed by lucigenin enhanced chemiluminescence, endothelial functions were examined ex vivo, and atherosclerotic lesions from the aorta were assessed by light microscopy. High-fat, high-sodium diet increased systolic blood pressure in LDLR(-/-) mice but not in C57Bl/6 mice, whereas it induced cardiac hypertrophy in both mouse strains. Dietary combination of fat and sodium induced endothelial dysfunction in LDLR(-/-) mice. Preincubation with a superoxide scavenger Tiron normalized endothelial dysfunction, whereas the hydrogen peroxide scavenger catalase did not alter endothelial function. High sodium intake induced superoxide formation in LDLR(-/-) mice on high-fat diet. Stimulation of muscarinic receptors in the endothelial cells by acetylcholine increased superoxide generation, whereas preincubation with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-arginine methyl ester or endothelium removal reduced superoxide production. Inhibition of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase by apocynin decreased vascular superoxide formation whereas the xanthine oxidase inhibitor oxypurinol did not significantly affect oxidative stress in LDLR(-/-) mice. In conclusion, the detrimental effects of dietary sodium on endothelial function and progression of atherosclerosis in LDLR(-/-) mice on high-fat diet are

  3. Effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation (Cuminum cyminum) on bacterial susceptibility of diabetes-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Moubarz, Gehan; Embaby, Mohamed A; Doleib, Nada M; Taha, Mona M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk of acquiring infections. Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Diabetes causes generation of reactive oxygen species that increases oxidative stress, which may play a role in the development of complications as immune-deficiency and bacterial infection. The study aimed to investigate the role of a natural antioxidant, cumin, in the improvement of immune functions in diabetes. Diabetes was achieved by interperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Bacterial infection was induced by application of Staphylococcus aureus suspension to a wound in the back of rats. The antioxidant was administered for 6 weeks. Results revealed a decrease in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats (p < 0.001), in addition to improving immune functions by decreasing total IgE approaching to the normal control level. Also, inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β and TNF) levels, as well as total blood count decreased in diabetic rats as compared to the control group. Thus, cumin may serve as anti-diabetic treatment and may help in attenuating diabetic complications by improving immune functions. Therefore, a medical dietary antioxidant supplementation is important to improve the immune functions in diabetes.

  4. Effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation (Cuminum cyminum) on bacterial susceptibility of diabetes-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Embaby, Mohamed A.; Doleib, Nada M.; Taha, Mona M.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk of acquiring infections. Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Diabetes causes generation of reactive oxygen species that increases oxidative stress, which may play a role in the development of complications as immune-deficiency and bacterial infection. The study aimed to investigate the role of a natural antioxidant, cumin, in the improvement of immune functions in diabetes. Diabetes was achieved by interperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Bacterial infection was induced by application of Staphylococcus aureus suspension to a wound in the back of rats. The antioxidant was administered for 6 weeks. Results revealed a decrease in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats (p < 0.001), in addition to improving immune functions by decreasing total IgE approaching to the normal control level. Also, inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β and TNF) levels, as well as total blood count decreased in diabetic rats as compared to the control group. Thus, cumin may serve as anti-diabetic treatment and may help in attenuating diabetic complications by improving immune functions. Therefore, a medical dietary antioxidant supplementation is important to improve the immune functions in diabetes. PMID:27536197

  5. Differential regulation of the renal sodium-phosphate cotransporters NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIc, and PiT-2 in dietary potassium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Breusegem, Sophia Y; Takahashi, Hideaki; Giral-Arnal, Hector; Wang, Xiaoxin; Jiang, Tao; Verlander, Jill W; Wilson, Paul; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Sutherland, Eileen; Caldas, Yupanqui; Blaine, Judith T; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Barry, Nicholas P; Levi, Moshe

    2009-08-01

    Dietary potassium (K) deficiency is accompanied by phosphaturia and decreased renal brush border membrane (BBM) vesicle sodium (Na)-dependent phosphate (P(i)) transport activity. Our laboratory previously showed that K deficiency in rats leads to increased abundance in the proximal tubule BBM of the apical Na-P(i) cotransporter NaPi-IIa, but that the activity, diffusion, and clustering of NaPi-IIa could be modulated by the altered lipid composition of the K-deficient BBM (Zajicek HK, Wang H, Puttaparthi K, Halaihel N, Markovich D, Shayman J, Beliveau R, Wilson P, Rogers T, Levi M. Kidney Int 60: 694-704, 2001; Inoue M, Digman MA, Cheng M, Breusegem SY, Halaihel N, Sorribas V, Mantulin WW, Gratton E, Barry NP, Levi M. J Biol Chem 279: 49160-49171, 2004). Here we investigated the role of the renal Na-P(i) cotransporters NaPi-IIc and PiT-2 in K deficiency. Using Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and quantitative real-time PCR, we found that, in rats and in mice, K deficiency is associated with a dramatic decrease in the NaPi-IIc protein abundance in proximal tubular BBM and in NaPi-IIc mRNA. In addition, we documented the presence of a third Na-coupled P(i) transporter in the renal BBM, PiT-2, whose abundance is also decreased by dietary K deficiency in rats and in mice. Finally, electron microscopy showed subcellular redistribution of NaPi-IIc in K deficiency: in control rats, NaPi-IIc immunolabel was primarily in BBM microvilli, whereas, in K-deficient rats, NaPi-IIc BBM label was reduced, and immunolabel was prevalent in cytoplasmic vesicles. In summary, our results demonstrate that decreases in BBM abundance of the phosphate transporter NaPi-IIc and also PiT-2 might contribute to the phosphaturia of dietary K deficiency, and that the three renal BBM phosphate transporters characterized so far can be differentially regulated by dietary perturbations.

  6. Preventing vitamin B12 deficiency in South Asian women of childbearing age: a randomised controlled trial comparing an oral vitamin B12 supplement with B12 dietary advice.

    PubMed

    Mearns, G J; Koziol-McLain, J; Obolonkin, V; Rush, E C

    2014-08-01

    To examine the effectiveness, acceptability and sustainability of interventions to reduce vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency in South Asian women before conception. A 6-month randomised controlled trial conducted in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants (62 South Asian women, 18-50 years old) were stratified by dietary practices, then randomised to three treatment groups: B12 Supplement (oral cyanocobalamin 6 μg/day) (n=21), Placebo (n=21), or B12 Dietary Advice (n=20). Primary outcome measures were changes in B12 biomarkers (serum B12 and holotranscobalamin (holoTC)) at 6 months. Dietary B12 intake was estimated from a B12 food-specific frequency questionnaire (B12FFQ). Intention-to-treat analysis was applied using 'last observation carried forward' method. Changes in B12 biomarkers by treatment were compared using analysis of variance. Pearson's correlations tested relationships between dietary B12 intake and B12 biomarkers. At baseline, 48% of women tested as insufficient or deficient in serum B12 (<222 pmol/l) and 51% as insufficient or deficient in holoTC (<45 pmol/l). B12 status was moderately correlated with dietary B12 intake (r=0.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.3-0.7)) and 44% of women reported insufficient dietary intake (<2.4 μg/day). B12 Supplement was the only treatment group to record a significant increase in B12 biomarkers over 6 months: serum B12 by 30% (95% CI (11-48%)) and holoTC by 42% (12-72%). The prevalence of B12 insufficiency among Auckland South Asian women is high and moderately correlated with inadequate intake of foods that contain B12. Cyanocobalamin supplementation (6 μg/day) was associated with improved B12 biomarkers, with a potential to improve preconception B12 status in South Asian women.

  7. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  8. Dietary Salt Exacerbates Isoproterenol-induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Heart Failure rats (SHHFs) take far longer to develop compensated heart failure and congestive decompensation than common surgical models of heart failure. Isoproterenol (ISO) infusion can accelerate cardiomyopathy in young SHHFs, while dietary salt loa...

  9. Dietary iron overload induces visceral adipose tissue insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Dongiovanni, Paola; Ruscica, Massimiliano; Rametta, Raffaela; Recalcati, Stefania; Steffani, Liliana; Gatti, Stefano; Girelli, Domenico; Cairo, Gaetano; Magni, Paolo; Fargion, Silvia; Valenti, Luca

    2013-06-01

    Increased iron stores associated with elevated levels of the iron hormone hepcidin are a frequent feature of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary iron supplementation on insulin resistance and the role of hepcidin in C57Bl/6 male mice fed a standard or iron-enriched diet for 16 weeks. Iron supplementation increased hepatic iron and serum hepcidin fivefold and led to a 40% increase in fasting glucose due to insulin resistance, as confirmed by the insulin tolerance test, and to threefold higher levels of triglycerides. Iron supplemented mice had lower visceral adipose tissue mass estimated by epididymal fat pad, associated with iron accumulation in adipocytes. Decreased insulin signaling, evaluated by the phospho-Akt/Akt ratio, was detected in the visceral adipose tissue of iron overloaded mice, and gene expression analysis of visceral adipose tissue showed that an iron-enriched diet up-regulated iron-responsive genes and adipokines, favoring insulin resistance, whereas lipoprotein lipase was down-regulated. This resulted in hyperresistinemia and increased visceral adipose tissue expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (Socs3), a target of resistin and hepcidin implicated in insulin resistance. Acute hepcidin administration down-regulated lipoprotein lipase and up-regulated Socs3 in visceral adipose tissue. In conclusion, we characterized a model of dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome in which an iron-enriched diet induces insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia and affects visceral adipose tissue metabolism by a mechanism involving hepcidin up-regulation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Deficiency of the Bax gene attenuates denervation-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Siu, P. M.; Alway, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been implicated in mediating denervation-induced muscle wasting. In this study we determined the effect of interference of apoptosis on muscle wasting during denervation by using mice genetically deficient in pro-apoptotic Bax. After denervation, muscle wasting was evident in both wild-type and Bax−/− muscles but reduction of muscle weight was attenuated in Bax−/− mice. Apoptotic DNA fragmentation increased in wild-type denervated muscles whereas there was no statistical increase in DNA fragmentation in denervated muscles from Bax−/− mice. Mitochondrial AIF and Smac/DIABLO releases and Bcl-2, p53 and HSP27 increased whereas XIAP and MnSOD decreased to a similar extent in muscles from wild-type and Bax−/− mice following denervation. Mitochondrial cytochrome c release was elevated in denervated muscles from wild-type mice but the increase was suppressed in muscles from Bax−/− mice. Increases in caspase-3 and -9 activities and oxidative stress markers H2O2, MDA/4-HAE and nitrotyrosine were all evident in denervated muscles from wild-type mice but these changes were absent in muscles from Bax−/− mice. Moreover, ARC increased exclusively in denervated Bax−/− muscle. Our data indicate that under conditions of denervation, pro-apoptotic signalling is suppressed and muscle wasting is attenuated when the Bax gene is lacking. These findings suggest that interventions targeting apoptosis may be valuable in ameliorating denervation-associated pathologic muscle wasting in certain neuromuscular disorders that involve partial or full denervation. PMID:16763784

  11. Retardation of myelination due to dietary vitamin B12 deficiency: cranial MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Lövblad, K; Ramelli, G; Remonda, L; Nirkko, A C; Ozdoba, C; Schroth, G

    1997-02-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency is known to be associated with signs of demyelination, usually in the spinal cord. Lack of vitamin B12 in the maternal diet during pregnancy has been shown to cause severe retardation of myelination in the nervous system. We report the case of a 14(1)/2-month-old child of strictly vegetarian parents who presented with severe psychomotor retardation. This severely hypotonic child had anemia due to insufficient maternal intake of vitamin B12 with associated megaloblastic anemia. MRI of the brain revealed severe brain atrophy with signs of retarded myelination, the frontal and temporal lobes being most severely affected. It was concluded that this myelination retardation was due to insufficient intake of vitamin B12 and vitamin B12 therapy was instituted. The patient responded well with improvement of clinical and imaging abnormalities. We stress the importance of MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with suspected diseases of myelination.

  12. Complex carbohydrates in the dietary management of patients with glycogenosis caused by glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Smit, G P; Ververs, M T; Belderok, B; Van Rijn, M; Berger, R; Fernandes, J

    1988-07-01

    Carbohydrates with digestion characteristics between those of lente uncooked starches and rapidly digestible oligosaccharides were administered in a dose of 1.5 g/kg body weight to five patients with glycogenosis from glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency. Postprandial duration of normoglycemia and concentrations of blood insulin and lactate were determined. Uncooked barley groats in water, or incorporated in a meal turned out to behave as lente carbohydrates. Uncooked couscous in water, couscous incorporated in a meal, and partially cooked macaroni given as a meal behaved as semilente carbohydrates as compared with uncooked cornstarch and glucose. The in vitro determination of the digestibility index along with the in vivo tolerance test enables us to choose and incorporate semilente carbohydrates in the day-time treatment of patients.

  13. Seminal quality and sperm production in beef bulls with chronic dietary vitamin A deficiency and subsequent re-alimentation.

    PubMed

    Rode, L M; Coulter, G H; Kastelic, J P; Bailey, D R

    1995-05-01

    Sixteen Hereford bulls (16 mo of age, 462 kg average body weight) were used in each of 2 yr to evaluate the effects of hypovitaminosis A on seminal quality and sperm production. Bulls were fed a high-concentrate diet with (+VIT) or without (-VIT) supplemental Vitamin A until the apparent onset of hypovitaminosis A (28 and 32 wk in Year 1 and 2, respectively). Half of the bulls on each treatment were then slaughtered and those remaining were re-alimented with Vitamin A. Plasma retinol concentration in -VIT bulls reached a nadir at approximately 25 wk. In Year 1, the proportion of progressively motile spermatozoa was lower in -VIT bulls after 17 wk but returned to that of the +VIT group after re-alimentation. The proportion of spermatozoa with primary morphological defects appeared to be greater in -VIT bulls compared to +VIT bulls by 26 and 24 wk in Year 1 and 2, respectively. The incidence of these defects declined in -VIT bulls upon re-alimentation, and approached the incidence observed in +VIT bulls by 8 to 12 wk of re-alimentation. Hypovitaminosis A decreased paired testes weight, daily sperm production, and epididymal sperm reserves but did not affect daily gain. Prolonged dietary Vitamin A deficiency impaired semen quality and sperm production in the absence of other clinical symptoms. However, under practical feeding conditions, diets that result in long-term, marginal Vitamin A deficiency or a relatively short-term absence of Vitamin A intake probably would have minimal effects on spermatogenesis.

  14. Effects of dietary boron and phytase supplementation on growth performance and mineral profile of broiler chickens fed on diets adequate or deficient in calcium and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Çinar, M; Küçükyilmaz, K; Bozkurt, M; Çatli, A U; Bintaş, E; Akşit, H; Konak, R; Yamaner, Ç; Seyrek, K

    2015-01-01

    1. Two experiments were designed to determine the effect of dietary boron (B) in broiler chickens. In Experiment 1, a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments was used to investigate the effect of dietary calcium (Ca) and available phosphorus (aP) (adequate or deficient) and supplemental B (0, 20, 40, and 60 mg/kg diet). In Experiment 2, B, at 20 mg/kg, and phytase (PHY) (500 FTU/kg diet) were incorporated into a basal diet deficient in Ca and aP, either alone or in combination. 2. The parameters that were measured were growth performance indices, serum biochemical activity as well as ash and mineral (i.e. Ca, P, Mg, Fe, Cu and Zn) content of tibia, breast muscle and liver. 3. Results indicated that both supplemental B and dietary Ca and aP had marginal effects on performance indices of chickens grown for 42 d. 4. There were positive correlations (linear effect) between B concentrations of serum, bone, breast muscle and liver and the amount of B consumed. 5. Serum T3 and T4 activities increased linearly with higher B supplementation. 6. Increasing supplemental B had significant implications on breast muscle and liver mineral composition. Lowering dietary Ca and aP level increased Cu content in liver and both Fe and Zn retention in breast muscle. Tibia ash content and mineral composition did not respond to dietary modifications with either Ca-aP or B. 7. The results also suggested that dietary contents of Ca and aP do not affect the response to B regarding tissue mineral profile. Dietary combination with B and PHY did not create a synergism with regard to growth performance and bioavailability of the minerals.

  15. Dietary polyamines promote the growth of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, J E; Reistad, R; Eliassen, K A; Sjaastad, O V; Alexander, J

    1997-10-01

    We have examined whether dietary polyamines influence the formation and initial growth of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. Effects of a combination of dietary polyamines at three dose levels (putrescine: 50, 280, 740 nmol/g; spermidine: 10, 261, 763 nmol/g; spermine: 1, 31, 91 nmol/g) in the polyamine-poor AIN-76A diet were studied in animals in two different experimental situations: animals treated with AOM alone and animals treated with AOM + difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a specific inhibitor of endogenous polyamine synthesis. In both experimental situations, dietary polyamines enhanced the growth of ACF, expressed as the number of large ACF (foci with three or more aberrant crypts, ACF > or = 3), whereas the formation of ACF, expressed as the number of ACF, was apparently not altered. In animals treated with AOM alone, maximal growth enhancing effect on ACF was nearly obtained with the median level of dietary polyamine. In rats fed a low polyamine diet, basic AIN-76A, DFMO reduced the growth of AOM-induced ACF by 83%. This inhibitory effect of DFMO was counteracted by dietary polyamines in a dose-dependent manner, and it was abolished at the highest level of polyamines. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that dietary polyamines are able to enhance the growth of AOM-induced ACF. Further, dietary polyamines reversed the DFMO-caused inhibition of ACF growth, probably by compensating for the DFMO-reduced endogenous polyamine synthesis.

  16. Combined Vitamin C & E deficiency induces motor defects in gulo−/−/SVCT2+/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Marquicia R; DiAsio, Danielle L; Rodrigues, Laurisa M; Harrison, Fiona E; May, James M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Key antioxidants, vitamins C and E, are necessary for normal brain development and neuronal function. In this study, we depleted both of these vitamins in two mouse models to determine if oxidative stress due to combined vitamin C and E dietary deficiency altered their neurological phenotype. The first model lacked both alleles for the Gulonolactone oxidase gene (Gulo−/−) and therefore was unable synthesize vitamin C. To obtain an additional cellular deficiency of vitamin C, the second model also lacked one allele for the cellular vitamin C transporter gene (Gulo−/−/SVCT2+/−). Methods The experimental treatment was 16 weeks of vitamin E deprivation followed by 3 weeks of vitamin C deprivation. Mice were assessed for motor coordination deficits, vitamin levels, and oxidative stress biomarkers. Results In the first model, defects in motor performance were more apparent in both vitamin C-deficient groups (VE+VC−, VE−VC−) compared to vitamin C-supplemented groups (VE+VC+, VE−VC+) regardless of vitamin E level. Analysis of brain cortex and liver confirmed decreases of at least 80% for each vitamin in mice on deficient diets. Vitamin E deficiency doubled oxidative stress biomarkers (F2-isoprostanes and malondialdehyde). In the second model, Gulo−/−/SVCT2+/− mice on the doubly deficient diets showed deficits in locomotor activity, Rota-rod performance, and other motor tasks, with no concomitant change in anxiety or spatial memory. Discussion Vitamin E deficiency alone caused a modest oxidative stress in brain that did not affect motor performance. Adding a cellular deficit in vitamin C to dietary deprivation of both vitamins significantly impaired motor performance. PMID:23321552

  17. Common Bean Leaves as a Source of Dietary Iron: Functional Test in an Iron-Deficient Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Zavala, Mauricio; Mora-Avilés, María Alejandra; Anaya-Loyola, Miriam Aracely; Guzmán-Maldonado, Horacio; Aguilera-Barreyro, Araceli; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro; García-Gasca, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Recent findings made by our group indicate that the iron content in Phaseolus vulgaris leaves is at least four times greater than in grains therefore, we evaluated the effect of supplementation with bean leaf (iron content of 275 mg/kg on a dry basis) in iron-deficient rats. Anemia was induced by feeding rats with an iron-deficient diet (IDD) for 11 days and iron-recovery diets were subsequently tested for 14 days using a normal diet, a 10 % bean leaf-supplemented IDD (BLSD) or a ferrous sulfate-supplemented IDD. Decreased levels of leukocytes (64 %), erythrocytes (30 %), lymphocytes (62 %), granulocytes (72 %), hematocrit (34 %), hemoglobin (35 %), and ferritin (34 %) were observed in the iron-deficient rats compared to the control rats. BLSD supplementation showed the highest recovery values relative to those recorded for control rats: leukocytes (40 %), erythrocytes (24 %), lymphocytes (33 %), granulocytes (88 %), hematocrit (17 %), and hemoglobin (18 %), suggesting that common bean leaves could be a good source of bioavailable iron with possible immunomodulatory effects.

  18. Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Glutamate and Aspartate on Diquat-Induced Oxidative Stress in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Duan, Jielin; Yang, Guan; Zhao, Yurong; Fang, Rejun; Chen, Lixiang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of dietary glutamate and aspartate supplementations on diquat-induced oxidative stress in piglets. Diquat injection significantly reduced growth performance, including body weight, average daily weight gain, and feed intake (P<0.05). Meanwhile, diquat administration induced oxidative stress evidenced by the decreased serum nitric oxide (NO) and elevated malondialdeyhde (MDA) concentration (P<0.05). Furthermore, diquat-induced oxidative stress disrupted intestinal absorption system and decreased serum threonine, serine, and glycine levels. Dietary supplementation with glutamate improved final body weight, antioxidant system, and expressions of amino acids transporters and enhanced serum glutamate concentration compared with diquat group (P<0.05). While aspartate failed to alleviate diquat-induced oxidative stress, growth depression, and dysfunction of nutrients absorption except for liver relative weight. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with glutamate confers beneficial effects on diquat-induced oxidative stress in piglets, while aspartate exhibits little effects. PMID:25875335

  19. Effects of dietary supplementation with glutamate and aspartate on diquat-induced oxidative stress in piglets.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jie; Liu, Mingfeng; Ren, Wenkai; Duan, Jielin; Yang, Guan; Zhao, Yurong; Fang, Rejun; Chen, Lixiang; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of dietary glutamate and aspartate supplementations on diquat-induced oxidative stress in piglets. Diquat injection significantly reduced growth performance, including body weight, average daily weight gain, and feed intake (P<0.05). Meanwhile, diquat administration induced oxidative stress evidenced by the decreased serum nitric oxide (NO) and elevated malondialdeyhde (MDA) concentration (P<0.05). Furthermore, diquat-induced oxidative stress disrupted intestinal absorption system and decreased serum threonine, serine, and glycine levels. Dietary supplementation with glutamate improved final body weight, antioxidant system, and expressions of amino acids transporters and enhanced serum glutamate concentration compared with diquat group (P<0.05). While aspartate failed to alleviate diquat-induced oxidative stress, growth depression, and dysfunction of nutrients absorption except for liver relative weight. In conclusion, dietary supplementation with glutamate confers beneficial effects on diquat-induced oxidative stress in piglets, while aspartate exhibits little effects.

  20. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper fiber supplementation promotes effectively the

  1. Dietary Fiber Intake Regulates Intestinal Microflora and Inhibits Ovalbumin-Induced Allergic Airway Inflammation in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyu; Shi, Lei; Pang, Wenhui; Liu, Wenwen; Li, Jianfeng; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Guanggang

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, academic studies suggest that global growth of airway allergic disease has a close association with dietary changes including reduced consumption of fiber. Therefore, appropriate dietary fiber supplementation might be potential to prevent airway allergic disease (AAD). Objective We investigated whether dietary fiber intake suppressed the induction of AAD and tried to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. Methods The control mice and AAD model mice fed with 4% standard-fiber chow, while low-fiber group of mice fed with a 1.75% low-fiber chow. The two fiber-intervened groups including mice, apart from a standard-fiber diet, were also intragastric (i.g.) administrated daily with poorly fermentable cellulose or readily fermentable pectin (0.4% of daily body weight), respectively. All animals except normal mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce airway allergic inflammation. Hallmarks of AAD were examined by histological analysis and ELISA. The variation in intestinal bacterial composition was assessed by qualitative analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) content in fecal samples using real-time PCR. Results Low-fiber diet aggravated inflammatory response in ovalbumin-induced allergic mice, whereas dietary fiber intake significantly suppressed the allergic responses, attenuated allergic symptoms of nasal rubbing and sneezing, decreased the pathology of eosinophil infiltration and goblet cell metaplasia in the nasal mucosa and lung, inhibited serum OVA-specific IgE levels, and lowered the levels of Th2 cytokines in NALF and BALF, but, increased Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines. Additionally, dietary fiber intake also increased the proportion of Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria, and decreased Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. Levels of probiotic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, were upgraded significantly. Conclusion Long-term deficiency of dietary fiber intake increases the susceptibility to AAD, whereas proper

  2. 1,25-Vitamin D3 Deficiency Induces Albuminuria.

    PubMed

    Sonneveld, Ramon; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Stavenuiter, Andrea W D; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Baltissen, Marijke P A; Dijkman, Henry B; Florquin, Sandrine; Rops, Angelique L; Wetzels, Jack F M; Berden, Jo H M; van der Vlag, Johan; Nijenhuis, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in renal (patho)physiology. Patients with glomerular diseases have an injured renal filtration barrier, leading to proteinuria and reduced renal function. An impaired renal function also leads to 1,25-vitamin D3 deficiency as a result of reduced renal 1α-hydroxylase activity. Vitamin D treatment to reduce proteinuria remains controversial, although there is an inverse correlation between vitamin D levels and proteinuria. Herein, we showed that 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient 25-hydroxy-vitamin-D3-1α-hydroxylase knockout mice and 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient rats develop podocyte injury and renal dysfunction. Glomerular injury was characterized by proteinuria and partial podocyte foot process effacement. Expression of nephrin, podocin, desmin, and transient receptor potential channel C6 in the podocyte was significantly altered in 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient animals. Supplementation with 1,25-vitamin D3 or 1,25-vitamin D2 prevented podocyte effacement or reversed glomerular and tubulointerstitial damage in 1,25-vitamin D3-deficient animals, thereby preserving and restoring renal function, respectively. The effect of 1,25-vitamin D3 deficiency and 1,25-vitamin D3 and 1,25-vitamin D2 repletion on proteinuria could not be explained by hypocalcemia, changes in parathyroid hormone, or fibroblast growth factor 23. This study demonstrates that 1,25-vitamin D3 deficiency directly leads to renal injury in rodents. Translated to human subjects, this would underline the need for early vitamin D supplementation in patients with glomerular disease and chronic renal insufficiency, which might inhibit or potentially reverse renal injury.

  3. Biphasic modulation of atherosclerosis induced by graded dietary copper supplementation in the cholesterol-fed rabbit.

    PubMed

    Lamb, D J; Avades, T Y; Ferns, G A

    2001-10-01

    There has been considerable debate about how copper status may affect the biochemical and cellular processes associated with atherogenesis. We have investigated the effects of graded dietary copper supplementation on processes likely to contribute to atherogenesis, using the cholesterol-fed New Zealand White rabbit model. Rabbits (n = 40) were fed a 0.25-1% cholesterol diet deficient in copper. Animals received either 0, 1, 3 or 20 mg copper/day and were killed after 13 weeks. Plasma cholesterol levels were similar in each dietary group. Aortic concentrations of copper were higher in the 20 mg copper/day animals compared to those receiving 0 mg copper/day (3.70 +/- 0.78 vs. 1.33 +/- 0.46 microg/g wet tissue; P < 0.05). Aortic superoxide dismutase activity was higher in animals receiving 20 mg copper/day (323 +/- 21 IU/mg tissue) compared to the other groups (187 +/- 21; 239 +/- 53; 201 +/- 33 IU/mg tissue) (P > 0.05). En face staining of aortae with oil red O showed that both high copper supplementation (20 mg/day) (67.1 +/- 5.5%) and a deficient diet (0 mg/day) (63.1 +/- 4.8%) was associated with significantly larger lesions (P < 0.05) compared to moderately supplemented animals (1 mg/day and 3 mg/day) (51.3 +/- 6.3 and 42.8 +/- 7.9%). These data indicate that in the cholesterol-fed rabbit, there is an optimal dietary copper intake and that dietary copper deficiency or excess are associated with an increased susceptibility to aortic atherosclerosis. Many Western diets contain insufficient copper and these findings indicate that a moderate dietary copper content may confer a degree of cardiac protection to the human population.

  4. Deficiency of calcium and magnesium induces apoptosis via scavenger receptor BI

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hong; Guo, Ling; Gao, Haiqing; Li, Xiang-An

    2011-01-01

    Aims Cell undergoes apoptosis in stressed status such as intracellular calcium overload or extracellular calcium/magnesium deficiency. The mechanisms of how deficiency of the divalent metal ions induces apoptosis remain to be defined. Scavenger receptor BI (SRBI) is a high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor. Recent studies demonstrated that SR-BI is a stress response molecule which induces apoptosis upon serum deprivation. In this study, we assessed our hypothesis that the deficiency of calcium/magnesium induces apoptosis via SR-BI apoptotic pathway. Main methods We employed CHO cell lines expressing vector and SR-BI to test the effect of SR-BI on apoptosis induced by deficiency of calcium, magnesium and zinc in culture medium. The regain of different metal ions in deficient medium was also performed, respectively. Cell death was detected by morphological changes and quantified by LDH cytotoxicity assay. Apoptosis was also assessed by DNA ladder assay and DNA condensation assay. The SR-BIC323G mutant cells which lack the apoptotic activity of SR-BI were employed to verify the SR-BI-dependent effect on calcium/magnesium induced apoptosis. Key findings The deficiency of calcium/magnesium induced cell apoptosis CHO-SR-BI cells, but not in CHO-vector cells. Moreover, no apoptotic cell death was observed in SR-BIC323G mutant cells, indicating that the deficiency of divalent metal ions induces apoptosis in a SR-BI-dependent manner. Furthermore, the restoration of calcium or magnesium, but not zinc, protected CHO-SR-BI cells from apoptotic cell death, in a dose-dependent fashion. Significance These findings extend our understanding about how calcium and magnesium deficiency induces apoptosis. PMID:21291896

  5. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  6. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  7. Mild vitamin D deficiency and secondary hyperparathyroidism in nursing home patients receiving adequate dietary vitamin D.

