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Sample records for dietary phosphorus-responsive genes

  1. Dietary phosphorus-responsive genes in the intestine, pyloric ceca, and kidney of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Shozo H; Ferraris, Ronaldo P

    2004-09-01

    Identification of phosphorus (P)-responsive genes is important in diagnosing the adequacy of dietary P intake well before clinical symptoms arise. The mRNA abundance of selected genes was determined in the intestine, pyloric ceca, and kidney of rainbow trout fed low-P (LP) or sufficient-P (SP) diet for 2, 5, and 20 days. The LP-to-SP ratio (LP/SP) of mRNA abundance was used to evaluate the difference in gene expression between LP and SP fish, and to compare the response with bone and serum P, which are conventional indicators of P status. The LP/SP of intestinal, cecal, and renal type II sodium-phosphate cotransporter (NaPi-II) mRNA abundance changed from approximately 1-2 (day 2) to approximately 1.4-4 (day 5) and to approximately 2-10 (day 20). The LP/SP of renal NaPi-II, vitamin D 24-hydroxylase, and vitamin D receptor mRNA abundance correlated inversely with serum P on day 5 but not on day 2 and day 20. In another study, differentially expressed genes between LP and SP fish were examined by subtractive hybridization, confirmed by Northern blot, and evaluated by t-test and correlation with serum and bone P concentrations. About 30 genes were identified as dietary P responsive at day 20, including intestinal meprin and cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase, renal S100 calcium-binding protein and mitochondrial P(i) carrier, and cecal apolipoprotein E, somatomedin B-related protein, and NaPi-II. The LP/SP of mRNA abundance of renal mitochondrial P(i) carrier and intestinal cysteinesulfinic acid decarboxylase changed significantly by day 2, and intestinal meprin by day 5. Hence, these genes and NaPi-II are among the earliest steady-response genes capable of predicting P deficiency well before the onset of clinical deficiency.

  2. Combining suppressive subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarrays to identify dietary phosphorus-responsive genes of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) kidney.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jennifer; Gravel, Catherine; Koko, Gabriel Koffi D; Robert, Claude; Vandenberg, Grant W

    2010-03-01

    Phosphorus (P)-responsive genes and how they regulate renal adaptation to phosphorous-deficient diets in animals, including fish, are not well understood. RNA abundance profiling using cDNA microarrays is an efficient approach to study nutrient-gene interactions and identify these dietary P-responsive genes. To test the hypothesis that dietary P-responsive genes are differentially expressed in fish fed varying P levels, rainbow trout were fed a practical high-P diet (R20: 0.96% P) or a low-P diet (R0: 0.38% P) for 7 weeks. The differentially-expressed genes between dietary groups were identified and compared from the kidney by combining suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) with cDNA microarray analysis. A number of genes were confirmed by real-time PCR, and correlated with plasma and bone P concentrations. Approximately 54 genes were identified as potential dietary P-responsive after 7 weeks on a diet deficient in P according to cDNA microarray analysis. Of 18 selected genes, 13 genes were confirmed to be P-responsive at 7 weeks by real-time PCR analysis, including: iNOS, cytochrome b, cytochrome c oxidase subunit II , alpha-globin I, beta-globin, ATP synthase, hyperosmotic protein 21, COL1A3, Nkef, NDPK, glucose phosphate isomerase 1, Na+/H+ exchange protein and GDP dissociation inhibitor 2. Many of these dietary P-responsive genes responded in a moderate way (R0/R20 ratio: <2-3 or >0.5) and in a transient manner to dietary P limitation. In summary, renal adaptation to dietary P deficiency in trout involves changes in the expression of several genes, suggesting a profile of metabolic stress, since many of these differentially-expressed candidates are associated with the cellular adaptative responses.

  3. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  4. Dietary intervention impact on gut microbial gene richness.

