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Sample records for dietary exposure

  1. CHILDREN'S DIETARY EXPOSURES TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 requires EPA to more accurately assess children's aggregate exposures to environmental contaminants. Children have unstructured eating behaviors which cause excess exposures as a result of their activities. Determining total dietary intak...

  2. RECENT ENHANCEMENTS TO THE DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation describes recent enhancements & new applications of the Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM), a model developed to assist in design & interpretation of dietary exposure measurements. Model is an interactive system that provides dietary exposure estimates using dat...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A DIETARY EXPOSURE POTENTIAL MODEL FOR EVALUATING DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dietary Exposure Potential Model (DEPM) is a computer-based model developed for estimating dietary exposure to chemical residues in food. The DEPM is based on food consumption data from the 1987-1988 Nationwide Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) administered by the United States ...

  4. ESTIMATING EXCESS DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nine children in a daycare that routinely applied the pesticide, esfenvalerate, were studied to assess excess dietary exposures. Surface wipes, a standard food item of processed American cheese slice pressed on the surface and handled by the child, an accelerometer reading, and ...

  5. MEASURING DIETARY EXPOSURE OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children do not consume foods in a structured manner. Their foods contact surfaces (hands, floors, eating surfaces, etc.) that may be contaminated while they are eating them. Thus, dietary exposures of young children are difficult to accurately assess or measure. A recen...

  6. Dietary exposures to selected metals and pesticides.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, D L; Spengler, J D; Ozkaynak, H; Tsai, L; Ryan, P B

    1996-02-01

    Average daily dietary exposures to 11 contaminants were estimated for approximately 120,000 U.S. adults by combining data on annual diet, as measured by a food frequency questionnaire, with contaminant residue data for table-ready foods that were collected as part of the annual U.S. Food and Drug Administration Total Diet Study. The contaminants included in the analysis were four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury), three organophosphate pesticides (chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion), and four organochlorine pesticides (dieldrin, p,p'-DDE, lindane, heptachlor epoxide). Dietary exposures to these contaminants were highly variable among individuals, spanning two to three orders of magnitude. Intraindividual exposures to the metals, organophosphates, and organochlorines were estimated to be strongly correlated; Pearson's correlation coefficients ranged from 0.28 for lindane:dieldrin to 0.84 for lead:mercury. For some of the compounds (e.g., arsenic and dieldrin), a substantial fraction of the population was estimated to have dietary intakes in excess of health-based standards established by the EPA. Before use for risk assessment or epidemiologic purposes, however, the validity of the exposure estimates must be evaluated by comparison with biological indicators of chronic exposure. Because of their low detection rate in table-ready foods, the estimated distributions of exposures for dieldrin, p,p'-DDE, heptachlor epoxide, lindane, diazinon, and chlorpyrifos were found to be sensitive to assumed values for nondetect samples. Reliable estimates of the population distribution of dietary exposures to most other contaminants cannot be made currently, due to their low rate of detection in table-ready foods. Monitoring programs that use more sensitive study designs and population-based assessments for other subpopulations should be a priority for future research.

  7. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART 3: MODELLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was used to model dietary exposure of young children. Parameters included pesticide residue on food before handling, surface pesticide loading, transfer efficiencies and children's activity patterns. Three components of dietary pesticide exposure were includ...

  8. ADVANCES IN DIETARY EXPOSURE RESEARCH AT THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency-National Exposure Research Laboratory's (USEPA-NERL)dietary exposure research program investigates the role of diet, including drinking water, as a potential pathway of human exposure to environmental contaminants. A primary progr...

  9. EXPOSURE OF RAINBOW TROUT TO DIETARY METALS USING LIVE PREY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary exposure to CD, Cu, ZN, and Pb has been shown to cause accumulatioin of metal in fish and other aquatic organisms...In this study the toxicity of dietary metal exposure was evaluated using an experimental food chain of sediment from oligochaetes to fish...Relationships am...

  10. Risks of dietary acrylamide exposure: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Riboldi, Bárbara Pelicioli; Vinhas, Álvaro Marchand; Moreira, Júlia Dubois

    2014-08-15

    Acrylamide (AA) is a probable human carcinogen found in carbohydrate-rich foods that have been heated to high temperatures. AA dietary exposure has been associated to development of health problems. We perform a systematic review to elucidate the association of dietary AA exposure and human health problems. Articles were screened by reading titles and abstracts before the full text of eligible articles was read (κ=0.824). Data were harvested by two reviewers and checked by a third. Forty-one articles were analyzed and assessment of dietary exposure proved to be far from uniform and suffered from limitations that possibly impact on the validity of outcomes with relation to human health. Risk assessment of dietary acrylamide exposure is in need of high quality methods for evaluating dietary exposure and validated acrylamide content databases.

  11. DIETARY EXPOSURE TO PYRETHROIDS IN THE U.S POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the contribution of pyrethroid residues in food as an important driver of exposure. The levels of urinary metabolites of pyrethroids reported in NHANES were used as a general estimate of population exposure to pyrethroids. Dietary exposure to pyrethroids was estimat...

  12. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART II: FIELD STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to determine the adequacy of protocols for dietary exposure measurements. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of pesticides transferred from contaminated surfaces or hands to foods of young children and to validate a dietary mod...

  13. Comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) for food additives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R

    2016-05-01

    European methods for assessing dietary exposures to nutrients, additives and other substances in food are limited by the availability of detailed food consumption data for all member states. A proposed comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) applies summary data published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in a deterministic model based on an algorithm from the EFSA intake method for food additives. The proposed approach can predict estimates of food additive exposure provided in previous EFSA scientific opinions that were based on the full European food consumption database.

  14. UNDERSTANDING CHILDREN'S TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURE TO PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent residential monitoring studies have demonstrated that significant portion of total exposure of infants and children to environmental contaminants can result from contamination of food in the home. Children's foods become contaminated through handling and contact with surf...

  15. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN TO LEAD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because 1) they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities, 2) lead adsorption occurs more readily in a child as compared to an adult, and 3) the child's development is more vulnerable ...

  16. Challenges in Dietary Exposure Assessment in Epidemiology: Research Trends.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Although exposure assessment of the usual diet is an essential component of nutrition epidemiology, it remains one of the most challenging issues in the field. Dietary exposure is widely measured using Food Frequency Questionnaires (FFQs), which impose a low burden on respondents and are inexpensive in large-scale studies. FFQs have long satisfied the needs of epidemiological research, and have helped deliver the tremendous recent growth in knowledge of the diet-disease association. However, issues surrounding measurement errors with FFQs have attracted substantial research interest around the world. Attenuation of the diet-disease association due to measurement errors identified in Western populations has led to extended methodological investigations comparing the performance of FFQs with biomarkers. The need for better dietary assessment methods has increased. Dietary records or recall provide relatively accurate estimates of intake for specific days, and of the usual diet if collected on multiple days. Until recently, however, their use in large-scale studies was not feasible, mainly due to cost. One innovative tool which may overcome the limitations of dietary records or recall is computerized 24-h dietary recall systems. These systems have been demonstrated to provide high-quality dietary intake data among Western populations. Incorporation of such new technology into large-scale epidemiological studies would make multiple-day administration of 24-h recall feasible in terms of cost. Research efforts to improve dietary assessment among Japanese and Asian populations are still under development. The development of innovative methods for Japanese remains an urgent research challenge. PMID:26598878

  17. Dietary exposure to aluminium of the Hong Kong population.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waiky W K; Chung, Stephen W C; Kwong, K P; Yin Ho, Yuk; Xiao, Ying

    2010-04-01

    A total of 256 individual food samples were collected in Hong Kong for aluminium testing. Most of food samples were analysed in ready-to-eat form. High aluminium levels were found in steamed bread/bun/cake (mean: 100-320 mg kg(-1)), some bakery products such as muffin, pancake/waffle, coconut tart and cake (mean: 250, 160, 120 and 91 mg kg(-1), respectively), and jellyfish (ready-to-eat form) (mean: 1200 mg kg(-1)). The results demonstrated that aluminium-containing food additives have been widely used in these food products. The average dietary exposure to aluminium for a 60 kg adult was estimated to be 0.60 mg kg(-1) bw week(-1), which amounted to 60% of the new PTWI established by JECFA. The main dietary source was "steamed bread/bun/cake", which contributed to 60% of the total exposure, followed by "bakery products" and "jellyfish", which contributed to 23 and 10% of the total exposure, respectively. However, the estimation did not include the intake of aluminium from natural food sources, food contact materials or other sources (e.g. drinking water). Although the results indicated that aluminium it is unlikely to cause adverse health effect for the general population, the risk to some populations who regularly consume foods with aluminium-containing food additives cannot be ruled out.

  18. TESTING DUPLICATE DIET SAMPLE COLLECTION METHODS FOR MEASURING PERSONAL DIETARY EXPOSURES TO CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary ingestion may be a significant pathway of human exposure to many potentially toxic chemicals. The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency-National Human Exposure Laboratory has made the development of methods for measuring persoanl dietary exposures a high priority for its di...

  19. Burden of disease of dietary exposure to acrylamide in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Lea Sletting; Granby, Kit; Knudsen, Vibeke Kildegaard; Nauta, Maarten; Pires, Sara Monteiro; Poulsen, Morten

    2016-04-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a process-contaminant that potentially increases the risk of developing cancer in humans. AA is formed during heat treatment of starchy foods and detected in a wide range of commonly consumed products. Increased focus on risk ranking and prioritization of major causes of disease makes it relevant to estimate the impact that exposure to chemical contaminants and other hazards in food have on health. In this study, we estimated the burden of disease (BoD) caused by dietary exposure to AA, using disability adjusted life years (DALY) as health metric. We applied an exposure-based approach and proposed a model of three components: an exposure, health-outcome, and DALY-module. We estimated BoD using two approaches for estimating cancer risk based on toxicological data and two approaches for estimating DALY. In Denmark, 1.8 healthy life years per 100.000 inhabitants are lost each year due to exposure to AA through foods, as estimated by the most conservative approach. This result should be used to inform risk management decisions and for comparison with BoD of other food-borne hazards for prioritizing policies. However, our study shows that careful evaluation of methodological choices and assumptions used in BoD studies is necessary before use in policy making.

  20. The food metabolome: a window over dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Scalbert, Augustin; Brennan, Lorraine; Manach, Claudine; Andres-Lacueva, Cristina; Dragsted, Lars O; Draper, John; Rappaport, Stephen M; van der Hooft, Justin J J; Wishart, David S

    2014-06-01

    The food metabolome is defined as the part of the human metabolome directly derived from the digestion and biotransformation of foods and their constituents. With >25,000 compounds known in various foods, the food metabolome is extremely complex, with a composition varying widely according to the diet. By its very nature it represents a considerable and still largely unexploited source of novel dietary biomarkers that could be used to measure dietary exposures with a high level of detail and precision. Most dietary biomarkers currently have been identified on the basis of our knowledge of food compositions by using hypothesis-driven approaches. However, the rapid development of metabolomics resulting from the development of highly sensitive modern analytic instruments, the availability of metabolite databases, and progress in (bio)informatics has made agnostic approaches more attractive as shown by the recent identification of novel biomarkers of intakes for fruit, vegetables, beverages, meats, or complex diets. Moreover, examples also show how the scrutiny of the food metabolome can lead to the discovery of bioactive molecules and dietary factors associated with diseases. However, researchers still face hurdles, which slow progress and need to be resolved to bring this emerging field of research to maturity. These limits were discussed during the First International Workshop on the Food Metabolome held in Glasgow. Key recommendations made during the workshop included more coordination of efforts; development of new databases, software tools, and chemical libraries for the food metabolome; and shared repositories of metabolomic data. Once achieved, major progress can be expected toward a better understanding of the complex interactions between diet and human health.

  1. Applicability of western chemical dietary exposure models to the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shizhen; Price, Oliver; Liu, Zhengtao; Jones, Kevin C; Sweetman, Andrew J

    2015-07-01

    A range of exposure models, which have been developed in Europe and North America, are playing an increasingly important role in priority setting and the risk assessment of chemicals. However, the applicability of these tools, which are based on Western dietary exposure pathways, to estimate chemical exposure to the Chinese population to support the development of a risk-based environment and exposure assessment, is unclear. Three frequently used modelling tools, EUSES, RAIDAR and ACC-HUMANsteady, have been evaluated in terms of human dietary exposure estimation by application to a range of chemicals with different physicochemical properties under both model default and Chinese dietary scenarios. Hence, the modelling approaches were assessed by considering dietary pattern differences only. The predicted dietary exposure pathways were compared under both scenarios using a range of hypothetical and current emerging contaminants. Although the differences across models are greater than those between dietary scenarios, model predictions indicated that dietary preference can have a significant impact on human exposure, with the relatively high consumption of vegetables and cereals resulting in higher exposure via plants-based foodstuffs under Chinese consumption patterns compared to Western diets. The selected models demonstrated a good ability to identify key dietary exposure pathways which can be used for screening purposes and an evaluative risk assessment. However, some model adaptations will be required to cover a number of important Chinese exposure pathways, such as freshwater farmed-fish, grains and pork.

  2. THE THREE INTERACTING FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CHILDREN'S DIETARY EXPOSURES: ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS, FOOD CONTAMINATION, AND CHILDREN'S BEHAVIORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dietary contribution to an aggregate exposure assessment is potentially an important pathway of exposure especially for young children. Enviornmental contamination appearing in the child's diet can result from contamination in the food as purchased or due to preparing, servin...

  3. Cumulative dietary exposure of the population of Denmark to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Petersen, Annette; Nielsen, Elsa; Christensen, Tue; Poulsen, Mette Erecius; Andersen, Jens Hinge

    2015-09-01

    We used the Hazard Index (HI) method to carry out a cumulative risk assessment after chronic dietary exposure to all monitored pesticides in fruit, vegetables and cereals for various consumer groups in Denmark. Residue data for all the pesticides were obtained from the Danish monitoring programme during the period 2004-2011. Food consumption data were obtained from DANSDA (the DAnish National Survey of Diet and physical Activity) for the period 2005-2008. The calculations were made using three different models to cope with residues below the limit of reporting (LOR). We concluded that a model that included processing factors and set non-detects to ½ LOR, but limited the correction (Model 3), gave the most realistic exposure estimate. With Model 3 the HI was calculated to be 0.44 for children and 0.18 for adults, indicating that there is no risk of adverse health effects following chronic cumulative exposure to the pesticides found in fruit, vegetables and cereals on the Danish market. The HI was below 1 even for consumers who eat more than 550 g of fruit and vegetables per day, corresponding to 1/3 of the population. Choosing Danish-produced commodities whenever possible could reduce the HI by a factor of 2.

  4. Simulating cholinesterase inhibition in birds caused by dietary insecticide exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corson, M.S.; Mora, M.A.; Grant, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a stochastic simulation model that simulates avian foraging in an agricultural landscape to evaluate factors affecting dietary insecticide exposure and to predict post-exposure cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. To evaluate the model, we simulated published field studies and found that model predictions of insecticide decay and ChE inhibition reasonably approximated most observed results. Sensitivity analysis suggested that foraging location usually influenced ChE inhibition more than diet preferences or daily intake rate. Although organophosphorus insecticides usually caused greater inhibition than carbamate insecticides, insecticide toxicity appeared only moderately important. When we simulated impact of heavy insecticide applications during breeding seasons of 15 wild bird species, mean maximum ChE inhibition in most species exceeded 20% at some point. At this level of inhibition, birds may experience nausea and/or may exhibit minor behavioral changes. Simulated risk peaked in April-May and August-September and was lowest in July. ChE inhibition increased with proportion of vegetation in the diet. This model, and ones like it, may help predict insecticide exposure of and sublethal ChE inhibition in grassland animals, thereby reducing dependence of ecological risk assessments on field studies alone.

  5. Probabilistic Modeling of Dietary Arsenic Exposure and Dose and Evaluation with 2003-2004 NHANES Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary exposure from food to toxic inorganic arsenic (iAs) in the general U.S. population has not been well studied. The goal of this research was to quantify dietary arsenic As exposure and analyze the major contributors to total As (tAs) and iAs. Another objective was to com...

  6. 76 FR 72404 - Pesticides: Availability of Pesticide Registration Notice Regarding the Non-Dietary Exposure Task...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... of the Non-Dietary Exposure Task Force (NDETF). This PR Notice (PR Notice 2011-2) was issued by the... initial notice in 2000, the membership of the task force has changed and the specific data needs have been... AGENCY Pesticides: Availability of Pesticide Registration Notice Regarding the Non-Dietary Exposure...

  7. DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, PART 1: MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND STUDY DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Young children contact surfaces (hands, floors, etc.) that may be contaminated with pesticides. Thus, dietary exposures of young children are difficult to measure, but are needed to support the aggregate exposure assessments. Evaluation of dietary field protocols and a total die...

  8. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers: occurrence, dietary exposure, and toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Darnerud, P O; Eriksen, G S; Jóhannesson, T; Larsen, P B; Viluksela, M

    2001-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as flame retardants in plastics (concentration, 5--30%) and in textile coatings. Commercial products consist predominantly of penta-, octa-, and decabromodiphenyl ether mixtures, and global PBDE production is about 40,000 tons per year. PBDEs are bioaccumulated and biomagnified in the environment, and comparatively high levels are often found in aquatic biotopes from different parts of the world. During the mid-1970--1980s there was a substantial increase in the PBDE levels with time in both sediments and aquatic biota, whereas the latest Swedish data (pike and guillemot egg) may indicate that levels are at steady state or are decreasing. However, exponentially increasing PBDE levels have been observed in mother's milk during 1972--1997. Based on levels in food from 1999, the dietary intake of PBDE in Sweden has been estimated to be 0.05 microg per day. Characteristic end points of animal toxicity are hepatotoxicity, embryotoxicity, and thyroid effects as well as maternal toxicity during gestation. Recently, behavioral effects have been observed in mice on administration of PBDEs during a critical period after birth. Based on the critical effects reported in available studies, we consider the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) value of the PBDE group to be 1 mg/kg/day (primarily based on effects of pentaBDEs). In conclusion, with the scientific knowledge of today and based on Nordic intake data, the possible consumer health risk from PBDEs appears limited, as a factor of over 10(6) separates the estimated present mean dietary intake from the suggested LOAEL value. However, the presence of many and important data gaps, including those in carcinogenicity, reproduction, and developmental toxicity, as well as additional routes of exposure, make this conclusion only preliminary. Moreover, the time trend of PBDEs in human breast milk is alarming for the future. PMID:11250805

  9. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups ...

  10. Dietary exposure to chlorpyrifos alters core temperature in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher J; Padnos, Beth K

    2002-08-15

    Administration of the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CHP) to the male rat at a dose of 25-80 mg/kg (p.o.) results in hypothermia followed by a delayed fever lasting for several days. These are high doses of CHP that cause marked cholinergic stimulation. It is important to understand if chronic exposure to CHP would evoke changes in thermoregulation that are comparable to the acute administration. Male rats of the Long-Evans strain were subjected to dietary treatment of 0, 1, or 5 mg/(kg day) CHP for 6 months. A limited amount of food was given per day to maintain body weight at 350 g. The constant body weight allowed for the regulation of a consistent dosage of CHP per kg body weight throughout the feeding period. Core temperature (T(a)) and motor activity (MA) were monitored by radio telemetric transmitters implanted in the abdominal cavity. After 5 months of treatment, T(c) and MA were monitored in undisturbed animals for 96 h. CHP at 5 mg/(kg day) led to a slight elevation in T(c) without affecting MA. The rats were then administered a challenge dose of CHP (30 mg/kg, p.o.) while T(c) and MA were monitored. Rats fed the 1 and 5 mg/kg CHP diets showed a significantly greater hypothermic response and reduction in MA following CHP challenge compared to controls. The restricted feeding schedule resulted in marked changes in the pattern of the circadian rhythm. Therefore, in another study, rats were treated ad libitum for 17 days with a CHP diet that resulted in a dosage of 7 mg CHP/(mg day). There was a significant increase in T(c) during the daytime but not during the night throughout most of the treatment period. Overall, chronic CHP was associated with a slight but significant elevation in T(c) and greater hypothermic response to a CHP challenge. This latter finding was unexpected and suggests that chronic exposure to CHP sensitizes the rat's thermoregulatory response to acute CHP exposure. PMID:12135625

  11. Exposure assessment of adult intake of bisphenol A (BPA) with emphasis on canned food dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Matthew; Schecter, Arnold; Paepke, Olaf; Shropshire, William; Christensen, Krista; Birnbaum, Linda

    2015-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-volume, synthetic compound found in epoxy resins and plastics used in food packaging. Food is believed to be a major source of BPA intake. In this study, we measured the concentration of BPA in convenience samplings of foodstuffs purchased in Dallas, Texas. Sampling entailed collection of 204 samples of fresh, frozen, and canned foods in two rounds in 2010. BPA was positive in 73% of the canned food samples, while it was found in only 7% of non-canned foods at low concentrations. The results of this food sampling program were used to calculate adult dietary intakes of BPA. A pathway approach combined food intakes, a "canned fraction" parameter which described what portion of total intake of that food came from canned products, and measured food concentrations. Dietary intakes were calculated as 12.6 ng/kg-day, of which 12.4 ng/kg-day was from canned foods. Canned vegetable intakes alone were 11.9 ng/kg-day. This dietary intake was compared to total intakes of BPA estimated from urine measurements of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Total adult central tendency intakes ranged from 30 to 70 ng/kg-day for NHANES cycles between 2005 and 2010. Three possibilities were explored to explain the difference between these two approaches for intake estimation. Not all foods which may have been canned, particularly canned beverages such as soft drinks, were sampled in our food sampling program. Second, non-food pathways of exposure may be important for adults, including thermal paper exposures, and dust and air exposures. Finally, our canned food concentrations may not be adequately representative of canned foods in the United States; they were found to be generally lower compared to canned food concentrations measured in six other worldwide food surveys including three in North America. Our finding that canned food concentrations greatly exceeded non-canned concentrations was consistent with other studies, and

  12. Exposure assessment of adult intake of bisphenol A (BPA) with emphasis on canned food dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Lorber, Matthew; Schecter, Arnold; Paepke, Olaf; Shropshire, William; Christensen, Krista; Birnbaum, Linda

    2015-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-volume, synthetic compound found in epoxy resins and plastics used in food packaging. Food is believed to be a major source of BPA intake. In this study, we measured the concentration of BPA in convenience samplings of foodstuffs purchased in Dallas, Texas. Sampling entailed collection of 204 samples of fresh, frozen, and canned foods in two rounds in 2010. BPA was positive in 73% of the canned food samples, while it was found in only 7% of non-canned foods at low concentrations. The results of this food sampling program were used to calculate adult dietary intakes of BPA. A pathway approach combined food intakes, a "canned fraction" parameter which described what portion of total intake of that food came from canned products, and measured food concentrations. Dietary intakes were calculated as 12.6 ng/kg-day, of which 12.4 ng/kg-day was from canned foods. Canned vegetable intakes alone were 11.9 ng/kg-day. This dietary intake was compared to total intakes of BPA estimated from urine measurements of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Total adult central tendency intakes ranged from 30 to 70 ng/kg-day for NHANES cycles between 2005 and 2010. Three possibilities were explored to explain the difference between these two approaches for intake estimation. Not all foods which may have been canned, particularly canned beverages such as soft drinks, were sampled in our food sampling program. Second, non-food pathways of exposure may be important for adults, including thermal paper exposures, and dust and air exposures. Finally, our canned food concentrations may not be adequately representative of canned foods in the United States; they were found to be generally lower compared to canned food concentrations measured in six other worldwide food surveys including three in North America. Our finding that canned food concentrations greatly exceeded non-canned concentrations was consistent with other studies, and

  13. Exposure assessment of adult intake of bisphenol A (BPA) with emphasis on canned food dietary exposures

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Matthew; Schecter, Arnold; Paepke, Olaf; Shropshire, William; Christensen, Krista; Birnbaum, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high-volume, synthetic compound found in epoxy resins and plastics used in food packaging. Food is believed to be a major source of BPA intake. In this study, we measured the concentration of BPA in convenience samplings of foodstuffs purchased in Dallas, Texas. Sampling entailed collection of 204 samples of fresh, frozen, and canned foods in two rounds in 2010. BPA was positive in 73% of the canned food samples, while it was found in only 7% of non-canned foods at low concentrations. The results of this food sampling program were used to calculate adult dietary intakes of BPA. A pathway approach combined food intakes, a “canned fraction” parameter which described what portion of total intake of that food came from canned products, and measured food concentrations. Dietary intakes were calculated as 12.6 ng/kg-day, of which 12.4 ng/kg-day was from canned foods. Canned vegetable intakes alone were 11.9 ng/kg-day. This dietary intake was compared to total intakes of BPA estimated from urine measurements of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Total adult central tendency intakes ranged from 30 to 70 ng/kg-day for NHANES cycles between 2005 and 2010. Three possibilities were explored to explain the difference between these two approaches for intake estimation. Not all foods which may have been canned, particularly canned beverages such as soft drinks, were sampled in our food sampling program. Second, non-food pathways of exposure may be important for adults, including thermal paper exposures, and dust and air exposures. Finally, our canned food concentrations may not be adequately representative of canned foods in the United States; they were found to be generally lower compared to canned food concentrations measured in six other worldwide food surveys including three in North America. Our finding that canned food concentrations greatly exceeded non-canned concentrations was consistent with other studies, and

  14. Contribution of PCB exposure from fish consumption to total dioxin-like dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Judd, Nancy; Griffith, William C; Faustman, Elaine M

    2004-10-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) are the second greatest cause of fish advisories, and are often the greatest contributors to dioxin-like toxic equivalency (TEQ) in fish and seafood. Because fish consumption is associated with both contaminant risks and health benefits, incremental health risks from PCBs in fish should be considered within the context of overall TEQ associated dietary risk to enable consumers to make informed decisions about choosing to eat fish or alternate foodstuffs. In this paper, potential TEQ exposure from PCBs in fish for adults with a variety of consumption patterns and consuming fish from a variety of sources are calculated using recent consumption and fish contaminant data from the literature and compared to total TEQ exposure from all sources. For high-level consumers and individuals eating fish from relatively contaminated sites, PCB TEQ exposure from fish consumption alone may exceed the 1 pg TEQ/kg/day average adult daily intake estimated by EPA, which itself carries an upper bound cancer risk of 1 in 1000. PCB TEQ risk for average consumers of commercial fish is expected to be far less, but is highly uncertain, since there is a dearth of congener specific PCB data for commercial fish and seafood. PMID:15450716

  15. A Dietary-Wide Association Study (DWAS) of Environmental Metal Exposure in US Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew A.; Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Karagas, Margaret R.; Li, Zhigang; Moore, Jason H.; Williams, Scott M.; Frost, H. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that exposure to toxic metals occurs through diet but few studies have comprehensively examined dietary sources of exposure in US populations. Purpose Our goal was to perform a novel dietary-wide association study (DWAS) to identify specific dietary sources of lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic exposure in US children and adults. Methods We combined data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with data from the US Department of Agriculture's Food Intakes Converted to Retail Commodities Database to examine associations between 49 different foods and environmental metal exposure. Using blood and urinary biomarkers for lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic, we compared sources of dietary exposure among children to that of adults. Results Diet accounted for more of the variation in mercury and arsenic than lead and cadmium. For instance we estimate 4.5% of the variation of mercury among children and 10.5% among adults is explained by diet. We identified a previously unrecognized association between rice consumption and mercury in a US study population – adjusted for other dietary sources such as seafood, an increase of 10 g/day of rice consumption was associated with a 4.8% (95% CI: 3.6, 5.2) increase in blood mercury concentration. Associations between diet and metal exposure were similar among children and adults, and we recapitulated other known dietary sources of exposure. Conclusion Utilizing this combination of data sources, this approach has the potential to identify and monitor dietary sources of metal exposure in the US population. PMID:25198543

  16. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURE OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was developed to identify critical input parameters to assess dietary intake of young children. The model was used as a framework for understanding important factors in data collection and analysis. Factors incorporated included transfer efficiencies of pest...

  17. Dietary exposure to aluminium and health risk assessment in the residents of Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Jiang, Lixin; Huang, Huiping; Zeng, Shengbo; Qiu, Fen; Yu, Miao; Li, Xiaorong; Wei, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Although there are great changes of dietary in the past few decades in China, few are known about the aluminium exposure in Chinese diet. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the dietary aluminium intake level in residents of Shenzhen, China. A total of 853 persons from 244 household were investigated their diet by three days food records. Finally, 149 kinds of foods in 17 food groups were selected to be the most consumed foods. From them, 1399 food samples were collected from market to test aluminium concentration. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (median, 527.5 mg/kg), fried twisted cruller (median, 466.0 mg/kg), shell (median, 107.1 mg/kg). The Shenzhen residents' average dietary aluminium exposure was estimated at 1.263 mg/kg bw/week which is lower than the PTWI (provisional tolerable weekly intake). But 0-2 and 3-13 age groups have the highest aluminium intake exceeding the PTWI (3.356 mg/kg bw/week and 3.248 mg/kg bw/week) than other age groups. And the main dietary aluminium exposure sources are fried twisted cruller, leaf vegetables and bean products. Our study suggested that even three decades rapid economy development, children in Shenzhen still have high dietary aluminium exposure risk. How to control high dietary aluminium exposure still is a great public health challenge in Shenzhen, China.

  18. Dietary Exposure to Aluminium and Health Risk Assessment in the Residents of Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mei; Jiang, Lixin; Huang, Huiping; Zeng, Shengbo; Qiu, Fen; Yu, Miao; Li, Xiaorong; Wei, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Although there are great changes of dietary in the past few decades in China, few are known about the aluminium exposure in Chinese diet. The aim of this study is to systematically evaluate the dietary aluminium intake level in residents of Shenzhen, China. A total of 853 persons from 244 household were investigated their diet by three days food records. Finally, 149 kinds of foods in 17 food groups were selected to be the most consumed foods. From them, 1399 food samples were collected from market to test aluminium concentration. High aluminium levels were found in jellyfish (median, 527.5 mg/kg), fried twisted cruller (median, 466.0 mg/kg), shell (median, 107.1 mg/kg). The Shenzhen residents' average dietary aluminium exposure was estimated at 1.263 mg/kg bw/week which is lower than the PTWI (provisional tolerable weekly intake). But 0–2 and 3–13 age groups have the highest aluminium intake exceeding the PTWI (3.356 mg/kg bw/week and 3.248 mg/kg bw/week) than other age groups. And the main dietary aluminium exposure sources are fried twisted cruller, leaf vegetables and bean products. Our study suggested that even three decades rapid economy development, children in Shenzhen still have high dietary aluminium exposure risk. How to control high dietary aluminium exposure still is a great public health challenge in Shenzhen, China. PMID:24594670

  19. Prioritization of pesticides based on daily dietary exposure potential as determined from the SHEDS model.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Lisa Jo; Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Zhilin; Xue, Jianping

    2016-10-01

    A major pathway for exposure to many pesticides is through diet. The objectives were to rank pesticides by comparing their calculated daily dietary exposure as determined by EPA's Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation (SHEDS) to single pesticides for different age groups to acceptable daily intakes (ADI), characterize pesticide trends in exposures over different time periods, and determine commodities contributing to pesticide exposures. SHEDS was applied, using Pesticide Data Program (PDP) (1991-2011) and pesticide usage data on crops from USDA combined with NHANES dietary consumption data, to generate exposure estimates by age group. ADI data collected from EPA, WHO, and other sources were used to rank pesticides based on relativeness of the dietary exposure potential to ADI by age groups. Sensitivity analysis provided trends in pesticide exposures. Within SHEDS, commodities contributing the majority of pesticides with greatest exposure potential were determined. The results indicated that the highest ranking pesticides were methamidophos and diazinon which exceeded 100% of the ADI. Sensitivity analysis indicated that exposure to methamidophos, diazinon, malathion, ethion and formetanate hydrochloride had a marked decrease from 1991-1999 to 2000-2011. Contributions analysis indicated that apples, mushroom, carrots, and lettuce contributed to diazinon exposure. Beans and pepper contributed to methamidophos exposure. PMID:27497764

  20. Exposure assessment of dietary cadmium: findings from shanghainese over 40 years, China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental exposure to cadmium causes renal dysfunction and bone damage. Cadmium contamination in food is regarded as the main environmental source of non-occupational exposure. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of dietary cadmium exposure in environmental cadmium exposure and its health risk among adults in Shanghai, China. Methods A cross-sectional survey about food consumption was conducted in 2008 among 207 citizens aged over 40 years in Shanghai, China. The food frequency questionnaire was combined with food, tobacco and water cadmium exposure to estimate the daily environmental cadmium exposure in both point and probabilistic estimations. Urine and blood samples of the participants were analyzed for internal exposure to total cadmium. Correlation analysis was conducted between the internal cadmium exposure and environmental cadmium exposure. Results According to the point estimation, average daily environmental cadmium exposure of the participants was 16.7 μg/day and approached 33.8% of the provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI). Dietary and tobacco cadmium exposure approached 25.8% and 7.9% of the PTDI, respectively. Males had higher levels of dietary cadmium exposure than females (p?=?0.002). The probabilistic model showed that 93.4% of the population did not have any health risks from dietary cadmium exposure. By sensitivity analysis, tobacco consumption, tobacco cadmium level, cadmium in vegetables and cadmium in rice accounted for 27.5%, 24.9%, 20.2% and 14.6% of the total cadmium exposure, respectively. The mean values of urinary and blood cadmium among the study population were 0.5 μg/L and 1.9 μg/L, respectively. Positive correlations were observed between environmental cadmium exposure and blood cadmium (R?=?0.52, P<0.01), tobacco cadmium intake and blood cadmium excluding non-smokers (R?=?0.26, P?=?0.049<0.05), and urine cadmium and age (R?=?0.15, P?=?0.037). Conclusions It has been suggested that there is no

  1. Dietary exposure to aluminium of urban residents from cities in South China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi; Wang, Jing; Li, Min; Liang, Xuxia; Dai, Guangwei; Hu, Zhikun; Wen, Jian; Huang, Qiong; Zhang, Yonghui

    2013-01-01

    A dietary survey was conducted over three consecutive days by using 24-hour dietary recall in the Pearl River Delta of South China to investigate the dietary consumption status. A total of 1702 food samples, 22 food groups, were collected, and aluminium concentrations of foods were determined by using ICP-MS. Weekly dietary exposure to aluminium of the average urban residents of South China was estimated to be 1.5 mg kg⁻¹ body weight, which amounted to 76% of the provisional tolerable weekly intake. Wheat-made products (53.5%) contributed most to the dietary exposure, followed by vegetables (12.2%). The high-level consumers' weekly exposure to aluminium was 11.1 mg kg⁻¹ body weight, which amounted to 407% of the provisional tolerable weekly intake. The results indicated that the general urban residents in South China might be safe from aluminium exposure, but the high-level consumers might be at some risk of aluminium exposure. The foods contributing to aluminium exposure were processed food with aluminium-containing food additives. It is necessary to take effective measures to control the overuse of aluminium-containing food additives.

  2. FACTORS INFLUENCING TOTAL DIETARY EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A deterministic model was developed to identify the critical input parameters needed to assess dietary intakes of young children. The model was used as a framework for understanding the important factors in data collection and data analysis. Factors incorporated into the model i...

  3. Reduced foodborne toxin exposure is a benefit of improving dietary diversity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Mitchell, Nicole J; Male, Denis; Kensler, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    Naturally occurring foodborne toxins are common in subsistence diets of low-income human populations worldwide. Often, these populations rely on one or two staple foods for the bulk of their calories, making them more susceptible to chronic intake of certain toxins. Exposure to common foodborne toxins is associated with diverse conditions such as cancer, immunotoxicity, growth impairment, and neurological deficits. Interventions focused solely on reducing toxin levels have proven difficult to sustain. Using case studies of two foodborne toxins, aflatoxin and cassava cyanide, this article addresses the heightened risk of particular diseases from eating monotonous diets based in maize, groundnuts, and cassava: common in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. We also discuss the potential role of increased dietary diversity in counteracting these diseases. Increased dietary diversity can reduce consumption of toxins and increase intake of nutrients that could counteract the toxicity of such chemicals. In Qidong, China, a population that previously consumed a monotonous maize-based diet and increased dietary diversity since the 1980s has experienced a dramatic reduction in liver cancer mortalities. That liver cancer decreased as dietary diversity increased is the catalyst for the hypothesis that dietary diversity could have a direct impact on reducing health effects of foodborne toxins. Future research, agricultural development, and food policy reforms should take into consideration the multifaceted benefits associated with improved dietary diversity. Collaborations between toxicologists, nutritionists, and policymakers are important to development of sustainable interventions to reduce foodborne toxin exposure and promote health through increased dietary diversity. PMID:25015663

  4. Reduced Foodborne Toxin Exposure Is a Benefit of Improving Dietary Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Mitchell, Nicole J.; Male, Denis; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring foodborne toxins are common in subsistence diets of low-income human populations worldwide. Often, these populations rely on one or two staple foods for the bulk of their calories, making them more susceptible to chronic intake of certain toxins. Exposure to common foodborne toxins is associated with diverse conditions such as cancer, immunotoxicity, growth impairment, and neurological deficits. Interventions focused solely on reducing toxin levels have proven difficult to sustain. Using case studies of two foodborne toxins, aflatoxin and cassava cyanide, this article addresses the heightened risk of particular diseases from eating monotonous diets based in maize, groundnuts, and cassava: common in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. We also discuss the potential role of increased dietary diversity in counteracting these diseases. Increased dietary diversity can reduce consumption of toxins and increase intake of nutrients that could counteract the toxicity of such chemicals. In Qidong, China, a population that previously consumed a monotonous maize-based diet and increased dietary diversity since the 1980s has experienced a dramatic reduction in liver cancer mortalities. That liver cancer decreased as dietary diversity increased is the catalyst for the hypothesis that dietary diversity could have a direct impact on reducing health effects of foodborne toxins. Future research, agricultural development, and food policy reforms should take into consideration the multifaceted benefits associated with improved dietary diversity. Collaborations between toxicologists, nutritionists, and policymakers are important to development of sustainable interventions to reduce foodborne toxin exposure and promote health through increased dietary diversity. PMID:25015663

  5. Reduced foodborne toxin exposure is a benefit of improving dietary diversity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Mitchell, Nicole J; Male, Denis; Kensler, Thomas W

    2014-10-01

    Naturally occurring foodborne toxins are common in subsistence diets of low-income human populations worldwide. Often, these populations rely on one or two staple foods for the bulk of their calories, making them more susceptible to chronic intake of certain toxins. Exposure to common foodborne toxins is associated with diverse conditions such as cancer, immunotoxicity, growth impairment, and neurological deficits. Interventions focused solely on reducing toxin levels have proven difficult to sustain. Using case studies of two foodborne toxins, aflatoxin and cassava cyanide, this article addresses the heightened risk of particular diseases from eating monotonous diets based in maize, groundnuts, and cassava: common in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. We also discuss the potential role of increased dietary diversity in counteracting these diseases. Increased dietary diversity can reduce consumption of toxins and increase intake of nutrients that could counteract the toxicity of such chemicals. In Qidong, China, a population that previously consumed a monotonous maize-based diet and increased dietary diversity since the 1980s has experienced a dramatic reduction in liver cancer mortalities. That liver cancer decreased as dietary diversity increased is the catalyst for the hypothesis that dietary diversity could have a direct impact on reducing health effects of foodborne toxins. Future research, agricultural development, and food policy reforms should take into consideration the multifaceted benefits associated with improved dietary diversity. Collaborations between toxicologists, nutritionists, and policymakers are important to development of sustainable interventions to reduce foodborne toxin exposure and promote health through increased dietary diversity.

  6. Dietary patterns among the Metro Atlanta Cohort: implications for population-based longitudinal dietary pesticide exposure and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Riederer, Anne M; Pearson, Melanie A; Lu, Chensheng

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing dietary consumption patterns is critical to dietary pesticide exposure assessment. We compared consumption patterns between adults (age 18-60) in the Metro Atlanta Cohort (MAC), a longitudinal study of pesticide exposure among Atlanta residents, and US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) adults. We focused on foods commonly eaten by US adults and foods likely to contain certain pesticide residues. MAC participants provided consumption data for 6 days per month for 1 year using a web-based data collection tool. We defined "percent eaters" as the percent of participants who reported eating a particular food in 24 h. We computed the NHANES weighted percent eaters and 95% confidence limits (CLs) using the 24-h dietary recall data. We calculated the MAC percent eaters for each sampling day and the percent of days this number fell below, within, or above the NHANES 95% CLs. We also re-sampled the MAC percent eaters across sampling days to find whether the resulting distribution resembled the NHANES estimate, and used the Kruskal-Wallis test to evaluate whether season affected the number of MAC eaters of a particular food on a given sampling day. In general, across all sampling days, a greater proportion of MAC participants reported eating banana, broccoli, cream, grapes, lettuce, onion, peach, pear, peas, strawberries, string beans, and tomatoes than the national estimate, whereas the proportion of apple, spinach, ketchup and white bread/roll eaters was similar, and the proportion of milk drinkers was lower. Season predicted the number of MAC peach and strawberry eaters but not other foods. The data show how a higher proportion of Atlanta adults may eat certain foods (e.g., peaches in summer or strawberries in spring) than the national average depending on season or other factors. An exposure assessment that ignored this difference could underestimate dietary pesticide intakes. PMID:20354565

  7. Assessing and reporting uncertainties in dietary exposure analysis: Mapping of uncertainties in a tiered approach.

    PubMed

    Kettler, Susanne; Kennedy, Marc; McNamara, Cronan; Oberdörfer, Regina; O'Mahony, Cian; Schnabel, Jürgen; Smith, Benjamin; Sprong, Corinne; Faludi, Roland; Tennant, David

    2015-08-01

    Uncertainty analysis is an important component of dietary exposure assessments in order to understand correctly the strength and limits of its results. Often, standard screening procedures are applied in a first step which results in conservative estimates. If through those screening procedures a potential exceedance of health-based guidance values is indicated, within the tiered approach more refined models are applied. However, the sources and types of uncertainties in deterministic and probabilistic models can vary or differ. A key objective of this work has been the mapping of different sources and types of uncertainties to better understand how to best use uncertainty analysis to generate more realistic comprehension of dietary exposure. In dietary exposure assessments, uncertainties can be introduced by knowledge gaps about the exposure scenario, parameter and the model itself. With this mapping, general and model-independent uncertainties have been identified and described, as well as those which can be introduced and influenced by the specific model during the tiered approach. This analysis identifies that there are general uncertainties common to point estimates (screening or deterministic methods) and probabilistic exposure assessment methods. To provide further clarity, general sources of uncertainty affecting many dietary exposure assessments should be separated from model-specific uncertainties. PMID:25890086

  8. Low-level arsenic exposure: Nutritional and dietary predictors in first-grade Uruguayan children.

    PubMed

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Queirolo, Elena I; Mañay, Nelly; Peregalli, Fabiana; Hsiao, Pao Ying; Lu, Ying; Vahter, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure in children is a public health concern but is understudied in relation to the predictors, and effects of low-level exposure. We examined the extent and dietary predictors of exposure to inorganic arsenic in 5-8 year old children from Montevideo, Uruguay. Children were recruited at school; 357 were enrolled, 328 collected morning urine samples, and 317 had two 24-h dietary recalls. Urinary arsenic metabolites, i.e. inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-MS), and the sum concentration (U-As) used for exposure assessment. Proportions of arsenic metabolites (%iAs, %MMA and %DMA) in urine were modelled in OLS regressions as functions of food groups, dietary patterns, nutrient intake, and nutritional status. Exposure to arsenic was low (median U-As: 9.9µg/L) and household water (water As: median 0.45µg/L) was not a major contributor to exposure. Children with higher consumption of rice had higher U-As but lower %iAs, %MMA, and higher %DMA. Children with higher meat consumption had lower %iAs and higher %DMA. Higher scores on "nutrient dense" dietary pattern were related to lower %iAs and %MMA, and higher %DMA. Higher intake of dietary folate was associated with lower %MMA and higher %DMA. Overweight children had lower %MMA and higher %DMA than normal-weight children. In summary, rice was an important predictor of exposure to inorganic arsenic and DMA. Higher meat and folate consumption, diet rich in green leafy and red-orange vegetables and eggs, and higher BMI contributed to higher arsenic methylation capacity.

  9. Low-level arsenic exposure: Nutritional and dietary predictors in first-grade Uruguayan children.

    PubMed

    Kordas, Katarzyna; Queirolo, Elena I; Mañay, Nelly; Peregalli, Fabiana; Hsiao, Pao Ying; Lu, Ying; Vahter, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic exposure in children is a public health concern but is understudied in relation to the predictors, and effects of low-level exposure. We examined the extent and dietary predictors of exposure to inorganic arsenic in 5-8 year old children from Montevideo, Uruguay. Children were recruited at school; 357 were enrolled, 328 collected morning urine samples, and 317 had two 24-h dietary recalls. Urinary arsenic metabolites, i.e. inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-HG-ICP-MS), and the sum concentration (U-As) used for exposure assessment. Proportions of arsenic metabolites (%iAs, %MMA and %DMA) in urine were modelled in OLS regressions as functions of food groups, dietary patterns, nutrient intake, and nutritional status. Exposure to arsenic was low (median U-As: 9.9µg/L) and household water (water As: median 0.45µg/L) was not a major contributor to exposure. Children with higher consumption of rice had higher U-As but lower %iAs, %MMA, and higher %DMA. Children with higher meat consumption had lower %iAs and higher %DMA. Higher scores on "nutrient dense" dietary pattern were related to lower %iAs and %MMA, and higher %DMA. Higher intake of dietary folate was associated with lower %MMA and higher %DMA. Overweight children had lower %MMA and higher %DMA than normal-weight children. In summary, rice was an important predictor of exposure to inorganic arsenic and DMA. Higher meat and folate consumption, diet rich in green leafy and red-orange vegetables and eggs, and higher BMI contributed to higher arsenic methylation capacity. PMID:26828624

  10. Estimate of dietary exposure to sulphites using Brazilian students as a sample population.

    PubMed

    Popolim, W D; De V C Penteado, M

    2005-11-01

    In Brazil, there is neither a register of the use of sulphites by the food industry nor is research being undertaken on their dietary exposure to the population. The objective of the work reported here was to estimate the dietary exposure to sulphites in two different groups of high school students, a fee-paying school group and a state school group. The data were collected through a 24-hour dietary recall, which provided estimates of sulphited foods and beverages in the diet. The Maximum Permitted Level (MPL), established by the Brazilian legislation for each of the sulphited food and beverages, was used to measure the dietary exposure to this additive. On this basis none of the students could have exceeded the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of 0.70 mg SO2/kg bw/day, with a average dietary exposure of 0.07 mg SO2/kg bw/day (p<0.001), with no significant statistical difference (p=0.643) between fee-paying and state school students. Highly exposed consumers (dietary exposure to more than 50% of the ADI, or either, 0.35 mg SO2/kg bw/day, to the maximum of 0.52 mg SO2/kg bw/dia) represented 4.5% of the researched samples and reached these levels of intake due to a consumption beyond 500 ml/day of industrialized packaged fruit juices, and, in the fee-paying school, for associating its consumption with alcoholic beverages like beer and wine.

  11. Inhalation and Dietary Exposure to PCBs in Urban and Rural Cohorts via Congener-Specific Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of 209 persistent organic pollutants, whose documented carcinogenic, neurological, and respiratory toxicities are expansive and growing. However, PCB inhalation exposure assessments have been lacking for North American ambient conditions and lower-chlorinated congeners. We assessed congener-specific inhalation and dietary exposure for 78 adolescent children and their mothers (n = 68) in the Airborne Exposure to Semi-volatile Organic Pollutants (AESOP) Study. Congener-specific PCB inhalation exposure was modeled using 293 measurements of indoor and outdoor airborne PCB concentrations at homes and schools, analyzed via tandem quadrupole GS-MS/MS, combined with questionnaire data from the AESOP Study. Dietary exposure was modeled using Canadian Total Diet Survey PCB concentrations and National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) food ingestion rates. For ∑PCB, dietary exposure dominates. For individual lower-chlorinated congeners (e.g., PCBs 40+41+71, 52), inhalation exposure was as high as one-third of the total (dietary+inhalation) exposure. ∑PCB inhalation (geometric mean (SE)) was greater for urban mothers (7.1 (1.2) μg yr–1) and children (12.0 (1.2) μg yr–1) than for rural mothers (2.4 (0.4) μg yr–1) and children (8.9 (0.3) μg yr–1). Schools attended by AESOP Study children had higher indoor PCB concentrations than did homes, and account for the majority of children’s inhalation exposure. PMID:25510359

  12. Effects of dietary selenium exposure in captive American common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Wells-Berlin, A. M.; Perry, M.C.; Bochsler, V.S.; Finley, D.L.; Flint, P.L.; Hollmen, T.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted two studies of Se exposure in captive common eiders (Somateria mollissima). In Study 1, eiders were fed diets with added Se (as L-selenomethionine) in concentrations increasing from 10 ppm to 80 ppm. In Study 2, eiders received control, low exposure (20 ppm Se), and high exposure (60 ppm Se) diets. One duck in the high exposure group in Study 2 died after 36 days. Remaining high exposure ducks in Study 2 and ducks in Study 1 were euthanized after losing 25-30% of their body weight, which occurred after 41 days and 60-78 days, respectively. Body weights did not differ between control and low exposure ducks in Study 2. At the end of Study 1, the mean Se concentration in blood was 32 ppm wet weight (ww). In Study 2, mean blood Se reached 14 ppm ww in the low exposure group and 17 ppm ww in high exposure ducks. Mean Se concentrations in liver were 1252 ppm dry weight (dw) in Study 1, and 351 and 735 ppm dw, respectively, in the low and high exposure groups of Study 2. Oxidative stress was evidenced by Se-associated effects on glutathione metabolism, but not entirely in the same manner as with previous laboratory studies in mallards. In plasma, activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase increased with time. As Se concentrations in liver increased, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, oxidized glutathione, and the ratio of hepatic oxidized to reduced glutathione increased. Total and protein bound sulfhydryl concentrations, reduced glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in liver were negatively correlated with Se concentrations in the liver. In Study 2, spleen weights were significantly lower in ducks receiving 60 ppm Se than in those receiving 20 ppm. Gross lesions associated with high Se exposure included emaciation, absence of thymus, loss of nails from digits, and alopecia. Microscopic lesions included severe depletion of lymphoid organs, hepatopathy, and necrosis of feather

  13. Evaluation of arsenic speciation in rainbow trout and fathead minnows from dietary exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The concentration of total arsenic and various arsenic species were measured in food and fish tissue samples from two dietary arsenic exposures to juvenile fish. For arsenic speciation, samples were extracted with 10% MeOH and analyzed by HPLC/ICPMS. Total arsenic concentration...

  14. ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S DERMAL AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE AND DOSE WITH EPA'S SHEDS MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model (SHEDS) has been developed to estimate pesticide exposure and dose to children via dermal residue contact and non-dietary ingestion. Time-location-activity data are sampled from national survey results to generate a population of simulated ch...

  15. MEASURING EXCESS DIETARY EXPOSURES CAUSED BY EATING ACTIVITIES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small, pilot field study was conducted to measure dietary exposures of young children which included contamination of foods while eating. Samples were collected to estimate the amount of a pesticide recently applied within the home which was transferred from contaminated surfa...

  16. Impact of dietary exposure to food contaminants on the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Halling, Jónrit; Bech, Sára; Wermuth, Lene; Weihe, Pál; Nielsen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Poul J; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Grandjean, Philippe

    2008-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and methylmercury (MeHg) in a community with increased exposure levels. A total of 79 clinically verified idiopathic PD cases and 154 controls matched by sex and age were examined in this case-control study in the Faroe Islands. Blood and hair samples were collected and a questionnaire recorded lifetime information on residence, dietary habits, smoking history, and occupational exposure to solvents, pesticides, and metals. Both unconditional and conditional logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) in regard to relevant exposure variables. Increased ORs for dietary intakes of whale meat and blubber during adult life were statistically significant. The ORs for occupational exposure to solvents, pesticides and metals also suggested an increased risk for PD. Current serum concentrations of summation operator PCB and related contaminants suggested slightly increased ORs, although only beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH) was statistically significant. Increased intake of whale meat and blubber in adult life was significantly associated with PD, thus suggesting a positive association between previous exposure to marine food contaminants and development of PD.

  17. Household dietary exposure to aflatoxins from maize and maize products in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kilonzo, Robert M; Imungi, Jasper K; Muiru, William M; Lamuka, Peter O; Njage, Patrick M Kamau

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxicosis has repeatedly affected Kenyans, particularly in the eastern region, due to consumption of contaminated maize. However, save for the cases of acute toxicity, the levels of sub-lethal exposure have not been adequately assessed. It is believed that this type of exposure does exist even during the seasons when acute toxicity does not occur. This study, therefore, was designed to assess the exposure of households to aflatoxins through consumption of maize and maize products. Twenty samples each of maize kernels, muthokoi and maize meal were randomly sampled from households in Kibwezi District of Makueni County in Eastern Kenya and analysed for aflatoxin contamination. The samples were quantitatively analysed for aflatoxin contamination using HPLC. The uncertainty and variability in dietary exposure was quantitatively modelled in Ms Excel using Monte Carlo simulation in @Risk software. Aflatoxins were found in 45% of maize kernels at between 18 and 480 μg kg⁻¹, 20% of muthokoi at between 12 and 123 μg kg⁻¹, and 35% of maize meal at between 6 and 30 μg kg⁻¹. The mean dietary exposure to aflatoxin in maize kernels was 292 ± 1567 ng kg⁻¹ body weight day⁻¹, while the mean dietary exposure to aflatoxin in maize meal and muthokoi were 59 ± 62 and 27 ± 154 ng kg⁻¹ body weight day⁻¹ respectively. The results showed that the amount and frequency of consumption of the three foods is the more important contributing factor than the mean aflatoxin concentration levels, to the risk of dietary exposure to aflatoxins.

  18. Assessing bisphenol A (BPA) exposure risk from long-term dietary intakes in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Shen, Yi-Pei; Chen, Szu-Chieh

    2016-02-01

    Dietary intake is the major bisphenol A (BPA) exposure route in humans, and is a cause of BPA-related adverse effects. The large-scale exposure risk of humans to BPA through dietary sources in Taiwan is less well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the average daily dose (ADD) and hazardous quotient (HQ) of BPA exposure risk from long-term dietary intake of BPA, as well as BPA concentrations in different age-sex groups in Taiwan. We reanalyzed the BPA concentrations of regular daily food sources (rice, poultry, livestock, seafood, protein, fruits, and vegetables) and used a national dietary survey to estimate the contribution of variance to ADDs and potential human health effect for different age-sex groups. This study found that the daily consumption of chicken, pork/beef, and seafood were estimated to be 33.77 (Male)/22.65 (Female), 91.70 (M)/66.35 (F), and 54.15 (M)/40.78 (F) g/day, respectively. The highest BPA ADD was found in the 6-9 years age group (95% CI=0.0006-0.0027 mg/kg-bw/day), whereas the lowest BPA ADD was in the ≥65 years age group (0.0002-0.0020 mg/kg-bw/day). Based on the latest EFSA guidelines (0.004 mg/kg-bw/day), the 97.5 percentile HQ of BPA intake in different age-sex groups in Taiwan posed no risks through dietary intake. However, a combination of multiple exposure routes and long-term exposure in specific populations may be of concern in the future. PMID:26580736

  19. Dietary exposure to aluminium from wheat flour and puffed products of residents in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junfei; Peng, Shaojie; Tian, Mingsheng; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Bo; Wu, Min; He, Gengsheng

    2015-01-01

    A dietary survey of 3431 residents was conducted by a 24-h dietary recall method in Shanghai, China, quarterly from September 2013 to September 2014. A total of 400 food samples were tested for aluminium concentration, including wheat flour and puffed products from 2011 to 2013. Probabilistic analysis was used to estimate the dietary exposure to aluminium from wheat and puffed products. The means of dietary aluminium exposure for children (2-6 years old), juveniles (7-17 years old), adults (18-65 years old) and seniors (over 65 years old) were 1.88, 0.94, 0.44 and 0.42 mg kg(-1) body weight (bw) week(-1) respectively, with a population average of 0.51 mg kg(-1) bw week(-1). The proportions of those who had aluminium exposure from wheat and puffed products lower than the provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) were 77%, 90%, 97%, and 97% respectively from children to seniors. We estimated that the proportions of people at risk would decrease by 13%, 6%, 2% and 2% respectively under the new China National Standards - GB 2760-2014 National Food Safety for Standards for using food additives. The results indicated that aluminium from wheat flour and puffed products is unlikely to cause adverse health effects in the general population in Shanghai; however, children were at a higher risk of excess aluminium exposure. Significant improvements in reducing the dietary exposure to aluminium are expected in the population, especially for children after the implementation of GB 2760-2014.

  20. Assessing bisphenol A (BPA) exposure risk from long-term dietary intakes in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Shen, Yi-Pei; Chen, Szu-Chieh

    2016-02-01

    Dietary intake is the major bisphenol A (BPA) exposure route in humans, and is a cause of BPA-related adverse effects. The large-scale exposure risk of humans to BPA through dietary sources in Taiwan is less well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the average daily dose (ADD) and hazardous quotient (HQ) of BPA exposure risk from long-term dietary intake of BPA, as well as BPA concentrations in different age-sex groups in Taiwan. We reanalyzed the BPA concentrations of regular daily food sources (rice, poultry, livestock, seafood, protein, fruits, and vegetables) and used a national dietary survey to estimate the contribution of variance to ADDs and potential human health effect for different age-sex groups. This study found that the daily consumption of chicken, pork/beef, and seafood were estimated to be 33.77 (Male)/22.65 (Female), 91.70 (M)/66.35 (F), and 54.15 (M)/40.78 (F) g/day, respectively. The highest BPA ADD was found in the 6-9 years age group (95% CI=0.0006-0.0027 mg/kg-bw/day), whereas the lowest BPA ADD was in the ≥65 years age group (0.0002-0.0020 mg/kg-bw/day). Based on the latest EFSA guidelines (0.004 mg/kg-bw/day), the 97.5 percentile HQ of BPA intake in different age-sex groups in Taiwan posed no risks through dietary intake. However, a combination of multiple exposure routes and long-term exposure in specific populations may be of concern in the future.

  1. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN IN LEAD-LADEN ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because of three interacting factors; they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities, lead absorption occurs more readily in a child compared to an adult, and the child's development i...

  2. DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN LIVING IN LEAD-LADEN ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children are the most susceptible population to lead exposure because of three interacting factors: they have more opportunity for contact with lead sources due to their activities; lead absorption occurs more readily in a child as compared to an adult; and the child's developmen...

  3. Dietary exposure to aflatoxins, ochratoxin A and deoxynivalenol from a total diet study in an adult urban Lebanese population.

    PubMed

    Raad, F; Nasreddine, L; Hilan, C; Bartosik, M; Parent-Massin, D

    2014-11-01

    Exposure to mycotoxins may be associated with carcinogenic, immunosuppressant and estrogenic effects. In the Middle-East, studies investigating food contamination and dietary exposure to mycotoxins are particularly scarce. This study aims at evaluating the dietary exposure of an adult Lebanese urban population to four mycotoxins (AFB1, AFM1, OTA, DON) classified as priority food contaminants by the WHO. Dietary exposure assessment was performed by means of the total diet study approach. Average and excessive consumer exposure estimates (p95) were calculated and compared with appropriate toxicological reference values (TRVs). Average dietary exposure levels to OTA and DON represented 29.9% and 156.8% of the respective TRVs, with the p95 exposure estimates approaching or exceeding the TRVs for these mycotoxins (95.1% and 355.8%, respectively). Based on the mean dietary exposure level to AFB1, cancer risk was estimated at 0.0527-0.0545cases/100,000persons/year, while mean exposure to AFM1 was associated with a population risk of 0.0018-0.0027cases/100,000persons/year. The study's findings place Lebanon among countries that are highly exposed to mycotoxins through the diet and call for larger-scale studies aiming at providing a comprehensive assessment of the dietary exposure of the Lebanese population to mycotoxins as well as to other food contaminants.

  4. Measured versus modeled dietary arsenic and relation to urinary arsenic excretion and total exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kurzius-Spencer, Margaret; O’Rourke, Mary Kay; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Hartz, Vern; Harris, Robin B.; Burgess, Jefferey L.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic (As) in food and water is a significant public health problem. Person-specific aggregate exposure is difficult to collect, and modeling based on limited food As residue databases is of uncertain reliability. Two, cross-sectional, population exposure studies—the National Human Exposure Assessment Survey (NHEXAS)-Arizona and the Arizona Border Survey (ABS)— had a total of 252 subjects with diet, water, and urinary As data. Total As was measured in 24-hour duplicate diet samples and modeled using 24-hour diet diaries in conjunction with several published food surveys of As. Two-stage regression was used to assess the effects of dietary As on urinary total As (uAs): 1) generalized linear mixed models of uAs above versus below the limit of detection (LOD); and 2) restricted models limited to those subjects with uAs > LOD, using bootstrap sampling and mixed models adjusted for age, sex, BMI, ethnicity, current smoking, and As intake from drinking and cooking water. In restricted models, measured and modeled estimates were significant predictors of uAs. Modeled dietary As based on Total Diet Study mean residues greatly underestimated dietary intake. In households with tap water As ≤ 10 ppb, over 93% of total As exposure was attributable to diet. PMID:23321855

  5. Pattern of mercury allocation into egg components is independent of dietary exposure in Gentoo penguins.

    PubMed

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Abel, Stephanie; Polito, Michael J

    2012-04-01

    Avian eggs have become one of the most common means of evaluating mercury contamination in aquatic and marine environments and can serve as reliable indicators of dietary mercury exposure. We investigated patterns of mercury deposition into the major components of penguin eggs (shell, membrane, albumen, and yolk) using the Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) as a model species. Eggs were collected from both wild and captive populations of Gentoo penguins to compare the allocation of mercury into individual egg components of birds feeding at disparate trophic positions as inferred by stable isotope analysis. Mercury concentrations in captive penguins were an order of magnitude higher than in wild birds, presumably because the former were fed only fish at a higher trophic position relative to wild penguins that fed on a diet of 72-93% krill (Euphausia spp.). Similar to previous studies, we found the majority of total egg mercury sequestered in the albumen (92%) followed by the yolk (6.7%) with the lowest amounts in the shell (0.9%) and membrane (0.4%). Regardless of dietary exposure, mercury concentrations in yolk and membrane, and to a lesser degree shell, increased with increasing albumen mercury (used as a proxy for whole-egg mercury), indicating that any component, in the absence of others, may be suitable for monitoring changes in dietary mercury. Because accessibility of egg tissues in the wild varies, the establishment of consistent relationships among egg components will facilitate comparisons with any other study using eggs to assess dietary exposure to mercury.

  6. Reducing Prenatal Phthalate Exposure Through Maternal Dietary Changes: Results from a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Emily S; Velez, Marissa; Qiu, Xing; Chen, Shaw-Ree

    2015-09-01

    Diet is a major source of exposure to certain phthalates, a class of environmental chemicals associated with endocrine disruption in animal models and humans. Several studies have attempted to lower phthalate exposure through carefully designed dietary interventions, with inconsistent results. We conducted a dietary intervention pilot study with the objective to lower phthalate exposure in low-income pregnant women, a particularly vulnerable population. Ten pregnant women consumed a provided diet consisting of mostly fresh, organic foods for 3 days. We collected urine samples before, during, and after the intervention and conducted semi-structured interviews to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. We used repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-tests to assess differences in urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations across the study, focusing on the metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), a phthalate of particular interest, and their molar sum (∑DEHP). Phthalate metabolite concentrations did not change appreciably during the intervention period. We observed no significant difference in ∑DEHP metabolite concentrations across the three time periods (F = 0.21; adjusted p value = 0.65), and no reduction during the intervention as compared to baseline (t = -1.07, adjusted p value = 0.51). Results of interviews indicated that participants were not motivated to make dietary changes to potentially reduce chemical exposures outside of the study. Despite the small sample size, our results suggest that promoting dietary changes to lower phthalate exposure may not be an effective public health measure. Reducing the use of phthalates in food processing and packaging may be a better solution to lowering exposure on a population level. PMID:25652062

  7. Reducing prenatal phthalate exposure through maternal dietary changes: results from a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Emily S.; Velez, Marissa; Qiu, Xing; Chen, Shaw-Ree

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diet is a major source of exposure to certain phthalates, a class of environmental chemicals associated with endocrine disruption in animal models and humans. Several studies have attempted to lower phthalate exposure through carefully designed dietary interventions, with inconsistent results. We conducted a dietary intervention pilot study with the objective to lower phthalate exposure in low-income pregnant women, a particularly vulnerable population. Methods Ten pregnant women consumed a provided diet consisting of mostly fresh, organic foods for three days. We collected urine samples before, during, and after the intervention and conducted semi-structured interviews to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. We used repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-tests to assess differences in urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations across the study, focusing on the metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), a phthalate of particular interest, and their molar sum (∑DEHP). Results Phthalate metabolite concentrations did not change appreciably during the intervention period. We observed no significant difference in ∑DEHP metabolite concentrations across the three time periods (F=0.21; adjusted p-value=0.65), and no reduction during the intervention as compared to baseline (t=−1.07, adjusted p-value=0.51). Results of interviews indicated that participants were not motivated to make dietary changes to potentially reduce chemical exposures outside of the study. Conclusions Despite the small sample size, our results suggest that promoting dietary changes to lower phthalate exposure may not be an effective public health measure. Reducing the use of phthalates in food processing and packaging may be a better solution to lowering exposure on a population level. PMID:25652062

  8. Concentration of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) in foods and its dietary exposure in China.

    PubMed

    Sui, Hai-Xia; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Ping-Gu; Song, Yan; Yong, Ling; Yang, Da-Jin; Jiang, Ding-Guo; Liu, Zhao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is a common plasticizer used in food contact materials that has been reported as an endocrine disruptor. In the present study, DEHP concentrations were analyzed in foods in order to determine dietary exposure among the Chinese population, including the general population (aged 2-100) and four age group, that is children aged 2-6, adolescent aged 7-12, young people aged 13-17 and adults aged 18 years old and above. 1704 food samples were collected during 2011-2012 and categorized into 12 food groups which covered major foods in China. Food consumption data were taken from China National Nutrient and Health Survey which was performed in 2002 and includes data from 68,959 subjects. Mean concentrations of DEHP were combined with individual food consumption data to estimate dietary exposure. It was found that DEHP levels in foods ranged from not detected to 3.41 mg/kg, with highest mean values in meat (0.23 mg/kg) and vegetable oils (0.21 mg/kg). Mean dietary intakes of DEHP in the general population, children, and adults were 2.34, 4.51, 2.03 μg/kg bw per day, respectively. The 97.5% intakes in these populations were 5.22, 8.43, 3.64 μg/kg bw per day, respectively. The main food sources of DEHP dietary intake were cereals (39.44%), drinking water (16.94%) and meat (15.81%) in children, and cereals (44.57%), meat (15.70%) and drinking water (12.28%) for adults. These findings suggested that dietary exposure to DEHP among Chinese population was lower than tolerable daily intake of DEHP and there are no health concerns based on generally accepted exposure limits.