    PubMed

    McMurtry, C T; Young, S E; Downs, R W; Adler, R A

    1992-04-01

    To compare the vitamin D metabolite and nutritional status of institutionalized elderly males with a noninstitutionalized control group. Case-control study. Veterans Administration Medical Center Nursing Home (NH) in Richmond, Virginia. Fifty-seven consecutive nursing home subjects were screened. After excluding blacks, those receiving anticonvulsants, glucocorticoids, or vitamin supplements, and those with liver or renal failure (creatinine greater than 1.5 mg/dL), 35 subjects were enrolled, and 22 completed the study. The noninstitutionalized control group (n = 18) consisted of consecutive volunteers, meeting the above criteria, from either a senior citizen group or a geriatric clinic. The serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D level in the NH residents was significantly lower than in community dwellers (17.4 +/- 5.2 ng/mL vs 31.2 pg/mL +/- 8.0 ng/mL, P less than 0.0001). No significant difference was demonstrated in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels (36.5 pg/mL +/- 10.5 in NH residents vs 42.0 pg/mL +/- 11.1 in controls). In the NH group PTH levels were inversely correlated with 25 OHD levels (P less than 0.008) and positively correlated with length of stay in the NH (P less than 0.016). There was no significant seasonal variation in vitamin D metabolite levels in the NH group. In the NH patients, the mean dietary intake of vitamin D was 232 +/- 378 mg/day and of calories was 1811 +/- 447 kcal/day. Despite apparently adequate calories, calcium, and vitamin D intake, hypovitaminosis D with compensatory PTH elevations occurs, regardless of season, in the nursing home population.

  8. A calcitonin receptor (CALCR) single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with growth performance and bone integrity in response to dietary phosphorus deficiency.

    PubMed

    Alexander, L S; Qu, A; Cutler, S A; Mahajan, A; Rothschild, M F; Cai, W; Dekkers, J C; Stahl, C H

    2010-03-01

    Although concerns over the environmental impact of excess P in the excreta from pig production and governmental regulations have driven research toward reducing dietary supplementation of P to swine diets for over a decade, recent dramatic increases in feed costs have further motivated researchers to identify means to further reduce dietary P supplementation. We have demonstrated that genetic background impacts P utilization in young pigs and have identified genetic polymorphisms in several target genes related to mineral utilization. In this study, we examined the impact of a SNP in the calcitonin receptor gene (CALCR) on P utilization in growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 36 gilts representing the 3 genotypes identified by this CALCR SNP (11, 12, and 22) were fed a P-adequate (PA) or a marginally P-deficient (approximately 20% less available P; PD) diet for 14 wk. As expected, P deficiency reduced plasma P concentration, bone strength, and mineral content (P < 0.05). However, the dietary P deficiency was mild enough to not affect the growth performance of these pigs. A genotype x dietary P interaction (P < 0.05) was observed in measures of bone integrity and mineral content, with the greatest reduction in bone strength and mineral content due to dietary P deficiency being associated with the allele 1. In Exp. 2, 168 pigs from a control line and low residual feed intake (RFI) line were genotyped for the CALCR SNP and fed a PA diet. As expected, pigs from the low RFI line consumed less feed but also gained less BW when compared with the control line (P < 0.05). Although ADFI did not differ between genotypes, pigs having the 11 genotype gained less BW (P < 0.05) than pigs having the 12 or 22 genotypes. Pigs of the 11 and 12 genotypes had bones that tolerated greater load when compared with animals having the 22 genotype (P < 0.05). A similar trend was observed in bone modulus and ash % (P < 0.10). These data are supportive of the association of this CALCR SNP with bone

  9. Interleukin-10 deficiency aggravates angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Woo-Young; Cha, Hye-Na; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, In-Kye; Park, So-Young

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the role of interleukin (IL)-10 in angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Angiotensin II was infused subcutaneously (1.1mg/kg/day) for one week in IL-10 knockout and wild-type mice, after which cardiac function and hypertrophy were assessed by echocardiogram. IL-10 gene expression in the heart was increased by angiotensin II infusion. Plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and gene expression of BNP in the heart were increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and plasma BNP levels were further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. IL-10 deficiency increased the left ventricular dimension, whereas treatment with angiotensin II increased heart weight. Angiotensin II significantly reduced cardiac function in IL-10 knockout mice compared with wild-type mice. Gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II infusion, and these increases were further enhanced by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Gene expression of collagen I/III and collagen III protein levels were increased by angiotensin II but not by IL-10 deficiency. Gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase2/9 was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II, and this expression was further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Akt phosphorylation was increased by IL-10 deficiency or angiotensin II and further increased by IL-10 deficiency with angiotensin II. Phosphorylation of p38 was increased by IL-10 deficiency. These results suggest that IL-10 deficiency causes deterioration in cardiac functions in angiotensin II-infused mice, suggesting that IL-10 plays a protective role against angiotensin II-induced cardiac remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency impairs hippocampal myelinated growth in lactational rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Yi; Dong, Jing; Wang, Yuan; Min, Hui; Song, Binbin; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency causes neurological deficits and impairments of brain function in offspring. Hypothyroxinemia is prevalent in developing and developed countries alike. However, the mechanism underlying these deficits remains less well known. Given that the myelin plays an important role in learning and memory function, we hypothesize that hippocampal myelinated growth may be impaired in rat offspring exposed to hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency. To test this hypothesis, the female Wistar rats were used and four experimental groups were prepared: (1) control; (2) maternal mild iodine deficiency diet inducing hypothyroxinemia; (3) hypothyroidism induced by maternal severe iodine deficiency diet; (4) hypothyroidism induced by maternal methimazole water. The rats were fed the diet from 3 months before pregnancy to the end of lactation. Our results showed that the physiological changes occuring in the hippocampal myelin were altered in the mild iodine deficiency group as indicated by the results of immunofluorescence of myelin basic proteins on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Moreover, hypothyroxinemia reduced the expressions of oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 and myelin-related proteins in the treatments on postnatal day 14 and postnatal day 21. Our data suggested that hypothyroxinemia induced by maternal mild iodine deficiency may impair myelinated growth of the offspring.

  11. NO synthase-generated NO acts downstream of auxin in regulating Fe-deficiency-induced root branching that enhances Fe-deficiency tolerance in tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chong Wei; Shamsi, Imran Haider; Luo, Bing Fang; Lin, Xian Yong

    2011-01-01

    In response to Fe-deficiency, various dicots increase their root branching which contributes to the enhancement of ferric-chelate reductase activity. Whether this Fe-deficiency-induced response eventually enhances the ability of the plant to tolerate Fe-deficiency or not is still unclear and evidence is also scarce about the signals triggering it. In this study, it was found that the SPAD-chlorophyll meter values of newly developed leaves of four tomato (Solanum lycocarpum) lines, namely line227/1 and Roza and their two reciprocal F1 hybrid lines, were positively correlated with their root branching under Fe-deficient conditions. It indicates that Fe-deficiency-induced root branching is critical for plant tolerance to Fe-deficiency. In another tomato line, Micro-Tom, the increased root branching in Fe-deficient plants was accompanied by the elevation of endogenous auxin and nitric oxide (NO) levels, and was suppressed either by the auxin transport inhibitors NPA and TIBA or the NO scavenger cPTIO. On the other hand, root branching in Fe-sufficient plants was induced either by the auxin analogues NAA and 2,4-D or the NO donors NONOate or SNP. Further, in Fe-deficient plants, NONOate restored the NPA-terminated root branching, but NAA did not affect the cPTIO-terminated root branching. Fe-deficiency-induced root branching was inhibited by the NO-synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME, but was not affected by the nitrate reductase (NR) inhibitor NH4+, tungstate or glycine. Taking all of these findings together, a novel function and signalling pathway of Fe-deficiency-induced root branching is presented where NOS-generated rather than NR-generated NO acts downstream of auxin in regulating this Fe-deficiency-induced response, which enhances the plant tolerance to Fe-deficiency. PMID:21511908

  12. MGAT2 deficiency ameliorates high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance by inhibiting intestinal fat absorption in mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Resynthesis of triglycerides in enterocytes of the small intestine plays a critical role in the absorption of dietary fat. Acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 (MGAT2) is highly expressed in the small intestine and catalyzes the synthesis of diacylglycerol from monoacylglycerol and acyl-CoA. To determine the physiological importance of MGAT2 in metabolic disorders and lipid metabolism in the small intestine, we constructed and analyzed Mgat2-deficient mice. Results In oral fat tolerance test (OFTT), Mgat2-deficient mice absorbed less fat into the circulation. When maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD), Mgat2-deficient mice were protected from HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Heterozygote (Mgat2+/−) mice had an intermediate phenotype between Mgat2+/+ and Mgat2−/− and were partially protected from metabolic disorders. Despite of a decrease in fat absorption in the Mgat2-deficient mice, lipid levels in the feces and small intestine were comparable among the genotypes. Oxygen consumption was increased in the Mgat2-deficient mice when maintained on an HFD. A prominent upregulation of the genes involved in fatty acid oxidation was observed in the duodenum but not in the liver of the Mgat2-deficient mice. Conclusion These results suggest that MGAT2 has a pivotal role in lipid metabolism in the small intestine, and the inhibition of MGAT2 activity may be a promising strategy for the treatment of obesity-related metabolic disorders. PMID:22698140

  13. Effect of dietary fiber on morphine-induced constipation in rats.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Takashi; Nakao, Makoto; Hoshi, Seiko; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Inagaki, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Mikio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2002-06-01

    Morphine is used to alleviate chronic cancer pain. However, constipation is a major adverse effect that often detracts from the patient's quality of life. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of dietary fiber on morphine-induced constipation. Rats were fed on a normal diet or one containing either 10% or 20% apple fiber for two weeks before morphine was administered. In the control diet group, the fecal number and dry weight were decreased by treating with morphine in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the motility of the small and large intestines was reduced. The fecal number and weight were increased and the colon motility was promoted by dietary fiber, regardless of whether morphine was being administered. The dietary fiber increased the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the cecum. These results suggest that dietary fiber has a preventative effect on morphine-induced constipation by increasing SCFAs in the cecum, and thereby promoting colon motility in rats.

  14. Thiamine Deficiency Induced Neurochemical, Neuroanatomical, and Neuropsychological Alterations: A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans. PMID:24235882

  15. Thiamine deficiency induced neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological alterations: a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional deficiency can cause, mainly in chronic alcoholic subjects, the Wernicke encephalopathy and its chronic neurological sequela, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS). Long-term chronic ethanol abuse results in hippocampal and cortical cell loss. Thiamine deficiency also alters principally hippocampal- and frontal cortical-dependent neurochemistry; moreover in WKS patients, important pathological damage to the diencephalon can occur. In fact, the amnesic syndrome typical for WKS is mainly due to the damage in the diencephalic-hippocampal circuitry, including thalamic nuclei and mammillary bodies. The loss of cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain region results in decreased cholinergic input to the hippocampus and the cortex and reduced choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase activities and function, as well as in acetylcholine receptor downregulation within these brain regions. In this narrative review, we will focus on the neurochemical, neuroanatomical, and neuropsychological studies shedding light on the effects of thiamine deficiency in experimental models and in humans.

  16. Dietary nitrite ameliorates renal injury in L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Tomita, Shuhei; Ishizawa, Keisuke; Abe, Shinji; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2010-02-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) has numerous important functions in the kidney, and long-term blockage of nitric oxide synthases in rats by L-NAME results in severe hypertension and progressive kidney damage. On the other hand, NO production seems to be low in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and NO deficiency may play a role in CKD progression. In this review, we summarized the mechanisms of amelioration of renal injury induced by L-NAME treated rats by treatment of nitrite. First, we demonstrate whether orally-administrated nitrite-derived NO can shift to the circulation. When 3mg/kg body weight Na(15)NO(2) was orally administered to rats, an apparent EPR signal derived from Hb(15)NO (A(z)=23.4 gauss) appeared in the blood, indicating that orally ingested nitrite can be a source of NO in vivo. Next, in order to clarify the capacity of nitrite to prevent renal disease, we administered low-dose nitrite (LDN: 0.1mg of sodium nitrite in 1L of drinking water), medium-dose nitrite (MDN: 1mg sodium nitrite/L, which corresponds to the amount of nitrite ingested by vegetarians), or high-dose nitrite (HDN: 10mg sodium nitrite/L) to rats simultaneously with L-NAME (1 g l-NAME/L) for 8 weeks, then examined the blood NO level as a hemoglobin-NO adduct (iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin) using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, urinary protein excretion, and renal histological changes at the end of the experiment. It was found that oral administration of MDN and HDN but not LDN increased the blood iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin concentration to the normal level, ameliorated the L-NAME-induced proteinuria, and reduced renal histological damage. The findings demonstrate that chronic administration of a mid-level dietary dose of nitrite restores the circulating iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin levels reduced by L-NAME and that maintenance of the circulating iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin level in a controlled range protects against L-NAME-induced renal injury. Taking these findings together, we

  17. Drug-induced haemolysis in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T K; Todd, D; Tso, S C

    1976-01-01

    People with the variants of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) deficiency common in the southern Chinese (Canton, B(-)Chinese, and Hong Kong-Pokfulam) have a moderate shortening of red-cell survival but no anaemia when they are in the steady state. With a cross-transfusion technique, primaquine, nitrofurantoin, and large doses of aspirin were found to aggravate the haemolysis while sulphamethoxazole did so only in some people. Individual differences in drug metabolism may be the reason for this. Many commonly used drugs reported to accentuate haemolysis in GPD deficiency did not shorten red-cell survival. PMID:990860

  18. Prolonged Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess Does Not Globally Affect Selenoprotein Gene Expression and/or Protein Production in Various Tissues of Pigs123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Qiaoshan; Tang, Jiayong; Li, Ke; Xia, Xin-Jie; Wang, Kang-Ning; Li, Kui; Lei, Xin Gen

    2012-01-01

    We previously determined the effects of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency or excess on mRNA abundance of 12 selenoprotein genes in pig tissues. In this study, we determined the effect of dietary Se on mRNA levels of the remaining porcine selenoprotein genes along with protein production of 4 selenoproteins (Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels) and body glucose homeostasis. Weanling male pigs (n = 24) were fed a Se-deficient (<0.02 mg Se/kg), basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.3, or 3.0 mg Se/kg as Se-enriched yeast (Angel Yeast) for 16 wk. Although mRNA abundance of the 13 selenoproteins in 10 tissues responded to dietary Se in 3 patterns, there was no common regulation for any given gene across all tissues or for any given tissue across all genes. Dietary Se affected (P < 0.05) 2, 3, 3, 5, 6, 7, 7, and 8 selenoprotein genes in muscle, hypothalamus, liver, kidney, heart, spleen, thyroid, and pituitary, respectively. Protein abundance of Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels in 6 tissues was regulated (P < 0.05) by dietary Se concentrations in 3 ways. Compared with those fed 0.3 mg Se/kg, pigs fed 3.0 mg Se/kg became hyperinsulinemic (P < 0.05) and had lower (P < 0.05) tissue levels of serine/threonine protein kinase. In conclusion, dietary Se exerted no global regulation of gene transcripts or protein levels of individual selenoproteins across porcine tissues. Pigs may be a good model for studying mechanisms related to the potential prodiabetic risk of high-Se intake in humans. PMID:22739382

  19. Prolonged dietary selenium deficiency or excess does not globally affect selenoprotein gene expression and/or protein production in various tissues of pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Qiaoshan; Tang, Jiayong; Li, Ke; Xia, Xin-Jie; Wang, Kang-Ning; Li, Kui; Lei, Xin Gen

    2012-08-01

    We previously determined the effects of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency or excess on mRNA abundance of 12 selenoprotein genes in pig tissues. In this study, we determined the effect of dietary Se on mRNA levels of the remaining porcine selenoprotein genes along with protein production of 4 selenoproteins (Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels) and body glucose homeostasis. Weanling male pigs (n = 24) were fed a Se-deficient (<0.02 mg Se/kg), basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.3, or 3.0 mg Se/kg as Se-enriched yeast (Angel Yeast) for 16 wk. Although mRNA abundance of the 13 selenoproteins in 10 tissues responded to dietary Se in 3 patterns, there was no common regulation for any given gene across all tissues or for any given tissue across all genes. Dietary Se affected (P < 0.05) 2, 3, 3, 5, 6, 7, 7, and 8 selenoprotein genes in muscle, hypothalamus, liver, kidney, heart, spleen, thyroid, and pituitary, respectively. Protein abundance of Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels in 6 tissues was regulated (P < 0.05) by dietary Se concentrations in 3 ways. Compared with those fed 0.3 mg Se/kg, pigs fed 3.0 mg Se/kg became hyperinsulinemic (P < 0.05) and had lower (P < 0.05) tissue levels of serine/threonine protein kinase. In conclusion, dietary Se exerted no global regulation of gene transcripts or protein levels of individual selenoproteins across porcine tissues. Pigs may be a good model for studying mechanisms related to the potential prodiabetic risk of high-Se intake in humans.

  20. Long-lasting cognitive, physiological and hematological effects in rehabilitated, early dietary iron-deficiency adult rats, and improvement by treatment with a mixture of essential fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Yehuda, Shlomo; Rabinovitz, Sharon; Carasso, Ralph L; Mostofsky, David I

    2008-08-01

    Despite some successful interventions and the large research efforts on this topic, iron deficiency and anemia remain the most common nutritional disorders in the world today. Recently, several researchers indicated that early, induced, iron deficiency produced a long-lasting effect even if the hemoglobin and iron levels returned to normal values. Recent human studies showed that 10-12-year-old children, who were iron deficient at age 1 year, showed lower IQ scores. In this study, we tried to imitate this condition by inducing iron deficiency in rats at age 21 days, for 28 days, and then tested the rats on day 120. The former iron-deficient rats had normal hematological and motor activity values, and normal thermoregulatory response, but they were very slow learners compared to the control rats. Treatment with a mixture of essential fatty acids improved their learning capacity.

  1. Cd-induced Cu deficiency responses in Arabidopsis thaliana: are phytochelatins involved?

    PubMed

    Gielen, Heidi; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2017-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) exposure can disturb the homeostasis of essential elements. In Arabidopsis thaliana, Cd induces a squamosa promoter binding protein-like 7 (SPL7)-dependent Cu deficiency response. We investigated how Cd induces a Cu deficiency response. The Cu deficiency response consists of the active SPL7 transcription factor binding to GTAC motifs in promoters of among others several Cu transporters, a Cu chaperone, and cupro-miRNAs to regulate Cu homeostasis. We demonstrated that the addition of supplemental Cu to Cd-exposed A. thaliana plants diminished the Cu deficiency response in roots, while it even disappeared in leaves. Exposure of plants to Cd in combination with extra Cu reduced Cd levels in both roots and leaves resulting in an improved cellular oxidative state. Furthermore, we demonstrated a role for phytochelatins (PCs) in the Cd-induced Cu deficiency response, because it was reduced in roots of cad1-3 mutant plants exposed to Cd. In conclusion, a working mechanism is provided in which it is suggested that Cd increases PC levels that can complex both Cd and Cu. This results in cellular Cu deficiency and subsequently the activation of SPL7 and hence the induction of the Cu deficiency response.

  2. Elevated levels of plasma homocysteine, deficiencies in dietary folic acid and uracil-DNA glycosylase impair learning in a mouse model of vascular cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, Nafisa M; Farr, Tracy D; Lips, Janet; Khalil, Ahmed A; Boehm-Sturm, Philipp; Foddis, Marco; Harms, Christoph; Füchtemeier, Martina; Dirnagl, Ulrich

    2015-04-15

    Dietary deficiencies in folic acid result in elevated levels of plasma homocysteine, which has been associated with the development of dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders. Previously, we have shown that elevated levels of plasma homocysteine in mice deficient for a DNA repair enzyme, uracil-DNA glycosylase (UNG), result in neurodegeneration. The goal of this study was to evaluate how deficiencies in folic acid and UNG along with elevated levels of homocysteine affect vascular cognitive impairment, via chronic hypoperfursion in an animal model. Ung(+/+) and Ung(-/-) mice were placed on either control (CD) or folic acid deficient (FADD) diets. Six weeks later, the mice either underwent implantation of microcoils around both common carotid arteries. Post-operatively, behavioral tests began at 3-weeks, angiography was measured after 5-weeks using MRI to assess vasculature and at completion of study plasma and brain tissue was collected for analysis. Learning impairments in the Morris water maze (MWM) were observed only in hypoperfused Ung(-/-) FADD mice and these mice had significantly higher plasma homocysteine concentrations. Interestingly, Ung(+/+) FADD produced significant remodeling of the basilar artery and arterial vasculature. Increased expression of GFAP was observed in the dentate gyrus of Ung(-/-) hypoperfused and FADD sham mice. Chronic hypoperfusion resulted in increased cortical MMP-9 protein levels of FADD hypoperfused mice regardless of genotypes. These results suggest that elevated levels of homocysteine only, as a result of dietary folic acid deficiency, don't lead to memory impairments and neurobiochemical changes. Rather a combination of either chronic hypoperfusion or UNG deficiency is required.

  3. A critical reappraisal of dietary practices in methylmalonic acidemia raises concerns about the safety of medical foods. Part 2: cobalamin C deficiency.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Irini; Myles, Jennifer G; Sloan, Jennifer L; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Morava, Eva; Strauss, Kevin A; Morton, Holmes; Venditti, Charles P

    2016-04-01

    Cobalamin C (cblC) deficiency impairs the biosynthesis of 5'-deoxyadenosyl-adenosyl- and methyl-cobalamin, resulting in methylmalonic acidemia combined with hyperhomocysteinemia and hypomethioninemia. However, some patients with cblC deficiency are treated with medical foods, devoid of methionine and high in leucine content, that are formulated for patients with isolated propionate oxidative defects. We examined the effects of imbalanced branched-chain amino acid intake on growth outcomes in cblC-deficient patients. Dietary intake was correlated with biochemical, anthropometric, and body composition measurements and other disease parameters in a cohort of 28 patients with early-onset cblC deficiency. Protein-restricted diets were followed by 21% of the patients, whereas 32% received medical foods. Patients on protein-restricted diets had lower height-for-age z-score (P = 0.034), whereas patients consuming medical foods had lower head circumference Z-scores (P = 0.037), plasma methionine concentrations (P = 0.001), and predicted methionine influx through the blood-brain barrier Z-score (-1.29 vs. -0.0617; P = 0.007). The combination of age at diagnosis, a history of seizures, and the leucine-to-valine dietary intake ratio best predicted head circumference Z-score based on multiple regression modeling (R(2) = 0.945). Patients with cblC deficiency treated with medical foods designed for isolated methylmalonic acidemia are at risk for iatrogenic methionine deficiency that could adversely affect brain growth and development.Genet Med 18 4, 396-404.

  4. Compared with saturated fatty acids, dietary monounsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates increase atherosclerosis and VLDL cholesterol levels in LDL receptor-deficient, but not apolipoprotein E-deficient, mice.

    PubMed

    Merkel, M; Velez-Carrasco, W; Hudgins, L C; Breslow, J L

    2001-11-06

    Heart-healthy dietary recommendations include decreasing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). However, the relative benefit of replacing SFA with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), or carbohydrates (CARB) is still being debated. We have used two mouse models of atherosclerosis, low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLRKO) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoEKO) mice to measure the effects of four isocaloric diets enriched with either SFA, MUFA, PUFA, or CARB on atherosclerotic lesion area and lipoprotein levels. In LDLRKO mice, compared with the SFA diet, the MUFA and CARB diets significantly increased atherosclerosis in both sexes, but the PUFA diet had no effect. The MUFA and CARB diets also increased very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) in males and VLDL-C levels in females. Analysis of data from LDLRKO mice on all diets showed that atherosclerotic lesion area correlated positively with VLDL-C levels (males: r = 0.47, P < 0.005; females: r = 0.52, P < 0.001). In contrast, in apoEKO mice there were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerosis in either sex. Compared with the SFA diet, the CARB diet significantly decreased VLDL-C in males and the MUFA, PUFA, and CARB diets decreased VLDL-C and the CARB diet decreased LDL-C in females. In summary, in LDLRKO mice the replacement of dietary SFA by either MUFA or CARB causes a proportionate increase in both atherosclerotic lesion area and VLDL-C. There were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerotic lesion area in apoEKO mice. These results are surprising and suggest that, depending on the underlying genotype, dietary MUFA and CARB can actually increase atherosclerosis susceptibility, probably by raising VLDL-C levels through a non-LDL receptor, apoE-dependent pathway.

  5. Compared with saturated fatty acids, dietary monounsaturated fatty acids and carbohydrates increase atherosclerosis and VLDL cholesterol levels in LDL receptor-deficient, but not apolipoprotein E-deficient, mice

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Martin; Velez-Carrasco, Wanda; Hudgins, Lisa C.; Breslow, Jan L.

    2001-01-01

    Heart-healthy dietary recommendations include decreasing the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). However, the relative benefit of replacing SFA with monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), or carbohydrates (CARB) is still being debated. We have used two mouse models of atherosclerosis, low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLRKO) and apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoEKO) mice to measure the effects of four isocaloric diets enriched with either SFA, MUFA, PUFA, or CARB on atherosclerotic lesion area and lipoprotein levels. In LDLRKO mice, compared with the SFA diet, the MUFA and CARB diets significantly increased atherosclerosis in both sexes, but the PUFA diet had no effect. The MUFA and CARB diets also increased very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) in males and VLDL-C levels in females. Analysis of data from LDLRKO mice on all diets showed that atherosclerotic lesion area correlated positively with VLDL-C levels (males: r = 0.47, P < 0.005; females: r = 0.52, P < 0.001). In contrast, in apoEKO mice there were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerosis in either sex. Compared with the SFA diet, the CARB diet significantly decreased VLDL-C in males and the MUFA, PUFA, and CARB diets decreased VLDL-C and the CARB diet decreased LDL-C in females. In summary, in LDLRKO mice the replacement of dietary SFA by either MUFA or CARB causes a proportionate increase in both atherosclerotic lesion area and VLDL-C. There were no significant dietary effects on atherosclerotic lesion area in apoEKO mice. These results are surprising and suggest that, depending on the underlying genotype, dietary MUFA and CARB can actually increase atherosclerosis susceptibility, probably by raising VLDL-C levels through a non-LDL receptor, apoE-dependent pathway. PMID:11606787

  6. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Chronic Starvation and Selenium Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) has been rarely documented as a cause of cardiovascular abnormalities, including dilated cardiomyopathy. Selenium is responsible for antioxidant defense mechanisms in cardiomyocytes, and its deficiency in the setting of PEM and disease related malnutrition (DRM) may lead to exacerbation of the dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a rare case of a fourteen-year-old boy who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure due to DRM and PEM (secondary to chronic starvation) along with severe selenium deficiency. An initial echocardiogram showed severely depressed systolic function consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Aggressive nutritional support and replacement of selenium and congestive heart failure medications that included diuretics and ACE inhibitors with the addition of carvedilol led to normalization of the cardiac function within four weeks. He continues to have significant weight gain and is currently completely asymptomatic from a cardiovascular standpoint. PMID:27994905

  7. Dietary supplementation with apple juice decreases endogenous amyloid-beta levels in murine brain.

    PubMed

    Chan, Amy; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with age-related neurodegeneration. We demonstrate herein that dietary deficiency in folate and vitamin E, coupled pro-oxidant stress induced by dietary iron, increased amyloid-beta (Abeta) levels in normal adult mice. This increase was potentiated by apolipoprotein E (ApoE) deficiency as shown by treatment of transgenic mice homozygously lacking murine ApoE. Dietary supplementation with apple juice concentrate in drinking water alleviated the increase in Abeta for both mouse genotypes. These findings provide further evidence linking nutritional and genetic risk factors for age-related neurodegeneration, and underscore that dietary supplementation may be useful to augment therapeutic approaches.

  8. Raman studies of gluten proteins aggregation induced by dietary fibres.

    PubMed

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Miś, Antoni; Kowalski, Radosław; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between gluten proteins and dietary fibre preparations are crucial in the baking industry. The addition of dietary fibre to bread causes significant reduction in its quality which is influenced by changes in the structure of gluten proteins. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was applied to determine changes in the structure of gluten proteins modified by seven dietary fibres. The commercially available gluten proteins without starch were mixed with the fibres in three concentrations: 3%, 6% and 9%. The obtained results showed that all fibres, regardless of their origin, caused the same kind of changes i.e. decrease in the α-helix content with a simultaneous increase in the content of antiparallel-β-sheet. The results indicated that presence of cellulose was the probable cause of these changes, and lead to aggregation or abnormal folding of the gluten proteins. Other changes observed in the gluten structure concerning β-structures, conformation of disulphide bridges, and aromatic amino acid environment, depended on the fibres chemical composition.

  9. Fe deficiency induced changes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuwen; Xu, Chao; Li, Kang; Cai, Xiaojie; Wu, Min; Chen, Guoxiang

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important abiotic stress that limits productivity of crops all over the world. We selected a hybrid rice (Oryza sativa L.), LYPJ, which is super high-yield and widely cultured in China, to investigate changes in the components and structure of thylakoid membranes and photosynthetic performance in response to iron deficiency. Our results demonstrated that photosystem I (PSI) is the primary target for iron deficiency, while the changes in photosystem II (PSII) are important for rebuilding a balance in disrupted energy utilization and dissipation caused by differential degradation of photosynthetic components. The result of immunoblot analysis suggested that the core subunit PsaA declined drastically, while PsbA remained relatively stable. Furthermore, several organizational changes of the photosynthetic apparatus were found by BN-PAGE, including a marked decrease in the PSI core complexes, the Cytb 6 /f complex, and the trimeric form of the LHCII antenna, consistent with the observed unstacking grana. The fluorescence induction analysis indicated a descending PSII activity with energy dissipation enhanced markedly. In addition, we proposed that the crippled CO2 assimilation could be compensated by the enhanced of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), which is suggested by the decreased ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and photosynthetic efficiency.