    PubMed

    Cotillard, Aurélie; Kennedy, Sean P; Kong, Ling Chun; Prifti, Edi; Pons, Nicolas; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Almeida, Mathieu; Quinquis, Benoit; Levenez, Florence; Galleron, Nathalie; Gougis, Sophie; Rizkalla, Salwa; Batto, Jean-Michel; Renault, Pierre; Doré, Joel; Zucker, Jean-Daniel; Clément, Karine; Ehrlich, Stanislav Dusko

    2013-08-29

    Complex gene-environment interactions are considered important in the development of obesity. The composition of the gut microbiota can determine the efficacy of energy harvest from food and changes in dietary composition have been associated with changes in the composition of gut microbial populations. The capacity to explore microbiota composition was markedly improved by the development of metagenomic approaches, which have already allowed production of the first human gut microbial gene catalogue and stratifying individuals by their gut genomic profile into different enterotypes, but the analyses were carried out mainly in non-intervention settings. To investigate the temporal relationships between food intake, gut microbiota and metabolic and inflammatory phenotypes, we conducted diet-induced weight-loss and weight-stabilization interventions in a study sample of 38 obese and 11 overweight individuals. Here we report that individuals with reduced microbial gene richness (40%) present more pronounced dys-metabolism and low-grade inflammation, as observed concomitantly in the accompanying paper. Dietary intervention improves low gene richness and clinical phenotypes, but seems to be less efficient for inflammation variables in individuals with lower gene richness. Low gene richness may therefore have predictive potential for the efficacy of intervention.

  5. Human nutrigenomics of gene regulation by dietary fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Afman, Lydia A; Müller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Nutrigenomics employs high-throughput genomics technologies to unravel how nutrients modulate gene and protein expression and ultimately influence cellular and organism metabolism. The most often-applied genomics technique so far is transcriptomics, which allows quantifying genome-wide changes in gene expression of thousands of genes at the same time in one sample. The performance of gene expression quantification requires sufficient high-quality homogenous cellular material, therefore research in healthy volunteers is restricted to biopsies from easy accessible tissues such as subcutaneous adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and intestinal biopsies or even more easily accessible cells such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells from blood. There is now significant evidence that fatty acids, in particular unsaturated fatty acids, exert many of their effects through modulation of gene transcription by regulating the activity of numerous transcription factors, including nuclear receptors such as peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, liver X receptor and sterol regulatory binding proteins. This review evaluates the human nutrigenomics studies performed on dietary fat since the initiation of nutrigenomics research around 10 years ago. Although the number of studies is still limited, all studies clearly suggest that changes in dietary fatty acids intake and composition can have a significant impact on cellular adaptive response capacity by gene transcription changes in humans. This adds important knowledge to our understanding of the strong effects that various fatty acids can have on numerous metabolic and inflammatory pathways, signaling routes and homeostatic control in the cell and ultimately on whole body health. It is important to use and integrate nutrigenomics in all future nutrition studies to build up the necessary framework for evidence-based nutrition in near future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Integration of Metabolic and Gene Regulatory Networks Modulates The C. elegans Dietary Response

    PubMed Central

    Arda, H. Efsun; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Expression profiles are tailored according to dietary input. However, the networks that control dietary responses remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine forward and reverse genetic screens to delineate a network of 184 genes that affect the C. elegans dietary response to Comamonas DA1877 bacteria. We find that perturbation of a mitochondrial network comprised of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and the TCA cycle affects the dietary response. In humans, mutations in the corresponding genes cause inborn diseases of amino acid metabolism, most of which are treated by dietary intervention. We identify several transcription factors (TFs) that mediate the changes in gene expression upon metabolic network perturbations. Altogether, our findings unveil a transcriptional response system that is poised to sense dietary cues and metabolic imbalances, illustrating extensive communication between metabolic networks in the mitochondria and gene regulatory networks in the nucleus. PMID:23540702

  7. Integration of metabolic and gene regulatory networks modulates the C. elegans dietary response.

    PubMed

    Watson, Emma; MacNeil, Lesley T; Arda, H Efsun; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2013-03-28

    Expression profiles are tailored according to dietary input. However, the networks that control dietary responses remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine forward and reverse genetic screens to delineate a network of 184 genes that affect the C. elegans dietary response to Comamonas DA1877 bacteria. We find that perturbation of a mitochondrial network composed of enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and the TCA cycle affects the dietary response. In humans, mutations in the corresponding genes cause inborn diseases of amino acid metabolism, most of which are treated by dietary intervention. We identify several transcription factors (TFs) that mediate the changes in gene expression upon metabolic network perturbations. Altogether, our findings unveil a transcriptional response system that is poised to sense dietary cues and metabolic imbalances, illustrating extensive communication between metabolic networks in the mitochondria and gene regulatory networks in the nucleus.