  9. Dietary exposure to the endocrine disruptor tolylfluanid promotes global metabolic dysfunction in male mice.

    PubMed

    Regnier, Shane M; Kirkley, Andrew G; Ye, Honggang; El-Hashani, Essam; Zhang, Xiaojie; Neel, Brian A; Kamau, Wakanene; Thomas, Celeste C; Williams, Ayanna K; Hayes, Emily T; Massad, Nicole L; Johnson, Daniel N; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Chunling; Sargis, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors are implicated as putative contributors to the burgeoning metabolic disease epidemic. Tolylfluanid (TF) is a commonly detected fungicide in Europe, and previous in vitro and ex vivo work has identified it as a potent endocrine disruptor with the capacity to promote adipocyte differentiation and induce adipocytic insulin resistance, effects likely resulting from activation of glucocorticoid receptor signaling. The present study extends these findings to an in vivo mouse model of dietary TF exposure. After 12 weeks of consumption of a normal chow diet supplemented with 100 parts per million TF, mice exhibited increased body weight gain and an increase in total fat mass, with a specific augmentation in visceral adipose depots. This increased adipose accumulation is proposed to occur through a reduction in lipolytic and fatty acid oxidation gene expression. Dietary TF exposure induced glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and metabolic inflexibility, while also disrupting diurnal rhythms of energy expenditure and food consumption. Adipose tissue endocrine function was also impaired with a reduction in serum adiponectin levels. Moreover, adipocytes from TF-exposed mice exhibited reduced insulin sensitivity, an effect likely mediated through a specific down-regulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 expression, mirroring effects of ex vivo TF exposure. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed an increase in adipose glucocorticoid receptor signaling with TF treatment. Taken together, these findings identify TF as a novel in vivo endocrine disruptor and obesogen in mice, with dietary exposure leading to alterations in energy homeostasis that recapitulate many features of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25535829

  10. Dietary Exposure to the Endocrine Disruptor Tolylfluanid Promotes Global Metabolic Dysfunction in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Regnier, Shane M.; Kirkley, Andrew G.; Ye, Honggang; El-Hashani, Essam; Zhang, Xiaojie; Neel, Brian A.; Kamau, Wakanene; Thomas, Celeste C.; Williams, Ayanna K.; Hayes, Emily T.; Massad, Nicole L.; Johnson, Daniel N.; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Environmental endocrine disruptors are implicated as putative contributors to the burgeoning metabolic disease epidemic. Tolylfluanid (TF) is a commonly detected fungicide in Europe, and previous in vitro and ex vivo work has identified it as a potent endocrine disruptor with the capacity to promote adipocyte differentiation and induce adipocytic insulin resistance, effects likely resulting from activation of glucocorticoid receptor signaling. The present study extends these findings to an in vivo mouse model of dietary TF exposure. After 12 weeks of consumption of a normal chow diet supplemented with 100 parts per million TF, mice exhibited increased body weight gain and an increase in total fat mass, with a specific augmentation in visceral adipose depots. This increased adipose accumulation is proposed to occur through a reduction in lipolytic and fatty acid oxidation gene expression. Dietary TF exposure induced glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and metabolic inflexibility, while also disrupting diurnal rhythms of energy expenditure and food consumption. Adipose tissue endocrine function was also impaired with a reduction in serum adiponectin levels. Moreover, adipocytes from TF-exposed mice exhibited reduced insulin sensitivity, an effect likely mediated through a specific down-regulation of insulin receptor substrate-1 expression, mirroring effects of ex vivo TF exposure. Finally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed an increase in adipose glucocorticoid receptor signaling with TF treatment. Taken together, these findings identify TF as a novel in vivo endocrine disruptor and obesogen in mice, with dietary exposure leading to alterations in energy homeostasis that recapitulate many features of the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25535829

  11. Dietary exposure to mycotoxins of the Hong Kong adult population from a Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Yau, Arthur Tin-Chung; Chen, Melva Yung-Yung; Lam, Chi-Ho; Ho, Yuk-Yin; Xiao, Ying; Chung, Stephen Wai-Cheung

    2016-06-01

    Dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to mycotoxins and their metabolites including aflatoxins (AFs), ochratoxin A (OTA), fumonisins (FNs), deoxynivalenol (DON), acetyldeoxynivalenols (AcDONs) and zearalenone (ZEA) was estimated using the Total Diet Study (TDS) approach to assess the associated health risk to the local people. Sixty commonly consumed food items, collected in four seasons, were sampled and prepared as consumed. These mycotoxins were primarily found at low levels. The highest mean levels (upper bound) were: AFs, 1.50 µg kg(-)(1) in legumes, nuts and seed; OTA, 0.22 µg kg(-)(1) in sugars and confectionery; FNs, 9.76 µg kg(-)(1) in cereals and their products; DON and AcDONs, 33.1 µg kg(-)(1) in cereals and their products; and ZEA, 53.8 µg kg(-)(1) in fats and oils. The estimated dietary exposures of Hong Kong adults to the mycotoxins analysed were well below the respective health-based guidance values, where available. For AFs, the upper-bound exposure for high consumers is 0.0049 µg kg bw(-)(1) day(-)(1), which was estimated to contribute to about 7.7 (< 1%) of liver cancer cases when compared with 1222 liver cancer cases per year in Hong Kong. The percentage contributions of the estimated 95th percentile dietary exposures (lower and upper bound) to the health-based guidance values of individual mycotoxins were: ochratoxin A, 3.6-9.2%; fumonisins, 0.04-8.5%; deoxynivalenol and acetyldeoxynivalenols, 21.7-28.2%; and zearalenone 3.3-34.5%. The findings indicate that dietary exposures to all the mycotoxins analysed in this study were unlikely to pose an unacceptable health risk to the Hong Kong population. PMID:27144988

  12. Dietary exposure and biomarkers of arsenic in consumers of fish and shellfish from France.

    PubMed

    Sirot, V; Guérin, T; Volatier, J-L; Leblanc, J-C

    2009-03-01

    Seafood, especially fish, is considered as a major dietary source of arsenic (As). Seafood consumption is recommended for nutritional properties but contaminant exposure should be considered. The objectives were to assess As intake of frequent French seafood consumers and exposure via biomarkers. Consumptions of 996 high consumers (18 and over) of 4 coastal areas were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Seafood samples were collected according to a total diet study (TDS) sampling method and analyzed for total As, arsenite (AsIII), arsenate (AsV), arsenobetaïne (AsB), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). The average As dietary exposure is 94.7+/-67.5 microg/kg bw/week in females and 77.3+/-54.6 microg/kg bw/week in males (p<0.001) and the inorganic As dietary exposure is respectively 3.34+/-2.06 microg/kg bw/week and 3.04+/-1.86 microg/kg bw/week (p<0.05). Urine samples were collected from 382 of the subjects. The average urinary As concentration is 94.8+/-250 microg/g creatinine for females and 59.7+/-81.8 microg/g for males (p<0.001). Samples having an As concentration above 75 microg/g creatinine (n=101) were analyzed for inorganic As (As(III), As(V), MMA(V) and DMA(V)) which was 24.6+/-27.9 microg/g creatinine for males and 27.1+/-20.6 microg/g for females. Analyses do not show any correlation between dietary exposure and urinary As. These results show that biological results should be interpreted cautiously. Diet recording seems to be the best way to assess dietary As exposure. Seafood is a high source of As exposure but even among high consumers it is not the main source of toxic As. From a public health point of view these results should be interpreted carefully in the absence of international consensus on the health-based guidance value.

  13. Estimating Pesticide Exposure from Dietary Intake and Organic Food Choices: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Beresford, Shirley A.A.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Lu, Chensheng; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Organophosphate pesticide (OP) exposure to the U.S. population is dominated by dietary intake. The magnitude of exposure from diet depends partly on personal decisions such as which foods to eat and whether to choose organic food. Most studies of OP exposure rely on urinary biomarkers, which are limited by short half-lives and often lack specificity to parent compounds. A reliable means of estimating long-term dietary exposure to individual OPs is needed to assess the potential relationship with adverse health effects. Objectives We assessed long-term dietary exposure to 14 OPs among 4,466 participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and examined the influence of organic produce consumption on this exposure. Methods Individual-level exposure was estimated by combining information on typical intake of specific food items with average OP residue levels on those items. In an analysis restricted to a subset of participants who reported rarely or never eating organic produce (“conventional consumers”), we assessed urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) levels across tertiles of estimated exposure (n = 480). In a second analysis, we compared DAP levels across subgroups with differing self-reported organic produce consumption habits (n = 240). Results Among conventional consumers, increasing tertile of estimated dietary OP exposure was associated with higher DAP concentrations (p < 0.05). DAP concentrations were also significantly lower in groups reporting more frequent consumption of organic produce (p < 0.02). Conclusions Long-term dietary exposure to OPs was estimated from dietary intake data, and estimates were consistent with DAP measurements. More frequent consumption of organic produce was associated with lower DAPs. Citation Curl CL, Beresford SA, Fenske RA, Fitzpatrick AL, Lu C, Nettleton JA, Kaufman JD. 2015. Estimating pesticide exposure from dietary intake and organic food choices: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Environ

  14. Histopathologic Alterations Associated with Global Gene Expression Due to Chronic Dietary TCDD Exposure in Juvenile Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Cariou, Ronan; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Nan; Goetz, Giles; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb) and male (18.04 ppb) fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption. PMID:24988445

  15. Relationships between children's exposure to ethnic produce and their dietary behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiong; Goto, Keiko; Wolff, Cindy; Zhao, Yanling

    2015-04-01

    The current study examined relationships between children's ethnic produce exposure and healthy dietary practices among Latino, Hmong and non-Hispanic white children. One hundred Latino, 100 Hmong, and 92 non-Hispanic white parents of children ages 5-8 years old in northern California completed a cross-sectional survey. Children's exposure to ethnic produce from Hmong and Latino cultures, overall fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food and ethnic restaurant use were measured. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare variables across different ethnic groups. Spearman's correlation was used to assess the relationship between variables. Children's overall ethnic produce exposure, as well as exposure to produce from other cultures, was significantly correlated with overall fruit and vegetable consumption. There was a marginal (p = 0.053) negative association between ethnic produce exposure and fast food restaurant use among Latino children. These findings suggest that promoting ethnic produce is an effective strategy for enhancing healthy dietary practices among children. PMID:24817576

  16. An assessment of dietary exposure to glyphosate using refined deterministic and probabilistic methods.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, C L; Harris, C A

    2016-09-01

    Glyphosate is a herbicide used to control broad-leaved weeds. Some uses of glyphosate in crop production can lead to residues of the active substance and related metabolites in food. This paper uses data on residue levels, processing information and consumption patterns, to assess theoretical lifetime dietary exposure to glyphosate. Initial estimates were made assuming exposure to the highest permitted residue levels in foods. These intakes were then refined using median residue levels from trials, processing information, and monitoring data to achieve a more realistic estimate of exposure. Estimates were made using deterministic and probabilistic methods. Exposures were compared to the acceptable daily intake (ADI)-the amount of a substance that can be consumed daily without an appreciable health risk. Refined deterministic intakes for all consumers were at or below 2.1% of the ADI. Variations were due to cultural differences in consumption patterns and the level of aggregation of the dietary information in calculation models, which allows refinements for processing. Probabilistic exposure estimates ranged from 0.03% to 0.90% of the ADI, depending on whether optimistic or pessimistic assumptions were made in the calculations. Additional refinements would be possible if further data on processing and from residues monitoring programmes were available. PMID:27371367

  17. Dietary exposure to copper in the European Union and its assessment for EU regulatory risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Sadhra, Steven S; Wheatley, Andrew D; Cross, Hilary J

    2007-03-15

    EU legislation requires a multimedia exposure assessment for substances supplied within the EU. Dietary intake is the main source of exposure for the majority of the population hence an essential component of the human risk assessment. This paper describes the available data for dietary copper and its use in estimating daily intake including variability and determinants of exposure. Typical and reasonable worst-case estimates are derived for the general population from the available peer reviewed literature. Intakes from drinking water are found to exhibit more variability than those from food. Therefore, different exposure scenarios are derived to reflect the range of acute and chronic exposures that may occur. Estimates of typical copper intakes for the EU population are in the range 0.8-1.8 mg/day. Typical copper intakes of men are higher than those of women while the intake among the general adult population is higher than that of the elderly. Intakes of both men and women are generally close to the WHO normative requirements but may be somewhat lower in specific locations where background levels of copper are unusually low. Alcoholic beverages represent minor contribution daily copper intakes. Intakes for children are rather variable ranging broadly from 0.7 to 1.5 mg/day and are somewhat age and sex dependent. Greater uncertainty applies to the assessment of local exposure incorporating food produced on land directly impacted by contemporary copper industry emissions. Specifically, the extent to which soil is enriched in copper in these conditions is unclear. However, effective homeostatic control mechanisms in plants limit uptake and transfer to the human food chain. A best estimate of 0.25 mg/day in addition to regional exposure was derived. Drinking water is estimated to contribute only marginally to total copper intake in most cases. Higher intakes may occur in areas of poor water quality and/or corroded distribution systems. Such elevated exposures

  18. Dietary exposure to copper in the European Union and its assessment for EU regulatory risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Sadhra, Steven S; Wheatley, Andrew D; Cross, Hilary J

    2007-03-15

    EU legislation requires a multimedia exposure assessment for substances supplied within the EU. Dietary intake is the main source of exposure for the majority of the population hence an essential component of the human risk assessment. This paper describes the available data for dietary copper and its use in estimating daily intake including variability and determinants of exposure. Typical and reasonable worst-case estimates are derived for the general population from the available peer reviewed literature. Intakes from drinking water are found to exhibit more variability than those from food. Therefore, different exposure scenarios are derived to reflect the range of acute and chronic exposures that may occur. Estimates of typical copper intakes for the EU population are in the range 0.8-1.8 mg/day. Typical copper intakes of men are higher than those of women while the intake among the general adult population is higher than that of the elderly. Intakes of both men and women are generally close to the WHO normative requirements but may be somewhat lower in specific locations where background levels of copper are unusually low. Alcoholic beverages represent minor contribution daily copper intakes. Intakes for children are rather variable ranging broadly from 0.7 to 1.5 mg/day and are somewhat age and sex dependent. Greater uncertainty applies to the assessment of local exposure incorporating food produced on land directly impacted by contemporary copper industry emissions. Specifically, the extent to which soil is enriched in copper in these conditions is unclear. However, effective homeostatic control mechanisms in plants limit uptake and transfer to the human food chain. A best estimate of 0.25 mg/day in addition to regional exposure was derived. Drinking water is estimated to contribute only marginally to total copper intake in most cases. Higher intakes may occur in areas of poor water quality and/or corroded distribution systems. Such elevated exposures

  19. Arsenic: bioaccessibility from seaweed and rice, dietary exposure calculations and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Esther F A; Janssen, Paul J C M; de Wit-Bos, Lianne

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a metalloid that occurs in food and the environment in different chemical forms. Inorganic arsenic is classified as a class I carcinogen. The inorganic arsenic intake from food and drinking water varies depending on the geographic arsenic background. Non-dietary exposure to arsenic is likely to be of minor importance for the general population within the European Union. In Europe, arsenic in drinking water is on average low, but food products (e.g. rice and seaweed) are imported from all over the world including from regions with naturally high arsenic levels. Therefore, specific populations living in Europe could also have a high exposure to inorganic arsenic due to their consumption pattern. Current risk assessment is based on exposure via drinking water. For a good estimation of the risks of arsenic in food, it is important to investigate if the bioavailability of inorganic arsenic from food is different from drinking water. The present study further explores the issue of European dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic via rice and seaweed and its associated health risks. The bioavailability of inorganic arsenic was measured in in vitro digestion experiments. The data indicate that the bioavailability of inorganic arsenic is similar for rice and seaweed compared with drinking water. The calculated dietary intake for specific European Union populations varied between 0.44 and 4.51 µg kg⁻¹ bw day⁻¹. The margins of exposure between the inorganic intake levels and the BMDL0.5 values as derived by JECFA are low. Decreasing the intake of inorganic arsenic via Hijiki seaweed could be achieved by setting legal limits similar to those set for rice by the Codex Alimentarius Commission in July 2014.

  20. Chronic dietary exposure of zebrafish to PAH mixtures results in carcinogenic but not genotoxic effects.

    PubMed

    Larcher, T; Perrichon, P; Vignet, C; Ledevin, M; Le Menach, K; Lyphout, L; Landi, L; Clerandeau, C; Lebihanic, F; Ménard, D; Burgeot, T; Budzinski, H; Akcha, F; Cachot, J; Cousin, X

    2014-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous contaminants that can be present at high levels as mixtures in polluted aquatic environments. Many PAHs are potent mutagens and several are well-known carcinogens. Despite numerous studies on individual compounds, little is known about the toxicity of PAHs mixtures that are encountered in environmental situations. In the present work, zebrafish were continuously fed from 5 days post-fertilisation to 14 months post-fertilisation (mpf) with a diet spiked with fractions of either pyrolytic (PY), petrogenic light oil (LO), or petrogenic heavy oil (HO) origin at three concentrations. A decrease in survival was identified after 3 mpf in fish fed with the highest concentration of HO or LO, but not for PY. All PAH fractions caused preneoplastic and neoplastic disorders in long-term-exposed animals. Target tissues were almost exclusively of epithelial origin, with the bile duct epithelium being the most susceptible to chronic exposure to all PAH fractions, and with germ cells being the second most responsive cells. Significantly higher incidences of neoplasms were observed with increasing PAH concentration and exposure duration. The most severe carcinogenic effects were induced by dietary exposure to HO compared to exposure to LO or PY (45, 30 and 7 %, respectively, after 9 to 10 months of exposure to an intermediate concentration of PAHs). In contrast, earliest carcinogenic effects were detected as soon as 3 mpf after exposure to LO, including the lowest concentration, or to PY. PAH bioactivation and genotoxicity in blood was assessed by ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity quantification and comet and micronuclei assays, respectively, but none of these were positive. Chronic dietary exposure of zebrafish to PAH mixtures results in carcinogenotoxic events that impair survival and physiology of exposed fish.

  1. Dietary exposure to pesticide residues from foods of plant origin and drinks in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Nasreddine, Lara; Rehaime, Maria; Kassaify, Zeina; Rechmany, Roula; Jaber, Farouk

    2016-08-01

    This study assesses the dietary exposure of Lebanese adults to 47 pesticide residues from both foods of plant origin and drinks. The study was conducted using the Total Diet Study protocol in two different areas of Lebanon: Greater Beirut (urban) and Keserwan (semi-rural). A total of 1860 individual foods were collected, prepared, and cooked prior to analysis. Composite samples of similar foods were analyzed, following the QuEChERS Multiresidue method. Eighteen residues were detected/quantified on at least one composite sample, with 66.7 % of the results being quantifiable and 33.3 % detectable. Quantifiable levels ranged between 10.3 and 208 μg/kg. For the composite samples where residues were detected, 55 % had one residue, while 45 % had 2-4 residues. The most frequently detected/quantified pesticide residues included Chlorpyrifos, Procymidone, Primiphos methyl, Dimethoate, and Dieldrin. The dietary exposure assessment was conducted using the deterministic approach with two scenarios: (1) the lower bound (LB) approach and (2) the upper bound (UB) approach. Using the LB approach, mean estimated daily exposures were far below the acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) for all investigated residues. Using the UB approach, which tends to overestimate exposure, mean estimated daily exposures were below the ADIs for all residues except for Dieldrin (semi-rural: 128.7 % ADI; urban: 100.7 % ADI). Estimates of mean exposure to Diazinon reached 50.3 % of ADI in the urban diet and 61.9 % in the semi-rural diet. Findings of this study identify specific pesticide residues as monitoring priorities for which more comprehensive and sensitive analyses are needed in order to refine exposure assessment. PMID:27461424

  2. Estimated dietary exposure to principal food mycotoxins from the first French Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, J-C; Tard, A; Volatier, J-L; Verger, P

    2005-07-01

    This study reports estimates on dietary exposure from the first French Total Diet Study (FTDS) and compares these estimates with both existing tolerable daily intakes for these toxins and the intakes calculated during previous French studies. To estimate the dietary exposure of the French population to the principal mycotoxins in the French diet (as consumed), 456 composite samples were prepared from 2280 individual samples and analysed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins and patulin. Average and high percentile intakes were calculated taking account of different eating patterns for adults, children and vegetarians. The results showed that contaminant levels observed in the foods examined 'as consumed' complied fully with current European legislation. However, particular attention needs to be paid to the exposure of specific population groups, such as children and vegans/macrobiotics, who could be exposed to certain mycotoxins in quantities that exceed the tolerable or weekly daily intake levels. This observation is particularly relevant with respect to ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone. For these mycotoxins, cereals and cereal products were the main contributors to high exposure. PMID:16019841

  3. Assessing dietary exposure to cadmium in a metal recycling community in Vietnam: age and gender aspects.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Duc Minh; Hough, Rupert Lloyd; Le, Thi Thuy; Nyberg, Ylva; Le, Bach Mai; Nguyen, Cong Vinh; Nguyen, Manh Khai; Oborn, Ingrid

    2012-02-01

    This study estimates the dietary exposure to cadmium (Cd), and associated potential health risks, for individuals living and working in a metal recycling community (n=132) in Vietnam in comparison to an agricultural (reference) community (n=130). Individual-level exposure to Cd was estimated through analysis of staple foodstuffs combined with information from a food frequency questionnaire. Individual-level exposure estimates were compared with published 'safe' doses to derive a Hazard Quotient (HQ) for each member of the study population. Looking at the populations as a whole, there were no significant differences in the diets of the two villages. However, significantly more rice was consumed by working age adults (18-60 years) in the recycling village compared to the reference village (p<0.001). Rice was the main staple food with individuals consuming 461±162g/d, followed by water spinach (103±51kg/d). Concentrations of Cd in the studied foodstuffs were elevated in the metal recycling village. Values of HQ exceeded unity for 87% of adult participants of the metal recycling community (39% had a HQ>3), while 20% of adult participants from the reference village had an HQ>1. We found an elevated health risk from dietary exposure to Cd in the metal recycling village compared to the reference community. WHO standard of 0.4mg Cd/kg rice may not be protective where people consume large amounts of rice/have relatively low body weight.

  4. Estimated dietary exposure to principal food mycotoxins from the first French Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, J-C; Tard, A; Volatier, J-L; Verger, P

    2005-07-01

    This study reports estimates on dietary exposure from the first French Total Diet Study (FTDS) and compares these estimates with both existing tolerable daily intakes for these toxins and the intakes calculated during previous French studies. To estimate the dietary exposure of the French population to the principal mycotoxins in the French diet (as consumed), 456 composite samples were prepared from 2280 individual samples and analysed for aflatoxins, ochratoxin A, trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins and patulin. Average and high percentile intakes were calculated taking account of different eating patterns for adults, children and vegetarians. The results showed that contaminant levels observed in the foods examined 'as consumed' complied fully with current European legislation. However, particular attention needs to be paid to the exposure of specific population groups, such as children and vegans/macrobiotics, who could be exposed to certain mycotoxins in quantities that exceed the tolerable or weekly daily intake levels. This observation is particularly relevant with respect to ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol and zearalenone. For these mycotoxins, cereals and cereal products were the main contributors to high exposure.

  5. Influence of dietary 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene exposure in the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Gogal, Robert M; Johnson, Mark S; Larsen, Calvert T; Prater, Mary R; Duncan, Robert B; Ward, Daniel L; Holladay, Steven D

    2002-01-01

    The risk to wildlife from exposure to the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) has been a concern at numerous military installations where it has been found in the soil. To date, no published data are available describing effects of TNT exposure in an avian species. Subchronic dietary exposure to TNT was therefore evaluated in a species of management concern at military installations, the northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus). Adult male and female quail (n = 5/sex/dose) were given commercial feed containing 3,000, 1,500, 750, and 100 mg/kg TNT for 90 d following the determination of an acute lethal dose and a 14-d range finding study. Dietary TNT intake caused a dose-dependent decrease in total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, total plasma protein, blood prolymphocytes, and blood lymphocytes. An increased trend in late apoptotic/necrotic blood leukocytic cells was also observed in TNT-exposed birds, as was hemosiderosis in the liver. With the exception of hemosiderosis, these trends were statistically significant yet of questionable biological significance. Since treatment-related responses in this preliminary study were variable, a conservative interpretation is suggested. However, since these treatments had concentrations that were a log-fold or more than doses in similar studies using mammals, these data suggest that northern bobwhite are less sensitive to oral exposures of TNT than mammals.

  6. Assessment of the dietary habits and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure in primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, T; Montuori, P; Mainardi, P; Russo, I; Fasano, E; Triassi, M; Amodio-Cocchieri, R

    2010-07-01

    Thirty Italian children, 7-9 year aged, living in Naples were investigated on their dietary habits and on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure by a food diary-questionnaire and one week duplicate diet sample analyses. Daily total food consumption mean value was 632 +/- 215 g day(-1), median value 613 g day(-1). The daily energy intake and the diet composition meanly agreed with the official guidelines for the Italian children. Sixteen PAHs were simultaneously detected and, according to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) approach, benzo[a]pyrene; benzo[a]pyrene + chrysene (PAH2); PAH2 + benz[a]anthracene + benzo[b]fluoranthene (PAH4); PAH4 + benzo[k]fluoranthene + benzo[ghi]perylene + dibenz[a, h]anthracene + indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene (PAH8) were considered in evaluating the children's dietary exposure to PAHs. The benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) median concentrations in foods varied from 0.06 to 0.33 microg kg(-1). Only three samples of cooked foods (one fish and two meat samples) exceeded legal limits fixed by the European Union for BaP. Daily median intakes of benzo[a]pyrene, PAH2, PAH4, and PAH8 were 153; 318; 990; 1776 ng day(-1); their median exposure values were 5; 10; 28; 54 ng kg(-1) bw day(-1). The Margins of Exposure (MOEs) in median consumers agreed with the EFSA safety values except for PAH8. PMID:20544457

  7. Dietary Phthalate Exposure in Pregnant Women and the Impact of Consumer Practices

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Samantha E.; Karr, Catherine J.; Seixas, Noah S.; Nguyen, Ruby H. N.; Barrett, Emily S.; Janssen, Sarah; Redmon, Bruce; Swan, Shanna H.; Sathyanarayana, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are contaminants in food and contribute to significant dietary exposures. We examined associations between reported consumption of specific foods and beverages and first trimester urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in 656 pregnant women within a multicenter cohort study, The Infant Development and Environment Study (TIDES), using multivariate regression analysis. We also examined whether reported use of ecofriendly and chemical-free products was associated with lower phthalate biomarker levels in comparison to not following such practices. Consumption of one additional serving of dairy per week was associated with decreases of 1% in the sum of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolite levels (95% CI: −2.0, −0.2). Further, participants who reported sometimes eating homegrown food had monoisobutyl phthalate (MiBP) levels that were 16.6% lower (95% CI: −29.5, −1.3) in comparison to participants in the rarely/never category. In contrast to rarely/never eating frozen fruits and vegetables, participants who reported sometimes following this practice had monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) levels that were 21% higher (95% CI: 3.3, 41.7) than rarely/ever respondents. Future study on prenatal dietary phthalate exposure and the role of consumer product choices in reducing such exposure is needed. PMID:24927036

  8. Phthalates in indoor dust in Kuwait: implications for non-dietary human exposure.

    PubMed

    Gevao, B; Al-Ghadban, A N; Bahloul, M; Uddin, S; Zafar, J

    2013-04-01

    Phthalates are semivolatile organic compounds with a ubiquitous environmental distribution. Their presence in indoor environments is linked to their use in a variety of consumer products such as children's toys, cosmetics, food packaging, flexible PVC flooring among others. The goal of this study was to investigate the occurrence and concentration of phthalates in dust from homes in Kuwait and to assess non-dietary human exposure to these phthalates. Dust samples were randomly collected from 21 homes and analyzed for eight phthalates. The concentrations of total phthalates were log normally distributed and ranged from 470 to 7800 μg/g. Five phthalates [Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), Di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP), Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), Benzyl butyl phthalate (BzBP), and Dicyclohexyl phthalate (DcHP)] were routinely detected. The major phthalate compound was DEHP at a geometric mean concentration of 1704 μg/g (median, 2256 μg/g) accounting for 92% of the total phthalates measured. Using the measured concentrations and estimates of dust ingestion rates for children and adults, estimated human non-dietary exposure based on median phthalate concentrations ranged from 938 ng/kg-bd/day for adults to 13362 ng/kg-bd/day for toddlers. The difference in exposure estimates between children and adults in this study supports previous reports that children are at greater risk from pollutants that accumulate indoors.

  9. Dietary phthalate exposure in pregnant women and the impact of consumer practices.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Samantha E; Karr, Catherine J; Seixas, Noah S; Nguyen, Ruby H N; Barrett, Emily S; Janssen, Sarah; Redmon, Bruce; Swan, Shanna H; Sathyanarayana, Sheela

    2014-06-12

    Phthalates are ubiquitous endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are contaminants in food and contribute to significant dietary exposures. We examined associations between reported consumption of specific foods and beverages and first trimester urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations in 656 pregnant women within a multicenter cohort study, The Infant Development and Environment Study (TIDES), using multivariate regression analysis. We also examined whether reported use of ecofriendly and chemical-free products was associated with lower phthalate biomarker levels in comparison to not following such practices. Consumption of one additional serving of dairy per week was associated with decreases of 1% in the sum of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) metabolite levels (95% CI: -2.0, -0.2). Further, participants who reported sometimes eating homegrown food had monoisobutyl phthalate (MiBP) levels that were 16.6% lower (95% CI: -29.5, -1.3) in comparison to participants in the rarely/never category. In contrast to rarely/never eating frozen fruits and vegetables, participants who reported sometimes following this practice had monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) levels that were 21% higher (95% CI: 3.3, 41.7) than rarely/ever respondents. Future study on prenatal dietary phthalate exposure and the role of consumer product choices in reducing such exposure is needed.

  10. Harmonisation of food categorisation systems for dietary exposure assessments among European children.

    PubMed

    De Neve, M; Sioen, I; Boon, P E; Arganini, C; Moschandreas, J; Ruprich, J; Lafay, L; Amiano, P; Arcella, D; Azpiri, M; Busk, L; Christensen, T; D'addezio, L; Fabiansson, S; Hilbig, A; Hirvonen, T; Kersting, M; Koulouridaki, S; Liukkonen, K-H; Oltarzewski, M; Papoutsou, S; Rehurkova, I; Ribas-Barba, L; Serra-Majem, L; Tornaritis, M; Trolle, E; Van Klaveren, J D; Verger, E; Walkiewicz, A; Westerlund, A; De Henauw, S; Huybrechts, I

    2010-12-01

    Within the European project called EXPOCHI (Individual Food Consumption Data and Exposure Assessment Studies for Children), 14 different European individual food consumption databases of children were used to conduct harmonised dietary exposure assessments for lead, chromium, selenium and food colours. For this, two food categorisation systems were developed to classify the food consumption data in such a way that these could be linked to occurrence data of the considered compounds. One system served for the exposure calculations of lead, chromium and selenium. The second system was developed for the exposure assessment of food colours. The food categories defined for the lead, chromium and selenium exposure calculations were used as a basis for the food colour categorisation, with adaptations to optimise the linkage with the food colour occurrence data. With this work, an initial impetus was given to make user-friendly food categorisation systems for contaminants and food colours applicable on a pan-European level. However, a set of difficulties were encountered in creating a common food categorisation system for 14 individual food consumption databases that differ in the type and number of foods coded and in level of detail provided about the consumed foods. The work done and the problems encountered in this project can be of interest for future projects in which food consumption data will be collected on a pan-European level and used for common exposure assessments. PMID:21108090

  11. Dietary acrylamide exposure of the French population: results of the second French Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Sirot, Véronique; Hommet, Frédéric; Tard, Alexandra; Leblanc, Jean-Charles

    2012-03-01

    Acrylamide is a heat-induced carcinogen compound that is found in some foods consequently to cooking or other thermal processes. In the second French Total Diet Study (TDS), acrylamide was analysed in 192 food samples collected in mainland France to be representative of the population diet and prepared "as consumed". Highest mean concentrations were found in potato chips/crisps (954 μg/kg), French fries and other fried potatoes (724 μg/kg), and salted biscuits other than potato chips (697 μg/kg). Exposure of general adult and child populations was assessed by combining analytical results with national consumption data. Mean acrylamide exposure was assessed to be 0.43±0.33 μg/kg of body weight (bw) per day for adults and 0.69±0.58 μg/kg bw/day for children. Although the exposure assessed is lower than in previous evaluations, the calculated margins of exposure, based on benchmark dose limits defined for carcinogenic effects, remain very low especially for young children (below 100 at the 95th percentile of exposure), indicating a health concern. It is therefore advisable to continue efforts in order to reduce dietary exposure to acrylamide.

  12. Chronic, dietary polybrominated diphenyl ether exposure affects survival, growth, and development of Rana pipiens tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Cary Coyle, Tawnya L; Karasov, William H

    2010-01-01

    Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the environment have been increasing rapidly over the past two decades; however, the toxicology of these compounds to aquatic organisms is poorly understood. Because amphibians play a role in both aquatic and terrestrial food webs, and are currently undergoing worldwide population declines, it is of interest to determine how PBDEs may affect amphibian health. This is the first study that reports chronic, dietary effects of environmentally relevant levels (7-277 ng/g wet food) of PBDEs in amphibians throughout larval development. Beginning at the free-swimming stage (Gosner Stage [GS] 25), Rana pipiens tadpoles were orally exposed to a technical pentabromodiphenyl ether mixture (DE-71) through metamorphic climax (GS 42). On exposure day 43, a subset of tadpoles was removed for body residue analysis. Sum PBDEs in whole-body tissue correlated linearly to dietary concentrations with BDE-99 represented as the highest contributing congener in both diet and tissue. Survival among all treatments compared to the control was decreased by DE-71 exposure. Further, growth and development were delayed in all but the highest treatment, perhaps indicating greater PBDE tolerance among those individuals that survived the highest treatment. Time to metamorphic climax was delayed, on average, 22 to 36 d in DE-71-treated tadpoles compared to control tadpoles. Additionally, size at metamorphosis was smaller in the highest treatment, suggesting that individuals that survived and metamorphosed similarly to the controls did so with a trade-off in size. At environmentally relevant levels, PBDEs induced mortality as well as sublethal effects on developing tadpoles through dietary exposure.

  13. A META-ANALYSIS OF CHILDREN'S HAND-TO-MOUTH FREQUENCY DATA FOR ESTIMATING NON-DIETARY INGESTION EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of their mouthing behaviors, children have a higher potential for exposure to available chemicals through the non-dietary ingestion route; thus, frequency of hand-to-mouth activity is an important variable for exposure assessments. Such data are limited and difficult to ...

  14. Dietary exposure to mycotoxins and health risk assessment in the second French total diet study.

    PubMed

    Sirot, Véronique; Fremy, Jean-Marc; Leblanc, Jean-Charles

    2013-02-01

    Mycotoxins are produced in plants by micro-fungi species, and naturally contaminated the food chain. In the second French total diet study (TDS), mycotoxins were analyzed in 577 food samples collected in mainland France to be representative of the population diet and prepared ((as consumed)). Highest mean concentrations were found in wheat and cereal-based products (bread, breakfast cereals, pasta, pastries, pizzas and savoury pastries…). Exposure of adult and child populations was assessed by combining national consumption data with analytical results, using lowerbound (LB) and upperbound (UB) assumptions for left-censorship management. Individual exposures were compared with available health-based guidance values (HBGV). Only the exposure to deoxynivalenol (DON) and its acetylated derivatives was found to significantly exceed the HBGV in LB in adults (0.5% [0.1; 0.8]) and children (5% [4; 6]). HBGV was exceeded in UB only for T-2 and HT-2 toxins by, respectively, 0.2% [0.02; 0.05] and 4% [3; 5] of adults, and 11% [9; 12] and 35% [32; 37] of children. Although the exposures assessed were generally lower than the previous French TDS, the results indicated a health concern for trichothecenes and a need to reduce dietary exposure as well as analytical limits. PMID:23137957

  15. Considerations when using longitudinal cohort studies to assess dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic and chronic health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Scrafford, Carolyn G; Barraj, Leila M; Tsuji, Joyce S

    2016-07-01

    Dietary arsenic exposure and chronic health outcomes are of interest, due in part to increased awareness and data available on inorganic arsenic levels in some foods. Recent concerns regarding levels of inorganic arsenic, the primary form of arsenic of human health concern, in foods are based on extrapolation from adverse health effects observed at high levels of inorganic arsenic exposure; the potential for the occurrence of these health effects from lower levels of dietary inorganic arsenic exposure has not been established. In this review, longitudinal cohort studies are evaluated for their utility in estimating dietary inorganic arsenic exposure and quantifying statistically reliable associations with health outcomes. The primary limiting factor in longitudinal studies is incomplete data on inorganic arsenic levels in foods combined with the aggregation of consumption of foods with varying arsenic levels into a single category, resulting in exposure misclassification. Longitudinal cohort studies could provide some evidence to evaluate associations of dietary patterns related to inorganic arsenic exposure with risk of arsenic-related diseases. However, currently available data from longitudinal cohort studies limit causal analyses regarding the association between inorganic arsenic exposure and health outcomes. Any conclusions should therefore be viewed with knowledge of the analytical and methodological limitations.

  16. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  17. Dietary exposure to chemical migrants from food contact materials: a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Holmes, M J; Hart, A; Northing, P; Oldring, P K T; Castle, L; Stott, D; Smith, G; Wardman, O

    2005-10-01

    A two-dimensional probabilistic model has been developed to estimate the short-term dietary exposure of UK consumers to migrants from food packaging materials. The current EU approach uses a default scenario of assuming that all individuals are 60 kg weight and consume 1 kg of food packaged in the material of interest per day. Using four UK National Dietary and Nutrition Surveys comprising 4-7 day dietary records for different age groups and survey years, a sample representative of the UK population has been obtained consuming around 4200 different food items. Each survey provides records for around 2000 individuals and supplies detailed information on the consumption of food and data on sex, height and socio-economic status which may be used to analyse the exposure of selected groups within the community. As a result we are able to address the variation in consumption of food amongst individuals, and account for actual body weights providing a more accurate representation of the 'true' exposure. The migrants bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE), di-2-ethylhexyl adipate (DEHA) and styrene were considered as specimen compounds although the methodology employed has the flexibility to adapt to other migrants and packaging types and indeed other food contaminants. Exposure for each individual is estimated by calculating and summing the individual exposure from each item in their diet, and is repeated for all individuals in each survey to produce a distribution of exposures for the population. The packaging type of each food item is assigned by utilizing known packaging types from the database or, by sampling from a distribution based upon market share information. The parameters contributing towards the exposure from a packaged dietary item are migrant concentration and item weight. Distributions are used to represent the inherent variation and uncertainty affecting these parameters. Where data on concentrations for a particular type of food are lacking, expert

  18. Dietary exposure to cadmium and health effects: impact of environmental changes.

    PubMed

    Piscator, M

    1985-11-01

    Cadmium exposure, metabolism, and effects are described especially in relation to dietary intakes. Data on dietary intakes in several countries have been complied from studies using the duplicate diet method or fecal analysis. These two methods seem to give more accurate data than estimates based on cadmium concentrations in food classes and food consumption (composite method). The present data on absorption and retention of ingested cadmium indicate that normally less than 5% is ingested, but absorption may increase in women who have iron deficiency. Earlier estimates of the critical concentration in renal cortex being about 200 mg/kg wet weight still seem to be valid. New information is available on present renal levels and their distribution in the general population. The present margin of safety with regard to risk for renal effects is small. To predict future health risks from increases in dietary cadmium due to environmental changes such as acid deposition, it is necessary that the models used are based on correct assumptions. Of interest are the distributions of dietary intake, gastrointestinal absorption, and renal cadmium concentrations. These distributions are normal or lognormal, and since standard deviations are used when estimating risks, it is of paramount importance that the standard deviations are estimated as accurately as possible. At present it is not possible to quantify the effects attributed to acid rain only; account must be also be taken of cadmium added to, e.g., soil by use of sewage sludge and other fertilizers. In addition to risks to human health, cadmium also poses a threat to horses, which generally have renal cadmium concentrations several times higher than adult humans. It is recommended that horses should be monitored in areas when acid deposition is high. Such monitoring might provide valuable information about impact of acid rain.

  19. Food Packaging and Bisphenol A and Bis(2-Ethyhexyl) Phthalate Exposure: Findings from a Dietary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Janet M.; Engel, Connie L.; Rawsthorne, Teresa W.; Dodson, Robin E.; Ackerman, Janet M.; Rizzo, Jeanne; Nudelman, Janet L.; Brody, Julia Green

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) are high-production-volume chemicals used in plastics and resins for food packaging. They have been associated with endocrine disruption in animals and in some human studies. Human exposure sources have been estimated, but the relative contribution of dietary exposure to total intake has not been studied empirically. Objectives: To evaluate the contribution of food packaging to exposure, we measured urinary BPA and phthalate metabolites before, during, and after a “fresh foods” dietary intervention. Methods: We selected 20 participants in five families based on self-reported use of canned and packaged foods. Participants ate their usual diet, followed by 3 days of “fresh foods” that were not canned or packaged in plastic, and then returned to their usual diet. We collected evening urine samples over 8 days in January 2010 and composited them into preintervention, during intervention, and postintervention samples. We used mixed-effects models for repeated measures and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests to assess change in urinary levels across time. Results: Urine levels of BPA and DEHP metabolites decreased significantly during the fresh foods intervention [e.g., BPA geometric mean (GM), 3.7 ng/mL preintervention vs. 1.2 ng/mL during intervention; mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxy hexyl) phthalate GM, 57 ng/mL vs. 25 ng/mL]. The intervention reduced GM concentrations of BPA by 66% and DEHP metabolites by 53–56%. Maxima were reduced by 76% for BPA and 93–96% for DEHP metabolites. Conclusions: BPA and DEHP exposures were substantially reduced when participants’ diets were restricted to food with limited packaging. PMID:21450549

  20. Effects of Dietary Exposure to Zearalenone (ZEN) on Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    PubMed Central

    Pietsch, Constanze; Kersten, Susanne; Valenta, Hana; Dänicke, Sven; Schulz, Carsten; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Junge, Ranka

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is frequently contaminating animal feeds including feed used in aquaculture. In the present study, the effects of dietary exposure to ZEN on carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) were investigated. ZEN at three different concentrations (low dose: 332 µg kg−1, medium dose: 621 µg kg−1 and high dose: 797 µg kg−1 final feed, respectively) was administered to juvenile carp for four weeks. Additional groups received the mycotoxin for the same time period but were fed with the uncontaminated diet for two more weeks to examine the reversibility of the ZEN effects. No effects on growth were observed during the feeding trial, but effects on haematological parameters occurred. In addition, an influence on white blood cell counts was noted whereby granulocytes and monocytes were affected in fish treated with the medium and high dose ZEN diet. In muscle samples, marginal ZEN and α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) concentrations were detected. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of ZEN was confirmed by analysing formation of micronuclei in erythrocytes. In contrast to previous reports on other fish species, estrogenic effects measured as vitellogenin concentrations in serum samples were not increased by dietary exposure to ZEN. This is probably due to the fact that ZEN is rapidly metabolized in carp. PMID:26343724

  1. Dietary selenium protect against redox-mediated immune suppression induced by methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Yin, Daqiang; Yin, Jiaoyang; Chen, Qiqing; Wang, Rui

    2014-10-01

    The antagonism between selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) has been widely recognized, however, the protective role of Se against methylmercury (MeHg) induced immunotoxicity and the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In the current study, MeHg exposure (0.01 mM via drinking water) significantly inhibited the lymphoproliferation and NK cells functions of the female Balb/c mice, while dietary Se supplementation (as Se-rich yeast) partly or fully recovered the observed immunotoxicity, indicating the protective role of Se against MeHg-induced immune suppression in mice. Besides, MeHg exposure promoted the generation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced the levels of nonenzymic and enzymic antioxidants in target organs, while dietary Se administration significantly diminished the MeHg-induced oxidative stress and subsequent cellular dysfunctions (lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation). Two possible mechanisms of Se's protective effects were further revealed. Firstly, the reduction of mercury concentrations (less than 25%, modulated by Se supplementation) in the target organs might contribute, but not fully explain the alleviated immune suppression. Secondly and more importantly, Se could help to maintain/or elevate the activities of several key antioxidants, therefore protect the immune cells against MeHg-induced oxidative damage.

  2. Dietary exposure to an environmental toxin triggers neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid deposits in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Paul Alan; Davis, David A.; Mash, Deborah C.; Metcalf, James S.; Banack, Sandra Anne

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and β-amyloid plaques are the neurological hallmarks of both Alzheimer's disease and an unusual paralytic illness suffered by Chamorro villagers on the Pacific island of Guam. Many Chamorros with the disease suffer dementia, and in some villages one-quarter of the adults perished from the disease. Like Alzheimer's, the causal factors of Guamanian amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC) are poorly understood. In replicated experiments, we found that chronic dietary exposure to a cyanobacterial toxin present in the traditional Chamorro diet, β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA), triggers the formation of both NFT and β-amyloid deposits similar in structure and density to those found in brain tissues of Chamorros who died with ALS/PDC. Vervets (Chlorocebus sabaeus) fed for 140 days with BMAA-dosed fruit developed NFT and sparse β-amyloid deposits in the brain. Co-administration of the dietary amino acid l-serine with l-BMAA significantly reduced the density of NFT. These findings indicate that while chronic exposure to the environmental toxin BMAA can trigger neurodegeneration in vulnerable individuals, increasing the amount of l-serine in the diet can reduce the risk. PMID:26791617

  3. Effects of Dietary Exposure to Zearalenone (ZEN) on Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Constanze; Kersten, Susanne; Valenta, Hana; Dänicke, Sven; Schulz, Carsten; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia; Junge, Ranka

    2015-09-01

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEN) is frequently contaminating animal feeds including feed used in aquaculture. In the present study, the effects of dietary exposure to ZEN on carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) were investigated. ZEN at three different concentrations (low dose: 332 µg kg(-1), medium dose: 621 µg kg(-1) and high dose: 797 µg kg(-1) final feed, respectively) was administered to juvenile carp for four weeks. Additional groups received the mycotoxin for the same time period but were fed with the uncontaminated diet for two more weeks to examine the reversibility of the ZEN effects. No effects on growth were observed during the feeding trial, but effects on haematological parameters occurred. In addition, an influence on white blood cell counts was noted whereby granulocytes and monocytes were affected in fish treated with the medium and high dose ZEN diet. In muscle samples, marginal ZEN and α-zearalenol (α-ZEL) concentrations were detected. Furthermore, the genotoxic potential of ZEN was confirmed by analysing formation of micronuclei in erythrocytes. In contrast to previous reports on other fish species, estrogenic effects measured as vitellogenin concentrations in serum samples were not increased by dietary exposure to ZEN. This is probably due to the fact that ZEN is rapidly metabolized in carp.

  4. Dietary exposure to acrylamide in adolescents from a Canadian urban center.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Louise; Bouchard, Michèle; Ayotte, Pierre; Blanchet, Carole; Becalski, Adam; Bonvalot, Yvette; Phaneuf, Denise; Lapointe, Caroline; Gagné, Michelle; Courteau, Marilène

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of acrylamide in food items frequently consumed by Canadian adolescents was determined along with estimates of their contribution to the overall dietary intake of acrylamide. A total of 196 non-smoking adolescents (10-17 years old) were recruited in Montreal Island population, Canada. Participants were invited to fill out a 2-day food diary and a food frequency questionnaire over the last month. 146 samples of foods most frequently consumed by participants were analyzed for acrylamide contents. The highest acrylamide contents were measured in deep-fried french fries and potato chips (mean ± SD: 1053 ± 657 and 524 ± 276 ng/g respectively). On the basis of the 2-day food diary, median total daily intake of acrylamide was estimated at 0.29 μg/kg bw/d, as compared to 0.17 μg/kg bw/d on the basis of the food frequency questionnaire. These values are similar to those reported in comparable populations. Deep-fried french fries consumption contributed the most to daily acrylamide intake (50%) followed by potato chips (10%), oven-baked french fries (8%) and breakfast cereals (8%). Margins of exposure based on genotoxic benchmark dose limits were estimated to be low (≈<100) in high-consumer adolescents, indicating the need to continue efforts to reduce dietary acrylamide exposure. PMID:23517909

  5. Dietary exposure to acrylamide in adolescents from a Canadian urban center.

    PubMed

    Normandin, Louise; Bouchard, Michèle; Ayotte, Pierre; Blanchet, Carole; Becalski, Adam; Bonvalot, Yvette; Phaneuf, Denise; Lapointe, Caroline; Gagné, Michelle; Courteau, Marilène

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of acrylamide in food items frequently consumed by Canadian adolescents was determined along with estimates of their contribution to the overall dietary intake of acrylamide. A total of 196 non-smoking adolescents (10-17 years old) were recruited in Montreal Island population, Canada. Participants were invited to fill out a 2-day food diary and a food frequency questionnaire over the last month. 146 samples of foods most frequently consumed by participants were analyzed for acrylamide contents. The highest acrylamide contents were measured in deep-fried french fries and potato chips (mean ± SD: 1053 ± 657 and 524 ± 276 ng/g respectively). On the basis of the 2-day food diary, median total daily intake of acrylamide was estimated at 0.29 μg/kg bw/d, as compared to 0.17 μg/kg bw/d on the basis of the food frequency questionnaire. These values are similar to those reported in comparable populations. Deep-fried french fries consumption contributed the most to daily acrylamide intake (50%) followed by potato chips (10%), oven-baked french fries (8%) and breakfast cereals (8%). Margins of exposure based on genotoxic benchmark dose limits were estimated to be low (≈<100) in high-consumer adolescents, indicating the need to continue efforts to reduce dietary acrylamide exposure.

  6. Estimate of dietary exposure to sulphites in child and adult populations in the Basque Country.

    PubMed

    Urtiaga, Carmen; Amiano, Pilar; Azpiri, Mikel; Alonso, Ana; Dorronsoro, Miren

    2013-01-01

    Sulphites are widely used as a preservative and antioxidant additive in food. The aim of this study was to assess dietary sulphite intake in adults aged 35-65 years and in children aged 4-18 years living in the Basque Country, northern Spain. We determined sulphite concentrations in 909 samples covering 16 food types. The maximum permitted levels were exceeded in 17% of samples. Making recommended assumptions for non-quantifiable results, estimates of mean lower and upper bounds were calculated for sulphite concentrations in each food type. These sulphite data were combined with consumption data derived from 8417 adults from the European Prospective Investigation in Cancer and Nutrition cohort in Gipuzkoa, recruited in 1992-1995 using a diet history method, and 1055 children from the Basque Country Nutrition Children Survey, conducted in 2004-2005 using two 24-h recall questionnaires to assess diet. The results were compared with the acceptable daily intake (ADI) proposed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA). The mean dietary exposure to sulphites was 0.08 mg kg⁻¹ bw day⁻¹, only 11% of the ADI in the overall group of children (4-18 years old), but the acceptable intake was exceeded by 4% of 4-6 year olds. For the adults (35-65 years old), the mean dietary exposure was 0.31 mg kg⁻¹ bw day⁻¹, 45% of the ADI, but the acceptable intake was exceeded in 14.6% of cases. The major contributing foods were minced meat and other meat products for children and wine for adults.

  7. Dietary exposure to non-dioxin-like PCBs of different population groups in Austria.

    PubMed

    Mihats, Daniela; Moche, Wolfgang; Prean, Michael; Rauscher-Gabernig, Elke

    2015-05-01

    The dietary exposure to the sum of the six indicator PCBs (Σ6 PCBs; PCB 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, and 180) across different Austrian population groups was assessed in this study by combining data on occurrence from food of the Austrian market (n=157) analysed during 2006-2011 with national food consumption data. The most contaminated food group was meat, poultry, game and offal with average levels of ndl-PCBs of 5.20 ng g(-1) fat. In fish and fish products and eggs, mean concentrations of 3.89 ng g(-1) fresh weight (fw) and 4.00 ng g(-1) fat, respectively, were found. In milk and dairy products average concentrations ranged from 3.07 to 4.44 ng g(-1) fat. The mean dietary intake of Σ6 PCBs was estimated to be 3.37 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for children (6-15 years old), 3.19 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for women (19-65 years) and 2.64 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) for men (19-65 years). In all three population groups, milk and dairy products was the major contributing food group to the total dietary intake (50-55%) followed by fish and fish products (23-27%). The exposure of all Austrian population groups is well below the tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 10 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) proposed by WHO, accounting for 34% in children, 32% in women and 26% in men.

  8. Hormone Use in Food Animal Production: Assessing Potential Dietary Exposures and Breast Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Keeve E; Smith, Tyler J S

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to the role of hormones in breast cancer etiology, following reports that heightened levels of endogenous hormones and exposure to exogenous hormones and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals through food and the environment are associated with increased breast cancer risk. Seven hormone drugs (testosterone propionate, trenbolone acetate, estradiol, zeranol, progesterone, melengestrol acetate, and bovine somatotropin) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in food animals. There is concern that these drugs or their biologically active metabolites may accumulate in edible tissues, potentially increasing the risk of exposure for consumers. To date, the potential for human exposure to residues of these compounds in animal products, as well as the risks that may result from this exposure, is poorly understood. In this paper, we discuss the existing scientific evidence examining the toxicological significance of exposure to hormones used in food animal production in relation to breast cancer risk. Through a discussion of U.S. federal regulatory programs and the primary literature, we interpret the state of surveillance for residues of hormone drugs in animal products and discuss trends in meat consumption in relation to the potential for hormone exposure. Given the lack of chronic bioassays of oral toxicity of the seven hormone compounds in the public literature and the limitations of existing residue surveillance programs, it is not currently possible to provide a quantitative characterization of risks that result from the use of hormonal drugs in food animal production, complicating our understanding of the role of dietary hormone exposure in the population burden of breast cancer.

  9. Dietary acrylamide exposure among Finnish adults and children: the potential effect of reduction measures.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, T; Jestoi, M; Tapanainen, H; Valsta, L; Virtanen, S M; Sinkko, H; Kronberg-Kippilä, C; Kontto, J; Virtamo, J; Simell, O; Peltonen, K

    2011-11-01

    A deterministic exposure assessment using the Nusser method that adjusts for within-subject variation and for nuisance effects among Finnish children and adults was carried out. The food consumption data covered 2038 adults (25-74 years old) and 1514 children of 1, 3 and 6 years of age, with the data on foods' acrylamide content obtained from published Finnish studies. We found that acrylamide exposure was highest among the 3-year-old children (median = 1.01 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1), 97.5th percentile = 1.95 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1)) and lowest among 65-74-year-old women (median = 0.31 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1), 97.5th percentile = 0.69 µg kg(-1) bw day(-1)). Among adults, the most important source of acrylamide exposure was coffee, followed by casseroles rich in starch, then rye bread. Among children, the most important sources were casseroles rich in starch and then biscuits and, finally, chips and other fried potatoes. Replacing lightly roasted coffee with dark-roasted, swapping sweet wheat buns for biscuits, and decreasing the acrylamide content of starch-based casseroles and rye bread by 50% would result in a 50% decrease in acrylamide exposure in adults. Among children, substituting boiled potatoes for chips and other friend potatoes and replacing biscuits with sweet wheat buns while lowering the acrylamide content of starch-based casseroles by 50% would lead to acrylamide exposure that is only half of the original exposure. In conclusions, dietary modifications could have a large impact in decreasing acrylamide exposure.

  10. Quantification of estragole in fennel herbal teas: implications on the assessment of dietary exposure to estragole.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; Nicoli, Stefano; Leclercq, Catherine

    2011-02-01

    Quantification of estragole content in commercial fennel herbal teas was carried out in order to allow for a more accurate estimate of the dietary exposure to estragole. A simple and rapid analytical method, based on Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction and GC-MS, was developed for this purpose. Fennel teas obtained from different types of commercial products were analysed. Concentration levels ranged from 241 to 2058 μg L(-1) in teas from teabags, from 9 to 912 μg L(-1) in diluted instant teas, from 251 to 1718 μg L(-1) in teas from not packaged seeds. Based on these data and considering the daily consumption of three portions of herbal tea, a maximum exposure to estragole for adults of 10 μg/kg bw/day was calculated. The relatively high level observed in diluted instant teas of some brands deserves attention since these products are designed for infant consumption. Estimated exposure in infants was up to 51 μg/kg bw/day for teas from teabags, and up to 23 μg/kg bw/day for instant teas. A generalization of the use of suitable technologies in production processes of instant teas could substantially reduce the exposure to estragole in the vulnerable population groups (infants, young children, pregnant and breastfeeding women) who consume these products.

  11. Dietary and waterborne exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to copper, cadmium, lead and zinc using a live diet

    SciTech Connect

    Mount, D.R.; Barth, A.K.; Garrison, T.D.; Barten, K.A.; Hockett, J.R. )

    1994-12-01

    In two 60-d exposures, rainbow trout fry were fed brine shrimp (Artemia sp.) enriched with Cu, Cd, Pb, and Zn both individually and as a mixture combined with As. Dietary concentrations fed to trout were selected based on metal concentrations measured in invertebrates collected from the Clark Fork River (CFR), Montana. In addition to dietary exposure, treatments also included simultaneous exposure to a mixture of waterborne metals at sublethal concentrations. Fish in all treatments showed increased tissue metal concentrations from water and/or dietary exposure. Despite these accumulations, trout showed no effects on survival or growth from dietary concentrations as high as 55 [mu]g Cd/g dry weight, 170 [mu]g Pb/g dry weight, or 1,500 [mu]g Zn/g dry weight. Dietary Cu concentrations up to 350 [mu]g Cu/g dry weight did not reduce survival or growth. Fish fed Cu concentrations higher than those typical of CFR invertebrates showed about 30% mortality with no effect on growth; waterborne Cu released from Artemia may have contributed to this mortality. Trout exposed to diets with a mixture of Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn, and As close to that measured in CFR invertebrates showed lower weight than did control fish after 35 d, but this difference was no longer present after 60 d.

  12. Role of Maternal Dietary Peanut Exposure in Development of Food Allergy and Oral Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Kirsi M.; Westfall, Jennifer; De Jesus, Magdia; Mantis, Nicholas J.; Carroll, Jessica A.; Metzger, Dennis W.; Sampson, Hugh A.; Berin, M. Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Background The impact of maternal ingestion of peanut during pregnancy and lactation on an offspring’s risk for peanut allergy is under debate. Objective To investigate the influence of maternal dietary peanut exposure and breast milk on an offspring’s allergy risk. Methods Preconceptionally peanut-exposed C3H/HeJ females were either fed or not fed peanut during pregnancy and lactation. The offsprings’ responses to peanut sensitization or oral tolerance induction by feeding antigen prior to immunization were assessed. We also assessed the impact of immune murine milk on tolerance induction pre- or post-weaning. For antigen uptake studies, mice were gavaged with fluorescent peanut in the presence or absence of immune murine milk; Peyer’s patches were harvested for immunostaining. Results Preconceptional peanut exposure resulted in the production of varying levels of maternal antibodies in serum (and breast milk), which were transferred to the offspring. Despite this, maternal peanut exposure either preconceptionally or during pregnancy and lactation, when compared to no maternal exposure, had no impact on peanut allergy. When offspring were fed peanut directly, dose-dependent tolerance induction, unaltered by maternal feeding of peanut, was seen. Although peanut uptake into the gut-associated lymphoid tissues was enhanced by immune milk as compared to naïve milk, tolerance induction was not affected by the co-administration of immune milk either pre- or post-weaning. Conclusion Maternal peanut exposure during pregnancy and lactation has no impact on the development of peanut allergy in the offspring. Tolerance to peanut can be induced early, even pre-weaning, by giving moderate amounts of peanut directly to the infant, and this is neither enhanced nor impaired by concurrent exposure to immune milk. PMID:26656505

  13. Dietary exposure to phenolic and methoxylated organohalogen contaminants in relation to their concentrations in breast milk and serum in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yukiko; Nishimura, Eri; Kato, Yoshihisa; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated human exposure to neutral, phenolic, and methoxylated organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) in a duplicate diet study to evaluate their concentrations in breast milk and serum of Okinawan people from Japan during 2004-2009. Dietary intakes of phenolic OHCs were predominantly 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TriBP), followed by tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and 6-hydroxy-2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (6-OH-BDE47). After exposure, TriBP and TBBPA were transferred to breast milk, whereas 6-OH-BDE47 was selectively retained in serum. Despite a lower dietary exposure to pentachlorophenol and 4-hydroxy-CB187, both were retained in serum. For the methoxylated OHCs, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TriBA) and 6-methoxy-BDE47 were the predominant dietary contaminants, of which TriBA was present in both breast milk and serum, whereas 6-methoxy-BDE47 was selectively transferred to breast milk. These findings suggest that dietary exposure to phenolic and methoxylated OHCs may result in differential partitioning between breast milk and serum with different pharmacokinetic or exposure routes. PMID:24263137

  14. Effects of dietary polychlorinated biphenyl exposure on energetics of white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voltura, M.B.; French, J.B.

    2000-01-01

    Energy budgets have provided physiological ecologists with a vital link between environmental variables and individual performance and should also prove useful to ecotoxicologists in understanding the effects of sublethal exposure in the field. Exposure to toxic compounds is likely to be metabolically expensive and may result in a trade-off between energy spent to detoxify and excrete contaminants and energy allocated to growth or reproduction. To quantify the energetic cost of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure, we fed captive white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) diets containing PCBs (2:1 Aroclor? 1242:1254) at levels of 0, 0.1, 10, and 25 ppm (mg PCBs/kg food). After six weeks on the diets, there were no differences in food intake (g/d), diet digestibility (%), or body mass related to the level of dietary PCBs. This indicated that short-term exposure to PCBs did not cause a detectable increase in energy need as measured by voluntary food intake. We continued to feed mice the PCB-containing diets for one year, at which time we repeated the food intake trial, and also measured oxygen consumption at 20 and 30 C. After one year, all mice had gained mass, but mice on the 25-ppm diet tended to be heavier than mice in the other groups. Compared to the control group, mice on the 25-ppm diet had higher food intake (4.1 vs 3.7 g/d; p = 0.06) and higher oxygen consumption at 30 C (40.1 vs 36.6 ml O2/h; p = 0.01). These results suggest that there is an energetic cost to long-term contaminant exposure that, when combined with other environmental stresses, may influence patterns of energy acquisition and allocation.

  15. Human dietary exposure to PBDEs around E-waste recycling sites in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Labunska, Iryna; Harrad, Stuart; Wang, Mengjiao; Santillo, David; Johnston, Paul

    2014-05-20

    Analysis of 10 types of locally produced staple foods (including meat, fish, and eggs), provided estimates of dietary intakes of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) for residents of areas of Taizhou City (Zhejiang Province, Eastern China), which are long-established centers of rudimentary "e-waste" recycling. Average ∑PBDE concentrations in chicken meat, eggs, and liver and duck meat and liver were among the highest recorded to date, with BDE-209 particularly abundant. The highest estimated contributions to ∑PBDE intake under a median exposure scenario were associated with adult consumption of duck eggs (3882 ng/day) and chicken eggs (1091 ng/day), and with consumption of fish by both adults (792 ng/day) and children (634 ng/day). Including estimates for ingestion of contaminated dust reported elsewhere increased median ∑PBDE daily intakes by approximately 19% for adults and 42% for children. Normalized to body weight, estimated median ∑PBDE exposures (from food and dust combined) were 130.9 ng/kg bw/day for adults and 614.1 ng/kg bw/day for children. High-end estimates of exposure for young children exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference doses for BDE-47 and BDE-99 by factors of approximately 2.5 and 1.5, respectively.

  16. Dietary exposure of acrylamide from the fifth Chinese Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Zhao, Yunfeng; Zhu, Feng; Ma, Yongjian; Li, Xiaowei; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2016-01-01

    The levels of acrylamide in 240 food composite samples from the 5th Chinese Total Diet Study (TDS) were measured using an LC-MS/MS method and the exposure estimates for the general population were evaluated. The samples were collected from 20 provinces in China, covering about two thirds of the Chinese population. Acrylamide was detected in 40.0% of composite samples with the concentrations ranged from 0.8 to 211.8 μg/kg. The average dietary intakes from the 5th Chinese TDS were 0.319 μg kg(-1) bw day(-1) and an increase with about 70% was observed from the 3rd Chinese TDS in 2000 to the 5th Chinese TDS between 2009 and 2012. The main food group contributors to acrylamide exposure were vegetables (35.2%), cereals (34.3%) and potatoes (15.7%). Based on the benchmark dose lower confidence limit at 10% risk (BMDL10) of 0.31 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for the induction of mammary tumors in rats and 0.18 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for Harderian gland tumors in mice, the margins of exposure (MOEs) were 973 and 565 for Chinese general population, respectively. These MOEs indicate a human health concern.

  17. Assessment of dietary exposure and effect in humans: The role of NMR.

    PubMed

    van Duynhoven, John P M; Jacobs, Doris M

    2016-08-01

    In human nutritional science progress has always depended strongly on analytical measurements for establishing relationships between diet and health. This field has undergone significant changes as a result of the development of NMR and mass spectrometry methods for large scale detection, identification and quantification of metabolites in body fluids. This has allowed systematic studies of the metabolic fingerprints that biological processes leave behind, and has become the research field of metabolomics. As a metabolic profiling technique, NMR is at its best when its unbiased nature, linearity and reproducibility are exploited in well-controlled nutritional intervention and cross-sectional population screening studies. Although its sensitivity is less good than that of mass spectrometry, NMR has maintained a strong position in metabolomics through implementation of standardisation protocols, hyphenation with mass spectrometry and chromatographic techniques, accurate quantification and spectral deconvolution approaches, and high-throughput automation. Thus, NMR-based metabolomics has contributed uniquely to new insights into dietary exposure, in particular by unravelling the metabolic fates of phytochemicals and the discovery of dietary intake markers. NMR profiling has also contributed to the understanding of the subtle effects of diet on central metabolism and lipoprotein metabolism. In order to hold its ground in nutritional metabolomics, NMR will need to step up its performance in sensitivity and resolution; the most promising routes forward are the analytical use of dynamic nuclear polarisation and developments in microcoil construction and automated fractionation. PMID:27573181

  18. Dietary acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats: Dataset of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation markers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiaolei; Coughlan, Melanie; Roberts, Jennifer; Mehta, Rekha; Raju, Jayadev

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dietary acrylamide, at doses (10 and 50 mg/kg diet) known to cause rodent tumors, lowered serum total high density lipoprotein and total testosterone, increased serum lipase, and lowered lymphocytes levels together with other hematological parameters in male F344 rats exposed for 10 weeks (doi: 10.1016/j.etap.2014.11.009 [1]). Here we present data related to the role of food-borne acrylamide exposure (at 0, 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg diet) in the presence of low (7% wt/wt) or high (23.9% wt/wt) dietary fat on serum and urinary markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in F344 rats. Briefly, urine and serum samples were collected from the experimental animals a day prior to or at the time of necropsy, respectively and processed for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay estimations of biochemical markers. Urine samples were analyzed for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and isoprostane, and serum samples for total antioxidant capacity, paraoxonase 1 activity, c-reactive protein, homocysteine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, thromboxin 2, and Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine. PMID:27014731

  19. Infant dietary exposure to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in Greece.

    PubMed

    Costopoulou, Danae; Vassiliadou, Irene; Leondiadis, Leondios

    2013-09-01

    The dietary exposure of infants to polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs) and dioxin like polychlorinated biphenyls (dl-PCBs) is an issue of great social impact. We investigated for the first time the dietary intake of these compounds in infants living in Greece. We included in our study two age groups: 0-6 months, when infants are fed exclusively by human milk and/or formula milk, and 6 to 12 months, when solid food is introduced to nutrition. We took into consideration analytical results for PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs concentrations in the most popular infant formulae in the Greek market, previous data for mother milk concentrations of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs from Greece, and finally analytical data for fat-containing food products from the Greek market. In the first study group, it was found than in infants exclusively fed by breast milk, the calculated sum of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs (60.3-80.4 TEQ pg/kg body weight) was significantly higher than that of infants that consume a combination of human milk and formula (31.2-41.6 TEQ pg/kg body weight). In the second study group, separate daily intake estimations were performed for babies receiving human milk (estimated total daily intake 19.76-24.95 TEQ pg/kg body weight) and formula milk (estimated total daily intake 1.60-2.24 TEQ pg/kg body weight). The risks of this exposure should not be overestimated because nursing is restricted to a limited period of human life and besides, the potential consumption of higher levels of dioxin-like compounds is fully compensated by the significant benefits of breast-feeding.

  20. Steroids in marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China: occurrence, bioconcentration, and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Sun, Kai-Feng; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence, bioconcentration, and human dietary exposure via seafood consumption of 24 steroids were investigated by rapid resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS/MS) in six typical marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China. Ten, 9, 10, 15 of 24 steroids were detected at concentrations ranging from <0.1 (testosterone) to 40 ng/L (prednisolone), from 0.1 (4-androstene-3,17-dione) to 2.4 ng/g (progesterone), from 0.3 ng/g (testosterone) to 21.4 ng/g (epi-androsterone), and from <0.1 (testosterone) to 560 ng/g (cortisol) (wet weight) in the water, sediment, feed and biota samples, respectively. Synthetic steroids (androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, 17α-boldenone, 17β-boldenone, 17β-trenbolone, prednisolone, norgestrel) were detected in the feed samples, clearly demonstrating the illegal use of steroids in the feed. The field bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of steroids calculated in different aquatic organisms ranged from 93.8 to 4000. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of androgens, glucocorticoids, and progestagens via consumption of seafood (i.e., shrimps, crabs, mollusks, and fish) for different age groups were in the range of 33.4-134, 2061-8566, and 40.4-155 ng/d for children (2-5 years), youth (6-18 years), and adults (>18 years), respectively. Even though no significant risk from dietary exposure arises from individual steroid, elevated risk to humans can result from the occurrence of multiple steroids in the seafood raised in the aquaculture farms, especially for the sensitive populations, such as pregnant women and children. PMID:25268569

  1. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in the Korean food basket and estimation of dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Barghi, Mandana; Shin, Eun-Su; Son, Min-Hui; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Pyo, Heesoo; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2016-06-01

    1,2,5,6,9,10-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant that is used worldwide in expanded and extruded polystyrene foam and simultaneously emitted to the environment. HBCD can easily accumulate in animals and humans and cause neurotoxicity, thyroid hormone disruption, and reproductive disorders. Therefore, it is essential to monitor the HBCD concentrations in foods and estimate the human exposure through the diet. In this study a total of 521 food samples from eight food categories were sampled and analyzed for their HBCD content. Based on consumption data, the average dietary intake of the general Korean population and specific subgroups was calculated. The highest levels of HBCD were found in fish and shellfish (0.47 ng g(-1) ww), and this was attributed to natural exposure to the contaminated marine environments and the HBCD bioaccumulation. In addition, the use of expanded polystyrene buoys in aquaculture was also found to be a potential source of HBCD in bivalves. The high solubility of α-HBCD in water and the persistence of this diastereomer compared to β- and γ-HBCD in biological tissues, led to higher accumulation of α-HBCD in animal-based foods. In contrast, the diastereomeric selectivity and lower metabolic capacity in plants compared with animals led to the predominance of γ-HBCD in plant-based foods. The dietary intake of HBCD was estimated to be 0.82 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) in the general population and 2.89 ng kg(-1) bw d(-1) in children up to 5 years of age. The high HBCD intake in children was found to be a result of their lower body weight and their high consumption of milk and homemade Korean baby foods that usually contain fish. PMID:26924755

  2. Dietary exposure and human risk assessment of phthalate esters based on total diet study in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhang; Li, Han-Han; Wang, Hong-Sheng; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Sthiannopkao, Suthipong; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Yasin, Mohamed Salleh Mohamed; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-10-01

    Phthalate esters are used in a wide variety of consumer products, and human exposure to this class of compounds is widespread. Nevertheless, studies on dietary exposure of human to phthalates are limited. In this study, to assess the daily intakes of phthalate esters and the possible adverse health impacts, different food samples were collected from three areas of Cambodia, one of the poorest countries in the world. The ∑phthalate ester concentrations in Kampong Cham, Kratie and Kandal provinces ranged from 0.05 to 2.34 (median 0.88) μgg(-1), 0.19-1.65 (median 0.86) μgg(-1) and 0.24-3.05 (median 0.59) μgg(-1) wet weight (ww), respectively. Di-2-Ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP) were the predominant compounds among all foodstuffs. The estimated daily intake (EDI) of phthalate esters for the general population in Kampong Cham, Kratie and Kandal was 34.3, 35.6 and 35.8μgkg(-1) bw d(-1), respectively. The dietary daily intake of DEHP, benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) in Kampong Cham, Kratie and Kandal were below the tolerable daily intakes (TDI) imposed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and reference doses (RfD) imposed by The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Rice contributed the greatest quantity of DEHP to the daily intake in Cambodia so may deserve further exploration. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the occurrence and the daily intakes of phthalate esters in Cambodia. PMID:27372065

  3. Dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants and metals among Inuit and Chukchi in Russian Arctic Chukotka

    PubMed Central

    Dudarev, Alexey A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The general aim was to assess dietary exposure to selected persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metals among Eskimo (Inuit) and Chukchi of the Chukotka Peninsula of the Russian Arctic, and to establish recommendations for exposure risk reduction. Study design A cross-sectional evaluation of nutritional patterns of coastal and inland indigenous peoples of the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug (in 2001–2003); assessment of the levels of persistent toxic substances (PTSs) in traditional foods and their comparison to Russian food safety limits; the identification of local sources of food contamination; and the recommendation and implementation of risk management measures. Methods Community-based dietary survey of self reported food frequencies (453 persons), chemical analyses (POPs and metals) of local foods and indoor matters (397 samples), substantiation of recommendations for daily (weekly, monthly) intakes of traditional food. Results POPs in traditional food items are generally below the Russian food safety limits except marine mammal fat, while Hg and Cd are high mainly in mammal viscera. Lead is relatively low in tissues of all animals studied. For the Chukotka coastal communities, seals constitute the principal source of the whole suite of PTSs considered. Consumption restrictions are recommended for marine and freshwater fish, some wild meats (waterfowl and seal), fats (whale and seal), liver (most animals) and kidney (reindeer, walrus and seal). Evidence is presented that contamination of foodstuffs may be significantly increased during storing/processing/cooking of food due to indoor and outdoor environmental conditions. Conclusions Based on the analytical findings and the local PTSs sources identified, guidelines on food safety are suggested, as well as measures to reduce food contamination and domestic and local sources. Important and urgent remedial actions are recommended to minimize PTSs environmental and domestic contamination. Waste clean

  4. Steroids in marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China: occurrence, bioconcentration, and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Sun, Kai-Feng; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence, bioconcentration, and human dietary exposure via seafood consumption of 24 steroids were investigated by rapid resolution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS/MS) in six typical marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China. Ten, 9, 10, 15 of 24 steroids were detected at concentrations ranging from <0.1 (testosterone) to 40 ng/L (prednisolone), from 0.1 (4-androstene-3,17-dione) to 2.4 ng/g (progesterone), from 0.3 ng/g (testosterone) to 21.4 ng/g (epi-androsterone), and from <0.1 (testosterone) to 560 ng/g (cortisol) (wet weight) in the water, sediment, feed and biota samples, respectively. Synthetic steroids (androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, 17α-boldenone, 17β-boldenone, 17β-trenbolone, prednisolone, norgestrel) were detected in the feed samples, clearly demonstrating the illegal use of steroids in the feed. The field bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of steroids calculated in different aquatic organisms ranged from 93.8 to 4000. The estimated daily intakes (EDIs) of androgens, glucocorticoids, and progestagens via consumption of seafood (i.e., shrimps, crabs, mollusks, and fish) for different age groups were in the range of 33.4-134, 2061-8566, and 40.4-155 ng/d for children (2-5 years), youth (6-18 years), and adults (>18 years), respectively. Even though no significant risk from dietary exposure arises from individual steroid, elevated risk to humans can result from the occurrence of multiple steroids in the seafood raised in the aquaculture farms, especially for the sensitive populations, such as pregnant women and children.