  10. Dopamine alleviates nutrient deficiency-induced stress in Malus hupehensis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bowen; Li, Cuiying; Ma, Changqing; Wei, Zhiwei; Wang, Qian; Huang, Dong; Chen, Qi; Li, Chao; Ma, Fengwang

    2017-10-01

    Dopamine mediates many physiological processes in plants. We investigated its role in regulating growth, root system architecture, nutrient uptake, and responses to nutrient deficiencies in Malus hupehensis Rehd. Under a nutrient deficiency, plants showed significant reductions in growth, chlorophyll concentrations, and net photosynthesis, along with disruptions in nutrient uptake, transport, and distribution. However, pretreatment with 100 μM dopamine markedly alleviated such inhibitions. Supplementation with that compound enabled plants to maintain their photosynthetic capacity and development of the root system while promoting the uptake of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, and B, altering the way in which those nutrients were partitioned throughout the plant. The addition of dopamine up-regulated genes for antioxidant enzymes involved in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle (MdcAPX, MdcGR, MdMDHAR, MdDHAR-1, and MdDHAR-2) but down-regulated genes for senescence (SAG12, PAO, and MdHXK). These results indicate that exogenous dopamine has an important antioxidant and anti-senescence effect that might be helpful for improving nutrient uptake. Our findings demonstrate that dopamine offers new opportunities for its use in agriculture, especially when addressing the problem of nutrient deficiencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary Fructose Inhibits Intestinal Calcium Absorption and Induces Vitamin D Insufficiency in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Douard, Veronique; Asgerally, Abbas; Sabbagh, Yves; Sugiura, Shozo; Shapses, Sue A.; Casirola, Donatella

    2010-01-01

    Renal disease leads to perturbations in calcium and phosphate homeostasis and vitamin D metabolism. Dietary fructose aggravates chronic kidney disease (CKD), but whether it also worsens CKD-induced derangements in calcium and phosphate homeostasis is unknown. Here, we fed rats diets containing 60% glucose or fructose for 1 mo beginning 6 wk after 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. Nephrectomized rats had markedly greater kidney weight, blood urea nitrogen, and serum levels of creatinine, phosphate, and calcium-phosphate product; dietary fructose significantly exacerbated all of these outcomes. Expression and activity of intestinal phosphate transporter, which did not change after nephrectomy or dietary fructose, did not correlate with hyperphosphatemia in 5/6-nephrectomized rats. Intestinal transport of calcium, however, decreased with dietary fructose, probably because of fructose-mediated downregulation of calbindin 9k. Serum calcium levels, however, were unaffected by nephrectomy and diet. Finally, only 5/6-nephrectomized rats that received dietary fructose demonstrated marked reductions in 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels, despite upregulation of 1α-hydroxylase. In summary, excess dietary fructose inhibits intestinal calcium absorption, induces marked vitamin D insufficiency in CKD, and exacerbates other classical symptoms of the disease. Future studies should evaluate the relevance of monitoring fructose consumption in patients with CKD. PMID:19959720

  12. Effect of dietary sodium on vasoconstriction and eNOS-mediated vascular relaxation in caveolin-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pojoga, Luminita H; Yao, Tham M; Sinha, Sumi; Ross, Reagan L; Lin, Jeffery C; Raffetto, Joseph D; Adler, Gail K; Williams, Gordon H; Khalil, Raouf A

    2008-03-01

    with WT mice on the HS diet, and the genotypic differences were less apparent during the LS diet. Thus Cav-1 deficiency during the HS diet is associated with decreased vasoconstriction, increased vascular relaxation, and increased eNOS expression and activity, and these effects are altered during the LS diet. The data support the hypothesis that endothelial Cav-1, likely through an effect on eNOS activity, plays a prominent role in the regulation of vascular function during substantial changes in dietary sodium intake.

  13. Heavy Metals Induce Iron Deficiency Responses at Different Hierarchic and Regulatory Levels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In plants, the excess of several heavy metals mimics iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis, indicating a disturbance in Fe homeostasis. To examine the level at which heavy metals interfere with Fe deficiency responses, we carried out an in-depth characterization of Fe-related physiological, regulatory, and morphological responses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) exposed to heavy metals. Enhanced zinc (Zn) uptake closely mimicked Fe deficiency by leading to low chlorophyll but high ferric-chelate reductase activity and coumarin release. These responses were not caused by Zn-inhibited Fe uptake via IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER (IRT1). Instead, Zn simulated the transcriptional response of typical Fe-regulated genes, indicating that Zn affects Fe homeostasis at the level of Fe sensing. Excess supplies of cobalt and nickel altered root traits in a different way from Fe deficiency, inducing only transient Fe deficiency responses, which were characterized by a lack of induction of the ethylene pathway. Cadmium showed a rather inconsistent influence on Fe deficiency responses at multiple levels. By contrast, manganese evoked weak Fe deficiency responses in wild-type plants but strongly exacerbated chlorosis in irt1 plants, indicating that manganese antagonized Fe mainly at the level of transport. These results show that the investigated heavy metals modulate Fe deficiency responses at different hierarchic and regulatory levels and that the interaction of metals with physiological and morphological Fe deficiency responses is uncoupled. Thus, this study not only emphasizes the importance of assessing heavy metal toxicities at multiple levels but also provides a new perspective on how Fe deficiency contributes to the toxic action of individual heavy metals. PMID:28500270

  14. RESISTANT PROPERTIES OF AZOTOBACTER CYSTS INDUCED IN RESPONSE TO MINERAL DEFICIENCIES

    PubMed Central

    Layne, Joseph S.; Johnson, Emmett J.

    1964-01-01

    Layne, Joseph S. (University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson), and Emmett J. Johnson. Resistant properties of Azotobacter cysts induced in response to mineral deficiencies. J. Bacteriol. 88:956–959. 1964.—Cysts produced in response to mineral deficiencies, and apparently lacking the characteristic exine and intine, possess the same degree of resistance to heat, mechanical disruption, desiccation, the action of lysozyme, and the combined action of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and lysozyme as do butanol-induced cysts. Slight differences in the behavior of the two varieties of cysts toward EDTA were observed. Since no significant differences seem to exist in resistant properties between cysts induced in response to mineral deficiencies and n-butanol-induced cysts, it would seem that the current concepts attributing the resistant properties of the Azotobacter cyst to the exine and intine require modification. PMID:14219059

  15. Induction of IRT1 by the nickel-induced iron-deficient response in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Sho; Aisu, Ayaka; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2012-01-01

    Excessive amounts of nickel (Ni) can be toxic for plants. Recently, we reported that IRT1, the primary iron (Fe) uptake transporter in roots, meditates excess Ni accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We also found that Ni exposure increases IRT1 expression in roots, suggesting that Ni uptake is further induced by Ni stress. Here, we show that Ni exposure induces expression of not only IRT1, but also FRO2, a ferric reductase in the root epidermis, and FIT, a transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in Fe homeostasis including IRT1 and FRO2. This result suggests that Ni accumulation induces an Fe-deficient response and leads to the induction of IRT1. Our findings suggest that excess Ni causes Fe deficiency at the molecular level and induces Fe deficiency signaling in plant cells. PMID:22476458

  16. Induction of IRT1 by the nickel-induced iron-deficient response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Sho; Aisu, Ayaka; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2012-03-01

    Excessive amounts of nickel (Ni) can be toxic for plants. Recently, we reported that IRT1, the primary iron (Fe) uptake transporter in roots, meditates excess Ni accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. We also found that Ni exposure increases IRT1 expression in roots, suggesting that Ni uptake is further induced by Ni stress. Here, we show that Ni exposure induces expression of not only IRT1, but also FRO2, a ferric reductase in the root epidermis, and FIT, a transcription factor regulating the expression of genes involved in Fe homeostasis including IRT1 and FRO2. This result suggests that Ni accumulation induces an Fe-deficient response and leads to the induction of IRT1. Our findings suggest that excess Ni causes Fe deficiency at the molecular level and induces Fe deficiency signaling in plant cells.

  17. Genetic AVP deficiency abolishes cold-induced diuresis but does not attenuate cold-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-06-01

    Chronic cold exposure causes hypertension and diuresis. The aim of this study was to determine whether vasopressin (AVP) plays a role in cold-induced hypertension and diuresis. Two groups of Long-Evans (LE) and two groups of homozygous AVP-deficient Brattleboro (VD) rats were used. Blood pressure (BP) was not different among the four groups during a 2-wk control period at room temperature (25 degrees C, warm). After the control period, one LE group and one VD group were exposed to cold (5 degrees C); the remaining groups were kept at room temperature. BP and body weight were measured weekly during exposure to cold. Food intake, water intake, urine output, and urine osmolality were measured during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of cold exposure. At the end of week 5, all animals were killed and blood was collected for measurement of plasma AVP. Kidneys were removed for measurement of renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2) protein expression. BP of LE and VD rats increased significantly by week 2 of cold exposure and reached a high level by week 5. BP elevations developed at approximately the same rate and to the same degree in LE and VD rats. AVP deficiency significantly increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality. Chronic cold exposure increased urine output and solute-free water clearance and decreased urine osmolality in LE rats, indicating that cold exposure caused diuresis in LE rats. Cold exposure failed to affect these parameters in VD rats, suggesting that the AVP system is responsible for cold-induced diuresis. Cold exposure did not alter plasma AVP in LE rats. Renal medulla V2 receptor mRNA and AQP-2 protein expression levels were decreased significantly in the cold-exposed LE rats, suggesting that cold exposure inhibited renal V2 receptors and AVP-inducible AQP-2 water channels. We conclude that 1) AVP may not be involved in the pathogenesis of cold-induced hypertension, 2) the AVP system plays a critical role

  18. Paroxysmal Exercise-induced Dyskinesias Caused by GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mongin, Marie; Mezouar, Nicolas; Dodet, Pauline; Vidailhet, Marie; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is due to de novo mutations in the SLC2A1 gene encoding the glucose transporter type 1. Phenomenology Shown Paroxysmal motor manifestations induced by exercise or fasting may be the main manifestations of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Educational Value Proper identification of the paroxysmal events and early diagnosis is important since the disease is potentially treatable. PMID:27351150

  19. Iron deficiency stress can induce MxNRAMP1 protein endocytosis in M. xiaojinensis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Haifa; Wang, Yi; Zha, Qian; Yuan, Mudan; Yin, Lili; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Han, Zhenhai

    2015-08-10

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders in plants, especially in fruit trees grown in calcareous soil. Iron deficiency stress can induce a series of adaptive responses in plants, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of which remain unclear. NRAMPs (natural resistance-associated macrophage proteins) play an important role in divalent metal ion transportation. In this study, we cloned MxNRAMP1, an NRAMP family gene from a highly iron-efficient apple genotype, Malus xiaojinensis. Further research showed that iron deficiency stress could induce MxNRAMP1 expression in roots and leaves. A protoplast transient expression system and immune electron microscopy localization techniques were used to prove that MxNRAMP1 mainly exists in the plasma membrane and vesicles. Interestingly, iron deficiency stress could induce the MxNRAMP protein to transport iron ions to specific organelles (lysosome and chloroplast) through vesicle endocytosis. Stable transgenic tobacco showed that MxNRAMP1 over-expression could promote iron absorption and accumulation in plants, and increase the plant's resistance against iron deficiency stress. These results showed that, in M. xiaojinensis, MxNRAMP1 not only plays an important role in iron absorption and transportation, it can also produce adaptive responses against iron deficiency through endocytosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Choline and betaine ameliorate liver lipid accumulation induced by vitamin B6 deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Erina; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Fujishita, Mayuko; Ota, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kohei; Nakagawa, Tomoyuki; Hayakawa, Takashi

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the efficacy of supplementing the diet with choline or betaine in ameliorating lipid accumulation induced by vitamin B6 (B6) deficiency in rat liver. Male Wistar rats were fed a control, B6-deficient, choline-supplemented (2, 4, or 6 g choline bitartrate/kg diet) B6-deficient diet or betaine-supplemented (1, 2, or 4 g betaine anhydrous/kg diet) B6-deficient diet for 35 d; all diets contained 9 g L-methionine (Met)/kg diet. Choline or betaine supplementation attenuated liver lipid deposition and restored plasma lipid profiles to control levels. These treatments restored the disruptions in Met metabolism and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio induced by B6 deficiency in liver microsomes. These results suggest that choline and betaine ameliorated liver lipid accumulation induced by B6 deficiency via recovery of Met metabolism and very low-density lipoprotein secretion by restoring the supply of PC derived from PE.

  1. Strategies to Rescue the Consequences of Inducible Arginase-1 Deficiency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Laurel L.; Sin, Yuan Yan; St. Amand, Tim; Si, Joshua; Goossens, Steven; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Haigh, Jody J.; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation) either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine) or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug). A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter) rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies. PMID:25938595

  2. Strategies to rescue the consequences of inducible arginase-1 deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Laurel L; Sin, Yuan Yan; St Amand, Tim; Si, Joshua; Goossens, Steven; Haenebalcke, Lieven; Haigh, Jody J; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D

    2015-01-01

    Arginase-1 catalyzes the conversion of arginine to ornithine and urea, which is the final step of the urea cycle used to remove excess ammonia from the body. Arginase-1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia in mice and man with severe lethal consequences in the former and progressive neurological impairment to varying degrees in the latter. In a tamoxifen-induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model, mice succumb to the enzyme deficiency within 2 weeks after inducing the knockout and retain <2 % enzyme in the liver. Standard clinical care regimens for arginase-1 deficiency (low-protein diet, the nitrogen-scavenging drug sodium phenylbutyrate, ornithine supplementation) either failed to extend lifespan (ornithine) or only minimally prolonged lifespan (maximum 8 days with low-protein diet and drug). A conditional, tamoxifen-inducible arginase-1 transgenic mouse strain expressing the enzyme from the Rosa26 locus modestly extended lifespan of neonatal mice, but not that of 4-week old mice, when crossed to the inducible arginase-1 knockout mouse strain. Delivery of an arginase-1/enhanced green fluorescent fusion construct by adeno-associated viral delivery (rh10 serotype with a strong cytomegalovirus-chicken β-actin hybrid promoter) rescued about 30% of male mice with lifespan prolongation to at least 6 months, extensive hepatic expression and restoration of significant enzyme activity in liver. In contrast, a vector of the AAV8 serotype driven by the thyroxine-binding globulin promoter led to weaker liver expression and did not rescue arginase-1 deficient mice to any great extent. Since the induced arginase-1 deficient mouse model displays a much more severe phenotype when compared to human arginase-1 deficiency, these studies reveal that it may be feasible with gene therapy strategies to correct the various manifestations of the disorder and they provide optimism for future clinical studies.

  3. The Pathogenesis of Alcohol-Induced Airflow Limitation in Acetaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Terufumi; Obase, Yasushi; Matsuse, Hiroto; Asai, Sadahiro; Iwanaga, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    In Japanese patients, alcohol-induced asthma is attributed to elevated plasma concentrations of acetaldehyde following alcohol consumption because of an acetaldehyde dehydrogenase 2 gene (ALDH2) polymorphism. The resulting increase in plasma histamine concentrations seems to trigger the onset of asthma symptoms. However, the specific pathogenic mechanism underlying this response remains unclear. ALDH2-deficient mice were therefore generated to investigate the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced asthma. ALDH2-deficient mice were generated using embryonic stem cells that were derived from C57BL/6 mice. The resulting mice were backcrossed into the BALB/c mice background. Exon 1 of ALDH2 was replaced with the Neo cassette. Pure ethanol was orally administered to ALDH2-deficient and wild-type mice, and the plasma concentrations of ethanol, acetaldehyde, and histamine, in addition to enhanced pause (Penh) values, were determined and compared between the 2 groups. We established an ALDH2-deficient mouse line to compare responses between wild-type and ALDH2-deficient mice receiving orally administered ethanol. The results showed that the plasma concentrations of acetaldehyde (p < 0.0001) and histamine (p < 0.005) were significantly higher, and the Penh values (p < 0.01) were significantly greater in the ALDH2-deficient mice, although plasma ethanol levels were not different. We studied the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced asthma using ALDH2-deficient mice. The results demonstrated that alcohol intake resulted in an increase in acetaldehyde levels, and a subsequent increase in histamine levels, which induced airway constriction. Alcohol consumption is known to be an important factor that exacerbates bronchial asthma, and studies investigating this factor are useful for the treatment of patients with alcohol-induced asthma. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Dietary zinc deficiency impairs humoral and cellular immune responses to BCG and ESAT-6/CFP-10 vaccination in offspring and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lina; Zhang, Lianying; Li, Changcai; Hu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xiaolei; Huang, Qing; Zhou, Gengyin

    2016-03-01

    Besides being the world's most widely used vaccine, BCG is the most controversial vaccine in current use. Estimates of protection impaired by BCG against pulmonary TB vary from nil to 80%. Dietary zinc deficiency has been confirmed to impair the immune function of animals. However, knowledge about effects of mild dietary zinc deficiency and the time of vaccination on BCG vaccine responsiveness in offspring and adult rats is limited. This work investigated the consequences of feeding zinc deficient and normal zinc diets to rats during gestation, infancy or adulthood on the immune responses to BCG vaccination. On gestation day 0, sixteen maternal rats were divided into two groups and fed with diets bellow: a control diet ad libitum (30 μg zinc/g diet, NC), a zinc deficient diet ad libitum (8 μg zinc/g diet, ZnD). Pup rats were served as experimental subjects. From day 1 of pregnancy upon delivery, maternal rats were given a standard diet (30 mg/kg/day zinc) or zinc deficient diet (8 mg/kg/day zinc) respectively. Adult male 10-week Wistar rats were divided into two dietary groups for 17 weeks of feeding: a control diet ad libitum (30 μg zinc/g diet, NC), a zinc deficient diet ad libitum (8 μg zinc/g diet, ZnD). The birth time of newborn pups was recorded as the zero week. For adult male rats, the time of receiving different assigned diet was recorded as the zeroth week. Newborn pups of these maternal rats were immunized with BCG vaccine or MTB antigen ESAT-6/CFP-10 at postnatal 0 and 2 week. The adult male rats were immunized on the 12th and 14th week. Then, blood samples, thymus and spleen from the rats were harvested for detection of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses using ELISA, MTT and QRT-PCR analysis. Decreased INF-γ and TNF-α production in plasma, changes of expression level of ZIP2, ZIP8, NF-κB and IL-6 mRNA in immune organs, together with reduced T cell proliferation was observed in pups and adult BCG rats suffered from dietary zinc deficiency

  5. Effects of dietary sialic acid in n-3 fatty acid-deficient dams during pregnancy and lactation on the learning abilities of their pups after weaning.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Seiichi; Honma, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Yoichi; Yasuda, Yuki; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko

    2013-01-01

    The effects of dietary sialic acid in dams on the learning abilities of their pups after weaning were investigated using rats deficient in n-3 fatty acids. Nine-week-old female Wistar rats were fed an n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet for 3 wk and were mated at 12 wk of age. During pregnancy and lactation, the female rats were fed the n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet, and were given water or water containing 1% N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) ad libitum. After weaning, the learning abilities of the pups were evaluated using a novel object recognition test. The recognition index of pups nursed by dams fed on water containing 1% NANA (NANA-intake dams) was significantly higher than that of pups nursed by dams fed only on water (NANA non-intake dams). There were no significant differences in the total sialic acid or docosahexaenoic acid contents in the cerebral cortex or hippocampus of pups nursed by dams fed on either type of water. The total dimethylacetal (DMA, from plasmalogen) level in the cerebral cortex of pups nursed by NANA-intake dams was significantly higher than that of pups nursed by NANA non-intake dams. These results suggest that dietary sialic acid in dams during pregnancy and lactation might be beneficial for the learning abilities of pups after weaning, which may be related to the plasmalogen level in the brain of pups.

  6. Neuronal depletion of omega-3 fatty acids induces flax seed dietary self-selection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Steven; Heinrichs, Stephen C

    2009-01-23

    The impact of essential dietary fatty acid deficiency on self-selection of fatty acid enriched foods is little studied in spite of widespread health promotion claims for fatty acid supplemented diets. Accordingly, the present studies investigated the consequences of consumption over four weeks of omega-3 fatty acid replete and deficient diets on dietary fatty acid self-selection and brain lipid composition in rats. Dietary omega-3 fatty acid deficiency produced correspondingly low levels (50-55% decrease) of omega-3 fatty acids in the forebrain relative to rats consuming an omega-3 fatty acid replete diet. The state of omega-3 fatty acid deficiency generated a robust preference for consumption of an omega-3 fatty acid replete diet. Moreover, omega-3 fatty acid self-selection developed slowly and was not present in rats maintained on laboratory chow diet suggesting that post-ingestive nutritional cues, rather than taste, odor or texture cues, were employed in guiding the preference for the omega-3 fatty acid enriched diet. These results provide evidence for the ability of rats with declining brain levels of omega-3 fatty acids to detect a dietary deficiency of this essential class of lipids and to identify and consume a food source capable of restoring fatty acid repletion.

  7. Cystathionine beta synthase deficiency induces catalase-mediated hydrogen peroxide detoxification in mice liver.

    PubMed

    Hamelet, Julien; Seltzer, Virginie; Petit, Emile; Noll, Christophe; Andreau, Karine; Delabar, Jean M; Janel, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    Cystathionine beta synthase deficiency induces hyperhomocysteinemia which is considered as a risk factor for vascular diseases. Studies underlined the importance of altered cellular redox reactions in hyperhomocysteinemia-induced vascular pathologies. Nevertheless, hyperhomocysteinemia also induces hepatic dysfunction which may accelerate the development of vascular pathologies by modifying cholesterol homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to analyze the modifications of redox state in the liver of heterozygous cystathionine beta synthase-deficient mice, a murine model of hyperhomocysteinemia. In this purpose, we quantified levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and we assayed activities of main antioxidant enzymes. We found that cystathionine beta synthase deficiency induced NADPH oxidase activation. However, there was no accumulation of reactive oxygen (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide) and nitrogen (nitrite, peroxynitrite) species. On the contrary, hepatic hydrogen peroxide level was decreased independently of an activation of glutathione-dependent mechanisms. In fact, cystathionine beta synthase deficiency had no effect on glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities. However, we found a 50% increase in hepatic catalase activity without any variation of expression. These findings demonstrate that cystathionine beta synthase deficiency initiates redox disequilibrium in the liver. However, the activation of catalase attenuates oxidative impairments.

  8. Dietary restriction protects against chronic-ethanol-induced changes in exploratory behavior in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Lucas S N M; Gualberto, Felipe A S; Pereira, Silvia R C; Barros, Paula A; Franco, Glaura C; Ribeiro, Angela M

    2006-03-17

    Chronic ethanol intake causes various types of neural damage and behavioral impairments, probably acting through oxidative stress and excitotoxicity, while dietary restriction is considered by some authors to protect the central nervous system from these kinds of damage. In the present study, a factorial experimental design was used to investigate the effects of chronic ethanol and dietary restriction treatments, associated or not, on Wistar rats' exploratory behavior, spatial memory aspects and cortical and hippocampal acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. Dietary restriction lasted for the whole experiment, while ethanol treatment lasted for only 3 weeks. Despite the short ethanol treatment duration, for two behavior categories assessed, moving and rearing, an interaction was observed between the effects of chronic ethanol and dietary restriction. There were no significant differences in AChE activities among the groups. Cerebellar neural nitric oxide synthase (nNOs) activity was measured as a first step to assess oxidative stress. Dietary restriction significantly reduced NO formation. The present results indicate that dietary restriction might exert a protective effect against chronic-ethanol-induced changes in exploratory behavior. It is hypothesized that the mechanisms underlying this protection can involve prevention of oxidative stress.

  9. Cystathionine γ-Lyase Deficiency Protects Mice from Galactosamine/Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shirozu, Kazuhiro; Tokuda, Kentaro; Marutani, Eizo; Lefer, David; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Acute liver failure (ALF) is a fatal syndrome attributed to massive hepatocyte death. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to exert cytoprotective or cytotoxic effects. Here, we examined the role of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, an enzyme produces H2S) in ALF induced by D-Galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results: Wild-type (WT) mice exhibited high mortality rate, prominent liver injury, and increased plasma alanine aminotransferase levels after GalN/LPS challenge. Congenital deficiency or chemical inhibition of CSE by DL-propargylglycine attenuated GalN/LPS-induced liver injury. CSE deficiency markedly improved survival rate and attenuated GalN/LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines and activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the liver. CSE deficiency protected primary hepatocytes from GalN/tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced cell death without affecting LPS-induced TNF-α production from primary peritoneal macrophages. Beneficial effects of CSE deficiency were associated with markedly elevated homocysteine and thiosulfate levels, upregulation of NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and antioxidant proteins, activation of Akt-dependent anti-apoptotic signaling, and inhibition of GalN/LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation in the liver. Finally, administration of sodium thiosulfate (STS) attenuated GalN/LPS-induced liver injury via activation of Akt- and Nrf2-dependent signaling and inhibition of GalN/LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation in WT mice. Innovation: These results suggest that inhibition of CSE or administration of STS prevents acute inflammatory liver failure by augmenting thiosulfate levels and upregulating antioxidant and anti-apoptotic defense in the liver. Conclusion: Congenital deficiency or chemical inhibition of CSE increases thiosulfate levels in the liver and prevents ALF at least in part by augmentation of antioxidant and anti-apoptotic mechanisms. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 204

  10. Cystathionine γ-lyase deficiency protects mice from galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Shirozu, Kazuhiro; Tokuda, Kentaro; Marutani, Eizo; Lefer, David; Wang, Rui; Ichinose, Fumito

    2014-01-10

    Acute liver failure (ALF) is a fatal syndrome attributed to massive hepatocyte death. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been reported to exert cytoprotective or cytotoxic effects. Here, we examined the role of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, an enzyme produces H2S) in ALF induced by D-Galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Wild-type (WT) mice exhibited high mortality rate, prominent liver injury, and increased plasma alanine aminotransferase levels after GalN/LPS challenge. Congenital deficiency or chemical inhibition of CSE by DL-propargylglycine attenuated GalN/LPS-induced liver injury. CSE deficiency markedly improved survival rate and attenuated GalN/LPS-induced upregulation of inflammatory cytokines and activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in the liver. CSE deficiency protected primary hepatocytes from GalN/tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced cell death without affecting LPS-induced TNF-α production from primary peritoneal macrophages. Beneficial effects of CSE deficiency were associated with markedly elevated homocysteine and thiosulfate levels, upregulation of NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and antioxidant proteins, activation of Akt-dependent anti-apoptotic signaling, and inhibition of GalN/LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation in the liver. Finally, administration of sodium thiosulfate (STS) attenuated GalN/LPS-induced liver injury via activation of Akt- and Nrf2-dependent signaling and inhibition of GalN/LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation in WT mice. These results suggest that inhibition of CSE or administration of STS prevents acute inflammatory liver failure by augmenting thiosulfate levels and upregulating antioxidant and anti-apoptotic defense in the liver. Congenital deficiency or chemical inhibition of CSE increases thiosulfate levels in the liver and prevents ALF at least in part by augmentation of antioxidant and anti-apoptotic mechanisms.

  11. Riboflavin deficiency induces a significant change in proteomic profiles in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhonghao; Pu, Lingling; Gao, Weina; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Jingyu; Shi, Tala; Yao, Zhanxin; Guo, Changjiang

    2017-01-01

    Riboflavin deficiency is widespread in many regions over the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin deficiency on protein expression profiles in HepG2 cells in order to provide molecular information for the abnormalities induced by riboflavin deficiency. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing different concentrations of riboflavin. Changes of cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using a label-free shotgun method with LC–MS/MS to investigate the global changes of proteomic profiles in response to riboflavin deficiency. Immunoblotting test was used to validate the results of proteomic approach. The cell viability and apoptosis tests showed that riboflavin was vital in maintaining the cytoactivity of HepG2 cells. The label-free proteomic analysis revealed that a total of 37 proteins showing differential expression (±2 fold, p < 0.05) were identified after riboflavin deficiency. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the riboflavin deficiency caused an up-regulation of Parkinson’s disease pathway, steroid catabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic process, while the fatty acid metabolism, tricarboxylic citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and iron metabolism were down-regulated. These findings provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of the effects caused by riboflavin deficiency. PMID:28367977

  12. Riboflavin deficiency induces a significant change in proteomic profiles in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhonghao; Pu, Lingling; Gao, Weina; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Jingyu; Shi, Tala; Yao, Zhanxin; Guo, Changjiang

    2017-04-03

    Riboflavin deficiency is widespread in many regions over the world, especially in underdeveloped countries. In this study, we investigated the effects of riboflavin deficiency on protein expression profiles in HepG2 cells in order to provide molecular information for the abnormalities induced by riboflavin deficiency. HepG2 cells were cultured in media containing different concentrations of riboflavin. Changes of cell viability and apoptosis were assessed. A comparative proteomic analysis was performed using a label-free shotgun method with LC-MS/MS to investigate the global changes of proteomic profiles in response to riboflavin deficiency. Immunoblotting test was used to validate the results of proteomic approach. The cell viability and apoptosis tests showed that riboflavin was vital in maintaining the cytoactivity of HepG2 cells. The label-free proteomic analysis revealed that a total of 37 proteins showing differential expression (±2 fold, p < 0.05) were identified after riboflavin deficiency. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the riboflavin deficiency caused an up-regulation of Parkinson's disease pathway, steroid catabolism, endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptotic process, while the fatty acid metabolism, tricarboxylic citrate cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and iron metabolism were down-regulated. These findings provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of the effects caused by riboflavin deficiency.

  13. [Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency-induced schizophrenia in a school-age boy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Yu-Peng; Li, Xi-Yuan; Ma, Yan-Yan; Wu, Tong-Fei; Ding, Yuan; Song, Jin-Qing; Wang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Yan-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. It is known that MTHFR deficiency may result in hyperhomocysteinemia, but MTHFR deficiency-induced schizophrenia has been rarely reported. Here we present the clinical course, biochemical and genetic characteristics of schizophrenia resulted from MTHFR deficiency in a school-age boy. He was 13 years old. He was admitted with a two-year history of fear, auditory hallucination, learning difficulty, sleeping problems, irascibility, drowsing and giggling. At admission, he had significantly elevated plasma and urine levels of total homocysteine, significantly decreased levels of folate in serum and cerebrospinal fluid, and a normal blood concentration of methionine. Further DNA sequencing analysis showed 665C>T homozygous mutations in the MTHFR gene. The patient was diagnosed with MTHFR deficiency-associated schizophrenia and treatment with calcium folinate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, and betaine was initiated. After the treatment for 1 week, his plasma and urine levels of homocysteine were decreased to a normal range and the clinical symptoms were significantly improved. After 3 months of treatment, the patient returned to school. He is now living with normal school life. In summary, children with late-onset MTHFR deficiency and secondary cerebral folate deficiency may lead to schizophrenia. This rare condition can be early diagnosed through analyses of blood and urine total homocysteine, amino acids in blood and folate in blood and cerebral fluid and successfully treated with folinic acid, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and betaine.