  8. Dietary components modify gene expression: implications for carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kan; Yang, Wancai; Mariadason, John; Velcich, Anna; Lipkin, Martin; Augenlicht, Leonard

    2005-11-01

    Mouse genetic models that probe important pathways in intestinal cell maturation, such as cell-cycle regulation, apoptosis, and, especially, lineage specific differentiation, have provided profound insight into the underlying mechanisms of intestinal tumor formation and progression. However, a wealth of epidemiological and experimental data indicates that environment, especially the diet, is a principal determinant of relative risk for tumor development. We have demonstrated that even in mouse models in which tumor incidence is strongly initiated by genetic manipulation of genes, such as Apc, p21(WAF1/cip1), and p27(Kip1), a Western-style diet that is high in fat and low in calcium and vitamin D can dramatically increase and accelerate tumor formation. Moreover, experiments show that modulation of calcium and vitamin D levels can substantially influence tumor formation in both the mouse genetic models, as well as in a new dietary model that appears to mimic the development of sporadic colon cancer. Finally, analysis of gene expression profiles provides important insights into how diets may alter metabolic profiles and regulatory pathways that influence probability of tumor formation in the histologically and physiologically normal intestinal mucosa.

  9. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  10. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  11. Oligonucleotide Microarray Analysis of Dietary-Induced Hyperlipidemia Gene Expression Profiles in Miniature Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Junko; Waki, Shiori; Matsumoto, Rena; Odake, Junji; Miyaji, Takayuki; Tottori, Junichi; Iwanaga, Takehiro; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Background Hyperlipidemia animal models have been established, but complete gene expression profiles of the transition from normal lipid levels have not been obtained. Miniature pigs are useful model animals for gene expression studies on dietary-induced hyperlipidemia because they have a similar anatomy and digestive physiology to humans, and blood samples can be obtained from them repeatedly. Methodology Two typical dietary treatments were used for dietary-induced hyperlipidemia models, by using specific pathogen-free (SPF) Clawn miniature pigs. One was a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet (HFCD) and the other was a high-fat, high-cholesterol, and high-sucrose diet (HFCSD). Microarray analyses were conducted from whole blood samples during the dietary period and from white blood cells at the end of the dietary period to evaluate the transition of expression profiles of the two dietary models. Principal Findings Variations in whole blood gene expression intensity within the HFCD or the HFCSD group were in the same range as the controls provide with normal diet at all periods. This indicates uniformity of dietary-induced hyperlipidemia for our dietary protocols. Gene ontology- (GO) based functional analyses revealed that characteristics of the common changes between HFCD and HFCSD were involved in inflammatory responses and reproduction. The correlation coefficient between whole blood and white blood cell expression profiles at 27 weeks with the HFCSD diet was significantly lower than that of the control and HFCD diet groups. This may be due to the effects of RNA originating from the tissues and/or organs. Conclusions No statistically significant differences in fasting plasma lipids and glucose levels between the HFCD and HFCSD groups were observed. However, blood RNA analyses revealed different characteristics corresponding to the dietary protocols. In this study, whole blood RNA analyses proved to be a useful tool to evaluate transitions in dietary

  12. Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple

  13. Dissecting the gene network of dietary restriction to identify evolutionarily conserved pathways and new functional genes.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR-essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR-essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR-essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR-essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR-induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led

  14. Variations in bitter-taste receptor genes, dietary intake, and colorectal adenoma risk.

    PubMed

    Schembre, Susan M; Cheng, Iona; Wilkens, Lynne R; Albright, Cheryl L; Marchand, Le Loïc

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variants in bitter-taste receptor genes have been hypothesized to negatively impact health outcomes and/or influence dietary intake and, consequently, could increase the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Using a case-control study of 914 colorectal adenoma cases/1188 controls, we explored associations among colorectal adenoma risk, dietary intake, and genetic variation in 3 bitter-taste receptor genes: TAS2R38 (rs713598, rs1726866, rs10246939), TAS2R16 (rs846672), and TAS2R50 (rs1376251). Analysis of covariance was conducted to detect trends in dietary intake across TAS2R genotypes/haplotypes. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by logistic regression to test gene-adenoma risk associations. No significant associations were observed between the TAS2R38 PAV/PAV diplotype or the TAS2R16 (rs846672) polymorphism with the selected diet variables. We observed weak inverse associations between the TAS2R50 (rs1376251) C allele and dietary fiber and vegetable intake (Ps < 0.015). Odds ratios for adenoma risk were not significantly different from the null. Our findings do not support a link between these TAS2R genotypes/haplotypes and dietary intake that could impact colorectal adenoma risk. However, given the paucity of data, we cannot dismiss the possibility that these genes may influence colorectal adenoma risk in other ways, such as through impaired gastrointestinal function, particularly in subgroups of the population.