  5. Environmental, dietary, demographic, and activity variables associated with biomarkers of exposure for benzene and lead.

    PubMed

    Roy, A; Georgopoulos, P G; Ouyang, M; Freeman, N; Lioy, P J

    2003-11-01

    Classification and regression tree methods represent a potentially powerful means of identifying patterns in exposure data that may otherwise be overlooked. Here, regression tree models are developed to identify associations between blood concentrations of benzene and lead and over 300 variables of disparate type (numerical and categorical), often with observations that are missing or below the quantitation limit. Benzene and lead are selected from among all the environmental agents measured in the NHEXAS Region V study because they are ubiquitous, and they serve as paradigms for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals, two classes of environmental agents that have very different properties. Two sets of regression models were developed. In the first set, only environmental and dietary measurements were employed as predictor variables, while in the second set these were supplemented with demographic and time-activity data. In both sets of regression models, the predictor variables were regressed on the blood concentrations of the environmental agents. Jack-knife cross-validation was employed to detect overfitting of the models to the data. Blood concentrations of benzene were found to be associated with: (a) indoor air concentrations of benzene; (b) the duration of time spent indoors with someone who was smoking; and (c) the number of cigarettes smoked by the subject. All these associations suggest that tobacco smoke is a major source of exposure to benzene. Blood concentrations of lead were found to be associated with: (a) house dust concentrations of lead; (b) the duration of time spent working in a closed workshop; and (c) the year in which the subject moved into the residence. An unexpected finding was that the regression trees identified time-activity data as better predictors of the blood concentrations than the measurements in environmental and dietary media.

  6. Development of a source-to-outcome model for dietary exposures to insecticide residues: an example using chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Hinderliter, Paul M; Price, Paul S; Bartels, Michael J; Timchalk, Charles; Poet, Torka S

    2011-10-01

    Probabilistic models of interindividual variation in exposure and response were linked to create a source-to-outcome population model. This model was used to investigate cholinesterase inhibition from dietary exposures to an insecticide (chlorpyrifos) in populations of adults and 3 year old children. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) model was used to calculate the variation in sensitivity occurring from interindividual variability in physiology, metabolism, and physical activity levels. A dietary intake model characterizes the variation in dietary insecticide exposures and variation in anthropometry in the populations. Published equations were used to describe the necessary physiology for each simulated individual based on the anthropometry from the dietary intake model. The model of the interindividual variation in response to chlorpyrifos was developed by performing a sensitivity analysis on the PBPK/PD model to determine the parameters that drive variation in pharmacodynamics outcomes (brain and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase inhibition). Distributions of interindividual variation were developed for parameters with the largest impact; the probabilistic model sampled from these distributions. The impact of age and interindividual variation on sensitivity at the doses that occur from dietary exposures, typically orders of magnitude lower than exposures assessed in toxicological studies, was assessed using the source-to-outcome model. The resulting simulations demonstrated that metabolic detoxification capacity was sufficient to prevent significant brain and red blood cell acetylcholinesterase inhibition, even in individuals with the lowest detoxification potential. Age-specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters did not predict differences in susceptibility between adults and children. In the future, the approach of this case study could be used to assess the risks from low level exposures to other chemicals

  7. Dietary cadmium exposure and kidney stone incidence: a population-based prospective cohort study of men & women.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Laura D K; Elinder, Carl-Gustaf; Tiselius, Hans-Göran; Wolk, Alicja; Akesson, Agneta

    2013-09-01

    Cadmium exposure is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion. Hypercalciuria is recognised as a major risk factor for kidney stone formation. Increased prevalence of kidney stones among those occupationally exposed to cadmium has previously been suggested. Food is the main source of cadmium exposure in the general population with tobacco representing an important additional source among smokers. We aimed to assess the association between dietary cadmium exposure and kidney stone incidence in two large population-based, prospective cohorts of men (Cohort of Swedish Men; COSM) and women (The Swedish Mammography Cohort; SMC). Those with a history of kidney stones were excluded. At baseline 1997, men (45-79yrs) and women (48 to 83yrs), completed a self-administered questionnaire on diet and lifestyle. During 12years of follow-up, we ascertained 707 cases of kidney stones in men and 290 in women through linkage of the cohorts to the national inpatient and outpatient registers. Individual dietary cadmium exposure was estimated using dietary data and concentrations of cadmium in food. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards regression models with adjustment for other risk factors. Estimated dietary cadmium exposure was not associated with increased kidney stone incidence among men HR 0.97 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77-1.23) or women HR 0.99 (95% CI: 0.89-1.43), comparing the highest tertile with the lowest. In conclusion, our results do not support a strong association between dietary cadmium and kidney stone risk at the exposure levels seen in the general population.

  8. MODELED RESIDENTIAL CHLORPYRIFOS EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHILDREN VIA DERMAL SURFACE RESIDUE CONTACT AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physically-based stochastic model has been applied to estimate residential chlorpyrifos exposure and dace to children via the non-dietary ingestion and dermal residue contact pathways. Time-location-activity data for 2825 children were sampled from national surveys to generat...

  9. Dietary predictors of young children’s exposures to chlorpyrifos, permethrin, and 2,4-D using urinary biomonitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    Few data exist on the association between dietary habits and urinary biomarker concentrations of pesticides in children. The objective was to examined the association between the weekly intake frequency of 65 food items and urinary biomarkers of exposure to chlorpyrifos (3,5,6-tr...

  10. A Meta-Analysis of Children's Object-to-Mouth Frequency Data for Estimating Non-Dietary Ingestion Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    To improve estimates of non-dietary ingestion in probabilistic exposure modeling, a meta-analysis of children's object-to-mouth frequency was conducted using data from seven available studies representing 438 participants and ~ 1500 h of behavior observation. The analysis repres...

  11. SPECIES SPECIFIC DIETARY ARSENIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: THE NEED TO ESTIMATE BIOACCESSIBILITY AND ASSESSING THE IMPLIED PRESYSTEMIC METABOLISM IMPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical form specific toxicity of arsenic dictates the need for species specific quantification in order to accurately assess the risk from an exposure. The literature has begun to produce preliminary species specific databases for certain dietary sources, but a quantitativ...

  12. Energetic cost of dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) for white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voltura, M.B.; French, J.B.

    1998-01-01

    Contaminant exposure is an environmental factor often overlooked in ecological studies. Yet exposure to toxicants is likely to be metabolically expensive, and result in a trade-off between energy spent to detoxify an excrete contaminants, and energy allocated to growth or reproduction. To quantify the energetic cost of PCB exposure, we fed mice diets containing 0, 0.1, 10 and 25 ppm PCBs (mg PCBs/kg food). After 6 wks, there were no differences in food intake or body mass related to the level of dietary PCBs. We continued to feed mice the PCB diets for one year, and then measured food intake and resting metabolic rate. After one year, all mice had gained mass, but mice on the 25 ppm diet were significantly heavier than mice in the other groups. Mice on the 25 ppm diet also showed an increase in both food intake (p=0.06) and metabolic rate (p=0.01), after correction for differences in body mass. Food intake averaged 4.1 g/d for mice on the 25 ppm diet, compared to 3.7 gld for control mice. Oxygen consumption at 30°C averaged 40.1 ml O2/h for mice on the 25 ppm diet, compared to 36.6 ml O2/h for control mice. These results show that for white-footed mice, there is an energetic cost to contaminant exposure that when combined with other environmental stresses, will influence patterns of energy acquisition and allocation.

  13. Phthalates dietary exposure and food sources for Belgian preschool children and adults.

    PubMed

    Sioen, Isabelle; Fierens, Tine; Van Holderbeke, Mirja; Geerts, Lieve; Bellemans, Mia; De Maeyer, Mieke; Servaes, Kelly; Vanermen, Guido; Boon, Polly E; De Henauw, Stefaan

    2012-11-01

    Numerous studies have indicated that for phthalates, the intake of contaminated foods is the most important exposure pathway for the general population. Up to now, data on dietary phthalate intake are scarce and - to the authors' knowledge - not available for the Belgian population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was: (1) to assess the long-term intake of the Belgian population for eight phthalates considering different exposure scenarios (benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP); di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP); dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP); di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP); diethyl phthalate (DEP); diisobutyl phthalate (DiBP); dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP)); (2) to evaluate the intake of BBP, DnBP, DEP and DEHP against tolerable daily intake (TDI) values; and (3) to assess the contribution of the different food groups to the phthalate intake. The intake assessment was performed using two Belgian food consumption databases, one with consumption data of preschool children (2.5 to 6.5 years old) and another of adults (≥15 years old), combined with a database of phthalate concentrations measured in over 550 food products sold on the Belgian market. Phthalate intake was calculated using the 'Monte Carlo Risk Assessment' programme (MCRA 7.0). The intake of DEHP was the highest, followed by DiBP. The intake of BBP, DnBP and DEP was far below the TDI for both children and adults. However, for DEHP, the 99th percentile of the intake distribution of preschoolers in the worst case exposure scenario was equal to 80% of the TDI, respectively. This is not negligible, since other exposure routes of DEHP exist for children as well (e.g. mouthing of toys). Bread was the most important contributor to the DEHP intake and this may deserve further exploration, since the origin of this phthalate in bread remains unclear.

  14. Dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to pesticide residues: results of the first Hong Kong Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waiky W K; Yau, Arthur T C; Chung, Stephen W C; Lam, Chi-ho; Ma, Stephanie; Ho, Y Y; Xiao, Ying

    2014-01-01

    The use of pesticides and other chemicals has become a common practice in modern agriculture to enhance and stabilise crop yield, protect the nutritional integrity of food, facilitate food storage to assure year-round supplies, and provide attractive and appealing food products. With the adoption of strict good agricultural practice (GAP), only minimal amounts of pesticide residues should remain on the crops or in connected foods of animal origin up the food chain. To assess their associated health risk to local people, the dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to residues of four groups of pesticides or their metabolites - organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), carbamates, pyrethrins and pyrethroids, and dithiocarbamate (DTC) metabolites - is estimated in the first Hong Kong Total Diet Study (TDS). A total of 150 commonly consumed food items were collected and prepared "as consumed". A total of 600 composite food samples were analysed for 85 pesticides or their metabolites by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). These pesticides were primarily found at low levels (highest mean = 350 μg kg⁻¹) in food samples of plant origin such as vegetables and fruits. Dietary exposures to pesticide residues were estimated based on the analytical results and the food consumption data of the local residents. The estimated dietary exposures of Hong Kong adults to all individual pesticides were well below their respective acceptable daily intakes (ADIs). The percentage contributions of the estimated mean and 95th percentile dietary exposures to the ADIs of individual pesticides were <6% and <24% for the OPPs, <1% for the carbamates and pyrethrins and pyrethroids, and <1% and <4% for the DTC metabolites, respectively. The findings indicate that dietary exposures to all the pesticide residues analysed in this study were unlikely to pose unacceptable health risks to the Hong Kong population.

  15. Dietary mercury exposure to endangered California Clapper Rails in San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casazza, Michael L.; Ricca, Mark A.; Overton, Cory T.; Takekawa, John Y.; Merritt, Angela M.; Ackerman, Joshua T.

    2015-01-01

    California Clapper Rails (Rallus longirostris obsoletus) are an endangered waterbird that forage in tidal-marsh habitats that pose risks from mercury exposure. We analyzed total mercury (Hg) in six macro-invertebrate and one fish species representing Clapper Rail diets from four tidal-marshes in San Francisco Bay, California. Mercury concentrations among individual taxa ranged from lowest at Colma Creek (mean range: 0.09–0.2 μg/g dw) to highest at Cogswell (0.2–0.7), Laumeister (0.2–0.9) and Arrowhead Marshes (0.3–1.9). These spatial patterns for Hg matched patterns reported previously in Clapper Rail blood from the same four marshes. Over 25% of eastern mudsnails (Ilyanassa obsolete) and staghorn sculpin (Leptocottus armatus) exceeded dietary Hg concentrations (ww) often associated with avian reproductive impairment. Our results indicate that Hg concentrations vary considerably among tidal-marshes and diet taxa, and Hg concentrations of prey may provide an appropriate proxy for relative exposure risk for Clapper Rails.

  16. Leaded crystal as a source of dietary lead: An exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Shorten, C.V.; Glowacki, M.L.

    1995-12-31

    Lead is a potent systemic toxic with many environmental sources. It can enter the body through a number of pathways, the most significant is ingestion. While many investigators of lead ingestion have focused on paint and dust sources, the authors examined food contaminated with lead from crystal ware. The rates and amounts of lead leached into vinegar stored in leaded crystal cruets were measured over the course of a 42-day laboratory study. Replicate lead oxide (PbO, 24%) crystal cruets (N = 13) were filled with vinegar, and sample aliquots were periodically removed for analysis. Lead leaching rates were determined by fitting a two-stage, non-linear model to the data, and observed rate coefficients were 0.066 hr{sup {minus}1} and 0.0019{sup {minus}1} for the first and second stages of leaching, respectively (R{sup 2} = 0.9680). Average lead concentrations in the stored vinegar range from 118 {micro}g/L at 8 parameters (ingestion rate, exposure frequency and duration, body weight, and averaging time) was generated to characterize the realm of potential intake estimates. Lead concentrations were input using the fitted model. Results indicated that a worst case lead intake estimate from this source could be as high as 420 {micro}g/kg/yr for a child. Crystal ware can be considered to be a potentially significant dietary source of lead, and risk characterizations cannot ignore this potential avenue when combining risks across all exposure pathways.

  17. A novel approach reveals that zinc oxide nanoparticles are bioavailable and toxic after dietary exposures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Dybowska, A.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    If engineered nanomaterials are released into the environment, some are likely to end up associated with the food of animals due to aggregation and sorption processes. However, few studies have considered dietary exposure of nanomaterials. Here we show that zinc (Zn) from isotopically modified 67ZnO particles is efficiently assimilated by freshwater snails when ingested with food. The 67Zn from nano-sized 67ZnO appears as bioavailable as 67Zn internalized by diatoms. Apparent agglomeration of the zinc oxide (ZnO) particles did not reduce bioavailability, nor preclude toxicity. In the diet, ZnO nanoparticles damage digestion: snails ate less, defecated less and inefficiently processed the ingested food when exposed to high concentrations of ZnO. It was not clear whether the toxicity was due to the high Zn dose achieved with nanoparticles or to the ZnO nanoparticles themselves. Further study of exposure from nanoparticles in food would greatly benefit assessment of ecological and human health risks. ?? 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  18. Feeding and growth responses of the snail Theba pisana to dietary metal exposure.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, K S; Radwan, M A; Gad, A F

    2011-02-01

    The effects of dietary exposure to copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) on feeding activities, growth response, and mortality of Theba pisana snails were studied in 5-week feeding tests. Snails were fed on an artificial diet containing the following Cu, Pb, or Zn concentrations: 0, 50, 100, 500, 1000, 5000, 10,000, and 15,000 μg/g dry food. At the end of 5 weeks, the food consumption rate was decreased with increasinges in both metal concentrations and time of exposure. The estimated concentrations of metals that reduces food consumption to 50% (EC₅₀) after 5 weeks were 56, 118, and 18 μg/g dry food for Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively. All tested metals in the diet were found to inhibit growth of the snails in a dose-dependent manner. The toxic effect on growth of the tested metals could be arranged in the order Cu > Zn > Pb. The cumulative percentage mortality among snails fed a Cu- or Zn-contaminated diet was 73.3% and the respective value for a Pb-contaminated diet was 13.3%. There was a positive correlation between growth coefficient and food consumption for all tested metals.

  19. Bioaccumulation and excretion of enantiomers of myclobutanil in Tenebrio molitor larvae through dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaotian; Liu, Chen; Li, Yaobin; Gao, Yongxin; Guo, Baoyuan; Wang, Huili; Li, Jianzhong

    2013-12-01

    The bioaccumulation and excretion of enantiomers of myclobutanil in Tenebrio molitor larvae through dietary exposure under laboratory conditions were investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) based on a ChiralcelOD-3R [cellulosetris-tris-(3, 5-dichlorophenyl-carbamate)] column. The wheat bran fed to Tenebrio molitor larvae was spiked with racemic myclobutanil at two dose levels of 20 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg (dry weight). The results showed that there was a significant trend of enantioselective bioaccumulation in the larvae with a preferential accumulation of (-)-myclobutanil in 20 mg/kg dose exposure, but it was not obviously observed in the 2 mg/kg dose group. A kinetic model considering enantiomerization between the two enantiomers based on first-order reactions was built and the rate constants were estimated to discuss the kinetic reason for the different concentrations of individual enantiomers in the larvae. The approximations implied an inversion between the two enantiomers with a relatively higher rate of the inversion from (-)-myclobutanil to (+)-myclobutanil. Meanwhile, analysis of data of excretion samples suggested the active excretion is probably an important pathway for the insect to eliminate myclobutanil rapidly with nonenantioselectivity as a passive transport process, which was consistent with the low accumulation efficiency of myclobutanil measured by BAF (bioaccumulation factor).

  20. Concentrations of phthalates and bisphenol A in Norwegian foods and beverages and estimated dietary exposure in adults.

    PubMed

    Sakhi, Amrit K; Lillegaard, Inger Therese L; Voorspoels, Stefan; Carlsen, Monica H; Løken, Elin B; Brantsæter, Anne L; Haugen, Margaretha; Meltzer, Helle M; Thomsen, Cathrine

    2014-12-01

    Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are ubiquitous in our environment. These chemicals have been characterized as endocrine disruptors that can cause functional impairment of development and reproduction. Processed and packaged foods are among the major sources of human exposure to these chemicals. No previous report showing the levels of these chemicals in food items purchased in Norway is available. The aim of the present study was to determine the concentration of ten different phthalates and BPA in foods and beverages purchased on the Norwegian market and estimate the daily dietary exposure in the Norwegian adult population. Commonly consumed foods and beverages in Norway were purchased in a grocery store and analysed using gas- and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Daily dietary exposures to these chemicals in the Norwegian adult population were estimated using the latest National dietary survey, Norkost 3 (2010-2011). This study showed that phthalates and BPA are found in all foods and beverages that are common to consume in Norway. The detection frequency of phthalates in the food items varied from 11% for dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP) to 84% for di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DiNP), one of the substitutes for bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). BPA was found in 54% of the food items analysed. Among the different phthalates, the highest concentrations were found for DEHP and DiNP in the food items. Estimated dietary exposures were also equally high and dominated by DEHP and DiNP (400-500 ng/kg body weight (bw)/day), followed by di-iso-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP) and di-iso-decyl phthalate (DiDP) (30-40 ng/kg bw/day). Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethylphthalate (DEP) and DCHP had the lowest concentrations and the exposures were around 10-20 ng/kg bw/day. Estimated dietary exposure to BPA was 5 ng/kg bw/day. In general, levels of phthalates and BPA in foods and beverages from the Norwegian market

  1. Dietary exposure and trends of exposure to nutrient elements iodine, iron, selenium and sodium from the 2003-4 New Zealand Total Diet Survey.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Barbara M; Vannoort, Richard W; Haslemore, Roger M

    2008-03-01

    The mean dietary exposure to the nutrient elements iodine, Fe, Se and Na by eight age-sex groups of the New Zealand population was estimated from foods purchased and prepared as for consumption. A total of 968 samples comprising 121 foods were collected and analysed. Mean daily exposures were calculated from mean concentration levels of the selected nutrients in each food combined with simulated diets for a 25+-year-old male and female, a 19-24-year-old male, a 11-14-year-old boy and girl, a 5-6-year-old child, a 1-3-year-old toddler and a 6-12-month-old infant. Food concentrations and dietary exposures are reported and compared with nutrient reference values (for example, recommended daily intakes, adequate intakes or upper limits). Dietary iodine exposures for all age-sex groups were well below recommended levels and have steadily decreased since 1982, raising concern especially for the physical and mental development of infants and young children. Fe exposures meet the recommended daily intake for the average male and 11-14 year olds but are only about half that recommended for adult females. Se exposure is about 20 % less than optimal for females. Na exposures, excluding discretionary salt, are above the acceptable exposure level for all age-sex groups, and exceed the upper intake limits for 25+-year-old males, 19-24-year-old young males, and 11-14-year-old boys and girls by up to 125 % for an average consumer. PMID:17925056

  2. Dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to acrylamide: results of the first Hong Kong Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Waiky W K; Chung, Stephen W C; Lam, Chi-ho; Ho, Y Y; Xiao, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Acrylamide is a processing contaminant in food formed during cooking at high temperature, such as frying and baking. To assess the associated health risk of the Hong Kong population, the dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to acrylamide was estimated in the first Hong Kong Total Diet Study (TDS), where food samples were collected and prepared "as consumed". A total of 532 composite food samples were analysed for acrylamide using LC-MS/MS. Dietary exposures were estimated by combining the analytical results with the food consumption data of the Hong Kong adults. The mean and 95th percentile exposures to acrylamide of the Hong Kong population were 0.213 and 0.538 μg kg⁻¹ body weight (bw) day⁻¹, respectively, and their margins of exposure (MOEs) were all below 10,000. The main dietary source of acrylamide was "Vegetables and their products" (52.4% of the total exposure), particularly stir-fried vegetables (44.9%), followed by "Cereals and their products" (14.7%) and "Mixed dishes" (9.43%). The study findings suggest that the relatively low figures for MOE for a genotoxic carcinogen may indicate human health concern of the Hong Kong population. Efforts should continue to be made in the interest of reducing acrylamide levels in food locally.

  3. Phthalate Concentrations and Dietary Exposure from Food Purchased in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Lorber, Matthew; Guo, Ying; Wu, Qian; Yun, Se Hun; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Hommel, Madeline; Imran, Nadia; Hynan, Linda S.; Cheng, Dunlei; Colacino, Justin A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Phthalates have been found in many personal care and industrial products, but have not previously been reported in food purchased in the United States. Phthalates are ubiquitous synthetic compounds and therefore difficult to measure in foods containing trace levels. Phthalates have been associated with endocrine disruption and developmental alteration. Objectives: Our goals were to report concentrations of phthalates in U.S. food for the first time, specifically, nine phthalates in 72 individual food samples purchased in Albany, New York, and to compare these findings with other countries and estimate dietary phthalate intake. Methods: A convenience sample of commonly consumed foods was purchased from New York supermarkets. Methods were developed to analyze these foods using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy. Dietary intakes of phthalates were estimated as the product of the food consumption rate and concentration of phthalates in that food. Results: The range of detection frequency of individual phthalates varied from 6% for dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP) to 74% for di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). DEHP concentrations were the highest of the phthalates measured in all foods except beef [where di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP) was the highest phthalate found], with pork having the highest estimated mean concentration of any food group (mean 300 ng/g; maximum, 1,158 ng/g). Estimated mean adult intakes ranged from 0.004 μg/kg/day for dimethyl phthalate (DMP) to 0.673 μg/kg/day for DEHP. Conclusions: Phthalates are widely present in U.S. foods. While estimated intakes for individual phthalates in this study were more than an order of magnitude lower than U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reference doses, cumulative exposure to phthalates is of concern and a more representative survey of U.S. foods is indicated. PMID:23461894

  4. Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in Irish foods: Occurrence and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A R; Tlustos, C; Rose, M; Smith, F; Carr, M; Panton, S

    2011-10-01

    The concentrations of selected polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners (PCNs 52, 53, 66/67, 68, 69, 71/72, 73, 74 and 75) were determined in 100 commonly consumed foods, in the first study on occurrence of these contaminants in the Republic of Ireland. Congener selection was based on current knowledge on PCN occurrence and toxicology, and the availability of reliable reference standards. The determinations were carried out using validated analytical methodology based on 13C10 labelled internal standardisation and measurement by HRGC-HRMS. The results showed PCN occurrence in the majority of studied foods--milk, fish, dairy and meat products, eggs, animal fat, shellfish, offal, vegetables, cereal products, etc. ranging from 0.09 ng kg(-1) whole weight for milk to 59.3 ng kg(-1) whole weight for fish, for the sum of the measured PCNs. The most frequently detected congeners were PCNs 66/67, PCN 52, and PCN 73. The highest concentrations were observed in fish, which generally showed congener profiles that reflect some commercial mixtures. The data compares well with other recently reported data for Western Europe. The dioxin-like toxicity (PCN TEQ) associated with these concentrations is lower than that reported for chlorinated dioxins or PCBs in food from Ireland. The dietary exposure of the Irish adult population to PCNs was calculated following a probabilistic approach, using the full dataset of occurrence and current consumption data. The estimates of dietary intakes at approximately 0.14 pg TEQ kg bw(-1) month(-1) for adults on an average diet, reflects the relatively lower occurrence levels. PMID:21783225

  5. Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) in Irish foods: Occurrence and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A R; Tlustos, C; Rose, M; Smith, F; Carr, M; Panton, S

    2011-10-01

    The concentrations of selected polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners (PCNs 52, 53, 66/67, 68, 69, 71/72, 73, 74 and 75) were determined in 100 commonly consumed foods, in the first study on occurrence of these contaminants in the Republic of Ireland. Congener selection was based on current knowledge on PCN occurrence and toxicology, and the availability of reliable reference standards. The determinations were carried out using validated analytical methodology based on 13C10 labelled internal standardisation and measurement by HRGC-HRMS. The results showed PCN occurrence in the majority of studied foods--milk, fish, dairy and meat products, eggs, animal fat, shellfish, offal, vegetables, cereal products, etc. ranging from 0.09 ng kg(-1) whole weight for milk to 59.3 ng kg(-1) whole weight for fish, for the sum of the measured PCNs. The most frequently detected congeners were PCNs 66/67, PCN 52, and PCN 73. The highest concentrations were observed in fish, which generally showed congener profiles that reflect some commercial mixtures. The data compares well with other recently reported data for Western Europe. The dioxin-like toxicity (PCN TEQ) associated with these concentrations is lower than that reported for chlorinated dioxins or PCBs in food from Ireland. The dietary exposure of the Irish adult population to PCNs was calculated following a probabilistic approach, using the full dataset of occurrence and current consumption data. The estimates of dietary intakes at approximately 0.14 pg TEQ kg bw(-1) month(-1) for adults on an average diet, reflects the relatively lower occurrence levels.

  6. Using dietary exposure and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling in human risk extrapolations for acrylamide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Doerge, Daniel R; Young, John F; Chen, James J; Dinovi, Michael J; Henry, Sara H

    2008-08-13

    The discovery of acrylamide (AA) in many common cooked starchy foods has presented significant challenges to toxicologists, food scientists, and national regulatory and public health organizations because of the potential for producing neurotoxicity and cancer. This paper reviews some of the underlying experimental bases for AA toxicity and earlier risk assessments. Then, dietary exposure modeling is used to estimate probable AA intake in the U.S. population, and physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD) modeling is used to integrate the findings of rodent neurotoxicity and cancer into estimates of risks from human AA exposure through the diet. The goal of these modeling techniques is to reduce the uncertainty inherent in extrapolating toxicological findings across species and dose by comparing common exposure biomarkers. PBPK/PD modeling estimated population-based lifetime excess cancer risks from average AA consumption in the diet in the range of 1-4 x 10 (-4); however, modeling did not support a link between dietary AA exposure and human neurotoxicity because marginal exposure ratios were 50-300 lower than in rodents. In addition, dietary exposure modeling suggests that because AA is found in so many common foods, even big changes in concentration for single foods or groups of foods would probably have a small impact on overall population-based intake and risk. These results suggest that a more holistic analysis of dietary cancer risks may be appropriate, by which potential risks from AA should be considered in conjunction with other risks and benefits from foods. PMID:18624435

  7. Exposure to media predicts use of dietary supplements and anabolic-androgenic steroids among Flemish adolescent boys.

    PubMed

    Frison, Eline; Vandenbosch, Laura; Eggermont, Steven

    2013-10-01

    This study examined whether different types of media affect the use of dietary proteins and amino acid supplements, and intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids. A random sample of 618 boys aged 11-18 years from eight schools in the Flemish part of Belgium completed standardized questionnaires as part of the Media and Adolescent Health Study. The survey measured exposure to sports media, appearance-focused media, fitness media, use of dietary supplements, and intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids. Data were analyzed using logistic regressions and are presented as adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI); 8.6 % indicated to have used dietary proteins, 3.9 % indicated to have used amino acid supplements, and 11.8 % would consider using anabolic-androgenic steroids. After adjusting for fitness activity, exposure to fitness media was associated with the use of dietary proteins (OR = 7.24, CI = 2.25-23.28) and amino acid supplements (5.16, 1.21-21.92; 44.30, 8.25-238). Intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids was associated with exposure to fitness media (2.38, 1.08-5.26; 8.07, 2.55-25.53) and appearance-focused media (6.02, 1.40-25.82; 8.94, 1.78-44.98). Sports media did not correlate with the use of dietary supplements and intent to use anabolic-androgenic steroids. Specific types of media are strong predictors of the use of supplements in adolescent boys. This provides an opportunity for intervention and prevention through the selection of fitness media as a communication channel. Health practitioners should also be aware that the contemporary body culture exerts pressure not only on girls but also on boys.

  8. Resistance of developing honeybee larvae during chronic exposure to dietary nicotine.

    PubMed

    Human, H; Archer, C R; du Rand, E E; Pirk, C W W; Nicolson, S W

    2014-10-01

    The effects of pesticides on honeybee larvae are less understood than for adult bees, even though larvae are chronically exposed to pesticide residues that accumulate in comb and food stores in the hive. We investigated how exposure to a plant alkaloid, nicotine, affects survival, growth and body composition of honeybee larvae. Larvae of Apis mellifera scutellata were reared in vitro and fed throughout development on standard diets with nicotine included at concentrations from 0 to 1000μg/100g diet. Overall mortality across all nicotine treatments was low, averaging 9.8% at the prepupal stage and 18.1% at the white-eyed pupal stage, but survival was significantly reduced by nicotine. The mass of prepupae and white-eyed pupae was not affected by nicotine. In terms of body composition, nicotine affected water content but did not influence either protein or lipid stores of white-eyed pupae. We attribute the absence of consistent negative effects of dietary nicotine to detoxification mechanisms in developing honeybees, which enable them to resist both natural and synthetic xenobiotics. PMID:24819201

  9. Resistance of developing honeybee larvae during chronic exposure to dietary nicotine.

    PubMed

    Human, H; Archer, C R; du Rand, E E; Pirk, C W W; Nicolson, S W

    2014-10-01

    The effects of pesticides on honeybee larvae are less understood than for adult bees, even though larvae are chronically exposed to pesticide residues that accumulate in comb and food stores in the hive. We investigated how exposure to a plant alkaloid, nicotine, affects survival, growth and body composition of honeybee larvae. Larvae of Apis mellifera scutellata were reared in vitro and fed throughout development on standard diets with nicotine included at concentrations from 0 to 1000μg/100g diet. Overall mortality across all nicotine treatments was low, averaging 9.8% at the prepupal stage and 18.1% at the white-eyed pupal stage, but survival was significantly reduced by nicotine. The mass of prepupae and white-eyed pupae was not affected by nicotine. In terms of body composition, nicotine affected water content but did not influence either protein or lipid stores of white-eyed pupae. We attribute the absence of consistent negative effects of dietary nicotine to detoxification mechanisms in developing honeybees, which enable them to resist both natural and synthetic xenobiotics.

  10. Toxicity of 2,4,4{prime}-trichlorobiphenyl in rats following 90-day dietary exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, I.; Villeneuve, D.C.; Yagminas, A.; Lecavalier, P.; Poon, R.

    1996-10-25

    The toxicity of 2,4,4{prime}-trichlorobiphenyl (PCB 28) was investigated in rats after a 90-d dietary exposure. Groups of 10 male and 10 female weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were administered PCB 28 in the diet at 0, 0.05, 0.50, 5.0, or 50.0 ppm for 13 wk. Growth rate and food consumption were not affected by treatment, and no clinical signs of toxicity were observed. Mottled liver was noted in both control and PCB-treated males, but was found with increased incidence in the highest treatment group. Increased urinary ascorbic acid and hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity were observed in the 50.0 ppm group of both sexes. The vitamin A content in liver, lung, and kidney was not significantly affected by treatment. Analysis of brain biogenic amines showed a decreased dopamine concentration in the substantial nigra region of female rats receiving 0.5 ppm PCB 28 and higher doses. Female rats appeared top be more sensitive than males to the neurochemical effects of PCB 28. Dose-dependent histologic changes were observed in the thyroid and liver, with biologically significant changes occurring at 5.0 ppm and above. Based on these data, the no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for this PCB congener was considered to be 0.5 ppm in diet or 36 {mu}g/kg body weight/d. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Toxicological effects of short-term dietary acrylamide exposure in male F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Raju, Jayadev; Roberts, Jennifer; Taylor, Marnie; Patry, Dominique; Chomyshyn, Emily; Caldwell, Don; Cooke, Gerard; Mehta, Rekha

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that acrylamide, a known rodent and probable human carcinogen, does not increase the risk of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced rat colon precancerous lesions when administered through the diet. Here, we present toxicological data from non-AOM-injected rats. Briefly, male F344 rats were randomized into four dietary groups and received experimental diets based on AIN-93G formulation and containing acrylamide at 0 (control), 5, 10 or 50mg/kg diet (wt/wt) ad libitum for 10 weeks, after which they were killed and their blood collected for hematological and biochemical markers. Acrylamide at the higher doses (10 and 50mg/kg diet) significantly lowered (p<0.05) serum total high density lipoprotein and total testosterone and increased serum lipase in comparison to the control. Blood hematocrit values and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower (p<0.05) in the high dose acrylamide (50mg/kg diet) group compared to control, with a concomitant decrease in hemoglobin level, mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. These results provide additional hazard characterization data and strengthen the notion that at high doses, acrylamide may involve systemic toxicity potentiating tumorigenesis in experimental animals. Further studies are required to understand the health effects of food-borne acrylamide, especially at the lower exposures typified by human diets.

  12. Long-term dietary exposure to lead in young European children: comparing a pan-European approach with a national exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Boon, P E; Te Biesebeek, J D; Sioen, I; Huybrechts, I; Moschandreas, J; Ruprich, J; Turrini, A; Azpiri, M; Busk, L; Christensen, T; Kersting, M; Lafay, L; Liukkonen, K-H; Papoutsou, S; Serra-Majem, L; Traczyk, I; De Henauw, S; Van Klaveren, J D

    2012-01-01

    Long-term dietary exposures to lead in young children were calculated by combining food consumption data of 11 European countries categorised using harmonised broad food categories with occurrence data on lead from different Member States (pan-European approach). The results of the assessment in children living in the Netherlands were compared with a long-term lead intake assessment in the same group using Dutch lead concentration data and linking the consumption and concentration data at the highest possible level of detail. Exposures obtained with the pan-European approach were higher than the national exposure calculations. For both assessments cereals contributed most to the exposure. The lower dietary exposure in the national study was due to the use of lower lead concentrations and a more optimal linkage of food consumption and concentration data. When a pan-European approach, using a harmonised food categorisation system and "European" concentration data, results in a possible health risk related to the intake of an environmental chemical for a certain country, it is advisable to refine this assessment, as part of a tiered approach, using national occurrence data, including an optimised linkage between foods analysed and consumed for that country. In the case of lack of occurrence data, these data can be supplemented with data from the "European" concentration database or by generating additional concentration data at country level. PMID:22950755

  13. An adaptable internal dose model for risk assessment of dietary and soil dioxin exposures in young children.

    PubMed

    Kerger, Brent D; Leung, Hon-Wing; Scott, Paul K; Paustenbach, Dennis J

    2007-11-01

    An adaptable model is presented for assessing the blood lipid concentrations of polychlorodibenzodioxins and polychlorodibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from dietary (breast milk, formula, milk, and other foods) and soil pathway exposures (soil ingestion and dermal contact) utilizing age-specific exposure and intake estimates for young children. The approach includes a simple one-compartment (adipose volume) toxicokinetic model that incorporates empirical data on age-dependent half-lives and bioavailability of PCDD/F congeners, child body size and intake rates, and recent data on breast milk and food dioxin levels. Users can enter site-specific soil concentration data on 2,3,7,8-chlorinated PCDD/F congeners for specific assessment of body burden changes from soil pathways in combination with background dietary exposures from birth through age 7 years. The model produces a profile of the estimated PCDD/F concentration in blood lipid (in World Health Organization 1998 dioxin toxic equivalents) versus time for a child from birth through age 7 years. The peak and time-weighted average (TWA) internal dose (defined as blood lipid dioxin toxic equivalents) for a variety of specific child exposure assumptions can then be compared to safe internal dose benchmarks for risk assessment purposes, similar to an approach taken by United States Environmental Protection Agency for assessing child lead exposures. We conclude that this adaptable toxicokinetic model can provide a more comprehensive assessment of potential health risks of PCDD/Fs to children because it integrates recent empirical findings on PCDD/F kinetics in humans and allows users to assess contributions from varied dietary and site-specific environmental exposure assumptions.

  14. Individual and combined effects of heat stress and aqueous or dietary copper exposure in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas).

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Dominique; Pierron, Fabien; Couture, Patrice

    2011-07-01

    Despite its role as an essential micronutrient, copper (Cu) can be present in aquatic ecosystems at concentrations able to cause adverse health effects on aquatic organisms. Although Cu is acquired by fish by either water or diet, studies that have investigated Cu impacts in fish have mainly focused on the toxicity of waterborne Cu. Moreover, as the majority of experiments were carried out under simplified conditions, little is known about the effects of natural factors other than competitive ions on Cu toxicity in fish. As temperature is a primary factor that affects the physiological state of poikilotherm organisms, we investigated the individual and combined effects of temperature and waterborne or dietary Cu on fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of waterborne or dietary Cu at 20 °C and 32 °C. Transcriptional and enzymatic responses of various indicators of metabolic capacities as well as indicators of heat, oxidative and metal stresses were measured in fish muscle. Under our experimental conditions, temperature was the most important factor affecting the general condition of fish. Although no significant Cu accumulation was observed in the muscle of Cu-exposed fish, at 20 °C, waterborne and dietary Cu triggered significant changes in the transcription level of genes encoding for proteins involved in energy metabolism, metal detoxification and protein protection. Moreover, the response was quantitatively more important for dietary Cu than for waterborne Cu. Combined exposure to heat and Cu triggered the most significant changes in gene transcription levels and enzyme activities. During combined exposure to heat and Cu, in addition to synergistic effects of the two factors, both waterborne and dietary Cu impaired the adaptive response developed by fish to curb heat stress. Reciprocally, temperature impaired the adaptive response developed by fish to combat Cu toxicity. These results suggest that

  15. Effect of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk protein on antigen-specific and nonspecific cellular proliferation in mice.

    PubMed

    Brix, Susanne; Magyar, Orit H; Barkholt, Vibeke; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2005-05-01

    The impact of dietary components on the immune system is gaining increased attention in the effort to develop safe food products, some even with health-promoting potential, as well as to improve the basic understanding of the immunomodulatory potential of common food components. In such studies, which are mainly based on experiments in vitro, it is important to be able to differentiate nonspecific activation of immune cells induced by dietary components from ex vivo restimulation of antigen-specific cells that might be present in cell cultures owing to prior dietary exposure to the antigens in cell donors. Focusing on the immunostimulatory potential of cows' milk proteins and peptides, we studied the impact of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk on proliferation of murine immune cells upon ex vivo stimulation with bovine milk proteins. Nonspecific proliferation induced by beta-casein peptides was further assessed on cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Regarding the dietary effect, we found that prior oral intake of cows' milk proteins affected cell proliferation induced by culturing with cows' milk proteins in vitro, as spleen cells from mice fed a milk-containing diet showed a significantly greater proliferative response than did cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Studies of immune enhancing potentials of beta-casein peptides showed that some peptides stimulate proliferation of immune cells nonspecifically. In conclusion, these findings stress the importance of employing immune cells from mice unexposed to cows' milk for studies of the immunomodulating capacity of cows' milk proteins and peptides, in order to rule out the interference caused by antigen-specific immune responses. By using such cells, we here show that some beta-casein peptides possess the potential to induce proliferation in immune cells in a nonspecific manner. PMID:15909688

  16. A semi-probabilistic modelling approach for the estimation of dietary exposure to phthalates in the Belgian adult population.

    PubMed

    Fierens, T; Standaert, A; Cornelis, C; Sioen, I; De Henauw, S; Willems, H; Bellemans, M; De Maeyer, M; Van Holderbeke, M

    2014-12-01

    In this study, a semi-probabilistic modelling approach was applied for the estimation of the long-term human dietary exposure to phthalates--one of world's most used families of plasticisers. Four phthalate compounds were considered: diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), benzylbutyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Intake estimates were calculated for the Belgian adult population and several subgroups of this population for two considered scenarios using an extended version of the EN-forc model. The highest intake rates were found for DEHP, followed by DnBP, BBP and DEP. In the Belgian adult population, men and young adults generally had the highest dietary phthalate intake estimates. Nevertheless, predicted dietary intake rates for all four investigated phthalates were far below the corresponding tolerable daily intake (TDI) values (i.e. P99 intake values were 6.4% of the TDI at most), which is reassuring because adults are also exposed to phthalates via other contamination pathways (e.g. dust ingestion and inhalation). The food groups contributing most to the dietary exposure were grains and grain-based products for DEP, milk and dairy products for DnBP, meat and meat products or grains and grain-based products (depending on the scenario) for BBP and meat and meat products for DEHP. Comparison of the predicted intake results based on modelled phthalate concentrations in food products with intake estimates from other surveys (mostly based on measured concentrations) showed that the extended version of the EN-forc model is a suitable semi-probabilistic tool for the estimation and evaluation of the long-term dietary intake of phthalates in humans.

  17. USE OF PHARMACOKINETIC MODELING FOR DIETARY EXPOSURE STUDY DESIGN AND MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has been shown that young children have potentially higher dietary pesticide intake when they handle foods while eating. Foods become contaminated with pesticides from "dirty" hands and home surfaces. A dietary intake model has been developed to estimate the potential increa...

  18. Silver bioaccumulation dynamics in a freshwater invertebrate after aqueous and dietary exposures to nanosized and ionic Ag

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    le Croteau, Marie-Noe; Misra, Superb K.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    We compared silver (Ag) bioavailability and toxicity to a freshwater gastropod after exposure to ionic silver (Ag+) and to Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) capped with citrate or with humic acid. Silver form, exposure route, and capping agent influence Ag bioaccumulation dynamics in Lymnaea stagnalis. Snails efficiently accumulated Ag from all forms after either aqueous or dietary exposure. For both exposure routes, uptake rates were faster for Ag+ than for Ag NPs. Snails efficiently assimilated Ag from Ag NPs mixed with diatoms (assimilation efficiency (AE) ranged from 49 to 58%) and from diatoms pre-exposed to Ag+ (AE of 73%). In the diet, Ag NPs damaged digestion. Snails ate less and inefficiently processed the ingested food, which adversely impacted their growth. Loss rates of Ag were faster after waterborne exposure to Ag NPs than after exposure to dissolved Ag+. Once Ag was taken up from diet, whether from Ag+ or Ag NPs, Ag was lost extremely slowly. Large Ag body concentrations are thus expected in L. stagnalis after dietborne exposures, especially to citrate-capped Ag NPs. Ingestion of Ag associated with particulate materials appears as the most important vector of uptake. Nanosilver exposure from food might trigger important environmental risks.

  19. Assessment of dietary exposure to trace metals in Baffin Inuit food.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H M; Kim, C; Khoday, K; Receveur, O; Kuhnlein, H V

    1995-01-01

    Chronic metal toxicity is a concern in the Canadian Arctic because of the findings of high metal levels in wildlife animals and the fact that traditional food constitutes a major component of the diet of indigenous peoples. We examined exposure to trace metals through traditional food resources for Inuit living in the community of Qikiqtarjuaq on Baffin Island in the eastern Arctic. Mercury, cadmium, and lead were determined in local food resources as normally prepared and eaten. Elevated concentrations of mercury ( > 50 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, narwhal mattak, beluga meat, and beluga mattak, and relatively high concentrations of cadmium and lead ( > 100 micrograms/100 g) were found in ringed seal liver, mussels, and kelp. Quantified dietary recalls taken seasonally reflected normal consumption patterns of these food resources by adult men and women ( > 20 years old) and children (3-12 years old). Based on traditional food consumption, the average daily intake levels of total mercury for both adults (65 micrograms for women and 97 micrograms for men) and children (38 micrograms) were higher than the Canadian average value (16 micrograms). The average weekly intake of mercury for all age groups exceeded the intake guidelines (5.0 micrograms/kg/day) established by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives and Contaminants. The primary foods that contributed to metal intake for the Baffin Inuit were ringed seal meat, caribou meat, and kelp. We review the superior nutritional benefits and potential health risks of traditional food items and implications for monitoring metal contents of food, clinical symptoms, and food use. Images Figure 1. PMID:7588487

  20. Occurrence of parabens in foodstuffs from China and its implications for human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunyang; Chen, Lingxin; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-07-01

    Parabens are alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid and are used as antimicrobial preservatives in a range of consumer products, including cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and foodstuffs. Despite their widespread use, prior to this study, paraben concentrations in foodstuffs from China and human dietary exposure to these chemicals have been unknown. In this study, concentrations of six parabens were determined in 13 categories of food samples (n=282), including cereals and cereal products, meat, fish and seafood, eggs, dairy products, bean products, fruits, vegetables, cookies, beverages, cooking oils, condiments, and others, collected from nine cities in China. Almost all (detection rate: 99%) food samples contained at least one of the parabens analyzed, and the total concentrations (ΣParabens; sum of six parabens) ranged from below limit of quantification (LOQ) to 2530ng/g fresh weight, with an overall mean value of 39.3ng/g. Methyl paraben (MeP), ethyl paraben (EtP), and propyl paraben (PrP) were the major paraben analogs found in foodstuffs, and these compounds accounted for 59%, 24%, and 10%, respectively, of ΣParaben concentrations. Although the mean concentrations of ΣParabens varied among different categories of food items (from 0.839ng/g in beverages to 100ng/g in vegetables), the concentrations were not statistically significant among the 13 food categories, including canned foodstuffs. Estimated daily intake (EDI) of parabens was based on the measured concentrations in foods and the corresponding daily food ingestion rates. The mean and 95th percentile values for EDI were 1010 and 3040ng/kg body weight (bw)/day for adult men and 1060 and 3170ng/kg bw/day for adult women, respectively.

  1. Occurrence of and dietary exposure to parabens in foodstuffs from the United States.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chunyang; Liu, Fang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-04-16

    Parabens are esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid and are widely used as preservatives in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, foodstuffs, including beverages. Information on the occurrence of parabens in foodstuffs and dietary exposure of humans to these chemicals is not available. In this study, food samples (n = 267) collected from Albany, New York, United States, were grouped into eight categories, namely, beverages, dairy products, fats and oils, fish and shellfish, grains, meat, fruits, and vegetables, and analyzed for five parabens by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The majority (>90%) of food samples contained measurable concentrations of parabens, and the total concentrations (Σparabens; sum of five parabens) ranged from below the limit of quantitation to 409 ng/g fresh weight (mean: 9.67 ng/g; median: 0.92 ng/g). Methyl-, ethyl-, and propyl-parabens were the predominant compounds, accounting for ∼90% of the total concentrations. Butyl- and benzyl-parabens were less frequently detected. There were no significant differences in paraben concentrations among the eight food categories, including the canned foods. On the basis of the concentrations measured and per capita daily ingestion rates of foods, we estimated the daily intake (EDI; ng/kg of body weight (bw)/day)) of parabens through food ingestion. The EDI values of total parabens (calculated from the mean concentrations measured and the mean daily ingestion rates of food items) were 940, 879, 470, 273, and 307 ng/kg bw/day for infants, toddlers, children, teenagers, and adults, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the occurrence of parabens in foodstuffs.

  2. Natural Occurrence of Alternaria Toxins in Wheat-Based Products and Their Dietary Exposure in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Shao, Bing; Yang, Dajin; Li, Fengqin; Zhu, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    A total of 181 wheat flour and 142 wheat-based foods including dried noodle, steamed bread and bread collected in China were analyzed for alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), tentoxin (TEN) and tenuazonic acid (TeA) by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. TeA was the predominant toxin found in 99.4% wheat flour samples at levels ranging from 1.76 μg/kg to 520 μg/kg. TEN was another Alternaria toxin frequently detected in wheat flour samples (97.2%) at levels between 2.72 μg/kg and 129 μg/kg. AOH and AME were detected in 11 (6.1%) samples at levels ranging from 16.0 μg/kg to 98.7 μg/kg (AOH) and in 165 (91.2%) samples with a range between 0.320 μg/kg and 61.8 μg/kg (AME). AOH was quantified at higher levels than AME with the ratio of AOH/AME ranging from 1.0 to 3.7. Significant linear regressions of correlation in toxin concentrations were observed between AOH and AME, AME and TeA, TEN and TeA, AOH+AME and TeA. At an average and 95th percentile, dietary exposure to AOH and AME in the Chinese general population and different age subgroups exceeded the relevant threshold value of toxicological concern (TTC), with the highest exposure found in children which deserves human health concern. TEN and TeA seem unlikely to be health concerns for the Chinese via wheat-based products but attention should be paid to synergistic or additive effects of TeA with AOH, AME, TEN and a further assessment will be performed once more data on toxicity-guided fractionation of the four toxins are available. It is necessary to conduct a systemic surveillance of Alternaria toxins in raw and processed foods in order to provide the scientific basis for making regulations on these toxins in China.

  3. Natural Occurrence of Alternaria Toxins in Wheat-Based Products and Their Dietary Exposure in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Shao, Bing; Yang, Dajin; Li, Fengqin; Zhu, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    A total of 181 wheat flour and 142 wheat-based foods including dried noodle, steamed bread and bread collected in China were analyzed for alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), tentoxin (TEN) and tenuazonic acid (TeA) by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. TeA was the predominant toxin found in 99.4% wheat flour samples at levels ranging from 1.76 μg/kg to 520 μg/kg. TEN was another Alternaria toxin frequently detected in wheat flour samples (97.2%) at levels between 2.72 μg/kg and 129 μg/kg. AOH and AME were detected in 11 (6.1%) samples at levels ranging from 16.0 μg/kg to 98.7 μg/kg (AOH) and in 165 (91.2%) samples with a range between 0.320 μg/kg and 61.8 μg/kg (AME). AOH was quantified at higher levels than AME with the ratio of AOH/AME ranging from 1.0 to 3.7. Significant linear regressions of correlation in toxin concentrations were observed between AOH and AME, AME and TeA, TEN and TeA, AOH+AME and TeA. At an average and 95th percentile, dietary exposure to AOH and AME in the Chinese general population and different age subgroups exceeded the relevant threshold value of toxicological concern (TTC), with the highest exposure found in children which deserves human health concern. TEN and TeA seem unlikely to be health concerns for the Chinese via wheat-based products but attention should be paid to synergistic or additive effects of TeA with AOH, AME, TEN and a further assessment will be performed once more data on toxicity-guided fractionation of the four toxins are available. It is necessary to conduct a systemic surveillance of Alternaria toxins in raw and processed foods in order to provide the scientific basis for making regulations on these toxins in China. PMID:26121047

  4. Natural Occurrence of Alternaria Toxins in Wheat-Based Products and Their Dietary Exposure in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Shao, Bing; Yang, Dajin; Li, Fengqin; Zhu, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    A total of 181 wheat flour and 142 wheat-based foods including dried noodle, steamed bread and bread collected in China were analyzed for alternariol (AOH), alternariol monomethyl ether (AME), tentoxin (TEN) and tenuazonic acid (TeA) by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. TeA was the predominant toxin found in 99.4% wheat flour samples at levels ranging from 1.76 μg/kg to 520 μg/kg. TEN was another Alternaria toxin frequently detected in wheat flour samples (97.2%) at levels between 2.72 μg/kg and 129 μg/kg. AOH and AME were detected in 11 (6.1%) samples at levels ranging from 16.0 μg/kg to 98.7 μg/kg (AOH) and in 165 (91.2%) samples with a range between 0.320 μg/kg and 61.8 μg/kg (AME). AOH was quantified at higher levels than AME with the ratio of AOH/AME ranging from 1.0 to 3.7. Significant linear regressions of correlation in toxin concentrations were observed between AOH and AME, AME and TeA, TEN and TeA, AOH+AME and TeA. At an average and 95th percentile, dietary exposure to AOH and AME in the Chinese general population and different age subgroups exceeded the relevant threshold value of toxicological concern (TTC), with the highest exposure found in children which deserves human health concern. TEN and TeA seem unlikely to be health concerns for the Chinese via wheat-based products but attention should be paid to synergistic or additive effects of TeA with AOH, AME, TEN and a further assessment will be performed once more data on toxicity-guided fractionation of the four toxins are available. It is necessary to conduct a systemic surveillance of Alternaria toxins in raw and processed foods in order to provide the scientific basis for making regulations on these toxins in China. PMID:26121047

  5. The bioaccumulation and effects of selenium in the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus via dissolved and dietary exposure routes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lingtian; Wu, Xing; Chen, Hongxing; Luo, Yongju; Guo, Zhongbao; Mu, Jingli; Blankson, Emmanuel R; Dong, Wu; Klerks, Paul L

    2016-09-01

    Aquatic organisms take up selenium from solution and from their diets. Many questions remain regarding the relative importance of selenium accumulation from these sources and resulting effects in benthic invertebrates. The present study addressed the toxicity and accumulation of Se via dissolved and dietary exposures to three different Se species, in the freshwater oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus. Worms were exposed to 20μg/g dry weight of selenite (Se(IV)), selenate (Se(VI)), or seleno-l-methionine (Se-Met) in their diet (sediment) or to 15μg/L dissolved Se in water-only exposures. While the dissolved and sediment Se levels differed greatly, such levels may co-occur at a Se-contaminated site. Se accumulation, worm population growth, lipid peroxidation (as TBARS), and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity were quantified at the end of the 2-week exposure. The sediment Se-Met exposure caused 100% mortality, while worm densities were reduced by the other exposures except the Se(VI) one. Se bioaccumulation was generally higher for the sediment-Se exposure than the dissolved-Se ones, and was higher for Se(IV) than Se(VI) in the dissolved-Se exposure but not the sediment-Se one. The Se accumulation was highest for Se-Met. The oligochaetes that accumulated Se had higher levels of lipid peroxidation and reduced Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity. The present study's findings of differences in Se accumulation and toxicity for the three Se species, with effects generally but not exclusively a function of Se body burdens, underscore the need for research on these issues in invertebrates. Moreover, the results imply that the dietary uptake route is the predominant one for Se accumulation in L. variegatus. PMID:27450235

  6. Probabilistic acute dietary exposure assessments to captan and tolylfluanid using several European food consumption and pesticide concentration databases.

    PubMed

    Boon, Polly E; Svensson, Kettil; Moussavian, Shahnaz; van der Voet, Hilko; Petersen, Annette; Ruprich, Jiri; Debegnach, Francesca; de Boer, Waldo J; van Donkersgoed, Gerda; Brera, Carlo; van Klaveren, Jacob D; Busk, Leif

    2009-12-01

    Probabilistic dietary acute exposure assessments of captan and tolylfluanid were performed for the populations of the Czech Republic, Denmark, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden. The basis for these assessments was national databases for food consumption and pesticide concentration data harmonised at the level of raw agricultural commodity. Data were obtained from national food consumption surveys and national monitoring programmes and organised in an electronic platform of databases connected to probabilistic software. The exposure assessments were conducted by linking national food consumption data either (1) to national pesticide concentration data or (2) to a pooled database containing all national pesticide concentration data. We show that with this tool national exposure assessments can be performed in a harmonised way and that pesticide concentrations of other countries can be linked to national food consumption surveys. In this way it is possible to exchange or merge concentration data between countries in situations of data scarcity. This electronic platform in connection with probabilistic software can be seen as a prototype of a data warehouse, including a harmonised approach for dietary exposure modelling.

  7. Effects of lead exposure before pregnancy and dietary calcium during pregnancy on fetal development and lead accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Han, S; Pfizenmaier, D H; Garcia, E; Eguez, M L; Ling, M; Kemp, F W; Bogden, J D

    2000-01-01

    Millions of women of child-bearing age have substantial bone lead stores due to lead exposure as children. Dietary calcium ingested simultaneously with lead exposure can reduce lead absorption and accumulation. However, the effects of dietary calcium on previously accumulated maternal lead stores and transfer to the fetus have not been investigated. We studied the effects of lead exposure of female rats at an early age on fetal development during a subsequent pregnancy. We gave 5-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats lead as the acetate in their drinking water for 5 weeks; controls received equimolar sodium acetate. This was followed by a 1-month period without lead exposure before mating. We randomly assigned pregnant rats (n = 39) to diets with a deficient (0.1%) or normal (0.5%) calcium content during pregnancy. A total of 345 pups were delivered alive. Lead-exposed dams and their pups had significantly higher blood lead concentrations than controls, but the concentrations were in the range of those found in many pregnant women. Pups born to dams fed the calcium-deficient diet during pregnancy had higher blood and organ lead concentrations than pups born to dams fed the 0. 5% calcium diet. Pups born to lead-exposed dams had significantly (p<0.0001) lower mean birth weights and birth lengths than controls. There were significant inverse univariate associations between dam or pup organ lead concentrations and birth weight or length. The 0.5% calcium diet did not increase in utero growth. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that greater litter size and female sex were significantly associated with reduced pup birth weight and length. However, lead exposure that ended well before pregnancy was significantly (p<0.0001) associated with reduced birth weight and length, even after litter size, pup sex, and dam weight gain during pregnancy were included in the regression analysis. The data demonstrate that an increase in dietary calcium during pregnancy can reduce

  8. USE OF A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED TOXICOKINETIC MODEL TO SIMULATE CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE IN FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model was developed to describe dietary uptake of hydrophobic organic chemicals by fish. The GI tract was modeled as four compartments corresponding to the stomach, pyloric ceca, upper intestine, and lower intestine. Partitioning coeff...

  9. Dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins from infancy until adulthood: A comparison between breast-feeding, toddler, and long-term exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Patandin, S; Dagnelie, P C; Mulder, P G; Op de Coul, E; van der Veen, J E; Weisglas-Kuperus, N; Sauer, P J

    1999-01-01

    Food is the major source for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and dioxin accumulation in the human body. Therefore, investigating food habits from early ages until reproductive age (25 years) is important in order to assess exposure risk for the next generation. The objective of this study was to assess the PCB/dioxin exposure and the relative contribution of different foods to total exposure during preschool age. Particularly, the importance of lactational PCB/dioxin exposure vs. dietary exposure until adulthood was investigated. A cohort of 207 children was studied from birth until preschool age. Based on 3 planar PCBs and 17 2,3,7,8-substituted dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) measured in breast milk, a model was developed to calculate the cumulative toxic equivalent (TEQ) intake during breast-feeding (0-1 year). In 3. 5-year-old children, daily dietary intake of planar PCB-TEQ and dioxin-TEQ was measured with a validated food questionnaire. Cumulative TEQ intake from 1 to 5 years was estimated using the PCB- and dioxin-TEQ intake measured with the food questionnaire. Cumulative TEQ intake from 6 to 25 years was estimated using national food consumption and contamination data of PCB- and dioxin-TEQ intake. In toddlers, dairy products contributed 43% to PCB-TEQ and 50% to dioxin-TEQ intake. Meat and meat products contributed 14% and 19%, respectively, and processed foods 23% and 15%, respectively. Breast-feeding for 6 months contributed to the cumulative PCB/dioxin TEQ intake until 25 years of age, 12% in boys and 14% in girls. The daily TEQ intake per kilogram body weight is 50 times higher in breast-fed infants and three times higher in toddlers than in adults. Long-term dietary exposure to PCBs and dioxins in men and women is partly due to breast-feeding (12 and 14%, respectively). After weaning, dairy products, processed foods, and meat are major contributors of PCB and dioxin accumulation until reproductive age. Instead of discouraging

  10. Long term dietary methoxychlor exposure in rats increases sodium solution consumption but has few effects on other sexually dimorphic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Flynn, K M; Delclos, K B; Newbold, R R; Ferguson, S A

    2005-09-01

    Methoxychlor is an insecticide with estrogen-like activity, thus exposure during development might cause sexually dimorphic behavioral alterations. To evaluate this, pregnant rats consumed diets containing 0, 10, 100 or 1000 ppm methoxychlor from gestational day 7, and offspring continued on these diets until postnatal day (PND) 77. Assessments of sexually dimorphic behaviors in offspring indicated that intake of a 3.0% sodium chloride solution was significantly increased (41%) in males and females of the 1000 ppm group. No treatment group differed from controls in open field nor running wheel activity, play behavior, nor 0.3% saccharin solution intake. Offspring of the 1000 ppm group showed significantly decreased body weight, reaching 17% less than controls at PND 77, but not clearly related to their salt solution intake. During pregnancy, 1000 ppm dams consumed 23% less food and weighed 10% less than controls, but this did not affect litter outcomes. These results indicate that in rodents, developmental and chronic exposure to dietary methoxychlor alters the sexually dimorphic behavior of salt-solution intake in young adults of both sexes. Similar behavioral alterations with other xenoestrogens, and the potential for interactions among xenoestrogens, suggest that this report may minimize the true effects of dietary methoxychlor exposure.

  11. Hepatic and renal trace element concentrations in American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) following chronic dietary exposure to coal fly ash contaminated prey.

    PubMed

    Tuberville, Tracey D; Scott, David E; Metts, Brian S; Finger, John W; Hamilton, Matthew T

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the propensity of crocodilians to bioaccumulate trace elements as a result of chronic dietary exposure. We exposed 36 juvenile alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) to one of four dietary treatments that varied in the relative frequency of meals containing prey from coal combustion waste (CCW)-contaminated habitats vs. prey from uncontaminated sites, and evaluated tissue residues and growth rates after 12 mo and 25 mo of exposure. Hepatic and renal concentrations of arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and selenium (Se) varied significantly among dietary treatment groups in a dose-dependent manner and were higher in kidneys than in livers. Exposure period did not affect Se or As levels but Cd levels were significantly higher after 25 mo than 12 mo of exposure. Kidney As and Se levels were negatively correlated with body size but neither growth rates nor body condition varied significantly among dietary treatment groups. Our study is among the first to experimentally examine bioaccumulation of trace element contaminants in crocodilians as a result of chronic dietary exposure. A combination of field surveys and laboratory experiments will be required to understand the effects of different exposure scenarios on tissue residues, and ultimately link these concentrations with effects on individual health. PMID:27149145

  12. Dietary exposure of 17-alpha ethinylestradiol modulates physiological endpoints and gene signaling pathways in female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Colli-Dula, Reyna-Cristina; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Kroll, Kevin J; Prucha, Melinda S; Kozuch, Marianne; Barber, David S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-11-01

    17Alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), used for birth control in humans, is a potent estrogen that is found in wastewater at low concentrations (ng/l). EE2 has the ability to interfere with the endocrine system of fish, affecting reproduction which can result in population level effects. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary exposure to EE2 would alter gene expression patterns and key pathways in the liver and ovary and whether these could be associated with reproductive endpoints in female largemouth bass during egg development. Female LMB received 70ng EE2/g feed (administered at 1% of body weight) for 60 days. EE2 dietary exposure significantly reduced plasma vitellogenin concentrations by 70%. Hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices were also decreased with EE2 feeding by 38.5% and 40%, respectively. Transcriptomic profiling revealed that there were more changes in steady state mRNA levels in the liver compared to the ovary. Genes associated with reproduction were differentially expressed, such as vitellogenin in the liver and aromatase in the gonad. In addition, a set of genes related with oxidative stress (e.g. glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase) were identified as altered in the liver and genes associated with the immune system (e.g. complement component 1, and macrophage-inducible C-type lectin) were altered in the gonad. In a follow-up study with 0.2ng EE2/g feed for 60 days, similar phenotypic and gene expression changes were observed that support these findings with the higher concentrations. This study provides new insights into how dietary exposure to EE2 interferes with endocrine signaling pathways in female LMB during a critical period of reproductive oogenesis. PMID:25203422

  13. Dietary exposure of 17-alpha ethinylestradiol modulates physiological endpoints and gene signaling pathways in female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Colli-Dula, Reyna-Cristina; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Kroll, Kevin J; Prucha, Melinda S; Kozuch, Marianne; Barber, David S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-11-01

    17Alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), used for birth control in humans, is a potent estrogen that is found in wastewater at low concentrations (ng/l). EE2 has the ability to interfere with the endocrine system of fish, affecting reproduction which can result in population level effects. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary exposure to EE2 would alter gene expression patterns and key pathways in the liver and ovary and whether these could be associated with reproductive endpoints in female largemouth bass during egg development. Female LMB received 70ng EE2/g feed (administered at 1% of body weight) for 60 days. EE2 dietary exposure significantly reduced plasma vitellogenin concentrations by 70%. Hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices were also decreased with EE2 feeding by 38.5% and 40%, respectively. Transcriptomic profiling revealed that there were more changes in steady state mRNA levels in the liver compared to the ovary. Genes associated with reproduction were differentially expressed, such as vitellogenin in the liver and aromatase in the gonad. In addition, a set of genes related with oxidative stress (e.g. glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase) were identified as altered in the liver and genes associated with the immune system (e.g. complement component 1, and macrophage-inducible C-type lectin) were altered in the gonad. In a follow-up study with 0.2ng EE2/g feed for 60 days, similar phenotypic and gene expression changes were observed that support these findings with the higher concentrations. This study provides new insights into how dietary exposure to EE2 interferes with endocrine signaling pathways in female LMB during a critical period of reproductive oogenesis.

  14. Ochratoxin A Dietary Exposure of Ten Population Groups in the Czech Republic: Comparison with Data over the World

    PubMed Central

    Ostry, Vladimir; Malir, Frantisek; Dofkova, Marcela; Skarkova, Jarmila; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Ruprich, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Ochratoxin A is a nephrotoxic and renal carcinogenic mycotoxin and is a common contaminant of various food commodities. Eighty six kinds of foodstuffs (1032 food samples) were collected in 2011–2013. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for ochratoxin A determination. Limit of quantification of the method varied between 0.01–0.2 μg/kg depending on the food matrices. The most exposed population is children aged 4–6 years old. Globally for this group, the maximum ochratoxin A dietary exposure for “average consumer” was estimated at 3.3 ng/kg bw/day (lower bound, considering the analytical values below the limit of quantification as 0) and 3.9 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound, considering the analytical values below the limit of quantification as 1/2 limit of quantification). Important sources of exposure for this latter group include grain-based products, confectionery, meat products and fruit juice. The dietary intake for “high consumers” in the group 4–6 years old was estimated from grains and grain-based products at 19.8 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound), from tea at 12.0 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound) and from confectionery at 6.5 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound). For men aged 18–59 years old beer was the main contributor with an intake of 2.60 ng/kg bw/day (“high consumers”, middle bound). Tea and grain-based products were identified to be the main contributors for dietary exposure in women aged 18–59 years old. Coffee and wine were identified as a higher contributor of the OTA intake in the population group of women aged 18–59 years old compared to the other population groups. PMID:26378578

  15. Ochratoxin A Dietary Exposure of Ten Population Groups in the Czech Republic: Comparison with Data over the World.

    PubMed

    Ostry, Vladimir; Malir, Frantisek; Dofkova, Marcela; Skarkova, Jarmila; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Ruprich, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    Ochratoxin A is a nephrotoxic and renal carcinogenic mycotoxin and is a common contaminant of various food commodities. Eighty six kinds of foodstuffs (1032 food samples) were collected in 2011-2013. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for ochratoxin A determination. Limit of quantification of the method varied between 0.01-0.2 μg/kg depending on the food matrices. The most exposed population is children aged 4-6 years old. Globally for this group, the maximum ochratoxin A dietary exposure for "average consumer" was estimated at 3.3 ng/kg bw/day (lower bound, considering the analytical values below the limit of quantification as 0) and 3.9 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound, considering the analytical values below the limit of quantification as 1/2 limit of quantification). Important sources of exposure for this latter group include grain-based products, confectionery, meat products and fruit juice. The dietary intake for "high consumers" in the group 4-6 years old was estimated from grains and grain-based products at 19.8 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound), from tea at 12.0 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound) and from confectionery at 6.5 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound). For men aged 18-59 years old beer was the main contributor with an intake of 2.60 ng/kg bw/day ("high consumers", middle bound). Tea and grain-based products were identified to be the main contributors for dietary exposure in women aged 18-59 years old. Coffee and wine were identified as a higher contributor of the OTA intake in the population group of women aged 18-59 years old compared to the other population groups. PMID:26378578

  16. Ochratoxin A Dietary Exposure of Ten Population Groups in the Czech Republic: Comparison with Data over the World.

    PubMed

    Ostry, Vladimir; Malir, Frantisek; Dofkova, Marcela; Skarkova, Jarmila; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Ruprich, Jiri

    2015-09-10

    Ochratoxin A is a nephrotoxic and renal carcinogenic mycotoxin and is a common contaminant of various food commodities. Eighty six kinds of foodstuffs (1032 food samples) were collected in 2011-2013. High-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for ochratoxin A determination. Limit of quantification of the method varied between 0.01-0.2 μg/kg depending on the food matrices. The most exposed population is children aged 4-6 years old. Globally for this group, the maximum ochratoxin A dietary exposure for "average consumer" was estimated at 3.3 ng/kg bw/day (lower bound, considering the analytical values below the limit of quantification as 0) and 3.9 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound, considering the analytical values below the limit of quantification as 1/2 limit of quantification). Important sources of exposure for this latter group include grain-based products, confectionery, meat products and fruit juice. The dietary intake for "high consumers" in the group 4-6 years old was estimated from grains and grain-based products at 19.8 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound), from tea at 12.0 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound) and from confectionery at 6.5 ng/kg bw/day (middle bound). For men aged 18-59 years old beer was the main contributor with an intake of 2.60 ng/kg bw/day ("high consumers", middle bound). Tea and grain-based products were identified to be the main contributors for dietary exposure in women aged 18-59 years old. Coffee and wine were identified as a higher contributor of the OTA intake in the population group of women aged 18-59 years old compared to the other population groups.