  14. Potassium deficiency induces the biosynthesis of oxylipins and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mineral fertilization and pest control are essential and costly requirements for modern crop production. The two measures go hand in hand because plant mineral status affects plant susceptibility to pests and vice versa. Nutrient deficiency triggers specific responses in plants that optimize nutrient acquisition and reprogram metabolism. K-deficient plants illustrate these strategies by inducing high-affinity K-uptake and adjusting primary metabolism. Whether and how K deficient plants also alter their secondary metabolism for nutrient management and defense is not known. Results Here we show that K-deficient plants contain higher levels of the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA), hydroxy-12-oxo-octadecadienoic acids (HODs) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) than K-sufficient plants. Up-regulation of the 13-LOX pathway in response to low K was evident in increased transcript levels of several biosynthetic enzymes. Indole and aliphatic glucosinolates accumulated in response to K-deficiency in a manner that was respectively dependent or independent on signaling through Coronatine-Insensitive 1 (COI1). Transcript and glucosinolate profiles of K-deficient plants resembled those of herbivore attacked plants. Conclusions Based on our results we propose that under K-deficiency plants produce oxylipins and glucosinolates to enhance their defense potential against herbivorous insects and create reversible storage for excess S and N. PMID:20701801

  15. Metformin administration induces hepatotoxic effects in paraoxonase-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Heredia, Anabel; Riera-Borrull, Marta; Fort-Gallifa, Isabel; Luciano-Mateo, Fedra; Cabré, Noemí; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Joven, Jorge; Camps, Jordi

    2016-04-05

    Metformin is the first-line pharmacological treatment of diabetes. In these patients, metformin reduces body weight and decreases the risk of diabetes-related complications such as cardiovascular disease. However, whether metformin elicits beneficial effects on liver histology is a controversial issue and, as yet, there is no consensus. Paraoxonase-1 (PON1), an enzyme synthesized mainly by the liver, degrades lipid peroxides and reduces oxidative stress. PON1 activities are decreased in chronic liver diseases. We evaluated the effects of metformin in the liver of PON1-deficient mice which, untreated, present a mild degree of liver steatosis. Metformin administration aggravated inflammation in animals given a standard mouse chow and in those fed a high-fat diet. Also, it was associated with a higher degree of steatosis in animals fed a standard chow diet. This report is a cautionary note regarding the prescription of metformin for the treatment of diabetes in patients with concomitant liver impairment.

  16. Nrf2 deficiency prevents reductive stress-induced hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sankaranarayanan; Muthusamy, Vasanthi R.; Whitehead, Kevin J.; Wang, Li; Gomes, Aldrin V.; Litwin, Sheldon E.; Kensler, Thomas W.; Abel, E. Dale; Hoidal, John R.; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Mutant protein aggregation (PA) cardiomyopathy (MPAC) is characterized by reductive stress (RS), PA (of chaperones and cytoskeletal components), and ventricular dysfunction in transgenic mice expressing human mutant CryAB (hmCryAB). Sustained activation of nuclear erythroid-2 like factor-2 (Nrf2) causes RS, which contributes to proteotoxic cardiac disease. The goals of this pre-clinical study were to (i) investigate whether disrupting Nrf2-antioxidant signalling prevents RS and rescues redox homeostasis in hearts expressing the mutant chaperone and (ii) elucidate mechanisms that could delay proteotoxic cardiac disease. Methods and results Non-transgenic (NTG), transgenic (TG) with MPAC and MPAC-TG:Nrf2-deficient (Nrf2-def) mice were used in this study. The effects of Nrf2 diminution (Nrf2±) on RS mediated MPAC in TG mice were assessed at 6–7 and 10 months of age. The diminution of Nrf2 prevented RS and prolonged the survival of TG mice (∼50 weeks) by an additional 20–25 weeks. The TG:Nrf2-def mice did not exhibit cardiac hypertrophy at even 60 weeks, while the MPAC-TG mice developed pathological hypertrophy and heart failure starting at 24–28 weeks of age. Aggregation of cardiac proteins was significantly reduced in TG:Nrf2-def when compared with TG mice at 7 months. Preventing RS and maintaining redox homeostasis in the TG:Nrf2-def mice ameliorated PA, leading to decreased ubiquitination of proteins. Conclusion Nrf2 deficiency rescues redox homeostasis, which reduces aggregation of mutant proteins, thereby delaying the proteotoxic pathological cardiac remodelling caused by RS and toxic protein aggregates. PMID:23761402

  17. Consequences of induced brassinosteroid deficiency in Arabidopsis leaves.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Florian; Lisso, Janina; Obata, Toshihiro; Erban, Alexander; Maximova, Eugenia; Giavalisco, Patrick; Kopka, Joachim; Fernie, Alisdair R; Willmitzer, Lothar; Müssig, Carsten

    2014-11-18

    The identification of brassinosteroid (BR) deficient and BR insensitive mutants provided conclusive evidence that BR is a potent growth-promoting phytohormone. Arabidopsis mutants are characterized by a compact rosette structure, decreased plant height and reduced root system, delayed development, and reduced fertility. Cell expansion, cell division, and multiple developmental processes depend on BR. The molecular and physiological basis of BR action is diverse. The BR signalling pathway controls the activity of transcription factors, and numerous BR responsive genes have been identified. The analysis of dwarf mutants, however, may to some extent reveal phenotypic changes that are an effect of the altered morphology and physiology. This restriction holds particularly true for the analysis of established organs such as rosette leaves. In this study, the mode of BR action was analysed in established leaves by means of two approaches. First, an inhibitor of BR biosynthesis (brassinazole) was applied to 21-day-old wild-type plants. Secondly, BR complementation of BR deficient plants, namely CPD (constitutive photomorphogenic dwarf)-antisense and cbb1 (cabbage1) mutant plants was stopped after 21 days. BR action in established leaves is associated with stimulated cell expansion, an increase in leaf index, starch accumulation, enhanced CO2 release by the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and increased biomass production. Cell number and protein content were barely affected. Previous analysis of BR promoted growth focused on genomic effects. However, the link between growth and changes in gene expression patterns barely provided clues to the physiological and metabolic basis of growth. Our study analysed comprehensive metabolic data sets of leaves with altered BR levels. The data suggest that BR promoted growth may depend on the increased provision and use of carbohydrates and energy. BR may stimulate both anabolic and catabolic pathways.

  18. Selenoprotein Gene Expression in Thyroid and Pituitary of Young Pigs Is Not Affected by Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess1–3

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji-Chang; Zhao, Hua; Li, Jun-Gang; Xia, Xin-Jie; Wang, Kang-Ning; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Ying; Lei, Xin Gen

    2009-01-01

    Expression and function of selenoproteins in endocrine tissues remain unclear, largely due to limited sample availability. Pigs have a greater metabolic similarity and tissue size than rodents as a model of humans for that purpose. We conducted 2 experiments: 1) we cloned 5 novel porcine selenoprotein genes; and 2) we compared the effects of dietary selenium (Se) on mRNA levels of 12 selenoproteins, activities of 4 antioxidant enzymes, and Se concentrations in testis, thyroid, and pituitary with those in liver of pigs. In Experiment 1, porcine Gpx2, Sephs2, Sep15, Sepn1, and Sepp1 were cloned and demonstrated 84–94% of coding sequence homology to human genes. In Experiment 2, weanling male pigs (n = 30) were fed a Se-deficient (0.02 mg Se/kg) diet added with 0, 0.3, or 3.0 mg Se/kg as Se-enriched yeast for 8 wk. Although dietary Se resulted in dose-dependent increases (P < 0.05) in Se concentrations and GPX activities in all 4 tissues, it did not affect the mRNA levels of any selenoprotein gene in thyroid or pituitary. Testis mRNA levels of Txnrd1 and Sep15 were decreased (P < 0.05) by increasing dietary Se from 0.3 to 3.0 mg/kg. Comparatively, expressions of Gpx2, Gpx4, Dio3, and Sep15 were high in pituitary and Dio1, Sepp1, Sephs2, and Gpx1 were high in liver. In conclusion, the mRNA abundances of the 12 selenoprotein genes in thyroid and pituitary of young pigs were resistant to dietary Se deficiency or excess. PMID:19357213

  19. Dietary nitrite induces occludin nitration in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bárbara S; Correia, Mariana G; Fernandes, Rita C; Gonçalves, João S; Laranjinha, João

    2016-01-01

    The clinical implications of the nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway have been extensively studied in recent years. However, the physiological impact of bioactive nitrogen oxides produced from dietary nitrate has remained largely elusive. Here, we report a hitherto unrecognized nitrite-dependent nitrating pathway that targets tight junction proteins in the stomach. Inorganic nitrate, nitrite or saliva obtained after the consumption of lettuce were administered by oral gavage to Wistar rats. The enterosalivary circulation of nitrate was allowed to occur for 4 h after which the animals were euthanized and the stomach collected. Nitrated occludin was detected by immunoprecipitation in the gastric epithelium upon inorganic nitrite administration (p < .05) but was not observed in the case of inorganic nitrate or human saliva administration. This observation, along with differences in (•)NO production rates from inorganic and salivary nitrite under simulated gastric conditions, suggests that competing reactions at acidic pH determine the production of nitrating agents ((•)NO2) or other, more stable, oxides. Accordingly, it is shown in vitro that salivary nitrite yields higher steady state concentrations of (•)NO (0.37 ± 0.01 μM) than sodium nitrite (0.12 ± 0.03 μM). Dietary-dependent reactions involving the production of nitrogen oxides should be further investigated as, in the context of occludin nitration, the consumption of green leafy vegetables (with high nitrate content), if able to modulate gut barrier function, may have important implications in the context of leaky gut disorders.

  20. Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess Reduces Sperm Quality and Testicular mRNA Abundance of Nuclear Glutathione Peroxidase 4 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji-Chang; Zheng, Shijie; Mo, Junluan; Liang, Xiongshun; Xu, Yuanfei; Zhang, Huimin; Gong, Chunmei; Liu, Xiao-Li; Lei, Xin Gen

    2017-10-01

    Background: Glutathione peroxidase (GPX) 4 and selenoprotein P (SELENOP) are abundant, and several variants are expressed in the testis.Objective: We determined the effects of dietary selenium deficiency or excess on sperm quality and expressions of GPX4 and SELENOP variants in rat testis and liver.Methods: After weaning, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a Se-deficient basal diet (BD) for 5 wk until they were 9 wk old [mean ± SEM body weight (BW) = 256 ± 5 g]. They were then fed the BD diet alone (deficient) or with 0.25 (adequate), 3 (excess), or 5 (excess) mg Se/kg for 4 wk. Testis, liver, blood, and semen were collected to assay for selenoprotein mRNA and protein abundances, selenium concentration, GPX activity, 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine concentration, and sperm quality.Results: Dietary selenium supplementations elevated (P < 0.05) tissue selenium concentrations and GPX activities. Compared with those fed BD + 0.25 mg Se/kg, rats fed BD showed lower (P < 0.05) BW gain (86%) and sperm density (57%) but higher (P < 0.05) plasma 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine concentrations (189%), and nonprogressive sperm motility (4.4-fold). Likewise, rats fed BD + 5 mg Se/kg had (P = 0.06) lower BW gain and higher (1.9-fold) sperm deformity rates than those in the selenium-adequate group. Compared with the selenium-adequate group, dietary selenium deficiency (BD) or excess (BD + 3 or 5 mg Se/kg) resulted in 45-77% lower (P < 0.05) nuclear Gpx4 (nGpx4) mRNA abundance in the testis. Rats fed BD had lower (P < 0.05) mRNA levels of 2 Selenop variants in both testis and liver than those in the other groups. Testicular SELENOP was 155-170% higher (P < 0.05) in rats fed BD + 5 mg Se/kg and hepatic c/mGPX4 was 13-15% lower (P < 0.05) in rats fed BD than in the other groups.Conclusions: The mRNA abundance of rat testicular nGPX4 responded to dietary selenium concentrations in similar ways to sperm parameters and may be used as a sensitive marker to assess appropriate Se status for male

  1. Phosphate Deficiency Induces the Jasmonate Pathway and Enhances Resistance to Insect Herbivory1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Gaétan

    2016-01-01

    During their life cycle, plants are typically confronted by simultaneous biotic and abiotic stresses. Low inorganic phosphate (Pi) is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies limiting plant growth in natural and agricultural ecosystems, while insect herbivory accounts for major losses in plant productivity and impacts ecological and evolutionary changes in plant populations. Here, we report that plants experiencing Pi deficiency induce the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway and enhance their defense against insect herbivory. Pi-deficient Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) showed enhanced synthesis of JA and the bioactive conjugate JA-isoleucine, as well as activation of the JA signaling pathway, in both shoots and roots of wild-type plants and in shoots of the Pi-deficient mutant pho1. The kinetics of the induction of the JA signaling pathway by Pi deficiency was influenced by PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE1, the main transcription factor regulating the expression of Pi starvation-induced genes. Phenotypes of the pho1 mutant typically associated with Pi deficiency, such as high shoot anthocyanin levels and poor shoot growth, were significantly attenuated by blocking the JA biosynthesis or signaling pathway. Wounded pho1 leaves hyperaccumulated JA/JA-isoleucine in comparison with the wild type. The pho1 mutant also showed an increased resistance against the generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis that was attenuated in JA biosynthesis and signaling mutants. Pi deficiency also triggered increased resistance to S. littoralis in wild-type Arabidopsis as well as tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and Nicotiana benthamiana, revealing that the link between Pi deficiency and enhanced herbivory resistance is conserved in a diversity of plants, including crops. PMID:27016448

  2. Potassium Inhibits Dietary Salt-Induced Transforming Growth Factor-β Production

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-β. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-β demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-β in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-β but did not affect production of TGF-β by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the α subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-β but did not alter TGF-β production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake. PMID:19738156

  3. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-11-01

    Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification.

  4. Dietary high-fat lard intake induces thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Shan-shan; Zhao, Yuan-fei; Song, Yong-feng; Xu, Chao; Yang, Jian-mei; Xuan, Shi-meng; Yan, Hui-li; Yu, Chun-xiao; Zhao, Meng; Xu, Jin; Zhao, Jia-jun

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Excess dietary fat intake can induce lipotoxicity in non-adipose tissues. The aim of this study was to observe the effects of dietary high-fat lard intake on thyroid in rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat lard diet for 24 weeks, and then the rats were fed a normal control diet (acute dietary modification) or the high-fat lard diet for another 6 weeks. The serum lipid profile, total thyroxine (TT4), free thyroxine (FT4) and thyrotropin (TSH) levels were determined at the 12, 18, 24 and 30 weeks. High-frequency ultrasound scanning of the thyroid glands was performed at the 24 or 30 weeks. After the rats were sacrificed, the thyroid glands were collected for histological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results: The high-fat lard diet significantly increased triglyceride levels in both the serum and thyroid, and decreased serum TT4 and FT4 levels in parallel with elevated serum TSH levels. Ultrasonic imaging revealed enlarged thyroid glands with lowered echotexture and relatively heterogeneous features in the high-fat lard fed rats. The thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats exhibited enlarged follicle cavities and flattened follicular epithelial cells under light microscopy, and dilated endoplasmic reticulum cisternae, twisted nuclei, fewer microvilli and secretory vesicles under transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, the thyroid glands from the high-fat lard fed rats showed markedly low levels of thyroid hormone synthesis-related proteins TTF-1 and NIS. Acute dietary modification by withdrawal of the high-fat lard diet for 6 weeks failed to ameliorate the high-fat lard diet-induced thyroid changes. Conclusion: Dietary high-fat lard intake induces significant thyroid dysfunction and abnormal morphology in rats, which can not be corrected by short-term dietary modification. PMID:25263336

  5. Potassium inhibits dietary salt-induced transforming growth factor-beta production.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W

    2009-11-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-beta. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-beta demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-beta in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-beta but did not affect production of TGF-beta by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the alpha subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-beta but did not alter TGF-beta production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake.

  6. IKKi Deficiency Promotes Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heng; Gan, Hua-Wen; Zong, Jing; Deng, Wei; Yuan, Yuan; Li, FangFang; Wu, Qing-Qing; Gao, Lu; Zhang, Rui; Ma, Zhen-Guo; Li, Hong-Liang; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    The inducible IκB kinase (IKKi/IKKε) is a recently described serine-threonine IKK-related kinase. Previous studies have reported the role of IKKi in infectious diseases and cancer. However, its role in the cardiac response to pressure overload remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the effects of IKKi deficiency on the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy using in vitro and in vivo models. First, we developed mouse models of pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload using aortic banding (AB). Four weeks after AB, cardiac function was then assessed through echocardiographic and hemodynamic measurements. Western blotting, real-time PCR and histological analyses were used to assess the pathological and molecular mechanisms. We observed that IKKi-deficient mice showed significantly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac dysfunction, apoptosis and fibrosis compared with WT mice. Furthermore, we recently revealed that the IKKi-deficient mice spontaneously develop cardiac hypertrophy. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that IKKi deficiency-induced cardiac hypertrophy was associated with the activation of the AKT and NF-κB signaling pathway in response to AB. In cultured cells, IKKi overexpression suppressed the activation of this pathway. In conclusion, we demonstrate that IKKi deficiency exacerbates cardiac hypertrophy by regulating the AKT and NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:23349709

  7. Folate deficiency induces neurodegeneration and brain dysfunction in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Sobol, Robert W; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Linhart, Heinz; Winter, Benjamin; Balkaya, Mustafa; Gertz, Karen; Gay, Shanna B; Cox, David; Eckart, Sarah; Ahmadi, Michael; Juckel, Georg; Kempermann, Gerd; Hellweg, Rainer; Sohr, Reinhard; Hörtnagl, Heide; Wilson, Samuel H; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Endres, Matthias

    2008-07-09

    Folate deficiency and resultant increased homocysteine levels have been linked experimentally and epidemiologically with neurodegenerative conditions like stroke and dementia. Moreover, folate deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, most notably depression. We hypothesized that the pathogenic mechanisms include uracil misincorporation and, therefore, analyzed the effects of folate deficiency in mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung-/-) versus wild-type controls. Folate depletion increased nuclear mutation rates in Ung-/- embryonic fibroblasts, and conferred death of cultured Ung-/- hippocampal neurons. Feeding animals a folate-deficient diet (FD) for 3 months induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons in Ung-/- but not Ung+/+ mice along with decreased hippocampal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein and decreased brain levels of antioxidant glutathione. Furthermore, FD induced cognitive deficits and mood alterations such as anxious and despair-like behaviors that were aggravated in Ung-/- mice. Independent of Ung genotype, FD increased plasma homocysteine levels, altered brain monoamine metabolism, and inhibited adult hippocampal neurogenesis. These results indicate that impaired uracil repair is involved in neurodegeneration and neuropsychiatric dysfunction induced by experimental folate deficiency.

  8. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  9. A critical reappraisal of dietary practices in methylmalonic acidemia raises concerns about the safety of medical foods. Part 2: Cobalamin C deficiency (cblC).¶

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Irini; Myles, Jennifer G.; Sloan, Jennifer L.; Carrillo-Carrasco, Nuria; Morava, Eva; Strauss, Kevin A.; Morton, Holmes; Venditti, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cobalamin C (cblC) deficiency impairs the biosynthesis of adenosyl- and methylcobalamin resulting in methylmalonic acidemia combined with hyperhomocysteinemia and hypomethioninemia. However, some patients with cblC deficiency are treated with medical foods, devoid of methionine and high in leucine content, that are formulated for patients with isolated propionate oxidative defects. We examined the effects of imbalanced branched-chain amino acid intake on growth outcomes in cblC patients. METHODS Dietary intake was correlated with biochemical, anthropometric, body composition measurements and other disease parameters in a cohort of 28 early-onset cblC patients. RESULTS Protein restricted diets were followed by 21% of the patients, while 32% received medical foods. Patients on protein-restricted diets had lower height-for-age Z-score (P=0.034), while patients consuming medical foods had lower head-circumference Z-scores (P=0.037), plasma methionine concentrations (P=0.001) and predicted methionine influx through the blood brain barrier Z-score (−1.29 vs. −0.0617, P=0.007). The combination of age of diagnosis, a history of seizures and the leucine/valine dietary intake ratio best predicted head circumference Z-score based on multiple regression modeling (R2= 0.945). CONCLUSIONS Patients with cblC deficiency treated with medical foods designed for isolated methylmalonic acidemia are at risk for iatrogenic methionine deficiency that could adversely affect brain growth and development. TRIAL REGISTRATION This clinical study is registered in www.clinicaltrials.gov with the ID: NCT00078078. Study URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00078078 PMID:26270766

  10. Resolution of adalimumab-induced psoriasis after vitamin D deficiency treatment.

    PubMed

    Werner de Castro, Gláucio Ricardo; Neves, Fabrício Souza; Pereira, Ivanio Alves; Fialho, Sonia Cristina Magalhaes Souza; Ribeiro, Giovana; Zimmermann, Adriana Fontes

    2012-05-01

    Tumoral necrosis factor alpha blockers are very efficient in the treatment of many inflammatory systemic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. However, a paradoxical arouse of psoriasiform lesions may occur in a few patients taking anti-TNFα. The etiology of this rare side effect is still a mystery, and its treatment may be difficult. The authors report the resolution of adalimumab-induced psoriasis in a woman with rheumatoid arthritis after the use of high vitamin D(3) doses for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency. This is the first report of resolution of anti-TNFα-induced psoriasiform lesions by high doses of vitamin D(3) in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and vitamin D deficiency. This case raises interesting questions on the role of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of this side effect and on the possible usefulness of high-dose vitamin D(3) in its treatment.

  11. Effects of montmorillonite on alleviating dietary Cd-induced oxidative damage in carp (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Song Gwan; Dai, Wei; Xu, Zirong; Li, Guanghuan

    2011-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of montmorillonite (MMT) on dietary Cd-induced oxidative damage in liver and kidney of carp (Carassius auratus). One hundred eighty carp were randomly divided into four groups and fed with a basal diet, a basal diet supplemented with 0.5% MMT, Cd-comtaminated basal diet (120 mg Cd/kg dry weight) and Cd-contaminated basal diet supplemented with 0.5% MMT, respectively. After 60 days, fish were sacrificed to measure malondialdehyde (MDA) content and antioxidative indices in liver and kidney. The results showed that the exposure of carp to dietary Cd caused decreases in glutathione peroxidase activity, catalase activity, superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione content and total antioxidant capacity level, while MMT supplemented in diet compensated Cd-induced decreases in above antioxidant indices to some extent in liver and kidney. As compared with the control group, increases in MDA content were observed in both measured tissues of carp exposed to dietary Cd, while MDA content decreased in carp exposed to Cd-contaminated basal diet supplemented with MMT in comparison with the Cd-contaminated group. It was suggested that MMT, when co-administered with Cd in diet, could alleviate dietary Cd-induced oxidative damage in liver and kidney of carp.

  12. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 with dietary quercetin reduces obesity-induced hepatic inflammation through macrophage phenotype switching

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chu-Sook; Choi, Hye-Seon; Joe, Yeonsoo; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Obesity-induced steatohepatitis accompanied by activated hepatic macrophages/Kupffer cells facilitates the progression of hepatic fibrinogenesis and exacerbates metabolic derangements such as insulin resistance. Heme oxyganase-1 (HO-1) modulates tissue macrophage phenotypes and thus is implicated in protection against inflammatory diseases. Here, we show that the flavonoid quercetin reduces obesity-induced hepatic inflammation by inducing HO-1, which promotes hepatic macrophage polarization in favor of the M2 phenotype. MATERIALS/METHODS Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a regular diet (RD), high-fat diet (HFD), or HFD supplemented with quercetin (HF+Que, 0.5g/kg diet) for nine weeks. Inflammatory cytokines and macrophage markers were measured by ELISA and RT-PCR, respectively. HO-1 protein was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS Quercetin supplementation decreased levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6) and increased that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10) in the livers of HFD-fed mice. This was accompanied by upregulation of M2 macrophage marker genes (Arg-1, Mrc1) and downregulation of M1 macrophage marker genes (TNFα, NOS2). In co-cultures of lipid-laden hepatocytes and macrophages, treatment with quercetin induced HO-1 in the macrophages, markedly suppressed expression of M1 macrophage marker genes, and reduced release of MCP-1. Moreover, these effects of quercetin were blunted by an HO-1 inhibitor and deficiency of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in macrophages. CONCLUSIONS Quercetin reduces obesity-induced hepatic inflammation by promoting macrophage phenotype switching. The beneficial effect of quercetin is associated with Nrf2-mediated HO-1 induction. Quercetin may be a useful dietary factor for protecting against obesity-induced steatohepatitis. PMID:27909560

  13. Selenium deficiency induced by zinc deprivation in a crustacean

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, K.I.; Caffrey, P.B. )

    1989-08-01

    For intact daphnids reared in circumstances of controlled trace element exposure, one consequence of insufficient zinc (Zn) is an increased demand on the animal's pool of available selenium (Se). This demand is manifested by the type of cuticle deterioration associated with Se deficiency and by a depression of reproduction. In the presence of 25 parts per billion (ppb) Zn, 1 ppb Se eliminates these symptoms. In the absence of detectable Zn, 5 ppb Se eliminates overt cuticle damage and substantially increases reproduction. A shortening of life span resulting from Zn deprivation is not ameliorated by Se addition. The authors suggest that the interplay between Zn and Se concentrations reflects an underlying interplay between interdependent, but distinct, metabolic pathways; i.e., (for Se) glutathione peroxidase and (for Zn) Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase--each offering protection against free radical damage. Because they are not necessarily localized in a given tissue, the key to recognition of such subtle, complex trace nutrient interactions has been use of intact animals in circumstances of control previously attainable only in tissue cultures.

  14. Selenium deficiency induced by zinc deprivation in a crustacean

    PubMed Central

    Keating, K. Irwin; Caffrey, P. Barone

    1989-01-01

    For intact daphnids reared in circumstances of controlled trace element exposure, one consequence of insufficient zinc (Zn) is an increased demand on the animal's pool of available selenium (Se). This demand is manifested by the type of cuticle deterioration associated with Se deficiency and by a depression of reproduction. In the presence of 25 parts per billion (ppb) Zn, 1 ppb Se eliminates these symptoms. In the absence of detectable Zn, 5 ppb Se eliminates overt cuticle damage and substantially increases reproduction. A shortening of life span resulting from Zn deprivation is not ameliorated by Se addition. We suggest that the interplay between Zn and Se concentrations reflects an underlying interplay between interdependent, but distinct, metabolic pathways; i.e., (for Se) glutathione peroxidase and (for Zn) Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase—each offering protection against free radical damage. Because they are not necessarily localized in a given tissue, the key to recognition of such subtle, complex trace nutrient interactions has been use of intact animals in circumstances of control previously attainable only in tissue cultures. PMID:16594062

  15. Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency protects from cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal damage.

    PubMed

    Rebillard, A; Rioux-Leclercq, N; Muller, C; Bellaud, P; Jouan, F; Meurette, O; Jouan, E; Vernhet, L; Le Quément, C; Carpinteiro, A; Schenck, M; Lagadic-Gossmann, D; Gulbins, E; Dimanche-Boitrel, M T

    2008-11-20

    Cisplatin is one of the most effectively used chemotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment. However, in humans, important cytotoxic side effects are observed including dose-limiting renal damage and profound gastrointestinal symptomatology. The toxic responses to cisplatin in mice are similar to those in human patients. Here, we evaluated whether the acid sphingomyelinase (Asm) mediates at least some of the toxic in vivo effects of cisplatin. To this end, we determined the toxic effects of a single intraperitoneal dose of cisplatin (27 mg/kg) in wild type (Asm(+/+)) and Asm-deficient mice (Asm(-/-)). Tissue injury and apoptosis were determined histologically on hematoxylin-eosin and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated nick end labeling) stainings 3, 12, 36 and 72 h after treatment. Our results revealed severe toxicity of cisplatin in Asm(+/+) mice with increased numbers of apoptotic cells in the thymus and small intestine. In marked contrast, Asm(-/-) mice were resistant to cisplatin and no apoptosis was observed in these organs after treatment. Moreover, cisplatin treatment primarily triggered apoptosis of endothelial cells in microvessels of intestine and thymus, an effect that was absent in mice lacking Asm. The data thus suggest that at least some toxic effects of cisplatin are mediated by the Asm in vivo resulting in early death of endothelial cells and consecutive organ damage.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation of the effect of dietary Zn or Cu deficiency and hyperoxia on the oxygen free radical defense system in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.G.; Towner, R.A.; Bray, T.M. )

    1990-02-26

    The role of Zn/Cu nutrition in oxygen free radical defense was investigate. Although endogenous free radical generation is increased in Zn and Cu deficiency, the free radical defense system in the lung and liver of Zn or Cu deficient rats was not compromised. The key oxygen radical defense enzyme, CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) activity was directly related to tissue Cu and inversely related to tissue Zn concentrations. When oxidative stress (85% oxygen exposure for 7 days) was superimposed on Zn or Cu deficiency, Cu but not Zn deficient rats were able to increase lung CuZnSOD activity. The changes in lung CuZnSOD activity during oxidative stress were not correlated with lung Cu or Zn concentrations. In a pioneering application of proton MRI, lung damage was monitored in vivo and non-invasively to evaluate the overall capacity of the free radical defense system for protection against oxidative stress. Zn deficient rats displayed the most severe lung damage by MRI. Repletion of Zn in the diet prevented MRI-detectable hyperoxia-induced lung damage. Volume selective spectroscopy (VOSY) verified lung damage was due to an increased water content. Inability of Zn deficient rats to increase lung CuZnSOD activity appears to contribute to the severe free radical-induced lung damage.