  15. Dietary wheat germ oil influences gene expression in larvae and eggs of the oriental fruit fly

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Changes in animal nutrition, particularly essential dietary components, alter global gene expression patterns. Our goal is to identify molecular markers that serve as early indicators of the quality of insect culture media. Markers of deficient culture media will increase the efficiency of develop...

  16. Dietary Nitrate Is a Modifier of Vascular Gene Expression in Old Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Totzeck, Matthias; Deenen, René; Köhrer, Karl; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.

    2015-01-01

    Aging leads to a number of disadvantageous changes in the cardiovascular system. Deterioration of vascular homoeostasis with increase in oxidative stress, chronic low-grade inflammation, and impaired nitric oxide bioavailability results in endothelial dysfunction, increased vascular stiffness, and compromised arterial-ventricular interactions. A chronic dietary supplementation with the micronutrient nitrate has been demonstrated to improve vascular function. Healthy dietary patterns may regulate gene expression profiles. However, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The changes that occur at the gene expression level and transcriptional profile following a nutritional modification with nitrate have not been elucidated. To determine the changes of the vascular transcriptome, we conducted gene expression microarray experiments on aortas of old mice, which were treated with dietary nitrate. Our results highlight differentially expressed genes overrepresented in gene ontology categories. Molecular interaction and reaction pathways involved in the calcium-signaling pathway and the detoxification system were identified. Our results provide novel insight to an altered gene-expression profile in old mice following nitrate supplementation. This supports the general notion of nutritional approaches to modulate age-related changes of vascular functions and its detrimental consequences. PMID:25838870

  17. Adipose Gene Expression Prior to Weight Loss Can Differentiate and Weakly Predict Dietary Responders

    PubMed Central

    Mutch, David M.; Temanni, M. Ramzi; Henegar, Corneliu; Combes, Florence; Pelloux, Véronique; Holst, Claus; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Astrup, Arne; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Saris, Wim H. M.; Viguerie, Nathalie; Langin, Dominique; Zucker, Jean-Daniel; Clément, Karine

    2007-01-01

    Background The ability to identify obese individuals who will successfully lose weight in response to dietary intervention will revolutionize disease management. Therefore, we asked whether it is possible to identify subjects who will lose weight during dietary intervention using only a single gene expression snapshot. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study involved 54 female subjects from the Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Human Obesity-Implications for Dietary Guidelines (NUGENOB) trial to determine whether subcutaneous adipose tissue gene expression could be used to predict weight loss prior to the 10-week consumption of a low-fat hypocaloric diet. Using several statistical tests revealed that the gene expression profiles of responders (8–12 kgs weight loss) could always be differentiated from non-responders (<4 kgs weight loss). We also assessed whether this differentiation was sufficient for prediction. Using a bottom-up (i.e. black-box) approach, standard class prediction algorithms were able to predict dietary responders with up to 61.1%±8.1% accuracy. Using a top-down approach (i.e. using differentially expressed genes to build a classifier) improved prediction accuracy to 80.9%±2.2%. Conclusion Adipose gene expression profiling prior to the consumption of a low-fat diet is able to differentiate responders from non-responders as well as serve as a weak predictor of subjects destined to lose weight. While the degree of prediction accuracy currently achieved with a gene expression snapshot is perhaps insufficient for clinical use, this work reveals that the comprehensive molecular signature of adipose tissue paves the way for the future of personalized nutrition. PMID:18094752

  18. Dietary macronutrient composition and central neuropeptide Y injection affect dietary preference and hypothalamic gene expression in chicks.