  17. A physiologically based toxicokinetic model for dietary uptake of hydrophobic organic compounds by fish: II. simulation of chronic exposure scenarios.

    PubMed

    Nichols, John W; Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Whiteman, Frank W

    2004-02-01

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK) model for dietary uptake of hydrophobic organic compounds by fish was used to simulate dosing scenarios commonly encountered in experimental and field studies. Simulations were initially generated for the model compound [UL-(14)C] 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl ([(14)C] PCB 52). Steady-state exposures were simulated by calculating chemical concentrations in tissues of the predator corresponding to an equilibrium distribution between the fish and water (termed the bioconcentration or BCF residue data set). This residue data set was then varied in a proportional manner until whole-body chemical concentrations exhibited no net change for each set of exposure conditions. For [(14)C] PCB 52, the proportional increase in BCF residues (termed the biomagnification factor or BMF) required to achieve steady state in a food-only exposure was 2.24, while in a combined food and water exposure the BMF was 3.11. Additional simulations for the food and water exposure scenario were obtained for a set of hypothetical organic compounds with increasing log K(OW) values. Using gut permeability coefficients determined for [(14)C] PCB 52, predicted BMFs increased with chemical log K(OW), achieving levels much higher than those reported in field sampling efforts. BMFs comparable to measured values were obtained by reducing permeability coefficients within each gut segment in a log K(OW)-dependent manner. This predicted decrease in chemical permeability is consistent with earlier work, suggesting that dietary absorption of hydrophobic compounds by fish is controlled in part by factors that vary with chemical log K(OW). Relatively low rates of metabolism or growth were shown to have a substantial impact on steady-state biomagnification of chemical residues. PMID:14657516

  18. SHEDS-HT: An Integrated Probabilistic Exposure Model for Prioritizing Exposures to Chemicals with Near-Field and Dietary Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) researchers are developing a strategy for highthroughput (HT) exposure-based prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. These novel modeling approaches for evaluating chemicals based on their potential for biologi...

  19. BIOACCUMULATION OF POPS IN FISH AND ESTIMATION OF HUMAN DIETARY EXPOSURE AND DOSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk assessment process is fundamental in understanding and controlling environmental health risks. Risk assessment includes four steps: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Exposure assessments seek to characteriz...

  20. EVALUATING EXCESS DIETARY EXPOSURE OF YOUNG CHILDREN EATING IN CONTAMINATED ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States' Food Quality Protection Act of 1996 requires more accurate assessment of children's aggregate exposures to environmental contaminants. Since children have unstructured eating behaviors, their excess exposures, caused by eating activities, becomes an importan...

  1. Accumulation and effects of Cr(VI) in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) during chronic dissolved and dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxing; Mu, Lei; Cao, Jinling; Mu, Jingli; Klerks, Paul L; Luo, Yongju; Guo, Zhongbao; Xie, Lingtian

    2016-07-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an essential metal and a nutritional supplement for both human and agricultural uses. It is also a pollutant from a variety of industrial uses. These uses can lead to elevated Cr levels in aquatic environments, where it can enter and affect aquatic organisms. Its accumulation and subsequent effects in fish have received relatively little attention, especially for chronic exposure. In the present study, Japanese medaka were chronically exposed to dissolved or dietary Cr(VI) for 3 months. Cr accumulation in liver, gills, intestine, and brain was evaluated. Effects on the antioxidant system, nervous system (acetylcholinesterase, AChE), digestive system (α-glucosidase, α-Glu), and tissue histology (liver and gills) were also assessed. Cr accumulation was observed in the intestine and liver of fish exposed to Cr-contaminated brine shrimp. However, chronic dissolved Cr exposure led to significant Cr accumulation in all organs tested. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of Cr in medaka livers revealed that 37% of the Cr was present in the heat stable protein fraction. The dissolved Cr exposure had pronounced effects on the antioxidant system in the liver, with an elevated ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and decreases in GSH and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The α-Glu activity in the intestine was significantly inhibited. In addition, Cr exposure caused histopathological alterations in the gills and liver. In general, the effects of dietary Cr were relatively minor, possible due to the much lower accumulation in the fish. Our results imply that Japanese medaka accumulate Cr mainly via uptake of dissolved Cr(VI).

  2. Waterborne and dietary hexavalent chromium exposure causes DNA-protein crosslink (DPX) formation in erythrocytes of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Kuykendall, Jim R; Miller, Kyle L; Mellinger, Kristen N; Cain, Andrew V

    2006-06-10

    Formation of DNA-protein crosslinks (DPXs) was demonstrated in erythrocytes from fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) exposed to hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a known carcinogenic and mutagenic metal contaminant of many industrial waterways. Tank water exposure of 2-3 in. fathead minnows to 2 ppm Cr(VI) led to significant DPX formation in erythrocytes, with over 140-200% elevations above background levels at 3-4 days, respectively. Largemouth bass exposed similarly were found to have 62% elevation of DPX levels after 4 days. When largemouth bass were fed a diet of minnows injected with 20 microg Cr(VI) for 5 days, a significant (p<0.01) increase of DPXs in erythrocytes was observed, with 80% elevation above erythrocytes from bass fed minnows injected only with saline. However, when largemouth bass were fed a diet exclusively of minnows exposed to 2 ppm Cr(VI) for 21 days, there was no significant difference in DPX levels compared to bass fed control (unexposed) minnows. This study provides evidence that DPX formation occurs in erythrocytes of fathead minnows exposed under controlled conditions to low ppm Cr(VI) concentrations, which is at or below concentrations previously assigned no observable effect levels. Furthermore, it appears that both waterborne and high dose dietary exposure to Cr(VI) can lead to DPX formation in erythrocytes of predatory fish species such as bass. However, it is unlikely that a bioconcentration of chromium in the food chain would be a major concern at these low ppm levels of exposure. Further, it may be difficult to achieve dietary Cr(VI) levels high enough to elicit DPXs in predatory fish under most environmental exposure scenarios.

  3. Accumulation and effects of Cr(VI) in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) during chronic dissolved and dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongxing; Mu, Lei; Cao, Jinling; Mu, Jingli; Klerks, Paul L; Luo, Yongju; Guo, Zhongbao; Xie, Lingtian

    2016-07-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an essential metal and a nutritional supplement for both human and agricultural uses. It is also a pollutant from a variety of industrial uses. These uses can lead to elevated Cr levels in aquatic environments, where it can enter and affect aquatic organisms. Its accumulation and subsequent effects in fish have received relatively little attention, especially for chronic exposure. In the present study, Japanese medaka were chronically exposed to dissolved or dietary Cr(VI) for 3 months. Cr accumulation in liver, gills, intestine, and brain was evaluated. Effects on the antioxidant system, nervous system (acetylcholinesterase, AChE), digestive system (α-glucosidase, α-Glu), and tissue histology (liver and gills) were also assessed. Cr accumulation was observed in the intestine and liver of fish exposed to Cr-contaminated brine shrimp. However, chronic dissolved Cr exposure led to significant Cr accumulation in all organs tested. Analysis of the subcellular distribution of Cr in medaka livers revealed that 37% of the Cr was present in the heat stable protein fraction. The dissolved Cr exposure had pronounced effects on the antioxidant system in the liver, with an elevated ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) and decreases in GSH and glutathione S-transferase (GST). The α-Glu activity in the intestine was significantly inhibited. In addition, Cr exposure caused histopathological alterations in the gills and liver. In general, the effects of dietary Cr were relatively minor, possible due to the much lower accumulation in the fish. Our results imply that Japanese medaka accumulate Cr mainly via uptake of dissolved Cr(VI). PMID:27162070

  4. Determinants of vitamin D status in Caucasian adults: influence of sun exposure, dietary intake, sociodemographic, lifestyle, anthropometric, and genetic factors.

    PubMed

    Touvier, Mathilde; Deschasaux, Mélanie; Montourcy, Marion; Sutton, Angela; Charnaux, Nathalie; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Assmann, Karen E; Fezeu, Léopold; Latino-Martel, Paule; Druesne-Pecollo, Nathalie; Guinot, Christiane; Latreille, Julie; Malvy, Denis; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Le Clerc, Sigrid; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Ezzedine, Khaled

    2015-02-01

    Very few studies have investigated the determinants of serum vitamin D levels using a set of variables that include simultaneously sun exposure, phototype, dietary intake, sociodemographics, anthropometric, lifestyle data, and genetic polymorphisms. Our objective was to investigate the associations between all these parameters and vitamin D status in a large sample of French adults. This cross-sectional survey was based on 1,828 middle-aged Caucasian adults from the SU.VI.MAX (SUpplémentation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants) study. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentration was lower among women (P<0.0001), older subjects (P=0.04), obese/underweight (P<0.0001), those living at higher latitudes (P<0.0001), those whose blood draw occurred in early spring (P<0.0001), less physically active (P<0.0001), with low sun exposure (P<0.0001), and with no-to-low alcohol intake (P=0.0001). Mutant GC rs4588 and rs7041 single nucleotide polymorphisms were associated with lower and higher 25OHD concentrations, respectively (P<0.0001). Dietary intake was not a major determinant of vitamin D status (P=0.7). This study provides an overall picture of determinants of vitamin D status. Several modifiable factors were identified, such as daily-life moderate sun exposure, physical activity, and normal-weight maintenance, which should be targeted by public health policies in order to improve vitamin D status in the general population, while avoiding active/intensive sun exposure, in line with recommendations for skin cancer prevention. PMID:25211176

  5. Effects of dietary 2,2', 4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) exposure in growing medaka fish (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    González-Doncel, Miguel; Carbonell, Gregoria; García-Mauriño, José Enrique; Sastre, Salvador; Beltrán, Eulalia María; Fernàndez Torija, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    In this research work, we addressed the effects of a diet fortified with BDE-47 (0, 10, 100, 1000ng/g) dosed to 4-7 day-old post-hatch medaka fish for 40 days, followed by an 80-day depuration period. BDE-47 accumulation and overall growth were evaluated throughout the dosing period, and its elimination was quantified over the following 60 days. The histological condition of the thyroid gland, liver and gonads from the 1000ng BDE-47-treated fish were assessed 5 and 70days after exposures finished. The phenotypic males to females ratio was also quantified 70days after treatments finished. Sixty days after the BDE-47 exposures, reproductive capacity (i.e. fecundity, fertility and hatchability) was evaluated in mating groups for a 20-day period. BDE-47 exposure via food from larval through juvenile life stages of medaka fish resulted in steady accumulation with time dose-dependently. This accumulation tendency rapidly decreased after dosing ended. The growth rates showed a significant increase only at the highest concentration 70days after exposures finished. The histological survey did not reveal BDE-47-related alterations in the condition of the potential target organs. However, a morphometrical approach suggested BDE-47-related differences in the thickness of the epithelium that lines thyroid follicles. The reproduction studies showed comparable values for the fecundity, fertility and hatching rates. Dietary BDE-47 dosed for 40days to growing medaka fish did not alter the phenotypic sex ratios at maturity. The dietary approach used herein could not provide conclusive evidence of effects on medaka development and thriving despite the fact that BDE-47 underwent rapid accumulation in whole fish during the 40-day treatment. PMID:27497303

  6. Community duplicate diet methodology: A new tool for estimating dietary exposure to pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    An observational field study was conducted to assess the feasibility of a community duplicate diet collection method; a dietary monitoring procedure that is population-based. The purpose was to establish an alternative procedure to duplicate diet sampling that would be more effi...

  7. Dietary exposure of Hong Kong adults to fatty acid esters of 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol.

    PubMed

    Chung, H Y; Chung, Stephen W C; Chan, B T P; Ho, Yuk Yin; Xiao, Ying

    2013-01-01

    A total of 290 individual food samples were collected in Hong Kong, China, for 3-monochloropropane-1,2-diol (3-MCPD) fatty acid esters analysis. Most samples were processed food and in ready-to-eat form. The results show that the levels of 3-MCPD fatty acid esters were high in biscuits, fats and oils, snacks and Chinese pastry with mean bound 3-MCPD levels of 440, 390, 270 and 270 μg kg⁻¹, respectively. The dietary exposures to bound 3-MCPD of average and high adult consumers were estimated to be 0.20 and 0.53 μg kg bw⁻¹ day⁻¹, respectively. The primary toxicological concern of 3-MCPD fatty acid esters is its potential to release 3-MCPD in vivo during digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. 3-MCPD would affect the kidney, the central nervous system and the male reproductive system of rats. Assuming that 100% of the 3-MCPD was released from 3-MCPD fatty acid esters by hydrolysis in the digestive system, the dietary exposures to 3-MCPD for average and high adult consumers were only 10% and 26% of the provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI) of 3-MCPD established by the Joint Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) (2 μg kg bw⁻¹ day⁻¹), respectively. The results suggest that both average and high adult consumers are unlikely to experience major toxicological effects of 3-MCPD.

  8. Health risk assessment of organochlorine pesticide exposure through dietary intake of vegetables grown in the periurban sites of Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Chourasiya, Sapna; Khillare, P S; Jyethi, Darpa Saurav

    2015-04-01

    The study investigated the levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in different types of vegetables grown in periurban area of National Capital Region (NCR), India. Vegetable sampling was carried out in winter and summer season of 2012. A total of 20 different OCPs were determined using gas chromatography (GC) assembled with electron capture detector (ECD). Obtained results showed that average levels of ∑(20)OCP ranged from 83.8 ± 25.5 ng g(-1) in smooth gourd to 222.4 ± 90.0 ng g(-1) in cauliflower. The mean concentrations of different OCPs were observed in order of ∑HCH > ∑CHLs > drins > ∑endosulfan > ∑DDT in all vegetables except in brinjal and smooth gourd. Most of the OCP residues recorded in vegetable samples exceeded the maximum residue levels (MRLs) set by international and national regulatory agencies. Health risk assessment suggests that daily dietary OCP exposure via vegetable consumption was higher for children (mean value 4.25E-05) than adults (mean value 2.19E-05). The hazard quotient (HQ) and lifetime cancer risk (LCR) estimated from dietary exposure of these vegetables were above the acceptable limit and can be considered as a serious concern for Delhi population. PMID:25384696

  9. Dietary exposure of the red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) to total and methyl mercury in Zhalong Wetland, northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinming; Ye, Yajie; Wang, Yongjie

    2014-06-01

    To determine the dietary exposure of the migratory red-crowned crane to mercury (Hg), this study analyzed the concentrations of total mercury (T-Hg) and methyl mercury (MeHg) in its prey, i.e., reeds and three aquatic animal families (Perccottus glenni Dybowski, Cybister japonicus Sharp, and Viviparidae) in northeastern China. Results indicated that the Hg concentration in Zhalong Wetland was elevated through the food chain, and the prey of the red-crowned crane contained measurable levels of T-Hg and MeHg. In prey tissues, MeHg was the main form of the Hg element and accounted for 61% of total Hg concentration in Viviparidae, 58% in C. japonicus Sharp, and 85% in P. glenni Dybowski. The highest T-Hg and MeHg concentrations ranged from 1.66 to 3.89 ppm and from 1.12 to 2.67 ppm, respectively, and they were detected in the feathers of the red-crowned cranes. The lowest T-Hg concentration was determined in the excretions of wild red-crowned cranes at 0.21 ppm; furthermore, the content of MeHg was below the detection limit. In Zhalong Wetland, the level of dietary exposure of the population of red-crowned cranes to Hg is below the threshold of Hg toxicity. Moreover, eggshells are suitable indicators of Hg risk levels to the red-crowned crane. PMID:24793423

  10. Effects of soil and dietary exposures to Ag nanoparticles and AgNO₃ in the terrestrial isopod Porcellionides pruinosus.

    PubMed

    Tourinho, Paula S; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Jurkschat, Kerstin; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Ag-NPs and AgNO3 on the isopod Porcellionides pruinosus were determined upon soil and dietary exposures. Isopods avoided Ag in soil, with EC50 values of ∼16.0 and 14.0 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. Feeding inhibition tests in soil showed EC50s for effects on consumption ratio of 127 and 56.7 mg Ag/kg, respectively. Although similar EC50s for effects on biomass were observed for nanoparticulate and ionic Ag (114 and 120 mg Ag/kg dry soil, respectively), at higher concentrations greater biomass loss was found for AgNO3. Upon dietary exposure, AgNO3 was more toxic, with EC50 for effects on biomass change being >1500 and 233 mg Ag/kg for Ag-NPs and AgNO3, respectively. The difference in toxicity between Ag-NPs and AgNO3 could not be explained from Ag body concentrations. This suggests that the relation between toxicity and bioavailability of Ag-NPs differs from that of ionic Ag in soils.

  11. Growth and reproductive effects from dietary exposure to Aroclor 1268 in mink (Neovison vison), a surrogate model for marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Remington, Richard E; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from the commercial mixture Aroclor 1268 were historically released into the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (southeastern Georgia, USA) from industrial operations. Sum PCBs (ΣPCBs) in blubber samples from Turtle-Brunswick River estuary bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have been reported at concentrations more than 10-fold higher than those observed in dolphins from adjacent regional estuaries. Given that toxicity data specific to Aroclor 1268 and applicable to marine mammals are limited, predicting the toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 in dolphins is uncertain, particularly because of its unique congener profile and associated physiochemical characteristics compared with other PCB mixtures. American mink (Neovison vison) were chosen as a surrogate model for cetaceans to develop marine mammalian PCB toxicity benchmarks. Mink are a suitable surrogate species for cetaceans in toxicity studies because of similarities in diet and taxonomic class, and a characteristic sensitivity to PCBs provides a potential safety factor when using mink toxicology data for cross-species extrapolations. Effects of dietary exposure to Aroclor 1268 on reproduction, growth, and mortality in mink were compared with both a negative control and a positive control (3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl, PCB 126). Aroclor 1268 dietary ΣPCB concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g feed wet weight to 29 µg/g feed wet weight. Whelp success was unaffected by Aroclor 1268 exposure at any level. Treatment mean litter size, kit growth, and kit survival were adversely affected relative to the negative control at dietary ΣPCB concentrations of 10.6 µg/g feed wet weight and greater. PMID:26313468

  12. Dietary Exposure of Fathead Minnows to the Explosives TNT and RDX and to the Pesticide DDT using Contaminated Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Jerre G.; Lotufo, Guilherme R.

    2005-01-01

    Explosive compounds have been released into the environment during manufacturing, handling, and usage procedures. These compounds have been found to persist in the environment and potentially promote detrimental biological effects. The lack of research on bioaccumulation and bioconcentration and especially dietary transfer on aquatic life has resulted in challenges in assessing ecological risks. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential trophic transfer of the explosive compounds 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) using a realistic freshwater prey/predator model and using dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), a highly bioaccumulative compound, to establish relative dietary uptake potential. The oligochaete worm Lumbriculus variegatus was exposed to 14C-labeled TNT, RDX or DDT for 5 hours in water, frozen in meal-size packages and subsequently fed to individual juvenile fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Fish were sampled for body residue determination on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14 following an 8-hour gut purging period. Extensive metabolism of the parent compound in worms occurred for TNT but not for RDX and DDT. Fish body residue remained relatively unchanged over time for TNT and RDX, but did not approach steady-state concentration for DDT during the exposure period. The bioaccumulation factor (concentration in fish relative to concentration in worms) was 0.018, 0.010, and 0.422 g/g for TNT, RDX and DDT, respectively, confirming the expected relatively low bioaccumulative potential for TNT and RDX through the dietary route. The experimental design was deemed successful in determining the potential for trophic transfer of organic contaminants via a realistic predator/prey exposure scenario. PMID:16705829

  13. Dietary exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals in metropolitan population from China: a risk assessment based on probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    He, Dongliang; Ye, Xiaolei; Xiao, Yonghua; Zhao, Nana; Long, Jia; Zhang, Piwei; Fan, Ying; Ding, Shibin; Jin, Xin; Tian, Chong; Xu, Shunqing; Ying, Chenjiang

    2015-11-01

    The intake of contaminated foods is an important exposure pathway for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). However, data on the occurrence of EDCs in foodstuffs are sporadic and the resultant risk of co-exposure is rarely concerned. In this study, 450 food samples representing 7 food categories (mainly raw and fresh food), collected from three geographic cities in China, were analyzed for eight EDCs using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Besides estrone (E1), other EDCs including diethylstilbestrol (DES), nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), octylphenol (OP), 17β-estradiol (E2), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and estriol (E3) were ubiquitous in food. Dose-dependent relationships were found between NP and EE2 (r=0.196, p<0.05), BPA (r=0.391, p<0.05). Moreover, there existed a correspondencebetween EDCs congener and food category. Based on the obtained database of EDCs concentration combined with local food consumption, dietary EDCs exposure was estimated using the Monte Carlo Risk Assessment (MCRA) system. The 50th and 95th percentile exposure of any EDCs isomer were far below the tolerable daily intake (TDI) value identically. However, the sum of 17β-estradiol equivalents (∑EEQs) exposure in population was considerably larger than the value of exposure to E2, which implied the underlying resultant risk of multiple EDCs in food should be concern. In conclusion, co-exposure via food consumption should be considered rather than individual EDCs during health risk evaluation. PMID:26025473

  14. Total and inorganic arsenic in dietary supplements based on herbs, other botanicals and algae--a possible contributor to inorganic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Rikke V; Rokkjær, Inge; Sloth, Jens J

    2013-05-01

    The content of total and inorganic arsenic was determined in 16 dietary supplements based on herbs, other botanicals and algae purchased on the Danish market. The dietary supplements originated from various regions, including Asia, Europe and USA. The contents of total and inorganic arsenic was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS, respectively, were in the range of 0.58 to 5.0 mgkg(-1) and 0.03 to 3.2 mg kg(-1), respectively, with a ratio between inorganic arsenic and total arsenic ranging between 5 and 100%. Consumption of the recommended dose of the individual dietary supplement would lead to an exposure to inorganic arsenic within the range of 0.07 to 13 μg day(-1). Such exposure from dietary supplements would in worst case constitute 62.4% of the range of benchmark dose lower confidence limit values (BMDL01 at 0.3 to 8 μg kg bw(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) put down by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in 2009, for cancers of the lung, skin and bladder, as well as skin lesions. Hence, the results demonstrate that consumption of certain dietary supplements could contribute significantly to the dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic at levels close to the toxicological limits established by EFSA.

  15. Total and inorganic arsenic in dietary supplements based on herbs, other botanicals and algae--a possible contributor to inorganic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Rikke V; Rokkjær, Inge; Sloth, Jens J

    2013-05-01

    The content of total and inorganic arsenic was determined in 16 dietary supplements based on herbs, other botanicals and algae purchased on the Danish market. The dietary supplements originated from various regions, including Asia, Europe and USA. The contents of total and inorganic arsenic was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS, respectively, were in the range of 0.58 to 5.0 mgkg(-1) and 0.03 to 3.2 mg kg(-1), respectively, with a ratio between inorganic arsenic and total arsenic ranging between 5 and 100%. Consumption of the recommended dose of the individual dietary supplement would lead to an exposure to inorganic arsenic within the range of 0.07 to 13 μg day(-1). Such exposure from dietary supplements would in worst case constitute 62.4% of the range of benchmark dose lower confidence limit values (BMDL01 at 0.3 to 8 μg kg bw(-1) kg(-1) day(-1)) put down by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in 2009, for cancers of the lung, skin and bladder, as well as skin lesions. Hence, the results demonstrate that consumption of certain dietary supplements could contribute significantly to the dietary exposure to inorganic arsenic at levels close to the toxicological limits established by EFSA. PMID:23436171

  16. Dietary and inhalation exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and urinary excretion of monohydroxy metabolites – a controlled case study in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanyan; Ding, Junnan; Shen, Guofeng; Zhong, Junjun; Wang, Chen; Wei, Siye; Chen, Chaoqi; Chen, Yuanchen; Lu, Yan; Shen, Huizhong; Li, Wei; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Su, Shu; Lin, Nan; Wang, Xilong; Liu, Wenxin; Tao, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Daily dietary and inhalation exposures to 16 parent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and urinary excretion of 13 monohydroxy metabolites (OHPAHs) were monitored for 12 non-smoking university students in Beijing, China, during a controlled feeding experiment. The relationship between the urinary excretion of OHPAHs and the uptake of PAHs was investigated. The results suggest severe exposure of the subjects to PAHs via both dietary and inhalation pathways. Large increase of most urinary OHPAHs occurred after the ingestion of lamb kabob. Higher concentrations of OHPAHs were observed for female subjects, with the intakes of parent PAHs lower than those by males, likely due to the gender differences in metabolism. It appears that besides 1-PYR, metabolites of PHE could also be used as biomarkers to indicate the short-term dietary exposure to PAHs and urinary 3-BaA may serve as the biomarker for inhalation intake of high molecular weight PAHs. PMID:24177434

  17. Measures for a closer-to-real estimate of dietary exposure to total mercury and lead in total diet study for Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Eunmi; Shin, Hyehyung; Yon, Miyong; Nam, Ji Woon; Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Dohee; Lee, Jeeyeon; Kim, Meehye; Park, Sung-Kug; Choi, Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Previous Korean total diet studies (KTDSs) have estimated dietary exposure to toxic chemicals based on 110-120 representative foods selected from over 500 foods appeared in the Korea National Health & Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES), which would result in a possible underestimation. In order to find measures for a closer-to-real estimate of dietary exposure to heavy metals, this study examined the feasibility of mapping foods to the representative foods in the KTDS by comparing estimates. In mapping, those foods not analyzed in the 2009 KTDS (443 out of 559 foods appeared in the 2007 KNHANES) were mapped to the 114 representative foods used in the 2009 KTDS based on the closeness in regards to biological systematics and morphological similarity. Dietary exposures to total mercury and lead were re-estimated using the content of total mercury and lead in 114 foods analyzed in the 2009 KTDS, food intake, and individual's own body weight for respondents in the 2007 KNHANES instead of mean body weight of Koreans used in the 2009 KTDS. The re-estimates of exposure with mapping were approximately 50% higher than the original estimates reported in the 2009 KTDS. In addition, mapping enabled the comparison of percentile distribution of the exposure among populations of different age groups. In conclusion, estimates via mapping resulted in a more comprehensive estimation of dietary exposure to heavy metals present in foods that Koreans consume. PMID:23198023

  18. Dietary exposure to low pesticide doses causes long-term immunosuppression in the leopard frog (Rana pipiens).

    PubMed

    Albert, Anathea; Drouillard, Ken; Haffner, G Douglas; Dixon, Brian

    2007-06-01

    This study examines the relationship between dietary exposure of pesticides, DDT, and dieldrin and immunosuppression in the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens). Immune function was measured before, during, and after a 10-week exposure period with the use of both adaptive and innate immunity responses. Exposure to low doses (75 ng/g body wt DDT or 2.1 ng/g dieldrin total dose over the 10 weeks) resulted in significant suppressive effects on antibody production and secondary delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). The high doses (750 ng/g DDT and 21 ng/g dieldrin), however, did not affect antibody production, DTH, or oxidative burst in a predictable dose-response manner. The differences in magnitude and direction of the effects of the two dosing regimes were likely due to differences in chemical exposure on the basis of feeding and effectiveness of chemical uptake. The low dose results demonstrated that moderate concentrations of pesticides, frequently observed in the environment, are able to weaken the immune response of R. pipiens.

  19. Risk of arsenic exposure from drinking water and dietary components: implications for risk management in rural Bengal.

    PubMed

    Halder, Dipti; Bhowmick, Subhamoy; Biswas, Ashis; Chatterjee, Debashis; Nriagu, Jerome; Guha Mazumder, Debendra Nath; Šlejkovec, Zdenka; Jacks, Gunnar; Bhattacharya, Prosun

    2013-01-15

    This study investigates the risk of arsenic (As) exposure to the communities in rural Bengal, even when they have been supplied with As safe drinking water. The estimates of exposure via dietary and drinking water routes show that, when people are consuming water with an As concentration of less than 10 μg L(-1), the total daily intake of inorganic As (TDI-iAs) exceeds the previous provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI) value of 2.1 μg day(-1) kg(-1) BW, recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 35% of the cases due to consumption of rice. When the level of As concentration in drinking water is above 10 μg L(-1), the TDI-iAs exceeds the previous PTDI for all the participants. These results imply that, when rice consumption is a significant contributor to the TDI-iAs, supplying water with an As concentration at the current national drinking water standard for India and Bangladesh would place many people above the safety threshold of PTDI. We also found that the consumption of vegetables in rural Bengal does not pose a significant health threat to the population independently. This study suggests that any effort to mitigate the As exposure of the villagers in Bengal must consider the risk of As exposure from rice consumption together with drinking water.

  20. Effects of dietary cadmium exposure on reproduction of saltwater cladoceran Moina monogolica Daday: Implications in water quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaosheng; Yan, Changzhou; Hyne, Ross V

    2010-02-01

    The chronic toxicity of dietary cadmium to the saltwater cladoceran Moina monogolica Daday and its relative toxicity compared with aquatic exposure were investigated in the present study. The microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa, exposed to cadmium in growth inhibition tests, had a 96-h median effective concentration (EC50) of 81.2 microg Cd/L (95% confidence intervals [CIs] = 71.9-95.1). C. pyrenoidosa exposed for 96 h to sublethal dissolved cadmium concentrations in the range 4.10 +/- 0.30 to 70.29 +/- 0.31 microg/L resulted in algal cadmium burdens up to 73.86 x 10(-16) g Cd/cell. Cellular cadmium burdens accumulated in a dose-dependent manner, whereas cell densities inversely declined from 670 x 10(4) to 38 x 10(4) cells/ml with exposure to the increasing aqueous cadmium concentrations. C. pyrenoidosa preexposed to cadmium and used as food in a chronic 21-d toxicity test with the cladoceran M. monogolica, containing no added dissolved cadmium, inhibited reproduction. Significant reductions of the net reproduction rate (R(0)) per brood were observed in all broods, and the decline in the number of neonates produced increased with each subsequent brood. The cadmium concentration (4.10 +/- 0.30 microg/L) in the algal culture water that produced the lowest algal cadmium burden (2.85 +/- 0.76 x 10(-16) g Cd/cell) was shown to inhibit M. monogolica reproduction and was compared with the water quality criteria (WQC) of China. This comparison indicated that dietary exposure to cadmium may cause sublethal responses at concentrations below the current cadmium WQC of China for aquaculture. PMID:20821455

  1. Natural occurrence of aflatoxin B1 in marketed foods and risk estimates of dietary exposure in Koreans.

    PubMed

    Ok, Hyun Ee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Shim, Won Bo; Lee, Hyomin; Bae, Dong-Ho; Chung, Duck-Hwa; Chun, Hyang Sook

    2007-12-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is an unavoidable food contaminant. To evaluate the potential health risk of AFB1 to Koreans posed by food consumption, we determined the natural occurrence of AFB1 in food and estimated the excess risk for liver cancer through dietary exposure to AFB1. A total of 694 food samples collected from six different regions of South Korea were analyzed for their AFB, content. One hundred four of the 694 samples were found to give positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) readings for AFB1 and were further investigated with high-performance liquid chromatography. Thirty-two samples, including 2 maize samples, 3 soybean products, 20 peanut samples, nut samples, and their products, and 7 spices, were found to be contaminated with AFB1 (4.6% incidence), up to 48.6 microg kg(-1). The level of AFB1 contamination in 28 of the 32 food products was below 10 microg kg(-1), which is the legal tolerance limit in Korea. From data on daily food consumption, the exposure dose of AFB1 was estimated to be 6.42 x 10(-7) mg kg(-1) body weight (bw) day(-1). The major contributors to the dietary intake of AFB1 were soybean paste and soy sauce, which composed 91% of the total exposure to AFB1. The excess risk of liver cancer for those exposed to AFB1 through food intake was estimated to be 5.78 x 10(-6) for hepatitis B-negative individuals and 1.48 x 10(-4) for hepatitis B-positive individuals. These results suggest that special consideration is required to reduce the intake of AFB1 in hepatitis B-positive individuals.

  2. Dietary mercury exposure causes decreased escape takeoff flight performance and increased molt rate in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jenna R; Cristol, Daniel; Swaddle, John P

    2014-10-01

    Mercury is a widespread and persistent environmental contaminant that occurs in aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Recently, songbirds that forage from primarily terrestrial sources have shown evidence of bioaccumulation of mercury, but little research has assessed the effects of mercury on their health and fitness. There are many indications that mercury negatively affects neurological functioning, bioenergetics, and behavior through a variety of mechanisms and in a wide array of avian taxa. Effective flight is crucial to avian fitness and feather molt is an energetically expensive life history trait. Therefore, we investigated whether mercury exposure influenced flight performance and molt in a common songbird, the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Specifically, we dosed the diet of captive starlings with methylmercury cysteine at 0.0, 0.75, or 1.5 μg/g wet weight and recorded changes in flight performance after 1 year of dietary mercury exposure. We also recorded the annual molt of wing feathers. We found that individuals dosed with mercury exhibited decreased escape takeoff flight performance compared with controls and blood mercury was also correlated with an increased rate of molt, which can reduce flight performance and thermoregulatory ability. This study reveals two novel endpoints, flight performance and molt, that may be affected by dietary mercury exposure. These findings suggest a potential impact on wild songbirds exposed to mercury levels comparable to the high dosage levels in the present study. Any decrease in flight efficiency could reduce fitness due to a direct impact on survival during predation events or by decreased efficiency in other critical activities (such as foraging or migration) that require efficient flight. PMID:25030113

  3. Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines.

    PubMed

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan Cm; Lee, Jong Bong; Mistry, Jatin; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Kishor M; Hennig, Ivo M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    There has been an escalating interest in the medicinal use of Cannabis sativa in recent years. Cannabis is often administered orally with fat-containing foods, or in lipid-based pharmaceutical preparations. However, the impact of lipids on the exposure of patients to cannabis components has not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of oral co-administration of lipids on the exposure to two main active cannabinoids, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). In this study, oral co-administration of lipids enhanced the systemic exposure of rats to THC and CBD by 2.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to lipid-free formulations. In vitro lipolysis was conducted to explore the effect of lipids on the intestinal solubilisation of cannabinoids. More than 30% of THC and CBD were distributed into micellar fraction following lipolysis, suggesting that at least one-third of the administered dose will be available for absorption following co-administration with lipids. Both cannabinoids showed very high affinity for artificial CM-like particles, as well as for rat and human CM, suggesting high potential for intestinal lymphatic transport. Moreover, comparable affinity of cannabinoids for rat and human CM suggests that similar increased exposure effects may be expected in humans. In conclusion, co-administration of dietary lipids or pharmaceutical lipid excipients has the potential to substantially increase the exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. The increase in patient exposure to cannabinoids is of high clinical importance as it could affect the therapeutic effect, but also toxicity, of orally administered cannabis or cannabis-based medicines.

  4. Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines.

    PubMed

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan Cm; Lee, Jong Bong; Mistry, Jatin; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Kishor M; Hennig, Ivo M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    There has been an escalating interest in the medicinal use of Cannabis sativa in recent years. Cannabis is often administered orally with fat-containing foods, or in lipid-based pharmaceutical preparations. However, the impact of lipids on the exposure of patients to cannabis components has not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of oral co-administration of lipids on the exposure to two main active cannabinoids, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). In this study, oral co-administration of lipids enhanced the systemic exposure of rats to THC and CBD by 2.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to lipid-free formulations. In vitro lipolysis was conducted to explore the effect of lipids on the intestinal solubilisation of cannabinoids. More than 30% of THC and CBD were distributed into micellar fraction following lipolysis, suggesting that at least one-third of the administered dose will be available for absorption following co-administration with lipids. Both cannabinoids showed very high affinity for artificial CM-like particles, as well as for rat and human CM, suggesting high potential for intestinal lymphatic transport. Moreover, comparable affinity of cannabinoids for rat and human CM suggests that similar increased exposure effects may be expected in humans. In conclusion, co-administration of dietary lipids or pharmaceutical lipid excipients has the potential to substantially increase the exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. The increase in patient exposure to cannabinoids is of high clinical importance as it could affect the therapeutic effect, but also toxicity, of orally administered cannabis or cannabis-based medicines. PMID:27648135

  5. Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines

    PubMed Central

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan CM; Lee, Jong Bong; Mistry, Jatin; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Kishor M; Hennig, Ivo M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    There has been an escalating interest in the medicinal use of Cannabis sativa in recent years. Cannabis is often administered orally with fat-containing foods, or in lipid-based pharmaceutical preparations. However, the impact of lipids on the exposure of patients to cannabis components has not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of oral co-administration of lipids on the exposure to two main active cannabinoids, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). In this study, oral co-administration of lipids enhanced the systemic exposure of rats to THC and CBD by 2.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to lipid-free formulations. In vitro lipolysis was conducted to explore the effect of lipids on the intestinal solubilisation of cannabinoids. More than 30% of THC and CBD were distributed into micellar fraction following lipolysis, suggesting that at least one-third of the administered dose will be available for absorption following co-administration with lipids. Both cannabinoids showed very high affinity for artificial CM-like particles, as well as for rat and human CM, suggesting high potential for intestinal lymphatic transport. Moreover, comparable affinity of cannabinoids for rat and human CM suggests that similar increased exposure effects may be expected in humans. In conclusion, co-administration of dietary lipids or pharmaceutical lipid excipients has the potential to substantially increase the exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. The increase in patient exposure to cannabinoids is of high clinical importance as it could affect the therapeutic effect, but also toxicity, of orally administered cannabis or cannabis-based medicines.

  6. Dietary fats and pharmaceutical lipid excipients increase systemic exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines

    PubMed Central

    Zgair, Atheer; Wong, Jonathan CM; Lee, Jong Bong; Mistry, Jatin; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Kishor M; Hennig, Ivo M; Barrett, David A; Constantinescu, Cris S; Fischer, Peter M; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    There has been an escalating interest in the medicinal use of Cannabis sativa in recent years. Cannabis is often administered orally with fat-containing foods, or in lipid-based pharmaceutical preparations. However, the impact of lipids on the exposure of patients to cannabis components has not been explored. Therefore, the aim of this study is to elucidate the effect of oral co-administration of lipids on the exposure to two main active cannabinoids, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). In this study, oral co-administration of lipids enhanced the systemic exposure of rats to THC and CBD by 2.5-fold and 3-fold, respectively, compared to lipid-free formulations. In vitro lipolysis was conducted to explore the effect of lipids on the intestinal solubilisation of cannabinoids. More than 30% of THC and CBD were distributed into micellar fraction following lipolysis, suggesting that at least one-third of the administered dose will be available for absorption following co-administration with lipids. Both cannabinoids showed very high affinity for artificial CM-like particles, as well as for rat and human CM, suggesting high potential for intestinal lymphatic transport. Moreover, comparable affinity of cannabinoids for rat and human CM suggests that similar increased exposure effects may be expected in humans. In conclusion, co-administration of dietary lipids or pharmaceutical lipid excipients has the potential to substantially increase the exposure to orally administered cannabis and cannabis-based medicines. The increase in patient exposure to cannabinoids is of high clinical importance as it could affect the therapeutic effect, but also toxicity, of orally administered cannabis or cannabis-based medicines. PMID:27648135

  7. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect vasoactivity of these compounds. Objectives were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in mesenteric artery and vein and determine if previous exposure to endophyte-infected tall fescue affec...

  8. Dietary exposure to ergot alkaloids decreases contractility of bovine mesenteric vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are hypothesized to cause vasoconstriction in the midgut, and prior exposure may affect the vasoactivity of these compounds. The objectives of this study were to profile vasoactivity of ergot alkaloids in bovine mesenteric artery (MA) and vein (MV) and determine if previous exposure ...

  9. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult rats were maintained on a chlorpyrifos-containing diet to p...

  10. Using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model to link urinary biomarker concentrations to dietary exposure of perchlorate

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to perchlorate is widespread in the United States and many studies have attempted to character the perchlorate exposure by estimating the average daily intakes of perchlorate. These approaches provided population-based estimates, but did not provide individual-level exp...

  11. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos, and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body weight by...

  12. Dietary exposure and health risk assessment for 11 minerals and trace elements in Yaoundé: the Cameroonian Total Diet Study.

    PubMed

    Gimou, M-M; Charrondière, U R; Leblanc, J-C; Noël, L; Guérin, T; Pouillot, R

    2013-01-01

    Dietary exposure to 11 elements was assessed by the Total Diet Study (TDS) method. Sixty-four pooled samples representing 96.5% of the diet in Yaoundé, Cameroon, were prepared as consumed before analysis. Consumption data were sourced from a household budget survey. Dietary exposures were compared with nutritional or health-based guidance values (HBGV) and to worldwide TDS results. Elevated prevalence of inadequate intake was estimated for calcium (71.6%), iron (89.7%), magnesium (31.8%), zinc (46.9%) and selenium (87.3%). The percentage of the study population exceeding the tolerable upper intake levels was estimated as <3.2% for calcium, iron, magnesium, zinc and cobalt; 19.1% of the population exceeded the HBGV for sodium. No exceedance of the HBGV for inorganic mercury was predicted in the population. The margin of exposure ranged from 0.91 to 25.0 for inorganic arsenic depending on the reference point. The "Fish" food group was the highest contributor to intake for calcium (65%), cobalt (32%) and selenium (96%). This group was the highest contributor to the exposure to total arsenic (71%) and organic mercury (96%). The "Cereals and cereal products" highly contributed to iron (26%), zinc (26%) and chromium (25%) intakes. The "Tubers and starches" highly contributed to magnesium (39%) and potassium (52%) intakes. This study highlights the dietary deficiency of some essential elements and a low dietary exposure to toxic elements in Yaoundé.

  13. Risk Assessment on Dietary Exposure to Aflatoxin B₁ in Post-Harvest Peanuts in the Yangtze River Ecological Region.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoxia; Wu, Linxia; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Zhaowei; Zhou, Haiyan; Bai, Yizhen; Chen, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jun

    2015-10-15

    Based on the 2983 peanut samples from 122 counties in six provinces of China's Yangtze River ecological region collected between 2009-2014, along with the dietary consumption data in Chinese resident nutrition and health survey reports from 2002 and 2004, dietary aflatoxin exposure and percentiles in the corresponding statistics were calculated by non-parametric probability assessment, Monte Carlo simulation and bootstrap sampling methods. Average climatic conditions in the Yangtze River ecological region were calculated based on the data from 118 weather stations via the Thiessen polygon method. The survey results found that the aflatoxin contamination of peanuts was significantly high in 2013. The determination coefficient (R²) of multiple regression reflected by the aflatoxin B₁ content with average precipitation and mean temperature in different periods showed that climatic conditions one month before harvest had the strongest impact on aflatoxin B₁ contamination, and that Hunan and Jiangxi provinces were greatly influenced. The simulated mean aflatoxin B₁ intake from peanuts at the mean peanut consumption level was 0.777-0.790 and 0.343-0.349 ng/(kg·d) for children aged 2-6 and standard adults respectively. Moreover, the evaluated cancer risks were 0.024 and 0.011/(100,000 persons·year) respectively, generally less than China's current liver cancer incidence of 24.6 cases/(100,000 persons·year). In general, the dietary risk caused by peanut production and harvest was low. Further studies would focus on the impacts of peanut circulation and storage on aflatoxin B₁ contamination risk assessment in order to protect peanut consumers' safety and boost international trade.

  14. Risk Assessment on Dietary Exposure to Aflatoxin B1 in Post-Harvest Peanuts in the Yangtze River Ecological Region

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaoxia; Wu, Linxia; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Zhaowei; Zhou, Haiyan; Bai, Yizhen; Chen, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Based on the 2983 peanut samples from 122 counties in six provinces of China’s Yangtze River ecological region collected between 2009–2014, along with the dietary consumption data in Chinese resident nutrition and health survey reports from 2002 and 2004, dietary aflatoxin exposure and percentiles in the corresponding statistics were calculated by non-parametric probability assessment, Monte Carlo simulation and bootstrap sampling methods. Average climatic conditions in the Yangtze River ecological region were calculated based on the data from 118 weather stations via the Thiessen polygon method. The survey results found that the aflatoxin contamination of peanuts was significantly high in 2013. The determination coefficient (R2) of multiple regression reflected by the aflatoxin B1 content with average precipitation and mean temperature in different periods showed that climatic conditions one month before harvest had the strongest impact on aflatoxin B1 contamination, and that Hunan and Jiangxi provinces were greatly influenced. The simulated mean aflatoxin B1 intake from peanuts at the mean peanut consumption level was 0.777–0.790 and 0.343–0.349 ng/(kg·d) for children aged 2–6 and standard adults respectively. Moreover, the evaluated cancer risks were 0.024 and 0.011/(100,000 persons·year) respectively, generally less than China’s current liver cancer incidence of 24.6 cases/(100,000 persons·year). In general, the dietary risk caused by peanut production and harvest was low. Further studies would focus on the impacts of peanut circulation and storage on aflatoxin B1 contamination risk assessment in order to protect peanut consumers’ safety and boost international trade. PMID:26501322

  15. Early life exposure to a high fat diet promotes long-term changes in dietary preferences and central reward signaling.

    PubMed

    Teegarden, S L; Scott, A N; Bale, T L

    2009-09-15

    Overweight and obesity in the United States continues to grow at epidemic rates in large part due to the overconsumption of calorically-dense palatable foods. Identification of factors influencing long-term macronutrient preferences may elucidate points of prevention and behavioral modification. In our current study, we examined the adult macronutrient preferences of mice acutely exposed to a high fat diet during the third postnatal week. We hypothesized that the consumption of a high fat diet during early life would alter the programming of central pathways important in adult dietary preferences. As adults, the early-exposed mice displayed a significant preference for a diet high in fat compared to controls. This effect was not due to diet familiarity as mice exposed to a novel high carbohydrate diet during this same early period failed to show differences in macronutrient preferences as adults. The increased intake of high fat diet in early exposed mice was specific to dietary preferences as no changes were detected for total caloric intake or caloric efficiency. Mechanistically, mice exposed to a high fat diet during early life exhibited significant alterations in biochemical markers of dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens, including changes in levels of phospho-dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein, molecular weight 32 kDa (DARPP-32) threonine-75, DeltaFosB, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These results support our hypothesis that even brief early life exposure to calorically-dense palatable diets alters long-term programming of central mechanisms important in dietary preferences and reward. These changes may underlie the passive overconsumption of high fat foods contributing to the increasing body mass in the western world. PMID:19465087

  16. Risk Assessment on Dietary Exposure to Aflatoxin B₁ in Post-Harvest Peanuts in the Yangtze River Ecological Region.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaoxia; Wu, Linxia; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Zhaowei; Zhou, Haiyan; Bai, Yizhen; Chen, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Based on the 2983 peanut samples from 122 counties in six provinces of China's Yangtze River ecological region collected between 2009-2014, along with the dietary consumption data in Chinese resident nutrition and health survey reports from 2002 and 2004, dietary aflatoxin exposure and percentiles in the corresponding statistics were calculated by non-parametric probability assessment, Monte Carlo simulation and bootstrap sampling methods. Average climatic conditions in the Yangtze River ecological region were calculated based on the data from 118 weather stations via the Thiessen polygon method. The survey results found that the aflatoxin contamination of peanuts was significantly high in 2013. The determination coefficient (R²) of multiple regression reflected by the aflatoxin B₁ content with average precipitation and mean temperature in different periods showed that climatic conditions one month before harvest had the strongest impact on aflatoxin B₁ contamination, and that Hunan and Jiangxi provinces were greatly influenced. The simulated mean aflatoxin B₁ intake from peanuts at the mean peanut consumption level was 0.777-0.790 and 0.343-0.349 ng/(kg·d) for children aged 2-6 and standard adults respectively. Moreover, the evaluated cancer risks were 0.024 and 0.011/(100,000 persons·year) respectively, generally less than China's current liver cancer incidence of 24.6 cases/(100,000 persons·year). In general, the dietary risk caused by peanut production and harvest was low. Further studies would focus on the impacts of peanut circulation and storage on aflatoxin B₁ contamination risk assessment in order to protect peanut consumers' safety and boost international trade. PMID:26501322

  17. Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Equivalency of Gavage, Dietary, and Drinking Water Exposure to Manganese in F344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Melanie L.; Bartnikas, Thomas B.; Johnson, Laura C.; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A.; Keene, Athena M.; Taylor, Michael D.; Dorman, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns exist as to whether individuals may be at greater risk for neurotoxicity following increased manganese (Mn) oral intake. The goals of this study were to determine the equivalence of 3 methods of oral exposure and the rate (mg Mn/kg/day) of exposure. Adult male rats were allocated to control diet (10 ppm), high manganese diet (200 ppm), manganese-supplemented drinking water, and manganese gavage treatment groups. Animals in the drinking water and gavage groups were given the 10 ppm manganese diet and supplemented with manganese chloride (MnCl2) in drinking water or once-daily gavage to provide a daily manganese intake equivalent to that seen in the high-manganese diet group. No statistically significant difference in body weight gain or terminal body weights was seen. Rats were anesthetized following 7 and 61 exposure days, and samples of bile and blood were collected. Rats were then euthanized and striatum, olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, cerebellum, liver, spleen, and femur samples were collected for chemical analysis. Hematocrit was unaffected by manganese exposure. Liver and bile manganese concentrations were elevated in all treatment groups on day 61 (relative to controls). Increased cerebellum manganese concentrations were seen in animals from the high-manganese diet group (day 61, relative to controls). Increased (relative to all treatment groups) femur, striatum, cerebellum, frontal cortex, and olfactory bulb manganese concentrations were also seen following gavage suggesting that dose rate is an important factor in the pharmacokinetics of oral manganese. These data will be used to refine physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, extending their utility for manganese risk assessment by including multiple dietary exposures. PMID:25724921

  18. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the equivalency of gavage, dietary, and drinking water exposure to manganese in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Foster, Melanie L; Bartnikas, Thomas B; Johnson, Laura C; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A; Keene, Athena M; Taylor, Michael D; Dorman, David C

    2015-06-01

    Concerns exist as to whether individuals may be at greater risk for neurotoxicity following increased manganese (Mn) oral intake. The goals of this study were to determine the equivalence of 3 methods of oral exposure and the rate (mg Mn/kg/day) of exposure. Adult male rats were allocated to control diet (10 ppm), high manganese diet (200 ppm), manganese-supplemented drinking water, and manganese gavage treatment groups. Animals in the drinking water and gavage groups were given the 10 ppm manganese diet and supplemented with manganese chloride (MnCl(2)) in drinking water or once-daily gavage to provide a daily manganese intake equivalent to that seen in the high-manganese diet group. No statistically significant difference in body weight gain or terminal body weights was seen. Rats were anesthetized following 7 and 61 exposure days, and samples of bile and blood were collected. Rats were then euthanized and striatum, olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, cerebellum, liver, spleen, and femur samples were collected for chemical analysis. Hematocrit was unaffected by manganese exposure. Liver and bile manganese concentrations were elevated in all treatment groups on day 61 (relative to controls). Increased cerebellum manganese concentrations were seen in animals from the high-manganese diet group (day 61, relative to controls). Increased (relative to all treatment groups) femur, striatum, cerebellum, frontal cortex, and olfactory bulb manganese concentrations were also seen following gavage suggesting that dose rate is an important factor in the pharmacokinetics of oral manganese. These data will be used to refine physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, extending their utility for manganese risk assessment by including multiple dietary exposures. PMID:25724921

  19. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of the equivalency of gavage, dietary, and drinking water exposure to manganese in F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Foster, Melanie L; Bartnikas, Thomas B; Johnson, Laura C; Herrera, Carolina; Pettiglio, Michael A; Keene, Athena M; Taylor, Michael D; Dorman, David C

    2015-06-01

    Concerns exist as to whether individuals may be at greater risk for neurotoxicity following increased manganese (Mn) oral intake. The goals of this study were to determine the equivalence of 3 methods of oral exposure and the rate (mg Mn/kg/day) of exposure. Adult male rats were allocated to control diet (10 ppm), high manganese diet (200 ppm), manganese-supplemented drinking water, and manganese gavage treatment groups. Animals in the drinking water and gavage groups were given the 10 ppm manganese diet and supplemented with manganese chloride (MnCl(2)) in drinking water or once-daily gavage to provide a daily manganese intake equivalent to that seen in the high-manganese diet group. No statistically significant difference in body weight gain or terminal body weights was seen. Rats were anesthetized following 7 and 61 exposure days, and samples of bile and blood were collected. Rats were then euthanized and striatum, olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, cerebellum, liver, spleen, and femur samples were collected for chemical analysis. Hematocrit was unaffected by manganese exposure. Liver and bile manganese concentrations were elevated in all treatment groups on day 61 (relative to controls). Increased cerebellum manganese concentrations were seen in animals from the high-manganese diet group (day 61, relative to controls). Increased (relative to all treatment groups) femur, striatum, cerebellum, frontal cortex, and olfactory bulb manganese concentrations were also seen following gavage suggesting that dose rate is an important factor in the pharmacokinetics of oral manganese. These data will be used to refine physiologically based pharmacokinetic models, extending their utility for manganese risk assessment by including multiple dietary exposures.

  20. Dietary exposure assessment of pregnant women to bisphenol-A from cans and microwave containers in Southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Mariscal-Arcas, M; Rivas, A; Granada, A; Monteagudo, C; Murcia, M A; Olea-Serrano, F

    2009-02-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA), material for polycarbonate and epoxy resin synthesis, has been detected in canned food, among other food containers. In mammal studies, BPA transferred from mother to fetus, caused abnormality of reproductive organs, and advanced female puberty. BPA from canned food and microwave containers was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Population was cohort of mother-son pairs established at Granada University Hospital. Frequency of food consumption (including canned food) was studied with a semi-quantitative questionnaire. The most frequently consumed products were fish and juice cans, consumed 1-3 times/week by 34.7% and 22.3% of the study population, respectively. The women made little use of polymer microwave containers, 52.8% never using them and 45.9% using them <3 times/month. Estimated mean (standard deviation) intake of BPA was 1.1(0.839) microgram/day. No relationship was found between BPA exposure and maternal socio-demographic variables or newborn characteristics. This study offers the first estimate of BPA dietary intake by pregnant women in Southern Spain. The consumption of canned foods and drinks by these women means that their exposure was lower than EFSA estimates for the European population. Nevertheless it remains of concern, given the proven undesirable effects of low-level exposure and higher susceptibility of pregnant women.

  1. Dietary exposure to diesel exhaust particles and oxidatively damaged DNA in young oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Risom, Lotte; Møller, Peter; Dybdahl, Marianne; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Loft, Steffen

    2007-12-10

    Pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) has been associated with high levels of oxidized DNA in lung cells, whereas long-term oral DEP exposure appears to induce the DNA repair system with concomitant unaltered levels of oxidized DNA in the colon and liver of rats. Here we studied the generation of oxidatively damaged DNA in young wild type (WT) and oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1) deficient mice after dietary exposure to 0mg/kg, 0.8 mg/kg, or 8 mg/kg Standard Reference Material 1650 in the feed for 21 days. The ingestion of DEP did not increase the levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and comet assay endpoints in terms of strand break, endonuclease III, and formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) in the colon, liver, and lung tissue of WT or Ogg1(-/-) mice. The level of OGG1 mRNA could only be measured in WT mice and it was not increased by DEP feeding. On the contrary, the level of FPG sites was twofold higher in the liver and lung of Ogg1(-/-) mice compared to the levels in the WT mice tissues. In conclusion, although Ogg1(-/-) mice have high levels of oxidized guanine lesions, they do not appear to be markedly vulnerable to the genotoxicity by oral administration of DEP. PMID:17964092

  2. Monitoring urinary mercapturic acids as biomarkers of human dietary exposure to acrylamide in combination with acrylamide uptake assessment based on duplicate diets.

    PubMed

    Ruenz, Meike; Bakuradze, Tamara; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Richling, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The present human intervention study investigated the relation between the intake of acrylamide (AA) in diets with minimized, low, and high AA contents and the levels of urinary exposure biomarkers. As biomarkers, the mercapturic acids, N-acetyl-S-(carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA), and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA) were monitored. The study was performed with 14 healthy male volunteers over a period of 9 days, under controlled conditions excluding any inadvertent AA exposure. Dietary exposure to AA was measured by determining AA contents in duplicates of all meals consumed by the volunteers. The study design included an initial washout period of 3 days on AA-minimized diet, resulting in dietary AA exposure not exceeding 41 ng/kg bw/d. Identical washout periods of 2 days each followed the AA exposure days (day 4, low exposure, and day 7, high exposure). At the respective AA intake days, volunteers ingested 0.6-0.8 (low exposure) or 1.3-1.8 (high exposure) μg AA/kg bw/d with their food. Both low and high AA intakes resulted in an AAMA output within 72 h corresponding to 58 % of the respective AA intake. At the end of the initial 3-day washout period, an AAMA baseline level of 93 ± 31 nmol/d was recorded, suggestive for an assumed net AA baseline exposure level of 0.2-0.3 μg AA/kg bw/d.

  3. Effects of dietary carotenoids on mouse lung genomic profiles and their modulatory effects on short-term cigarette smoke exposures

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Hnin H.; Vasu, Vihas T.; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Corbacho, Ana M.; Kota, Rama S.; Lim, Yunsook; Obermueller-Jevic, Ute C.; Packer, Lester; Gohil, Kishorchandra

    2008-01-01

    Male C57BL/6 mice were fed diets supplemented with either β-carotene (BC) or lycopene (LY) that were formulated for human consumption. Four weeks of dietary supplementations results in plasma and lung carotenoid (CAR) concentrations that approximated the levels detected in humans. Bioactivity of the CARs was determined by assaying their effects on the activity of the lung transcriptome (~8,500 mRNAs). Both CARs activated the cytochrome P450 1A1 gene but only BC induced the retinol dehydrogenase gene. The contrasting effects of the two CARs on the lung transcriptome were further uncovered in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 3 days; only LY activated ~50 genes detected in the lungs of CS-exposed mice. These genes encoded inflammatory-immune proteins. Our data suggest that mice offer a viable in vivo model for studying bioactivities of dietary CARs and their modulatory effects on lung genomic expression in both health and after exposure to CS toxicants. PMID:19104882

  4. Dietary modulation of the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Carey, A. N.

    On exploratory missions to other planets, astronauts will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays composed of protons and heavy particles, such as 56Fe. Long-term exposure to these particles can cause cancer. However, there are significant uncertainties in the risk estimates for the probability of developing heavy particle-induced cancer, and in the amount of shielding needed to provide an adequate level of radiation protection. The results of this preliminary study, using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays, show reduced tumorigenesis in rats maintained on diets containing blueberry or strawberry extract prior to exposure to 56Fe particles. Because the study was not initially designed to evaluate tumorigenesis following exposure to 56Fe particles, additional research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of strawberry and blueberry supplementation. However, the preliminary results presented in this study suggest that diets containing antioxidant phytochemicals can provide additional radiation protection on interplanetary voyages.

  5. Effects of chronic dietary selenomethionine exposure on repeat swimming performance, aerobic metabolism and methionine catabolism in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jith K; Wiseman, Steve; Giesy, John P; Janz, David M

    2013-04-15

    In a previous study we reported impaired swimming performance and greater stored energy in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) after chronic dietary exposure to selenomethionine (SeMet). The goal of the present study was to further investigate effects of chronic exposure to dietary SeMet on repeat swimming performance, oxygen consumption (MO2), metabolic capacities (standard metabolic rate [SMR], active metabolic rate [AMR], factorial aerobic scope [F-AS] and cost of transport [COT]) and gene expression of energy metabolism and methionine catabolism enzymes in adult zebrafish. Fish were fed SeMet at measured concentrations of 1.3, 3.4, 9.8 or 27.5 μg Se/g dry mass (d.m.) for 90 d. At the end of the exposure period, fish from each treatment group were divided into three subgroups: (a) no swim, (b) swim, and (c) repeat swim. Fish from the no swim group were euthanized immediately at 90 d and whole body triglycerides, glycogen and lactate, and gene expression of energy metabolism and methionine catabolism enzymes were determined. Individual fish from the swim group were placed in a swim tunnel respirometer and swimming performance was assessed by determining the critical swimming speed (U(crit)). After both Ucrit and MO2 analyses, fish were euthanized and whole body energy stores and lactate were determined. Similarly, individual fish from the repeat swim group were subjected to two U(crit) tests (U(crit-1) and U(crit-2)) performed with a 60 min recovery period between tests, followed by determination of energy stores and lactate. Impaired swim performance was observed in fish fed SeMet at concentrations greater than 3 μg Se/g in the diet. However, within each dietary Se treatment group, no significant differences between single and repeat U(crits) were observed. Oxygen consumption, SMR and COT were significantly greater, and F-AS was significantly lesser, in fish fed SeMet. Whole body triglycerides were proportional to the concentration of SeMet in the diet. While

  6. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Malaysian Chinese: salted fish and other dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R W; Imrey, P B; Lye, M S; Armstrong, M J; Yu, M C; Sani, S

    1998-07-17

    We interviewed 282 histologically confirmed cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Chinese residents of Selangor and the Federal Territory, Malaysia, and an equal number of Chinese age-, sex-, and length-of-residence-matched controls sampled from the general population. Consumption of 55 dietary items during childhood, and 5 years pre-diagnosis of NPC, was analyzed by univariate and multivariate methods. Four salted preserved foods (fish, leafy vegetables, egg and root), fresh pork/beef organ meats and beer and liquor consumption exhibited strong positive associations, and 4 vegetable/fruit combinations strong negative associations with NPC. Factor analysis and multivariable modeling using estimated factor scores strongly supported separate effects on NPC of vegetables/fruits, salted preserved foods, pork/beef organ meats and beer/liquor consumption. Multivariable modeling associated NPC most clearly with high consumption of salted fish, salted eggs, pork/beef liver and beer and low consumption of Chinese flowering cabbage, oranges/tangerines and shrimp. A strong residual association of social class with NPC remained after adjustment for diet, which is consistent with a substantial role for non-dietary environmental factors.

  7. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Malaysian Chinese: salted fish and other dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R W; Imrey, P B; Lye, M S; Armstrong, M J; Yu, M C; Sani, S

    1998-07-17

    We interviewed 282 histologically confirmed cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in Chinese residents of Selangor and the Federal Territory, Malaysia, and an equal number of Chinese age-, sex-, and length-of-residence-matched controls sampled from the general population. Consumption of 55 dietary items during childhood, and 5 years pre-diagnosis of NPC, was analyzed by univariate and multivariate methods. Four salted preserved foods (fish, leafy vegetables, egg and root), fresh pork/beef organ meats and beer and liquor consumption exhibited strong positive associations, and 4 vegetable/fruit combinations strong negative associations with NPC. Factor analysis and multivariable modeling using estimated factor scores strongly supported separate effects on NPC of vegetables/fruits, salted preserved foods, pork/beef organ meats and beer/liquor consumption. Multivariable modeling associated NPC most clearly with high consumption of salted fish, salted eggs, pork/beef liver and beer and low consumption of Chinese flowering cabbage, oranges/tangerines and shrimp. A strong residual association of social class with NPC remained after adjustment for diet, which is consistent with a substantial role for non-dietary environmental factors. PMID:9650558

  8. Factors affecting the estimated probabilistic acute dietary exposure to captan from apple consumption.

    PubMed

    Zentai, A; Sali, J; Szabó, I J; Szeitzné-Szabó, M; Ambrus, A; Vásárhelyi, A

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the number of pesticide residue values below the LOQ/LOD of analytical methods, the variability of residues in individual fruits, mass of fruit units and the number of bootstrap iterations was studied on the probabilistically estimated acute exposure of consumers. The 4720 daily apple consumption data and the results of 1239 apple sample analyses for captan residues, performed within the Hungarian monitoring programme between 2005 and 2011, were used in this study as model matrix. Up to about 95th percentile exposure (µg/(kg bw·day)), simply multiplying each residue in composite samples with each consumption value gave similar estimates to those obtained with the complex procedure taking also into account the mass of and residues in individual fruits. However, the exposure above the 95th percentile calculated with the complex procedure gradually increased with increasing percentile level compared to the simple procedure. Including the high number of non-detects reduced the estimated exposure, which was the highest when only the residues measured in treated fruits were taken into account. The number of bootstrap iterations between 100 and 10,000 did not significantly affect the calculated exposure. The 99.99th percentile exposure amounted to 17.9% of the acute reference dose of 300 µg/(kg bw·day) for women of childbearing age.

  9. Association of bisphenol A exposure with dietary quality indices in Spanish schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Ana; Monteagudo, Celia; Heras-Gonzalez, Leticia; Mariscal-Arcas, Miguel; Lorenzo-Tovar, Maria Luisa; Olea-Serrano, Fátima

    2016-08-01

    Young children, whose growth and development are highly dependent on the endocrine system, are particularly vulnerable to endocrine disruptor exposure. The main objectives of this study were to measure BPA migration levels from cans, fruit juice bottles/packs, and microwave containers used for food/drinks consumed by a sample of 6- to 8-year old schoolchildren in Spain and to estimate the relationship between their resulting BPA exposure and diet quality index scores (Mediterranean Diet Score and Breakfast Quality Index). The mean BPA concentration was 11.8 ng/mL for vegetable cans, 22.1 ng/mL for pulse cans, 3.6 ng/mL for juice bottles/packs, and 1.2 ng/mL for microwave containers. Results revealed a significant association between the Mediterranean Diet Score and low BPA exposure of the children. BPA exposure below the median level was significantly associated with a higher score in both the first-grade (P = 0.030) and second-grade (p = 0.0001) groups. However, no association was found between BPA exposure and the Breakfast Quality Index. In conclusion, children with a stronger adherence to a Mediterranean-like diet appear to be less exposed to BPA migrating from food packaging and microwave containers. Further research is warranted on the inadvertent exposure of children to endocrinedisrupting chemicals from these sources. PMID:27208728

  10. Dietary exposure of three passerine species to PCDD/DFs from the Chippewa, Tittabawassee, and Saginaw River floodplains, Midland, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Fredricks, Timothy B; Giesy, John P; Coefield, Sarah J; Seston, Rita M; Haswell, Melissa M; Tazelaar, Dustin L; Bradley, Patrick W; Moore, Jeremy N; Roark, Shaun A; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Dietary exposure of house wrens (Troglodytes aedon), tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor), and eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) to polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) near Midland, Michigan (USA) was evaluated based on site-specific data, including concentrations of residues in bolus samples and individual invertebrate orders and dietary compositions by study species. Site-specific dietary compositions for the three species were similar to those reported in the literature, but differed in their relative proportions of some dietary items. Oligocheata (non-depurated) and Brachycera (Diptera) contained the greatest average concentrations of ΣPCDD/DFs of the major site-specific dietary items collected via food web-based sampling. Average ingestion values of ΣPCDD/DFs from site-specific bolus-based and food web-based dietary concentrations for nestlings at study areas (SAs) were 6- to 20-fold and 2- to 9-fold greater than at proximally located reference areas (RAs), respectively. Average ingestion values of total 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (TEQ(WHO - Avian)) from site-specific bolus-based and food web-based dietary concentrations for nestlings at SAs were 31- to 121-fold and 9- to 64-fold greater than at proximally located RAs, respectively. Estimates of ΣPCDD/DFs and TEQ(WHO - Avian) tissue concentrations based on nestling dietary exposures were greater than those measured. Plausible explanations include nestling metabolism of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and assimilation rates of less than the 70% assumed to occur over the nestling growth period. Profiles of the relative concentrations of individual PCDD/DF congeners in samples of invertebrates and bolus at SAs on the Tittabawassee River downstream of the source of contamination were dominated by 1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-octachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (22% to 44%) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (18% to 50%).

  11. TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIBROMOMETHANE EXPOSURE AND DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF ABERRANT CRYPT FOCI IN THE COLONS OF F344/N RATS

    David R. Geter', Tanya M. Moore', Michael H. George', Steve R. Kilburn', Gloria Huggins-Clark', James W. Allen', and Anthony B. DeAngelo' 'National H...

  12. A MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR ESTIMATING CHILDREN'S RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE AND DOSE TO CHLORPYRIFOS VIA DERMAL RESIDUE CONTACT AND NON-DIETARY INGESTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help address the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, a physically-based probabilistic model (Residential Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation Model for Pesticides; Residential-SHEDS) has been developed to quantify and analyze dermal and non-dietary ingestion exposu...

  13. Accumulation and Toxicity of CuO and ZnO Nanoparticles through Waterborne and Dietary Exposure of Goldfish (Carassius auratus)

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; Demir, Veysel; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary and waterborne exposure to CuO and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was conducted using a simplified model of an aquatic food chain consisting of zooplankton (Artemia salina) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) to determine bioaccumulation, toxic effects and particle transport through trophic levels. Artemia contaminated with NPs were used as food in dietary exposure. Fish were exposed to suspensions of the NPs in waterborne exposure. ICP-MS analysis showed that accumulation primarily occurred in the intestine, followed by the gills and liver. Dietary uptake was lower, but was found to be a potential pathway for transport of NPs to higher organisms. Waterborne exposure resulted in about a tenfold higher accumulation in the intestine. The heart, brain and muscle tissue had no significant Cu or Zn. However, concentrations in muscle increased with NP concentration, which was ascribed to bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn released from NPs. Free Cu concentration in the medium was always higher than that of Zn, indicating CuO NPs dissolved more readily. ZnO NPs were relatively benign, even in waterborne exposure (p≥0.05). In contrast, CuO NPs were toxic. Malondialdehyde levels in the liver and gills increased substantially (p<0.05). Despite lower Cu accumulation, the liver exhibited significant oxidative stress, which could be from chronic exposure to Cu ions. PMID:24860999

  14. Accumulation and toxicity of CuO and ZnO nanoparticles through waterborne and dietary exposure of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Arslan, Zikri; Demir, Veysel; Daniels, James; Farah, Ibrahim O

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and waterborne exposure to copper oxide (CuO) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) was conducted using a simplified model of an aquatic food chain consisting of zooplankton (Artemia salina) and goldfish (Carassius auratus) to determine bioaccumulation, toxic effects, and particle transport through trophic levels. Artemia contaminated with NPs were used as food in dietary exposure. Fish were exposed to suspensions of the NPs in waterborne exposure. ICP-MS analysis showed that accumulation primarily occurred in the intestine, followed by the gills and liver. Dietary uptake was lower, but was found to be a potential pathway for transport of NPs to higher organisms. Waterborne exposure resulted in about a 10-fold higher accumulation in the intestine. The heart, brain, and muscle tissue had no significant Cu or Zn. However, concentrations in muscle increased with NP concentration, which was ascribed to bioaccumulation of Cu and Zn released from NPs. Free Cu concentration in the medium was always higher than that of Zn, indicating CuO NPs dissolved more readily. ZnO NPs were relatively benign, even in waterborne exposure (p ≥ 0.05). In contrast, CuO NPs were toxic. Malondialdehyde levels in the liver and gills increased substantially (p < 0.05). Despite lower Cu accumulation, the liver exhibited significant oxidative stress, which could be from chronic exposure to Cu ions.