  17. Resistance to diet-induced adiposity in cannabinoid receptor-1 deficient mice is not due to impaired adipocyte function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Overactivity and/or dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) contribute to development of obesity. In vitro studies indicate a regulatory role for the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in adipocyte function and CB1-receptor deficient (CB1-/-) mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity. Whether this phenotype of CB1-/- mice is related to altered fat metabolism in adipose tissue is unknown. Methods We evaluated adipose tissue differentiation/proliferation markers and quantified lipogenic and lipolytic activities in fat tissues of CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice fed a high-fat (HF) or a high-fat/fish oil (HF/FO) diet as compared to animals receiving a low-fat chow diet. Comparison between HF diet and HF/FO diet allowed to investigate the influence of dietary fat quality on adipose tissue biology in relation to CB1 functioning. Results The adiposity-resistant phenotype of the CB1-/- mice was characterized by reduced fat mass and adipocyte size in HF and HF/FO-fed CB1-/- mice in parallel to a significant increase in energy expenditure as compared to CB1+/+ mice. The expression levels of adipocyte differentiation and proliferation markers were however maintained in these animals. Consistent with unaltered lipogenic gene expression, the fatty acid synthesis rates in adipose tissues from CB1-/- and CB1+/+ mice were unchanged. Whole-body and adipose-specific lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities were also not altered in CB1-/- mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that protection against diet-induced adiposity in CB1-deficient mice is not related to changes in adipocyte function per se, but rather results from increased energy dissipation by oxidative and non-oxidative pathways. PMID:22201701

  18. GA-DELLA pathway is involved in regulation of nitrogen deficiency-induced anthocyanin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Liu, Zhongjuan; Liu, Jianping; Lin, Sheng; Wang, Jianfeng; Lin, Wenxiong; Xu, Weifeng

    2017-04-01

    DELLA proteins positively regulate nitrogen deficiency-induced anthocyanin accumulation through directly interaction with PAP1 to enhance its transcriptional activity on anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expressions. Plants can survive a limiting nitrogen supply by undergoing adaptive responses, including induction of anthocyanin production. However, the detailed mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we found that this process was impaired and enhanced, respectively, by exogenous GA3 (an active form of GAs) and paclobutrazol (PAC, a specific GA biosynthesis inhibitor) in Arabidopsis seedlings. Consistently, the nitrogen deficiency-induced transcript levels of several key genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis, including F3'H, DFR, LDOX, and UF3GT, were decreased and enhanced by exogenous GA3 and PAC, respectively. Moreover, the nitrogen deficiency-induced anthocyanin accumulation and biosynthesis gene expressions were impaired in the loss-of-function mutant gai-t6/rga-t2/rgl1-1/rgl2-1/rgl3-1 (della) but enhanced in the GA-insensitive mutant gai, suggesting that DELLA proteins, known as repressors of GA signaling, are necessary for fully induction of nitrogen deficiency-driven anthocyanin biosynthesis. Using yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay, pull-down assay, and luciferase complementation assay, it was found that RGA, a DELLA of Arabidopsis, could strongly interact with PAP1, a known regulatory transcription factor positively involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis. Furthermore, transient expression assays indicated that RGA and GAI could enhance the transcriptional activities of PAP1 on its downstream genes, including F3'H and DFR. Taken together, this study suggests that DELLAs are necessary regulators for nitrogen deficiency-induced anthocyanin accumulation through interaction with PAP1 and enhancement of PAP1's transcriptional activity on its target genes. GA-DELLA-involved anthocyanin accumulation is important for plant adaptation to nitrogen deficiency.

  19. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With the Severity of Radiation-Induced Proctitis in Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorbanzadeh-Moghaddam, Amir; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Hemati, Simin

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced injury to normal tissues is a common complication of radiation therapy in cancer patients. Considering the role of vitamin D in mucosal barrier hemostasis and inflammatory responses, we investigated whether vitamin D deficiency is associated with the severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis in cancer patients. Methods and Materials: This prospective observational study was conducted in cancer patients referred for pelvic radiation therapy. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was measured before radiation therapy. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations of <35 nmol/L and <40 nmol/L in male and female patients, respectively, based on available normative data. Acute proctitis was assessed after 5 weeks of radiation therapy (total received radiation dose of 50 Gy) and graded from 0 to 4 using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Ninety-eight patients (57.1% male) with a mean age of 62.8 ± 9.1 years were studied. Vitamin D deficiency was found in 57 patients (58.1%). Symptoms of acute proctitis occurred in 72 patients (73.4%) after radiation therapy. RTOG grade was significantly higher in patients with vitamin D deficiency than in normal cases (median [interquartile range] of 2 [0.5-3] vs 1 [0-2], P=.037). Vitamin D deficiency was associated with RTOG grade of ≥2, independent of possible confounding factors; odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 3.07 (1.27-7.50), P=.013. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of this association and evaluating the effectiveness of vitamin D therapy in preventing radiation-induced acute proctitis is warranted.

  20. Myeloperoxidase deficiency attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced skin injuries

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Orlicky, David J.; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic mechanisms of skin injuries, following the acute inflammatory response induced by vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) exposure, are poorly understood. Neutrophils which accumulate at the site of injury, abundantly express myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein that is implicated in oxidant-related antimicrobial and cytotoxic responses. Our previous studies have shown that exposure to SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) or NM results in an inflammatory response including increased neutrophilic infiltration and MPO activity. To further define the role of neutrophil-derived MPO in NM-induced skin injury, here we used a genetic approach and examined the effect of NM exposure (12 h and 24 h) on previously established injury endpoints in C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and B6.129X1-MPOtm1Lus/J mice (MPO KO), homozygous null for MPO gene. NM exposure caused a significant increase in skin bi-fold thickness, epidermal thickness, microvesication, DNA damage and apoptosis in WT mice compared to MPO KO mice. MPO KO mice showed relatively insignificant effect. Similarly, NM-induced increases in the expression of inflammatory and proteolytic mediators, including COX-2, iNOS and MMP-9 in WT mice, while having a significantly lower effect in MPO KO mice. Collectively, these results show that MPO, which generates microbicidal oxidants, plays an important role in NM-induced skin injuries. This suggests the development of mechanism-based treatments against NM- and SM-induced skin injuries that inhibit MPO activity and attenuate MPO-derived oxidants. PMID:24631667

  1. Myeloperoxidase deficiency attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced skin injuries.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Orlicky, David J; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-06-05

    The pathologic mechanisms of skin injuries, following the acute inflammatory response induced by vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) exposure, are poorly understood. Neutrophils which accumulate at the site of injury, abundantly express myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein that is implicated in oxidant-related antimicrobial and cytotoxic responses. Our previous studies have shown that exposure to SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) or NM results in an inflammatory response including increased neutrophilic infiltration and MPO activity. To further define the role of neutrophil-derived MPO in NM-induced skin injury, here we used a genetic approach and examined the effect of NM exposure (12h and 24h) on previously established injury endpoints in C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and B6.129X1-MPOtm1Lus/J mice (MPO KO), homozygous null for MPO gene. NM exposure caused a significant increase in skin bi-fold thickness, epidermal thickness, microvesication, DNA damage and apoptosis in WT mice compared to MPO KO mice. MPO KO mice showed relatively insignificant effect. Similarly, NM induced increases in the expression of inflammatory and proteolytic mediators, including COX-2, iNOS and MMP-9 in WT mice, while having a significantly lower effect in MPO KO mice. Collectively, these results show that MPO, which generates microbicidal oxidants, plays an important role in NM-induced skin injuries. This suggests the development of mechanism-based treatments against NM- and SM-induced skin injuries that inhibit MPO activity and attenuate MPO-derived oxidants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Epigenetic mechanisms of dietary restriction induced aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lian, Ting; Gaur, Uma; Yang, Deying; Li, Diyan; Li, Ying; Yang, Mingyao

    2015-12-01

    Aging is a long-standing problem that people are always interested in. Thus, it is critical to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms in aging and explore the most efficient method to extend life expectancy. To achieve this goal, a wide range of systems including cells, rodent models, budding yeast, worms and flies have been employed for decades. In recent years, the effect of dietary restriction (DR) on lifespan is in the prime focus. Although we have confirmed that reduced insulin and/or insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling can increase Drosophila lifespan; the precise molecular mechanisms and nutritional response landscape of diet-mediated aging is ambiguous. Epigenetic events have been considered as the major contributors to lifespan extension with response to DR. The role of DNA methylation in aging is well acknowledged in mammals and rodents where it has been shown to impact aging by regulating the transcription, though the mechanism of regulation is not limited to only transcription. In Drosophila, the contribution of methylation during DR in aging is definitely less explored. In this review, we will update the advances in mechanisms of DR, with a particular focus on methylation as an upcoming target for aging studies and discuss Drosophila as a powerful model to understand mechanisms of aging with response to diet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 deficiency induces compensatory amino acid metabolism during fasting in mice.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoki; Yoshida, Yuma; Morita, Akihito; Mori, Nobuko; Miura, Shinji

    2016-11-01

    Glucose is used as an energy source in many organs and obtained from dietary carbohydrates. However, when the external energy supply is interrupted, e.g., during fasting, carbohydrates preserved in the liver and glycogenic precursors derived from other organs are used to maintain blood glucose levels. Glycerol and glycogenic amino acids derived from adipocytes and skeletal muscles are utilized as glycogenic precursors. Glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1), an NAD(+)/NADH-dependent enzyme present in the cytosol, catalyzes the reversible conversion of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) to dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). Since G3P is one of the substrates utilized for gluconeogenesis in the liver, the conversion of G3P to DHAP by GPD1 is essential for maintaining blood glucose levels during fasting. We focused on GPD1 and examined its roles in gluconeogenesis during fasting. Using GPD1 null model BALB/cHeA mice (HeA mice), we measured gluconeogenesis from glycerol and the change of blood glucose levels under fasting conditions. We also measured gene expression related to gluconeogenesis in the liver and protein metabolism in skeletal muscle. BALB/cBy mice (By mice) were used as a control. The blood glucose levels in the HeA mice were lower than that in the By mice after glycerol administration. Although lack of GPD1 inhibited gluconeogenesis from glycerol, blood glucose levels in the HeA mice after 1-4h of fasting were significantly higher than that in the By mice. Muscle protein synthesis in HeA mice was significantly lower than that in the By mice. Moreover, blood alanine levels and usage of alanine for gluconeogenesis in the liver were significantly higher in the HeA mice than that in the By mice. Although these data indicate that a lack of GPD1 inhibits gluconeogenesis from glycerol, chronic GPD1 deficiency may induce an adaptation that enhances gluconeogenesis from glycogenic amino acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sirtuin-6 deficiency exacerbates diabetes induced impairment of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Babu, Sahana Suresh; Jeyabal, Prince; Verma, Suresh K; Mackie, Alexander R; Khan, Mohsin; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Watanabe, Kenichi; Kishore, Raj; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major complications in diabetes and is characterized by chronic proinflammatory response, and abnormalities in angiogenesis and collagen deposition. Sirtuin family proteins regulate numerous pathophysiological processes, including those involved in promotion of longevity, DNA repair, glycolysis and inflammation. However the role of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a NAD+-dependent nuclear deacetylase, in wound healing specifically under diabetic condition remains unclear. To analyze the role of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound healing, paired 6 mm stented wound were created in diabetic db/db mice and injected siRNA against SIRT6 in the wound margins (transfection agent alone and non-sensed siRNA served as controls). Wound time to closure was assessed by digital planimetry, and wounds were harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. SIRT6-siRNA treated diabetic wound showed impaired healing, which was associated with reduced capillary density (CD31 staining vessels) when compared to control treatment. Interestingly, SIRT6 deficiency decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and proliferation markers in the wounds. Furthermore, SIRT6 ablation in diabetic wound promotes nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activation resulting in increased expression of proinflammatory markers (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) and increased oxidative stress. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that loss of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound aggravates proinflammatory response by increasing NF-kB activation, oxidative stress and decrease in angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Based on these findings, we speculate that activation of SIRT6 signaling might be a potential therapeutic approach for promoting wound healing in diabetics. PMID:26010430

  5. Allergens induce enhanced bronchoconstriction and leukotriene production in C5 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Laura; Kim, Jiyoun; Bolgos, Gerald L; Siddiqui, Javed; Remick, Daniel G

    2006-01-01

    Background Previous genetic analysis has shown that a deletion in the complement component 5 gene-coding region renders mice more susceptible to allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) due to reduced IL-12 production. We investigated the role of complement in a murine model of asthma-like pulmonary inflammation. Methods In order to evaluate the role of complement B10 mice either sufficient or deficient in C5 were studied. Both groups of mice immunized and challenged with a house dust extract (HDE) containing high levels of cockroach allergens. Airways hyper-reactivity was determined with whole-body plesthysmography. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed to determine pulmonary cellular recruitment and measure inflammatory mediators. Lung homogenates were assayed for mediators and plasma levels of IgE determined. Pulmonary histology was also evaluated. Results C5-deficient mice showed enhanced AHR to methylcholine challenge, 474% and 91% increase above baseline Penh in C5-deficient and C5-sufficient mice respectively, p < 0.001. IL-12 levels in the lung homogenate (LH) were only slightly reduced and BAL IL-12 was comparable in C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice. However, C5-deficient mice had significantly higher cysteinyl-leukotriene levels in the BAL fluid, 1913 +/- 246 pg/ml in C5d and 756 +/- 232 pg/ml in C5-sufficient, p = 0.003. Conclusion These data demonstrate that C5-deficient mice show enhanced AHR due to increased production of cysteinyl-leukotrienes. PMID:17044927

  6. Increased Sucrose in the Hypocotyls of Radish Sprouts Contributes to Nitrogen Deficiency-Induced Anthocyanin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Nana; Wu, Qi; Cui, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Effects of nitrogen (N) deficiency and sucrose (Suc) addition on regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis and their relationship were investigated in this study. Radish sprouts subjected to N deficiency had 50% higher anthocyanin accumulation than when grown in Hoagland solution (a nutrient medium with all macronutrients). The contents of endogenous soluble sugars (Suc, fructose, and glucose) in the hypocotyls were also markedly increased by N limitation, with Suc showing the highest increase. Inhibition of carbohydrate biosynthesis by addition of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) also eliminated N deficiency-induced anthocyanin accumulation. The latter was further supported by the expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis related genes and decreased activities of nitrate reductase in the presence of Suc. Together our results indicate that N deficiency-induced anthocyanin accumulation was, at least partly, dependent on the increase of the soluble sugar, especially Suc. This work is the first comprehensive study on relationship between N deficiency and sugar content on anthocyanin accumulation in the hypocotyls of radish sprouts. PMID:28083009

  7. Iron deficiency modifies gene expression variation induced by augmented hypoxia sensing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Shwu-Fan; Miasniakova, Galina; Sergueeva, Adelina; Ammosova, Tatiana; Xu, Min; Nekhai, Sergei; Nourai, Mehdi; Wade, Michael S.; Prchal, Josef T.

    2013-01-01

    In congenital Chuvash polycythemia (CP), VHLR200W homozygosity leads to elevated hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) levels at normoxia. CP is often treated by phlebotomy resulting in iron deficiency, permitting us to examine the separate and synergistic effects of iron deficiency and HIF signaling on gene expression. We compared peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression profiles of eight VHLR200W homozygotes with 17 wildtype individuals with normal iron status and found 812 up-regulated and 2120 down-regulated genes at false discovery rate 0.05. Among differential genes we identified three major gene regulation modules involving induction of innate immune responses, alteration of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and down-regulation of cell proliferation, stress-induced apoptosis and T-cell activation. These observations suggest molecular mechanisms for previous observations in CP of lower blood sugar without increased insulin and low oncogenic potential. Studies including 16 additional VHLR200W homozygotes with low ferritin indicated that iron deficiency enhanced the induction effect of VHLR200W for 50 genes including hemoglobin synthesis loci but suppressed the effect for 107 genes enriched for HIF-2 targets. This pattern is consistent with potentiation of HIF-1α protein stability by iron deficiency but a trend for down-regulation of HIF-2α translation by iron deficiency overriding an increase in HIF-2α protein stability. PMID:23993337

  8. CARMA3 deficiency abrogates G protein-coupled receptor-induced NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Grabiner, Brian C.; Blonska, Marzenna; Lin, Pei-Chun; You, Yun; Wang, Donghai; Sun, Jiyuan; Darnay, Bryant G.; Dong, Chen; Lin, Xin

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play pivotal roles in regulating various cellular functions. Although many GPCRs induce NF-κB activation, the molecular mechanism of GPCR-induced NF-κB activation remains largely unknown. CARMA3 (CARD and MAGUK domain-containing protein 3) is a scaffold molecule with unknown biological functions. By generating CARMA3 knockout mice using the gene targeting approach, here we show CARMA3 is required for GPCR-induced NF-κB activation. Mechanistically, we found that CARMA3 deficiency impairs GPCR-induced IκB kinase (IKK) activation, although it does not affect GPCR-induced IKKα/β phosphorylation, indicating that inducible phosphorylation of IKKα/β alone is not sufficient to induce its kinase activity. We also found that CARMA3 is physically associated with NEMO/IKKγ, and induces polyubiquitination of an unknown protein(s) that associates with NEMO, likely by linking NEMO to TRAF6. Consistently, we found TRAF6 deficiency also abrogates GPCR-induced NF-κB activation. Together, our results provide the genetic evidence that CARMA3 is required for GPCR-induced NF-κB activation. PMID:17438001

  9. Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Deficiency Augments Doxorubicin‐Induced Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xihui; Bucala, Richard; Ren, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence has depicted a role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in cardiac homeostasis under pathological conditions. This study was designed to evaluate the role of MIF in doxorubicin‐induced cardiomyopathy and the underlying mechanism involved with a focus on autophagy. Methods and Results Wild‐type (WT) and MIF knockout (MIF−/−) mice were given saline or doxorubicin (20 mg/kg cumulative, i.p.). A cohort of WT and MIF−/− mice was given rapamycin (6 mg/kg, i.p.) with or without bafilomycin A1 (BafA1, 3 μmol/kg per day, i.p.) for 1 week prior to doxorubicin challenge. To consolidate a role for MIF in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis following doxorubicin challenge, recombinant mouse MIF (rmMIF) was given to MIF−/− mice challenged with or without doxorubicin. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte function, and intracellular Ca2+ handling were evaluated. Autophagy and apoptosis were examined. Mitochondrial morphology and function were examined using transmission electron microscopy, JC‐1 staining, MitoSOX Red fluorescence, and mitochondrial respiration complex assay. DHE staining was used to evaluate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. MIF knockout exacerbated doxorubicin‐induced mortality and cardiomyopathy (compromised fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte and mitochondrial function, apoptosis, and ROS generation). These detrimental effects of doxorubicin were accompanied by defective autophagolysosome formation, the effect of which was exacerbated by MIF knockout. Rapamycin pretreatment rescued doxorubicin‐induced cardiomyopathy in WT and MIF−/− mice. Blocking autophagolysosome formation using BafA1 negated the cardioprotective effect of rapamycin and rmMIF. Conclusions Our data suggest that MIF serves as an indispensable cardioprotective factor against doxorubicin‐induced cardiomyopathy with an underlying mechanism through facilitating autophagolysosome formation. PMID:24334905

  10. LNK deficiency aggravates palmitate-induced preadipocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Jie-Yi; Jin, Chen-Chen; Wang, Guo-Hao; Huang, Xiong-Qing; Cheng, Jian-Ding; Wen, Xue-Jun; Zhao, Xiao-Miao; Wang, Guan-Lei

    2017-08-19

    LNK (SH2B3) is an intracellular adaptor protein that negatively regulates cellular proliferation or self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and some other progenitor cells. LNK is also recognized as a key regulator of insulin resistance and inflammatory responses in several tissues and organs. The function of LNK in adipose tissue is unknown. We previously demonstrated that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) mouse model had elevated serum free fatty acids (FFAs) levels and increased preadipocyte apoptosis in visceral fat tissue, showing the occurrence of lipotoxicity. Herein, when compared to control mice, the protein expression of LNK decreased in epididymal fat tissue from the high-sucrose/fat diet, low-dose streptozotocin induced T2DM mouse model. We thus investigated whether LNK could regulate palmitate-induced preadipocyte apoptosis in an in vitro apoptotic model in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. LNK specific siRNA exacerbated palmitate-induced apoptosis and increased pro-apoptotic protein levels of cleaved caspase-3, Bax and cytochrome C; while overexpression of LNK cDNA exhibited significant anti-apoptotic effects. Consistently, LNK specific siRNA further decreased the Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation reduced by palmitate and located on upstream of Bax and cytochrome C. The siRNA-mediated LNK knockdown exacerbated mitochondrial membrane depolarization and mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species production induced by palmitate, whereas overexpression of LNK attenuated that. These results indicated that LNK plays a regulatory role in the palmitate-related preadipocyte apoptosis and might be involved in adipose tissue dysfunction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. TLR4 deficiency promotes autophagy during cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    An, Chang Hyeok; Wang, Xiao Mei; Lam, Hilaire C; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Washko, George R; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2012-11-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) exert important nonimmune functions in lung homeostasis. TLR4 deficiency promotes pulmonary emphysema. We examined the role of TLR4 in regulating cigarette smoke (CS)-induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. Lung tissue was obtained from chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) patients. C3H/HeJ (Tlr4-mutated) mice and C57BL/10ScNJ (Tlr4-deficient) mice and their respective control strains were exposed to chronic CS or air. Human or mouse epithelial cells (wild-type, Tlr4-knockdown, and Tlr4-deficient) were exposed to CS-extract (CSE). Samples were analyzed for TLR4 expression, and for autophagic or apoptotic proteins by Western blot analysis or confocal imaging. Chronic obstructive lung disease lung tissues and human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to CSE displayed increased TLR4 expression, and increased autophagic [microtubule-associated protein-1 light-chain-3B (LC3B)] and apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3) markers. Beas-2B cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA displayed increased expression of LC3B relative to control cells, basally and after exposure to CSE. The basal and CSE-inducible expression of LC3B and cleaved caspase-3 were elevated in pulmonary alveolar type II cells from Tlr4-deficient mice. Wild-type mice subjected to chronic CS-exposure displayed airspace enlargement;, however, the Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice exhibited a marked increase in airspace relative to wild-type mice after CS-exposure. The Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice showed higher levels of LC3B under basal conditions and after CS exposure. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 was markedly increased in Tlr4-deficient mice exposed to CS. We describe a protective regulatory function of TLR4 against emphysematous changes of the lung in response to CS.

  12. TLR4 deficiency promotes autophagy during cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema

    PubMed Central

    An, Chang Hyeok; Wang, Xiao Mei; Lam, Hilaire C.; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Washko, George R.; Ryter, Stefan W.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) exert important nonimmune functions in lung homeostasis. TLR4 deficiency promotes pulmonary emphysema. We examined the role of TLR4 in regulating cigarette smoke (CS)-induced autophagy, apoptosis, and emphysema. Lung tissue was obtained from chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) patients. C3H/HeJ (Tlr4-mutated) mice and C57BL/10ScNJ (Tlr4-deficient) mice and their respective control strains were exposed to chronic CS or air. Human or mouse epithelial cells (wild-type, Tlr4-knockdown, and Tlr4-deficient) were exposed to CS-extract (CSE). Samples were analyzed for TLR4 expression, and for autophagic or apoptotic proteins by Western blot analysis or confocal imaging. Chronic obstructive lung disease lung tissues and human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to CSE displayed increased TLR4 expression, and increased autophagic [microtubule-associated protein-1 light-chain-3B (LC3B)] and apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3) markers. Beas-2B cells transfected with TLR4 siRNA displayed increased expression of LC3B relative to control cells, basally and after exposure to CSE. The basal and CSE-inducible expression of LC3B and cleaved caspase-3 were elevated in pulmonary alveolar type II cells from Tlr4-deficient mice. Wild-type mice subjected to chronic CS-exposure displayed airspace enlargement;, however, the Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice exhibited a marked increase in airspace relative to wild-type mice after CS-exposure. The Tlr4-mutated or Tlr4-deficient mice showed higher levels of LC3B under basal conditions and after CS exposure. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 was markedly increased in Tlr4-deficient mice exposed to CS. We describe a protective regulatory function of TLR4 against emphysematous changes of the lung in response to CS. PMID:22983353

  13. Prostaglandin E2 is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-Ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-10-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three ``D's'': diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation.

  14. Prostaglandin E2 is critical for the development of niacin-deficiency-induced photosensitivity via ROS production

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Kazunari; Ikenouchi-Sugita, Atsuko; Nakayama, Yasuko; Yoshioka, Haruna; Nomura, Takashi; Sakabe, Jun-ichi; Nakahigashi, Kyoko; Kuroda, Etsushi; Uematsu, Satoshi; Nakamura, Jun; Akira, Shizuo; Nakamura, Motonobu; Narumiya, Shuh; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Tokura, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Pellagra is a photosensitivity syndrome characterized by three “D's”: diarrhea, dermatitis, and dementia as a result of niacin deficiency. However, the molecular mechanisms of photosensitivity dermatitis, the hallmark abnormality of this syndrome, remain unclear. We prepared niacin deficient mice in order to develop a murine model of pellagra. Niacin deficiency induced photosensitivity and severe diarrhea with weight loss. In addition, niacin deficient mice exhibited elevated expressions of COX-2 and PGE syntheses (Ptges) mRNA. Consistently, photosensitivity was alleviated by a COX inhibitor, deficiency of Ptges, or blockade of EP4 receptor signaling. Moreover, enhanced PGE2 production in niacin deficiency was mediated via ROS production in keratinocytes. In line with the above murine findings, human skin lesions of pellagra patients confirmed the enhanced expression of Ptges. Niacin deficiency-induced photosensitivity was mediated through EP4 signaling in response to increased PGE2 production via induction of ROS formation. PMID:24131900

  15. Adaptive response of the heart to long-term anemia induced by iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yoshiro; Tsujino, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Mika; Sakoda, Tsuyoshi; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa; Masuyama, Tohru

    2009-03-01

    Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure and an independent predictor of poor prognosis. Chronic anemia leads to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and heart failure, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We investigated the mechanisms, including the molecular signaling pathway, of cardiac remodeling induced by iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an iron-deficient diet for 20 wk to induce IDA, and the molecular mechanisms of cardiac remodeling were evaluated. The iron-deficient diet initially induced severe anemia, which resulted in LV hypertrophy and dilation with preserved systolic function associated with increased serum erythropoietin (Epo) concentration. Cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation and VEGF gene expression increased by 12 wk of IDA, causing angiogenesis in the heart. Thereafter, sustained IDA induced upregulation of cardiac hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha gene expression and maintained upregulation of cardiac VEGF gene expression and cardiac angiogenesis; however, sustained IDA promoted cardiac fibrosis and lung congestion, with decreased serum Epo concentration and cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation after 20 wk of IDA compared with 12 wk. Upregulation of serum Epo concentration and cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation is associated with a beneficial adaptive mechanism of anemia-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and later decreased levels of these molecules may be critical for the transition from adaptive cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac dysfunction in long-term anemia. Understanding the mechanism of cardiac maladaptation to anemia may lead to a new strategy for treatment of chronic heart failure with anemia.

  16. Lesions of the entopeduncular nucleus in rats prevent apomorphine-induced deficient sensorimotor gating.

    PubMed

    Lütjens, Götz; Krauss, Joachim K; Schwabe, Kerstin

    2011-07-07

    Dopamine-induced hyperactivity and deficient sensorimotor gating, measured as prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle response (ASR), are used as animal models for neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and Tourette's syndrome. We here investigated whether excitotoxic lesions of the rat entopeduncular nucleus (EPN), the equivalent to the human globus pallidus internus (GPi), would improve apomorphine-induced PPI-deficits and hyperactivity. Additionally, we investigated the effect of EPN lesions on cognition, motivation and motor skills. In male Sprague Dawley rats bilateral EPN lesions were induced by stereotactic injection of ibotenate (4 μg in 0.4 μl phosphate buffered saline, PBS) or sham-lesions by injection of vehicle PBS. After one week, rats were tested for learning and memory (continuous and delayed alternation, T-maze), for motivation (progressive ratio test with breakpoint of 3 min inactivity, Skinner box), and for motor skills (rotating rod). Thereafter, rats were tested for PPI of ASR (startle response system) after subcutaneous injection of apomorphine (1.0mg/kg and vehicle) and for locomotor activity (0.5mg/kg and vehicle). Ibotenate-induced EPN lesions did not affect learning and memory, motivation or motor skills. Basal locomotor activity and PPI was also not affected, but EPN lesions ameliorated apomorphine-induced hyperlocomotion and deficient PPI. This work indicates an important role of the EPN for the modulation of dopamine agonist-induced deficient sensorimotor gating and hyperlocomotion, without affecting normal behavioral function.

  17. A dietary nucleoside-nucleotide mixture inhibits endotoxin-induced bacterial translocation in mice fed protein-free diet.

    PubMed

    Adjei, A A; Yamamoto, S

    1995-01-01

    Nucleosides and nucleotides are important substrates utilized by the intestinal mucosa. To determine the relative effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides on the gut, we investigated the effects of these compounds on endotoxin-induced bacterial translocation, cecal bacterial populations and ileal histology in protein-malnourished mice. There was an inhibition of gram-negative enteric bacteria in the mesenteric lymph node and spleen of the surviving mice fed the protein-free diet supplemented with a nucleoside-nucleotide mixture compared with the nonsupplemented group. Histologically, the damage to the gut mucosal barrier was more pronounced in the nonsupplemented group than in the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group. However, the cecal bacterial populations in the groups were not different. The villous height, crypt depth and total wall thickness were more developed in the supplemented group compared with the nonsupplemented group, indicating that the nucleoside-nucleotide mixture blocked bacterial translocation by preventing endotoxin-induced mucosal or epithelial damage. These results suggest that the nucleoside-nucleotide mixture could be used to inhibit or reduce the incidence of bacterial translocation, decrease intestinal injury and improve survival in a lethal model of protein deficiency and endotoxemia.