    PubMed

    McConn, Betty R; Cline, Mark A; Gilbert, Elizabeth R

    2017-03-10

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of dietary macronutrient composition on central NPY's orexigenic effect in chicks. Day-of-hatch chicks were fed one of three diets (3000 kcal ME/kg) ad libitum from hatch: high carbohydrate (HC), high fat (HF; 30% ME derived from soybean oil), and high protein (HP; 25 vs. 22% CP). In Experiment 1, chicks received intracerebroventricular injections of 0 (vehicle), 0.2, or 2.0 nmol NPY on day 4 and food intake was recorded for 6 hours. In Experiment 2, chicks were given all three diets before and after injection. In Experiment 3, hypothalamus was collected at 1-hour post-injection for gene expression analysis. The HC diet-fed chicks responded with a greater increase, while the chicks fed the HF diet had a lower threshold response in food intake to NPY. Neuropeptide Y dose-dependently increased food intake in chicks fed the HC and HP diets. Chicks administered 0.2 nmol NPY preferred the HC and HP diets over the HF diet. Relative quantities of hypothalamic NPYR1 and MC4R mRNA were reduced by NPY in chicks that consumed the HP and HC diets, respectively. Consumption of the HC diet was associated with the most robust NPY-induced increase in food intake. Injection of NPY accentuated differences among dietary groups in hypothalamic gene expression of several appetite-associated factors, results suggesting that the NPY/agouti-related peptide and melanocortin pathways are associated with some of the diet- and NPY-induced differences observed in this study.

  19. Short-term dietary phosphate restriction up-regulates ileal fibroblast growth factor 15 gene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakahashi, Otoki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tanaka, Sarasa; Kozai, Mina; Takei, Yuichiro; Masuda, Masashi; Kaneko, Ichiro; Taketani, Yutaka; Iwano, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Members of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 19 subfamily, including FGF23, FGF15/19, and FGF21, have a role as endocrine factors which influence the metabolism of inorganic phosphate (Pi) and vitamin D, bile acid, and energy. It has been reported that dietary Pi regulates circulating FGF23. In this study, the short-term effects of dietary Pi restriction on the expression of FGF19 subfamily members in mice were analyzed. An initial analysis confirmed plasma FGF23 levels positively correlated with the amount of dietary Pi. On the other hand, ileal Fgf15 gene expression, but not hepatic Fgf21 gene expression, was up-regulated by dietary Pi restriction. In addition, we observed the increase of plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] levels by dietary Pi restriction, and the up-regulation of ileal Fgf15 mRNA expression by 1,25(OH)2D3 and vitamin D receptor (VDR). Importantly, dietary Pi restriction-induced Fgf15 gene expression was prevented in VDR-knockout mice. Furthermore, diurnal variations of plasma triglyceride concentrations and hepatic mRNA expression of the bile acid synthesis enzyme Cyp7a1 as one of Fgf15 negative target genes was influenced by dietary Pi restriction. These results suggest that dietary Pi restriction up-regulates ileal Fgf15 gene expression through 1,25(OH)2D3 and VDR, and may affect hepatic bile acid homeostasis. PMID:24688219

  20. Variations in the WNK1 gene modulates the effect of dietary intake of sodium and potassium on blood pressure determination.

    PubMed

    Osada, Yuko; Miyauchi, Rie; Goda, Toshinao; Kasezawa, Nobuhiko; Horiike, Hiromi; Iida, Mariko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Yamakawa-Kobayashi, Kimiko

    2009-08-01

    WNK lysine-deficient protein kinase 1 (WNK1) is a member of the WNK family of serine/threonine kinases with no lysine (K), and these kinases have been implicated as important modulators of salt homeostasis in the kidney. It is well known that high dietary sodium and low dietary potassium have been implicated in the etiology of increased blood pressure. However, the blood pressure response to dietary sodium and potassium intake varies considerably among individuals. In this study, we have detected that the haplotypes of the WNK1 gene are associated with blood pressure variations in the general Japanese population. In addition, we investigated the interactions between the haplotypes of the WNK1 gene and dietary sodium and potassium intake for determining inter-individual variations in blood pressure. Our data support the hypothesis that part of the variation in blood pressure response to dietary sodium and potassium intake among individuals can be explained by variations in the WNK1 gene.