  15. Quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid insecticide residues in foods: implication for dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Tao, Lin; McLean, John; Lu, Chensheng

    2014-07-01

    This study quantitatively measured neonicotinoids in various foods that are common to human consumption. All fruit and vegetable samples (except nectarine and tomato) and 90% of honey samples were detected positive for at least one neonicotinoid; 72% of fruits, 45% of vegetables, and 50% of honey samples contained at least two different neonicotinoids in one sample, with imidacloprid having the highest detection rate among all samples. All pollen samples from New Zealand contained multiple neonicotinoids, and five of seven pollens from Massachusetts detected positive for imidacloprid. These results show the prevalence of low-level neonicotinoid residues in fruits, vegetables, and honey that are readily available in the market for human consumption and in the environment where honeybees forage. In light of new reports of toxicological effects in mammals, the results strengthen the importance of assessing dietary neonicotinoid intakes and the potential human health effects. PMID:24933495

  16. Estimates of dietary exposure of children to artificial food colours in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Husain, A; Sawaya, W; Al-Omair, A; Al-Zenki, S; Al-Amiri, H; Ahmed, N; Al-Sinan, M

    2006-03-01

    To assess the intake of artificial food colour additives by 5-14-year-old children in the State of Kuwait, a 24-h dietary recall was conducted twice on 3141 male and female Kuwaiti and non-Kuwaiti children from 58 schools. The determination of colour additives in 344 foods items consumed was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector. A comparison with the Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) was undertaken to evaluate the potential risk associated with the consumption of artificial colour additives by children in Kuwait. The results indicated that out of nine permitted colours, four exceeded their ADIs by factors of 2-8: tartrazine, sunset yellow, carmoisine and allura red. Further, follow-up studies to provide insight into potential adverse health effects associated with the high intakes of these artificial colour additives on the test population are warranted.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Neonicotinoid Insecticide Residues in Foods: Implication for Dietary Exposures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study quantitatively measured neonicotinoids in various foods that are common to human consumption. All fruit and vegetable samples (except nectarine and tomato) and 90% of honey samples were detected positive for at least one neonicotinoid; 72% of fruits, 45% of vegetables, and 50% of honey samples contained at least two different neonicotinoids in one sample, with imidacloprid having the highest detection rate among all samples. All pollen samples from New Zealand contained multiple neonicotinoids, and five of seven pollens from Massachusetts detected positive for imidacloprid. These results show the prevalence of low-level neonicotinoid residues in fruits, vegetables, and honey that are readily available in the market for human consumption and in the environment where honeybees forage. In light of new reports of toxicological effects in mammals, the results strengthen the importance of assessing dietary neonicotinoid intakes and the potential human health effects. PMID:24933495

  18. Exposure of growing and adult captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) to dietary isoflavones: twenty years later.

    PubMed

    Bell, K M; Rutherfurd, S M; Hendriks, W H

    2010-12-01

    Dietary isoflavones are associated with oestrogenic and anti-oestrogenic effects, and have been linked to infertility in cheetahs. This study aimed to determine the isoflavone content of commercially prepared diets consumed by captive cheetahs. Sixteen international zoological facilities provided diets, and the isoflavone content of each diet was determined by acid hydrolysis and HPLC quantification. Proximate nutritional composition was also determined. Over half the diets analysed contained detectable concentrations of isoflavones, whereby total isoflavone content ranged from 1.75-183 mg/kg dry matter. The zoo-specific diets were calculated to deliver a median isoflavone dose of 0.07 mg/kg body weight (BW) and a maximum of 1.95 mg/kg BW to captive cheetahs. On a metabolic body weight basis this equates to a maximum of 4.90-5.43 mg/kg(0.75) . Some diets prepared for hand-rearing neonatal cheetahs could expose neonates to doses of up to 4.24 mg/kg BW (or 4.24-6.33 mg/kg(0.75) for cubs under 3 months of age). Only one of six zoo-specific diets was found to deliver isoflavones in doses shown to possess biological activity in other species. Therefore, on average, dietary isoflavones were not found in commercially prepared diets consumed by captive cheetahs in concentrations predicted to cause physiological changes. However, a small proportion of these diets, including hand-rearing formulas, contained elevated isoflavones concentrations which may influence cheetah fertility, behaviour or other physiological parameters.

  19. TRANSFER OF PESTICIDES FROM SURFACES TO FOODS FOR THE ESTIMATION OF DIETARY EXPOSURE OF CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since small children spend much of their time in contact with contaminated surfaces, residues of pesticides found on floors and other surfaces contribute to their aggregate exposures. Any dislodgeable pesticide residues on hands and surfaces may be transferred to foods while bei...

  20. SERUM LEVELS OF SEVERAL ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES IN FARMERS CORRESPOND WITH DIETARY EXPOSURE AND LOCAL USE HISTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to reported increased cancer risks among farmers, the Agricultural Health Study (AHS) was designed to examine health outcomes and environmental exposures among farm families in the United States. In the pilot phase of the AHS,food,beverage,air,dermal,dust,surface wipe...

  1. [Current dietary exposure to mercury during pregnancy and childhood, and public health recommendations].

    PubMed

    Llop, Sabrina; Ibarlucea, Jesús; Sunyer, Jordi; Ballester, Ferran

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to high levels of mercury during vulnerable periods (such as pregnancy and childhood) may have serious consequences for cognitive development, as observed after acute poisoning episodes in Japan and Irak. The main source of mercury exposure in the general population is consumption of certain types of fish. There is growing concern about the possible neurotoxic effects of mercury, especially in younger children in populations where fish intake is moderate to high. The scientific evidence to date is inconclusive. In Spain, the Childhood and Environment (Infancia y Medio Ambiente [INMA]) project has provided information on levels of prenatal exposure to mercury among 1800 newborns from Valencia, Sabadell, Asturias and Guipúzcoa. In general, levels were high, being above the World Health Organization's recommended dose in 24% of children and above the recommended levels of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 64%. However, the results did not indicate a significant association between prenatal mercury exposure and delayed cognitive development during the second year of life. Various agencies have developed recommendations on fish consumption for pregnant women and children, due to the presence of mercury. These recommendations should be strengthened, since there is general consensus among all regional and national public administrations that fish is an essential source of nutrients for development in the early stages of life.

  2. High-Throughput Dietary Exposure Predictions for Chemical Migrants from Food Packaging Materials

    EPA Science Inventory

    United States Environmental Protection Agency researchers have developed a Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation High -Throughput (SHEDS-HT) model for use in prioritization of chemicals under the ExpoCast program. In this research, new methods were implemented in SHEDS-HT...

  3. Modulation of estrogenic exposure effects mediated through temperature and dietary regimens in male fat head minnows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plethora of studies has examined the biological effects of environmental estrogens on fathead minnows. However, in many cases results from environmental studies do not match the expectations from prior laboratory exposures, which usually are designed to minimize confounding factors such as temper...

  4. DIETARY EXPOSURE FROM PESTICIDE APPLICATION ON FARMS IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of total human exposure measurements performed on six farms in Iowa and North Carolina during the Agricultural Health Pilot Study, a household duplicate diet, several locally grown foods, an applicator meal, a child duplicate diet, and drinking water samples were collecte...

  5. THERMOREGULATION IN THE RAT DURING CHRONIC, DIETARY EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS, AN ORGANOPHOSPHATE INSECTICIDE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of chlorpyrifos (CHP) at a dose of 25 to 80 mg/kg (p.o.) To rats results in hypothermia followed by a fever lasting for several days. To understand if chronic, low level exposure to CHP affects thermoregulation in a comparable manner to acute administration, male L...

  6. Perfluoroalkyl acids and their precursors in Swedish food: The relative importance of direct and indirect dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Gebbink, Wouter A; Glynn, Anders; Darnerud, Per Ola; Berger, Urs

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed food market basket samples obtained in Sweden from 1999, 2005, and 2010 for perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) and a range of precursor compounds. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) precursors were detected in all food year pools with the highest concentrations in 1999. Six polyfluoroalkyl phosphate diesters (diPAPs, 4:2/6:2, 6:2/6:2, 6:2/8:2, 8:2/8:2, 6:2/10:2, and 10:2/10:2) were detected in the year pools with the highest ∑diPAP concentrations in 1999 and 2005. All precursors were predominantly found in meat, fish, and/or eggs based on analysis of individual food groups from 1999. Based on year pools, PFOS precursors contributed between 4 and 1% as an indirect source to total dietary PFOS intakes between 1999 and 2010. Perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) exposure originated entirely from diPAPs, whereas for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), diPAPs contributed between 1 and 19% to total exposure. The lowest precursor contributions were generally seen in food samples from 2010.

  7. Acrylamide in commercial potato crisps from Spanish market: Trends from 2004 to 2014 and assessment of the dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Mesías, Marta; Morales, Francisco J

    2015-07-01

    This research updates the acrylamide content of commercial potato crisps marketed in Spain with the aim to evaluate its trend since 2004. Two different batches of 40 potato crisps brands from 18 producers were analysed. Acrylamide content ranged from 108 to 2180 µg/kg, with an average value of 630 µg/kg and a median of 556 µg/kg. Data revealed a continuous decreased trend from 2004 to 2014. In 2014, potato crisps showed an average acrylamide content 14.6% lower than the previous report in 2009 and 57.6% lower than the first report in 2004. These data confirm the overall effectiveness in the mitigation strategies implemented by the Spanish industrial sector, although variations up to 80% were observed between a number of brands. However, 17.5% of the samples registered values higher than the indicative value recommended by European Commission for potato crisps. The dietary exposure of the Spanish population to this contaminant through potato crisps intake was estimated to be 0.035 µg/kg body weight/day. Although exposure has decreased over the last ten years, it is necessary to continue efforts to reduce acrylamide content in potato crisps since there is still margin for it.

  8. Dietary selenomethionine exposure induces physical malformations and decreases growth and survival to metamorphosis in an amphibian (Hyla chrysoscelis).

    PubMed

    Lockard, Laura; Rowe, Christopher L; Heyes, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient with a narrow therapeutic concentration range. The relative toxicity of Se increases as it is biotransformed into organic compounds, primarily selenomethionine (SeMet), within the aquatic food chain. Effects of aquatic Se contamination are well quantified for many freshwater fish and aquatic bird species, but impacts on amphibians are not well known. This study investigated the responses of larval Cope's gray tree frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis) fed a diet enriched with one of two concentrations of SeMet (50.1 and 489.9 μg Se g(-1) dw [low and high groups, respectively]) by way of a food-limited (ration) or ad libitum (ad lib) feeding regimen. The high dose caused 100 % mortality during the larval period independent of resource provision levels. Regardless of feeding regimen, the low dose decreased larval survival and successful metamorphosis relative to control treatments. The low dose also induced rear limb deformities in ≤73 % of individuals initiating metamorphosis. Providing low-dose food by way of a rationed feeding regimen decreased observed toxicity, likely because of decreased dietary exposure to SeMet relative to the low ad lib treatment. Individuals from the low ration treatment had decreased wet mass at initiation and completion of metamorphic climax (Gosner stages 42 through 46) compared with those from the control ad lib treatment, indicating that resource limitation combined with Se exposure might negatively affect energy stores after metamorphosis. However, lipid content analyses of recently metamorphosed individuals did not reveal any influence of treatment or resource provision on energy stored as lipids. The mean tissue Se concentration of individuals that received the low dose and completed metamorphosis was significantly greater than that of control ad lib or ration individuals at the same developmental stage. This study demonstrates that larval exposure to dietary SeMet can decrease growth and survival

  9. Dietary selenium protects against selected signs of aging and methylmercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Heath, John C; Banna, Kelly M; Reed, Miranda N; Pesek, Erin F; Cole, Nathan; Li, Jun; Newland, M Christopher

    2010-03-01

    Acute or short-term exposure to high doses of methylmercury (MeHg) causes a well-characterized syndrome that includes sensory and motor deficits. The environmental threat from MeHg, however, comes from chronic, low-level exposure, the consequences of which are poorly understood. Selenium (Se), an essential nutrient, both increases deposition of mercury (Hg) in neurons and mitigates some of MeHg's neurotoxicity in the short term, but it is unclear whether this deposition produces long-term adverse consequences. To investigate these issues, adult Long-Evans rats were fed a diet containing 0.06 or 0.6 ppm of Se as sodium selenite. After 100 days on these diets, the subjects began consuming 0.0, 0.5, 5.0, or 15 ppm of Hg as methylmercuric chloride in their drinking water for 16 months. Somatosensory sensitivity, grip strength, hindlimb cross (clasping reflex), flexion, and voluntary wheel-running in overnight sessions were among the measures examined. MeHg caused a dose- and time-dependent impairment in all measures. No effects appeared in rats consuming 0 or 0.5 ppm of Hg. Somatosensory function, grip strength, and flexion were among the earliest signs of exposure. Selenium significantly delayed or blunted MeHg's effects. Selenium also increased running in unexposed animals as they aged, a novel finding that may have important clinical implications. Nerve pathology studies revealed axonal atrophy or mild degeneration in peripheral nerve fibers, which is consistent with abnormal sensorimotor function in chronic MeHg neurotoxicity. Lidocaine challenge reproduced the somatosensory deficits but not hindlimb cross or flexion. Together, these results quantify the neurotoxicity of long-term MeHg exposure, support the safety and efficacy of Se in ameliorating MeHg's neurotoxicity, and demonstrate the potential benefits of Se during aging. PMID:20079371

  10. The metabonomics of combined dietary exposure to phthalates and polychlorinated biphenyls in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yan, Lijuan; Tian, Meiping; Huang, Qiansheng; Peng, Siyuan; Dong, Sijun; Shen, Heqing

    2012-07-01

    Humans undergo simultaneous daily exposure to a multitude of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs). In present study, after combined exposure to endocrine disruptors DEHP and Aroclor 1254 for 12 days, a liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometer method combining both reversed-phase (RP) and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) separations was carried out to investigate the metabolic responses in mice. The metabolic profiles of endogenous metabolites could differentiate the dose and control groups in both RPLC and HILIC modes. Moreover, the male mice and female mice in different groups could be obviously clustered in their own regions with combined model. Fourteen lysoPCs, PC(18:4/18:1), lysoPE(18:2/0:0), phenylalanine and tryptophan were identified as potential biomarkers for the combined toxicity of DEHP and Aroclor 1254. Different change trends could be observed for the identified lysoPCs, due to their different levels of uptake and metabolism in mice. Moreover, gender-specific differences in several lysoPCs (e.g. lysoPC(18:0), lysoPC(22:6), lysoPC(20:3), and PC(18:4/18:1)) were observed for treated mice. The metabonomic results indicated the combined exposure led to a disturbance of lipid metabolism. The mRNA expressions of PLA2, ACOX1, CPT1, FAS and SCD1 involved in lipid metabolism were investigated. Among them, significant increases of FAS and SCD1 expressions in the liver induced by the exposure could be observed for both male and female mice, contributing to the hepatic lipid accumulation in mice. Besides lipid metabolism, tryptophan metabolism and phenylalanine metabolism may also be involved with the toxic responses to these EDCs. The present study not only improves the understanding of the combined toxicity of phthalates and PCBs but also shows that the metabonomic approach may prove to be a promising technique for the toxicity research of EDCs.

  11. Effects of dietary exposure to brominated flame retardant BDE-47 on thyroid condition, gonadal development and growth of zebrafish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torres, Leticia; Orazio, Carl E.; Peterman, Paul H.; Patino, Reynaldo

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of brominated flame retardants in teleosts and some of the information currently available is inconsistent. This study examined effects of dietary exposure to 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on thyroid condition, body mass and size, and gonadal development of zebrafish. Pubertal, 49-day-old (posthatch) fish were fed diets without BDE-47 (control) or with 1, 5 or 25 μg/g BDE-47/diet. Treatments were conducted in triplicate 30-L tanks each containing 50 zebrafish, and 15 fish per treatment (5 per tank) were sampled at days 40, 80 and 120 of exposure. Measurements were taken of body mass, standard length, head depth and head length. Sex (at 40–120 days of exposure), germ cell stage (at 40 days) and thyroid condition (at 120 days; follicular cell height, colloid depletion, angiogenesis) were histologically determined. Whole-body BDE-47 levels at study completion were within the high end of levels reported in environmentally exposed (wild) fishes. Analysis of variance was used to determine differences among treatments at each sampling time. No effects were observed on thyroid condition or germ cell stage in either sex. Reduced head length was observed in females exposed to BDE-47 at 80 days but not at 40 or 120 days. In males, no apparent effects of BDE-47 were observed at 40 and 80 days, but fish exposed to 25 μg/g had lower body mass at 120 days compared to control fish. These observations suggest that BDE-47 at environmentally relevant whole-body concentrations does not affect thyroid condition or pubertal development of zebrafish but does affect growth during the juvenile-to-adult transition, especially in males.

  12. Assessment of potential toxicological aspects of dietary exposure to silicon-rich spirulina in rats.

    PubMed

    Vidé, Joris; Romain, Cindy; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Bonafos, Béatrice; Cristol, Jean Paul; Fouret, Gilles; Rouanet, Jean-Max; Gaillet, Sylvie

    2015-06-01

    Silicon has beneficial effects especially on bones and skin and is important in cardiovascular pathophysiology. Furthermore, in spontaneously hypertensive rats, it reduces hypertension and increases antihypertensive and antiatherogenic gene expressions in the aorta. Thus, incorporating silicon into spirulina could be a way to produce a bioavailable food supplement. The potential toxic effects of silicon-rich spirulina (SES) through haematological and biochemical parameters and inflammatory and oxidative status were evaluated in rats' blood and liver tissue. The study consisted in a 90-day experiment on female and male rats supplemented with three doses (28.5, 57 and 285 mg/kg BW/day) of SES. No mortality, abnormal clinical signs, behavioural changes or macroscopic findings were observed whatever the groups. Haematological parameters were not modified in SES treated-groups. No marked change was recorded in biochemical parameters The liver endogenous antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx, catalase) activities were not modified whatever the gender and the dose, just as markers of oxidative stress (O2°(-), TBARS, thiols) and inflammation such as IL-6 and TNF-alpha. Our findings indicate that dietary supplementation of silicon-rich spirulina on rats has no harmful side nor toxic effects and could be beneficial especially in the case of suspicion or installation of pathologies due to oxidative stress.

  13. Effects of chronic dietary exposure to trace elements on banded water snakes (Nerodia fasciata).

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William A; Roe, John H; Snodgrass, Joel W; Staub, Brandon P; Jackson, Brian P; Congdon, Justin D

    2002-05-01

    Little currently is known about the accumulation or effects of contaminants on reptiles. To date, most studies examining reptile exposure to trace elements report tissue burdens of field-captured animals, but seldom provide insight into the dose, duration, or mode of exposure involved. For two years, we fed juvenile banded water snakes (Nerodia fasciata) prey items collected from a coal ash-contaminated site that contained elevated levels of As, Cd, Cu, Se, Sr, and V. With the exception of Cu, snakes accumulated significant concentrations of elements, usually in a dose-dependent manner. Accumulation varied significantly among liver, kidney, and gonads, and in most cases between sexes. Selenium accumulation was most notable, greatly exceeding established toxicity thresholds for other vertebrates. Despite the high concentrations of pollutants accumulated, snakes exposed to the contaminated diet survived through the study and exhibited normal food consumption, growth, condition factor, overwinter survival and mass loss, metabolic rate, and gonadosomatic index. The results of this study confirm that diet can be a significant route of exposure to trace elements in snakes and indicate that further studies on snakes are warranted to better understand their responses to contaminants.

  14. The accumulation, distribution, and toxicological effects of dietary arsenic exposure in lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Pedlar, R M; Ptashynski, M D; Wautier, K G; Evans, R E; Baron, C L; Klaverkamp, J F

    2002-01-01

    A 20-day experiment was conducted to compare the accumulation, distribution, and toxicological effects of dietary As, as arsenate, in lake whitefish (LWF, Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake trout (LT, Salvelinus namaycush). Results of this experiment were used to design an experiment of longer duration in which one of the fish species was selected and exposed three times per week to lower dietary As doses. In the present study each treatment group was exposed to a combination of one of three doses of As (0, 100, or 1000 microg As/g) and one of two types of diet, no brine shrimp (NS) or with brine shrimp (WS) for a total of eight dosing events. Brine shrimp were added to determine whether their presence enhanced consumption of As-contaminated food. Modified feeding behavior occurred in both fish species fed As contaminated diets, with the exception of the 100 microg As/g NS food. Brine shrimp addition did not affect feed consumption of the As contaminated diets. Significant As accumulation occurred in stomach, pyloric caeca, intestine, liver, kidney, and gallbladder, but not in bile or muscle. As exposure did not have a significant effect on hepatic and renal metallothionein concentrations. Concentrations of lipid peroxides were only significantly elevated in the plasma of LT fed the 1000 microg As/g WS food. Liver somatic indices decreased significantly in both species, whereas hematological parameters were not affected in either species. Histological lesions occurred in gallbladder, liver, kidney, pyloric caeca and intestine from LWF. These lesions were not observed in LT; however, gallbladders were not examined in this species. Weight gain was lower in both species fed As contaminated diets, however, condition factors were not affected. PMID:11796327

  15. Assessment of dietary exposure in the French population to 13 selected food colours, preservatives, antioxidants, stabilizers, emulsifiers and sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Bemrah, Nawel; Leblanc, Jean-Charles; Volatier, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    The results of French intake estimates for 13 food additives prioritized by the methods proposed in the 2001 Report from the European Commission on Dietary Food Additive Intake in the European Union are reported. These 13 additives were selected using the first and second tiers of the three-tier approach. The first tier was based on theoretical food consumption data and the maximum permitted level of additives. The second tier used real individual food consumption data and the maximum permitted level of additives for the substances which exceeded the acceptable daily intakes (ADI) in the first tier. In the third tier reported in this study, intake estimates were calculated for the 13 additives (colours, preservatives, antioxidants, stabilizers, emulsifiers and sweeteners) according to two modelling assumptions corresponding to two different food habit scenarios (assumption 1: consumers consume foods that may or may not contain food additives, and assumption 2: consumers always consume foods that contain additives) when possible. In this approach, real individual food consumption data and the occurrence/use-level of food additives reported by the food industry were used. Overall, the results of the intake estimates are reassuring for the majority of additives studied since the risk of exceeding the ADI was low, except for nitrites, sulfites and annatto, whose ADIs were exceeded by either children or adult consumers or by both populations under one and/or two modelling assumptions. Under the first assumption, the ADI is exceeded for high consumers among adults for nitrites and sulfites (155 and 118.4%, respectively) and among children for nitrites (275%). Under the second assumption, the average nitrites dietary exposure in children exceeds the ADI (146.7%). For high consumers, adults exceed the nitrite and sulfite ADIs (223 and 156.4%, respectively) and children exceed the nitrite, annatto and sulfite ADIs (416.7, 124.6 and 130.6%, respectively).

  16. Brominated and chlorinated dioxins, PCBs and brominated flame retardants in Scottish shellfish: methodology, occurrence and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Alwyn; Dicks, Pamela; Mortimer, David; Gem, Martin; Smith, Frankie; Driffield, Malcolm; White, Shaun; Rose, Martin

    2008-02-01

    The most commonly consumed shellfish species produced in Scotland - mussels, oysters and scallops - were investigated for the occurrence of a range of brominated and chlorinated contaminants in order to establish current levels and estimate human dietary exposure. Flesh from individual sub-samples was representatively pooled and 35 composites were analysed for brominated and chlorinated dioxins (PBDD/Fs, PCDD/Fs), brominated and chlorinated biphenyls (PBBs, PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA). The analytical methodology used (13)C(12) labelled surrogates of the target compounds, with GC coupled to (usually) high resolution MS, and LC-MS/MS for HBCD and TBBPA analysis. Positive identifications were made in the majority of samples for most analytes with the exception of TBBPA and most PBDD congeners measured. None of the levels detected for PCDD/F and PCB were above the maximum permitted levels specified in European Union regulations. The levels of brominated furans predominated over brominated dioxins, reflecting the environmental distribution and source emission profiles of these contaminants, and relatively high levels of the tri-brominated congeners were observed. Levels of the flame retardant chemicals reflected current and legacy use, with appreciable concentrations of PBDEs and HBCDs (predominantly alpha-HBCD) but far lower levels of PBBs. TBBPA was not detected in any of the species. In general, mussels and oysters displayed relatively higher levels of contamination than scallops, although the gonad tissue of the latter showed significant levels of brominated dioxins. The estimated adult dietary intakes of PCDD/Fs and PCBs arising from the consumption of a typical portion of these foods in combination with an otherwise average UK diet were in the range 0.5-0.6 pg World Health Organisation (WHO)-toxic equivalent (TEQ)(2005)/kg bodyweight per day. These estimated dietary intakes are

  17. Dietary cadmium exposure attenuates D-amphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine release from striatal slices and methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Miller, Dennis K; Dopheide, Marsha M; Smith, Shawn M; Casteel, Stan W

    2005-04-01

    Prolonged exposure to environmentally relevant amounts of CdCl2 results in cadmium accumulation in dopamine-rich brain regions, such as striatum. Exposure to these low levels of cadmium also diminishes cocaine-induced hyperactivity and conditioned reinforcement. The goal of the present study was to assess the effect of cadmium on amphetamine pharmacology. Direct application of cadmium (0.1-100 microM), within the concentrations reported in brain after chronic exposure, to preloaded rat striatal slices did not alter D-amphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine release. To determine the effect of dietary cadmium exposure on amphetamines, rats received ad libitum access to diet containing CdCl2 (10 or 100 ppm) or to control diet for 30 days and then D-amphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine release and methamphetamine-induced hyperactivity were measured. Dietary CdCl2 exposure produced a marked increase in cadmium blood and brain levels, approximate to environmental metal exposure. Dietary cadmium exposure was associated with decreased potency of D-amphetamine to evoke [3H]dopamine release. Cadmium-exposed rats were also less sensitive to the locomotor-activating effect of acute methamphetamine (0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) injection. The present findings demonstrate that the presence of cadmium in brain is not sufficient for the inhibition of D-amphetamine-evoked dopamine release. This suggests that cadmium does not directly interfere with the mechanism of action for amphetamine pharmacology; rather, it suggests that long-term cadmium exposure induces a change in the number and/or function of striatal neurons.

  18. Mercury in Hazel Bolete Leccinum griseum and soil substratum: Distribution, bioconcentration and dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Krasińska, Grażyna; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the accumulation and distribution of total mercury (Hg) in fruiting bodies of edible wild-grown mushroom Hazel Bolete Leccinum griseum (Quél.) Singer, collected from six spatially distantly distributed places across Poland and to assess the probable dietary intake of the element by consumers. Mercury content of fungal and soil samples were determined by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AAS) with a direct sample thermal decomposition coupled with gold wool trap of Hg and its further desorption and quantitative measurement at the wavelength of 296 nm. The median values of Hg content in caps of L. griseum collected from less-contaminated places (< 0.10 mg Hg kg(-1) dry matter in upper 0-10 cm layer of soil substratum) were from 0.23 mg kg(-1) dm to 0.43 mg kg(-1) dm. And for more contaminated topsoil (0.15 mg Hg kg(-1) dry matter), the median in caps was about 1.5 mg kg(-1) dry matter. The mushroom L. griseum has potential to accumulate Hg in fruiting bodies, while quantities of this element noted in consignments of this species originating from the forests with typical background values of Hg in topsoil are low. In the light of the published value of PTWI for Hg consumption of fruiting bodies of L. griseus emerged in forests of Poland is without health risk for consumers. Information on total mercury and methylmercury in Fungi of the genus Leccinum is also described briefly.

  19. [Distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in wild crucian carp and exposure estimation of dietary intake].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Xia; Wang, Chun-Yan; Liu, Li-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Yang-Cheng; Lin, Kuang-Fei

    2014-08-01

    The concentration and distribution of PBDEs in liver, heart, brain, egg and muscle tissues of market farmed fish and wild river fish (crucian carp) from Taizhou, which is a large e-waste recycling site in China, were quantitatively measured using gas chromatography -negative chemical ion tandem mass spectrometry (GC-NCI-MS). The dietary intake of PBDEs via the consumption of fish by the population of this region was also estimated. The results showed that the concentrations of PBDEs in the muscle of river fish samples near the e-waste recycling site were significantly higher than those in the market farmed fish without obviously polluted sources of PBDEs. The distribution of PBDEs in various tissues was not even, and the highest and lowest mean concentrations of total PBDEs ( sigma PBDEs) were 18.82 ng x g(-1) and 1.97 ng x g(-1) (wet weight), in heart and egg tissues, respectively. A similar PBDE congener profiles in different tissues of farmed fish were found. Among PBDE congeners, BDE-47 was predominant in various tissues accounting for above 50% of the total PBDEs, and followed by BDE-183 (about 20%), BDE-99 and BDE-153. While different profiles of PBDEs in muscle tissues between wild fish in river and market farmed fish were observed, that BDE-47, -153 and -99 were dominant for the former type. These facts suggested primitive e-waste recycling behavior to be a pollution source of high levels of PBDEs in wild fish. The average estimated daily intake of PBDEs via river fish consumption by local residents near the e-waste recycling site in Taizhou was approximately 29.0 ng, slightly higher than that in other regions.

  20. Adverse health effects due to arsenic exposure: Modification by dietary supplementation of jaggery in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Nrashant; Kumar, D.; Lal, Kewal; Raisuddin, S.; Sahu, Anand P.

    2010-02-01

    Populations of villages of eastern India and Bangladesh and many other parts of the world are exposed to arsenic mainly through drinking water. Due to non-availability of safe drinking water they are compelled to depend on arsenic-contaminated water. Generally, poverty level is high in those areas and situation is compounded by the lack of proper nutrition. The hypothesis that the deleterious health effects of arsenic can be prevented by modification of dietary factors with the availability of an affordable and indigenous functional food jaggery (sugarcane juice) has been tested in the present study. Jaggery contains polyphenols, vitamin C, carotene and other biologically active components. Arsenic as sodium-m-arsenite at low (0.05 ppm) and high (5 ppm) doses was orally administered to Swiss male albino mice, alone and in combination with jaggery feeding (250 mg/mice), consecutively for 180 days. The serum levels of total antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were substantially reduced in arsenic-exposed groups, while supplementation of jaggery enhanced their levels in combined treatment groups. The serum levels of interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha were significantly increased in arsenic-exposed groups, while in the arsenic-exposed and jaggery supplemented groups their levels were normal. The comet assay in bone marrow cells showed the genotoxic effects of arsenic, whereas combination with jaggery feeding lessened the DNA damage. Histopathologically, the lung of arsenic-exposed mice showed the necrosis and degenerative changes in bronchiolar epithelium with emphysema and thickening of alveolar septa which was effectively antagonized by jaggery feeding. These results demonstrate that jaggery, a natural functional food, effectively antagonizes many of the adverse effects of arsenic.

  1. Diagnostic criteria for selenium toxicosis in aquatic birds: dietary exposure, tissue concentrations, and macroscopic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Green, D.E.; Sanderson, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    A feeding study with mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) was conducted during March-July, 1988 in Laurel, Maryland, to identify diagnostic criteria for selenium toxicosis in birds. One-year-old male mallards in groups of 21 were fed diets containing 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 parts per million (ppm) selenium, as seleno-DL-methionine, for 16 weeks. All ducks receiving 80 ppm died. Ducks receiving 40 or 80 ppm selenium consumed less feed than ducks in the other treatment groups. Body weights of ducks receiving 40 or 80 ppm selenium declined during the study. The post-breeding molt was delayed in ducks receiving 40 ppm; most ducks receiving 80 ppm selenium died prior to the onset of molt. At necropsy, numerous abnormalities were observed in ducks that died but only a small number of abnormalities were observed in ducks surviving to the end of the study in the 40 ppm group. Weights of the heart, spleen, and pancreas were mostly lower and weights of the kidney were higher for ducks dying during the study than for euthanized ducks. Liver weights were unaffected. Selenium accumulated in soft tissues approximately in proportion to dietary concentrations. Selenium concentrations in tissues of all ducks that died were different from those of surviving ducks in the 0, 10, and 20 ppm groups, but were not different from those of surviving ducks in the 40 ppm group. Proposed diagnostic criteria for fatal chronic selenosis were derived from body weight, macroscopic abnormalities, organ weights, and concentrations of selenium in the liver. Proposed diagnostic criteria for non-fatal chronic selenosis were derived from body weight, plumage condition, macroscopic abnormalities, concentrations of selenium in the liver, reproductive failure, and alterations of blood and tissue chemistries. Lead or dioxin poisoning have diagnostic criteria most similar to selenium toxicosis.

  2. Vulnerability to dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid deficiency after exposure to early stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Charles Francisco; Bernardi, Juliana Rombaldi; Krolow, Rachel; Arcego, Danusa Mar; Fries, Gabriel Rodrigo; de Aguiar, Bianca Wollenhaupt; Senter, Gabrielle; Kapczinski, Flávio Pereira; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Dalmaz, Carla

    2013-06-01

    The exposure to adverse events early in life may affect brain development. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) deficiency has been linked to the development of mood and anxiety disorders. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction between variations in the early environment (handling or maternal separation) and the chronic exposure to a nutritional n-3 PUFA deficiency on locomotor activity, sucrose preference, forced swimming test and on serum and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. Rats were randomized into Non-handled (NH), Neonatal Handled (H) and Maternal Separated (MS) groups. Pups were removed from their dams (incubator at 32°C on postnatal days (PND) 1-10) during 10 min/day (H) or 3h/day (MS). On PND 35, males were subdivided into diets adequate or deficient in n-3 PUFA for 15 weeks. H and MS gained weight differently, and animals receiving the n-3 PUFA deficient diet gained less weight. MS displayed a higher food consumption and higher consumption of sucrose solution during the second hour of exposure to the sucrose preference test. No differences were observed in the swimming test. H group had increased locomotion and showed a higher response to amfepramone. No significant effect was observed on serum BDNF levels. BDNF protein levels were decreased in animals receiving the n-3 PUFA deficient diet. We observed that early life environment and a mild n-3 PUFA deficiency are able to affect several behavioral aspects (food and sucrose consumption and locomotor response), and lead to a differential hippocampal BDNF metabolism in adult life.

  3. Parental dietary seleno-L-methionine exposure and resultant offspring developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chernick, Melissa; Ware, Megan; Albright, Elizabeth; Kwok, Kevin W H; Dong, Wu; Zheng, Na; Hinton, David E

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) leaches into water from agricultural soils and from storage sites for coal fly ash. Se toxicity causes population and community level effects in fishes and birds. We used the laboratory aquarium model fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), an asynchronous breeder, to determine aspects of uptake in adults and resultant developmental toxicity in their offspring. The superior imaging properties of the model enabled detailed descriptions of phenotypic alterations not commonly reported in the existing Se literature. Adult males and females in treatment groups were exposed, separately and together, to a dry diet spiked with 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 μg/g (dry weight) seleno-L-methionine (SeMet) for 6 days, and their embryo progeny collected for 5 days, maintained under controlled conditions and observed daily for hatchability, mortality and/or developmental toxicity. Sites of alteration included: craniofacial, pericardium and abdomen (Pc/Ab), notochord, gall bladder, spleen, blood, and swim bladder. Next, adult tissue Se concentrations (liver, skeletal muscle, ovary and testis) were determined and compared in treatment groups of bred and unbred individuals. No significant difference was found across treatment groups at the various SeMet concentrations; and, subsequent analysis compared exposed vs. control in each of the treatment groups at 10 dpf. Increased embryo mortality was observed in all treatment groups, compared to controls, and embryos had a decreased hatching rate when both parents were exposed. Exposure resulted in significantly more total altered phenotypes than controls. When altered phenotypes following exposure of both parents were higher than maternal only exposure, a male role was suggested. The comparisons between treatment groups revealed that particular types of phenotypic change may be driven by the sex of the exposed parent. Additionally, breeding reduced Se concentrations in some adult tissues, specifically the liver of exposed females

  4. Parental dietary seleno-L-methionine exposure and resultant offspring developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chernick, Melissa; Ware, Megan; Albright, Elizabeth; Kwok, Kevin W H; Dong, Wu; Zheng, Na; Hinton, David E

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) leaches into water from agricultural soils and from storage sites for coal fly ash. Se toxicity causes population and community level effects in fishes and birds. We used the laboratory aquarium model fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), an asynchronous breeder, to determine aspects of uptake in adults and resultant developmental toxicity in their offspring. The superior imaging properties of the model enabled detailed descriptions of phenotypic alterations not commonly reported in the existing Se literature. Adult males and females in treatment groups were exposed, separately and together, to a dry diet spiked with 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 μg/g (dry weight) seleno-L-methionine (SeMet) for 6 days, and their embryo progeny collected for 5 days, maintained under controlled conditions and observed daily for hatchability, mortality and/or developmental toxicity. Sites of alteration included: craniofacial, pericardium and abdomen (Pc/Ab), notochord, gall bladder, spleen, blood, and swim bladder. Next, adult tissue Se concentrations (liver, skeletal muscle, ovary and testis) were determined and compared in treatment groups of bred and unbred individuals. No significant difference was found across treatment groups at the various SeMet concentrations; and, subsequent analysis compared exposed vs. control in each of the treatment groups at 10 dpf. Increased embryo mortality was observed in all treatment groups, compared to controls, and embryos had a decreased hatching rate when both parents were exposed. Exposure resulted in significantly more total altered phenotypes than controls. When altered phenotypes following exposure of both parents were higher than maternal only exposure, a male role was suggested. The comparisons between treatment groups revealed that particular types of phenotypic change may be driven by the sex of the exposed parent. Additionally, breeding reduced Se concentrations in some adult tissues, specifically the liver of exposed females

  5. Concentrations of Inorganic Arsenic in Milled Rice from China and Associated Dietary Exposure Assessment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yatao; Wang, Min; Mao, Xuefei; Qian, Yongzhong; Chen, Tianjin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-12-23

    Total arsenic (As) and inorganic As (Asi) in milled rice (n = 1653) collected from China were studied to evaluate the contamination level, distribution, and health risks. The mean concentrations of the total As and Asi were 116.5 and 90.9 μg/kg, respectively. There were significant differences (P < 0.01) between the 11 provinces, and 1.1% of samples exceeded the maximum contaminant level established by Chinese legislation. According to the exposure assessment method of probabilistic simulation, all values of the target hazard quotients (THQs) for chronic noncarcinogenic risks (skin lesions as the point of departure) were below 1, suggesting that the Chinese population will not encounter a significant noncarcinogenic risk. However, the mean values of margin of exposure (MOE) for lung cancer risks ranging from 3.86 to 8.54 were under 100 for all age groups and genders of the Chinese population; moreover, MOE values for some major rice-producing and -consuming countries, such as Japan, Thailand, Bangladesh, and the United States, were all also below 100. More attention should be paid to carcinogenic risks from rice Asi intake, and some control measures to reduce rice Asi intake should be taken. PMID:26641731

  6. Concentrations of Inorganic Arsenic in Milled Rice from China and Associated Dietary Exposure Assessment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yatao; Wang, Min; Mao, Xuefei; Qian, Yongzhong; Chen, Tianjin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-12-23

    Total arsenic (As) and inorganic As (Asi) in milled rice (n = 1653) collected from China were studied to evaluate the contamination level, distribution, and health risks. The mean concentrations of the total As and Asi were 116.5 and 90.9 μg/kg, respectively. There were significant differences (P < 0.01) between the 11 provinces, and 1.1% of samples exceeded the maximum contaminant level established by Chinese legislation. According to the exposure assessment method of probabilistic simulation, all values of the target hazard quotients (THQs) for chronic noncarcinogenic risks (skin lesions as the point of departure) were below 1, suggesting that the Chinese population will not encounter a significant noncarcinogenic risk. However, the mean values of margin of exposure (MOE) for lung cancer risks ranging from 3.86 to 8.54 were under 100 for all age groups and genders of the Chinese population; moreover, MOE values for some major rice-producing and -consuming countries, such as Japan, Thailand, Bangladesh, and the United States, were all also below 100. More attention should be paid to carcinogenic risks from rice Asi intake, and some control measures to reduce rice Asi intake should be taken.

  7. Effects of dietary PCB exposure on reproduction in the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Voltura, M.B.; French, J.B.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of the impact of environmental contaminants on reproduction have typically focused on effects on fertility and subsequent reproductive failure. Contaminants may also impact reproductive output or other aspects of life history through effects on resource acquisition or allocation. We fed successfully breeding female white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyls (2:1 Aroclor 1242:1254) at levels of 0 (n = 10), 10 (n = 12), and 25 (n = 10) ppm (mg polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]/kg food). After 4 months on the diets, female mice were bred with male mice maintained on control food. There was no effect of PCB exposure on litter size at birth or weaning, although fewer female mice on the 25-ppm diet gave birth. There was no effect of PCB dose on maternal metabolic rate at peak lactation or on total food (dry matter) intake during lactation. Female mice on the 10-ppm diet, however, consumed more food per pup during lactation and weaned larger pups, although these differences disappeared after 4 weeks of age. We conclude that although moderate-term exposure to PCBs did decrease the number of litters produced for high-dose female mice, it did not change litter size, pup growth rate, or energetic measures for those female mice that did successfully reproduce.

  8. Variation in arsenic speciation and concentration in paddy rice related to dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Williams, P N; Price, A H; Raab, A; Hossain, S A; Feldmann, J; Meharg, A A

    2005-08-01

    Ingestion of drinking water is not the only elevated source of arsenic to the diet in the Bengal Delta. Even at background levels, the arsenic in rice contributes considerably to arsenic ingestion in subsistence rice diets. We set out to survey As speciation in different rice varieties from different parts of the globe to understand the contribution of rice to arsenic exposure. Pot experiments were utilized to ascertain whether growing rice on As contaminated soil affected speciation and whether genetic variation accounted for uptake and speciation. USA long grain rice had the highest mean arsenic level in the grain at 0.26 microg As g(-1) (n = 7), and the highest grain arsenic value of the survey at 0.40 microg As g(-1). The mean arsenic level of Bangladeshi rice was 0.13 microg As g(-1) (n = 15). The main As species detected in the rice extract were AsIII, DMAV, and AsV. In European, Bangladeshi, and Indian rice 64 +/- 1% (n = 7), 80 +/- 3% (n = 11), and 81 +/- 4% (n = 15), respectively, of the recovered arsenic was found to be inorganic. In contrast, DMAV was the predominant species in rice from the USA, with only 42 +/- 5% (n = 12) of the arsenic being inorganic. Pot experiments show that the proportions of DMAV in the grain are significantly dependent on rice cultivar (p = 0.026) and that plant nutrient status is effected by arsenic exposure. PMID:16124284

  9. Chronic effects of dietary exposure to amosite asbestos and tremolite in F344 rats.

    PubMed Central

    McConnell, E E; Rutter, H A; Ulland, B M; Moore, J A

    1983-01-01

    Carcinogenesis bioassays of blocky (nonfibrous) tremolite and amosite asbestos alone or in combination with the intestinal carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) were conducted with male and female Fischer 344 rats. The minerals were administered at a concentration of 1% in pelleted diet for the entire lifetime of the rats starting with the dams of the test animals. One group of amosite rats also received chrysotile asbestos via gavage during lactation. Group sizes varied from 100 to 250 animals. The offspring from mothers exposed to tremolite or amosite asbestos were smaller at weaning than those from untreated mothers and remained smaller throughout their life. The administration of dimethylhydrazine (DMH) did not affect body weight gain, either in amosite-exposed or nonexposed animals. Survival was comparable in the tremolite and control groups. The amosite-exposed rats showed enhanced survival compared to the untreated controls. DMH exposure reduced survival by approximately one year, although the amosite plus DMH groups survived slightly better than the DMH alone groups. No toxicity or increase in neoplasia was observed in the tremolite-exposed rats compared to the controls. Significant increases (p less than 0.05) in the rates of C-cell carcinomas of the thyroid and monocytic (mononuclear cell) leukemia in male rats were observed in amosite-exposed groups. However, the biological significance of the C-cell carcinomas in relation to amosite asbestos exposure is discounted because of a lack of significance when C-cell adenomas and carcinomas were combined and the positive effect was not observed in the amosite plus preweaning gavage group. The biological significance of an increased incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia is questionable, because of a lack of statistical significance in the amosite group when evaluated using life table analysis, lack of significance when compared to the tremolite control group, and the fact that no toxic or

  10. Short-term exposure of laying hens to high dietary sodium chloride levels.

    PubMed

    Damron, B L; Kelly, L S

    1987-05-01

    Four replicate pens, each containing five individually caged hens received a corn-soy basal diet to which .4, 1, 2, 4, or 6% NaCl was added during two 21-day experiments. An additional bilevel treatment, approximating a reported commercial feed production problem, consisted of 6% NaCl for 7 days followed by .4% NaCl for the remaining 2 weeks. Egg production was significantly reduced by 4 and 6% NaCl in Experiment 1 and by 2, 4, and 6% NaCl in Experiment 2. The switchback treatment (6-.4% NaCl) did not statistically alter overall egg production in either experiment. Daily water consumption increased significantly when more than 1% NaCl was added, and subsequently with each feed addition. When 6% NaCl was fed for 7 days feed intake was quickly suppressed; this caused a rapid increase in water intake. Water intake returned to normal levels before the end of the second week. Daily feed intake was significantly reduced by a continuous feeding of 4% or more NaCl. A 1-week exposure to the 6% treatment suppressed feed intake quickly but intake recovered within one week. In both experiments, only the continuous 6% NaCl feeding regime of Experiment 1 resulted in a significant loss of body weight or a significant reduction of overall egg weight averages. Mortality was not a factor in either experiment. These data indicate that at least 2% NaCl in feed was required before any significant effects were noted, and that laying hens recovered from a 1-week exposure to 6% NaCl in feed within the following week.

  11. Long-term dietary-exposure to non-coplanar PCBs induces behavioral disruptions in adult zebrafish and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Péan, Samuel; Daouk, Tarek; Vignet, Caroline; Lyphout, Laura; Leguay, Didier; Loizeau, Véronique; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Cousin, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    The use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been banned for several decades. PCBs have a long biological half-life and high liposolubility which leads to their bioaccumulation and biomagnification through food chains over a wide range of trophic levels. Exposure can lead to changes in animal physiology and behavior and has been demonstrated in both experimental and field analyses. There are also potential risks to high trophic level predators, including humans. A maternal transfer has been demonstrated in fish as PCBs bind to lipids in eggs. In this study, behavioral traits (exploration and free swimming, with or without challenges) of contaminated zebrafish (Danio rerio) adults and their offspring (both as five-day-old larvae and as two-month-old fish reared under standard conditions) were measured using video-tracking. Long-term dietary exposure to a mixture of non-coplanar PCBs was used to mimic known environmental contamination levels and congener composition. Eight-week-old fish were exposed for eight months at 26-28 °C. Those exposed to an intermediate dose (equivalent to that found in the Loire Estuary, ∑(CB)=515 ng g⁻¹ dry weight in food) displayed behavioral disruption in exploration capacities. Fish exposed to the highest dose (equivalent to that found in the Seine Estuary, ∑(CB)=2302 ng g⁻¹ dry weight in food) displayed an increased swimming activity at the end of the night. In offspring, larval activity was increased and two-month-old fish occupied the bottom section of the tank less often. These findings call for more long-term experiments using the zebrafish model; the mechanisms underlying behavioral disruptions need to be understood due to their implications for both human health and their ecological relevance in terms of individual fitness and survival.

  12. Effects of Pubertal Exposure to Dietary Soy on Estrogen Receptor Activity in the Breast of Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Fitriya N; Wood, Charles E; Willson, Cynthia J; Register, Thomas C; Lees, Cynthia J; Howard, Timothy D; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Tooze, Janet A; Chou, Jeff W; Miller, Lance D; Cline, J Mark

    2016-05-01

    Endogenous estrogens influence mammary gland development during puberty and breast cancer risk during adulthood. Early-life exposure to dietary or environmental estrogens may alter estrogen-mediated processes. Soy foods contain phytoestrogenic isoflavones (IF), which have mixed estrogen agonist/antagonist properties. Here, we evaluated mammary gland responses over time in pubertal female cynomolgus macaques fed diets containing either casein/lactalbumin (n = 12) or soy protein containing a human-equivalent dose of 120 mg IF/day (n = 17) for approximately 4.5 years spanning menarche. We assessed estrogen receptor (ER) expression and activity, promoter methylation of ERs and their downstream targets, and markers of estrogen metabolism. Expression of ERα and classical ERα response genes (TFF1, PGR, and GREB1) decreased with maturity, independent of diet. A significant inverse correlation was observed between TFF1 mRNA and methylation of CpG sites within the TFF1 promoter. Soy effects included lower ERβ expression before menarche and lower mRNA for ERα and GREB1 after menarche. Expression of GATA-3, an epithelial differentiation marker that regulates ERα-mediated transcription, was elevated before menarche and decreased after menarche in soy-fed animals. Soy did not significantly alter expression of other ER activity markers, estrogen-metabolizing enzymes, or promoter methylation for ERs or ER-regulated genes. Our results demonstrate greater ER expression and activity during the pubertal transition, supporting the idea that this life stage is a critical window for phenotypic modulation by estrogenic compounds. Pubertal soy exposure decreases mammary ERα expression after menarche and exerts subtle effects on receptor activity and mammary gland differentiation. Cancer Prev Res; 9(5); 385-95. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Dietary exposure of Antarctic krill to p,p'-DDE: uptake kinetics and toxicological sensitivity in a key polar species.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Anita H; Landrum, Peter F; Kawaguchi, So; Bengtson Nash, Susan M

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated the dietary uptake kinetics and sublethal toxicity of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) in Antarctic krill. The uptake rate constant (characterised by the seawater volume stripped of contaminant sorbed to algae) of 200 ± 0.32 mL g(-1) wet weight h(-1), average absorption efficiency of 86 ± 13% and very low elimination rate constant of 5 × 10(-6) ± 0.0031 h(-1) demonstrate the importance of feeding for p,p'-DDE bioaccumulation in Antarctic krill. Faecal egestion of unabsorbed p,p'-DDE of 8.1 ± 2.7% indicates that this pathway contributes considerably to p,p'-DDE sinking fluxes. A median internal effective concentration (IEC50) of 15 mmol/kg lipid weight for complete immobility indicates baseline toxicity and that Antarctic krill exhibit comparable toxicological sensitivity as temperate species under similar 10 d exposure conditions. These findings support the critical body residue approach and provide insight to the role of Antarctic krill in the biogeochemical cycling of p,p'-DDE in the Southern Ocean.

  14. Dietary exposure of children and teenagers to benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) in Beirut (Lebanon).

    PubMed

    Soubra, L; Sarkis, D; Hilan, C; Verger, Ph

    2007-02-01

    The acceptable daily intake (ADI) for a considered chemical is by definition the amount of that substance which can be ingested every day during the life time without appreciable health risk. The theoretical risk of exceeding the ADI for benzoates, sulphites, butylhydroxyanisol (BHA) and butylhydroxytoluen (BHT) has often been examined on the basis of worst case scenario. The aim of this paper is to assess the actual intake of the food additives listed above for a group of the Lebanese population (students aged between 9 and 18 years old) likely to be highly exposed to food additives through the consumption of processed foods. Dietary exposure was obtained by combining food consumption data with food additives levels determined by chemical analysis. Food products available in Lebanon and containing added benzoates, sulphites, BHA and BHT were identified. Overall 420 samples of foods and beverages were analysed. The determination of food additives residue levels was carried out according to the official methods adopted in "Lebanese Institute for agronomic research" (IRAL) on food as consumed. The acceptable daily intake (ADI) could be exceeded for sulphites and BHT by a fraction of the population, in particular within children of 9-13 years old. Among all food additive-containing foods, the highest contributors were: soft drinks to benzoates intake, nuts and canned juices to sulphites intake, bread and biscuits to BHA intake and chewing gum to BHT intake.

  15. Great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) dietary exposure to PCDD/DF in the Tittabawassee River floodplain in Midland, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Coefield, Sarah J; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Fredricks, Timothy B; Seston, Rita M; Nadeau, Michael W; Tazelaar, Dustin L; Moore, Jeremy N; Kay, Denise P; Roark, Shaun A; Giesy, John P

    2010-10-01

    Soils and sediments in the floodplain of the Tittabawassee River downstream of Midland, Michigan, USA contain elevated concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD). As a long-lived, resident top predator, the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus; GHO) has the potential to be exposed to bioaccumulative compounds such as PCDD/DF. Site-specific components of the GHO diet were collected along 115 km of the Tittabawassee, Pine, Chippewa, and Saginaw Rivers during 2005 and 2006. The site-specific GHO biomass-based diet was dominated by cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) and muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus). Incidental soil ingestion and cottontail rabbits were the primary contributors of PCDD/DF to the GHO diet. The great horned owl daily dietary exposure estimates were greater in the study area (SA) (3.3 to 5.0 ng 2,3,7,8-TCDD equivalents (TEQ(WHO-avian))/kg body wt/d) than the reference area (RA) (0.07 ng TEQ(WHO-Avian)/kg body wt/d). Hazard quotients (HQs) based on central tendency estimates of the average daily dose and no-observable-adverse effect level (NOAEL) for the screech owl and uncertainty factors were <1.0 for both the RA and the SA. Hazard quotients based on upper end estimates of the average daily dose and NOAEL were <1.0 in the RA and up to 3.4 in the SA. PMID:20872700

  16. Estimated dietary exposure of Canadians to perchlorate through the consumption of fruits and vegetables available in Ottawa markets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongwen; Forsyth, Don; Lau, Benjamin P-Y; Pelletier, Luc; Bronson, Roni; Gaertner, Dean

    2009-10-14

    There has been increasing concern over the contamination of drinking water and food with perchlorate. Studies have reported perchlorate in a variety of foods, including lettuce, milk, fruits, and juices. In this study, 150 food samples were analyzed by ion chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (IC-MS/MS) to determine the concentrations of perchlorate in imported and domestic fruits and vegetables available from retail outlets in Ottawa, Canada. Perchlorate was found in most of the tested food types with concentrations appearing to vary by commodity and country of origin. Levels ranged from nondetectable to 536 microg/kg, with Guatemalan cantaloupes (156 +/- 232 microg/kg), United States spinach (133 +/- 24.9 microg/kg), Chilean green grapes (45.5 +/- 13.3 microg/kg), and United States Romaine lettuce (29.1 +/- 10.5 microg/kg) having the highest concentrations. Dietary exposure to perchlorate from analyzed fruits and vegetables was estimated to be approximately 36.6 and 41.1 ng/kg bw/day for toddlers (1-4 yrs) and children (5-11yrs), respectively.

  17. Antibiotics in typical marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China: occurrence, bioaccumulation and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Liu, Shan; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Shuang-Shuang; Zhou, Guang-Jie; Sun, Kai-Feng; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2015-01-15

    The occurrence, bioaccumulation, and human dietary exposure via seafood consumption of 37 antibiotics in six typical marine aquaculture farms surrounding Hailing Island, South China were investigated in this study. Sulfamethoxazole, salinomycin and trimethoprim were widely detected in the water samples (0.4-36.9 ng/L), while oxytetracycline was the predominant antibiotic in the water samples of shrimp larvae pond. Enrofloxacin was widely detected in the feed samples (16.6-31.8 ng/g) and erythromycin-H2O was the most frequently detected antibiotic in the sediment samples (0.8-4.8 ng/g). Erythromycin-H2O was the dominant antibiotic in the adult Fenneropenaeus penicillatus with concentrations ranging from 2498 to 15,090 ng/g. In addition, trimethoprim was found to be bioaccumulative in young Lutjanus russelli with a median bioaccumulation factor of 6488 L/kg. Based on daily intake estimation, the erythromycin-H2O in adult F. penicillatus presented a potential risk to human safety.

  18. Dietary exposure estimates for the food preservatives benzoic acid and sorbic acid in the total diet in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ling, Min-Pei; Lien, Keng-Wen; Wu, Chiu-Hua; Ni, Shih-Pei; Huang, Hui-Ying; Hsieh, Dennis P H

    2015-02-25

    The purpose was to assess the health risk to general consumers in Taiwan associated with dietary intake of benzoic acid and sorbic acid by conducting a total diet study (TDS). The hazard index (HI) in percent acceptable daily intake (%ADI) of benzoic acid and sorbic acid for eight exposure groups classified by age were calculated. In high-intake consumers, the highest HI of benzoic acid was 54.1%ADI for males aged 1-2 years old at the 95th percentile, whereas for females, the HI was 61.7%ADI for aged over 66 years old. The highest HI of sorbic acid for male and female consumers aged 3-6 years old at the 95th percentile were 14.0%ADI and 12.2%ADI, respectively. These results indicate that the use of benzoic acid and sorbic acid as preservatives at the current level of use in the Taiwanese diet does not constitute a public health and safety concern.

  19. Prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke interacts with OPRM1 to modulate dietary preference for fat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ken W.K.; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leonard, Gabriel T.; Richer, Louis; Perron, Michel; Veillette, Suzanne; Reischl, Eva; Bouchard, Luigi; Gaudet, Daniel; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    Background Preference for fatty foods is a risk factor for obesity. It is a complex behaviour that involves the brain reward system and is regulated by genetic and environmental factors, such as the opioid receptor mu-1 gene (OPRM1) and prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking (PEMCS). We examined whether OPRM1 and PEMCS interact in influencing fat intake and whether exposure-associated epigenetic modifications of OPRM1 may mediate this gene–environment interaction. Methods We studied adolescents from a French Canadian genetic founder population, half of whom were exposed prenatally to maternal cigarette smoking. Fat intake was assessed with a 24-hour food recall in the form of a structured interview conducted by a trained nutritionist. The OPRM1 variant rs2281617 was genotyped for the whole sample with the Illumina Human610-Quad and HumanOmniExpress BeadChips. Methylation of blood DNA was assessed at 21 CpGs across OPRM1 in a subset of the sample using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Results We included 956 adolescents in our study. In the whole sample, OPRM1 (T carrier in rs2281617) was associated with lower fat intake (−1.6%, p = 0.017), and PEMCS was associated with higher fat intake (+1.6%, p = 0.005). OPRM1 and PEMCS interacted with each other (p = 0.003); the “protective” (fat intake–lowering) allele of OPRM1 was associated with lower fat intake in nonexposed (−3.2%, p < 0.001) but not in exposed individuals (+0.8%, p = 0.42). Further, PEMCS was associated with lower DNA methylation across multiple CpGs across OPRM1 in exposed versus nonexposed individuals (p = 0.031). Limitations A limitation of our study was its cross-sectional design. Conclusion Our study suggests that PEMCS may interact with OPRM1 in increasing fat preference. Silencing of the protective OPRM1 allele in exposed adolescents might be related to epigenetic modification of this gene. PMID:25266401

  20. Uptake and biotransformation of structurally diverse brominated flame retardants in zebrafish (Danio rerio) after dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Nyholm, Jenny Rattfelt; Norman, Anna; Norrgren, Leif; Haglund, Peter; Andersson, Patrik L

    2009-05-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were fed a diet containing a mixture of 11 structurally diverse brominated flame retardants (BFRs) at nominal concentrations of either 1 or 100 nmol/g for up to 42 d, followed by an elimination period of 14 d. Uptake rates and elimination constants for five of the BFRs were calculated from measurements of their concentrations in the male fish during the exposure and elimination phases. Observed uptake efficiencies were highest for 2,4,4'-tribromodiphenyl ether (BDE 28) and 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH) and were lowest for decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209). Estimated half-lives for TBECH and 2,4,6-tribromophenol were short (<2 d). Four BFR metabolites were identified in the fish: 2,2',3,4',5',6-Hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 149), 2,2',4,4',5,6'-hexabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 154), 2,4,6-tribromoanisole, and 1,2,4,5-hexabromobenzene. These metabolites were still present in the zebrafish after the 14-d elimination period. No relationship between the BFR concentrations in the zebrafish and their log octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) values was found. Generally, low tendencies to bioaccumulate were observed for perbrominated and hydroxylated compounds. The observed accumulation of BFR metabolites in fish, however, shows that low concentration of a BFR does not provide, in isolation, a sound indication that the BFR poses low risks. PMID:19049262

  1. Relevant shellfish consumption data for dietary exposure assessment among high shellfish consumers, Western Brittany, France.

    PubMed

    Picot, Cyndie; Nguyen, Thuan Anh; Carpentier, François-Gilles; Roudot, Alain-Claude; Parent-Massin, Dominique

    2011-04-01

    Shellfish consumption can be a major pathway of exposure to pollutants for humans. It is fundamental to know if people eat enough shellfish to cause health problems, firstly in high consumers as recreational shellfish harvesters. The objectives of this study were to investigate the types of shellfish eaten, number of meals, portion size, sources of shellfish and shellfish consumption rates among French recreational shellfish harvesters; to determine factors affecting consumption patterns and to examine the reliability of the two methods used: a Food Frequency Questionnaire and a one-month food diary. The mean consumption rates were 11.63 and 26.21 g/person/day for shellfish derived from a self-harvested source only and from all sources, respectively. Harvester consumption rates were between 6- and 15-fold higher than the general French population. The comparison between the FFQ and the food diary showed that results were reliable. Thereby, our results are relevant to assess risk due to shellfish consumption.

  2. Dietary Exposure of Nigerians to Mutagens and Estrogen-Like Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Omoruyi, Iyekhoetin Matthew; Ahamioje, Derek; Pohjanvirta, Raimo

    2014-01-01

    Food and drinking water are poorly delineated sources of human exposure to chemical food mutagens and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. In this study, we investigated the presence of mutagens and chemicals exhibiting estrogenic activity in the daily diet of Nigerians, using in vitro assays. Commercially processed foods or snacks and various brands of pure water sachets were extracted by solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction, respectively. Mutagenicity was determined by the conventional Ames test and two complementary assays on two strains of Salmonella (TA 100 and TA 98), while the estrogenic activity was assessed by a yeast bioluminescent assay, using two recombinant yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMAEREluc/ERα and S. cerevisiae BMA64/luc). A third of the food varieties investigated (chin-chin, hamburger, suya and bean cake) were mutagenic in all three assays, either in the presence or absence of S9 mix. Of the packed water samples, five out of the sixteen investigated (31%), were found to be estrogenic, with estradiol and bisphenol A equivalents ranging from 0.79 to 44.0 ng/L and 124.2 to 1,000.8 ng/L, respectively. Hence, although the current situation in Nigeria does not appear to be substantially worse than, e.g., in Europe, regular monitoring is warranted in the future. PMID:25153465

  3. Hexabromocyclododecane in consumer fish from South China: implications for human exposure via dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Xiang, Nan; Duan, Yan-Ping; Chen, Ling; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2012-07-01

    Levels of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) were determined in 12 consumer fish species from South China. The concentrations of the sum of HBCD diastereoisomers (ΣHBCD) ranged from nondetectable to 194 pg/g wet weight, with a detectable frequency of 70%. This was at the low end of the concentration range globally observed. Carnivorous fish species contained higher HBCD concentrations than herbivorous and detritivorous ones, suggesting the potential for biomagnification of HBCDs via the trophic chain. Moreover, ΣHBCD concentrations were higher in both freshwater and seawater farmed fish than in wild marine fish, indicating that human activities were probably an important input source of HBCD in aquaculture. Among the three diastereoisomers, α-HBCD dominated in most samples, with a mean relative abundance of 70%. In agreement with previous studies, a difference in the diastereomer patterns was observed from commercial products and several environmental media to biota samples. For farm-raised snubnose pompano, the concentrations of ΣHBCD were moderately linearly correlated with lipid contents but were not significantly correlated with fish body lengths and weights. In the worst-case exposure, the mean estimated daily intake of ΣHBCD via fish consumption for residents of South China ranged from 13 to 16 pg/kg body weight/d for various age groups, much lower than its lowest observed adverse effect level derived from a two-generation reproductive toxicity study on rats.

  4. Dietary exposure of Nigerians to mutagens and estrogen-like chemicals.

    PubMed

    Omoruyi, Iyekhoetin Matthew; Ahamioje, Derek; Pohjanvirta, Raimo

    2014-08-15

    Food and drinking water are poorly delineated sources of human exposure to chemical food mutagens and endocrine-disrupting chemicals. In this study, we investigated the presence of mutagens and chemicals exhibiting estrogenic activity in the daily diet of Nigerians, using in vitro assays. Commercially processed foods or snacks and various brands of pure water sachets were extracted by solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction, respectively. Mutagenicity was determined by the conventional Ames test and two complementary assays on two strains of Salmonella (TA 100 and TA 98), while the estrogenic activity was assessed by a yeast bioluminescent assay, using two recombinant yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMAEREluc/ERα and S. cerevisiae BMA64/luc). A third of the food varieties investigated (chin-chin, hamburger, suya and bean cake) were mutagenic in all three assays, either in the presence or absence of S9 mix. Of the packed water samples, five out of the sixteen investigated (31%), were found to be estrogenic, with estradiol and bisphenol A equivalents ranging from 0.79 to 44.0 ng/L and 124.2 to 1,000.8 ng/L, respectively. Hence, although the current situation in Nigeria does not appear to be substantially worse than, e.g., in Europe, regular monitoring is warranted in the future.

  5. Dietary exposure of largemouth bass to OCPs changes expression of genes important for reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Barber, D.S.; Gross, T.S.; Johnson, K.G.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Szabo, N.J.; Denslow, N.D.

    2006-01-01

    Dieldrin and p,p???-DDE are ubiquitous contaminants known to act as endocrine disruptors, causing impaired development and reproduction in fish and wildlife. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which dieldrin and p,p???-DDE cause endocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), fish were exposed subchronically through the diet to both contaminants. Following 120 days of exposure, p,p???-DDE decreased estradiol in females, but increased 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Dieldrin on the other hand, decreased estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Both pesticides also altered steady state mRNA expression levels of a set of genes chosen to represent three possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption: (1) direct interaction with soluble sex steroid receptors, (2) biosynthesis of endogenous sex hormones, and (3) metabolism of endogenous hormones. p,p???-DDE acted as a weak estrogen, increasing the expression of vitellogenin and estrogen receptor ?? in the liver. p,p???-DDE also altered the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of endogenous hormones as well as their metabolism. Dieldrin, on the other hand, only altered expression of vitellogenin and not estrogen receptor ??. Dieldrin also altered the expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis and metabolism, and it dramatically lowered plasma hormone levels. Both pesticides targeted expression of genes involved in all three modes of action, suggesting that they each have multiple modes of action. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dietary exposure and health risk assessment for 14 toxic and essential trace elements in Yaoundé: the Cameroonian total diet study.

    PubMed

    Gimou, Marie-Madeleine; Pouillot, Régis; Charrondiere, U Ruth; Noël, Laurent; Guérin, Thierry; Leblanc, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    Dietary exposure to trace elements (aluminium, antimony, barium, cadmium, lead, nickel, vanadium, copper, manganese, molybdenum, germanium, lithium, strontium and tellurium) was assessed by the total diet study (TDS) method. Sixty-four pooled samples representing 96.5% of the diet in Yaoundé, Cameroon, were prepared "as consumed" before analysis. Consumption data were sourced from a households' budget survey. Dietary exposures were compared with health-based guidance or nutritional values and to worldwide TDS results. The health-based guidance value was exceeded by ≤ 0.2% of the study population for aluminium, antimony, barium, cadmium, nickel and vanadium. For lead, the observed 95th percentile of exposure (3.05 µg kg(-1) body weight day(-1)) equals the critical value considered by JECFA for cardiovascular effects; therefore, risk to health cannot be excluded for certain consumer groups. The population at risk of excess intake for manganese, copper, molybdenum and nickel was considered to be low (≤ 0.3%). The prevalence of inadequate intake was estimated at 5.9% for copper and was nil for molybdenum. Due to the lack of toxicological and/or nutritional consistent data to perform a risk assessment, dietary exposures to germanium, lithium, strontium and tellurium were provided as supplementary data. The food groups highest contributors to exposure were "tubers and starches" for aluminium (27%), lead (39%) and copper (26%), "cereals and cereal products" for cadmium (54%) and manganese (35%), "fruits, vegetables and oilseeds" for barium (34%), molybdenum (49%) and nickel (31%), "beverages" for antimony (27%) and "fish" for vanadium (43% - lower bound). Measures should be recommended to maintain low levels of exposure before the problem could become an important health or trade issue.