  18. The Vacuolar Manganese Transporter MTP8 Determines Tolerance to Iron Deficiency-Induced Chlorosis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Seckin; Meier, Bastian; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Peiter, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a widespread nutritional disorder on calcareous soils. To identify genes involved in the Fe deficiency response, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion lines were screened on a high-pH medium with low Fe availability. This approach identified METAL TOLERANCE PROTEIN8 (MTP8), a member of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator family, as a critical determinant for the tolerance to Fe deficiency-induced chlorosis, also on soil substrate. Subcellular localization to the tonoplast, complementation of a manganese (Mn)-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain, and Mn sensitivity of mtp8 knockout mutants characterized the protein as a vacuolar Mn transporter suitable to prevent plant cells from Mn toxicity. MTP8 expression was strongly induced on low-Fe as well as high-Mn medium, which were both strictly dependent on the transcription factor FIT, indicating that high-Mn stress induces Fe deficiency. mtp8 mutants were only hypersensitive to Fe deficiency when Mn was present in the medium, which further suggested an Mn-specific role of MTP8 during Fe limitation. Under those conditions, mtp8 mutants not only translocated more Mn to the shoot than did wild-type plants but suffered in particular from critically low Fe concentrations and, hence, Fe chlorosis, although the transcriptional Fe deficiency response was up-regulated more strongly in mtp8. The diminished uptake of Fe from Mn-containing low-Fe medium by mtp8 mutants was caused by an impaired ability to boost the ferric chelate reductase activity, which is an essential process in Fe acquisition. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the long-known interference of Mn in Fe nutrition and define the molecular processes by which plants alleviate this antagonism. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Gastrointestinal protective effect of dietary spices during ethanol-induced oxidant stress in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Usha N S; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2010-04-01

    Spices are traditionally known to have digestive stimulant action and to cure digestive disorders. In this study, the protective effect of dietary spices with respect to activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa was examined. Groups of Wistar rats were fed for 8 weeks with diets containing black pepper (0.5%), piperine (0.02%), red pepper (3.0%), capsaicin (0.01%), and ginger (0.05%). All these spices significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes--superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase--in both gastric and intestinal mucosa, suggesting a gastrointestinal protective role for these spices. In a separate study, these dietary spices were found to alleviate the diminished activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa under conditions of ethanol-induced oxidative stress. The gastroprotective effect of the spices was also reflected in their positive effect on mucosal glycoproteins, thereby lowering mucosal injury. The amelioration of the ethanol-induced decrease in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in gastric and intestinal mucosa by dietary spices suggests their beneficial gastrointestinal protective role. This is the first report on the gastrointestinal protective potential of dietary spices.

  20. Expression of growth-related genes in the mouse placenta is influenced by interactions between intestinal nematode (Heligmosomoides bakeri) infection and dietary protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lisa M; Koski, Kristine G; Scott, Marilyn E

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal nematode infection and dietary protein deficiency are common during pregnancy and both have been shown to impair fetal growth in humans, livestock and laboratory animals. The placenta has been linked to fetal growth but its role in mediating the response to maternal infection and protein deficiency is not understood. We used microarrays to test the hypothesis that maternal intestinal nematode infection and protein deficiency alter the expression of placental genes related to fetal growth. Placentas were obtained on day 18 of pregnancy from CD-1 mice fed protein sufficient (24%) or protein deficiency (6%) isoenergetic diets and either uninfected or infected with Heligmosomoides bakeri. Gene expression was analysed using the Affymetrix GeneChip 2.0 ST mouse array (n=3/experimental group). Differentially expressed genes were identified using two-way ANOVA (P<0.02, fold-change >1.25) and pathway analyses were performed using DAVID software. Expression changes for selected genes were confirmed using qPCR. Heligmosomoides bakeri infection down-regulated 109 transcripts, including genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, and up-regulated 214 transcripts, including genes involved in ATP binding and hemopoiesis. Up-regulation of hemopoiesis genes may explain increased placental mass previously reported in H. bakeri-infected mice. Protein deficiency down-regulated 141 annotated transcripts, including genes involved in cell motility and endopeptidase activity, and up-regulated 131 annotated transcripts, including genes related to hemopoiesis. A statistical interaction was detected for 248 transcripts, including several genes with known functions in fetal growth. Notably, expression of the gene Irs1 (insulin receptor substrate) was lower in infected dams but only when they were fed a protein sufficient diet. Also, expression of several genes, including Igf1r (insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor) and Prl (prolactin) was up-regulated by infection in protein

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco: Molecular Characterization, Tissue Expression, and Expression Responses to Dietary Copper Deficiency and Excess

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Feng; Luo, Zhi; Huang, Chao; Chen, Qi-Liang; Pan, Ya–Xiong; Xu, Yi-Huan

    2015-01-01

    Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones [glucose-regulated protein 78 (grp78) and calreticulin (crt)] and three ER stress sensors [PKR-like ER kinase (perk), inositol requiring enzyme (ire)-1α, and activating transcription factor (atf)-6α] cDNAs were first characterized from yellow catfish, Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. The predicted amino acid sequences for the yellow catfish grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α revealed that the proteins contained all of the structural features that were characteristic of the five genes in other species, including the KDEL motif, signal peptide, sensor domain, and effector domain. mRNAs of the five genes mentioned above were expressed in various tissues, but their mRNA levels varied among tissues. Dietary Cu excess, but not Cu deficiency, activated the chaperones (grp78 and crt) and folding sensors in ER, and the UPR signaling pathways (i.e., perk–eif2α and the ire1–xbp1) in a tissue-specific manner. For the first time, our study cloned grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α genes in yellow catfish and demonstrated their differential expression among tissues. Moreover, the present study also indicated differential regulation of these ER stress–related genes by dietary Cu deficiency and excess, which will be beneficial for us to evaluate effects of dietary Cu levels in fish at the molecular level, based on the upstream pathway of lipid metabolism (the ER) and thus provide novel insights regarding the nutrition of Cu in fish. PMID:26276384

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Genes in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco: Molecular Characterization, Tissue Expression, and Expression Responses to Dietary Copper Deficiency and Excess.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Feng; Luo, Zhi; Huang, Chao; Chen, Qi-Liang; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Xu, Yi-Huan

    2015-08-13

    Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones [glucose-regulated protein 78 (grp78) and calreticulin (crt)] and three ER stress sensors [PKR-like ER kinase (perk), inositol requiring enzyme (ire)-1α, and activating transcription factor (atf)-6α] cDNAs were first characterized from yellow catfish, Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. The predicted amino acid sequences for the yellow catfish grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α revealed that the proteins contained all of the structural features that were characteristic of the five genes in other species, including the KDEL motif, signal peptide, sensor domain, and effector domain. mRNAs of the five genes mentioned above were expressed in various tissues, but their mRNA levels varied among tissues. Dietary Cu excess, but not Cu deficiency, activated the chaperones (grp78 and crt) and folding sensors in ER, and the UPR signaling pathways (i.e., perk-eif2α and the ire1-xbp1) in a tissue-specific manner. For the first time, our study cloned grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α genes in yellow catfish and demonstrated their differential expression among tissues. Moreover, the present study also indicated differential regulation of these ER stress-related genes by dietary Cu deficiency and excess, which will be beneficial for us to evaluate effects of dietary Cu levels in fish at the molecular level, based on the upstream pathway of lipid metabolism (the ER) and thus provide novel insights regarding the nutrition of Cu in fish.

  3. Myeloid mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency inhibits aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yu Yao; Frieler, Ryan A; Zheng, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Wu Chang; Sun, Xue Nan; Yang, Qing Zhen; Ma, Shu Min; Huang, Baozhuan; Berger, Stefan; Wang, Wang; Wu, Yong; Yu, Ying; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Mortensen, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade has been shown to suppress cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling in animal models of pressure overload (POL). This study aims to determine whether MR deficiency in myeloid cells modulates aortic constriction-induced cardiovascular injuries. Myeloid MR knockout (MMRKO) mice and littermate control mice were subjected to abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) or sham operation. We found that AAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were significantly attenuated in MMRKO mice. Expression of genes important in generating reactive oxygen species was decreased in MMRKO mice, while that of manganese superoxide dismutase increased. Furthermore, expression of genes important in cardiac metabolism was increased in MMRKO hearts. Macrophage infiltration in the heart was inhibited and expression of inflammatory genes was decreased in MMRKO mice. In addition, aortic fibrosis and inflammation were attenuated in MMRKO mice. Taken together, our data indicated that MR deficiency in myeloid cells effectively attenuated aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, as well as aortic fibrosis and inflammation.

  4. Ethanol-induced developmental neurodegeneration in secretin receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dong-Woo; Givens, Bennet; Nishijima, Ichiko

    2009-05-06

    Alcohol exposure during brain development induces neuronal cell death in the brain. Several neuroactive peptides have been shown to protect against alcohol-induced cell death. Secretin is a peptide hormone, and the secretin receptor is expressed in the gut and the brain. To explore a potential role of secretin signal against ethanol neurotoxicity during brain development, secretin receptor-deficient mice were exposed to ethanol on postnatal day 4. We identified significant ethanol-induced apoptosis in the external granular layer of the secretin receptor-deficient cerebellum and in the striatum after ethanol treatment. During the early postnatal period, there is a proliferation of granular cell progenitors that reside in the external granular layer. The results suggest that secretin signal plays a neuroprotective role of neuronal progenitor cells against the neurotoxicity of ethanol.

  5. High dietary folate in pregnant mice leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency and altered methyl metabolism, with embryonic growth delay and short-term memory impairment in offspring.

    PubMed

    Bahous, Renata H; Jadavji, Nafisa M; Deng, Liyuan; Cosín-Tomás, Marta; Lu, Jessica; Malysheva, Olga; Leung, Kit-Yi; Ho, Ming-Kai; Pallàs, Mercè; Kaliman, Perla; Greene, Nicholas D E; Bedell, Barry J; Caudill, Marie A; Rozen, Rima

    2017-03-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) generates methyltetrahydrofolate for methylation reactions. Severe MTHFR deficiency results in homocystinuria and neurologic impairment. Mild MTHFR deficiency (677C > T polymorphism) increases risk for complex traits, including neuropsychiatric disorders. Although low dietary folate impacts brain development, recent concerns have focused on high folate intake following food fortification and increased vitamin use. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate during pregnancy affects brain development in murine offspring. Female mice were placed on control diet (CD) or folic acid-supplemented diet (FASD) throughout mating, pregnancy and lactation. Three-week-old male pups were evaluated for motor and cognitive function. Tissues from E17.5 embryos, pups and dams were collected for choline/methyl metabolite measurements, immunoblotting or gene expression of relevant enzymes. Brains were examined for morphology of hippocampus and cortex. Pups of FASD mothers displayed short-term memory impairment, decreased hippocampal size and decreased thickness of the dentate gyrus. MTHFR protein levels were reduced in FASD pup livers, with lower concentrations of phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine in liver and hippocampus, respectively. FASD pup brains showed evidence of altered acetylcholine availability and Dnmt3a mRNA was reduced in cortex and hippocampus. E17.5 embryos and placentas from FASD dams were smaller. MTHFR protein and mRNA were reduced in embryonic liver, with lower concentrations of choline, betaine and phosphocholine. Embryonic brain displayed altered development of cortical layers. In summary, high folate intake during pregnancy leads to pseudo-MTHFR deficiency, disturbed choline/methyl metabolism, embryonic growth delay and memory impairment in offspring. These findings highlight the unintended negative consequences of supplemental folic acid. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Iodine deficiency induces a VEGF-dependent microvascular response in salivary glands and in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, Jessica; Derradji, Hanane; Craps, Julie; Sonveaux, Pierre; Colin, Ides M; Many, Marie-Christine; Gérard, Anne-Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Despite efforts to optimize iodine supply in iodine deficient countries, iodine deficiency (ID) remains a global problem worldwide. Activation of the local microvasculature by ID in the thyroid gland aims at improving the local supply of iodide. For this purpose, the thyrocytes secrete vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) that acts on adjacent capillaries, via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)/Hypoxia Inducible factor (HIF)-dependent pathway. Beside the thyroid, other organs including salivary glands and the stomach do express the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and are able to take iodide up, potentially rendering them sensitive to ID. To verify this hypothesis, ID-induced effects on the local microvasculature were studied in salivary glands and in the stomach. ID was induced by feeding young mice with an iodide-deficient diet and NIS inhibitor perchlorate in the drinking water. In salivary glands, ID induced a transient increase in HIF-1α protein expression accompanied by a transient, VEGF-dependent increase in blood flow. In the gastric mucosa, ID transiently increased VEGF expression in the mucin-secreting epithelium and in ghrelin-secreting endocrine cells. These observations suggest that microvascular changes in response to ID occur in NIS-expressing tissues other than the thyroid. NIS expressing cells could be viewed as iodide sensors that respond to ID by inducing vascular changes, probably to optimize iodide bioavailability at regional or systemic levels.

  7. Bifidobacterium animalis protects intestine from damage induced by zinc deficiency in rats.

    PubMed

    Mengheri, E; Nobili, F; Vignolini, F; Pesenti, M; Brandi, G; Biavati, B

    1999-12-01

    We investigated the potential beneficial effects of Bifidobacterium animalis on intestinal damage using zinc-deficient (ZD) rats as a model for intestinal alterations. The ZD rats were fed diets containing 1 mg Zn/kg for 20 (ZD(20)) or 40 (ZD(40)) d to induce damage that differed in severity. Subgroups of these rats, the ZD(20) + B and ZD(40) + B groups, received a suspension of B. animalis (3.5 x 10(8) colony forming units) daily for the last 10 d. Another subgroup, the ZD(40) + B + 7 d group, was fed the ZD diet for 7 d after the B. animalis treatment period. Zinc deficiency induced ulcerations, edema, inflammatory cell infiltration and dilatation of blood vessels in duodenum, jejunum and ileum, with increasing severity between 20 and 40 d of zinc deficiency. The mucosa of the ZD(20) + B group was well preserved, and most of the morphologic alterations induced by zinc deficiency were normalized in the ZD(40) + B group. The high fecal concentrations of B. animalis in the ZD(40) + B and ZD(40) + B + 7 d groups indicate that these bifidobacteria survived passage through the gastrointestinal tract and proliferated. Electron microscopy confirmed the elevated numbers of bifidobacteria in cecum. Treatment with B. animalis resulted in greater epithelial cell proliferation and disaccharidase activities in the ZD(40) + B group compared with the ZD(40) group. These findings indicate that B. animalis can protect the intestine from alterations induced by zinc deficiency, suggesting that this bacterium may play a role in intestinal mucosal defense.

  8. Is Metformin-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency Responsible for Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Deepti; Khaliq, Farah; Vaney, Neelam; Madhu, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes mellitus has its deleterious effects on various aspects of cognition such as memory function, executive function, and information-processing speed. The present study aims to assess cognition in diabetes patients and also tries to find its association with Vitamin B12 deficiency induced by metformin. Materials and Methods: Thirty diabetics taking metformin and thirty nondiabetic controls were enrolled. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and serum Vitamin B12 levels were evaluated in them. Results: Vitamin B12 levels were found to be deficient, and latencies of waves P200 and P300 were prolonged in the diabetics as compared to the controls. The dose and duration of metformin had no association with the ERPs. Conclusions: Although the Vitamin B12 levels were deficient in diabetics on metformin, this is not the reason behind the cognitive impairment found in them. PMID:27570337

  9. Lead induced thiamine deficiency in the brain decreased the threshold of electroshock seizure in rat.

    PubMed

    Cheong, J H; Seo, D O; Ryu, J R; Shin, C Y; Kim, Y T; Kim, H C; Kim, W K; Ko, K H

    1999-04-15

    Many neurological disorders that occur frequently in lead intoxicated animals, have also been observed in thiamine deficient animals. To test whether lead intoxication could decrease the thiamine status and thresholds of electroshock seizure in rats, 3-week-old Wistar rats were treated with lead or lead plus thiamine. For comparison, a thiamine deficient group was included. Thiamine contents and transketolase activity, one of the thiamine dependent enzymes in the brain regions were significantly lowered by lead intoxication and thiamine deficiency. In both cases, thresholds of the electroshock seizure were significantly decreased. Thiamine supplementation reversed these signs and decreased the brain lead concentration in the lead treated group. The results from the present study suggest that the increased seizure susceptibility induced by lead intoxication in rats may be mediated at least in part through the changes of thiamine status.

  10. Effect of dietary phosphorus deficiency on the growth, immune function and structural integrity of head kidney, spleen and skin in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2017-04-01

    This study evaluates the effects of dietary phosphorus on the growth, immune function and structural integrity (head kidney, spleen and skin) of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) that were fed graded levels of available phosphorus (0.95-8.75 g/kg diet). Results indicated that phosphorus deficiency decreased the growth performance of young grass carp. In addition, the results first demonstrated that compared with the optimal phosphorus level, phosphorus deficiency depressed the lysozyme (LZ) and acid phosphatase (ACP) activities and the complement 3 (C3), C4 and immunoglobulin M (IgM) contents, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of antimicrobial peptides, anti-inflammatory cytokines, inhibitor of κBα (IκBα) and target of rapamycin (TOR), whereas it up-regulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and NF-κB p52 mRNA levels to decrease fish head kidney and spleen immune functions. Moreover, phosphorus deficiency up-regulated the mRNA levels of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1a (Keap1a), Fas ligand (FasL), apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1), Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax), caspase -2, -3, -7, -8 and -9, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), whereas it depressed the glutathione (GSH) contents and antioxidant enzymes activities, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of antioxidant enzymes, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), B-cell lymphoma protein-2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) and tight junction complexes to attenuate fish head kidney and spleen structural integrity. In addition, phosphorus deficiency increased skin hemorrhage and lesions morbidity. Finally, based on the percent weight gain (PWG) and the ability to combat skin hemorrhage and lesions, the dietary available phosphorus requirements for young grass carp (254.56-898.23 g) were estimated to be 4.10 and 4.13 g/kg diet, respectively. In summary, phosphorus deficiency decreases the growth

  11. Biochemical characteristics of neonatal cholestasis induced by citrin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-She; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Zheng, Ying-Jie; Fu, Hai-Yan; Chen, Rui; Lu, Yi; Fang, Ling-Juan; Saheki, Takeyori; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To explore differences in biochemical indices between neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD) and that with other etiologies. METHODS: Patients under 6 mo of age who were referred for investigation of conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia from June 2003 to December 2010 were eligible for this study. After excluding diseases affecting the extrahepatic biliary system, all patients were screened for the two most common SLC25A13 mutations; the coding exons of the entire SLC25A13 gene was sequenced and Western blotting of citrin protein performed in selected cases. Patients in whom homozygous or compound heterozygous SLC25A13 mutation and/or absence of normal citrin protein was detected were defined as having NICCD. Cases in which no specific etiological factor could be ascertained after a comprehensive conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia work-up were defined as idiopathic neonatal cholestasis (INC). Thirty-two NICCD patients, 250 INC patients, and 39 infants with cholangiography-confirmed biliary atresia (BA) were enrolled. Laboratory values at their first visit were abstracted from medical files and compared. RESULTS: Compared with BA and INC patients, the NICCD patients had significantly higher levels of total bile acid (TBA) [all measures are expressed as median (inter-quartile range): 178.0 (111.2-236.4) μmol/L in NICCD vs 112.0 (84.9-153.9) μmol/L in BA and 103.0 (70.9-135.3) μmol/L in INC, P = 0.0001]. The NICCD patients had significantly lower direct bilirubin [D-Bil 59.6 (43.1-90.9) μmol/L in NICCD vs 134.0 (115.9-151.2) μmol/L in BA and 87.3 (63.0-123.6) μmol/L in INC, P = 0.0001]; alanine aminotransferase [ALT 34.0 (23.0-55.0) U/L in NICCD vs 108.0 (62.0-199.0) U/L in BA and 84.5 (46.0-166.0) U/L in INC, P = 0.0001]; aspartate aminotransferase [AST 74.0 (53.5-150.0) U/L in NICCD vs 153.0 (115.0-239.0) U/L in BA and 130.5 (81.0-223.0) U/L in INC, P = 0.0006]; albumin [34.9 (30.7-38.2) g/L in NICCD vs 38.4 (36.3-42.2) g/L in BA and

  12. Biochemical characteristics of neonatal cholestasis induced by citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-She; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Zheng, Ying-Jie; Fu, Hai-Yan; Chen, Rui; Lu, Yi; Fang, Ling-Juan; Saheki, Takeyori; Kobayashi, Keiko

    2012-10-21

    To explore differences in biochemical indices between neonatal intrahepatic cholestasis caused by citrin deficiency (NICCD) and that with other etiologies. Patients under 6 mo of age who were referred for investigation of conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia from June 2003 to December 2010 were eligible for this study. After excluding diseases affecting the extrahepatic biliary system, all patients were screened for the two most common SLC25A13 mutations; the coding exons of the entire SLC25A13 gene was sequenced and Western blotting of citrin protein performed in selected cases. Patients in whom homozygous or compound heterozygous SLC25A13 mutation and/or absence of normal citrin protein was detected were defined as having NICCD. Cases in which no specific etiological factor could be ascertained after a comprehensive conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia work-up were defined as idiopathic neonatal cholestasis (INC). Thirty-two NICCD patients, 250 INC patients, and 39 infants with cholangiography-confirmed biliary atresia (BA) were enrolled. Laboratory values at their first visit were abstracted from medical files and compared. Compared with BA and INC patients, the NICCD patients had significantly higher levels of total bile acid (TBA) [all measures are expressed as median (inter-quartile range): 178.0 (111.2-236.4) μmol/L in NICCD vs 112.0 (84.9-153.9) μmol/L in BA and 103.0 (70.9-135.3) μmol/L in INC, P = 0.0001]. The NICCD patients had significantly lower direct bilirubin [D-Bil 59.6 (43.1-90.9) μmol/L in NICCD vs 134.0 (115.9-151.2) μmol/L in BA and 87.3 (63.0-123.6) μmol/L in INC, P = 0.0001]; alanine aminotransferase [ALT 34.0 (23.0-55.0) U/L in NICCD vs 108.0 (62.0-199.0) U/L in BA and 84.5 (46.0-166.0) U/L in INC, P = 0.0001]; aspartate aminotransferase [AST 74.0 (53.5-150.0) U/L in NICCD vs 153.0 (115.0-239.0) U/L in BA and 130.5 (81.0-223.0) U/L in INC, P = 0.0006]; albumin [34.9 (30.7-38.2) g/L in NICCD vs 38.4 (36.3-42.2) g/L in BA and 39.9 (37.0-42.3) g/L in

  13. FKBP12 deficiency reduces strength deficits after eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Benjamin T.; Rouviere, Clement; Hamilton, Susan L.; Ingalls, Christopher P.

    2008-01-01

    Strength deficits associated with eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury stem, in part, from excitation-contraction uncoupling. FKBP12 is a 12-kDa binding protein known to bind to the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel [ryanodine receptor (RyR1)] and plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling. To assess the effects of FKBP12 deficiency on muscle injury and recovery, we measured anterior crural muscle (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles) strength in skeletal muscle-specific FKBP12-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice before and after a single bout of 150 eccentric contractions, as well as before and after the performance of six injury bouts. Histological damage of the tibialis anterior muscle was assessed after injury. Body weight and peak isometric and eccentric torques were lower in FKBP12-deficient mice compared with WT mice. There were no differences between FKBP12-deficient and WT mice in preinjury peak isometric and eccentric torques when normalized to body weight, and no differences in the relative decreases in eccentric torque with a single or multiple injury bouts. After a single injury bout, FKBP12-deficient mice had less initial strength deficits and recovered faster (especially females) than WT mice, despite no differences in the degree of histological damage. After multiple injury bouts, FKBP12-deficient mice recovered muscle strength faster than WT mice and exhibited significantly less histological muscle damage than WT mice. In summary, FKBP12 deficiency results in less initial strength deficits and enhanced recovery from single (especially females) and repeated bouts of injury than WT mice. PMID:18511525

  14. FKBP12 deficiency reduces strength deficits after eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury.

    PubMed

    Corona, Benjamin T; Rouviere, Clement; Hamilton, Susan L; Ingalls, Christopher P

    2008-08-01

    Strength deficits associated with eccentric contraction-induced muscle injury stem, in part, from excitation-contraction uncoupling. FKBP12 is a 12-kDa binding protein known to bind to the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channel [ryanodine receptor (RyR1)] and plays an important role in excitation-contraction coupling. To assess the effects of FKBP12 deficiency on muscle injury and recovery, we measured anterior crural muscle (tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles) strength in skeletal muscle-specific FKBP12-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice before and after a single bout of 150 eccentric contractions, as well as before and after the performance of six injury bouts. Histological damage of the tibialis anterior muscle was assessed after injury. Body weight and peak isometric and eccentric torques were lower in FKBP12-deficient mice compared with WT mice. There were no differences between FKBP12-deficient and WT mice in preinjury peak isometric and eccentric torques when normalized to body weight, and no differences in the relative decreases in eccentric torque with a single or multiple injury bouts. After a single injury bout, FKBP12-deficient mice had less initial strength deficits and recovered faster (especially females) than WT mice, despite no differences in the degree of histological damage. After multiple injury bouts, FKBP12-deficient mice recovered muscle strength faster than WT mice and exhibited significantly less histological muscle damage than WT mice. In summary, FKBP12 deficiency results in less initial strength deficits and enhanced recovery from single (especially females) and repeated bouts of injury than WT mice.

  15. Mechanism of phytohormone involvement in feedback regulation of cotton leaf senescence induced by potassium deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the phytohormonal basis of the feedback regulation of leaf senescence induced by potassium (K) deficiency in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), two cultivars contrasting in sensitivity to K deficiency were self- and reciprocally grafted hypocotyl-to-hypocotyl, using standard grafting (one scion grafted onto one rootstock), Y grafting (two scions grafted onto one rootstock), and inverted Y grafting (one scion grafted onto two rootstocks) at the seedling stage. K deficiency (0.03mM for standard and Y grafting, and 0.01mM for inverted Y grafting) increased the root abscisic acid (ABA) concentration by 1.6- to 3.1-fold and xylem ABA delivery rates by 1.8- to 4.6-fold. The K deficiency also decreased the delivery rates of xylem cytokinins [CKs; including the zeatin riboside (ZR) and isopentenyl adenosine (iPA) type] by 29–65% and leaf CK concentration by 16–57%. The leaf ABA concentration and xylem ABA deliveries were consistently greater in CCRI41 (more sensitive to K deficiency) than in SCRC22 (less sensitive to K deficiency) scions under K deficiency, and ZR- and iPA-type levels were consistently lower in the former than in the latter, irrespective of rootstock cultivar or grafting type, indicating that cotton shoot influences the levels of ABA and CKs in leaves and xylem sap. Because the scions had little influence on phytohormone levels in the roots (rootstocks) of all three types of grafts and rootstock xylem sap (collected below the graft union) of Y and inverted Y grafts, it appears that the site for basipetal feedback signal(s) involved in the regulation of xylem phytohormones is the hypocotyl of cotton seedlings. Also, the target of this feedback signal(s) is more likely to be the changes in xylem phytohormones within tissues of the hypocotyl rather than the export of phytohormones from the roots. PMID:22962680

  16. Lamp-2 deficiency prevents high-fat diet-induced obese diabetes via enhancing energy expenditure

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda-Yamahara, Mako; Kume, Shinji; Yamahara, Kosuke; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakzu; Ugi, Satoshi; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-09-18

    Autophagy process is essential for maintaining intracellular homeostasis and consists of autophagosome formation and subsequent fusion with lysosome for degradation. Although the role of autophagosome formation in the pathogenesis of diabetes has been recently documented, the role of the latter process remains unclear. This study analyzed high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice lacking lysosome-associated membrane protein-2 (lamp-2), which is essential for the fusion with lysosome and subsequent degradation of autophagosomes. Although lamp-2 deficient mice showed little alteration in glucose metabolism under normal diet feeding, they showed a resistance against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemia and tissues lipid accumulation, accompanied with higher energy expenditure. The expression levels of thermogenic genes in brown adipose tissue were significantly increased in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice. Of some serum factors related to energy expenditure, the serum level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21 and its mRNA expression level in the liver were significantly higher in HFD-fed lamp-2-deficient mice in an ER stress-, but not PPARα-, dependent manner. In conclusion, a lamp-2-depenedent fusion and degradation process of autophagosomes is involved in the pathogenesis of obese diabetes, providing a novel insight into autophagy and diabetes. - Highlights: • Lamp-2 is essential for autophagosome fusion with lysosome and its degradation. • Lamp-2 deficiency lead to a resistance to diet-induced obese diabetes in mice. • Lamp-2 deficiency increased whole body energy expenditure under HFD-feeding. • Lamp-2 deficiency elevated the serum level of FGF21 under HFD-feeding.

  17. Combined Tlr2 and Tlr4 Deficiency Increases Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Paun, Alexandra; Fox, Jessica; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Qureshi, Salman T.; Haston, Christina K.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To determine whether Toll-like receptor 2 or 4 genotype alters the lung response to irradiation in C57BL/6 mice using a model developing a phenotype that resembles radiotherapy-induced fibrosis in both histological characteristics and onset post-treatment. Methods and Materials: The pulmonary phenotype of C57BL/6 mice deficient in each or both of these genes was assessed after an 18-Gy single dose to the thoracic cavity by survival time postirradiation, bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential, histological evidence of alveolitis and fibrosis, and gene expression levels, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Results: The lung phenotype of Tlr4-deficient and Tlr2-deficient mice did not differ from that of wild-type mice in terms of survival time postirradiation, or by histological evidence of alveolitis or fibrosis. In contrast, mice deficient in both receptors developed respiratory distress at an earlier time than did wild-type mice and presented an enhanced fibrotic response (13.5% vs. 5.8% of the lung by image analysis of histological sections, p < 0.001). No differences in bronchoalveolar cell differential counts, nor in numbers of apoptotic cells in the lung as detected through active caspase-3 staining, were evident among the irradiated mice grouped by Tlr genotype. Gene expression analysis of lung tissue revealed that Tlr2,4-deficient mice have increased levels of hyaluronidase 2 compared with both wild-type mice and mice lacking either Tlr2 or Tlr4. Conclusion: We conclude that a combined deficiency in both Tlr2 and Tlr4, but not Tlr2 or Tlr4 alone, leads to enhanced radiation-induced fibrosis in the C57BL/6 mouse model.