  1. Dietary regulation of rat intestinal cholecystokinin gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Liddle, R A; Carter, J D; McDonald, A R

    1988-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a gastrointestinal hormone produced by discrete endocrine cells in the upper small intestine and released after ingestion of a meal. The present study was designed to determine if enhanced CCK secretion is associated with increases in intestinal CCK mRNA levels. Rats, prepared with indwelling intraduodenal cannulae, were first fed an elemental diet that did not stimulate CCK release. Next, as a means of stimulating CCK secretion, soybean trypsin inhibitor was perfused for up to 24 h. Trypsin inhibitor administration increased plasma CCK levels from 0.9 +/- 0.1 to approximately 5 pmol/liter. RNA was prepared from the proximal small intestine at various times after trypsin inhibitor perfusion and mRNA levels analyzed by hybridization with a CCK cDNA probe. After 12 and 24 h of trypsin inhibitor treatment there were three- and fourfold increases, respectively, in CCK mRNA levels. In comparison, there was no change in beta-actin mRNA levels. To determine if regulation of CCK mRNA was at the level of CCK gene transcription, labeled transcripts from nuclear run-on incubations were hybridized to immobilized CCK cDNA. In trypsin inhibitor-treated rats, a two- to threefold increase in transcriptional activity was observed, whereas beta-actin gene transcription levels were unaltered. These studies indicate that stimulation of CCK secretion is associated with an increase in intestinal CCK mRNA content resulting from an increase in CCK gene transcription. Images PMID:2454954

  2. Supranutritional dietary selenium depressed expression of selenoprotein genes in three immune organs of broilers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiayong; Huang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Longqiong; Li, Qiang; Xu, Jinyang; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Haiying; Zhao, Hua

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of supranutritional dietary selenium (Se) on selenoproteins expression in three immune organs of chickens. A total of 160 1-day-old male Cobb broilers were randomly divided into two groups and fed a Se-deficient corn-soybean basal diet supplemented with 0.3 (adequate) and 3.0 (excess) mg/kg Se for 42 days. Immune organs were collected, and effects of supranutritional Se on messenger RNA abundance of 23 selenoprotein genes and eight inflammation-related genes were compared at day 42. Also enzyme activities were measured at days 14, 28 and 42. The results showed supranutritional dietary Se depressed growth performance of chicken and down-regulated nine and three selenoprotein genes in thymus and spleen, respectively, and only Sepp1 was up-regulated in the bursa of Fabricius. Also three, three and seven inflammation-related genes were up-regulated in three organs, respectively. Supranutritional Se elevated (P < 0.05) activities of superoxidase dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and glutathione peroxidase, mainly in early stages. In summary, supranutritional Se resulted in down-regulation of selenoprotein genes and up-regulation of inflammation-related genes in three immune organs of chicken, which indicated potential roles of those selenoprotein genes in immune organs of the chicken. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  3. Dietary intake alters gene expression in colon tissue: possible underlying mechanism for the influence of diet on disease.

    PubMed

    Pellatt, Andrew J; Slattery, Martha L; Mullany, Lila E; Wolff, Roger K; Pellatt, Daniel F

    2016-06-01

    Although the association between diet and disease is well documented, the biologic mechanisms involved have not been entirely elucidated. In this study, we evaluate how dietary intake influences gene expression to better understand the underlying mechanisms through which diet operates. We used data from 144 individuals who had comprehensive dietary intake and gene expression data from RNAseq using normal colonic mucosa. Using the DESeq2 statistical package, we identified genes that showed statistically significant differences in expression between individuals in high-intake and low-intake categories for several dietary variables of interest adjusting for age and sex. We examined total calories, total fats, vegetable protein, animal protein, carbohydrates, trans-fatty acids, mutagen index, red meat, processed meat, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, fiber, folate, dairy products, calcium, and prudent and western dietary patterns. Using a false discovery rate of less than 0.1, meat-related foods were statistically associated with 68 dysregulated genes, calcium with three dysregulated genes, folate with four dysregulated genes, and nonmeat-related foods with 65 dysregulated genes. With a more stringent false discovery rate of less than 0.05, there were nine meat-related dysregulated genes and 23 nonmeat-related genes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified three major networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to meat-related dietary variables and three networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to nonmeat-related variables. The top networks (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis network score >30) associated with meat-related genes were (i) cancer, organismal injury, and abnormalities, tumor morphology, and (ii) cellular function and maintenance, cellular movement, cell death, and survival. Among genes related to nonmeat consumption variables, the top networks were (i) hematological system development and function, nervous system development