  7. Total Diet Study: For a Closer-to-real Estimate of Dietary Exposure to Chemical Substances

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeeyeon; Kwon, Sungok; Yoon, Hae-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Recent amendment on the Food Sanitation Act in Korea mandated the Minister of Food & Drug Safety to secure the scientific basis for management and reevaluation of standards and specifications of foods. Especially because the current food safety control is limited within the scope of ‘Farm to Market’ covering from production to retail in Korea, safety control at the plane of true ‘Farm to Fork’ scope is urgently needed and should include ‘total diet’ of population instead of individual food items. Therefore, ‘Total Diet Study (TDS)’ which provides ‘closer-to-real’ estimates of exposure to hazardous materials through analysis on table-ready (cooked) samples of foods would be the solution to more comprehensive food safety management, as suggested by World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Although the protection of diets from hazards must be considered as one of the most essential public health functions of any country, we may need to revisit the value of foods which has been too much underrated by the meaningless amount of some hazardous materials in Korea. Considering the primary value of foods lies on sustaining life, growth, development, and health promotion of human being, food safety control should be handled not only by the presence or absence of hazardous materials but also by maximizing the value of foods via balancing with the preservation of beneficial components in foods embracing total diet. In this regard, this article aims to provide an overview on TDS by describing procedures involved except chemical analysis which is beyond our scope. Also, details on the ongoing TDS in Korea are provided as an example. Although TDS itself might not be of keen interest for most readers, it is the main user of the safety reference values resulted from toxicological research in the public health perspective. PMID:26483882

  8. Assessment of dietary exposure to some persistent organic pollutants in the Republic of Karakalpakstan of Uzbekistan.

    PubMed Central

    Muntean, Nigina; Jermini, Marco; Small, Ian; Falzon, Dennis; Fürst, Peter; Migliorati, Giacomo; Scortichini, Giampiero; Forti, Anna Francesca; Anklam, Elke; von Holst, Christoph; Niyazmatov, Bakhtier; Bahkridinov, Shakub; Aertgeerts, Roger; Bertollini, Roberto; Tirado, Cristina; Kolb, Anthony

    2003-01-01

    A 1999 study heightened long-standing concerns over persistent organic pollutant contamination in the Aral Sea area, detecting elevated levels in breast milk and cord blood of women in Karakalpakstan (western Uzbekistan). These findings prompted a collaborative research study aimed at linking such human findings with evidence of food chain contamination in the area. An international team carried out analyses of organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) on samples of 12 foods commonly produced and consumed in Karakalpakstan. Analysis consistently detected long-lasting organochlorine pesticides and their metabolites in all foods of animal origin and in some vegetables such as onions and carrots--two low-cost components of many traditional dishes. Levels of PCBs were relatively low in all samples except fish. Analyses revealed high levels of PCDDs and PCDFs (together often termed "dioxins") in sheep fat, dairy cream, eggs, and edible cottonseed oil, among other foodstuffs. These findings indicate that food traditionally grown, sold, and consumed in Karakalpakstan is a major route of human exposure to several persistent toxic contaminants, including the most toxic of dioxins, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Intake estimations demonstrate that consumption of even small amounts of locally grown food may expose consumers to dioxin levels that considerably exceed the monthly tolerable dioxin intake levels set by the World Health Organization. Data presented in this study allow a first assessment of the risk associated with the consumption of certain food products in Karakalpakstan and highlight a critical public health situation. PMID:12896851

  9. Assessment of dietary exposure to some persistent organic pollutants in the Republic of Karakalpakstan of Uzbekistan.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Nigina; Jermini, Marco; Small, Ian; Falzon, Dennis; Fürst, Peter; Migliorati, Giacomo; Scortichini, Giampiero; Forti, Anna Francesca; Anklam, Elke; von Holst, Christoph; Niyazmatov, Bakhtier; Bahkridinov, Shakub; Aertgeerts, Roger; Bertollini, Roberto; Tirado, Cristina; Kolb, Anthony

    2003-08-01

    A 1999 study heightened long-standing concerns over persistent organic pollutant contamination in the Aral Sea area, detecting elevated levels in breast milk and cord blood of women in Karakalpakstan (western Uzbekistan). These findings prompted a collaborative research study aimed at linking such human findings with evidence of food chain contamination in the area. An international team carried out analyses of organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) on samples of 12 foods commonly produced and consumed in Karakalpakstan. Analysis consistently detected long-lasting organochlorine pesticides and their metabolites in all foods of animal origin and in some vegetables such as onions and carrots--two low-cost components of many traditional dishes. Levels of PCBs were relatively low in all samples except fish. Analyses revealed high levels of PCDDs and PCDFs (together often termed "dioxins") in sheep fat, dairy cream, eggs, and edible cottonseed oil, among other foodstuffs. These findings indicate that food traditionally grown, sold, and consumed in Karakalpakstan is a major route of human exposure to several persistent toxic contaminants, including the most toxic of dioxins, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Intake estimations demonstrate that consumption of even small amounts of locally grown food may expose consumers to dioxin levels that considerably exceed the monthly tolerable dioxin intake levels set by the World Health Organization. Data presented in this study allow a first assessment of the risk associated with the consumption of certain food products in Karakalpakstan and highlight a critical public health situation. PMID:12896851

  10. Total Diet Study: For a Closer-to-real Estimate of Dietary Exposure to Chemical Substances.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cho-Il; Lee, Jeeyeon; Kwon, Sungok; Yoon, Hae-Jung

    2015-09-01

    Recent amendment on the Food Sanitation Act in Korea mandated the Minister of Food & Drug Safety to secure the scientific basis for management and reevaluation of standards and specifications of foods. Especially because the current food safety control is limited within the scope of 'Farm to Market' covering from production to retail in Korea, safety control at the plane of true 'Farm to Fork' scope is urgently needed and should include 'total diet' of population instead of individual food items. Therefore, 'Total Diet Study (TDS)' which provides 'closer-to-real' estimates of exposure to hazardous materials through analysis on table-ready (cooked) samples of foods would be the solution to more comprehensive food safety management, as suggested by World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Although the protection of diets from hazards must be considered as one of the most essential public health functions of any country, we may need to revisit the value of foods which has been too much underrated by the meaningless amount of some hazardous materials in Korea. Considering the primary value of foods lies on sustaining life, growth, development, and health promotion of human being, food safety control should be handled not only by the presence or absence of hazardous materials but also by maximizing the value of foods via balancing with the preservation of beneficial components in foods embracing total diet. In this regard, this article aims to provide an overview on TDS by describing procedures involved except chemical analysis which is beyond our scope. Also, details on the ongoing TDS in Korea are provided as an example. Although TDS itself might not be of keen interest for most readers, it is the main user of the safety reference values resulted from toxicological research in the public health perspective. PMID:26483882

  11. Oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, and metallothionein (MT) gene expression in juvenile rock fish Sebastes schlegelii under the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) exposure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Kang, Ju-Chan

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile Sebastes schlegelii were exposed for 4 weeks with the different levels of dietary chromium (Cr(6+)) concentration (0, 30, 60, 120 and 200mg/kg). The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and glutathione (GSH) level of liver and gill were evaluated after 4 weeks exposure. The SOD and GST activity of liver and gill was significantly increased in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg after 4 weeks, whereas a considerable decrease in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg after 4 weeks was observed in the GSH levels of liver and gill. In neurotoxicity, AChE activity was significatly inhibited in brain in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 60mg/kg after 4 weeks and muscle in the concentration of 240mg/kg after 2 weeks and over 120mg/kg after 4 weeks. Metallothionein (MT) gene in liver was considerably increased over 120mg/kg after 2 weeks and at 30, 120, and 240mg/kg after 4 weeks by dietary chromium exposure. The results indicate that dietary Cr exposure over 120mg/kg can induce substantial alterations in antioxidant responses, AChE activity and MT gene expression.

  12. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER BRAINSTEM AUDITORY EVOKED RESPONSE (BAERS) IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in auditory structures in the periphery and the brainstem and is altered following chlorpyrifos exposure. This study e...

  13. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FAILS TO ALTER FLASH OR PATTERN REVERSAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Visual disturbances are often reported following exposure to xenobiotics, and cholinesterase-inhibiting compounds have been reported to alter visual functi...

  14. Dietary ingestion of fine sediments and microalgae represent the dominant route of exposure and metal accumulation for Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata): A biokinetic model for zinc.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-H; Birch, G F; Cresswell, T; Johansen, M P; Adams, M S; Simpson, S L

    2015-10-01

    Past studies disagree on the extent to which dissolved or dietary uptake contribute to metal bioaccumulation in the filter-feeding Sydney rock oyster (Saccostrea glomerata) in urbanized estuaries. Although most data support the assumption that fine sediments are a major route of metal uptake in these bivalves, some studies based in the Sydney estuary, Australia, have indicated a poor correlation. In the present study, seawater, sediment and microalgae were radiolabelled with (65)Zn tracer and exposed to S. glomerata to assess the influence of dissolved and dietary sources to Zn bioaccumulation. Oysters in the dissolved-phase uptake experiment (5, 25 and 50 μg L(-1) (65)Zn for 4 d followed by 21 days of depuration) readily accumulated (65)Zn for all three concentrations with an uptake rate constant of 0.160±0.006 L dry weight g(-1) d(-1). Oysters in the dietary assimilation experiment (1h pulse-feed of either (65)Zn-radiolabelled suspended fine-fraction (<63 μm) sediment or the microalgae Tetraselmis sp.) accumulated (65)Zn, with assimilation efficiencies of 59 and 67% for fine sediment and microalgae, respectively. The efflux rates were low for the three experiments (0.1-0.5% d(-1)). A bioaccumulation kinetic model predicts that uptake of Zn will occur predominantly through the dietary ingestion of contaminated fine sediment particles and microalgae within the water column, with considerably greater metal bioaccumulation predicted if oysters ingested microalgae preferentially to sediments. However, the model predicts that for dissolved Zn concentrations greater than 40 μg L(-1), as observed during precipitation events, the uptake of the dissolved phase may contribute ≥50% to accumulation. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that all three sources may be important exposure routes to S. glomerata under different environmental conditions, but contributions from dietary exposure will often dominate.

  15. A community-based assessment of seafood consumption along the lower James River, Virginia, USA: potential sources of dietary mercury exposure.

    PubMed

    Holloman, Erica L; Newman, Michael C

    2010-04-01

    The use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) methods to conduct environmental exposure assessments provides valuable insight about disparities in seafood consumption and contaminant exposure. Ninety-five community-specific seafood consumption surveys were administered to low-income African-American women (ages 16-49) residing in the Southeast community of Newport News, VA, USA, for the purpose of assessing potential dietary mercury exposure. Only the results of the seafood consumption surveys are presented in this manuscript. Approximately 65% of the women surveyed do not fish; however, 83% had consumed seafood within the last 7 days. Whiting, shrimp, and canned tuna were the three items most frequently consumed. Ninety-three percent of the women surveyed stated that grocery/seafood markets were the main sources of the seafood items generally consumed. The mean seafood consumption rate for the women surveyed was 147.8 g/day (95% CI: 117.6-185.8), a rate substantially higher than the mean seafood consumption rate reported for US women (1.8 g/day 95% CI: 1.51-2.04). Shrimp, croaker, and blue crab were the top three seafood items with the highest summed amount (g/day) consumed. There was no significant association between demographic variables (age, income, education, and weight) and total number of seafood items listed, ingestion rate (g/meal), exposure frequency (meals/year), and seafood consumption rate (g/day). By using CBPR to assess seafood consumption in this community, we learned that even though women in Southeast Newport News, Virginia are not subsistence fishers, they consume seafood at a subsistence fisher rate. Of the three seafood items most frequently consumed, canned tuna potentially plays a significant role in dietary mercury exposure for women in this community. Future work includes determining mercury concentrations in seafood items consumed and generating community-specific statements of dietary mercury risks. PMID:20129605

  16. Use of volatile compound metabolic signatures in poultry liver to back-trace dietary exposure to rapidly metabolized xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Berge, Philippe; Ratel, Jérémy; Fournier, Agnès; Jondreville, Catherine; Feidt, Cyril; Roudaut, Brigitte; Le Bizec, Bruno; Engel, Erwan

    2011-08-01

    The study investigated the feasibility of using volatile compound signatures of liver tissues in poultry to detect previous dietary exposure to different types of xenobiotic. Six groups of broiler chickens were fed a similar diet either noncontaminated or contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/-furans (PCDD/Fs; 3.14 pg WHO-TEQ/g feed, 12% moisture), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; 0.08 pg WHO-TEQ/g feed, 12% moisture), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; 1.63 ng/g feed, 12% moisture), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; 0.72 μg/g fresh matter), or coccidiostats (0.5 mg/g feed, fresh matter). Each chicken liver was analyzed by solid-phase microextraction - mass spectrometry (SPME-MS) for volatile compound metabolic signature and by gas chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS), gas chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS), and liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to quantify xenobiotic residues. Volatile compound signature evidenced a liver metabolic response to PAH although these rapidly metabolized xenobiotics are undetectable in this organ by the reference methods. Similarly, the volatile compound metabolic signature enabled to differentiate the noncontaminated chickens from those contaminated with PBDEs or coccidiostats. In contrast, no clear signature was pointed out for slowly metabolized compounds such as PCDD/Fs and PCBs although their residues were found in liver at 50.93 (±6.71) and 0.67 (±0.1) pg WHO-TEQ/g fat, respectively. PMID:21749145

  17. Analysis, distribution, and dietary exposure of glyoxal and methylglyoxal in cookies and their relationship with other heat-induced contaminants.

    PubMed

    Arribas-Lorenzo, Gema; Morales, Francisco J

    2010-03-10

    Thermal processing of food leads to the formation of dicarbonyls such as glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MGO), which are potentially harmful because they are precursors of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). GO and MGO formation was examined during the baking process of cookies as cookies are a widely distributed food commodity in Western diets. GO and MGO were chromatographically analyzed after employment of an improved method of derivatization with orthophenylenediamine to produce stable quinoxaline derivatives. Sample extraction, cleanup, and chromatographic conditions were evaluated to provide an in-house validated procedure for GO and MGO analysis in cookies. Quantification limits were set at 1.5 and 2 mg/kg for GO and MGO, respectively, with an average recovery of 103% and a calculated precision lower than 7%. Studies were carried out both on laboratory-scale cookies under controlled conditions and on commercial samples as well. GO and MGO values in commercial cookies ranged from 4.8 to 26.0 mg/kg and from 3.7 to 81.4 mg/kg, respectively. Commercial cookies made from ammonium bicarbonate and fructose showed the highest levels of MGO. Dicarbonyls were rapidly formed on the upper side of the cookie regardless of the shape or thickness of the samples, confirming there was a surface effect. Under controlled baking conditions, the formations of GO and MGO were linearly correlated with baking time. MGO formation was related with acrylamide, a heat-processing contaminant, in commercial cookies, but this relationship was not observed for 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Dietary exposure of the Spanish population to GO and MGO from cookies was estimated to be 213 and 216 microg/person/day, respectively.

  18. Dietary exposure to technical hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) alters courtship, incubation and parental behaviors in American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    PubMed

    Marteinson, Sarah C; Bird, David M; Letcher, Robert J; Sullivan, Katrina M; Ritchie, Ian J; Fernie, Kim J

    2012-11-01

    Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a high production volume brominated flame retardant that has been detected in the environment and wildlife at increasing concentrations. This study was designed to determine potential effects of dietary exposure to environmentally relevant levels of HBCD on behavior during reproduction in captive American kestrels. Twenty kestrel pairs were exposed to 0.51 μg technical HBCD g(-1) kestrel d(-1) from 4 weeks prior to pairing until chicks hatched (~75 d). Ten pairs of controls received the safflower oil vehicle only and were used for comparison. During the courtship period the chitter-calls were reduced in both sexes (p=0.038) and females performed fewer bonding displays (p=0.053). Both sexes showed a propensity to be less active than controls during courtship. The reduction in male courtship behavior was correlated with reduced courtship behaviors of females (p=0.008) as well as reduced egg mass (p=0.019). During incubation, nest temperatures of treatment pairs were lower at mid-incubation (p=0.038). HBCD-exposed males performed fewer key parental behaviors when rearing nestlings, including entering the nest-box, pair-bonding displays and food-retrievals. HBCD-exposed females appeared to compensate for the reduced parental behavior of their mates by performing these same behaviors more frequently than controls (p=0.004, p=0.027, p=0.025, respectively). This study demonstrates that HBCD affects breeding behavior in American kestrels throughout the reproductive season and behavioral alterations were linked to reproductive changes (egg size). This is the first study to report HBCD effects on reproductive behavior in any animal model. PMID:22743184

  19. Dietary glutamine prevents the loss of intestinal barrier function and attenuates the increase in core body temperature induced by acute heat exposure.

    PubMed

    Soares, Anne D N; Costa, Kátia A; Wanner, Samuel P; Santos, Rosana G C; Fernandes, Simone O A; Martins, Flaviano S; Nicoli, Jacques R; Coimbra, Cândido C; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2014-11-28

    Dietary glutamine (Gln) supplementation improves intestinal function in several stressful conditions. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of dietary Gln supplementation on the core body temperature (T core), bacterial translocation (BT) and intestinal permeability of mice subjected to acute heat stress were evaluated. Male Swiss mice (4 weeks old) were implanted with an abdominal temperature sensor and randomly assigned to one of the following groups fed isoenergetic and isoproteic diets for 7 d before the experimental trials: group fed the standard AIN-93G diet and exposed to a high ambient temperature (39°C) for 2 h (H-NS); group fed the AIN-93G diet supplemented with l-Gln and exposed to a high temperature (H-Gln); group fed the standard AIN-93G diet and not exposed to a high temperature (control, C-NS). Mice were orally administered diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid radiolabelled with technetium (99mTc) for the assessment of intestinal permeability or 99mTc-Escherichia coli for the assessment of BT. Heat exposure increased T core (approximately 41°C during the experimental trial), intestinal permeability and BT to the blood and liver (3 h after the experimental trial) in mice from the H-NS group relative to those from the C-NS group. Dietary Gln supplementation attenuated hyperthermia and prevented the increases in intestinal permeability and BT induced by heat exposure. No correlations were observed between the improvements in gastrointestinal function and the attenuation of hyperthermia by Gln. Our findings indicate that dietary Gln supplementation preserved the integrity of the intestinal barrier and reduced the severity of hyperthermia during heat exposure. The findings also indicate that these Gln-mediated effects occurred through independent mechanisms.

  20. Arsenic Exposure within the Korean Community (United States) Based on Dietary Behavior and Arsenic Levels in Hair, Urine, Air, and Water

    PubMed Central

    Cleland, Bill; Tsuchiya, Ami; Kalman, David A.; Dills, Russell; Burbacher, Thomas M.; White, Jim W.; Faustman, Elaine M.; Mariën, Koenraad

    2009-01-01

    Background Determining arsenic exposure in groups based on geographic location, dietary behaviors, or lifestyles is important, as even moderate exposures may lead to health concerns. Objectives/Methods The Korean community in Washington State, represents a group warranting investigation, as they consume foods (e.g., shellfish, rice, finfish, and seaweed) known to contain arsenic. As part of the Arsenic Mercury Intake Biometric Study, we examined the arsenic levels in hair and urine along with the diets of 108 women of childbearing age from within this community. Arsenic levels in indoor air and drinking water were also investigated, and shellfish commonly consumed were collected and analyzed for total and speciated arsenic. Results The six shellfish species analyzed (n = 667) contain total arsenic (range, 1–5 μg/g) but are a small source of inorganic arsenic (range, 0.01–0.12 μg/g). Six percent of the individuals may have elevated urinary inorganic arsenic levels (> 10 μg/L) due to diet. Seaweed, rice, shellfish, and finfish are principal sources for total arsenic intake/excretion based on mass balance estimates. Rice consumption (163 g/person/day) may be a significant source of inorganic arsenic. Air and water are not significant sources of exposure. Hair is a poor biometric for examining arsenic levels at low to moderate exposures. Conclusions We conclude that a portion of this community may have dietary inorganic arsenic exposure resulting in urine levels exceeding 10 μg/L. Although their exposure is below that associated with populations exposed to high levels of arsenic from drinking water (> 100 μg/L), their exposure may be among the highest in the United States. PMID:19440504

  1. Dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake modifies the effect of cadmium exposure on markers of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Colacino, Justin A.; Arthur, Anna E.; Ferguson, Kelly K.; Rozek, Laura S.

    2014-05-01

    Chronic cadmium exposure may cause disease through induction of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Factors that mitigate cadmium toxicity and could serve as interventions in exposed populations have not been well characterized. We used data from the 2003–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to quantify diet's role in modifying associations between cadmium exposure and oxidative stress and inflammation. We created a composite antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet score (ADS) by ranking participants by quintile of intake across a panel of 19 nutrients. We identified associations and effect modification between ADS, urinary cadmium, and markers of oxidative stress and inflammation by multiple linear regression. An interquartile range increase in urinary cadmium was associated with a 47.5%, 8.8%, and 3.7% increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), respectively. An interquartile range increase in ADS was associated with an 7.4%, 3.3%, 5.2%, and 2.5% decrease in CRP, GGT, ALP, and total white blood cell count respectively, and a 3.0% increase in serum bilirubin. ADS significantly attenuated the association between cadmium exposure, CRP and ALP. Dietary interventions may provide a route to reduce the impact of cadmium toxicity on the population level. - Highlights: • Cadmium may cause chronic disease through oxidative stress or inflammation. • We developed a score to quantify dietary antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake. • Cadmium was associated with markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. • Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory intake mitigated the effects of cadmium exposure. • Dietary interventions may be effective against chronic cadmium toxicity.

  2. The Role of Arsenic Speciation in Dietary Exposure Assessment and the Need to Include Bioaccessibility and Biotransformation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical form specific exposure assessment for arsenic has long been identified as a source of uncertainty in estimating the risk associated with the aggregate exposure for a population. Some speciation based assessments document occurrence within an exposure route; however, the...

  3. From pure compounds to complex exposure: Effects of dietary cadmium and lignans on estrogen, epidermal growth factor receptor, and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Hurmerinta, Teija; Nurmi, Tarja; Berglund, Marika; Rüegg, Joelle; Poutanen, Matti; Halldin, Krister; Mäkelä, Sari; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina

    2016-06-24

    Exposure to environmental endocrine active compounds correlates with altered susceptibility to disease in human populations. Chemical risk assessment is single compound based, although exposure often takes place as heterogeneous mixtures of man-made and natural substances within complex matrices like diet. Here we studied whether the effects of cadmium and enterolactone on endocrine endpoints in dietary exposure can be predicted based on pure compound effects. Ovariectomized estrogen reporter ERE-luciferase (ERE-luc) mice were maintained on diets that intrinsically contain increasing concentrations of cadmium and enterolactone precursors for three and 21 days. The activation of the ERE-luc, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-ERK1/2, and classical estrogen responses were measured. Interactions between the diets and endogenous hormone were evaluated by challenging the animals with 17β-estradiol. Compared to animals on basal purified diet, mice consuming experimental diets were exposed to significantly higher levels of cadmium and enterolactone, yet the exposure remained comparable to typical human dietary intake. Surprisingly, we could not detect effects on endpoints regulated by pure enterolactone, such as ERE-luc activation. However, cadmium accumulation in the liver was accompanied with activation of EGFR and MAPK-ERK1/2 in line with our earlier CdCl2 studies. Further, attenuation of 17β-estradiol-induced ERE-luc response in liver by experimental diets was observed. Our findings indicate that the exposure context can have substantial effects on the activity of endocrine active compounds in vivo. Thus, whenever possible, a context that mimics human exposure should be tested along with pure compounds. PMID:27108949

  4. A methodology for evaluating the influence of diets and intergenerational dietary transitions on historic and future human exposure to persistent organic pollutants in the Arctic.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Cristina L; Armitage, James M; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank

    2012-11-15

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Inuit populations have been observed to decrease over the last decade. The main objective of this study was to develop a methodology to quantify the potential influence of intergenerational dietary transitions on human exposure to organic contaminants in the Arctic environment using PCB-153 as a case study. Long-term (1930-2050) dynamic simulations using realistic emission estimates were conducted using linked chemical fate and bioaccumulation models. Female body burdens were calculated over time assuming five diets with varying proportions of traditional and imported food items and then used to illustrate the potential variability at a community/population level. At any given time point, individuals consuming a 100% traditional diet (i.e. high intake of ringed seal blubber) have modelled body burdens approximately 15-150 times higher than individuals consuming a 100% imported food diet. Consumption of locally-harvested fish (e.g. Arctic cod) and seal meat are also associated with comparatively low body burdens. Decreased emissions are predicted to decrease the PCB-153 body burden of 30-year old females by 6 to 13-fold from 1980 to 2020 with dietary transitions accounting for an additional factor of 2-50 (i.e. 12-650 times lower in total) depending on the type of dietary transition and the origin of the imported food items. The model results indicate that dietary transitions are an important factor underlying the variability within and between subpopulations in addition to partially explaining the observed temporal trends. Specific information on the nature and timing of dietary transitions is highly valuable when interpreting biomonitoring data.

  5. Potential of an in vitro toolbox combined with exposure data as a first step for the risk assessment of dietary chemical contaminants.

    PubMed

    Ribonnet, L; van der Heiden, E; Nobels, I; Chaumont, A; Remacle, A-S; De Saeger, S; Schneider, Y-J; Scippo, M-L; Blust, R; Pussemier, L; Larondelle, Y

    2011-09-01

    In vitro risk assessment of dietary contaminants has become a priority in human food safety. This paper proposes an in vitro approach associating different complementary tools in an original toolbox and aims to improve the assessment of the toxicological impact of dietary contaminants at realistic human exposure levels, with a special focus on the intestinal compartment. The system is based on the use of four complementary cellular tools, namely stress gene induction in transgenic strains of Escherichia coli, modulation of the activity of key biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P-450 (CYP) 1A1 and 3A4) in a human intestinal cell line, and activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and oestrogenic receptor (ER)-dependent genes in agonistic and antagonistic assays with luciferase reporter cells. It was applied to four chosen model molecules: ochratoxin A (OTA) and deoxynivalenol (DON), two common food-borne mycotoxins, and imazalil (IMA) and benomyl (BEN), two fungicides widely occurring in foodstuffs. All these assays were performed at or around a realistic intestinal concentration, determined through a deterministic approach based on the calculation of a theoretical maximum daily intake (TMDI). Using the four model molecules, it is clearly highlighted that induction of CYP1A1 activity and inhibition of CYP3A4 activity occurred in Caco-2 cells at a realistic intestinal concentration of IMA. Furthermore, some bacterial stress genes were induced in a range of realistic concentrations, following exposure to DON and IMA. In addition, BEN clearly provoked an ER agonistic activity in a human oestrogen sensitive reporter cell line. All these results are in accordance with the literature, suggesting that the in vitro toolbox constitutes an interesting approach in order to obtain a first 'fingerprint' of dietary contaminants at realistic human exposure for further risk assessment.

  6. Dietary salt loading and ion-poor water exposure provide insight into the molecular physiology of the rainbow trout gill epithelium tight junction complex.

    PubMed

    Kolosov, Dennis; Kelly, Scott P

    2016-08-01

    This study utilized dietary salt loading and ion-poor water (IPW) exposure of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to further understand the role of fish gill epithelium tight junction (TJ) physiology in salt and water balance. Gill morphology, biochemistry and molecular physiology were examined, with an emphasis on genes encoding TJ proteins. Fish were either fed a control or salt-enriched diet (~10 % NaCl) for 4 weeks prior to IPW exposure for 24 h. Serum [Na(+)], [Cl(-)] and muscle moisture content were unaltered by salt feeding, but changed in response to IPW irrespective of diet. Dietary salt loading altered the morphology (reduced Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase-immunoreactive cell numbers and surface exposure of mitochondrion-rich cells), biochemistry (decreased vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase activity) and molecular physiology (decreased nkaα1a and cftrII mRNA abundance) of the gill in a manner indicative of reduced active ion uptake activity. But in control fish and not salt-fed fish, gill mRNA abundance of nkaα1c increased and nbc decreased after IPW exposure. Genes encoding TJ proteins were typically either responsive to salt feeding or IPW, but select genes responded to combined experimental treatment (e.g. IPW responsive but only if fish were salt-fed). Therefore, using salt feeding and IPW exposure, new insights into what factors influence gill TJ proteins and the role that specific TJ proteins might play in regulating the barrier properties of the gill epithelium have been acquired. In particular, evidence suggests that TJ proteins in the gill epithelium, or the regulatory networks that control them, respond independently to external or internal stimuli. PMID:27083431

  7. Gender-specific modulation of immune system complement gene expression in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma following dietary exposure of BDE-47.

    PubMed

    Ye, Roy R; Lei, Elva N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Chan, Alice K Y; Bo, Jun; van de Merwe, Jason P; Fong, Amy C C; Yang, Michael M S; Lee, J S; Segner, Helmut E; Wong, Chris K C; Wu, Rudolf S S; Au, Doris W T

    2011-08-01

    BDE-47 is one of the most widely found congeners of PBDEs in marine environments. The potential immunomodulatory effects of BDE-47 on fish complement system were studied using the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma as a model fish. Three-month-old O. melastigma were subjected to short-term (5 days) and long-term (21 days) exposure to two concentrations of BDE-47 (low dose at 290 ± 172 ng/day; high dose at 580 ± 344 ng/day) via dietary uptake of BDE-47 encapsulated in Artemia nauplii. Body burdens of BDE-47 and other metabolic products were analyzed in the exposed and control fish. Only a small amount of debrominated product, BDE-28, was detected, while other metabolic products were all under detection limit. Transcriptional expression of six major complement system genes involved in complement activation: C1r/s (classical pathway), MBL-2 (lectin pathway), CFP (alternative pathway), F2 (coagulation pathway), C3 (the central component of complement system), and C9 (cell lysis) were quantified in the liver of marine medaka. Endogenous expression of all six complement system genes was found to be higher in males than in females (p < 0.05). Upon dietary exposure of marine medaka to BDE-47, expression of all six complement genes were downregulated in males at day 5 (or longer), whereas in females, MBl-2, CFP, and F2 mRNAs expression were upregulated, but C3 and C9 remained stable with exposure time and dose. A significant negative relationship was found between BDE-47 body burden and mRNA expression of C1r/s, CFP, and C3 in male fish (r = -0.8576 to -0.9447). The above findings on changes in complement gene expression patterns indicate the complement system may be compromised in male O. melastigma upon dietary exposure to BDE-47. Distinct gender difference in expression of six major complement system genes was evident in marine medaka under resting condition and dietary BDE-47 challenge. The immunomodulatory effects of BDE-47 on transcriptional

  8. Gender-specific modulation of immune system complement gene expression in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma following dietary exposure of BDE-47.

    PubMed

    Ye, Roy R; Lei, Elva N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Chan, Alice K Y; Bo, Jun; van de Merwe, Jason P; Fong, Amy C C; Yang, Michael M S; Lee, J S; Segner, Helmut E; Wong, Chris K C; Wu, Rudolf S S; Au, Doris W T

    2011-08-01

    BDE-47 is one of the most widely found congeners of PBDEs in marine environments. The potential immunomodulatory effects of BDE-47 on fish complement system were studied using the marine medaka Oryzias melastigma as a model fish. Three-month-old O. melastigma were subjected to short-term (5 days) and long-term (21 days) exposure to two concentrations of BDE-47 (low dose at 290 ± 172 ng/day; high dose at 580 ± 344 ng/day) via dietary uptake of BDE-47 encapsulated in Artemia nauplii. Body burdens of BDE-47 and other metabolic products were analyzed in the exposed and control fish. Only a small amount of debrominated product, BDE-28, was detected, while other metabolic products were all under detection limit. Transcriptional expression of six major complement system genes involved in complement activation: C1r/s (classical pathway), MBL-2 (lectin pathway), CFP (alternative pathway), F2 (coagulation pathway), C3 (the central component of complement system), and C9 (cell lysis) were quantified in the liver of marine medaka. Endogenous expression of all six complement system genes was found to be higher in males than in females (p < 0.05). Upon dietary exposure of marine medaka to BDE-47, expression of all six complement genes were downregulated in males at day 5 (or longer), whereas in females, MBl-2, CFP, and F2 mRNAs expression were upregulated, but C3 and C9 remained stable with exposure time and dose. A significant negative relationship was found between BDE-47 body burden and mRNA expression of C1r/s, CFP, and C3 in male fish (r = -0.8576 to -0.9447). The above findings on changes in complement gene expression patterns indicate the complement system may be compromised in male O. melastigma upon dietary exposure to BDE-47. Distinct gender difference in expression of six major complement system genes was evident in marine medaka under resting condition and dietary BDE-47 challenge. The immunomodulatory effects of BDE-47 on transcriptional

  9. Probabilistic risk assessment of dietary exposure to single and multiple pesticide residues or contaminants: summary of the work performed within the SAFE FOODS project.

    PubMed

    van Klaveren, Jacob D; Boon, Polly E

    2009-12-01

    This introduction to the journal's supplement on probabilistic risk assessment of single and multiple exposure to pesticide residues or contaminants summarizes the objectives and results of the work performed in work package 3 of the EU-funded project SAFE FOODS. Within this work package, we developed an electronic platform of food consumption and chemical concentration databases harmonised at raw agricultural commodity level. In this platform the databases are connected to probabilistic software to allow probabilistic modelling of dietary exposure in a standardised way. The usefulness of this platform is demonstrated in two papers, which describe the exposure to pesticides and glycoalkaloids in several European countries. Furthermore, an integrated probabilistic risk assessment (IPRA) model was developed: a new tool to integrate exposure and effect modelling, including uncertainty analyses. The use of this model was shown in a paper on the cumulative exposure to anti-androgen pesticides. Combined with a health impact prioritization system, developed within this work package to compare heath risks between chemicals, the IPRA tool can also be used to compare health risks between multiple chemicals in complex risk assessment situation such as risk-benefit and risk trade-off analyses. Both the electronic platform of databases as the IPRA model may proof to be powerful tools to tackle the challenges risk managers are or will be faced with in the future.

  10. Risk assessment of non-dietary exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) via house PM2.5, TSP and dust and the implications from human hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Min-juan; Chan, Chuen-Yu; Cheung, Kwai Chung; Wong, Ming Hung

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the cancer risk due to non-dietary PAHs exposure in home environment (inhalation and ingestion), exposure to fine particles (PM2.5) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) of PM2.5, total suspend particles (TSP) and dust in homes at two urban centers of Pearl River Delta were assessed. House PM2.5 bound PAHs in Guangzhou (GZ) ranged from 10.0 to 61.9 ng m-3 and 0.72 to 8.15 ng m-3 in Hong Kong (HK). PAH profiles found in PM2.5, TSP and dust were different than that in hair (dominated by Nap and Phe). Pyr and Flu in house dust significantly correlated with that in hair (r = 0.69; 0.55, p < 0.05) but no correlation was found between PAHs in hair and PM2.5. High correlation coefficients (r2 = 0.97/0.95, p < 0.01) were noted between dibenzo(a,h)anthracene (DBA) and Toxicity Equivalent Concentrations (TEQs) of dust and PM2.5. The lung cancer risks based on PM2.5 bound PAHs exposure in houses of GZ (10-5-10-4) were significantly higher than those of HK (10-6-10-5), which were also significantly higher than the cancer risks associated with house dust intake (10-7-10-5) in GZ. PAHs exposure via non-dietary route (PM2.5 and dust) was found to be 1-3 times higher than fish consumption for children and contributed to 52-76% of total PAHs intake for children and 24-50% for adults in GZ.

  11. Use and impact of usual intake models on dietary exposure estimate and risk assessment of chemical substances: a practical example for cadmium, acrylamide and sulphites.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Francesca Romana; Sirot, Véronique; Busani, Luca; Volatier, Jean-Luc; Hulin, Marion

    2015-01-01

    To estimate of food and nutrient intakes, 24-h recalls are frequently used in dietary assessment. However intake data collected for a short period are a limited estimator of long-term usual intake. An important limitation of such data is that the within-person variability tends to inflate the intake distribution leading to a biased estimation of extreme percentiles. Statistical models, named usual-intake models, that separate the within-person variability from the between-persons variability, have lately been implemented. The main objectives of this study were to highlight the potential impact that usual-intake models can have on exposure estimate and risk assessment and to point out which are the key aspects to be considered in order to run these models properly and be sure to interpret the output correctly. To achieve the goal we used the consumption data obtained by the French dietary survey INCA2 and the concentration data collected during the French TDS2, using Monte Carlo Risk Assessment (MCRA) software, release 8.0. For the three substances included in this study (cadmium, acrylamide and sulphites), the exposure of the upper percentiles was significantly reduced when using usual-intake models in comparison with the results obtained in the observed individual mean models, even if in terms of risk assessment the impact of using usual-intake models was limited. From the results it appears that the key aspects to consider when using usual-intake models are: (1) the normality of the log-transformed intake distribution, (2) the contribution per single food group to the total exposure, and (3) the independency of food consumption data on multiple days. In conclusion, usual-intake models may have an impact on exposure estimates although, referring to the results, it did not bring any changes in terms of risk assessment, but further investigations are needed.

  12. Assessment of dietary exposure to flavouring substances via consumption of flavoured teas. Part II: transfer rates of linalool and linalyl esters into Earl Grey tea infusions.

    PubMed

    Orth, Anne-Marie; Poplacean, Iulia; Fastowski, Oxana; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of dietary exposure via the consumption of flavoured foods is a key element of the safety evaluation of flavouring substances. Linalyl acetate and linalool are the major flavouring substances in Earl Grey teas; the objective of this study was to determine their transfer rates from the tea leaves into the tea beverage upon preparation of a hot water infusion. Spiking experiments revealed a transfer rate of 66% for linalool. In contrast, the transfer rate for linalyl acetate was only 1.9%; in turn, the hydrolysis product linalool (17.0%) and a spectrum (19.9%) of degradation and rearrangement products (monoterpene alcohols, esters and hydrocarbons) were present in the tea beverage. The transfer rates were shown to be proportional to the length of the infusion. The impact of the hot water treatment on the enantiomeric compositions of linalyl acetate and linalool was determined, and structure-dependent experiments were performed by variation of the acyl and the alcohol moiety of the monoterpene ester. Comparative dietary exposure assessments demonstrated the need to take correction factors based on the experimentally determined transfer rates into account. Based on tea consumption data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (2000/2001), the exposure to linalyl acetate ranges from 0.2 mg day(-1) (average) to 1.8 mg day(-1) (high). The corresponding values for linalool are 4.2 mg day(-1) (average) and 46.6 mg day(-1) (high). The exposure of linalool via consumption of the tea beverage is approximately 26 times higher than that of linalyl acetate, although in the flavoured tea leaves the median content of linalyl acetate is approximately 1.8 times higher than that of linalool.

  13. Dietary exposure to shiitake mushroom confers reductions in serum glucose, lipids, leptin and antioxidant capacity in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previously, we showed that dietary intake of shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) decreased serum levels of polar lipids in rats. This study evaluated the effects of lifelong consumption of shiitake on body composition and serum cholesterol-related- and anti-oxidant indices in rats. Rat dams and th...

  14. Long-chain perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids in Pacific cods from coastal areas in northern Japan: a major source of human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yukiko; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio; Kimura, Osamu; Endo, Tetsuya; Haraguchi, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs) contamination of edible fish muscle from Japanese coastal waters. The concentrations of PFCAs with 8-14 carbon atoms (C8-C14) in Pacific cods in Hokkaido, Japan were 51 (median: pg/g-wet weight) for C8, 93 for C9, 99 for C10, 746 for C11, 416 for C12, 404 for C13, and 93 for C14. The levels of C9-C14 PFCAs in fish were strongly correlated to each other, but not to C8 and the other chlorinated persistent organic pollutants, indicating that C9-C14 PFCAs have a different emission source and/or bioaccumulation mechanism. The relative ratios between estimated PFCAs intake through fish consumption and the reported total dietary exposure of PFCAs were less than 1 for C8 to C9, but were more than 1 for C10 to C14. This result strongly suggests that fish consumption is a significant source of human dietary exposure to C10-C14 PFCAs.

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis TP53 mutation analysis reflects a moderate dietary exposure to aflatoxins in Espírito Santo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Fernanda Magri; de Almeida Pereira, Thiago; Gonçalves, Patrícia Lofego; Jarske, Robson Dettmann; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Louro, Iuri Drumond

    2013-08-01

    The close relationship between aflatoxins and 249ser TP53 gene mutation (AGG to AGT, Arg to Ser) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes this mutation an indirect indicator of dietary contamination with this toxin. We have examined the prevalence of codon 249 TP53 mutation in 41 HCC and 74 liver cirrhosis (without HCC) cases diagnosed at the HUCAM University Hospital in Vitoria, Espírito Santo State, Brazil. DNA was extracted from paraffin sections and from plasma. The mutation was detected by DNA amplification, followed by restriction endonuclease digestion and confirmed by direct sequencing. DNA restriction showed 249ser mutation in 16 HCC and 13 liver cirrhosis, but sequencing confirmed mutations in only 6 HCC and 1 liver cirrhosis. In addition, sequencing revealed 4 patients with mutations at codon 250 (250ser and 250leu) in HCC cases. The prevalence of TP53 mutation was 10/41 (24.3%) in HCC and 1/74 (1.4%) in liver cirrhosis. No relationship between the presence of mutations and the etiology of HCC was observed. TP53 exon 7 mutations, which are related to aflatoxins exposure, were found at 14.6% (249ser), 7.3% (250leu) and 2.4% (250ser) in 41 cases of HCC and 1.4% in 74 liver cirrhosis (without HCC) cases, suggesting a moderate dietary exposure to aflatoxins in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil.

  16. PSA-Based Screening Outcomes, Dietary Heterocyclic Amine Exposure, and Prostate Cancer Risk in African Americans: Annual Report (Year 1 of 3)

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, K T

    2006-01-18

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the second leading cause of male U.S. cancer deaths, with African-Americans having the highest rate of PC mortality worldwide, as well as more abnormal results from screening tests that correlate with current or eventual PC. A 3-year prospective clinic-based study is studying the performance of current (PSA and DRE) vs. (% free PSA) clinical biomarkers of PC risk in 400 African-American men 50 to 70 years of age who undergo PC screening in Oakland, CA (East Bay San Francisco area), as well as possible association of PC screening results for these men with their dietary exposures to the cancer-causing heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) that forms when meat is cooked. This study expands an ongoing NIH-funded study (by the same research team) to add a new %-free-PSA test, results of which will be compared with PSA/DRE results and PhIP exposures estimated by dietary interviews. For 392 men studied under the NIH protocol, an odds ratio (95% CL) of 32 (3.2, 720) for highly elevated PSA ({ge}20 ng/mL) was observed in the highest 15% vs. the lower 50% of estimated daily PhIP intakes. Approximately 100 additional men have completed participation in the expanded NIH/DOD-supported study. This study will help define the potential value of improved screening and dietary/behavioral intervention to reduce PC risk, namely, prevention of PhIP intake by avoiding overcooked meats.

  17. NORMAL MAMMARY GLAND MORPHOLOGY IN PUBERTAL FEMALE MICE FOLLOWING IN UTERO AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO GENISTEIN AT LEVELS COMPARABLE TO HUMAN DIETARY EXPOSURE. (R827402)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of in utero and lactational exposure to genistein (0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.5 and 10 mg/kg/day) on mammary gland morphology in female B6D2F1 mice at levels comparable to or greater than human exposures. The effect of diethylstilbest...

  18. Methyl mercury exposure from fish consumption in vulnerable racial/ethnic populations: probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model analyses using 1999-2006 NHANES and 1990-2002 TDS data.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianping; Zartarian, Valerie G; Liu, Shi V; Geller, Andrew M

    2012-01-01

    NHANES subjects self-identified as "Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, or multiracial" (A/P/N/M) have higher levels of blood organic mercury than other racial/ethnic groups; however, the reasons for this have been unclear. This research uses exposure modeling to determine the reasons for elevated blood methylmercury (MeHg) levels, and also extends previous analyses of observed NHANES blood levels. The probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary model was applied, using MeHg fish residue data from FDA's Total Diet Study (1990-2002) combined with NHANES/WWEIA (1999-2006) fish consumption data, to generate exposure estimates by race/ethnicity, age group, and fish type. Statistical analyses of blood methylmercury levels in the (6 times larger) 1999-2006 NHANES data were compared against previous published results for 1999-2002 data. The A/P/N/M group has higher fish intake, modeled MeHg exposures, and blood levels than the general population and other racial/ethnic groups. Tuna, other saltwater fish, and other freshwater fish are key food types driving dietary MeHg exposure. The 1-<3 years-old A/P/N/M group has the highest mean dietary MeHg intake per body weight (0.06 μg/kg/day; ~2.3 times higher than the rest of the population). Fish intake and modeled exposure predictions correlate well with NHANES blood biomarker levels. This study, using the SHEDS-Dietary model with national data, reinforces and expands upon previous observations that dietary exposure via fish consumption is an important route for methylmercury intake by the general population, and especially for racial/ethnic groups with higher fish consumption. These probabilistic dietary modeling approaches could be applied for local populations (e.g., tribes) and other chemicals and foods, if data are available. PMID:22119327

  19. Dietary exposure estimates of 14 trace elements in Xuanwei and Fuyuan, two high lung cancer incidence areas in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Lv, Jungang; Liao, Chunyang

    2012-06-01

    Xuanwei and Fuyuan, located in the Yunnan province in southwest of China, are known to have a strikingly high incidence of lung cancer. Among the many factors that have been explored, the association between lung cancer and trace elements has not received enough attention. In this study, dietary samples were collected from 60 families of the lung cancer and control groups and abundances of 14 trace elements were determined using inductively coupled-plasma mass spectroscopy. Accuracy and sensitivity of the method were demonstrated by analyzing national standard reference materials. The results showed that the dietary intake of the trace elements contributed 96.6% of total intake. Among the 14 elements tested, cadmium and titanium were found to be present at a significantly higher level in the food consumed by the cancer group than by the control group. The intake of selenium by the population living in the areas is much lower than what it should be, with the people in the cancer group experiencing even more severe selenium deficiency. In addition, in both groups, the intakes of several essential elements (iron, copper, and zinc) from food and the drinking water were found to be significantly lower than required according to the Chinese Dietary Reference Intakes. The present study of the relationship between trace element intakes of lung cancer cases and controls provides important information urgently needed for the assessment of lung cancer risk of healthy subjects. The study also gives rational dietary suggestions to local residents which is important to the early diagnosis and pretreatment of lung cancer. PMID:22068732

  20. Food selection, growth and physiology in relation to dietary sodium chloride content in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) under chronic waterborne Cu exposure.

    PubMed

    Niyogi, S; Kamunde, C N; Wood, C M

    2006-05-01

    Waterborne Cu is toxic to Na(+) and Cl(-) regulation in freshwater fish, and Cu is taken up, at least in part, via the Na(+)-transport pathway in the gills. Therefore, we hypothesized that freshwater fish may mitigate the toxic effects of waterborne Cu by selecting a NaCl-enriched diet over a normal diet. We tested this hypothesis in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by offering them the choice between NaCl-enriched (1.9 mmol g(-1)Na(+)) and normal (0.2 mmol g(-1)Na(+)) diets under a chronic waterborne Cu exposure of 55 microg L(-1) for a period of 28 days. Contrary to expectation, trout exhibited a preference for NaCl-enriched diet under control conditions, while exposure to chronic waterborne Cu severely disrupted their normal feeding pattern with an accompanying loss of preference for the NaCl-enriched diet. Waterborne Cu exposure also severely affected appetite and growth. Both appetite and growth gradually recovered with time, but remained significantly impaired relative to Cu-unexposed fish until the end of the exposure. Waterborne Cu exposure also significantly increased Cu accumulations in target organs (gill, liver, and gut), plasma and whole body. However, Cu accumulation decreased substantially towards the end of the exposure in target organs and whole body as well as in plasma in Cu-exposed fish with dietary choice relative to Cu-exposed fish with normal diet. These adjustments were concurrent with the gradual recovery of appetite, which also led to increased ingestion of the NaCl-enriched diet. Interestingly, this elevated dietary uptake of NaCl produced significant stimulation of Na(+) efflux in Cu-exposed fish. Subsequently, it also led to significant elevation of Na(+) levels in target organs and whole body, and restored the decrease of plasma Na(+) and Cl(-) levels in Cu-exposed fish. The NaCl supplemented diet appeared to be beneficial in compensating Na(+) and Cl(-) losses from the body induced by waterborne Cu. Overall, these results

  1. Dietary contaminant exposure affects plasma testosterone, but not thyroid hormones, vitamin A, and vitamin E, in male juvenile arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus).

    PubMed

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Jørgensen, Even H; Fuglei, Eva; Ahlstrøm, Øystein; Muir, Derek C G; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro

    2012-01-01

    Levels of persistent organic pollutants (POP), such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), are high in many Arctic top predators, including the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus). The aim of this study was to examine possible endocrine-disruptive effects of dietary POP exposure in male juvenile Arctic foxes in a controlled exposure experiment. The study was conducted using domesticated farmed blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) as a model species. Two groups of newly weaned male foxes received a diet supplemented with either minke whale (Baleneoptera acutorostrata) blubber that was naturally contaminated with POP (exposed group, n = 5 or 21), or pork (Sus scrofa) fat (control group, n = 5 or 21). When the foxes were 6 mo old and had received the 2 diets for approximately 4 mo (147 d), effects of the dietary exposure to POP on plasma concentrations of testosterone (T), thyroid hormones (TH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), retinol (vitamin A), and tocopherol (viramin E) were examined. At sampling, the total body concentrations of 104 PCB congeners were 0.1 ± 0.03 μg/g lipid weight (l.w.; n = 5 [mean ± standard deviation]) and 1.5 ± 0.17 μg/g l.w. (n = 5) in the control and exposed groups, respectively. Plasma testosterone concentrations in the exposed male foxes were significantly lower than in the control males, being approximately 25% of that in the exposed foxes. There were no between-treatment differences for TH, TSH, retinol, or tocopherol. The results suggest that the high POP levels experienced by costal populations of Arctic foxes, such as in Svalbard and Iceland, may result in delayed masculine maturation during adolescence. Sex hormone disruption during puberty may thus have lifetime consequences on all aspects of reproductive function in adult male foxes. PMID:23030655

  2. NEUROBEHAVIORAL EVALUATION OF RATS EXPOSED TO CHLORPYRIFOS VIA CHRONIC DIETARY AND REPEATED HIGH-LEVEL SPIKE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study aimed to model long-term subtoxic human exposure to an organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), and to examine the influence of that exposure on the response to intermittent high-dose acute challenges. Adult Long-Evans male rats were maintained at 350g body wei...

  3. Down-regulation of muscarinic receptors and the m3 subtype in white-footed mice by dietary exposure to parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.; Hill, E.F.; Fernando, J.C.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of ad libitum dietary exposure (as occurs in the field) to parathion for 14 d was investigated on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in brains and submaxillary glands of adults of a field species, the white-footed mouse Peromyscus leucopus. Immunoprecipitation using subtype selective antibodies revealed that the relative ratios of the m1-m5 mAChR subtypes in Peromyscus brain were similar to those in rat brain. There was little variability in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in control mice brains but large variability in 39 exposed mice, resulting from differences in food ingestion and parathion metabolism. Accordingly, data on radioligand binding to mAChRs in each mouse brain were correlated with brain AChE activity in the same mouse, and AChE inhibition served as a biomarker of exposure reflecting in situ paraoxon concentrations. Exposure to parathion for 14 d reduced maximal binding (Bmax) of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB), [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS), and [3H]-4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide ([3H]-4-DAMP) by up to approximately 58% without affecting receptor affinities for these ligands. Maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]QNB and [3H]-4-DAMP binding occurred in mice with highest AChE inhibition, while equivalent maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]NMS occurred in mice with only approximately 10% AChE inhibition, without further change at higher parathion doses. This is believed to be due to the hydrophilicity of [3H]NMS, which limits its accessibility to internalized desensitized receptors. In submaxillary glands (mAChRs are predominantly m3 subtype), there were significant dose-dependent reductions in [3H]QNB binding and m3 mRNA levels in exposed mice, revealed by Northern blot analyses. The reduction in m3 receptors is suggested to result mostly from reduced synthesis at the transcription level, rather than from translational or posttranslational events. The data suggest that down-regulation of mAChRs occurs

  4. Dietary exposure to PCDD/PCDFs by individuals living near a hazardous waste incinerator in Catalonia, Spain: temporal trend.

    PubMed

    Martí-Cid, Roser; Bocio, Ana; Domingo, José L

    2008-02-01

    The levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) were measured in foodstuffs randomly acquired in July 2006 in various locations of Tarragona County (Catalonia, Spain), which are near a hazardous waste incinerator (HWI). A total of 35 composite samples, belonging to various food groups (vegetables, pulses, cereals, fruits, fish and seafood, meat and meat products, eggs, milk, dairy products, and oils and fats) were analyzed by HRGC/HRMS. The dietary intake of PCDD/PCDFs was subsequently determined and compared with a previous survey performed in 2002. For calculations, recent data on consumption of the selected food items were used. Total dietary intake of PCDD/PCDFs for the general population of Tarragona County was estimated to be 27.81 pg WHO-TEQ/day, value notably lower than that found in the 2002 study, 63.80 pg WHO-TEQ/day. Fish and seafood (28%), oils and fats (22%), eggs (17%), and dairy products (11%) were the most important contributors to this intake, while pulses (1%), milk (2%), vegetables (3%) and fruits (3%) showed the lowest contribution to total WHO-TEQ. The current PCDD/PCDF intake is also considerably lower than the intake estimated in 1998 for the population of the same geographical area, 210.1 pg I-TEQ/day, when a baseline study was carried out during the construction of the HWI. The present intake is also compared with the dietary intakes of PCDD/PCDFs recently (2006-2007) reported for a number of regions and countries.

  5. Effects of human food grade titanium dioxide nanoparticle dietary exposure on Drosophila melanogaster survival, fecundity, pupation and expression of antioxidant genes.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Cvetković, Vladimir J; Mitrović, Tatjana Lj

    2016-02-01

    The fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster was exposed to the human food grade of E171 titanium dioxide (TiO2). This is a special grade of TiO2 which is frequently omitted in nanotoxicology studies dealing with TiO2, yet it is the most relevant grade regarding oral exposure of humans. D. melanogaster larvae were exposed to 0.002 mg mL(-1), 0.02 mg mL(-1), 0.2 mg mL(-1), and 2 mg mL(-1) of TiO2 in feeding medium, and the survival, fecundity, pupation time, and expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response were monitored. TiO2 did not affect survival but significantly increased time to pupation (p < 0.001). Fecundity of D. melanogaster was unaffected by the treatment. Expression of the gene for catalase was markedly downregulated by the treatment, while the effect on the downregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 was less pronounced. After four days of dietary exposure TiO2 was present in a significant amount in larvae, but was not transferred to adults during metamorphosis. Two individuals with aberrant phenotype similar to previously described gold nanoparticles induced mutant phenotypes were detected in the group exposed to TiO2. In general, TiO2 showed little toxicity toward D. melanogaster at concentrations relevant to oral exposure of humans.

  6. Quantitation of tr-cinnamaldehyde, safrole and myristicin in cola-flavoured soft drinks to improve the assessment of their dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; D'Aloise, Antonio; Magrì, Antonio L; Leclercq, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Quantitation of tr-cinnamaldehyde, safrole and myristicin was carried out in 70 samples of cola-flavoured soft drinks purchased in eight European countries with the purpose of assessing the variability in the levels of these substances. Results indicated a limited variability in the content of the three substances: the ratio between the 90th and the 10th percentile concentration amounted to 21, 6 and 13 for tr-cinnamaldehyde, safrole and myristicin, respectively. The uncertainty in the assessment of dietary exposure to these substances due to the variability of their level in cola-flavoured drinks was low. Based on these analytical data and on refined food consumption data, estimates of exposure to safrole associated to cola drink consumption, along with Margin of Exposure (MOE) values, were obtained. For high consumers of cola-flavoured soft drinks in certain age groups, within some European countries, MOE values lower than 10,000 resulted, MOE values of 10,000 or higher having been stated by the EFSA as a quantitative criterion to identify low concern from a public health point of view and low priority for risk management actions. The lowest MOE values, from 1900 to 3000, were observed for children and teen agers in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

  7. Quantitation of tr-cinnamaldehyde, safrole and myristicin in cola-flavoured soft drinks to improve the assessment of their dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Raffo, Antonio; D'Aloise, Antonio; Magrì, Antonio L; Leclercq, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Quantitation of tr-cinnamaldehyde, safrole and myristicin was carried out in 70 samples of cola-flavoured soft drinks purchased in eight European countries with the purpose of assessing the variability in the levels of these substances. Results indicated a limited variability in the content of the three substances: the ratio between the 90th and the 10th percentile concentration amounted to 21, 6 and 13 for tr-cinnamaldehyde, safrole and myristicin, respectively. The uncertainty in the assessment of dietary exposure to these substances due to the variability of their level in cola-flavoured drinks was low. Based on these analytical data and on refined food consumption data, estimates of exposure to safrole associated to cola drink consumption, along with Margin of Exposure (MOE) values, were obtained. For high consumers of cola-flavoured soft drinks in certain age groups, within some European countries, MOE values lower than 10,000 resulted, MOE values of 10,000 or higher having been stated by the EFSA as a quantitative criterion to identify low concern from a public health point of view and low priority for risk management actions. The lowest MOE values, from 1900 to 3000, were observed for children and teen agers in the United Kingdom and Ireland. PMID:23845511

  8. Effect of long-term dietary lead exposure on some maturation and reproductive parameters of a female Prussian carp (Carassius gibelio B.).

    PubMed

    Łuszczek-Trojnar, Ewa; Drąg-Kozak, Ewa; Szczerbik, Paweł; Socha, Magdalena; Popek, Włodzimierz

    2014-02-01

    Lead is reported to be an endocrine disruptor. In the current study, we exposed female Prussian carp to artificial feed, supplemented with five doses of dietary Pb (0, 1 (control), 8, 13, 24, and 49 mg/kg) over either a 24-month period or a 12-month period, followed by further 12 months where the fish were fed the control diet. Periodically, oocyte maturation, gonadosomatic index (GSI), ability to secret luteinizing hormone (LH) as well as gonad Pb concentrations were measured. It was found that the reproductive system of the female Prussian carp is not indifferent to chronic exposure to lead. The negative effect was manifested by a decrease in the GSI after 12 months despite the fact that a higher proportion of oocytes at more advanced maturity stages were concurrently observed. After 12 months of exposure, the effect on LH secretion varied according to the dose. In the group exposed to the lowest dose (8 mg/kg), LH decreased spontaneously, and in the groups exposed to the highest two doses (24 and 48 mg/kg), a significantly higher LHRH-A-stimulated LH secretion was observed. After 24 months of lead exposure, the effects on oocyte maturation and size and on GSI values were not pronounced. Analysis of the effect of lead exposure on LH secretion showed that the relationships were similar to those observed after 12 months but nonsignificant. During chronic a 24-month period exposure to Pb, Prussian carp female appears to acclimate to Pb doses used in the experiment. After 12 months of exposure and 12 months of depuration, the levels of spontaneous and stimulated LH secretion observed in all the groups were similar to the control, which is evidence that depuration eliminates the previously observed effects of exposure to lead. Lead is easily accumulated in the ovary, reaching a fivefold higher level (0.8 mg/kg tissue) compared to the control(0.15 mg/kg tissue), but after discontinuation of exposure, this organ is quickly depurated. The results indicate that

  9. Dietary Supplementation with Olive Oil or Fish Oil and Vascular Effects of Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Human Volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Olive oil (OO) and fish oil (FO) supplements have beneficial effects on endothelial function. Objective: In this study we evaluated the efficacy of...

  10. A morbid condition involving cardio-vascular, broncho-pulmonary, digestive and neural lesions in children and young adults after dietary arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Zaldívar, R

    1980-02-01

    An investigation on the relationship between dietary arsenic exposure and cardiovascular diseases was made. In Antofagasta Commune, northern Chile, since 1955 arsenic has polluted public drinking water. This environmental contamination is of geological origin. The concentration of arsenic in drinking water for the 1955-1970 period was 0.5980 ppm (weighted mean). In the period June 1970-March 1972, the concentration decreased to 0.0815 ppm (weighted mean), due to a Water Filtration Plant which started operating in May 1970. Greater Santiago showed 0.00 ppm of arsenic in drinking water. Amongst 10 autopsied patients (age range: 1 year 7 months to 18 years) with chronic arsenical dermatosis from Antofagasta Commune, 9 showed marked fibrous intimal thickening of the arterial wall and/or restricted lumen of the left coronary artery, 2 of these 9 also exhibiting myocardial infarction. Of the 10 patients, 7 developed cardiomegaly, which was related to chronic exposure to dietary arsenic. Two series of patients with myocardial infarction under 40 years of age, one from Antofagasta Commune (exposed to arsenic), the other from Greater Santiago (not exposed to arsenic) were compared. The Yates' corrected chi 2 value (1 d.f.) being 11.7776. The difference was statistically highly significant (P approximately equal to 0.0006018). Furthermore, in Antofagasta Commune, the number of cases (< 40 yr) which had myocardial infarction with chronic arsenical dermatosis were compared with the cases (< 40 yr) which showed myocardial infarction without chronic arsenical dermatosis. The Yates' corrected chi 2 value (1 d.f.) was 13.0395. A highly significant difference was detected (P approximately equal to 0.0003044). Children (0-15 yr)from the two cities were also compared.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. No bioavailability of 17α-ethinylestradiol when associated with nC60 aggregates during dietary exposure in adult male zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Park, June-Woo; Henry, Theodore B; Menn, Fu-Min; Compton, Robert N; Sayler, Gary

    2010-11-01

    The C(60) fullerene is a manufactured carbon nanoparticle (CNP) that could pose a risk to humans and other organisms after release into the environment. In surface waters, C(60) is likely to be present as aggregates of nC(60) and these aggregates can associate with other substances that are toxic. Our goal was to evaluate the association of a model contaminant [17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2)] with nC(60) and determine bioavailability of EE2 after accumulation by a filter feeding organism [Brine shrimp (BS) Artemia sp.] and subsequent dietary exposure in zebrafish. Aqueous suspensions of nC(60) were prepared (600 mg C(60)/900 mL, 6-month water stirred method) with/without EE2 (1 μg/L) and BS were exposed to these preparations. Accumulation of nC(60) in gut of BS was assessed by light microscopy, and C(60) were extracted from BS and concentration analyzed by HPLC. Adult male zebrafish were fed (5d) live BS according to the following treatments: BS (control); BS containing nC(60); BS containing nC(60)+EE2; or BS containing EE2. Liver was excised from exposed fish and total RNA was extracted for assessment of vitellogenin gene (vtg1A/B) expression. The vtg1A/B was highly up-regulated in fish exposed to BS containing EE2, but expression of vtg1A/B did not differ from controls in other treatments. The EE2 associated with nC(60) did not become bioavailable in zebrafish during passage through the intestinal tract of zebrafish. Results have implications on the effect of nC(60) on the bioavailability of co-contaminants in organisms during dietary exposure. PMID:20937515

  12. River transport of mercury from artisanal and small-scale gold mining and risks for dietary mercury exposure in Madre de Dios, Peru.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Sarah E; Feingold, Beth J; Ortiz, Ernesto J; Gallis, John A; Araújo-Flores, Julio M; Berky, Axel; Pan, William K Y; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-02-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is a major contributor to deforestation and the largest anthropogenic source of atmospheric mercury worldwide. Despite significant information on the direct health impacts of mercury to ASGM miners, the impact of mercury contamination on downstream communities has not been well characterized, particularly in Peru's Madre de Dios region. In this area, ASGM has increased significantly since 2000 and has led to substantial political and social controversy. This research examined the spatial distribution and transport of mercury through the Madre de Dios River with distance from ASGM activity. This study also characterized risks for dietary mercury exposure to local residents who depend on fish from the river. River sediment, suspended solids from the water column, and fish samples were collected in 2013 at 62 sites near 17 communities over a 560 km stretch of the Madre de Dios River and its major tributaries. In areas downstream of known ASGM activity, mercury concentrations in sediment, suspended solids, and fish within the Madre de Dios River were elevated relative to locations upstream of mining. Fish tissue mercury concentrations were observed at levels representing a public health threat, with greater than one-third of carnivorous fish exceeding the international health standard of 0.5 mg kg(-1). This study demonstrates that communities located hundreds of kilometers downstream of ASGM activity, including children and indigenous populations who may not be involved in mining, are at risk of dietary mercury exposure that exceed acceptable body burdens. This report represents the first systematic study of the region to aid policy decision-making related to ASGM activities in Peru.

  13. Chronic Responses of Daphnia magna Under Dietary Exposure to Leaves of a Transgenic (Event MON810) Bt-Maize Hybrid and its Conventional Near-Isoline.

    PubMed

    Holderbaum, Daniel Ferreira; Cuhra, Marek; Wickson, Fern; Orth, Afonso Inácio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Bøhn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance is the second most common trait globally in cultivated genetically modified (GM) plants. Resistance is usually obtained by introducing into the plant's genome genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) coding for insecticidal proteins (Cry proteins or toxins) that target insect pests. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that a chronic, high-dose dietary exposure to leaves of a Bt-maize hybrid (GM event MON810, expressing a transgenic or recombinant Cry1Ab toxin), exerted no adverse effects on fitness parameters of the aquatic nontarget organism Daphnia magna (water flea) when compared to an identical control diet based on leaves of the non-GM near-isoline. Cry1Ab was immunologically detected and quantified in GM maize leaf material used for Daphnia feed. A 69-kD protein near Bt's active core-toxin size and a 34-kD protein were identified. The D. magna bioassay showed a resource allocation to production of resting eggs and early fecundity in D. magna fed GM maize, with adverse effects for body size and fecundity later in life. This is the first study to examine GM-plant leaf material in the D. magna model, and provides of negative fitness effects of a MON810 maize hybrid in a nontarget model organism under chronic, high dietary exposure. Based upon these results, it is postulated that the observed transgenic proteins exert a nontarget effect in D. magna and/or unintended changes were produced in the maize genome/metabolome by the transformation process, producing a nutritional difference between GM-maize and non-GM near-isoline. PMID:26262442

  14. Chronic Responses of Daphnia magna Under Dietary Exposure to Leaves of a Transgenic (Event MON810) Bt-Maize Hybrid and its Conventional Near-Isoline.

    PubMed

    Holderbaum, Daniel Ferreira; Cuhra, Marek; Wickson, Fern; Orth, Afonso Inácio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Bøhn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance is the second most common trait globally in cultivated genetically modified (GM) plants. Resistance is usually obtained by introducing into the plant's genome genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) coding for insecticidal proteins (Cry proteins or toxins) that target insect pests. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that a chronic, high-dose dietary exposure to leaves of a Bt-maize hybrid (GM event MON810, expressing a transgenic or recombinant Cry1Ab toxin), exerted no adverse effects on fitness parameters of the aquatic nontarget organism Daphnia magna (water flea) when compared to an identical control diet based on leaves of the non-GM near-isoline. Cry1Ab was immunologically detected and quantified in GM maize leaf material used for Daphnia feed. A 69-kD protein near Bt's active core-toxin size and a 34-kD protein were identified. The D. magna bioassay showed a resource allocation to production of resting eggs and early fecundity in D. magna fed GM maize, with adverse effects for body size and fecundity later in life. This is the first study to examine GM-plant leaf material in the D. magna model, and provides of negative fitness effects of a MON810 maize hybrid in a nontarget model organism under chronic, high dietary exposure. Based upon these results, it is postulated that the observed transgenic proteins exert a nontarget effect in D. magna and/or unintended changes were produced in the maize genome/metabolome by the transformation process, producing a nutritional difference between GM-maize and non-GM near-isoline.

  15. River transport of mercury from artisanal and small-scale gold mining and risks for dietary mercury exposure in Madre de Dios, Peru.

    PubMed

    Diringer, Sarah E; Feingold, Beth J; Ortiz, Ernesto J; Gallis, John A; Araújo-Flores, Julio M; Berky, Axel; Pan, William K Y; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-02-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is a major contributor to deforestation and the largest anthropogenic source of atmospheric mercury worldwide. Despite significant information on the direct health impacts of mercury to ASGM miners, the impact of mercury contamination on downstream communities has not been well characterized, particularly in Peru's Madre de Dios region. In this area, ASGM has increased significantly since 2000 and has led to substantial political and social controversy. This research examined the spatial distribution and transport of mercury through the Madre de Dios River with distance from ASGM activity. This study also characterized risks for dietary mercury exposure to local residents who depend on fish from the river. River sediment, suspended solids from the water column, and fish samples were collected in 2013 at 62 sites near 17 communities over a 560 km stretch of the Madre de Dios River and its major tributaries. In areas downstream of known ASGM activity, mercury concentrations in sediment, suspended solids, and fish within the Madre de Dios River were elevated relative to locations upstream of mining. Fish tissue mercury concentrations were observed at levels representing a public health threat, with greater than one-third of carnivorous fish exceeding the international health standard of 0.5 mg kg(-1). This study demonstrates that communities located hundreds of kilometers downstream of ASGM activity, including children and indigenous populations who may not be involved in mining, are at risk of dietary mercury exposure that exceed acceptable body burdens. This report represents the first systematic study of the region to aid policy decision-making related to ASGM activities in Peru. PMID:25573610

  16. Chronic Responses of Daphnia magna Under Dietary Exposure to Leaves of a Transgenic (Event MON810) Bt–Maize Hybrid and its Conventional Near-Isoline

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Holderbaum, Daniel; Cuhra, Marek; Wickson, Fern; Orth, Afonso Inácio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Bøhn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Insect resistance is the second most common trait globally in cultivated genetically modified (GM) plants. Resistance is usually obtained by introducing into the plant’s genome genes from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) coding for insecticidal proteins (Cry proteins or toxins) that target insect pests. The aim of this study was to examine the hypothesis that a chronic, high-dose dietary exposure to leaves of a Bt–maize hybrid (GM event MON810, expressing a transgenic or recombinant Cry1Ab toxin), exerted no adverse effects on fitness parameters of the aquatic nontarget organism Daphnia magna (water flea) when compared to an identical control diet based on leaves of the non-GM near-isoline. Cry1Ab was immunologically detected and quantified in GM maize leaf material used for Daphnia feed. A 69-kD protein near Bt’s active core-toxin size and a 34-kD protein were identified. The D. magna bioassay showed a resource allocation to production of resting eggs and early fecundity in D. magna fed GM maize, with adverse effects for body size and fecundity later in life. This is the first study to examine GM-plant leaf material in the D. magna model, and provides of negative fitness effects of a MON810 maize hybrid in a nontarget model organism under chronic, high dietary exposure. Based upon these results, it is postulated that the observed transgenic proteins exert a nontarget effect in D. magna and/or unintended changes were produced in the maize genome/metabolome by the transformation process, producing a nutritional difference between GM-maize and non-GM near-isoline. PMID:26262442

  17. Other Perspectives for Developing Exposure Estimates: “SHEDS-Lite: Rapid Scenario-Based ExposurePredictions for Chemicals with Near-Field and Dietary Pathways”

    EPA Science Inventory

    Creative advances in exposure science are needed to support efficient and effective evaluation and management of chemical risks, particularly for chemicals in consumer products. This presentation will describe the development of EPA’s screening-level, probabilistic SHEDS-Li...

  18. The influence of dietary zinc source and coccidial vaccine exposure on intracellular zinc homeostasis and immune status in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Troche, Catalina; Eicher, Susan D; Applegate, Todd J

    2015-07-01

    Coccidia are protozoal parasites which compromise mucosal integrity of the intestine, potentiating poultry morbidity. The host's Zn status influences the course of infection. Therefore, two experiments were designed to determine how supplemental Zn regimens impacted jejunal and caecal immune status and Zn transporter expression. Coccivac®-B was administered weekly at ten times the recommended dose as a mild coccidial challenge (10 CV). Zn was provided through a basal diet, supplemental zinc sulfate (ZnSO4), or a supplemental 1:1 blend of ZnSO4 and Availa®-Zn (Blend). Mucosal jejunum (Expt 1) and caecal tonsils (Expt 2) were evaluated for intracellular Zn concentrations and phagocytic capacity. Messenger expression of Zn transporters ZnT5, ZnT7, Zip9 and Zip13 were investigated to determine Zn trafficking. With 10 CV, phagocytic capacity was decreased in jejunal cells by 2%. In the caecal tonsils, however, phagocytic capacity increased with challenge, with the magnitude of increase being more pronounced with higher dietary Zn (10 CV × Zn interaction; P = 0.04). Intracellular Zn within caecal tonsils was found significantly reduced with 10 CV (27%, P = 0.0001). 10 CV also resulted in an overall increase in the ratio of Zip:ZnT transporters. With the exception of Zip13 transporter expression, dietary Zn source had little impact on any of the measured cellular parameters. Thus, intestinal mucosal tissues had reductions in intracellular free Zn during coccidial challenge, which was coupled with an upregulation of measured Zip transporters. This suggests that under coccidial challenge, intestinal cells attempt to compensate for the drop in intracellular Zn.