  18. Docosahexaenoic acid affects insulin deficiency- and insulin resistance-induced alterations in cardiac mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ovide-Bordeaux, Stéphanie; Grynberg, Alain

    2004-03-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake on cardiac mitochondrial function was evaluated in permeabilized fibers in insulin deficiency and insulin resistance in rats. The insulin-deficient state was obtained by streptozotocin injection 2 mo before investigations. Insulin resistance was obtained by feeding a 62% fructose diet for 3 mo. DHA was incorporated in the diet to modify the fatty acid composition of cardiac membranes, including mitochondria. Insulin deficiency decreased mitochondrial creatine kinase (mi-CK) activity and mitochondrial sensitivity to ADP. DHA intake prevented these alterations. Moreover, the insulin-deficient state significantly decreased n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and slightly increased n-6 PUFA in both cardiac and mitochondrial membranes, inducing a significant increase in the n-6-to-n-3 ratio. DHA intake maintained high myocardial and mitochondrial DHA content. Insulin deficiency also decreased glutamate- and palmitoylcarnitine-supported mitochondrial respiration, but DHA intake did not prevent these effects. In contrast, insulin resistance did not affect mi-CK activity or sensitivity to ADP. However, insulin resistance influenced the myocardial fatty acid composition with decreased n-6 and n-3 PUFA contents and increased monounsaturated fatty acid content. Only slight alterations were observed in mitochondrial fatty acid composition, and they were corrected by DHA intake. Moreover, insulin resistance decreased the glutamate-supported respiration, and DHA intake did not influence this effect. In conclusion, the impairment of cardiac mitochondrial function was more pronounced in the insulin-deficient state than in insulin resistance. The modification of fatty acid composition of cardiac and mitochondrial membranes by DHA partially prevented the mitochondrial alterations induced in the two models.

  19. Selenoprotein deficiency enhances radiation-induced micronuclei formation.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Manjeshwar S; Diwadkar-Navsariwala, Veda; Koh, Timothy; Fayad, Raja; Fantuzzi, Giamila; Diamond, Alan M

    2008-11-01

    The availability of selenium and the levels of specific selenoproteins might affect cancer risk by influencing the ability of DNA damaging agents to cause genomic instability and mutations. Transgenic mice that express reduced levels of selenoproteins and previously shown to be more susceptible to pathology associated with cancer development were used to study this possibility. These mice were exposed to X-rays and DNA damage assessed in the erythrocytes, where micronuclei formation was higher compared to the same cells obtained from irradiated wild-type controls. To determine whether the selenoprotein glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) might be involved in this protection, its levels were reduced by siRNA targeting in LNCaP human prostate cells. UV-induced micronuclei frequency was higher in these cells compared to control-transfected cells. These results indicate a role for selenoproteins in protecting DNA from damage and support human data implicating GPx-1 as a possible target of the chemoprotective effect of selenium.

  20. Dietary Fructose-Induced Hepatic Injury in Male and Female Rats: Influence of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Pektas, Mehmet Bilgehan; Yücel, Gözde; Koca, Halit Buğra; Sadi, Gökhan; Yıldırım, Onur Gökhan; Öztürk, Gözde; Akar, Fatma

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Relatively little is known about gender-dependent susceptibility to hepatic injury induced by nutritional factors. In the current study, we investigated dietary fructose-induced hepatic degeneration and roles of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), insulin receptor (IRβ) and substrate-1 (IRS-1) expressions in association with inflammatory markers in male and female rats. Moreover, we examined potential effect of resveratrol on fructose-induced changes. Methods: Male and female rats were divided into 4 groups as control, resveratrol, fructose and resveratrol plus fructose. All rats were fed with a standard diet with or without resveratrol (500 mg/kg). Fructose was given as 10% in drinking waterfor 24 weeks. Results: Long-term dietary fructose caused parenchymal degeneration and hyperemia in association with impaired eNOS mRNA/protein expressions in liver of male and female rats. This dietary intervention also led to increases in hepatic triglyceride content, TNFα and IL-1β levels in both genders. Gender-related differences to consequence of fructose consumption were not obvious. Resveratrol supplementation markedly attenuated hepatic degeneration, hyperemia and triglyceride content in association with reduced TNFα and IL-1β levels, but enhanced IRβ mRNA and IRS-1 protein, in male and female rats upon fructose feeding. Conclusion: Long-term dietary fructose causes hepatic degeneration possibly via a decrease in eNOS, but increase in TNFα and IL-1β, in both genders. Resveratrol supplementation improved fructose-induced hepatic injury. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and dietary antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Abbas; Javadi, Maryam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra

    2015-03-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during physical exercise, exercise induced oxidative stress and antioxidant supplementation is interesting and controversial concepts that have been considered during the past decades. In this review, we aimed to summarize current evidence in relation to antioxidant supplementation outcomes during exercise and physical activity. For this aim, we obtained relevant articles through searches of the Medline and PubMed databases between 1980 to 2013. Although major studies have indicated that antioxidants could attenuate biomarkers of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the use of antioxidant supplement is a common phenomenon among athletes and physically active people, there are some doubts regarding the benefits of these. It seems that the best recommendations regarding antioxidants and exercise are having a balanced diet rich in natural antioxidants and phytochemicals. Regular consumption of various fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and beans, sprouts and seeds is an effective and safe way to meet all antioxidant requirements in physically active persons and athletes.

  2. Sharply higher rates of iron deficiency in obese Mexican women and children are predicted by obesity-related inflammation rather than by differences in dietary iron intake.

    PubMed

    Cepeda-Lopez, Ana C; Osendarp, Saskia Jm; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Aeberli, Isabelle; Gonzalez-Salazar, Francisco; Feskens, Edith; Villalpando, Salvador; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2011-05-01

    Obese individuals may be at increased risk of iron deficiency (ID), but it is unclear whether this is due to poor dietary iron intakes or to adiposity-related inflammation. The aim of this study was to examine the relations between body mass index (BMI), dietary iron, and dietary factors affecting iron bioavailability, iron status, and inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP)] in a transition country where obesity and ID are common. Data from the 1999 Mexican Nutrition Survey, which included 1174 children (aged 5-12 y) and 621 nonpregnant women (aged 18-50 y), were analyzed. The prevalence of obesity was 25.3% in women and 3.5% in children. The prevalence of ID was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in obese women and children compared with normal-weight subjects [odds ratios (95% CIs): 1.92 (1.23, 3.01) and 3.96 (1.34, 11.67) for women and children, respectively]. Despite similar dietary iron intakes in the 2 groups, serum iron concentrations were lower in obese women than in normal-weight women (62.6 ± 29.5 compared with 72.4 ± 34.6 μg/dL; P = 0.014), and total-iron-binding capacity was higher in obese children than in normal-weight children (399 ± 51 compared with 360 ± 48 μg/dL; P < 0.001). CRP concentrations in obese women and children were 4 times those of their normal-weight counterparts (P < 0.05). CRP but not iron intake was a strong negative predictor of iron status, independently of BMI (P < 0.05). The risk of ID in obese Mexican women and children was 2-4 times that of normal-weight individuals at similar dietary iron intakes. This increased risk of ID may be due to the effects of obesity-related inflammation on dietary iron absorption. Thus, ID control efforts in Mexico may be hampered by increasing rates of adiposity in women and children.

  3. Prenatal Choline Supplementation Diminishes Early-Life Iron Deficiency-Induced Reprogramming of Molecular Networks Associated with Behavioral Abnormalities in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu V; Kennedy, Bruce C; Pisansky, Marc T; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Gewirtz, Jonathan C; Simmons, Rebecca A; Georgieff, Michael K

    2016-03-01

    Early-life iron deficiency is a common nutrient deficiency worldwide. Maternal iron deficiency increases the risk of schizophrenia and autism in the offspring. Postnatal iron deficiency in young children results in cognitive and socioemotional abnormalities in adulthood despite iron treatment. The rat model of diet-induced fetal-neonatal iron deficiency recapitulates the observed neurobehavioral deficits. We sought to establish molecular underpinnings for the persistent psychopathologic effects of early-life iron deficiency by determining whether it permanently reprograms the hippocampal transcriptome. We also assessed the effects of maternal dietary choline supplementation on the offspring's hippocampal transcriptome to identify pathways through which choline mitigates the emergence of long-term cognitive deficits. Male rat pups were made iron deficient (ID) by providing pregnant and nursing dams an ID diet (4 g Fe/kg) from gestational day (G) 2 through postnatal day (PND) 7 and an iron-sufficient (IS) diet (200 g Fe/kg) thereafter. Control pups were provided IS diet throughout. Choline (5 g/kg) was given to half the pregnant dams in each group from G11 to G18. PND65 hippocampal transcriptomes were assayed by next generation sequencing (NGS) and analyzed with the use of knowledge-based Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to validate a subset of altered genes. Formerly ID rats had altered hippocampal expression of 619 from >10,000 gene loci sequenced by NGS, many of which map onto molecular networks implicated in psychological disorders, including anxiety, autism, and schizophrenia. There were significant interactions between iron status and prenatal choline treatment in influencing gene expression. Choline supplementation reduced the effects of iron deficiency, including those on gene networks associated with autism and schizophrenia. Fetal-neonatal iron deficiency reprograms molecular networks associated with the

  4. Perinatal thiamine deficiency-induced spontaneous abortion and pup-killing responses in rat dams.

    PubMed

    Bâ, Abdoulaye

    2013-03-01

    The current study attempts to determine whether thiamine (B1 vitamin) deficiency and chronic alcohol-related thiamine-deficient (TD) status, disturb maternal behavior towards pups. During gestation and lactation, Wistar rat dams were exposed to the following treatments: (i) prenatal TD dams; (ii) perinatal TD dams; (iii) postnatal TD dams; (iv) 12% alcohol/water drinking mothers; (v) ad libitum control dams. Pair-feeding treatments controlled malnutrition related to thiamine deficiency; (vi) prenatal pair-fed (PF) dams; (vii) perinatal PF dams; (viii) postnatal PF dams and included also the control of alcohol consummation: (ix) PF saccharose dams. Dams were observed for gestation outcome and for apparent disorders of the maternal behavior related to the pups at parturition. From the nine experimental groups studied, only pre- and perinatal TD dams exhibited spontaneous abortion (33.36 and 41.66%, respectively) followed by pups-killing responses where, respectively, 4 dams/7 (57.14%) and 5 dams/7 (71.43%) showed disruption of maternal behavior and appearance of cannibalism towards pups which all were killed within 48 hours after parturition. Spontaneous abortion and pup-killing responses were not observed in the dams of any other experimental group, suggesting that perinatal disturbances of hormonal factors underlay these maternal disorders. Previous studies reported that thiamine deficiency-induced degeneration of dopamine neurons may be related to mouse-killing aggression in rats. The present study suggests that perinatal thiamine deficiency-induced alteration of dopaminergic neurons in maternal brain could be a trigger factor of pup-killing responses. Central dopamine and oxytocin have been strongly associated with both the onset and maintenance of maternal behavior and the regulation of maternal aggressiveness as well. Our studies suggest that estrogen control oxytocin levels in brain structures of pregnancy-terminated rats via dopamine transmission. Thiamine

  5. Endostatin Prevents Dietary-Induced Obesity by Inhibiting Adipogenesis and Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Yang; Lu, Xin-an; Liu, Guanghua; Fu, Yan; Luo, Yongzhang

    2015-07-01

    Endostatin is a well-known angiogenesis inhibitor. Although angiogenesis has been considered as a potential therapeutic target of obesity, the inhibitory effect of endostatin on adipogenesis and dietary-induced obesity has never been demonstrated. Adipogenesis plays a critical role in controlling adipocyte cell number, body weight, and metabolic profile in a homeostatic state. Here we reveal that endostatin inhibits adipogenesis and dietary-induced obesity. The antiadipogenic mechanism of endostatin lies in its interaction with Sam68 RNA-binding protein in the nuclei of preadipocytes. This interaction competitively impairs the binding of Sam68 to intron 5 of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), causing an error in mTOR transcript. This consequently decreases the expression of mTOR, results in decreased activities of the mTOR complex 1 pathway, and leads to defects in adipogenesis. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that the antiangiogenic function of endostatin also contributes to its obesity-inhibitory activity. Through the combined functions on adipogenesis and angiogenesis, endostatin prevents dietary-induced obesity and its related metabolic disorders, including insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatic steatosis. Thus, our findings reveal that endostatin has a potential application for antiobesity therapy and the prevention of obesity-related metabolic syndromes. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. Calcium Montmorillonite-based dietary supplement attenuates Necrotic Enteritis induced by Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens in broilers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We provide the first description of Dietary Supplement of sorbent minerals attenuates Necrotic Enteritis Induced by Eimeria maxima and Clostridium perfringens in Broilers. Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a poultry disease caused by Clostridium perfringens and characterized by severe intestinal necrosis....

  7. Resistin deficiency in mice has no effect on pulmonary responses induced by acute ozone exposure

    PubMed Central

    Razvi, Shehla S.; Richards, Jeremy B.; Malik, Farhan; Cromar, Kevin R.; Price, Roger E.; Bell, Cynthia S.; Weng, Tingting; Atkins, Constance L.; Spencer, Chantal Y.; Cockerill, Katherine J.; Alexander, Amy L.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Haque, Ikram U.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exposure to ozone (O3), an air pollutant, causes pulmonary inflammation, airway epithelial desquamation, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Pro-inflammatory cytokines—including IL-6 and ligands of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 [keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2], TNF receptor 1 and 2 (TNF), and type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1α and IL-1β)—promote these sequelae. Human resistin, a pleiotropic hormone and cytokine, induces expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 (the human ortholog of murine KC and MIP-2), and TNF. Functional differences exist between human and murine resistin; yet given the aforementioned observations, we hypothesized that murine resistin promotes O3-induced lung pathology by inducing expression of the same inflammatory cytokines as human resistin. Consequently, we examined indexes of O3-induced lung pathology in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice following acute exposure to either filtered room air or O3. In wild-type mice, O3 increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) resistin. Furthermore, O3 increased lung tissue or BALF IL-1α, IL-6, KC, TNF, macrophages, neutrophils, and epithelial cells in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. With the exception of KC, which was significantly greater in resistin-deficient compared with wild-type mice, no genotype-related differences in the other indexes existed following O3 exposure. O3 caused AHR to acetyl-β-methylcholine chloride (methacholine) in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. However, genotype-related differences in airway responsiveness to methacholine were nonexistent subsequent to O3 exposure. Taken together, these data demonstrate that murine resistin is increased in the lungs of wild-type mice following acute O3 exposure but does not promote O3-induced lung pathology. PMID:26386120

  8. Resistin deficiency in mice has no effect on pulmonary responses induced by acute ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Razvi, Shehla S; Richards, Jeremy B; Malik, Farhan; Cromar, Kevin R; Price, Roger E; Bell, Cynthia S; Weng, Tingting; Atkins, Constance L; Spencer, Chantal Y; Cockerill, Katherine J; Alexander, Amy L; Blackburn, Michael R; Alcorn, Joseph L; Haque, Ikram U; Johnston, Richard A

    2015-11-15

    Acute exposure to ozone (O3), an air pollutant, causes pulmonary inflammation, airway epithelial desquamation, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Pro-inflammatory cytokines-including IL-6 and ligands of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 [keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC) and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2], TNF receptor 1 and 2 (TNF), and type I IL-1 receptor (IL-1α and IL-1β)-promote these sequelae. Human resistin, a pleiotropic hormone and cytokine, induces expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 (the human ortholog of murine KC and MIP-2), and TNF. Functional differences exist between human and murine resistin; yet given the aforementioned observations, we hypothesized that murine resistin promotes O3-induced lung pathology by inducing expression of the same inflammatory cytokines as human resistin. Consequently, we examined indexes of O3-induced lung pathology in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice following acute exposure to either filtered room air or O3. In wild-type mice, O3 increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) resistin. Furthermore, O3 increased lung tissue or BALF IL-1α, IL-6, KC, TNF, macrophages, neutrophils, and epithelial cells in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. With the exception of KC, which was significantly greater in resistin-deficient compared with wild-type mice, no genotype-related differences in the other indexes existed following O3 exposure. O3 caused AHR to acetyl-β-methylcholine chloride (methacholine) in wild-type and resistin-deficient mice. However, genotype-related differences in airway responsiveness to methacholine were nonexistent subsequent to O3 exposure. Taken together, these data demonstrate that murine resistin is increased in the lungs of wild-type mice following acute O3 exposure but does not promote O3-induced lung pathology. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. STAT1-deficient Mice are Resistant to CLP-induced Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Herzig, Daniela; Fang, Geping; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy E.; Guo, Yin; Bohannon, Julia; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    STAT1 is a member of the JAK-STAT signaling family and plays a key role in facilitating gene transcription in response to activation of the Type I and Type II interferon (IFN) receptors. TYK2 is essential for type I, but not type II, IFN-induced STAT1 activation. Previous studies show that STAT1-deficient mice are resistant to endotoxin-induced shock. The goal of the present study was to assess the response of STAT1-and TYK2-deficient mice to septic shock caused by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Endpoints included survival, core temperature, organ injury, systemic cytokine production and bacterial clearance. Results showed that survival rates were significantly higher in STAT1KO mice compared to wild type controls (80% vs 10%). The improved survival of STAT1KO mice was associated with less hypothermia, metabolic acidosis, hypoglycemia and hepatocellular injury. Plasma IL-6, MIP-2, CXCL10 and IFNα concentrations were significantly lower in STAT1KO mice than in wild type mice. In the absence of antibiotic treatment, blood and lung bacterial counts were significantly lower in STAT1KO mice than in controls. However, treatment with antibiotics ablated that difference. A survival advantage was not observed in TYK2-deficient mice compared to control. However, CLP-induced hypothermia and systemic IL-6 and CXCL10 production were significantly attenuated in TYK2-deficient mice. These results indicate that STAT1 activation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of CLP-induced septic shock and is associated with the development of systemic inflammation and organ injury. TYK2 activation also appears to contribute to CLP-induced inflammation, but to a lesser extent than STAT1. PMID:22777121

  10. Artificial Surface-Induced Inflammation Relies on Complement Factor 5: Proof From a Deficient Person

    PubMed Central

    Bergseth, Grethe; Lambris, John D.; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Lappegård, Knut Tore

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposing blood to artificial surfaces results in an inflammatory response, including complement activation and cytokine release. The aim of this investigation was to study complement-dependency and independency in artificial surface-induced inflammation in human whole blood from a patient with a genetic deficiency of complement factor 5 (C5). Methods Whole blood from a C5-deficient patient, C5 protein reconstituted blood, and blood from a control subject was used. The complement inhibitor compstatin (C3 inhibitor) and a C5a receptor antagonist were used to block complement. Blood was circulated in closed loops of polyvinyl chloride tubing. Leukocyte CD11b expression and release of granule enzymes (myeloperoxidase, elastase, lactoferrin), cytokines (interleukins, chemokines, and growth factors; n = 27) as well as complement activation were measured after incubation. Results In C5-deficient blood, there was no formation of the terminal complement complex, as opposed to reconstituted or control blood. Release of granule enzymes was partly dependent on C3, revealed by a compstatin-dependent effect in C5-deficient blood, and partly C5a-dependent as evident from the reconstitution and control blood. The chemokines interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were also highly complement dependent, the effect being C5a-mediated, whereas platelet-derived and vascular endothelial growth factors were partly complement dependent. Interferon-γ increased in a complement-independent manner, whereas the rest of the cytokines did not respond to the surface. Leukocyte expression of CD11b was only marginally increased in deficient blood exposed to the surface, whereas reconstitution induced a considerable, C5a-dependent increase, comparable with that of the control. Conclusions The polyvinyl chloride surface induced a defined inflammatory response, which largely depended on C5. PMID:21256307

  11. Dietary strategies to recover from exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Mónica; Teixeira, Vítor H; Soares, José

    2014-03-01

    Exhaustive or unaccustomed intense exercise can cause exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) and its undesirable consequences may decrease the ability to exercise and to adhere to a training programme. This review briefly summarises the muscle damage process, focusing predominantly on oxidative stress and inflammation as contributing factors, and describes how nutrition may be positively used to recover from EIMD. The combined intake of carbohydrates and proteins and the use of antioxidants and/or anti-inflammatory nutrients within physiological ranges are interventions that may assist the recovery process. Although the works studying food instead of nutritional supplements are very scarce, their results seem to indicate that food might be a favourable option as a recovery strategy. To date, the only tested foods were milk, cherries, blueberries and pomegranate with promising results. Other potential solutions are foods rich in protein, carbohydrates, antioxidants and/or anti-inflammatory nutrients.

  12. Nitric oxide ameliorates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Alka; Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120, iron deficiency leads to oxidative stress with unavoidable consequences. Nitric oxide reduces pigment damage and supported the growth of Anabaena 7120 in iron-deficient conditions. Elevation in nitric oxide accumulation and reduced superoxide radical production justified the role of nitric oxide in alleviating oxidative stress in iron deficiency. Increased activities of antioxidative enzymes and higher levels of ROS scavengers (ascorbate, glutathione and thiol) in iron deficiency were also observed in the presence of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide also supported the membrane integrity of Anabaena cells and reduces protein and DNA damage caused by oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency. Results suggested that nitric oxide alleviates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

  13. Dietary linoleic acid-induced alterations in pro- and anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Amit; Majchrzak-Hong, Sharon F; Yang, Jun; Blanchard, Helene; Zamora, Daisy; Loewke, James D; Rapoport, Stanley I; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Davis, John M; Hammock, Bruce D; Taha, Ameer Y

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic idiopathic pain syndromes are major causes of personal suffering, disability, and societal expense. Dietary n-6 linoleic acid has increased markedly in modern industrialized populations over the past century. These high amounts of linoleic acid could hypothetically predispose to physical pain by increasing the production of pro-nociceptive linoleic acid-derived lipid autacoids and by interfering with the production of anti-nociceptive lipid autacoids derived from n-3 fatty acids. Here, we used a rat model to determine the effect of increasing dietary linoleic acid as a controlled variable for 15 weeks on nociceptive lipid autacoids and their precursor n-6 and n-3 fatty acids in tissues associated with idiopathic pain syndromes. Results Increasing dietary linoleic acid markedly increased the abundance of linoleic acid and its pro-nociceptive derivatives and reduced the abundance of n-3 eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid and their anti-nociceptive monoepoxide derivatives. Diet-induced changes occurred in a tissue-specific manner, with marked alterations of nociceptive lipid autacoids in both peripheral and central tissues, and the most pronounced changes in their fatty acid precursors in peripheral tissues. Conclusions The present findings provide biochemical support for the hypothesis that the high linoleic acid content of modern industrialized diets may create a biochemical susceptibility to develop chronic pain. Dietary linoleic acid lowering should be further investigated as part of an integrative strategy for the prevention and management of idiopathic pain syndromes. PMID:27030719

  14. Phyto-power dietary supplement potently inhibits dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Fen; Tsai, Mei-Ling; Sun, Pei-Pei; Chien, Ling-Lung; Cheng, An-Chin; Ma, Nianhan Jia-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-02-26

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its therapeutic effects in a variety of disorders. Fermented soy consumption is associated with a low incidence rate of chronic diseases in many Asian countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential underlying mechanisms of the effect of a phyto-power dietary supplement on liver fibrosis. Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with dimethylnitrosamine (DMN; 10 mg kg(-1)) three times a week for four consecutive weeks. A phyto-power dietary supplement (50 or 100 mg kg(-1)) was administered by oral gavage daily for four weeks. Liver morphology, function, and fibrotic status were examined in DMN induced hepatic fibrogenesis. However, a phyto-power dietary supplement alleviated liver damage as indicated by histopathological examination of the α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen I, accompanied by the concomitant reduction of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2). These data indicate that the phyto-power dietary supplement may inhibit the TGF-β1/Smad signaling and relieve liver damage in experimental fibrosis.

  15. Dietary Fructose and GLUT5 Transporter Activity Contribute to Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Palavicino-Maggio, Caroline B; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2016-09-01

    Receptors for antipsychotics in the hypothalamus contribute to antipsychotics-induced weight gain; however, many of these receptors are also expressed in the intestine. The role of these intestinally-expressed receptors, and their potential modulation of nutrient absorption, have not been investigated in the context of antipsychotics-induced weight gain. Here we tested the effect of dietary fructose and intestinal fructose uptake on clozapine-induced weight gain in mice. Weight gain was determined in wild type mice and mice lacking the GLUT5 fructose transporter that were "orally-administered" 20mg/kg clozapine for 28 days. To assess the role of dietary fructose, clozapine-treated mice were fed controlled diets with different levels of fructose. Effect of clozapine treatment on intestinal fructose transport activity and expression levels of various receptors that bind clozapine, as well as several genes involved in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis were measured using real-time RT-PCR and western blotting. Oral administration of clozapine significantly increased body weight in wild type C57BL/6 mice but not in GLUT5 null mice. The clozapine-induced weight gain was proportional to the percentage of fructose in the diet. Clozapine-treated mice increased intestinal fructose uptake without changing the intestinal expression level of GLUT5. Clozapine-treated mice expressed significantly higher levels of intestinal H1 histamine receptor in the wild type but not GLUT5 null mice. Clozapine also increased the intestinal expression of fructokinase and several genes involved in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Our results suggest that increased intestinal absorption and metabolism of fructose contributes to clozapine-induced weight gain. Eliminating dietary fructose might prevent antipsychotics-induced weight gain. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email

  16. DIETARY VITAMIN E DEFICIENCY AS A MODIFIER OF THE ASSOCIATIONS OF RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES WITH AIR POLLUTION IN ADOLESCENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: We investigated whether low dietary intake of the lipophilic antioxidant vitamin E may act as a modifier of chronic air pollution's associations with respiratory outcomes among adolescents due to an increased respiratory response to the oxidative effects of air pol...

  17. DIETARY VITAMIN E DEFICIENCY AS A MODIFIER OF THE ASSOCIATIONS OF RESPIRATORY OUTCOMES WITH AIR POLLUTION IN ADOLESCENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: We investigated whether low dietary intake of the lipophilic antioxidant vitamin E may act as a modifier of chronic air pollution's associations with respiratory outcomes among adolescents due to an increased respiratory response to the oxidative effects of air pol...

  18. The effect of a moderate zinc deficiency and dietary fat source on the activity and expression of the Δ(3)Δ (2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase in the liver of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

    2014-06-01

    Auxiliary enzymes participate in β-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on Δ(3)Δ(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver and other tissues. Five groups of eight weanling rats each were fed moderately zinc-deficient (ZD) or zinc-adequate (ZA) semisynthetic diets (7 or 50 mg Zn/kg) enriched with 22 % cocoa butter (CB) or 22 % safflower oil (SO) for 4 weeks: (1) ZD-CB, fed free choice; (2) ZA-CBR, ZA-CB diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-CB group; (3) ZD-SO, fed free choice; (4) ZA-SOR, ZA-SO diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-SO group; and (5) ZA-SO, fed free choice. Growth and Zn status markers were markedly reduced in the ZD groups. ECI activity in the liver of the animals fed the ZD- and ZA-SO diets were significantly higher (approximately 2- and 3-fold, respectively) as compared with the CB-fed animals, whereas activities in extrahepatic tissues (kidneys, heart, skeletal muscle, testes, adipose tissue) were not altered by dietary treatments. Transcript levels of the mitochondrial Eci gene in the liver did not significantly differ between ZD and ZA rats, but were 1.6-fold higher in the ZA-SO- than in the ZD-CB-fed animals (P < 0.05). It is concluded that diets enriched with safflower oil as a source high in linoleic acid induce markedly increased hepatic ECI activities and that a moderate Zn deficiency does not affect transcription of the mitochondrial Eci gene in the liver.

  19. Modulation of intestinal gene expression by dietary zinc status: effectiveness of cDNA arrays for expression profiling of a single nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R K; Moore, J B; Green, C L; Cousins, R J

    2001-11-20

    Mammalian nutritional status affects the homeostatic balance of multiple physiological processes and their associated gene expression. Although DNA array analysis can monitor large numbers of genes, there are no reports of expression profiling of a micronutrient deficiency in an intact animal system. In this report, we have tested the feasibility of using cDNA arrays to compare the global changes in expression of genes of known function that occur in the early stages of rodent zinc deficiency. The gene-modulating effects of this deficiency were demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR measurements of altered mRNA levels for metallothionein 1, zinc transporter 2, and uroguanylin, all of which have been previously documented as zinc-regulated genes. As a result of the low level of inherent noise within this model system and application of a recently reported statistical tool for statistical analysis of microarrays [Tusher, V.G., Tibshirani, R. & Chu, G. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 5116-5121], we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly identify the modest changes in mRNA abundance produced by this single micronutrient deficiency. Among the genes identified by this array profile are intestinal genes that influence signaling pathways, growth, transcription, redox, and energy utilization. Additionally, the influence of dietary zinc supply on the expression of some of these genes was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Overall, these data support the effectiveness of cDNA array expression profiling to investigate the pleiotropic effects of specific nutrients and may provide an approach to establishing markers for assessment of nutritional status.