  19. Response to Comments on Probabilistic Modeling Dietary Arsenic Exposure and Dose and Evaluation with 2003-2004 NHANES Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    In our article (Xue et al. (2010), we cited Boyce et al. (2008) based on their major conclusion, stated at the end of their abstract that. "typical and high-end background exposures to inorganic arsenic in U.S. populations do not present elevated risks of carcinogenicity." We agr...

  20. DIETARY CHARACTERIZATIONS IN A STUDY OF HUMAN EXPOSURES IN THE LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY:II. HOUSEHOLD WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley Environmental Study (LRGVES) was designed to evaluate multiple forms of exposure to Valley residents because of community concerns of possible adverse health effects from environmental conditions. This is the second of two papers that describe the diet...

  1. Comet-assay parameters as rapid biomarkers of exposure to dietary/environmental compounds -- an in vitro feasibility study on spermatozoa and lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, A; Kurzawa-Zegota, M; Laubenthal, J; Cemeli, E; Anderson, D

    2012-03-18

    Twelve chemical compounds have been selected for the European NewGeneris study on the basis of their potential to damage DNA, in order to establish adequate and reliable biomarkers of exposure. These genotoxic chemicals include heterocyclic amines, organochlorines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, mycotoxins, lipid peroxidation products and alcohol. Damage in somatic cells such as lymphocytes could give rise to cancer, while damage in germ cells could not only give rise to cancer but also to heritable defects. The alkaline Comet assay, with and without metabolic activation, as well as the neutral Comet assay were used to assess DNA integrity in spermatozoa and lymphocytes after in vitro treatment with low, middle and high doses of each chemical. DNA-reactive aldehydes generated by lipid peroxidation, food mutagens such as heterocyclic amines, nitrosamine and benzo[a]pyrene produced the highest amounts of DNA damage, even without metabolic activation. Damage seen with the neutral Comet assay - detecting primarily double-strand breaks - was lower than with the alkaline assay. In general, there was increased damage in the spermatozoa by comparison with the lymphocytes, with altered slopes in the dose-response curves. The Comet assay with sperm was generally very sensitive in assessing genotoxic damage, with the Comet parameters being good biomarkers of induced DNA damage. Establishing reliable biomarkers of exposure for the evaluation of dietary/environmental carcinogens is of utmost importance to protect our health and the health of our offspring.

  2. Estimation of the Exposure of the UK Population to the Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Agent through Dietary Intake During the Period 1980 to 1996

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chu-Chih; Wang, Yin-Han

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) has declined to 1 since 2012 in the UK, uncertainty remains regarding possible future cases and the size of the subclinical population that may cause secondary transmission of the disease through blood transfusion. Estimating the number of individuals who were exposed to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) infectious agent and may be susceptible to vCJD will help to clarify related public health concerns and plan strategies. In this paper, we explore this estimate by describing the probability of potential exposure due to dietary intake throughout the BSE epidemic period from 1980 to 1996 as a stochastic Poisson process. We estimate the age- and gender-specific exposure intensities in food categories of beef and beef-containing dishes, burgers and kebabs, pies, and sausages, separating the two periods of 1980–1989 and 1990–1996 due to the specified bovine offal legislation of 1989. The estimated total number of (living) exposed individuals during each period is 5,089,027 (95% confidence interval [CI] 4,514,963–6,410,317), which was obtained by multiplying the population size of different birth cohorts by the probability of exposure via dietary intake and the probability of survival until the end of 2013. The estimated number is approximately doubled, assuming a contamination rate of . Among those individuals estimated, 31,855 (95% CI 26,849–42,541) are susceptible to infection. We also examined the threshold hypothesis by fitting an extreme-value distribution to the estimated infectious dose of the exposed individuals and obtained a threshold estimate of 13.7 bID50 (95% CI 6.6–26.2 bID50) (Weibull). The results provide useful information on potential carriers of prion disease who may pose a threat of infection via blood transfusion and thus provide insight into the likelihood of new incidents of vCJD occurring in the future. PMID:24736322

  3. Dietary Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program's goals in Dietary Assessment are to increase the precision of dietary intake estimates by improving self-report of dietary intake and the analytic procedures for processing reported information.

  4. Comprehensive profiling of mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide as short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluation of toxicokinetics in rats and daily internal exposure in humans using isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Qiao; Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Jingshun; Xu, Jiaojiao; Ren, Yiping

    2015-09-24

    Mercapturic acid metabolites from dietary acrylamide are important short-term exposure biomarkers for evaluating the in vivo toxicity of acrylamide. Most of studies have focused on the measurement of two metabolites, N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine (AAMA) and N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (GAMA). Thus, the comprehensive profile of acrylamide urinary metabolites cannot be fully understood. We developed an isotope dilution ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of all four mercapturic acid adducts of acrylamide and its primary metabolite glycidamide under the electroscopy ionization negative (ESI-) mode in the present study. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the analytes ranged 0.1-0.3 ng/mL and 0.4-1.0 ng/mL, respectively. The recovery rates with low, intermediate and high spiking levels were calculated as 95.5%-105.4%, 98.2%-114.0% and 92.2%-108.9%, respectively. Acceptable within-laboratory reproducibility (RSD<7.0%) substantially supported the use of current method for robust analysis. Rapid pretreatment procedures and short run time (8 min per sample) ensured good efficiency of metabolism profiling, indicating a wide application for investigating short-term internal exposure of dietary acrylamide. Our proposed UHPLC-MS/MS method was successfully applied to the toxicokinetic study of acrylamide in rats. Meanwhile, results of human urine analysis indicated that the levels of N-acetyl-S-(2-carbamoylethyl)-L-cysteine-sulfoxide (AAMA-sul), which did not appear in the mercapturic acid metabolites in rodents, were more than the sum of GAMA and N-acetyl-S-(1-carbamoyl-2-hydroxyethyl)-L-cysteine (iso-GAMA). Thus, AAMA-sul may alternatively become a specific biomarker for investigating the acrylamide exposure in humans. Current proposed method provides a substantial methodology support for comprehensive profiling of

  5. Dietary sodium butyrate alleviates the oxidative stress induced by corticosterone exposure and improves meat quality in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W H; Gao, F; Zhu, Q F; Li, C; Jiang, Y; Dai, S F; Zhou, G H

    2011-11-01

    The present study was to investigate the effects of dietary microencapsulated sodium butyrate (SB) and acute pre-slaughter stress, mimicked by subcutaneous corticosterone (CORT) administration, on BW, carcass characteristics, muscle antioxidant status, and meat quality of broiler chickens. A total of 120 1-d-old broiler chickens were fed a control diet (without SB) or a 0.4-g microencapsulated SB/kg diet. On 42 d, half of the birds from each treatment were given 1 single subcutaneous injection of CORT (4 mg/kg of BW in corn oil) to mimic acute stress, whereas the other half were injected with the same amount of corn oil (sham control). Three hours later, BW loss was determined and breast meat samples were collected. The results showed that the BW of the CORT-challenged groups lost much more than the sham control group (P < 0.001), whereas it was alleviated by the dietary microencapsulated SB (P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the catalase activity was decreased and malondialdehyde level was increased by the stress (P < 0.05), and the microencapsulated-SB diet significantly inhibited this effect (P < 0.05). Lower pH values and higher yellowness values were also observed in CORT-challenged chickens (P < 0.05), and the microencapsulated-SB diet treatment partially exerted a preventive effect. Microencapsulated SB significantly decreased the contents of saturated fatty acids and C18:0 (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001), and increased C20:0 and C20:4 contents. However, the effect of the stress treatment on fatty acid composition was insignificant (P > 0.05). In addition, diet and stress did not significantly influence carcass characteristics and the chemical composition of breast meat (P > 0.05). These results suggest that microencapsulated SB was favorable for chickens in the presence of stress, which may be partially ascribed to the ability of SB to decrease catabolism and oxidative injury of tissues.

  6. Dietary supplementation with n-3 fatty acids from weaning limits brain biochemistry and behavioural changes elicited by prenatal exposure to maternal inflammation in the mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Q; Leung, Y O; Zhou, I; Ho, L C; Kong, W; Basil, P; Wei, R; Lam, S; Zhang, X; Law, A C K; Chua, S E; Sham, P C; Wu, E X; McAlonan, G M

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to maternal immune activation (MIA) increases the risk of schizophrenia and autism in the offspring. The MIA rodent model provides a valuable tool to directly test the postnatal consequences of exposure to an early inflammatory insult; and examine novel preventative strategies. Here we tested the hypotheses that behavioural differences in the MIA mouse model are accompanied by in vivo and ex vivo alterations in brain biochemistry; and that these can be prevented by a post-weaning diet enriched with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA). The viral analogue PolyI:C (POL) or saline (SAL) was administered to pregnant mice on gestation day 9. Half the resulting male offspring (POL=21; SAL=17) were weaned onto a conventional lab diet (n-6 PUFA); half were weaned onto n-3 PUFA-enriched diet. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy measures were acquired prior to behavioural tests; glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels were measured ex vivo. The main findings were: (i) Adult MIA-exposed mice fed a standard diet had greater N-acetylaspartate/creatine (Cr) and lower myo-inositol/Cr levels in the cingulate cortex in vivo. (ii) The extent of these metabolite differences was correlated with impairment in prepulse inhibition. (iii) MIA-exposed mice on the control diet also had higher levels of anxiety and altered levels of GAD67 ex vivo. (iv) An n-3 PUFA diet prevented all the in vivo and ex vivo effects of MIA observed. Thus, n-3 PUFA dietary enrichment from early life may offer a relatively safe and non-toxic approach to limit the otherwise persistent behavioural and biochemical consequences of prenatal exposure to inflammation. This result may have translational importance. PMID:26393487

  7. Mercury in seabird feathers: insight on dietary habits and evidence for exposure levels in the western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kojadinovic, Jessica; Bustamante, Paco; Churlaud, Carine; Cosson, Richard P; Le Corre, Matthieu

    2007-10-01

    Breast feathers were used to estimate mercury levels in six marine birds nesting in the tropical western Indian Ocean, i.e. Sooty Tern (Sterna fuscata), Brown Noddy (Anous stolidus), Lesser Noddy (Anous tenuirostris), Audubon Shearwater (Puffinus lherminieri bailloni), Barau's Petrel (Pterodroma baraui) and the White-tailed Tropicbird (Phaethon lepturus). Juveniles consistently showed lower plumage mercury than adults. The lowest mean level was noted in juvenile Sooty Terns from the Glorioso Archipelago (0.05 microg g(-1)). The highest levels were obtained for adult Barau's Petrels from Reunion Island (0.96 microg g(-1)). An inter-site analysis of Sooty Tern showed higher mercury levels in birds nesting on Juan de Nova Island. Levels were low in comparison with values reported in the plumage of seabirds worldwide. The potential impacts of the size, the type (fish/cephalopod) and the origin (epi-/meso-pelagic) of prey on mercury intake in birds are discussed. Although the diet composition of individuals within a species appeared to be quite variable, combining results on mercury levels with common knowledge of each species allowed additional information on their dietary and foraging habits to be unraveled. PMID:17659323

  8. Sub-lethal effects of dietary neonicotinoid insecticide exposure on honey bee queen fecundity and colony development.

    PubMed

    Wu-Smart, Judy; Spivak, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Many factors can negatively affect honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) health including the pervasive use of systemic neonicotinoid insecticides. Through direct consumption of contaminated nectar and pollen from treated plants, neonicotinoids can affect foraging, learning, and memory in worker bees. Less well studied are the potential effects of neonicotinoids on queen bees, which may be exposed indirectly through trophallaxis, or food-sharing. To assess effects on queen productivity, small colonies of different sizes (1500, 3000, and 7000 bees) were fed imidacloprid (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 ppb) in syrup for three weeks. We found adverse effects of imidacloprid on queens (egg-laying and locomotor activity), worker bees (foraging and hygienic activities), and colony development (brood production and pollen stores) in all treated colonies. Some effects were less evident as colony size increased, suggesting that larger colony populations may act as a buffer to pesticide exposure. This study is the first to show adverse effects of imidacloprid on queen bee fecundity and behavior and improves our understanding of how neonicotinoids may impair short-term colony functioning. These data indicate that risk-mitigation efforts should focus on reducing neonicotinoid exposure in the early spring when colonies are smallest and queens are most vulnerable to exposure. PMID:27562025

  9. Dietary protection by iron against clastogenic effects of short-term exposure to arsenic in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S; Mukherjee, P; Talukder, G; Sharma, A

    2000-08-01

    Iron, as freshly prepared aqueous solution of ferrous sulfate, was administered by gavage to laboratory bred Swiss albino mice. The concentration used was 152 mg/kg body weight (1/10 of the LD(50)). While screening for protection against arsenic, in one set of experiment exposure to iron was followed after 2 hr by gavaging with 2.5 mg/kg body weight (1/10 of the LD(50)) of arsenic as sodium (III) meta arsenite in distilled water. In another set, equal amounts (1:1) of ferrous sulfate and sodium arsenite were administered simultaneously. Control sets were given sodium m-arsenite alone and distilled water (vehicle). After exposure for 24 hr in all experiments, mice were sacrificed and chromosome preparations were made from bone marrow according to a colchicine-hypotonic-fixation-air-drying-Giemsa schedule. Cytogenetic endpoints screened were chromosome aberrations and divisional frequencies. Sodium arsenite alone was highly clastogenic. Ferrous sulfate, whether given together with or before exposure to sodium arsenite, reduced the clastogenic effects of the latter to a significant extent.

  10. Sub-lethal effects of dietary neonicotinoid insecticide exposure on honey bee queen fecundity and colony development

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Smart, Judy; Spivak, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Many factors can negatively affect honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) health including the pervasive use of systemic neonicotinoid insecticides. Through direct consumption of contaminated nectar and pollen from treated plants, neonicotinoids can affect foraging, learning, and memory in worker bees. Less well studied are the potential effects of neonicotinoids on queen bees, which may be exposed indirectly through trophallaxis, or food-sharing. To assess effects on queen productivity, small colonies of different sizes (1500, 3000, and 7000 bees) were fed imidacloprid (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 ppb) in syrup for three weeks. We found adverse effects of imidacloprid on queens (egg-laying and locomotor activity), worker bees (foraging and hygienic activities), and colony development (brood production and pollen stores) in all treated colonies. Some effects were less evident as colony size increased, suggesting that larger colony populations may act as a buffer to pesticide exposure. This study is the first to show adverse effects of imidacloprid on queen bee fecundity and behavior and improves our understanding of how neonicotinoids may impair short-term colony functioning. These data indicate that risk-mitigation efforts should focus on reducing neonicotinoid exposure in the early spring when colonies are smallest and queens are most vulnerable to exposure. PMID:27562025

  11. Chronic Dietary Exposure to Aristolochic Acid and Kidney Function in Native Farmers from a Croatian Endemic Area and Bosnian Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Jelaković, Bojan; Karanović, Sandra; Dika, Živka; Kos, Jelena; Dickman, Kathleen; Šekoranja, Maja; Poljičanin, Tamara; Mišić, Maja; Premužić, Vedran; Abramović, Mirta; Matijević, Vesna; Miletić Medved, Marica; Cvitković, Ante; Edwards, Karen; Fuček, Mirjana; Leko, Ninoslav; Teskera, Tomislav; Laganović, Mario; Čvorišćec, Dubravka; Grollman, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Improvements in agricultural practices in Croatia have reduced exposure to consumption of aristolochic acid-contaminated flour and development of endemic (Balkan) nephropathy. Therefore, it was hypothesized that Bosnian immigrants who settled in an endemic area in Croatia 15–30 years ago would be at lower risk of developing endemic nephropathy because of reduced exposure to aristolochic acid. To test this hypothesis, past and present exposure to aristolochic acid, proximal tubule damage as a hallmark of endemic nephropathy, and prevalence of CKD in Bosnian immigrants were analyzed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this cross-sectional observational study from 2005 to 2010, 2161 farmers were divided into groups: indigenous inhabitants from endemic nephropathy and nonendemic nephropathy villages and Bosnian immigrants; α-1 microglobulin-to-creatinine ratio >31.5 mg/g and eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 were considered to be abnormal. Results CKD and proximal tubule damage prevalence was significantly lower in Bosnian immigrants than inhabitants of endemic nephropathy villages (6.9% versus 16.6%; P<0.001; 1.3% versus 7.3%; P=0.003, respectively); 20 years ago, Bosnian immigrants observed fewer Aristolochia clematitis in cultivated fields (41.9% versus 67.8%) and fewer seeds among wheat seeds (6.1% versus 35.6%) and ate more purchased than homemade bread compared with Croatian farmers from endemic nephropathy villages (38.5% versus 14.8%, P<0.001). Both Croatian farmers and Bosnian immigrants observe significantly fewer Aristolochia plants growing in their fields compared with 15–30 years ago. Prior aristolochic acid exposure was associated with proximal tubule damage (odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 2.58; P=0.02), whereas present exposure was not (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 2.30; P=0.33). Furthermore, immigrant status was an independent negative predictor of proximal tubule damage

  12. Aluminum accumulation and neurotoxicity in Swiss-Webster mice after long-term dietary exposure to aluminum and citrate.

    PubMed

    Oteiza, P I; Keen, C L; Han, B; Golub, M S

    1993-10-01

    The present study was performed to determine aluminum uptake, retention, and neurotoxic effects in the presence of dietary citrate. Six-week-old female Swiss-Webster mice were fed semipurified diets containing 3.5% sodium citrate and either 3 micrograms Al/g diet (3 Al) or 1,000 micrograms Al/g diet (1,000 Al) as AlCl3. After 5 to 7 weeks of feeding these diets, changes in behavior were assessed using the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Neurobehavioral Test Battery. Liver and bone Al concentrations in the 1,000 Al group were higher than in the 3 Al group at both the 5- and 7-week time points. Spinal cord Al concentrations in the 1,000 Al group were 200% higher at 5 weeks (P < .01) than in controls, and brain nuclear fraction Al concentrations in the 1,000 Al group were 150% higher at 5 and 7 weeks (P < .01) than in the 3 Al group. The Neurobehavioral Test Battery showed lower grip strength and greater startle responsiveness in the 1,000 Al group compared with the 3 Al group at both the 5- and 7-week time points. Based on reports that Al can act as a pro-oxidant, we examined Al-induced brain lipid and protein oxidative damage; neither was evident in the Al-intoxicated mice. In summary, feeding of Al and citrate to mice resulted in Al accumulation in the central nervous system, and this accumulation was associated with overt signs of neurotoxicity. Brain protein and lipid oxidative damage was not associated with early manifestation of Al toxicity.

  13. DNA adduct formation and oxidative stress in colon and liver of Big Blue rats after dietary exposure to diesel particles.

    PubMed

    Dybdahl, Marianne; Risom, Lotte; Møller, Peter; Autrup, Herman; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Bornholdt, Jette; Daneshvar, Bahram; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Weimann, Allan; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) via the gastrointestinal route may impose risk of cancer in the colon and liver. We investigated the effects of DEP given in the diet to Big Blue rats by quantifying a panel of markers of DNA damage and repair, mutation, oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, and antioxidative defence mechanisms in colon mucosa cells, liver tissue and the blood compartment. Seven groups of rats were fed a diet with 0, 0.2, 0.8, 2, 8, 20 or 80 mg DEP/kg feed for 21 days. DEP induced a significant increase in DNA strand breaks in colon and liver. There was no effect on oxidative DNA damage (8-oxodG) in colon or liver DNA or in the urine. However, the mRNA expression of OGG1, encoding an enzyme involved in repair of 8-oxodG, was increased by DEP in both liver and colon. DNA adduct levels measured by 32P-post-labelling were elevated in colon and liver, and the expression of ERCC1 gene was affected in liver, but not in colon. In addition to these effects, DEP exposure induced apoptosis in liver. There was no significant change in mutation frequency in colon or liver. The levels of oxidative protein modifications (oxidized arginine and proline residues) were increased in liver accompanied by enhanced vitamin C levels. In plasma, we found no significant effects on oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, antioxidant enzymes or vitamin C levels. Our data indicate that gastrointestinal exposure to DEP induces DNA adducts and oxidative stress resulting in DNA strand breaks, enhanced repair capacity of oxidative base damage, apoptosis and protein oxidation in colon mucosa cells and liver.

  14. DNA adduct formation and oxidative stress in colon and liver of Big Blue rats after dietary exposure to diesel particles.

    PubMed

    Dybdahl, Marianne; Risom, Lotte; Møller, Peter; Autrup, Herman; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla; Bornholdt, Jette; Daneshvar, Bahram; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Weimann, Allan; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Loft, Steffen

    2003-11-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) via the gastrointestinal route may impose risk of cancer in the colon and liver. We investigated the effects of DEP given in the diet to Big Blue rats by quantifying a panel of markers of DNA damage and repair, mutation, oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, and antioxidative defence mechanisms in colon mucosa cells, liver tissue and the blood compartment. Seven groups of rats were fed a diet with 0, 0.2, 0.8, 2, 8, 20 or 80 mg DEP/kg feed for 21 days. DEP induced a significant increase in DNA strand breaks in colon and liver. There was no effect on oxidative DNA damage (8-oxodG) in colon or liver DNA or in the urine. However, the mRNA expression of OGG1, encoding an enzyme involved in repair of 8-oxodG, was increased by DEP in both liver and colon. DNA adduct levels measured by 32P-post-labelling were elevated in colon and liver, and the expression of ERCC1 gene was affected in liver, but not in colon. In addition to these effects, DEP exposure induced apoptosis in liver. There was no significant change in mutation frequency in colon or liver. The levels of oxidative protein modifications (oxidized arginine and proline residues) were increased in liver accompanied by enhanced vitamin C levels. In plasma, we found no significant effects on oxidative damage to proteins and lipids, antioxidant enzymes or vitamin C levels. Our data indicate that gastrointestinal exposure to DEP induces DNA adducts and oxidative stress resulting in DNA strand breaks, enhanced repair capacity of oxidative base damage, apoptosis and protein oxidation in colon mucosa cells and liver. PMID:12919963

  15. Excretion of N-mononitrosopiperazine after low level exposure to piperazine in air: effects of dietary nitrate and ascorbate

    SciTech Connect

    Bellander, T.; Osterdahl, B.G.; Hagmar, L.

    1988-04-01

    The secondary amine piperazine may be nitrosated in vivo, following oral intake or occupational exposure by inhalation. The suspected carcinogen N-mononitrosopiperazine could be formed in the human stomach, and in part excreted in the urine. In this study, 0.4 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine, determined by gas chromatography-Thermal Energy Analysis, was observed in the urine in one of four volunteers, at an experimental exposure by inhalation of 0.3 mg piperazine/m3. The intake of spinach and beetroot caused an increased nitrosation of piperazine, and up to 1.7 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine was excreted in the urine in the four individuals. This excretion indicates that about 5% of the absorbed piperazine dose was converted to N-mononitrosopiperazine. With the same nitrate-rich diet, but with the addition of citrus fruits and fresh vegetables, the highest excretion was 0.6 microgram N-mononitrosopiperazine. The excretion was significantly correlated with the ratio between the maximum level of nitrite in saliva and the ascorbate level in plasma. There was also a significant interindividual variation. N,N'-Dinitrosopiperazine was not found in any sample of urine.

  16. Challenging Role of Dietary Aflatoxin B1 Exposure and Hepatitis B Infection on Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kucukcakan, Basak; Hayrulai-Musliu, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AFT) are poisonous substances which are classified in Group 1 carcinogenic agents to humans by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). AFT can occur naturally in food commodities (maize, corn, rice) as a result of fungal contamination in hot and humid environments. In the food, toxin contamination can remain during manufacturing and long after fungi have stopped being biologically active. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most dominant and potent agent from all AFT. In developing countries, high exposure to AFB1 can cause chronic toxicity and usually increases the incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). However, in these regions hepatitis B is the most common risk factor for HCC cases. Many researches were aimed to enlighten the mechanism and the role of two etiological agents on risk of HCC, but the obtained data was conflicting with each other. It was uncertain that the indicators/biomarkers might be the contribution of the carcinogenic status of the patient; and, the biomarker samples from the subject may only reflect the recent effects of the toxin exposure after consumption of AFB1 contaminated commodities. The studies were facing with the errors of methods which were un-fit to enlighten the possible interaction between Hepatitis B and AFB1 on contribution to HCC. It was pivotal to understand the effect of each risk factor in order to prevent and improve public health in poor and undeveloped regions. Although some of the studies evaluate AFB1 alone as a considerable factor on HCC risk, according to this review it was concluded vice versa. This study was aimed to clarify the main etiological agent of HCC where AFB1 and HBV are endangering public health. In additionally, the purpose was to enlighten the possible synergistic effect between these two factors among HCC pathogenesis. Hence forth, appropriate and right applications could be conducted in undeveloped countries in order to protect public health. PMID:27275251

  17. Challenging Role of Dietary Aflatoxin B1 Exposure and Hepatitis B Infection on Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kucukcakan, Basak; Hayrulai-Musliu, Zehra

    2015-06-15

    Aflatoxins (AFT) are poisonous substances which are classified in Group 1 carcinogenic agents to humans by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). AFT can occur naturally in food commodities (maize, corn, rice) as a result of fungal contamination in hot and humid environments. In the food, toxin contamination can remain during manufacturing and long after fungi have stopped being biologically active. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most dominant and potent agent from all AFT. In developing countries, high exposure to AFB1 can cause chronic toxicity and usually increases the incidence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC). However, in these regions hepatitis B is the most common risk factor for HCC cases. Many researches were aimed to enlighten the mechanism and the role of two etiological agents on risk of HCC, but the obtained data was conflicting with each other. It was uncertain that the indicators/biomarkers might be the contribution of the carcinogenic status of the patient; and, the biomarker samples from the subject may only reflect the recent effects of the toxin exposure after consumption of AFB1 contaminated commodities. The studies were facing with the errors of methods which were un-fit to enlighten the possible interaction between Hepatitis B and AFB1 on contribution to HCC. It was pivotal to understand the effect of each risk factor in order to prevent and improve public health in poor and undeveloped regions. Although some of the studies evaluate AFB1 alone as a considerable factor on HCC risk, according to this review it was concluded vice versa. This study was aimed to clarify the main etiological agent of HCC where AFB1 and HBV are endangering public health. In additionally, the purpose was to enlighten the possible synergistic effect between these two factors among HCC pathogenesis. Hence forth, appropriate and right applications could be conducted in undeveloped countries in order to protect public health. PMID:27275251

  18. Dietary exposure to low doses of bisphenol A: effects on reproduction and development in two generations of C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenichi; Ohtani, Katsumi; Kubota, Hisayo; Miyagawa, Muneyuki

    2010-09-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the effects of low-dose exposure to bisphenol A on reproduction and development in two generations of mice. Pregnant female C57BL/6J mice (F(0)) were fed a diet containing low doses of bisphenol A (0, 0.33, 3.3, or 33 ppm) from gestational day 6 through postnatal day 22, and the weanlings (F(1) and F(2)) from each F(0) and F(1) dam group, respectively, were also fed these same concentrations of bisphenol A ad libitum until sacrifice. There were no treatment-related changes in body weight, body weight gain, food consumption, gestation length, or the number of live births on postnatal day 1 in F(0) dams between the control group and bisphenol A groups. Sex ratio and viability were similar in all F(1) pups. No treatment-related changes were observed in body weight, food consumption, developmental parameters, anogenital distance, or weight of any of the organs (liver, kidney, heart, spleen, thymus, testis, ovary, or uterus) in F(1) and F(2) adults in either sex. The epididymis weight was slightly higher with 0.33 and 3.3 ppm in F(1) males, but this slight increase was neither dose dependent nor seen across generations. There were no treatment-related effects of bisphenol A on cauda epididymal sperm count or sperm motility in F(1) or F(2) males. These findings indicate that dietary exposure to bisphenol A between 0.33 and 33 ppm does not adversely affect reproduction or development as assessed in two generations of mice.

  19. Dietary choline supplementation to dams during pregnancy and lactation mitigates the effects of in utero stress exposure on adult anxiety-related behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Kalynn M.; Pearson, Jennifer N.; Gasparrini, Mary E.; Brooks, Kayla F.; Drake-Frazier, Chakeer; Zajkowski, Megan E.; Kreisler, Alison D.; Adams, Catherine E.; Leonard, Sherry; Stevens, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Brain cholinergic dysfunction is associated with neuropsychiatric illnesses such as depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. Maternal stress exposure is associated with these same illnesses in adult offspring, yet the relationship between prenatal stress and brain cholinergic function is largely unexplored. Thus, using a rodent model, the current study implemented an intervention aimed at buffering the potential effects of prenatal stress on the developing brain cholinergic system. Specifically, control and stressed dams were fed choline-supplemented or control chow during pregnancy and lactation, and the anxiety-related behaviors of adult offspring were assessed in the open field, elevated zero maze and social interaction tests. In the open field test, choline supplementation significantly increased center investigation in both stressed and nonstressed female offspring, suggesting that choline-supplementation decreases female anxiety-related behavior irrespective of prenatal stress exposure. In the elevated zero maze, prenatal stress increased anxiety-related behaviors of female offspring fed a control diet (normal choline levels). However, prenatal stress failed to increase anxiety-related behaviors in female offspring receiving supplemental choline during gestation and lactation, suggesting that dietary choline supplementation ameliorated the effects of prenatal stress on anxiety-related behaviors. For male rats, neither prenatal stress nor diet impacted anxiety-related behaviors in the open field or elevated zero maze. In contrast, perinatal choline supplementation mitigated prenatal stress-induced social behavioral deficits in males, whereas neither prenatal stress nor choline supplementation influenced female social behaviors. Taken together, these data suggest that perinatal choline supplementation ameliorates the sex-specific effects of prenatal stress. PMID:24675162

  20. UVB exposure of farm animals: study on a food-based strategy to bridge the gap between current vitamin D intakes and dietary targets.

    PubMed

    Schutkowski, Alexandra; Krämer, Julia; Kluge, Holger; Hirche, Frank; Krombholz, Andreas; Theumer, Torsten; Stangl, Gabriele I

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a global health problem. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) B radiation for improving vitamin D3 content of eggs and meat. In a two-factorial design hens that received diets with 0 (-D3) or 3,000 IU (+D3) vitamin D3/kg were non-exposed (-UVB) or exposed to UVB radiation (+UVB) for 3 h daily over 4 weeks. Data show that UVB radiation was very effective in raising the vitamin D3 content of egg yolk and meat. Egg yolk from +UVB/-D3 hens had a higher vitamin D3 content (17.5±7.2 µg/100 g dry matter (DM)) than those from the -UVB/+D3 group (5.2±2.4 µg/100 g DM, p<0.01). Vitamin D3 content in egg yolk of vitamin D3-supplemented hens could be further increased by UVB radiation (32.4±10.9 µg/100 g DM). The content of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in the egg yolk also increased in response to UVB, although less pronounced than vitamin D3. Meat revealed about 4-fold higher vitamin D3 contents in response to UVB than to dietary vitamin D3 (p<0.001). In conclusion, exposure of hens to UVB is an efficient approach to provide consumers with vitamin D3-enriched foods from animal sources.

  1. Evaluation of seasonal dietary exposure to arsenic, cadmium and lead in schoolchildren through the analysis of meals served by public schools of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nacano, Letícia Ramos; de Freitas, Rodolfo; Barbosa, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dietary exposure to arsenic (AS), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb) of Brazilian schoolchildren living in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, was assessed. Food samples including rice, beans, vegetables, fruits, and meat served daily by public schools were collected as presented in different seasons. Metallic elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).The main sources of As, Cd, and Pb were found to be rice, vegetables, and pork, respectively. Further, in some food types there were seasonal differences in the concentrations of metallic elements. The mean daily intakes of As, Cd, and Pb based upon the association between food consumption data and the observed concentrations of metals in their diet were 6.9 μg, 0.9 μg, and 0.6 μg for As, Cd, and Pb, respectively. These findings are below the toxicological reference values provided by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the World Health Organization (WHO).

  2. UVB Exposure of Farm Animals: Study on a Food-Based Strategy to Bridge the Gap between Current Vitamin D Intakes and Dietary Targets

    PubMed Central

    Schutkowski, Alexandra; Krämer, Julia; Kluge, Holger; Hirche, Frank; Krombholz, Andreas; Theumer, Torsten; Stangl, Gabriele I.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is a global health problem. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) B radiation for improving vitamin D3 content of eggs and meat. In a two-factorial design hens that received diets with 0 (-D3) or 3,000 IU (+D3) vitamin D3/kg were non-exposed (-UVB) or exposed to UVB radiation (+UVB) for 3 h daily over 4 weeks. Data show that UVB radiation was very effective in raising the vitamin D3 content of egg yolk and meat. Egg yolk from +UVB/−D3 hens had a higher vitamin D3 content (17.5±7.2 µg/100 g dry matter (DM)) than those from the –UVB/+D3 group (5.2±2.4 µg/100 g DM, p<0.01). Vitamin D3 content in egg yolk of vitamin D3-supplemented hens could be further increased by UVB radiation (32.4±10.9 µg/100 g DM). The content of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in the egg yolk also increased in response to UVB, although less pronounced than vitamin D3. Meat revealed about 4-fold higher vitamin D3 contents in response to UVB than to dietary vitamin D3 (p<0.001). In conclusion, exposure of hens to UVB is an efficient approach to provide consumers with vitamin D3-enriched foods from animal sources. PMID:23894475

  3. Overview of existing European food consumption databases: critical aspects in relation to their use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials.

    PubMed

    Le Donne, Cinzia; Piccinelli, Raffaela; Sette, Stefania; Leclercq, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    A critical analysis of existing food consumption databases was performed with particular regard for their current and potential use for the assessment of dietary exposure to additives, flavourings and residues of food contact materials. Within the European Food Consumption Validation project (EFCOVAL), a questionnaire on critical aspects of such datasets was developed and administered to researchers responsible for the collection/analysis of national food consumption data in European countries. Information collected was complemented through a review of the literature and of grey publications in order to provide an inventory of the main food consumption surveys performed in Europe from 1994 to 2007, for a total of 23 countries and 37 surveys. It appeared that existing European food consumption surveys have as a main objective the assessment of nutrient intake in the population. On the other hand, most of the databases were shown to be used also for the purpose of dietary exposure assessment.

  4. Dietary exposure to, and internal organ transfer of, selected halogenated organic compounds in birds eating fish from the Southern Baltic.

    PubMed

    Falkowska, Lucyna; Reindl, Andrzej R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a marine diet on the accumulation, magnification, maternal transfer and detoxification of chlorinated organic pollutants on the highest trophic level in the Baltic Sea. Results showed that birds eating whole herring received the highest doses of herbicides > pesticides > fungicides > polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) > polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs). The toxicity of PCDD/Fs in a penguin's 24-h alimentary exposure was estimated at 7.77 ng TEQ-WHO2005. Among pesticides, the highest concentrations--both in fish and penguin tissue--were those of the pp-DDE isomer. In terms of herbicides, simazine and terbutrine were predominant. The majority of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) underwent accumulation and magnification, and these factors were observed to increase with the birds' age. Guano was found to be an effective means of elimination for all of the studied xenobiotics. Maternal transfer of PCDD/Fs into eggs from internal tissues was most prominent for highly chlorinated dioxins and low chlorinated furans. PMID:26121018

  5. Urinary and Dietary Analysis of 18,470 Bangladeshis Reveal a Correlation of Rice Consumption with Arsenic Exposure and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Melkonian, Stephanie; Argos, Maria; Hall, Megan N.; Chen, Yu; Parvez, Faruque; Pierce, Brandon; Cao, Hongyuan; Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Slavcovich, Vesna; Gamble, Mary; Haris, Parvez I.; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2013-01-01

    Background We utilized data from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to evaluate the association of steamed rice consumption with urinary total arsenic concentration and arsenical skin lesions in the overall study cohort (N=18,470) and in a subset with available urinary arsenic metabolite data (N=4,517). Methods General linear models with standardized beta coefficients were used to estimate associations between steamed rice consumption and urinary total arsenic concentration and urinary arsenic metabolites. Logistic regression models were used to estimate prevalence odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between rice intake and prevalent skin lesions at baseline. Discrete time hazard models were used to estimate discrete time (HRs) ratios and their 95% CIs for the associations between rice intake and incident skin lesions. Results Steamed rice consumption was positively associated with creatinine-adjusted urinary total arsenic (β=0.041, 95% CI: 0.032-0.051) and urinary total arsenic with statistical adjustment for creatinine in the model (β=0.043, 95% CI: 0.032-0.053). Additionally, we observed a significant trend in skin lesion prevalence (P-trend=0.007) and a moderate trend in skin lesion incidence (P-trend=0.07) associated with increased intake of steamed rice. Conclusions This study suggests that rice intake may be a source of arsenic exposure beyond drinking water. PMID:24260455

  6. Assessment of dietary exposure to annatto (E160b), nitrites (E249-250), sulphites (E220-228) and tartaric acid (E334) in the French population: the second French total diet study.

    PubMed

    Bemrah, N; Vin, K; Sirot, V; Aguilar, F; Ladrat, A-C; Ducasse, C; Gey, J-L; Rétho, C; Nougadere, A; Leblanc, J-C

    2012-01-01

    The results of the assessment of the dietary exposure to annatto, nitrites, tartaric acid and sulphites within the framework of the second French total diet study (TDS) are reported. These 4 additives were selected from the Bemrah et al. study [Bemrah N, Leblanc JC, Volatier JL. 2008. Assessment of dietary exposure in the French population to 13 selected food colours, preservatives, antioxidants, stabilizers, emulsifiers and sweeteners. Food Addit Contam B. 1(1):2-14] on 13 food additives which identified a possible health risk for annatto, sulphites and nitrites and a lack of data for tartaric acid. Among the composite samples selected for the whole TDS, 524 were analysed for additives (a sample was analysed for a given additive when it was identified as a major contributor for this additive only): 130 for tartaric acid, 135 for nitrites, 59 for annatto and 200 for sulphites. Estimated concentrations (minimum lower bound to maximum upper bound) vary nationally from 0 to 9 mg/kg for annatto, 0 to 420 mg/kg for tartaric acid, 0 to 108 mg/kg for sulphites and 0 to 3.4 mg/kg for nitrites. Based on the analytical results, the dietary exposure was calculated for adults and children, separately, using lower bound and upper bound assumptions. The European ADIs for these 4 additives were not exceeded except for the dietary exposure for sulphites among 2.9% of the adult population, where the major contributors were alcoholic drinks and especially wine under both hypotheses (lower and upper bound).

  7. Epigenetic and phenotypic changes result from a continuous pre and post natal dietary exposure to phytoestrogens in an experimental population of mice

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos M; Sabat, Pablo; Valdovinos, Fernanda S; Valladares, Luis E; Clark, Susan J

    2008-01-01

    Background Developmental effects of exposure to endocrine disruptors can influence adult characters in mammals, but could also have evolutionary consequences. The aim of this study was to simulate an environmental exposure of an experimental population of mice to high amounts of nutritional phytoestrogens and to evaluate parameters of relevance for evolutionary change in the offspring. The effect of a continuous pre- and post-natal exposure to high levels of dietary isoflavones was evaluated on sexual maturity, morphometric parameters and DNA methylation status in mice. Adult mice male/female couples were fed ad libitum either with control diet (standard laboratory chow) or ISF diet (control diet plus a soy isoflavone extract at 2% (w/w) that contained the phytoestrogens genistein and daidzein). In the offspring we measured: i) the onset of vaginal opening (sexual maturation) in females, ii) weight and size in all pups at 7, 14, 21 and 42 days post-natal (dpn) and iii) DNA methylation patterns in skeletal α-actin (Acta1), estrogen receptor-α and c-fos in adults (42 dpn). Results Vaginal opening was advanced in female pups in the ISF group, from 31.6 ± 0.75 dpn to 25.7 ± 0.48. No differences in size or weight at ages 7, 14 or 21 dpn were detected between experimental groups. Nevertheless, at age 42 dpn reduced size and weight were observed in ISF pups, in addition to suppression of normal gender differences in weight seen in the control group (males heavier that females). Also, natural differences seen in DNA methylation at Acta1 promoter in the offspring originated in the control group were suppressed in the ISF group. Acta1 is known to be developmentally regulated and related to morphomotric features. Conclusion This study demonstrates in mammals that individuals from a population subjected to a high consumption of isoflavones can show alterations in characters that may be of importance from an evolutionary perspective, such as epigenetic and morphometric

  8. Differential gene expression associated with dietary methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Basu, Niladri; Goetz, Giles; Jiang, Nan; Hutz, Reinhold J; Tonellato, Peter J; Carvan, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate conserved biomarkers that could be used in most species of teleost fish at most life-stages. We investigated the effects of sublethal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on developing rainbow trout and zebrafish. Juvenile rainbow trout and young adult zebrafish were fed food with MeHg added at 0, 0.5, 5, and 50 ppm. Atomic absorption spectrometry was applied to measure whole body total Hg levels, and pathologic analysis was performed to identify MeHg-induced toxicity. Fish at 6 weeks were sampled from each group for microarray analysis using RNA from whole fish. MeHg-exposed trout and zebrafish did not show overt signs of toxicity or pathology, nor were significant differences seen in mortality, length, mass, or condition factor. The accumulation of MeHg in trout and zebrafish exhibited dose- and time-dependent patterns during 6 weeks, and zebrafish exhibited greater assimilation of total Hg than rainbow trout. The dysregulated genes in MeHg-treated fish have multiple functional annotations, such as iron ion homeostasis, glutathione transferase activity, regulation of muscle contraction, troponin I binding and calcium-dependent protein binding. Genes were selected as biomarker candidates based on their microarray data and their expression was evaluated by QPCR. Unfortunately, these genes are not good consistent biomarkers for both rainbow trout and zebrafish from QPCR evaluation using individual fish. Our conclusion is that biomarker analysis for aquatic toxicant assessment using fish needs to be based on tissue-, sex- and species-specific consideration.

  9. Assessing Children’s Dietary Pesticide Exposure: Direct Measurement of Pesticide Residues in 24-Hr Duplicate Food Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chensheng; Schenck, Frank J.; Pearson, Melanie A.; Wong, Jon W.

    2010-01-01

    Background The data presented here are a response to calls for more direct measurements of pesticide residues in foods consumed by children and provide an opportunity to compare direct measures of pesticide residues in foods representing actual consumption with those reported by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Pesticide Data Program. Objective We measured pesticide residues in 24-hr duplicate food samples collected from a group of 46 young children participating in the Children’s Pesticide Exposure Study (CPES). Methods Parents were instructed to collect 24-hr duplicate food samples of all conventional fruits, vegetables, and fruit juices equal to the quantity consumed by their children, similarly prewashed/prepared, and from the same source or batch. Individual or composite food items were analyzed for organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid insecticide residues. Results We collected a total of 239 24-hr duplicate food samples collected from the 46 CPES children. We found 14% or 5% of those food samples contained at least one OP or pyrethroid insecticide, respectively. We measured a total of 11 OP insecticides, at levels ranging from 1 to 387 ng/g, and three pyrethroid insecticides, at levels ranging from 2 to 1,133 ng/g, in children’s food samples. We found that many of the food items consumed by the CPES children were also on the list of the most contaminated food commodities reported by the Environmental Working Group. Conclusions The frequent consumption of food commodities with episodic presence of pesticide residues that are suspected to cause developmental and neurological effects in young children supports the need for further mitigation. PMID:20639183

  10. Refined biokinetic model for humans exposed to cobalt dietary supplements and other sources of systemic cobalt exposure.

    PubMed

    Unice, Kenneth M; Kerger, Brent D; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Finley, Brent L; Tvermoes, Brooke E

    2014-06-01

    An updated biokinetic model for human exposures to cobalt (Co) was developed based on a comprehensive set of human pharmacokinetics data collected from five male and five female volunteers who ingested ∼1 mg Co/day of a Co supplement for 3 months. Three key experimental observations from the human dosing studies were incorporated into the model: (1) an increase in the measured fraction of large molecular serum protein bound Co from 95% during dosing to 99% after dosing; (2) a linear decrease in Co red blood cell concentration after dosing; and (3) Co renal clearance consistent with estimated glomerular filtration rates and free Co²⁺ concentration. The model was refined by adding compartments accounting for (1) albumin bound Co in intravascular fluid (serum); (2) albumin bound Co in extravascular fluid with physiologic exchange rates of albumin bound Co between extravascular and intravascular fluid; and (3) a novel sequential cascade of compartments representing red blood cell ages between 1 and 120 days. Reasonable agreement between the modeled and measured urine, serum, and whole blood concentrations were observed (r>0.84, slope=0.79-1.0) with gastrointestinal absorption rates between 9% and 66%. In addition, model predictions agreed well with data from several external studies representing healthy human volunteers, dialysis patients, anephric patients, a Co-poisoning incident and whole body retention studies. Our revised model considerably improves the state of knowledge on human Co kinetics, and should be helpful for evaluating elevated blood Co concentrations in currently exposed populations, such as metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implant patients.

  11. Chronic Exposure to Dietary Sterol Glucosides is Neurotoxic to Motor Neurons and Induces an ALS-PDC Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, R. C.; Wilson, J. M. B.; Ly, P.; Zwiegers, P.; Kwok, D.; Van Kampen, J. M.; Cashman, N.; Shaw, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the Guamanian variants of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS-PDC), have shown a positive correlation between consumption of washed cycad seed flour and disease occurrence. Previous in vivo studies by our group have shown that the same seed flour induces ALS and PDC phenotypes in out bred adult male mice. In vitro studies using isolated cycad compounds have also demonstrated that several of these are neurotoxic, specifically, a number of water insoluble phytosterol glucosides of which β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG) forms the largest fraction. BSSG is neurotoxic to motor neurons and other neuronal populations in culture. The present study shows that an in vitro hybrid motor neuron (NSC-34) culture treated with BSSG undergoes a dose-dependent cell loss. Surviving cells show increased expression of HSP70, decreased cytosolic heavy neurofilament expression, and have various morphological abnormalities. CD-1 mice fed mouse chow pellets containing BSSG for 15 weeks showed motor deficits and motor neuron loss in the lumbar and thoracic spinal cord, along with decreased glutamate transporter labelling, and increased glial fibrillary acid protein reactivity. Other pathological outcomes included increased caspase-3 labelling in the striatum and decreased tyrosine-hydroxylase labelling in the striatum and substantia nigra. C57BL/6 mice fed BSSG-treated pellets for 10 weeks exhibited progressive loss of motor neurons in the lumbar spinal cord that continued to worsen even after the BSSG exposure ended. These results provide further support implicating sterol glucosides as one potential causal factor in the motor neuron pathology previously associated with cycad consumption and ALS-PDC. PMID:18196479

  12. Occurrence of halogenated contaminants in inland and coastal fish from Ghana: levels, dietary exposure assessment and human health implications.

    PubMed

    Asante, Kwadwo Ansong; Takahashi, Shin; Itai, Takaaki; Isobe, Tomohiko; Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Muto, Mamoru; Agyakwah, Seth Koranteng; Adu-Kumi, Sam; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-08-01

    Fish consumption is known to have several health benefits for humans. However, the accumulation of toxic contaminants, such as PCBs, PBDEs and HBCDs in fish could pose health hazards. These contaminants were measured in tilapia fish species collected from Ghana. Mean levels were PCBs (62 ng/g lw), PBDEs (7.3 ng/g lw) and HBCDs (1.2 ng/g lw) and the predominance of CB-153, CB-138, CB-180, BDE-47 and α-HBCD is in concordance with scientific literature. The congener profiles of PBDEs and PCBs in the fish suggest that sources of Penta- and Deca-BDE technical mixtures as well as technical PCB mixture (Clophen A60) exist in Ghana, while textile operations and associated release of untreated wastewater are likely to be significant sources of HBCDs. Comparison of the results with some reported studies showed moderate contamination in Ghana although Ghana is a developing country in Africa. Concentrations of PCBs measured in all the specimens in this study were below the food safety guidelines issued by the Food and Drug Administration, USA and the European Commission. The calculated hazard index levels of the target contaminants were below the threshold value of one, indicating that the levels of the target contaminants do not seem to constitute a health risk via fish consumption, with regard to PCBs, PBDEs and HBCDs, based on the limited number of samples that was accounted for in this study. However, due to the continuous discharge of untreated effluents, follow up studies are warranted as the consumption of fish is the primary route of human exposure to PCBs. This maiden report on the status of PBDEs and HBCDs in fish from Ghana will contribute to the knowledge about environmental contamination by POPs in a less industrialized region of the world so far sparsely covered in the literature. PMID:23743250

  13. CHRONIC DIETARY EXPOSURE WITH INTERMITTENT SPIKE DOSES OF CHLORPYRIFOS FALLS TO ALTER SOMATOSENSORY EVOKED POTENTIALS, COMPOUND NERVE ACTION POTENTIALS, OR NERVE CONDUCTION VELOCITY IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposure to pesticides is often characterized by chronic low level exposure with intermittent spiked higher exposures. Cholinergic transmission is involved in sensory modulation in the cortex and cerebellum, and therefore may be altered following chlorpyrifos (CPF) exposure...

  14. Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, herbs, and many other products. They can come as pills, capsules, powders, drinks, ... possible Tell your health care provider about any dietary supplements you use Do not take a bigger dose ...

  15. Monitoring the arsenic and iodine exposure of seaweed-eating North Ronaldsay sheep from the gestational and suckling periods to adulthood by using horns as a dietary archive.

    PubMed

    Caumette, Guilhem; Ouypornkochagorn, Sairoong; Scrimgeour, Charlie M; Raab, Andrea; Feldmann, Jörg

    2007-04-15

    Trace elements often accumulate in keratin-rich tissues. Hair, nails, and horns grow steadily but once formed are metabolically inactive and provide an archive of trace element exposure when analyzed in segments. Here we demonstrate the use of laser ablation ICP-MS for the high-resolution monitoring of trace elements in the horns of seaweed-eating sheep from North Ronaldsay, which live on grass only during lambing time. Due to this peculiar husbandry/dietary pattern and the fact that seaweed is rich in arsenic and iodine, we hoped to use iodine and arsenic as markers for seaweed ingestion. Cross sections and scans along the growing axis (representing the first 8-10 months of the sheep's life) revealed that these elements were not homogeneously distributed in the horn, with arsenic representing the amount of seaweed intake. The scans show the periods in which the lambs were fed on milk and grass and the change to seaweed ingestion with the successive replacement of milk with seaweed; this was supported by the carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures (delta13C and delta15N) of the horn and the arsenic speciation in the horn. The period of low arsenic accumulation in the horn had terrestrial isotope signatures and accumulated arsenic of mainly inorganic origin. The period of high arsenic accumulation was characterized by isotope signatures of marine origin, and the majority of accumulated arsenic in the horn was the main arsenosugar metabolite dimethylarsinic acid. Although we have investigated only four different horns of individual sheep, this study shows that arsenic is not significantly transported with milk. However, the high concentration of arsenic in the oldest part of the horn, which was formed in utero, points to a relatively high placental transport of arsenic while the ewe was eating seaweed. In contrast to arsenic, iodine is transported not only through milk ingestion but also through the placenta in large quantities.

  16. Urinary Metabolites of the Dietary Carcinogen PhIP are Predictive of Colon DNA Adducts After a Low Dose Exposure in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Malfatti, M; Dingley, K; Nowell, S; Ubick, E; Mulakken, N; Nelson, D; Lang, N; Felton, J; Turteltaub, K

    2006-04-28

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that exposure to heterocyclic amines (HAs) in the diet is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Well-done cooked meats contain significant levels of HAs which have been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals. To better understand the mechanisms of HA bioactivation in humans, the most mass abundant HA, 2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), was used to assess the relationship between PhIP metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Ten human volunteers were administered a dietary relevant dose of [{sup 14}C]PhIP 48-72 h prior to surgery to remove colon tumors. Urine was collected for 24 h after dosing for metabolite analysis, and DNA was extracted from colon tissue and analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry for DNA adducts. All ten subjects were phenotyped for CYP1A2, NAT2, and SULT1A1 enzyme activity. Twelve PhIP metabolites were detected in the urine samples. The most abundant metabolite in all volunteers was N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide. Metabolite levels varied significantly between the volunteers. Interindividual differences in colon DNA adducts levels were observed between each individual. The data showed that individuals with a rapid CYP1A2 phenotype and high levels of urinary N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide, had the lowest level of colon PhIP-DNA adducts. This suggests that glucuronidation plays a significant role in detoxifying N-hydroxy-PhIP. The levels of urinary N-hydroxy-PhIP-N{sup 2}-glucuronide were negatively correlated to colon DNA adduct levels. Although it is difficult to make definite conclusions from a small data set, the results from this pilot study have encouraged further investigations using a much larger study group.

  17. Dietary exposure to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans via fish consumption and dioxin-like activity in fish determined by H4IIE-luc bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chan, Janet Kit Yan; Man, Yu Bon; Xing, Guan Hua; Wu, Sheng Chun; Murphy, Margaret B; Xu, Ying; Wong, Ming H

    2013-10-01

    Dietary exposure to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) via fish consumption in two major electronic (e) waste sites: Guiyu (GY), Guangdong Province and Taizhou (TZ), Zhejiang Province, and dioxin-like activity in fish determined by H4IIE-luc bioassay. In the present study, all fish were below EU's maximum allowable concentration in muscle of fish (4 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt), except crucian (4.28 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) and silver carps (7.49 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) collected from GY rivers. Moreover, the residual concentration in bighead carp collected from GY (2.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) was close to the EU's action level (3 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) which gives "early warning" to the competent authorities and operators to take measures to eliminate contamination. In addition, results indicated that the maximum human intake of PCDD/Fs via freshwater fish consumption in GY was 4.31 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day, which exceeds the higher end of the tolerable daily intake recommended by the WHO, EC-SCF and JECFA (1-4, 2 and 2.3 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day respectively). Furthermore, H4IIE-luc cell bioassay provides a very sensitive and cost-efficient screening tool for assessing the overall dioxin-like toxicity in the study, and is therefore valuable for high-throughput environmental monitoring studies.

  18. Dietary exposure to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans via fish consumption and dioxin-like activity in fish determined by H4IIE-luc bioassay.

    PubMed

    Chan, Janet Kit Yan; Man, Yu Bon; Xing, Guan Hua; Wu, Sheng Chun; Murphy, Margaret B; Xu, Ying; Wong, Ming H

    2013-10-01

    Dietary exposure to polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) via fish consumption in two major electronic (e) waste sites: Guiyu (GY), Guangdong Province and Taizhou (TZ), Zhejiang Province, and dioxin-like activity in fish determined by H4IIE-luc bioassay. In the present study, all fish were below EU's maximum allowable concentration in muscle of fish (4 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt), except crucian (4.28 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) and silver carps (7.49 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) collected from GY rivers. Moreover, the residual concentration in bighead carp collected from GY (2.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) was close to the EU's action level (3 pg WHO-TEQ/g wet wt) which gives "early warning" to the competent authorities and operators to take measures to eliminate contamination. In addition, results indicated that the maximum human intake of PCDD/Fs via freshwater fish consumption in GY was 4.31 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day, which exceeds the higher end of the tolerable daily intake recommended by the WHO, EC-SCF and JECFA (1-4, 2 and 2.3 pg WHO-TEQ/kg bw/day respectively). Furthermore, H4IIE-luc cell bioassay provides a very sensitive and cost-efficient screening tool for assessing the overall dioxin-like toxicity in the study, and is therefore valuable for high-throughput environmental monitoring studies. PMID:22959899

  19. Market basket survey shows elevated levels of As in South Central U.S. processed rice compared to California: consequences for human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Williams, P N; Raab, A; Feldmann, J; Meharg, A A

    2007-04-01

    We report the largest market basket survey of arsenic (As) in U.S. rice to date. Our findings show differences in transitional-metal levels between polished and unpolished rice and geographical variation in As and selenium (Se) between rice processed in California and the South Central U.S. The mean and median As grain levels for the South Central U.S. were 0.30 and 0.27 mimcrog As g(-1), respectively, for 107 samples. Levels for California were 41% lower than the South Central U.S., with a mean of 0.17 microg As g(-1) and a median of 0.16 microg As g(-1) for 27 samples. The mean and median Se grain levels for the South Central U.S. were 0.19 microg Se g(-1). Californian rice levels were lower, averaging only 0.08 and 0.06 microg Se g(-1) for mean and median values, respectively. The difference between the two regions was found to be significant for As and Se (General Linear Model (GLM): As p < 0.001; Se p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences were observed in As or Se levels between polished and unpolished rice (GLM: As p= 0.213; Se p= 0.113). No significant differences in grain levels of manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), or zinc (Zn) were observed between California and the South Central U.S. Modeling arsenic intake for the U.S. population based on this survey shows that for certain groups (namely Hispanics, Asians, sufferers of Celiac disease, and infants) dietary exposure to inorganic As from elevated levels in rice potentially exceeds the maximum intake of As from drinking water (based on consumption of 1 L of 0.01 mg L(-1) In. As) and Californian state exposure limits. Further studies on the transformation of As in soil, grain As bioavailability in the human gastrointestinal tract, and grain elemental speciation trends are critical. PMID:17438760

  20. Pilot study on the dietary habits and lifestyles of girls with idiopathic precocious puberty from the city of Rome: potential impact of exposure to flame retardant polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Roberta; Mancini, Francesca R; Mantovani, Alberto; Busani, Luca; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    Puberty is regulated by the endocrine system, which when disrupted can affect reproductive health. Endocrine disrupters (ED) are involved in the pathogenesis of idiopathic central precocious puberty (ICPP). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) are lipophilic, persistent ED used as flame retardants in several products; thus, human population is exposed through food and domestic dust. PBDE exposure during the peripubertal period is suspected to interfere with reproductive development. The study aimed to investigate PBDE serum concentration in 31 girls with ICPP as well as describe their dietary habits and lifestyles. The PBDE median level was 59 ng/g of lipids, higher than in healthy girls in comparable studies. Interestingly, elder girls and girls with higher body mass index (BMI) showed higher PBDE serum levels. Considering the relevance of altered puberty onset as a risk factor for reproductive health, studies on food contribution to PBDE exposure in Italian children, and efforts to ameliorate risk assessment for emerging chemicals are suggested. PMID:26226124

  1. Pilot study on the dietary habits and lifestyles of girls with idiopathic precocious puberty from the city of Rome: potential impact of exposure to flame retardant polybrominated diphenyl ethers.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, Roberta; Mancini, Francesca R; Mantovani, Alberto; Busani, Luca; Maranghi, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    Puberty is regulated by the endocrine system, which when disrupted can affect reproductive health. Endocrine disrupters (ED) are involved in the pathogenesis of idiopathic central precocious puberty (ICPP). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) are lipophilic, persistent ED used as flame retardants in several products; thus, human population is exposed through food and domestic dust. PBDE exposure during the peripubertal period is suspected to interfere with reproductive development. The study aimed to investigate PBDE serum concentration in 31 girls with ICPP as well as describe their dietary habits and lifestyles. The PBDE median level was 59 ng/g of lipids, higher than in healthy girls in comparable studies. Interestingly, elder girls and girls with higher body mass index (BMI) showed higher PBDE serum levels. Considering the relevance of altered puberty onset as a risk factor for reproductive health, studies on food contribution to PBDE exposure in Italian children, and efforts to ameliorate risk assessment for emerging chemicals are suggested.

  2. A systematic review of the effect of dietary exposure that could be achieved through normal dietary intake on learning and performance of school-aged children of relevance to UK schools.

    PubMed

    Ells, Louisa J; Hillier, Frances C; Shucksmith, Janet; Crawley, Helen; Harbige, Laurence; Shield, Julian; Wiggins, Andy; Summerbell, Carolyn D

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the present review was to perform a systematic in-depth review of the best evidence from controlled trial studies that have investigated the effects of nutrition, diet and dietary change on learning, education and performance in school-aged children (4-18 years) from the UK and other developed countries. The twenty-nine studies identified for the review examined the effects of breakfast consumption, sugar intake, fish oil and vitamin supplementation and 'good diets'. In summary, the studies included in the present review suggest there is insufficient evidence to identify any effect of nutrition, diet and dietary change on learning, education or performance of school-aged children from the developed world. However, there is emerging evidence for the effects of certain fatty acids which appear to be a function of dose and time. Further research is required in settings of relevance to the UK and must be of high quality, representative of all populations, undertaken for longer durations and use universal validated measures of educational attainment. However, challenges in terms of interpreting the results of such studies within the context of factors such as family and community context, poverty, disease and the rate of individual maturation and neurodevelopment will remain. Whilst the importance of diet in educational attainment remains under investigation, the evidence for promotion of lower-fat, -salt and -sugar diets, high in fruits, vegetables and complex carbohydrates, as well as promotion of physical activity remains unequivocal in terms of health outcomes for all schoolchildren.

  3. Development of a method for assessing the relative contribution of waterborne and dietary exposure to zinc bioaccumulation in Daphnia magna by using isotopically enriched tracers and ICP-MS detection.

    PubMed

    Balcaen, Lieve I L; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C; Janssen, Colin R; Moens, Luc; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the effect of anthropogenic substances on freshwater and marine ecosystems and to develop methods to derive water-quality criteria, ecotoxicological testing is required. While toxicity assessments are traditionally based on dissolved metal concentrations, assuming that toxicity is caused by waterborne metal only, it was recently pointed out that also the dietary exposure route should be carefully considered and interpreted in regulatory assessments of zinc. In this context, the aim of this experimental study was to develop a method which allows the uptake of waterborne and dietary zinc by Daphnia magna and the interaction between both exposure routes to be studied. Therefore, the setup of a dual isotopic tracer study was required. During several days, daphnids were exposed to 67Zn and 68Zn via the dietary and the waterborne routes, respectively, and after several time intervals the daphnids were sampled and subjected to isotopic analysis by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In order to obtain reliable and accurate results for zinc, special care was taken to prevent contamination and to deal with the spectral interferences traditionally hindering the determination of zinc. The figures of merit of both a quadrupole-based ICP-MS instrument equipped with a dynamic reaction cell, and a sector field ICP-MS unit were studied, and it was concluded that by using a sector field mass spectrometer operated at medium mass resolution all interferences could be overcome adequately. Although the set-up of the exposure experiments seems to be rather simple at first sight, it was shown in this work that several (dynamic) variables can have an influence on the results obtained and on the subsequent data interpretation. The importance of these confounding factors was examined, and on the basis of preliminary calculations it became clear that not only the isotopic composition of the daphnids has to be studied--adequate monitoring of the

  4. Dietary exposure of BDE-47 and BDE-99 and effects on behavior, bioenergetics, and thyroid function in juvenile red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) and common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina).

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Karen M; Rowe, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    Juvenile red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) and snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) were fed food dosed with brominated diphenyl ether-47 (BDE-47) or BDE-99 for 6 mo beginning approximately 9 mo posthatch. During the exposure period, measurements of growth, bioenergetics, and behavior were made; thyroid function and accumulation were quantified postexposure. Whole-body concentrations of both congeners were lower in red-eared sliders compared with snapping turtles after 6 mo of exposure. Snapping turtles receiving BDE-47 had significantly elevated standard metabolic rates after 3 mo and 4 mo of exposure (p = 0.014 and p = 0.019, respectively). When exposed to BDE-99, red-eared sliders were slower to right themselves after having been inverted (p < 0.0001). Total glandular thyroxine concentrations were significantly reduced in red-eared sliders exposed to BDE-47 (mean control, 8080 ng/g; mean BDE-47, 5126 ng/g; p = 0.034). These results demonstrate that dietary exposure to BDE-47 and BDE-99 can elicit a suite of responses in 2 species of turtles, but that the red-eared slider appears to be a more sensitive species to the measured end points. PMID:25210006

  5. Dietary exposure of BDE-47 and BDE-99 and effects on behavior, bioenergetics, and thyroid function in juvenile red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) and common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina).

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Karen M; Rowe, Christopher L

    2014-12-01

    Juvenile red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) and snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) were fed food dosed with brominated diphenyl ether-47 (BDE-47) or BDE-99 for 6 mo beginning approximately 9 mo posthatch. During the exposure period, measurements of growth, bioenergetics, and behavior were made; thyroid function and accumulation were quantified postexposure. Whole-body concentrations of both congeners were lower in red-eared sliders compared with snapping turtles after 6 mo of exposure. Snapping turtles receiving BDE-47 had significantly elevated standard metabolic rates after 3 mo and 4 mo of exposure (p = 0.014 and p = 0.019, respectively). When exposed to BDE-99, red-eared sliders were slower to right themselves after having been inverted (p < 0.0001). Total glandular thyroxine concentrations were significantly reduced in red-eared sliders exposed to BDE-47 (mean control, 8080 ng/g; mean BDE-47, 5126 ng/g; p = 0.034). These results demonstrate that dietary exposure to BDE-47 and BDE-99 can elicit a suite of responses in 2 species of turtles, but that the red-eared slider appears to be a more sensitive species to the measured end points.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF RESIDENTIAL EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS AND DIAZINON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposures to chlorpyrifos and diazinon in residential microenvironment in AZ were estimated using the indirect method of exposure calculation by combining measured concentrations in multiple media with time subjects spent indoors, dietary and non-dietary items they consumed, an...

  7. Effects of dietary linseed oil on innate immune system of Eurasian perch and disease resistance after exposure to Aeromonas salmonicida achromogen.

    PubMed

    Geay, F; Mellery, J; Tinti, E; Douxfils, J; Larondelle, Y; Mandiki, S N M; Kestemont, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designated to investigate the effects of dietary fish oil (FO diet) replacement by linseed oil (LO diet) on regulation of immune response and disease resistance in Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis). A control diet containing fish oil (FO = cod liver oil) and characterized by high levels of n-3 high LC-PUFA (6% EPA, 7.5% of total fatty acids (FAs)) was compared to linseed oil diet (LO diet) composed of low LC-PUFA contents (1% EPA, 2.3% DHA of total FAs) but high C18 fatty acids levels. The experiment was conducted in quadruplicate groups of 80 fish each. After 10 weeks of feeding, the innate immune status was evaluated in various organs (liver, spleen, and head-kidney) (feeding condition). Two days later, a bacterial challenge was performed on fish from 2 rearing conditions: fish infected with Aeromonas salmonicida (bacteria condition) and fish injected with sterile medium but maintained in the same flow system that fish challenged with bacteria (sentinel condition). Three days after injection of bacteria, a significant decrease of lymphocyte, thrombocyte and basophil populations was observed while neutrophils were not affected. In addition, plasma lysozyme activity and reactive oxygen species production in kidney significantly increased in fish challenged with A. salmonicida while the plasma alternative complement pathway activity was not affected. Increase of plasma lysozyme activity as well as reactive oxygen species production in spleen and kidney of sentinel fish suggest that these immune defenses can also be activated, but at lower bacteria concentration than infected fish. No differences in leucocyte populations, plasma lysozyme and alternative complement pathway activities were observed between dietary treatments. Similarly, expression of genes related to eicosanoid synthesis in liver were not affected by the dietary oil source but were strongly stimulated in fish challenged with A. salmonicida. These findings demonstrated that the use of

  8. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the upper Hudson River, New York, USA: effects on reproduction and offspring growth and mortality.

    PubMed

    Bursian, Steven J; Kern, John; Remington, Richard E; Link, Jane E; Fitzgerald, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    The effects of feeding farm-raised mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish from the upper Hudson River (New York, USA) on adult reproductive performance and kit growth and mortality were evaluated. Diets contained 2.5 to 20% Hudson River fish, providing 0.72 to 6.1 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (4.8-38 pg toxic equivalents [TEQWHO 2005 ]/g feed). The percentage of stillborn kits per litter was significantly increased by dietary concentrations of 4.5 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (28 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) and greater. All offspring exposed to dietary concentrations of 4.5 and 6.1 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (28 and 38 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) died by 10 weeks of age, and all offspring exposed to 1.5 and 2.8 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (10 and 18 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) died by 31 weeks of age, leaving juveniles in the control and 0.72 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (0.41- and 4.8 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed) groups only. The dietary concentration predicted to result in 20% kit mortality (LC20) at six weeks of age was 0.34 µg ∑PCBs/g feed (2.6 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g feed). The corresponding maternal hepatic concentration was 0.80 µg ∑PCBs/g liver, wet weight (13 pg TEQWHO 2005 /g liver, wet wt). Mink residing in the upper Hudson River would be expected to consume species of fish that contain an average of 4.0 µg ∑PCBs/g tissue. Thus, a daily diet composed of less than 10% Hudson River fish could provide a dietary concentration of ∑PCBs that resulted in 20% kit mortality in the present study.

  9. Detection of furan levels in select Chinese foods by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method and dietary exposure estimation of furan in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Sijia, Wu; Enting, Wang; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPMEGC/MS) method was developed to detection the levels of furan in 191 selected food products obtained from the Chinese markets. The performance of the analysis method was evaluated by some quality parameters such as limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), linearity, recovery, and runto-run (n=6) and day-to-day (n=18) precisions. The LOD and the LOQ of the method were 0.059 ng/g and 0.175 ng/g, respectively. The recovery of the method in fruit juice, canned jam, and infant formula ranged from 93.25% to 104.69%. The results from this study showed that furan was detected in almost all analyzed samples. Furan contents in different food samples varied greatly according to the raw materials and processing conditions. The higher contents of furan were detected in traditional Chinese liquor (61.63 ng/g), coffee (71.36 ng/g), tea (68.28 ng/g) and pickle (85.63 ng/g). The dietary intake of furan was estimated to be 0.093 μg/kg b.w.t/day in adults and 0.333 μg/kg b.w.t/day in infants at 6 months. Further studies are needed to reveal other sources of dietary furan exposure.