  20. Modulation of intestinal gene expression by dietary zinc status: Effectiveness of cDNA arrays for expression profiling of a single nutrient deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Raymond K.; Moore, J. Bernadette; Green, Calvert L.; Cousins, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian nutritional status affects the homeostatic balance of multiple physiological processes and their associated gene expression. Although DNA array analysis can monitor large numbers of genes, there are no reports of expression profiling of a micronutrient deficiency in an intact animal system. In this report, we have tested the feasibility of using cDNA arrays to compare the global changes in expression of genes of known function that occur in the early stages of rodent zinc deficiency. The gene-modulating effects of this deficiency were demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR measurements of altered mRNA levels for metallothionein 1, zinc transporter 2, and uroguanylin, all of which have been previously documented as zinc-regulated genes. As a result of the low level of inherent noise within this model system and application of a recently reported statistical tool for statistical analysis of microarrays [Tusher, V.G., Tibshirani, R. & Chu, G. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 5116–5121], we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly identify the modest changes in mRNA abundance produced by this single micronutrient deficiency. Among the genes identified by this array profile are intestinal genes that influence signaling pathways, growth, transcription, redox, and energy utilization. Additionally, the influence of dietary zinc supply on the expression of some of these genes was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Overall, these data support the effectiveness of cDNA array expression profiling to investigate the pleiotropic effects of specific nutrients and may provide an approach to establishing markers for assessment of nutritional status. PMID:11717422

  1. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficiency in T cells suppresses the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahama, Taisuke; Kimura, Akihiro; Nguyen, Nam Trung; Chinen, Ichino; Hanieh, Hamza; Nohara, Keiko; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Ahr deficiency ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Collagen-immunized Ahr KO mice showed decreased serum levels of such proinflammatory cytokines as IL-1β and IL-6. The Th17 and Th1 cell populations in lymph nodes from these mice decreased and increased, respectively, whereas the percentage of regulatory T cells was unchanged. Interestingly, a lack of Ahr specifically in T cells significantly suppressed collagen-induced arthritis development, whereas Ahr deficiency in macrophages had no effect. These finding indicate that the development of experimental autoimmune arthritis depends on the presence of Ahr in T cells, and that Th1/Th17 balance may be particularly important for this process. PMID:21825138

  2. Capicua deficiency induces autoimmunity and promotes follicular helper T cell differentiation via derepression of ETV5

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, Seungwon; Lee, Choong-Gu; Park, Guk Yeol; Hong, Hyebeen; Lee, Jeon-Soo; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Sung Bae; Hwang, Daehee; Choi, Youn Soo; Fryer, John D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Yoontae

    2017-01-01

    High-affinity antibody production through the germinal centre (GC) response is a pivotal process in adaptive immunity. Abnormal development of follicular helper T (TFH) cells can induce the GC response to self-antigens, subsequently leading to autoimmunity. Here we show the transcriptional repressor Capicua/CIC maintains peripheral immune tolerance by suppressing aberrant activation of adaptive immunity. CIC deficiency induces excessive development of TFH cells and GC responses in a T-cell-intrinsic manner. ETV5 expression is derepressed in Cic null TFH cells and knockdown of Etv5 suppresses the enhanced TFH cell differentiation in Cic-deficient CD4+ T cells, suggesting that Etv5 is a critical CIC target gene in TFH cell differentiation. Furthermore, we identify Maf as a downstream target of the CIC–ETV5 axis in this process. These data demonstrate that CIC maintains T-cell homeostasis and negatively regulates TFH cell development and autoimmunity. PMID:28855737

  3. Chronic ethanol perturbs testicular folate metabolism and dietary folate deficiency reduces sex hormone levels in the Yucatan micropig.

    PubMed

    Wallock-Montelius, Lynn M; Villanueva, Jesus A; Chapin, Robert E; Conley, A J; Nguyen, Hung P; Ames, Bruce N; Halsted, Charles H

    2007-03-01

    Although alcoholism causes changes in hepatic folate metabolism that are aggravated by folate deficiency, male reproductive effects have never been studied. We evaluated changes in folate metabolism in the male reproductive system following chronic ethanol consumption and folate deficiency. Twenty-four juvenile micropigs received folate-sufficient (FS) or folate-depleted (FD) diets or the same diets containing 40% of energy as ethanol (FSE or FDE) for 14 wk, and the differences between the groups were determined by ANOVA. Chronic ethanol consumption (FSE and FDE compared with FS and FD groups) reduced testis and epididymis weights, testis sperm concentrations, and total sperm counts and circulating FSH levels. Folate deficiency (FD and FDE compared with FS and FSE groups) reduced circulating testosterone, estradiol and LH levels, and also testicular 17,20-lyase and aromatase activities. There was histological evidence of testicular lesions and incomplete progression of spermatogenesis in all treated groups relative to the FS control, with the FDE group being the most affected. Chronic ethanol consumption increased testis folate concentrations and decreased testis methionine synthase activity, whereas folate deficiency reduced total testis folate levels and increased methionine synthase activity. In all pigs combined, testicular methionine synthase activity was negatively associated with circulating estradiol, LH and FSH, and 17,20-lyase activity after controlling for ethanol, folate deficiency, and their interaction. Thus, while chronic ethanol consumption primarily impairs spermatogenesis, folate deficiency reduces sex hormones, and the two treatments have opposite effects on testicular folate metabolism. Furthermore, methionine synthase may influence the hormonal regulation of spermatogenesis.

  4. RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lidocaine against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Jie; Liao, Changli; Li, Xiaobing; Liu, Minghua; Song, Daqiang; Jiang, Xian

    2017-04-01

    Lidocaine (Lido) is reported to suppress inflammatory responses and exhibit a therapeutic effect in models of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) exerts pro-inflammatory effects by enhancing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. However, the precise mechanism by which Lido confers protection against ALI is not clear. ALI was induced in RAGE WT and RAGE knockout (KO) rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) operations for 24 h. The results showed that Lido significantly inhibited CLP-induced lung inflammation and histopathological lung injury. Furthermore, Lido significantly reduced CLP-induced upregulation of HMGB1 and RAGE expression and activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. With the use of RAGE KO rats, we demonstrate here that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced lung inflammatory cell infiltration and histopathological lung injury. These results suggest that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced ALI by attenuating the pro-inflammatory cytokines production.

  5. UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis: Chemoprevention by dietary botanical agents

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of immune-suppressed transplant recipients and patients with biopsy-proven skin cancer have confirmed that ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for the development of skin cancer in humans. UV radiation suppresses the immune system in several ways. The UVB spectrum inhibits antigen presentation, induces the release of immunosuppressive cytokines, and elicits DNA damage that is a molecular trigger of UV-mediated immunosuppression. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immunosuppression as a basis for developing strategies to protect individuals from this effect and subsequent development of skin cancer. Dietary botanicals are of particular interest as they have been shown to inhibit UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies regarding the photoprotective efficacy of selected dietary agents, including, green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins and silymarin. We present evidence that these chemopreventive agents prevent UVB-induced immunosuppression and photocarcinogenesis through: (i) The induction of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-12; (ii) IL-12-dependent DNA repair; and (iii) Stimulation of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor microenvironment. The new information regarding the mechanisms of action of these agents supports their potential use as adjuncts in the prevention of photocarcinogenesis. PMID:17382466

  6. UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis: chemoprevention by dietary botanical agents.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Santosh K

    2007-09-18

    Studies of immune-suppressed transplant recipients and patients with biopsy-proven skin cancer have confirmed that ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for the development of skin cancer in humans. UV radiation suppresses the immune system in several ways. The UVB spectrum inhibits antigen presentation, induces the release of immunosuppressive cytokines, and elicits DNA damage that is a molecular trigger of UV-mediated immunosuppression. It is therefore important to elucidate the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immunosuppression as a basis for developing strategies to protect individuals from this effect and subsequent development of skin cancer. Dietary botanicals are of particular interest as they have been shown to inhibit UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the most recent investigations and mechanistic studies regarding the photoprotective efficacy of selected dietary agents, including, green tea polyphenols, grape seed proanthocyanidins and silymarin. We present evidence that these chemopreventive agents prevent UVB-induced immunosuppression and photocarcinogenesis through: (i) the induction of immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-12; (ii) IL-12-dependent DNA repair; and (iii) stimulation of cytotoxic T cells in the tumor microenvironment. The new information regarding the mechanisms of action of these agents supports their potential use as adjuncts in the prevention of photocarcinogenesis.

  7. Discovering the role of mitochondria in the iron deficiency-induced metabolic responses of plants.

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero

    2012-01-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis is a major problem, affecting both yield and quality of crops. Plants have evolved multifaceted strategies, such as reductase activity, proton extrusion, and specialised storage proteins, to mobilise Fe from the environment and distribute it within the plant. Because of its fundamental role in plant productivity, several issues concerning Fe homeostasis in plants are currently intensively studied. The activation of Fe uptake reactions requires an overall adaptation of the primary metabolism because these activities need the constant supply of energetic substrates (i.e., NADPH and ATP). Several studies concerning the metabolism of Fe-deficient plants have been conducted, but research focused on mitochondrial implications in adaptive responses to nutritional stress has only begun in recent years. Mitochondria are the energetic centre of the root cell, and they are strongly affected by Fe deficiency. Nevertheless, they display a high level of functional flexibility, which allows them to maintain the viability of the cell. Mitochondria represent a crucial target of studies on plant homeostasis, and it might be of interest to concentrate future research on understanding how mitochondria orchestrate the reprogramming of root cell metabolism under Fe deficiency. In this review, I summarise what it is known about the effect of Fe deficiency on mitochondrial metabolism and morphology. Moreover, I present a detailed view of the possible roles of mitochondria in the development of plant responses to Fe deficiency, integrating old findings with new and discussing new hypotheses for future investigations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. C5a receptor signaling prevents folate deficiency-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Denny, Kerina J; Coulthard, Liam G; Jeanes, Angela; Lisgo, Steven; Simmons, David G; Callaway, Leonie K; Wlodarczyk, Bogdan; Finnell, Richard H; Woodruff, Trent M; Taylor, Stephen M

    2013-04-01

    The complement system is involved in a range of diverse developmental processes, including cell survival, growth, differentiation, and regeneration. However, little is known about the role of complement in embryogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate a novel role for the canonical complement 5a receptor (C5aR) in the development of the mammalian neural tube under conditions of maternal dietary folic acid deficiency. Specifically, we found C5aR and C5 to be expressed throughout the period of neurulation in wild-type mice and localized the expression to the cephalic regions of the developing neural tube. C5aR was also found to be expressed in the neuroepithelium of early human embryos. Ablation of the C5ar1 gene or the administration of a specific C5aR peptide antagonist to folic acid-deficient pregnant mice resulted in a high prevalence of severe anterior neural tube defect-associated congenital malformations. These findings provide a new and compelling insight into the role of the complement system during mammalian embryonic development.

  9. Protein deficiency and muscle damage in carbon tetrachloride induced liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    López-Lirola, A; González-Reimers, E; Martín Olivera, R; Santolaria-Fernández, F; Galindo-Martín, L; Abreu-González, P; González-Hernández, T; Valladares-Parrilla, F

    2003-12-01

    Protein undernutrition, alterations of hormones such as IGF-1, testosterone and cortisol, and increased lipid peroxidation-which may be related with deranged metabolism of some elements such as iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), selenium (Se) or copper (Cu)-may contribute to muscle damage in non alcoholic cirrhosis. Here, we analyse the effect of protein deficiency on muscle Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn and Se in carbon-tetrachloride (CCl(4)) induced liver cirrhosis. We also study the association between protein undernutrition and these trace elements with the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxidation products, and how all these are related with muscle morphological changes in 40 male adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Liver cirrhosis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of CCl(4) to 10 rats fed a 2% protein diet, and to another 10 fed a 18% protein control diet. Two further groups included rats without cirrhosis fed the 2% protein and the 18% protein diets. After sacrifice (6 weeks later), we found type IIa fibre atrophy in the cirrhotic animals, especially in the low-protein fed ones and this was due to protein deficiency. Muscle Fe increased in low protein fed cirrhotic rats. No relationship was found between muscle changes and any of the hormones, enzymes and trace elements analysed, or with liver fibrosis. These results suggest that muscle atrophy observed in CCl(4)-induced cirrhosis is related with protein deficiency, but not with cirrhosis itself.

  10. Protease-activated receptor-1 deficiency protects against streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Waasdorp, Maaike; Duitman, JanWillem; Florquin, Sandrine; Spek, C. Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Endogenously administered activated protein C ameliorates diabetic nephropathy (DN) in a protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-dependent manner, suggesting that PAR-1 activation limits the progression of DN. Activation of PAR-1 in fibroblast-like cells, however, induces proliferation and extracellular matrix production, thereby driving fibrotic disease. Considering the key role of mesangial proliferation and extracellular matrix production during DN, PAR-1 may in fact potentiate diabetes-induced kidney injury. To determine the net effect of PAR-1 in DN, streptozotocin-induced DN was studied in wild type and PAR-1 deficient mice. Subsequent mechanistic insight was obtained by assessing profibrotic responses of mesangial and tubular epithelial cells in vitro, following PAR-1 stimulation and inhibition. Despite having similar glucose levels, PAR-1 deficient mice developed less kidney damage after induction of diabetes, as evidenced by diminished proteinuria, plasma cystatin C levels, expansion of the mesangial area, and tubular atrophy. In vitro, PAR-1 signaling in mesangial cells led to increased proliferation and expression of matrix proteins fibronectin and collagen IV. Conversely, a reduction in both proliferation and fibronectin deposition was observed in diabetic PAR-1 deficient mice. Overall, we show that PAR-1 plays an important role in the development of DN and PAR-1 might therefore be an attractive therapeutic target to pursue in DN. PMID:27618774

  11. Effect of copper deficiency on cocaine-induced seizures in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore, V. )

    1991-03-11

    The objective of the present study was to study the effects of nutritional copper (Cu) deficiency on cocaine-induced seizures in rats. Following results were obtained when cocaine was given to 10 each of Cu-deficient (CUD) and Cu-sufficient (CUS) rats after 45 days on respective diets. For CUD and CUS groups of rats, respectively, (a) incidence of seizures was 60% and 40%; (b) time of onset for seizures was 8.42 {plus minus} 0.72 and 7.63 {plus minus} 1.00; (c) seizure severity was 2.5 {plus minus} 0.75 and 1.1 {plus minus} 0.45; and (d) 24 h mortality was 40% and none. Thus, except for time of onset, all other parameters for cocaine-induced seizures were significantly higher in CUD rats. These results clearly demonstrate that Cu deficiency enhances seizure-inducing effects of cocaine in rats. It is likely that the enhancement observed is due to a decrease in the hepatic metabolism of cocaine in CUD rats. This possibility is currently being investigated.

  12. Iron deficiency accelerates Helicobacter pylori–induced carcinogenesis in rodents and humans

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Jennifer M.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Lee, Josephine Y.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Friedman, David B.; Colvin, Daniel C.; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Suarez, Giovanni; Loh, John; Slaughter, James C.; Tan, Shumin; Morgan, Douglas R.; Wilson, Keith T.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Cover, Timothy L.; Amieva, Manuel R.; Peek, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori infection; however, most infected persons never develop this malignancy. H. pylori strains harboring the cag pathogenicity island (cag+), which encodes CagA and a type IV secretion system (T4SS), induce more severe disease outcomes. H. pylori infection is also associated with iron deficiency, which similarly augments gastric cancer risk. To define the influence of iron deficiency on microbial virulence in gastric carcinogenesis, Mongolian gerbils were maintained on iron-depleted diets and infected with an oncogenic H. pylori cag+ strain. Iron depletion accelerated the development of H. pylori–induced premalignant and malignant lesions in a cagA-dependent manner. H. pylori strains harvested from iron-depleted gerbils or grown under iron-limiting conditions exhibited enhanced virulence and induction of inflammatory factors. Further, in a human population at high risk for gastric cancer, H. pylori strains isolated from patients with the lowest ferritin levels induced more robust proinflammatory responses compared with strains isolated from patients with the highest ferritin levels, irrespective of histologic status. These data demonstrate that iron deficiency enhances H. pylori virulence and represents a measurable biomarker to identify populations of infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer. PMID:23257361

  13. Mice deficient in Group VIB phospholipase A2 (iPLA2γ) exhibit relative resistance to obesity and metabolic abnormalities induced by a Western diet

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haowei; Wohltmann, Mary; Bao, Shunzhong; Ladenson, Jack H.; Semenkovich, Clay F.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) play important roles in metabolic processes, and the Group VI PLA2 family is comprised of intracellular enzymes that do not require Ca2+ for catalysis. Mice deficient in Group VIA PLA2 (iPLA2β) develop more severe glucose intolerance than wild-type (WT) mice in response to dietary stress. Group VIB PLA2 (iPLA2γ) is a related enzyme distributed in membranous organelles, including mitochondria, and iPLA2γ knockout (KO) mice exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and function. We have compared metabolic responses of iPLA2γ-KO and WT mice fed a Western diet (WD) with a high fat content. We find that KO mice are resistant to WD-induced increases in body weight and adiposity and in blood levels of cholesterol, glucose, and insulin, even though WT and KO mice exhibit similar food consumption and dietary fat digestion and absorption. KO mice are also relatively resistant to WD-induced insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and altered patterns of fat vs. carbohydrate fuel utilization. KO skeletal muscle exhibits impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids, as reflected by accumulation of larger amounts of long-chain acylcarnitine (LCAC) species in KO muscle and liver compared with WT in response to WD feeding. This is associated with increased urinary excretion of LCAC and much reduced deposition of triacylglycerols in liver by WD-fed KO compared with WT mice. The iPLA2γ-deficient genotype thus results in a phenotype characterized by impaired mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids and relative resistance to the metabolic abnormalities induced by WD. PMID:20179248

  14. Dietary selenium as a modulator of PCB 126-induced hepatotoxicity in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ian K; Chai, Yingtao; Simmons, Donald; Watson, Walter H; Tan, Rommel; Haschek, Wanda M; Wang, Kai; Wang, Bingxuan; Ludewig, Gabriele; Robertson, Larry W

    2011-11-01

    Homeostasis of selenium (Se), a critical antioxidant incorporated into amino acids and enzymes, is disrupted by exposure to aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Here we examined the importance of dietary Se in preventing the toxicity of the most toxic polychlorinated biphenyl congener, 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), a potent AhR agonist. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a modified AIN-93 diet with differing dietary Se levels (0.02, 0.2, and 2 ppm). Following 3 weeks of acclimatization, rats from each dietary group were given a single ip injection of corn oil (vehicle), 0.2, 1, or 5 μmol/kg body weight PCB 126, followed 2 weeks later by euthanasia. PCB exposure caused dose-dependent increases in liver weight and at the highest PCB 126 dose decreases in whole body weight gains. Hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP1A1) activity was significantly increased even at the lowest dose of PCB 126, indicating potent AhR activation. PCB exposure diminished hepatic Se levels in a dose-dependent manner, and this was accompanied by diminished Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase activity. Both these effects were partially mitigated by Se supplementation. Conversely, thioredoxin (Trx) reductase activity and Trx oxidation state, although significantly diminished in the lowest dietary Se groups, were not affected by PCB exposure. In addition, PCB 126-induced changes in hepatic copper, iron, manganese, and zinc were observed. These results demonstrate that supplemental dietary Se was not able to completely prevent the toxicity caused by PCB 126 but was able to increase moderately the levels of several key antioxidants, thereby maintaining them roughly at normal levels.

  15. Dietary Inulin Fibers Prevent Proton-Pump Inhibitor (PPI)-Induced Hypocalcemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Mark W.; de Baaij, Jeroen H. F.; Gommers, Lisanne M. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, René J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) is the most recognized side effect of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). Additionally, PPIH is associated with hypocalcemia and hypokalemia. It is hypothesized that PPIs reduce epithelial proton secretion and thereby increase the pH in the colon, which may explain the reduced absorption of and Mg2+ and Ca2+. Fermentation of dietary oligofructose-enriched inulin fibers by the microflora leads to acidification of the intestinal lumen and by this enhances mineral uptake. This study aimed, therefore, to improve mineral absorption by application of dietary inulin to counteract PPIH. Methods Here, C57BL/J6 mice were supplemented with omeprazole and/or inulin. Subsequently, Mg2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis was assessed by means of serum, urine and fecal electrolyte measurements. Moreover, the mRNA levels of magnesiotropic and calciotropic genes were examined in the large intestine and kidney by real-time PCR. Results Treatment with omeprazole significantly reduced serum Mg2+ and Ca2+ levels. However, concomitant addition of dietary inulin fibers normalized serum Ca2+ but not serum Mg2+ concentrations. Inulin abolished enhanced expression of Trpv6 and S100g in the colon by omeprazole. Additionally, intestinal and renal mRNA levels of the Trpm6 gene were reduced after inulin intake. Conclusions This study suggests that dietary inulin counteracts reduced intestinal Ca2+ absorption upon PPI treatment. In contrast, inulin did not increase intestinal absorption of Mg2+ sufficiently to recover serum Mg2+. The clinical potential of dietary inulin treatment should be the subject of future studies. PMID:26397986

  16. Dietary Inulin Fibers Prevent Proton-Pump Inhibitor (PPI)-Induced Hypocalcemia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hess, Mark W; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M

    2015-01-01

    Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) is the most recognized side effect of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). Additionally, PPIH is associated with hypocalcemia and hypokalemia. It is hypothesized that PPIs reduce epithelial proton secretion and thereby increase the pH in the colon, which may explain the reduced absorption of and Mg2+ and Ca2+. Fermentation of dietary oligofructose-enriched inulin fibers by the microflora leads to acidification of the intestinal lumen and by this enhances mineral uptake. This study aimed, therefore, to improve mineral absorption by application of dietary inulin to counteract PPIH. Here, C57BL/J6 mice were supplemented with omeprazole and/or inulin. Subsequently, Mg2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis was assessed by means of serum, urine and fecal electrolyte measurements. Moreover, the mRNA levels of magnesiotropic and calciotropic genes were examined in the large intestine and kidney by real-time PCR. Treatment with omeprazole significantly reduced serum Mg2+ and Ca2+ levels. However, concomitant addition of dietary inulin fibers normalized serum Ca2+ but not serum Mg2+ concentrations. Inulin abolished enhanced expression of Trpv6 and S100g in the colon by omeprazole. Additionally, intestinal and renal mRNA levels of the Trpm6 gene were reduced after inulin intake. This study suggests that dietary inulin counteracts reduced intestinal Ca2+ absorption upon PPI treatment. In contrast, inulin did not increase intestinal absorption of Mg2+ sufficiently to recover serum Mg2+. The clinical potential of dietary inulin treatment should be the subject of future studies.

  17. Benzo(a)pyrene induced lung cancer: Role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Sriram, Chandra Shekhar; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the major cause of overall cancer deaths, and chemoprevention is a promising strategy to control this disease. Benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is one among the principal constituents of tobacco smoke that plays a key role in lung carcinogenesis. The B(a)P induced lung cancer in mice offers a relevant model to study the effect of natural products and has been widely used by many researchers and found considerable success in ameliorating the pathophysiological changes of lung cancer. Currently available synthetic drugs that constitute the pharmacological armamentarium are themselves effective in managing the condition but not without setbacks. These hunches have accelerated the requisite for natural products, which may be used as dietary supplement to prevent the progress of lung cancer. Besides, these agents also supplement the conventional treatment and offer better management of the condition with less side effects. In the context of soaring interest toward dietary phytochemicals as newer pharmacological interventions for lung cancer, in the present review, we are attempting to give a silhouette of mechanisms of B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis and the role of dietary phytochemicals in chemoprevention.

  18. Benefits of dietary phytochemical supplementation on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage: Is including antioxidants enough?

    PubMed

    Pereira Panza, Vilma Simões; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; da Silva, Edson Luiz

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to critically discuss studies that investigated the effects of supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. The performance of physical activities that involve unaccustomed eccentric muscle actions-such as lowering a weight or downhill walking-can result in muscle damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. These events may be accompanied by muscle weakness and delayed-onset muscle soreness. According to the current evidences, supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals appears to have the potential to attenuate symptoms associated with eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. However, there are inconsistencies regarding the relationship between muscle damage and blood markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Furthermore, the effectiveness of strategies appear to depend on a number of aspects inherent to phytochemical compounds as well as its food matrix. Methodological issues also may interfere with the proper interpretation of supplementation effects. Thus, the study may contribute to updating professionals involved in sport nutrition as well as highlighting the interest of scientists in new perspectives that can widen dietary strategies applied to training.

  19. Pancreas Recovery Following Caerulein-induced Pancreatitis is Impaired in Plasminogen Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lugea, Aurelia; Nan, Li; French, Samuel W.; Bezerra, Jorge A.; Gukovskaya, Anna S; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    Background & Aims: The plasminogen (plg) system participates in tissue repair in several organs, but its role in pancreas repair remains poorly characterized. To better understand the role of plg in pancreas recovery following injury, we examined the course of caerulein-induced pancreatitis in plg deficient and sufficient mice. Methods: Pancreatitis was induced by caerulein administration (50 μg/kg, 7 ip injections). Mice were sacrificed either at the acute phase (7 hours after the first caerulein injection) or during recovery (at 2, 4 and 7 days). In pancreatic sections we examined: pancreatic morphology, trypsin activation, inflammatory cell infiltration, acinar cell death, cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, activation of stellate cells (PSCs), and components of the plg and metalloproteinase systems. Results: In plg sufficient mice, pancreatic plg levels and plasmin activity increased during the acute phase and remained elevated during recovery. Pancreatitis resolved in plg sufficient mice within 7 days. Pancreas recovery involved reorganization of the parenchyma structure, removal of necrotic debris, cell proliferation, transient activation of PSCs and moderate deposition of ECM proteins. Acute pancreatitis (7-h) was indistinguishable between plg deficient and sufficient mice. In contrast, pancreas recovery was impaired in plg deficient mice. Plg deficiency led to disorganized parenchyma, extensive acinar cell loss, poor removal of necrotic debris, reduced cell proliferation and fibrosis. Fibrosis was characterized by deposition of collagens and fibronectin, persistent activation of PSCs and upregulation of pancreatic TGF-β1. Conclusions: Plg/plasmin deficiency leads to features similar to those found in chronic pancreatitis such as parenchymal atrophy and fibrosis. PMID:16952557

  20. Gastric Helicobacter Infection Induces Iron Deficiency in the INS-GAS Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Melanie J.; Pritchard, D. Mark; Boxall, Sally A.; Abuderman, Abdul A.; Williams, Jonathan M.; Varro, Andrea; Crabtree, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence from clinical and population studies for a role of H. pylori infection in the aetiology of iron deficiency. Rodent models of Helicobacter infection are helpful for investigating any causal links and mechanisms of iron deficiency in the host. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gastric Helicobacter infection on iron deficiency and host iron metabolism/transport gene expression in hypergastrinemic INS-GAS mice. INS-GAS mice were infected with Helicobacter felis for 3, 6 and 9 months. At post mortem, blood was taken for assessment of iron status and gastric mucosa for pathology, immunohistology and analysis of gene expression. Chronic Helicobacter infection of INS- GAS mice resulted in decreased serum iron, transferrin saturation and hypoferritinemia and increased Total iron binding capacity (TIBC). Decreased serum iron concentrations were associated with a concomitant reduction in the number of parietal cells, strengthening the association between hypochlorhydria and gastric Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Infection with H. felis for nine months was associated with decreased gastric expression of iron metabolism regulators hepcidin, Bmp4 and Bmp6 but increased expression of Ferroportin 1, the iron efflux protein, iron absorption genes such as Divalent metal transporter 1, Transferrin receptor 1 and also Lcn2 a siderophore-binding protein. The INS-GAS mouse is therefore a useful model for studying Helicobacter-induced iron deficiency. Furthermore, the marked changes in expression of gastric iron transporters following Helicobacter infection may be relevant to the more rapid development of carcinogenesis in the Helicobacter infected INS-GAS model. PMID:23185574

  1. Nitric oxide is involved in phosphorus deficiency-induced cluster root development and citrate exudation in white lupin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    White lupin (Lupinus albus) forms specialized cluster roots characterized by exudation of organic anions under phosphorus (P) deficiency. Here, we evaluated the role of nitric oxide (NO) in P deficiency-induced cluster-root formation and citrate exudation in white lupin. Plants were treated with NO ...

  2. Dietary Heme Induces Gut Dysbiosis, Aggravates Colitis, and Potentiates the Development of Adenomas in Mice.

    PubMed

    Constante, Marco; Fragoso, Gabriela; Calvé, Annie; Samba-Mondonga, Macha; Santos, Manuela M

    2017-01-01

    Dietary heme can be used by colonic bacteria equipped with heme-uptake systems as a growth factor and thereby impact on the microbial community structure. The impact of heme on the gut microbiota composition may be particularly pertinent in chronic inflammation such as in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), where a strong association with gut dysbiosis has been consistently reported. In this study we investigated the influence of dietary heme on the gut microbiota and inferred metagenomic composition, and on chemically induced colitis and colitis-associated adenoma development in mice. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we found that mice fed a diet supplemented with heme significantly altered their microbiota composition, characterized by a decrease in α-diversity, a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase of Proteobacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae. These changes were similar to shifts seen in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-treated mice to induce colitis. In addition, dietary heme, but not systemically delivered heme, contributed to the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis and facilitated adenoma formation in the azoxymethane/DSS colorectal cancer (CRC) mouse model. Using inferred metagenomics, we found that the microbiota alterations elicited by dietary heme resulted in non-beneficial functional shifts, which were also characteristic of DSS-induced colitis. Furthermore, a reduction in fecal butyrate levels was found in mice fed the heme supplemented diet compared to mice fed the control diet. Iron metabolism genes known to contribute to heme release from red blood cells, heme uptake, and heme exporter proteins, were significantly enriched, indicating a shift toward favoring the growth of bacteria able to uptake heme and protect against its toxicity. In conclusion, our data suggest that luminal heme, originating from dietary components or gastrointestinal bleeding in IBD and, to lesser extent in CRC, directly contributes to microbiota dysbiosis. Thus, luminal

  3. Dietary zinc deficiency affects blood linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio; a sensitive physiological marker of zinc status in vivo (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad

    2014-03-20

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn⁺ (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn⁻ (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn⁺ control versus Zn⁻ group (p < 0.05). Hepatic TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 gene expression were higher in the Zn⁺ control group (p < 0.05), and hepatic Δ⁶ desaturase was significantly higher in the Zn⁺ group (p < 0.001). The LA:DGLA ratio was significantly elevated in the Zn⁻ group compared to the Zn⁺ group (22.6 ± 0.5 and 18.5 ± 0.5, % w/w, respectively, p < 0.001). This study suggests erythrocyte LA:DGLA is able to differentiate zinc status between zinc adequate and zinc deficient birds, and may be a sensitive biomarker to assess dietary zinc manipulation.

  4. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Affects Blood Linoleic Acid: Dihomo-γ-linolenic Acid (LA:DGLA) Ratio; a Sensitive Physiological Marker of Zinc Status in Vivo (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Spenser; Qin, Xia; Ran-Ressler, Rinat; Brenna, James Thomas; Glahn, Raymond P.; Tako, Elad

    2014-01-01

    Zinc is a vital micronutrient used for over 300 enzymatic reactions and multiple biochemical and structural processes in the body. To date, sensitive and specific biological markers of zinc status are still needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate Gallus gallus as an in vivo model in the context of assessing the sensitivity of a previously unexplored potential zinc biomarker, the erythrocyte linoleic acid: dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (LA:DGLA) ratio. Diets identical in composition were formulated and two groups of birds (n = 12) were randomly separated upon hatching into two diets, Zn(+) (zinc adequate control, 42.3 μg/g zinc), and Zn(−) (zinc deficient, 2.5 μg/g zinc). Dietary zinc intake, body weight, serum zinc, and the erythrocyte fatty acid profile were measured weekly. At the conclusion of the study, tissues were collected for gene expression analysis. Body weight, feed consumption, zinc intake, and serum zinc were higher in the Zn(+) contro