  10. Detection of furan levels in select Chinese foods by solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method and dietary exposure estimation of furan in the Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Sijia, Wu; Enting, Wang; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPMEGC/MS) method was developed to detection the levels of furan in 191 selected food products obtained from the Chinese markets. The performance of the analysis method was evaluated by some quality parameters such as limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), linearity, recovery, and runto-run (n=6) and day-to-day (n=18) precisions. The LOD and the LOQ of the method were 0.059 ng/g and 0.175 ng/g, respectively. The recovery of the method in fruit juice, canned jam, and infant formula ranged from 93.25% to 104.69%. The results from this study showed that furan was detected in almost all analyzed samples. Furan contents in different food samples varied greatly according to the raw materials and processing conditions. The higher contents of furan were detected in traditional Chinese liquor (61.63 ng/g), coffee (71.36 ng/g), tea (68.28 ng/g) and pickle (85.63 ng/g). The dietary intake of furan was estimated to be 0.093 μg/kg b.w.t/day in adults and 0.333 μg/kg b.w.t/day in infants at 6 months. Further studies are needed to reveal other sources of dietary furan exposure. PMID:24262489

  11. Mitochondrial and Oxidative Stress Aspects in Hippocampus of Rats Submitted to Dietary n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Deficiency After Exposure to Early Stress.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Charles Francisco; Bernardi, Juliana Rombaldi; da Silva, Diego Carrilho; de Sá Couto-Pereira, Natividade; de Souza Mota, Carina; Krolow, Rachel; Weis, Simone Nardin; Pettenuzzo, Letícia; Kapczinski, Flávio; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Dalmaz, Carla

    2015-09-01

    Chronic dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) deficiency may lead to changes in cortex and hippocampus neuronal membrane phospholipids, and may be linked to impaired central nervous system function. Particularly docosahexaenoic acid deficiency appears to be involved in neuropsychiatric disorders. On the other hand, adverse events early in life may also profoundly affect brain development, leading to long-lasting effects on neurophysiology, neurobiology and behavior. This research assessed if neonatal stress and a dietary n-3 PUFAs deficiency could interact to produce hippocampal alterations related to mitochondrial functions in adult rats. There were no effects of diet, neonatal intervention or interactions on superoxide dismutase or catalase enzymatic activities, mitochondrial membrane potential and respiratory chain complexes. Rats fed n-3 PUFAs deficient diet displayed higher levels of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity, higher free radicals production and higher thiol content compared to rats fed n-3 PUFAs adequate diet. There were interactions among diets and neonatal stress, since glutathione peroxidase, free radicals production and thiol content were increased in groups that were subjected to neonatal interventions fed n-3 PUFAs deficient diet. Additionally, reduced mitochondrial potential was observed in handled animals. Total thiol revealed a neonatal stress effect, since animals subjected to neonatal interventions displayed lower thiol content. In conclusion, we observed that a chronic treatment with deficient n-3 PUFAs diet, from the puberty period on, increased free radicals production and imbalanced antioxidant enzymes activities, and these increases were higher in animals subjected to neonatal interventions.

  12. Estimates of Dietary Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) from Light Metal Packaging using Food Consumption and Packaging usage Data: A Refined Deterministic Approach and a Fully Probabilistic (FACET) Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oldring, P.K.T.; Castle, L.; O'Mahony, C.; Dixon, J.

    2013-01-01

    The FACET tool is a probabilistic model to estimate exposure to chemicals in foodstuffs, originating from flavours, additives and food contact materials. This paper demonstrates the use of the FACET tool to estimate exposure to BPA (bisphenol A) from light metal packaging. For exposure to migrants from food packaging, FACET uses industry-supplied data on the occurrence of substances in the packaging, their concentrations and construction of the packaging, which were combined with data from a market research organisation and food consumption data supplied by national database managers. To illustrate the principles, UK packaging data were used together with consumption data from the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) dietary survey for 19–64 year olds for a refined deterministic verification. The UK data were chosen mainly because the consumption surveys are detailed, data for UK packaging at a detailed level were available and, arguably, the UK population is composed of high consumers of packaged foodstuffs. Exposures were run for each food category that could give rise to BPA from light metal packaging. Consumer loyalty to a particular type of packaging, commonly referred to as packaging loyalty, was set. The BPA extraction levels used for the 15 types of coating chemistries that could release BPA were in the range of 0.00005–0.012 mg dm−2. The estimates of exposure to BPA using FACET for the total diet were 0.0098 (mean) and 0.0466 (97.5th percentile) mg/person/day, corresponding to 0.00013 (mean) and 0.00059 (97.5th percentile) mg kg−1 body weight day−1 for consumers of foods packed in light metal packaging. This is well below the current EFSA (and other recognised bodies) TDI of 0.05 mg kg−1 body weight day. These probabilistic estimates were compared with estimates using a refined deterministic approach drawing on the same input data. The results from FACET for the mean, 95th and 97.5th percentile exposures to BPA lay between the lowest

  13. Hand-to-mouth contacts result in greater ingestion of feces than dietary water consumption in Tanzania: a quantitative fecal exposure assessment model.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Mia Catharine M; Davis, Jennifer; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2015-02-01

    Diarrheal diseases kill 1800 children under the age of five die each day, and nearly half of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Contaminated drinking water and hands are two important environmental transmission routes of diarrhea-causing pathogens to young children in low-income countries. The objective of this research is to evaluate the relative contribution of these two major exposure pathways in a low-income country setting. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the amount of human feces ingested by children under five years old from exposure via hand-to-mouth contacts and stored drinking water ingestion in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. Child specific exposure data were obtained from the USEPA 2011 Exposure Factors Handbook, and fecal contamination was estimated using hand rinse and stored water fecal indicator bacteria concentrations from over 1200 Tanzanian households. The model outcome is a distribution of a child's daily dose of feces via each exposure route. The model results show that Tanzanian children ingest a significantly greater amount of feces each day from hand-to-mouth contacts than from drinking water, which may help elucidate why interventions focused on water without also addressing hygiene often see little to no effect on reported incidence of diarrhea.

  14. Environmental fate and dietary exposures of humans to TCDD as a result of the spraying of Agent Orange in upland forests of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Ginevan, Michael E; Hewitt, Andrew; Ross, John H; Watkins, Deborah K; Solomon, Keith R

    2015-02-15

    The fate and transport of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD) released into the environment of South Vietnam (SVN) as a consequence of the aerial application of the herbicidal defoliant Agent Orange (AO) were simulated for a generic upland forest scenario and followed over a 50-year period (1965, 1968 and 1970 onwards). Modeled concentrations of TCDD in the environment were then used as inputs to a human exposure model, which focused on long-term exposures via the food chain. Intake rates and body burdens of TCDD were estimated for adult males over the course of the simulation period and compared to available biomonitoring data. One of the most important factors determining the magnitude of the simulated human exposure to TCDD was the fraction of the chemical deposited directly to soil (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of 10 or 15years) relative to the fraction assumed to remain on/in the forest canopy following the spray application (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of ≤48h). The simulated body burdens under the various scenarios considered were broadly consistent with the biomonitoring data from SVN collected in the mid-1980s to late 1990s. Taken together, the modeling results and empirical data suggest that highly elevated exposures to TCDD (i.e., body burdens in the several 100s of pg/g lipid range and greater) were not common among people inhabiting upland forest locations in SVN sprayed with AO and that peak and average body burdens were broadly similar to those of the general population of the U.S. in the 1970s and early 1980s. The model-based assessment is consistent with the 'hot spot' hypothesis i.e., potential exposures to TCDD linked to activities conducted on or near former bases where AO was stored are greater than potential exposures in areas subjected to aerial spraying. PMID:25433383

  15. Environmental fate and dietary exposures of humans to TCDD as a result of the spraying of Agent Orange in upland forests of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Ginevan, Michael E; Hewitt, Andrew; Ross, John H; Watkins, Deborah K; Solomon, Keith R

    2015-02-15

    The fate and transport of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD) released into the environment of South Vietnam (SVN) as a consequence of the aerial application of the herbicidal defoliant Agent Orange (AO) were simulated for a generic upland forest scenario and followed over a 50-year period (1965, 1968 and 1970 onwards). Modeled concentrations of TCDD in the environment were then used as inputs to a human exposure model, which focused on long-term exposures via the food chain. Intake rates and body burdens of TCDD were estimated for adult males over the course of the simulation period and compared to available biomonitoring data. One of the most important factors determining the magnitude of the simulated human exposure to TCDD was the fraction of the chemical deposited directly to soil (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of 10 or 15years) relative to the fraction assumed to remain on/in the forest canopy following the spray application (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of ≤48h). The simulated body burdens under the various scenarios considered were broadly consistent with the biomonitoring data from SVN collected in the mid-1980s to late 1990s. Taken together, the modeling results and empirical data suggest that highly elevated exposures to TCDD (i.e., body burdens in the several 100s of pg/g lipid range and greater) were not common among people inhabiting upland forest locations in SVN sprayed with AO and that peak and average body burdens were broadly similar to those of the general population of the U.S. in the 1970s and early 1980s. The model-based assessment is consistent with the 'hot spot' hypothesis i.e., potential exposures to TCDD linked to activities conducted on or near former bases where AO was stored are greater than potential exposures in areas subjected to aerial spraying.

  16. EFFECTS OF DIETARY COPPER, ZINC, LEAD, CADMIUM, AND ARSENIC ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF JUVENILE FISH USING LIVE FOOD ORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Except for certain organometallic compounds, dietary exposures of aquatic organisms to metal/metalloids have received little regulatory attention. However, various studies have suggested that dietary exposure could be important, especially in areas where current water column conc...

  17. Quantifying Children's Aggregate (Dietary and Residential) Exposure and Dose to Permethin: Application and Evaluation of EPA's Probabilistic SHED-Multimedia Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reliable, evaluated human exposure and dose models are important for understanding the health risks from chemicals. A case study focusing on permethrin was conducted because of this insecticide’s widespread use and potential health effects. SHEDS-Multimedia was applied to estimat...

  18. Assessing dietary exposure to caffeine from beverages in the U.S. population using brand-specific versus category-specific caffeine values.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Diane C; Hockenberry, Jon; Teplansky, Robyn; Hartman, Terryl J

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports on caffeine intakes in the United States have highlighted the importance of obtaining accurate and valid measures of caffeine exposure. The objective of this study is to compare two methods of assigning caffeine values to beverages: brand-specific values versus an aggregate single value representing a broader range of products within a beverage category (i.e., category-specific). The two methods yielded some small, but statistically significant differences in the estimation of caffeine intake from coffee, tea, and carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) for all ages combined and within several of the adult age groups (i.e., 35-49, 50-64, and ≥65 years). These differences, while small, suggest that detailed brand-specific data, particularly for CSDs, commercially pre-packaged or bottled teas, coffee, and specialty coffee drinks, provide more accurate estimates of caffeine exposure for some age groups. Despite these differences, these data provide some assurance that studies using a single aggregate caffeine value provide reasonable measures of caffeine exposure, particularly for studies conducted over a decade ago when there were fewer caffeinated products and brand-specific data available. As the caffeinated beverage marketplace continues to evolve, the use of more detailed, brand-specific data will likely strengthen the assessment of caffeine exposure in the United States.

  19. Dietary methoxychlor exposure modulates splenic natural killer cell activity, antibody-forming cell response and phenotypic marker expression in F0 and F1 generations of Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    White, K L; Germolec, D R; Booker, C D; Hernendez, D M; McCay, J A; Delclos, K B; Newbold, R R; Weis, C; Guo, T L

    2005-02-14

    Methoxychlor, a chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticide, is a persistent environmental contaminant that has been identified in human reproductive tissues. Methoxychlor has been shown to be estrogenic in both in vivo and in vitro studies. As an endocrine disrupter, it may have the potential to adversely affect endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems in animals. The present study evaluated methoxychlor's immunotoxic potential in F0 (dams) and F1 generations of Sprague Dawley rats exposed to an isoflavone-free diet containing methoxychlor at concentrations of 10, 100, and 1000 ppm. In dams, exposure to methoxychlor from gestation day 7 to postpartum day 51 (65 days total exposure) produced a significant increase in the NK activity (1000 ppm) and the percentages of T cells (1000 ppm), helper T cells (1000 ppm) and macrophages (100 and 1000 ppm). In contrast, a decrease in the numbers of splenocytes and B cells was observed at the 100 and 1000 ppm concentrations. In F1 males, exposure to methoxychlor gestationally, lactationally and through feed from postnatal day 22-64 (78 days total exposure) produced an increase in the spleen IgM antibody-forming cell response to sheep red blood cells (100 and 1000 ppm) and the activity of NK cells (1000 ppm). However, there was a decrease in the terminal body weight (1000 ppm), spleen weight (1000 ppm), thymus weight (100 and 1000 ppm), and the numbers of splenocytes (1000 ppm), B cells (100 and 1000 ppm), cytotoxic T cells (1000 ppm) and NK cells (100 and 1000 ppm). In F1 females, exposure to methoxychlor produced a decrease in the terminal body weight (1000 ppm) and the percentages of cytotoxic T cells (10, 100 and 1000 ppm). These results demonstrate that developmental and adult dietary exposure to methoxychlor modulates immune responses in Sprague Dawley rats. Immunological changes were more pronounced in the F1 generation male rats that were exposed during gestation and postpartum, when compared to the F0 and F1 generation

  20. Dietary assessment methods: dietary records.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rosa M; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-02-26

    Dietary records or food diaries can be highlighted among dietary assessment methods of the current diet for their interest and validity. It is a prospective, open-ended survey method collecting data about the foods and beverages consumed over a previously specified period of time. Dietary records can be used to estimate current diet of individuals and population groups, as well as to identify groups at risk of inadequacy. It is a dietary assessment method interesting for its use in epidemiological or in clinical studies. High validity and precision has been reported for the method when used following adequate procedures and considering the sufficient number of days. Thus, dietary records are often considered as a reference method in validation studies. Nevertheless, the method is affected by error and has limitations due mainly to the tendency of subjects to report food consumption close to those socially desirable. Additional problems are related to the high burden posed on respondents. The method can also influence food behavior in respondents in order to simplify the registration of food intake and some subjects can experience difficulties in writing down the foods and beverages consumed or in describing the portion sizes. Increasing the number of days observed reduces the quality of completed diet records. It should also be considered the high cost of coding and processing information collected in diet records. One of the main advantages of the method is the registration of the foods and beverages as consumed, thus reducing the problem of food omissions due to memory failure. Weighted food records provide more precise estimates of consumed portions. New Technologies can be helpful to improve and ease collaboration of respondents, as well as precision of the estimates, although it would be desirable to evaluate the advantages and limitations in order to optimize the implementation.

  1. Effect of long-term fluoride exposure on growth, nutrient utilization and fluoride kinetics of calves fed graded levels of dietary protein.

    PubMed

    Lohakare, Jayant; Pattanaik, Ashokkumar; Khan, Sardar Ayub

    2010-12-01

    In order to assess the influence of dietary protein levels on the fluoride (F) bioavailability, 30 crossbred calves (6-8 months; approximately 104 kg BW) initially exposed to different dietary protein levels were allotted into six groups in a 3 × 2 factorial design. The factors included three different levels of protein viz. normal (100%; NP), low (75%; LP), and high (125%; HP) as per Kearl recommendations besides two levels of supplemental fluorine (as sodium fluoride) at 0 or 200 mg/kg diet. The animals were fed on the respective concentrate mixture and wheat straw for 210 days. A metabolism trial was conducted at 200 days post-feeding to study digestibility, plane of nutrition, and nutrient balances. The final body weight at the end of 210 days was lower (p < 0.01) in animals fed 200 mg/kg F (164.2 ± 8.92 kg) compared to those fed no F (200.7 ± 8.05 kg). Calves on LP diets attained lower (p < 0.05) average daily gain in comparison to NP or HP fed calves. The F-supplemented calves exhibited lower (p < 0.01) voluntary feed intake than their non-supplemented control. The digestibility of proximate nutrients other than ether extract exhibited higher (p < 0.01) values in F-fed calves attributable chiefly to reduced consumption of dry matter. The calves fed extra F retained lower mean daily nitrogen; calcium, and phosphorus compared to the calves fed no F. The mean daily intake, excretion, and retention of F were higher (p < 0.01) in the F-supplemented calves. A significant (p < 0.01) interaction between protein levels and F was evident in the urinary excretion of F; calves on LP diet exhibiting lower urinary excretion. Consequently, the bioavailability of F tended to be higher on LP than NP or HP diets. From the results, it is concluded that protein levels in the diet do not impart significant influence on susceptibility to fluorosis in crossbred calves. However, the bioavailability of F tended to increase on diets low in protein.

  2. Dietary biomarkers: advances, limitations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Valisa E; Dietrich, Andrea M; Estabrooks, Paul A; Savla, Jyoti; Serrano, Elena; Davy, Brenda M

    2012-12-14

    The subjective nature of self-reported dietary intake assessment methods presents numerous challenges to obtaining accurate dietary intake and nutritional status. This limitation can be overcome by the use of dietary biomarkers, which are able to objectively assess dietary consumption (or exposure) without the bias of self-reported dietary intake errors. The need for dietary biomarkers was addressed by the Institute of Medicine, who recognized the lack of nutritional biomarkers as a knowledge gap requiring future research. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on currently available dietary biomarkers, including novel biomarkers of specific foods and dietary components, and assess the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the markers. This review revealed several biomarkers in need of additional validation research; research is also needed to produce sensitive, specific, cost-effective and noninvasive dietary biomarkers. The emerging field of metabolomics may help to advance the development of food/nutrient biomarkers, yet advances in food metabolome databases are needed. The availability of biomarkers that estimate intake of specific foods and dietary components could greatly enhance nutritional research targeting compliance to national recommendations as well as direct associations with disease outcomes. More research is necessary to refine existing biomarkers by accounting for confounding factors, to establish new indicators of specific food intake, and to develop techniques that are cost-effective, noninvasive, rapid and accurate measures of nutritional status.

  3. Dietary biomarkers: advances, limitations and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Valisa E; Dietrich, Andrea M; Estabrooks, Paul A; Savla, Jyoti; Serrano, Elena; Davy, Brenda M

    2012-01-01

    The subjective nature of self-reported dietary intake assessment methods presents numerous challenges to obtaining accurate dietary intake and nutritional status. This limitation can be overcome by the use of dietary biomarkers, which are able to objectively assess dietary consumption (or exposure) without the bias of self-reported dietary intake errors. The need for dietary biomarkers was addressed by the Institute of Medicine, who recognized the lack of nutritional biomarkers as a knowledge gap requiring future research. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on currently available dietary biomarkers, including novel biomarkers of specific foods and dietary components, and assess the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the markers. This review revealed several biomarkers in need of additional validation research; research is also needed to produce sensitive, specific, cost-effective and noninvasive dietary biomarkers. The emerging field of metabolomics may help to advance the development of food/nutrient biomarkers, yet advances in food metabolome databases are needed. The availability of biomarkers that estimate intake of specific foods and dietary components could greatly enhance nutritional research targeting compliance to national recommendations as well as direct associations with disease outcomes. More research is necessary to refine existing biomarkers by accounting for confounding factors, to establish new indicators of specific food intake, and to develop techniques that are cost-effective, noninvasive, rapid and accurate measures of nutritional status. PMID:23237668

  4. Biochemical and behavioural responses of the marine polychaete Hediste diversicolor to cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs): waterborne and dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Poirier, Laurence; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Lopes, Christelle; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Gaudin, Pierre; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots are widely used in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to examine toxicity effects of CdS engineered nanoparticles (CdS NPs) compared to soluble Cd, on marine ragworms (Hediste diversicolor) exposed for 14 d to these contaminants (10 μg Cd L(-1)) in seawater or via their food (contaminated worm tissue). In our experimental media, Dynamic Light Scattering studies showed that the majority of CdS remained in the nanoscale (1-10 nm) with the exception of few aggregates (100-300 nm). Labile Cd fractions released from CdS NPs were estimated by diffusive gradient in thin films, showing that about 50% of CdS NPs remained in nanoparticulate form. Ragworms accumulated Cd in both soluble Cd and CdS NPs in waterborne exposures only. Greater significant changes of biochemical responses were observed in worms exposed to CdS NPs in seawater compared to contaminated food. Catalase and glutathione-S-transferase activities were the most sensitive biochemical biomarkers responding to both Cd treatments for waterborne exposure. Inductions of CAT were higher in diet-exposed worms to Cd as NPs vs soluble form suggesting a specific "nano" effect. Caspase activities increased in worms exposed to soluble Cd and Cd NPs for the two routes of exposure compared to controls. Defences, may be insufficient to prevent reactive oxygen species generation and the associated apoptosis. Behaviour of invertebrates inside sediment showed impairments of body movements in worms exposed to CdS NPs. This study points out oxidative processes as the main consequences of exposure to Cd based NPs in worms.

  5. Biochemical and behavioural responses of the marine polychaete Hediste diversicolor to cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs): waterborne and dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre-Emmanuel; Poirier, Laurence; Zalouk-Vergnoux, Aurore; Lopes, Christelle; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Gaudin, Pierre; Risso-de Faverney, Christine; Guibbolini, Marielle; Gilliland, Douglas; Perrein-Ettajani, Hanane; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Mouneyrac, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dots are widely used in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to examine toxicity effects of CdS engineered nanoparticles (CdS NPs) compared to soluble Cd, on marine ragworms (Hediste diversicolor) exposed for 14 d to these contaminants (10 μg Cd L(-1)) in seawater or via their food (contaminated worm tissue). In our experimental media, Dynamic Light Scattering studies showed that the majority of CdS remained in the nanoscale (1-10 nm) with the exception of few aggregates (100-300 nm). Labile Cd fractions released from CdS NPs were estimated by diffusive gradient in thin films, showing that about 50% of CdS NPs remained in nanoparticulate form. Ragworms accumulated Cd in both soluble Cd and CdS NPs in waterborne exposures only. Greater significant changes of biochemical responses were observed in worms exposed to CdS NPs in seawater compared to contaminated food. Catalase and glutathione-S-transferase activities were the most sensitive biochemical biomarkers responding to both Cd treatments for waterborne exposure. Inductions of CAT were higher in diet-exposed worms to Cd as NPs vs soluble form suggesting a specific "nano" effect. Caspase activities increased in worms exposed to soluble Cd and Cd NPs for the two routes of exposure compared to controls. Defences, may be insufficient to prevent reactive oxygen species generation and the associated apoptosis. Behaviour of invertebrates inside sediment showed impairments of body movements in worms exposed to CdS NPs. This study points out oxidative processes as the main consequences of exposure to Cd based NPs in worms. PMID:24480429

  6. Dietary early-life exposure to contaminated eels does not impair spatial cognitive performances in adult offspring mice as assessed in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Imen; Leroy, Delphine; Guignard, Cédric; Scholl, Georges; Bohn, Torsten; Landoulsi, Ahmed; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Eppe, Gauthier; Soulimani, Rachid; Bouayed, Jaouad

    2014-12-01

    Many environmental contaminants are introduced via the diet and may act as neurotoxins and endocrine disrupters, especially influencing growing organisms in early life. The purpose of this study was to examine whether dietary exposure of dams to fish naturally contaminated with xenobiotics, especially with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and heavy metals (e.g., mercury and lead), resulted in cognitive function deficits in adult offspring mice. Daily, four groups of dams (n = 10/group) ingested standard diet plus paste with/without eels, during gestation and lactation, from gestational day (GD) six until post natal day (PND) 21 (weaning). Dams orally ingested a standardized amount of eel (0.8 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) containing the six non-dioxin-like (NDL) PCBs (Σ6 NDL-PCBs: 28, 52, 101, 138, 153, and 180) at 0, 85, 216, and 400 ng kg(-1) d(-1). Results showed that early-life exposure to contaminated eels did not (compared to non-exposed controls) impair immediate working memory in the Y-maze in the offspring assessed at PND 38. Furthermore, it did not significantly impact spatial learning and retention memory as measured in the Morris water maze in adult offspring mice (PND 120-123). Our results suggest that perinatal exposure to contaminated eels does not affect spatial cognitive performances, as assessed by the Y-maze and Morris water maze at adult age. Adverse effects of xenobiotics reported earlier might be camouflaged by beneficial eel constituents, such as n-3 fatty acids. However, additional studies are needed to differentiate between potential positive and negative effects following consumption of food items both rich in nutrients and contaminants.

  7. Dietary exposure of mink (Mustela vison) to fish from the Housatonic River, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA: Effects on reproduction, kit growth, and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bursian, S.J.; Sharma, C.; Aulerich, R.J.; Yamini, B.; Mitchell, R.R.; Orazio, C.E.; Moore, D.R.J.; Svirsky, S.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of feeding farm-raised mink (Mustela vison) diets containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated fish from the Housatonic River (HR; Berkshire County, MA, USA) on adult reproductive performance and kit growth and survival. Diets contained 0.22-3.54% HR fish, providing 0.34-3.7 ??g total PCBs (TPCB)/g feed wet wt (3.5-68.5 pg toxic equivalence [TEQ]/g). Female mink were fed diets before breeding through weaning of kits. Twelve kits from each treatment were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 180 d. Dietary PCBs had no effect on the number of offspring produced, gestation period, or other measures of adult reproductive performance. Mink kits exposed to 3.7 ??g TPCB/g feed (68.5 pg TEQ/g) in utero and during lactation had reduced survivability between three and six weeks of age. The lethal concentrations to 10 and 20% of the population (LC10 and LC20, respectively) were estimated to be 0.231 and 0.984 ??g TPCB/g feed, respectively. Because inclusion of PCB-contaminated fish that composed approximately 1% of the diet would reduce mink kit survival by 20% or more, it is likely that consumption of up to 30-fold that quantity of HR fish, as could be expected for wild mink, would have an adverse effect on wild mink populations. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  8. Short-Term and Sub-Chronic Dietary Exposure to Aspalathin-Enriched Green Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) Extract Affects Rat Liver Function and Antioxidant Status.

    PubMed

    van der Merwe, Johanna Debora; de Beer, Dalene; Joubert, Elizabeth; Gelderblom, Wentzel C A

    2015-12-18

    An aspalathin-enriched green rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) extract (GRE) was fed to male Fischer rats in two independent studies for 28 and 90 days. The average dietary total polyphenol (TP) intake was 756 and 627 mg Gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/kg body weight (bw)/day over 28 and 90 days, respectively, equaling human equivalent doses (HEDs) of 123 and 102 GAE mg/kg bw/day. Aspalathin intake of 295 mg/kg bw/day represents a HED of 48 mg/kg bw/day (90 day study). Consumption of GRE increased feed intake significantly (p < 0.05) compared to the control after 90 days, but no effect on body and organ weight parameters was observed. GRE significantly (p < 0.05) reduced serum total cholesterol and iron levels, whilst significantly (p < 0.05) increasing alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity after 90 days. Endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity in the liver, i.e., catalase and superoxide dismutase activity, was not adversely affected. Glutathione reductase activity significantly (p < 0.05) increased after 28 days, while glutathione (GSH) content was decreased after 90 days, suggesting an altered glutathione redox cycle. Quantitative Real Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed altered expression of certain antioxidant defense and oxidative stress related genes, indicative, among others, of an underlying oxidative stress related to changes in the GSH redox pathway and possible biliary dysfunction.

  9. Effects of chronic dietary exposure to a low-dose of Malathion, Aroclor-1254 and 3-methylcholanthrene on three biomarkers in male mice.

    PubMed

    Hackenberger, B K; Jarić, Davorka; Hackenberger, Dubravka; Stepić, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the applicability of some chronic toxicological tests in the determination of exposure to xenobiotics present in concentrations below No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) and below the detection limit of analytical instruments. In the present experiment tested chemicals (Malathion, Aroclor-1254 and 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)) were mixed with wheat grains and given to male mice as feed over a period of 12 months. 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity with the 3-MC and Aroclor-1254 treatments reached the peak at 9th month of exposure (26.7 and 42.4 pmol⁻¹ mg(prot)-⁻¹, respectively), while malathion did not have significant influence. Glutathione (GSH) level depletion was highest after three months of exposure. Unexpectedly, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity increased after treatment with malathion, an organophosphorous insecticide. In conclusion, low-level concentrations chronically administered exert certain effects on the levels of selected enzymes, e.g. biomarkers.

  10. Chronic dietary exposure to pyrolytic and petrogenic mixtures of PAHs causes physiological disruption in zebrafish--part I: Survival and growth.

    PubMed

    Vignet, Caroline; Le Menach, Karyn; Mazurais, David; Lucas, Julie; Perrichon, Prescilla; Le Bihanic, Florane; Devier, Marie-Hélène; Lyphout, Laura; Frère, Laura; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Zambonino-Infante, José-Luis; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    The release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into the environment has increased very substantially over the last decades leading to high concentrations in sediments of contaminated areas. To evaluate the consequences of long-term chronic exposure to PAHs, zebrafish were exposed, from their first meal at 5 days post fertilisation until they became reproducing adults, to diets spiked with three PAH fractions at three environmentally relevant concentrations with the medium concentration being in the range of 4.6-6.7 μg g(-1) for total quantified PAHs including the 16 US-EPA indicator PAHs and alkylated derivatives. The fractions used were representative of PAHs of pyrolytic (PY) origin or of two different oils of differing compositions, a heavy fuel (HO) and a light crude oil (LO). Fish growth was inhibited by all PAH fractions and the effects were sex specific: as determined with 9-month-old adults, exposure to the highest PY inhibited growth of females; exposure to the highest HO and LO inhibited growth of males; also, the highest HO dramatically reduced survival. Morphological analysis indicated a disruption of jaw growth in larvae and malformations in adults. Intestinal and pancreatic enzyme activities were abnormal in 2-month-old exposed fish. These effects may contribute to poor growth. Finally, our results indicate that PAH mixtures of different compositions, representative of situations encountered in the wild, can promote lethal and sublethal effects which are likely to be detrimental for fish recruitment.

  11. Food avoidance behavior to dietary octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) exposure in the northern bobwhite (Colinusvirginianus).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark S; Gogal, Robert M; Larsen, Calvert T

    2005-08-13

    High-melting explosive (HMX; octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is a widely utilized explosive component of munitions used by the military. Consequently, production and use through testing and training at military installations has resulted in deposition of HMX in soil. Since these areas are often used by birds, the oral toxicity of HMX exposure to northern bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) was evaluated. Attempts to determine the acute lethal dose were unsuccessful. Initially, 8 birds (1 male/1 female per dose group) were orally dosed at levels ranging from 125 to 2125 mg HMX/kg body weight. A single death at the midrange resulted in subsequent trials of oral doses up to 10,760 mg/kg body weight. Only a single death occurred at 7173 mg/kg. A subsequent 28-d feeding study was then conducted to evaluate the potential for toxicity resulting from repetitive oral exposures. Northern bobwhite were exposed to concentrations of HMX in feed of either 10000, 1000, 100, or 0 mg/kg. These exposures resulted in a clear concentration-related reduction in feed consumption and body mass. Reductions in egg production in females were correlated with changes in body mass and feed consumption. Other physiological indicators were consistent with a considerable reduction in feed intake. These results suggest that HMX concentration is responsible for intense feed aversion behavior and thus not likely a factor that would appreciably contribute to risk for wild birds at military ranges.

  12. Habitat- and species-dependent accumulation of organohalogen pollutants in home-produced eggs from an electronic waste recycling site in South China: Levels, profiles, and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Hong; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Bin; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-09-01

    Organohalogen pollutants (OHPs) including chlorinated paraffins (CPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other halogenated flame retardants (OHFRs) (dechlorane plus (DP), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)) originating from an e-waste recycling area in Guiyu, southern China were investigated in chicken and goose eggs. As expected, OHP concentrations were higher in chicken eggs collected from the location (site 1) approaching the e-waste recycling center than from the location (site 2) far from the e-waste recycling center. Also, much higher OHP levels were observed in goose eggs foraging in residential area (site 2) than that in agricultural area (site 1), suggesting a clear habitat dependent OHP bioaccumulation pattern both concerning distance from e-waste activities and type of foraging habitat. Goose eggs exhibited higher short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) concentrations but lower PBDE and OHFR levels than chicken eggs. The proportion of high brominated PBDEs (hepta-to deca-BDEs) was lower in goose eggs than that in chicken eggs and showed a clear decrease from site 1 to site 2. DP isomeric composition fanti values (the ratio of the anti-DP to the sum of the anti- and syn-DP) in goose eggs were significantly lower than those in chicken eggs (p < 0.001). These differences are likely a reflection of factors such as the species-specific differences in habitat preference and the differing environmental behaviors of the pollutants owing to their inherent properties (such as solubility and vapor pressure). Our findings suggested a high dietary intake of OHPs via home-produced eggs. For BDE99 there is a potential health concern with respect to the current dietary exposure via eggs. PMID:27239689

  13. Habitat- and species-dependent accumulation of organohalogen pollutants in home-produced eggs from an electronic waste recycling site in South China: Levels, profiles, and human dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Hong; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Bin; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-09-01

    Organohalogen pollutants (OHPs) including chlorinated paraffins (CPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other halogenated flame retardants (OHFRs) (dechlorane plus (DP), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA)) originating from an e-waste recycling area in Guiyu, southern China were investigated in chicken and goose eggs. As expected, OHP concentrations were higher in chicken eggs collected from the location (site 1) approaching the e-waste recycling center than from the location (site 2) far from the e-waste recycling center. Also, much higher OHP levels were observed in goose eggs foraging in residential area (site 2) than that in agricultural area (site 1), suggesting a clear habitat dependent OHP bioaccumulation pattern both concerning distance from e-waste activities and type of foraging habitat. Goose eggs exhibited higher short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) concentrations but lower PBDE and OHFR levels than chicken eggs. The proportion of high brominated PBDEs (hepta-to deca-BDEs) was lower in goose eggs than that in chicken eggs and showed a clear decrease from site 1 to site 2. DP isomeric composition fanti values (the ratio of the anti-DP to the sum of the anti- and syn-DP) in goose eggs were significantly lower than those in chicken eggs (p < 0.001). These differences are likely a reflection of factors such as the species-specific differences in habitat preference and the differing environmental behaviors of the pollutants owing to their inherent properties (such as solubility and vapor pressure). Our findings suggested a high dietary intake of OHPs via home-produced eggs. For BDE99 there is a potential health concern with respect to the current dietary exposure via eggs.

  14. Determination of levels of Mn, As, and other metals in water, sediment, and biota from Phayao Lake, Northern Thailand, and assessment of dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Tupwongse, Vitchayut; Parkpian, Preeda; Watcharasit, Piyajit; Satayavivad, Jutamaad

    2007-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine levels of contamination of toxic metals in water, sediment, and consumed fishery products from Phayao freshwater lake located in northern Thailand, which is a major water resource for drinking water, agriculture, and household use. Concentrations of Mn, As, and other metals were determined in water, sediment, fish tissues (Puntius gonionotus) and pond snails (Filopaludina martensi). Sampling was carried out in 3 periods (February, May, and August) in 2005. Metal analysis was performed by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). Concentrations of Mn and As in lakewater ranged from 40-382 and 0.68-8.79 microg L(- 1) whereas the USEPA (Mn) and WHO (As) guidelines for drinking water are 50 and 10 microg L(- 1), respectively. Concentrations of some metals (Al, Cr, Mn, and Fe) in water were found to be higher in the area where water flowed into the lake from a small river than in other areas. The highest metal concentrations were found in the period of the dry season (May 2005). Among different sampling sites, the patterns of metal accumulations were different. Estimated fishery product consumption from the lake was calculated and the results indicated that the concentrations of metals in these products were lower than the recommended average daily dietary intake. Therefore, the consumption of fish and pond snail from this water resource may not pose a risk of metal toxicity. However, monitoring of the levels of Mn and As in lakewater should be carried out routinely so that appropriate prevention of contamination from these toxic metals can be implemented.

  15. Contamination of indoor dust and air by polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame retardants and relevance of non-dietary exposure in Vietnamese informal e-waste recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Takahashi, Shin; Suzuki, Go; Isobe, Tomohiko; Viet, Pham Hung; Kobara, Yuso; Seike, Nobuyasu; Zhang, Gan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several additive brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor dust and air from two Vietnamese informal e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs) and an urban site in order to assess the relevance of these media for human exposure. The levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in settled house dust from the EWRSs (130-12,000, 5.4-400, 5.2-620 and 31-1400 ng g(-1), respectively) were significantly higher than in urban house dust but the levels of PCBs (4.8-320 ng g(-1)) were not higher. The levels of PCBs and PBDEs in air at e-waste recycling houses (1000-1800 and 620-720 pg m(-3), respectively), determined using passive sampling, were also higher compared with non-e-waste houses. The composition of BFRs in EWRS samples suggests the influence from high-temperature processes and occurrence of waste materials containing older BFR formulations. Results of daily intake estimation for e-waste recycling workers are in good agreement with the accumulation patterns previously observed in human milk and indicate that dust ingestion contributes a large portion of the PBDE intake (60%-88%), and air inhalation to the low-chlorinated PCB intake (>80% for triCBs) due to their high levels in dust and air, respectively. Further investigation of both indoor dust and air as the exposure media for other e-waste recycling-related contaminants and assessment of health risk associated with exposure to these contaminant mixtures is necessary.

  16. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol in foodstuffs: Chinese dietary exposure from the 2007 total diet study and infant health risk from formulas.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yumin; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Hejun; Wu, Yongning; Shao, Bing

    2015-01-15

    Concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) and nonylphenol (NP) were measured in food samples from the 2007 Chinese total diet study (TDS). BPA and NP were detected in 72 and 143 of 144 TDS samples, respectively, with concentrations ranging from 20 ng/kg to 267 μg/kg and 30 ng/kg to 1,268 μg/kg, respectively. BPA was highest in Hebei (HB) province for most food groups. NP was much higher in milk than in other foods across all the provinces. Mean exposures to BPA and NP were estimated to be 43 ng/kg bw/day and 520 ng/kg bw/day for a Chinese adult, respectively, well below the tolerable daily intake (TDI). Mean exposure to NP from formula for infants aged 0-6 years ranged from 300 ng/kg bw/day to 17 μg/kg bw/day. For infants aged 0-1 year, intakes ranged from 5 to 17 μg/kg bw/day, which is above the TDI.

  17. Reduction in the urinary aflatoxin M1 biomarker as an early indicator of the efficacy of dietary interventions to reduce exposure to aflatoxins.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Nicole J; Kumi, Justice; Johnson, Natalie M; Dotse, Eunice; Marroquin-Cardona, Alicia; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Jolly, Pauline E; Ankrah, Nii-Ayi; Phillips, Timothy D

    2013-08-01

    Aflatoxin B1 is a persistent public health issue in Ghana. Assessment of AFB1 intervention efficacy is currently dependent on long-term biomarkers. This study was designed to determine whether daily AFM1 biomarker levels could be utilized as an early detection method for intervention efficacy. Participants were treated with a refined calcium montmorillonite clay (UPSN) or a placebo (calcium carbonate) in a crossover study. Urine samples were assessed for AFM1 levels daily. UPSN treatment reduced AFM1 biomarkers by 55% compared to the placebo. This is the first study to show that daily urinary AFM1 levels can be used as a biomarker of internal aflatoxin B1 exposure in short-term intervention trials to determine efficacy. PMID:23697800

  18. Bioaccumulation and tissue distribution of Pb and Cd and growth effects in the green garden snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778), after dietary exposure to the metals alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Mleiki, Anwar; Irizar, Amaia; Zaldibar, Beñat; El Menif, Najoua Trigui; Marigómez, Ionan

    2016-03-15

    The present study was aimed at determining bioaccumulation and cell and tissue distribution of Pb and Cd in the green garden snail, Cantareus apertus (Born, 1778), exposed to different nominal dietary concentrations of Pb (25, 100 and 2500 mg Pb/kg), Cd (5, 10 and 100 mg Cd/kg) and their combination (25mg Pb+10 mg Cd/kg and 2500 mg Pb+100 mg Cd/kg) for 1 and 8 wk. Pb and Cd were bioaccumulated in the digestive gland in a dose-dependent manner and the degree of effects on growth was related to the level of exposure, though metal-metal interactions were observed after treatment with mixtures of Pb and Cd. The present results are absolutely comparable to those obtained in other terrestrial pulmonates in other regions and therefore they absolutely support that C. apertus is suitable as biomonitor for the assessment of the Pb and Cd levels and their biological effects in soil ecosystems in Northern Africa.

  19. Prenatal Exposure to Dietary Fat Induces Changes in the Transcriptional Factors,TEF and YAP, Which May Stimulate Differentiation of Peptide Neurons in Rat Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kinning; Mandava, Sushma; Chen, Karen; Barson, Jessica R.; Buschlen, Sylvie; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2013-01-01

    Gestational exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) stimulates the differentiation of orexigenic peptide-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus of offspring. To examine possible mechanisms that mediate this phenomenon, this study investigated the transcriptional factor, transcription enhancer factor-1 (TEF), and co-activator, Yes-associated protein (YAP), which when inactivated stimulate neuronal differentiation. In rat embryos and postnatal offspring prenatally exposed to a HFD compared to chow, changes in hypothalamic TEF and YAP and their relationship to the orexigenic peptide, enkephalin (ENK), were measured. The HFD offspring at postnatal day 15 (P15) exhibited in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus a significant reduction in YAP mRNA and protein, and increased levels of inactive and total TEF protein, with no change in mRNA. Similarly, HFD-exposed embryos at embryonic day 19 (E19) showed in whole hypothalamus significantly decreased levels of YAP mRNA and protein and TEF mRNA, and increased levels of inactive TEF protein, suggesting that HFD inactivates TEF and YAP. This was accompanied by increased density and fluorescence intensity of ENK neurons. A close relationship between TEF and ENK was suggested by the finding that TEF co-localizes with this peptide in hypothalamic neurons and HFD reduced the density of TEF/ENK co-labeled neurons, even while the number and fluorescence intensity of single-labeled TEF neurons were increased. Increased YAP inactivity by HFD was further evidenced by a decrease in number and fluorescence intensity of YAP-containing neurons, although the density of YAP/ENK co-labeled neurons was unaltered. Genetic knockdown of TEF or YAP stimulated ENK expression in hypothalamic neurons, supporting a close relationship between these transcription factors and neuropeptide. These findings suggest that prenatal HFD exposure inactivates both hypothalamic TEF and YAP, by either decreasing their levels or increasing their inactive form, and that

  20. Dioxin-related compounds in breast milk of women from Vietnamese e-waste recycling sites: levels, toxic equivalents and relevance of non-dietary exposure.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Katsura, Kana; Suzuki, Go; Tuyen, Le Huu; Takasuga, Takumi; Takahashi, Shin; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-08-01

    Although informal e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs) are hotspots of both polychlorinated and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs and PBDD/Fs), human exposure to the latter has not been studied in details. This study investigated the accumulation levels and profiles of dioxin-related compounds (DRCs) in breast milk samples from women living in two Vietnamese EWRSs and estimated the intake contribution from e-waste-related exposure. Screening results using Dioxin-Responsive Chemically Activated LUciferase gene eXpression assay (DR-CALUX) showed higher dioxin-like (DL) activities in samples from the EWRS Bui Dau than in those from the EWRS Trang Minh and a reference site (2.3-10 vs 1.7-4.8 and 0.60-5.7 pg CALUX-TEQ/g lipid, n=10, 6 and 9, respectively). Chemical analysis results of selected samples show that the WHO-TEQ levels of PCDD/Fs, DL-PCBs and PBDD/Fs in EWRS samples were not significantly higher than in those from the reference site (0.22-7.4 vs 1.1-3.0 pg/g lipid) and within the Vietnamese background range, but women involved in recycling accumulated higher concentrations of PCDFs (13-15 vs 2.3-8.8 pg/g lipid) and PBDFs (1.1-1.5 vs <1.1 pg/g lipid). By comparing the DRC profile in milk of these women with the reported profile in house dust from the same site, dust ingestion was estimated to contribute most of the intake for tetraBDF, 37 per cent to 55 per cent for penta-octaCDFs, but less than twenty per cent for PCDDs and DL-PCBs, and 26 per cent for total WHO-TEQs. The DL activities in some EWRS milk samples were not fully explained by chemical data, suggesting contribution from unidentified compounds. The estimated WHO-TEQ intake doses for breastfed infants (1.3-33 pg/kg/d) mostly exceeded the tolerable value, especially for those living in the EWRSs; and unidentified DRCs might increase further the dioxin-related health risk.

  1. Dietary nitrates, nitrites, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)), nitrite (NO(2)), and arginine can serve as sources for production of NO(x) (a diverse group of metabolites including nitric oxide, nitrosothiols, and nitroalkenes) via ultraviolet light exposure to skin, mammalian nitrate/nitrite reductases in tissues, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, respectively. NO(x) are responsible for the hypotensive, antiplatelet, and cytoprotective effects of dietary nitrates and nitrites. Current regulatory limits on nitrate intakes, based on concerns regarding potential risk of carcinogenicity and methemoglobinemia, are exceeded by normal daily intakes of single foods, such as soya milk and spinach, as well as by some recommended dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. This review includes a call for regulatory bodies to consider all available data on the beneficial physiologic roles of nitrate and nitrite in order to derive rational bases for dietary recommendations.

  2. Population Based Exposure Assessment of Bioaccessible Arsenic in Carrots

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two predominant arsenic exposure routes are food and water. Estimating the risk from dietary exposures is complicated, owing to the chemical form dependent toxicity of arsenic and the diversity of arsenicals present in dietary matrices. Two aspects of assessing dietary expo...

  3. Effects of dietary exposure to herbicide and of the nutritive quality of contaminated food on the reproductive output of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bessa da Silva, M; Abrantes, N; Rocha-Santos, T A P; Duarte, A C; Freitas, A C; Gomes, A M; Carvalho, A P; Marques, J C; Gonçalves, F; Pereira, R

    2016-10-01

    Risk assessment of pesticides has been based on direct toxic effects on aquatic organisms. Indirect effects data are taken into account but with limitations, as it is frequently difficult to predict their real impacts in the ecosystems. In this context the main aim of this work was to assess how the exposure to the herbicide pendimethalin (Prowl(®)), under environmentally relevant concentrations, may compromise the nutritional composition of food for a relevant group of primary consumers of freshwater food webs-the daphnids, thus affecting their reproduction performance and subsequently the long-term sustainability of active populations of this grazer. Therefore, Daphnia magna individuals were chronically exposed in a clean medium to a control diet (NCF - i.e., non-contaminated green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata) and to a contaminated diet (CF - i.e., the same monoalgal culture grown in a medium enriched with pendimethalin in a concentration equivalent to the EC20 for growth inhibition of algae), during which reproductive endpoints were assessed. The algae were analysed for protein, carbohydrate and fatty acid content. The chemical composition of R. subcapitata in the CF revealed a slight decrease on total fatty acid levels, with a particular decrease of essential ω9 monounsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, the protein content was high in the CF. D. magna exposed to CF experienced a 16% reduction in reproduction, measured as the total number of offspring produced per female. Additionally, an internal pendimethalin body burden of 4.226μgg(-1) was accumulated by daphnids fed with CF. Hence, although it is difficult to discriminate the contribution of the pesticide (as a toxic agent transferred through the food web) from that of the food with a poor quality-compromised by the same pesticide, there are no doubts that, under environmentally relevant concentrations of pesticides, both pathways may compromise the populations of freshwater grazers in the long term

  4. Assessment of human health hazards associated with the dietary exposure to organic and inorganic contaminants through the consumption of fishery products in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Ángel; Camacho, María; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Boada, Luis D; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valerón, Pilar F; Almeida González, Maira; Zaccaroni, Annalisa; Zumbado, Manuel; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2016-07-01

    In this work we have evaluated the potential carcinogenic and acutely toxic risks associated to the exposure to highly prevalent organic and inorganic contaminants through the consumption of fishery products by the Spanish population. The concentrations of 8 organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), 18 polychlorinated biphenils (PCBs), 7 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (expressed as benzo[a]pyrene toxic equivalents (B[a]Peq)), and three inorganic toxic elements [arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and mercury (Hg)] were determined in 93 samples of the most consumed species of white fish, blue fish, cephalopods and seafood species, which were acquired directly in markets and supermarkets in the Canary Islands, Spain. The chemical concentration data were combined with the pattern of consumption of these foodstuffs in order to calculate the daily intake of these contaminants, and on this basis the risk quotients for carcinogenicity and acute toxicity were determined for Spanish adults and children. Our results showed that the daily intake of OCPs, PCBs and B[a]Peq, which is associated to blue fish consumption was the highest within the fish group. The estimated intake of pollutants can be considered low or very low for the individual contaminants, when compared to reference values, except in the case of HCB and As. All the estimated intakes were below the reported Tolerable Daily Intakes. Considering the additive effects of multiple contaminants, the risk of acute toxic effects can also be considered as low or very low. However, our results reflect that the current consumption of white fish in adults and children, and also the blue fish in the case of adults, poses a moderate carcinogenic risk to Spanish consumers, mainly related to their concentrations of As. The conclusions of this research may be useful for the design of appropriate risk communication campaigns.

  5. [Polychlorinated biphenyls and their methylsulfonyl metabolites in fish from an electronic waste recycling site in south China: tissue distribution and human dietary exposure].

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zeng, Yan-Hong; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we determined polychlorinated biphenyls and their methylsulfonyl metabolites (MeSO2-PCBs) in the tissues of two fish species-mud carp and northern snakehead-from a natural pond in an electronic waste recycling site in the Pearl River Delta, Southern China. The mean concentrations of PCBs (Σ PCBs )varied from 560 to 10 462 ng x g(-1) wet weight, and from 580 to 50 492 ng x g(-1) wet weight in the tissues of mud carp and northern snakehead, respectively, with the highest levels found in the liver. Lipid contents played an important role in the determination of tissue distribution of PCBs. The mean concentrations of Σ MeSO2-PCBs varied between 0.44 and 53 ng x g(-1) wet weight in tissues of mud carp, while varied between 1.86 and 132 ng x g(-1) wet weight in northern snakehead. These levels were one order of magnitude greater than the highest levels of MeSO2-PCBs previously reported in fish. The EF values of chiral PCBs in mud carp were lower than those in the sediments, with an exception of PCB149. However, the declined EFs in mud carp were rebounded in northern snakehead, and some values were even higher than those in the sediment. This result may suggest that the mud carp and the northern snakehead preferred to biotransform different enantiomers of PCB congeners. The elevated levels of Σ PCBs and Σ MeSO2-PCBs detected in the present study indicated a high exposure risk to the local residents. Restricting the consumption of these fish in the local markets is important and essential for reducing the health risks to local residents. PMID:25826938

  6. Effects of dietary β-1,3/1,6-glucan on the antioxidant and digestive enzyme activities of Pacific red snapper (Lutjanus peru) after exposure to lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Villanueva, Laura T; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Macías-Rodríguez, María E; Tovar-Ramírez, Dariel

    2014-06-01

    The effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan, derived from yeast, on growth, antioxidant, and digestive enzyme performance of Pacific red snapper Lutjanus peru before and after exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) was investigated. The β-1,3/1,6-glucan was added to the basal diet at two concentrations (0.1 and 0.2 %). The treatment lasted 6 weeks, with sampling at regular intervals (0, 2, 4, and 6 weeks). At the end of this period, the remaining fish from either control or β-glucan-fed fish were injected intraperitoneally with LPS (3 mg kg(-1)) or with sterile physiological saline solution (SS) and then sampled at 0, 24, and 72 h. The results showed a significant increase (P < 0.05) in growth performance after 6 weeks of feeding with β-glucan. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver was significantly higher in diets containing 0.1 % β-glucan in weeks 4 and 6, compared to the control group. β-Glucan supplementation at 0.1 and 0.2 % significantly increased aminopeptidase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin activity. At 72 h after injection of LPS, we observed a significant increase in catalase activity in liver from fish fed diets supplemented with 0.1 and 0.2 % β-glucan; SOD activity increased in fish fed with 0.1 % β-glucan in relation to those injected with SS. Feed supplemented with β-1,3/1,6-glucan increased growth, antioxidant activity, and digestive enzyme activity in Pacific red snapper.

  7. Conservation of body calcium by increased dietary intake of potassium: A potential measure to reduce the osteoporosis process during prolonged exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nechay, Bohdan R.

    1989-01-01

    During the 1988 NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, it was proposed that the loss of skeletal calcium upon prolonged exposure to microgravity could be explained, in part, by a renal maladjustment characterized by an increased urinary excretion of calcium. It was theorized that because the conservation of body fluids and electrolytes depends upon the energy of adenosine triphosphate and enzymes that control the use of its energy for renal ion transport, an induction of renal sodium and potassium-dependent adenosine triphosphatase (Na + K ATPase) by oral loading with potassium would increase the reabsorption of sodium directly and that of calcium indirectly, leading to improved hydration and to reduced calcium loss. Preliminary studies showed the following. Rats drinking water containing 0.2 M potassium chloride for six to 13 days excreted in urine 22 muEq of calcium and 135 muEq of sodium per 100 grams of body weight per day. The corresponding values for control rats drinking tap water were 43 muEq and 269 muEq respectively. Renal Na + K ATPase activity in potassium loaded rats was higher than in controls. Thus, oral potassium loading resulted in increased Na + K ATPase activity and diminished urinary excretion of calcium and of sodium as predicted by the hypothesis. An extension of these studies to humans has the potential of resulting in development of harmless, non-invasive, drug-free, convenient measures to reduce bone loss and other electrolyte and fluid problems in space travelers exposed to prolonged periods of microgravity.

  8. [Polychlorinated biphenyls and their methylsulfonyl metabolites in fish from an electronic waste recycling site in south China: tissue distribution and human dietary exposure].

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Zeng, Yan-Hong; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we determined polychlorinated biphenyls and their methylsulfonyl metabolites (MeSO2-PCBs) in the tissues of two fish species-mud carp and northern snakehead-from a natural pond in an electronic waste recycling site in the Pearl River Delta, Southern China. The mean concentrations of PCBs (Σ PCBs )varied from 560 to 10 462 ng x g(-1) wet weight, and from 580 to 50 492 ng x g(-1) wet weight in the tissues of mud carp and northern snakehead, respectively, with the highest levels found in the liver. Lipid contents played an important role in the determination of tissue distribution of PCBs. The mean concentrations of Σ MeSO2-PCBs varied between 0.44 and 53 ng x g(-1) wet weight in tissues of mud carp, while varied between 1.86 and 132 ng x g(-1) wet weight in northern snakehead. These levels were one order of magnitude greater than the highest levels of MeSO2-PCBs previously reported in fish. The EF values of chiral PCBs in mud carp were lower than those in the sediments, with an exception of PCB149. However, the declined EFs in mud carp were rebounded in northern snakehead, and some values were even higher than those in the sediment. This result may suggest that the mud carp and the northern snakehead preferred to biotransform different enantiomers of PCB congeners. The elevated levels of Σ PCBs and Σ MeSO2-PCBs detected in the present study indicated a high exposure risk to the local residents. Restricting the consumption of these fish in the local markets is important and essential for reducing the health risks to local residents.

  9. Effects of dietary exposure to herbicide and of the nutritive quality of contaminated food on the reproductive output of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bessa da Silva, M; Abrantes, N; Rocha-Santos, T A P; Duarte, A C; Freitas, A C; Gomes, A M; Carvalho, A P; Marques, J C; Gonçalves, F; Pereira, R

    2016-10-01

    Risk assessment of pesticides has been based on direct toxic effects on aquatic organisms. Indirect effects data are taken into account but with limitations, as it is frequently difficult to predict their real impacts in the ecosystems. In this context the main aim of this work was to assess how the exposure to the herbicide pendimethalin (Prowl(®)), under environmentally relevant concentrations, may compromise the nutritional composition of food for a relevant group of primary consumers of freshwater food webs-the daphnids, thus affecting their reproduction performance and subsequently the long-term sustainability of active populations of this grazer. Therefore, Daphnia magna individuals were chronically exposed in a clean medium to a control diet (NCF - i.e., non-contaminated green algae Raphidocelis subcapitata) and to a contaminated diet (CF - i.e., the same monoalgal culture grown in a medium enriched with pendimethalin in a concentration equivalent to the EC20 for growth inhibition of algae), during which reproductive endpoints were assessed. The algae were analysed for protein, carbohydrate and fatty acid content. The chemical composition of R. subcapitata in the CF revealed a slight decrease on total fatty acid levels, with a particular decrease of essential ω9 monounsaturated fatty acids. In contrast, the protein content was high in the CF. D. magna exposed to CF experienced a 16% reduction in reproduction, measured as the total number of offspring produced per female. Additionally, an internal pendimethalin body burden of 4.226μgg(-1) was accumulated by daphnids fed with CF. Hence, although it is difficult to discriminate the contribution of the pesticide (as a toxic agent transferred through the food web) from that of the food with a poor quality-compromised by the same pesticide, there are no doubts that, under environmentally relevant concentrations of pesticides, both pathways may compromise the populations of freshwater grazers in the long term

  10. Hepatocellular hypertrophy and cell proliferation in Sprague-Dawley rats following dietary exposure to ammonium perfluorooctanoate occurs through increased activation of the xenosensor nuclear receptors PPARα and CAR/PXR.

    PubMed

    Elcombe, Clifford R; Elcombe, Barbara M; Foster, John R; Farrar, David G; Jung, Reinhard; Chang, Shu-Ching; Kennedy, Gerald L; Butenhoff, John L

    2010-10-01

    treatment and suggest that the hepatomegaly and tumours observed after chronic dietary exposure of S-D rats to APFO likely are due to a proliferative response to combined activation of PPARα and CAR/PXR. This mode of action is unlikely to pose a human hepatocarcinogenic hazard.

  11. Expanding perceptions of subsistence fish consumption: evidence of high commercial fish consumption and dietary mercury exposure in an urban coastal community.

    PubMed

    Holloman, Erica L; Newman, Michael C

    2012-02-01

    Through collaborative partnerships established between current researchers and The Moton Community House (a local community center), African American women (ages 16-49yrs) from the Southeast Community of Newport News, Virginia, USA were surveyed to assess the reproducibility and consistency of fish consumption patterns (ingestion rates, exposure frequencies, weight, and fish consumption rates) derived from a community-specific fish consumption survey. Women were also surveyed to assess the reliability of the survey responses, and to estimate daily mercury intake. Fish consumption patterns were reproducible and the survey responses were reliable. Comparison between years revealed that fish consumption patterns remained consistent over time. In addition, the high fish consumption rate estimated in 2008 (147.8g/day; 95% CI: 117.6-185.8g/day) was confirmed with a rate (134.9g/day; 95% CI: 88-207g/day) not materially different and still considerably higher than mean fish consumption rates reported for U.S. women. Daily mercury intake rates were estimated using consumption data from 2008 and three consumption scenarios (canned white, canned light, and no tuna) due to confirmed differences in mercury concentration between canned white and light tuna. Arithmetic mean daily mercury intake rates were 0.284μg/kg bw/day (95% CI: 0.229-0.340μg/kg bw/day) using canned white tuna, 0.212μg/kg bw/day (95% CI: 0.165-0.259μg/kg bw/day) using light tuna, and 0.197μg/kg bw/day (95% CI: 0.151-0.243μg/kg bw/day) using no tuna. Approximately 58%-73% of the daily mercury intake rates for African American women in the Southeast Community exceeded US EPA's oral reference dose (RfD) of 0.10μg/kg bw/day for mercury. In addition, 2% of the rates exceeded a level (1.00μg/kg bw/day) documented to produce adverse health effects. Past and current investigations confirmed that even though women in this community were not subsistence fishers, they are subsistence fish consumers. PMID:22225823

  12. DETERMINATION OF PYRETHROID PESTICIDES IN COMPOSITE DIETARY SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) conducts aggregate exposure studies for determining an individual's exposure to a broad range of target analytes in composite dietary samples. The objective of this work is to develop an anal...

  13. Dietary Fat and Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Posted under Health Guides . Updated 23 ... warm What are the different types of dietary fat? The four main types of fat found in ...

  14. Dietary Assessment in Food Environment Research

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Sharon I.; Reedy, Jill; Butler, Eboneé N.; Dodd, Kevin W.; Subar, Amy F.; Thompson, Frances E.; McKinnon, Robin A.

    2015-01-01

    Context The existing evidence on food environments and diet is inconsistent, potentially due in part to heterogeneity in measures used to assess diet. The objective of this review, conducted in 2012–2013, was to examine measures of dietary intake utilized in food environment research. Evidence acquisition Included studies were published from January 2007 through June 2012 and assessed relationships between at least one food environment exposure and at least one dietary outcome. Fifty-one articles were identified using PubMed, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, and PsycINFO; references listed in the papers reviewed and relevant review articles; and the National Cancer Institute's Measures of the Food Environment website. The frequency of the use of dietary intake measures and assessment of specific dietary outcomes was examined, as were patterns of results among studies using different dietary measures. Evidence synthesis The majority of studies used brief instruments, such as screeners or one or two questions, to assess intake. Food frequency questionnaires were used in about a third of studies, one in ten used 24-hour recalls, and fewer than one in twenty used diaries. Little consideration of dietary measurement error was evident. Associations between the food environment and diet were more consistently in the expected direction in studies using less error-prone measures. Conclusions There is a tendency toward the use of brief dietary assessment instruments with low cost and burden rather than more detailed instruments that capture intake with less bias. Use of error-prone dietary measures may lead to spurious findings and reduced power to detect associations. PMID:24355678

  15. Pesticides on Household Surfaces May Influence Dietary Intake of Children

    EPA Science Inventory

    The physical and chemical environment influences children’s exposures to pesticides in and around the home. Children’s activities, which increase their potential for exposure especially during eating, have been captured in the Children’s Dietary Intake Model (CDIM). In addition t...

  16. Dietary fibre analysis.

    PubMed

    McCleary, Barry V

    2003-02-01

    The 'gold standard' method for the measurement of total dietary fibre is that of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists (2000; method 985.29). This procedure has been modified to allow measurement of soluble and insoluble dietary fibre, and buffers employed have been improved. However, the recognition of the fact that non-digestible oligosaccharides and resistant starch also behave physiologically as dietary fibre has necessitated a re-examination of the definition of dietary fibre, and in turn, a re-evaluation of the dietary fibre methods of the Association of Official Analytical Chemists. With this realisation, the American Association of Cereal Chemists appointed a scientific review committee and charged it with the task of reviewing and, if necessary, updating the definition of dietary fibre. It organised various workshops and accepted comments from interested parties worldwide through an interactive website. More recently, the (US) Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Health, National Academy of Sciences, under the oversight of the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, assembled a panel to develop a proposed definition(s) of dietary fibre. Various elements of these definitions were in agreement, but not all. What was clear from both reviews is that there is an immediate need to re-evaluate the methods that are used for dietary fibre measurement and to make appropriate changes where required, and to find new methods to fill gaps. In this presentation, the 'state of the art' in measurement of total dietary fibre and dietary fibre components will be described and discussed, together with suggestions for future research. PMID:12740050

  17. Dietary guidelines in singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin Lc

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Dietary Guidelines were developed with the aim of providing guidance on what dietary strategies can best address increasing rates of obesity and non-communicable chronic disease in Singapore. This set of dietary guidelines was developed with a local expert committee based on a review of scientific literature and data on current dietary patterns from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. Projected nutrient intakes from a diet adhering to the 2011 Dietary Guidelines were calculated using a local food composition database (FOCOS) and validated against nutrient recommendations. Acknowledging that dietary requirements differ between age groups, different sets of dietary guidelines have been developed and customised for different segments of the population. To date, Singapore has produced dietary guidelines for children and adolescents (focusing on establishing healthy lifelong eating patterns), adults (focusing on preventing obesity and reinforcing healthy eating patterns), and most recently, guidelines for older adults (>50 years of age) that address the issue of potential dietary insufficiency caused by age-related increases in nutrient requirements combined with a reduction in energy requirements. In Singapore, dietary guidelines have been used to inform and direct public policy and promote dietary patterns that meet nutrient requirements while reducing the risk of non-communicable chronic diseases. Examples of public policy include: national guidelines on food advertising and standards for food served in nursing homes; examples of public health promotion programmes include: the Healthier Choice Symbol Programme for packaged food products and programmes encouraging provision of healthier meals in hawker centres, restaurants, and school or workplace canteens. PMID:21859669

  18. Dietary Interviewing by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Warner V.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A computer based dietary interviewing program enhanced self awareness for overweight participants. In a three part interview designed for direct interaction between patient and computer, questions dealt with general dietary behavior and details of food intake. The computer assisted the patient in planning a weight reducing diet of approximately…

  19. Limitations of observational evidence: implications for evidence-based dietary recommendations.

    PubMed

    Maki, Kevin C; Slavin, Joanne L; Rains, Tia M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2014-01-01

    Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide the strongest evidence for establishing relations between exposures, including dietary exposures, and health outcomes. However, not all diet and health outcome relations can be practically or ethically evaluated by using RCTs; therefore, many dietary recommendations are supported by evidence primarily from observational data, particularly those from prospective cohort studies. Although such evidence is of critical importance, limitations are often underappreciated by nutrition scientists and policymakers. This editorial review is intended to 1) highlight some of these limitations of observational evidence for diet-disease relations, including imprecise exposure quantification, collinearity among dietary exposures, displacement/substitution effects, healthy/unhealthy consumer bias, residual confounding, and effect modification; and 2) advocate for greater caution in the communication of dietary recommendations for which RCT evidence of clinical event reduction after dietary intervention is not available.

  20. Ramadan Major Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. Results: We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). Conclusions: This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest. PMID:25593728

  1. Dietary Acrylamide and Human Cancer: A Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Tim R.; Barnes, Stephen; Groopman, John

    2014-01-01

    Cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, and the numbers of cases are expected to continue to rise worldwide. Cancer prevention strategies are crucial for reducing the cancer burden. The carcinogenic potential of dietary acrylamide exposure from cooked foods is unknown. Acrylamide is a by-product of the common Maillard reaction where reducing sugars (i.e., fructose and glucose) react with the amino acid, asparagine. Based on the evidence of acrylamide carcinogenicity in animals, the International Agency for Research on Cancer has classified acrylamide as a group 2A carcinogen for humans. Since the discovery of acrylamide in foods in 2002, a number of studies have explored its potential as a human carcinogen. This paper outlines a systematic review of dietary acrylamide and human cancer, acrylamide exposure and internal dose, exposure assessment methods in the epidemiologic studies, existing data gaps, and future directions. A majority of the studies reported no statistically significant association between dietary acrylamide intake and various cancers, and few studies reported increased risk for renal, endometrial, and ovarian cancers; however, the exposure assessment has been inadequate leading to potential misclassification or underestimation of exposure. Future studies with improved dietary acrylamide exposure assessment are encouraged. PMID:24875401

  2. INHIBITION OF FRIED MEAT-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE: A DIETARY INTERVENTION STUDY IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dietary exposures have been implicated as risk factors in colorectal cancer. Such agents may act by causing DNA damage or may be protective against DNA damage. The effects of dietary exposures in causing or preventing damage have not been assessed directly in colon tissues. In th...

  3. Pesticides on household surfaces may influence dietary intake of children.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Lisa Jo; Byron, Margie Z; Brown, G Gordon; Clayton, C Andrew; Michael, Larry C

    2011-05-15

    The physical and chemical environment influences children's exposures to pesticides in and around the home. Children's activities, which increase their potential for exposure especially during eating, have been captured in the Children's Dietary Intake Model (CDIM). In addition to the chemical exposure associated with the food itself, this model incorporates excess dietary exposures due to handling of food during consumption. To stochastically evaluate CDIM, distributions of measured, and in some cases estimated, model factors were determined from measurements of permethrin, chlorpyrifos, and diazinon derived from assembled databases and laboratory experiments. Using the distributions of these factors, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain distributions of total dietary intake of pesticides. To target the sources of pesticide contamination that were influencing total dietary intake, each factor was evaluated. We found pesticide surface concentration to be highly influential. By excluding surface concentration, we were also able to determine the influence of the other factors based on the F-statistic. Transfer efficiencies, followed by pesticide residue in consumed foods and amount of food consumed, were the next most influential factors within the model. With these distributions for model inputs, CDIM has the potential to more accurately predict total dietary intake of a contaminant by a child.

  4. FDA 101: Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... professionals. As its resources permit, FDA also reviews product labels and other product information, such as package inserts, ... the address or phone number listed on the product's label. Dietary supplement firms are required to forward reports ...

  5. Dietary determinants of obesity.

    PubMed

    Du, Huaidong; Feskens, Edith

    2010-08-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem worldwide, and dietary composition can play a role in its prevention and treatment. However, available literature on the impacts of different dietary factors on weight change is inconsistent, or even conflicting. In this review, we briefly summarized the mechanisms and influences of several major dietary determinants of weight change, with a focus on their potential in the prevention of weight gain or regain. We discussed the intake of fat, protein, total carbohydrates, fruits and vegetables, fibre, free sugars, fructose and sugar sweetened beverages, dietary energy density, portion size, eating outside home, glycaemic index and glycaemic load. Popular weight loss diets, including the Atkins diet, Weight Watchers, Ornish diet and Zone diet, are also briefly discussed for their safety and efficacy in the maintenance of weight loss.

  6. Effects of alpha-linolenic acid vs. docosahexaenoic acid supply on the distribution of fatty acids among the rat cardiac subcellular membranes after a short- or long-term dietary exposure

    PubMed Central

    Brochot, Amandine; Guinot, Marine; Auchere, Daniel; Macaire, Jean-Paul; Weill, Pierre; Grynberg, Alain; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous work showed that the functional cardiac effect of dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) in rats requires a long feeding period (6 months), although a docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid-supply affects cardiac adrenergic response after 2 months. However, the total cardiac membrane n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition remained unchanged after 2 months. This delay could be due to a specific reorganization of the different subcellular membrane PUFA profiles. This study was designed to investigate the evolution between 2 and 6 months of diet duration of the fatty acid profile in sarcolemmal (SL), mitochondrial (MI), nuclear (NU) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane fractions. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 3 dietary groups (n = 10/diet/period), either n-3 PUFA-free diet (CTL), or ALA or DHA-rich diets. After 2 or 6 months, the subcellular cardiac membrane fractions were separated by differential centrifugations and sucrose gradients. Each membrane profile was analysed by gas chromatography (GC) after lipid extraction. Results As expected the n-3 PUFA-rich diets incorporated n-3 PUFA instead of n-6 PUFA in all the subcellular fractions, which also exhibited individual specificities. The diet duration increased SFA and decreased PUFA in SL, whereas NU remained constant. The SR and MI enriched in n-3 PUFA exhibited a decreased DHA level with ageing in the DHA and CTL groups. Conversely, the n-3 PUFA level remained unchanged in the ALA group, due to a significant increase in docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). N-3 PUFA rich diets lead to a better PUFA profile in all the fractions and significantly prevent the profile modifications induced by ageing. Conclusion With the ALA diet the n-3 PUFA content, particularly in SR and SL kept increasing between 2 and 6 months, which may partly account for the delay to achieve the modification of adrenergic response. PMID:19320987

  7. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  8. Dietary patterns of older adults: associations with biomarkers, anthropometry and nutrient intakes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns (DP) reflect chronic dietary exposure and thus present an optimal technique for examining diet and disease relationships in epidemiological studies. The purpose of this study was to examine the DP of participants in the Geisinger Rural Aging Study (114 male, 158 female mean age 78.5...

  9. Methyl Mercury Exposure from Fish Consumption in Vulnerable Racial/Ethnic Populations: Probabilistic SHEDS-Dietary Model Analyses Using 1999-2006 NHANES and 1990-2002 TDS Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    NHANES subjects self-identified as “Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, or multiracial” (A/P/N/M) have higher levels of blood organic mercury than other racial/ethnic groups; however, the reasons for this have been unclear. This research uses exposure modeling to determine ...