  4. Histopathologic Alterations Associated with Global Gene Expression Due to Chronic Dietary TCDD Exposure in Juvenile Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Cariou, Ronan; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Jiang, Nan; Goetz, Giles; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the effects and possible developmental disease implication of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on global gene expression anchored to histopathologic analysis in juvenile zebrafish by functional genomic, histopathologic and analytic chemistry methods. Specifically, juvenile zebrafish were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb, and fish were sampled following 0, 7, 14, 28 and 42 d after initiation of the exposure. TCDD accumulated in a dose- and time-dependent manner and 100 ppb TCDD caused TCDD accumulation in female (15.49 ppb) and male (18.04 ppb) fish at 28 d post exposure. Dietary TCDD caused multiple lesions in liver, kidney, intestine and ovary of zebrafish and functional dysregulation such as depletion of glycogen in liver, retrobulbar edema, degeneration of nasal neurosensory epithelium, underdevelopment of intestine, and diminution in the fraction of ovarian follicles containing vitellogenic oocytes. Importantly, lesions in nasal epithelium and evidence of endocrine disruption based on alternatively spliced vasa transcripts are two novel and significant results of this study. Microarray gene expression analysis comparing vehicle control to dietary TCDD revealed dysregulated genes involved in pathways associated with cardiac necrosis/cell death, cardiac fibrosis, renal necrosis/cell death and liver necrosis/cell death. These baseline toxicological effects provide evidence for the potential mechanisms of developmental dysfunctions induced by TCDD and vasa as a biomarker for ovarian developmental disruption. PMID:24988445

  5. Suppression of rat hepatic fatty acid synthase and S14 gene transcription by dietary polyunsaturated fat.

    PubMed

    Blake, W L; Clarke, S D

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS) mRNA levels by altering FAS gene transcription. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were meal-fed for 10 d a high glucose diet supplemented with 20% digestible energy as menhaden oil or tripalmitin. The transcription rate for FAS was determined by nuclear run-on analysis in hepatic nuclei isolated from rats 2 h postmeal. The values for transcription rates of FAS and S14 (a putative lipogenic protein) in rats fed menhaden oil were only 6 and 21%, respectively, of the rates in rats fed the tripalmitin diet (p less than 0.02). Gene transcription for beta-actin and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase did not differ between treatments. The reduction in hepatic FAS mRNA levels caused by dietary polyunsaturated fats appears to be caused primarily by an inhibition of FAS transcription. The control of transcription by polyunsaturated fats appears not to be mediated by cAMP because the transcription rate for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (whose gene is very sensitive to cAMP stimulation) was unaffected by the source of dietary fat.

  6. Effects of dietary soybean stachyose and phytic acid on gene expressions of serine proteases in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Haifeng; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Wenbing; Wu, Chenglong; Cai, Yinghua

    2011-09-01

    Soybean stachyose (SBS) and phytic acid (PA) are anti-nutritional factors (ANF) which have deleterious effects on the growth and digestibility in fish. The present research studied the effects of dietary SBS and PA on the expression of three serine protease genes in the liver of Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus). These genes are trypsinogen 1 (poTRY), elastase 1 (poEL) and chymotrypsinogen 1 (poCTRY). Eight artificial diets with graded levels of supplemented ANFs were formulated to 4 levels of SBS (0.00, 0.40, 0.80 and 1.50%), 4 levels of PA (0.00, 0.20, 0.40 and 0.80), respectively. Japanese flounder (initial weight 2.45 g ± 0.01 g) were fed with these diets for 10 weeks with three replications per treatment. At the end of 10 weeks, supplementation of 0.40% of dietary SBS or PA significantly increased the gene expression of poTRY and poCTRY ( P<0.05). The same level of dietary SBS significantly decreased the gene expression of poEL. In comparison with the control group (ANF-free), dietary PA (0.2% and 0.8%) significantly decreased the gene expression of poTRY, poCTRY and poEL ( P<0.05). However, excessive supplement of dietary SBS (1.5%) has no significant effects on these gene expressions ( P>0.05). These results suggested that dietary SBS and dietary PA could directly affect the serine protease genes at the transcriptional level in Japanese flounder, and these genes' expression was more sensitive to dietary PA than to SBS under the current experimental conditions.

  7. Effect of Dietary Fat on Gene Expression in Poultry, A Review.

    PubMed

    Navidshad, Bahman; Royan, M

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, poultry farmers aimed to produce birds with high body weight and feed conversion ratio. However, in line with current developments, there are other traits that must be taken into account as well. These include producing poultry meat with lower body fat content and improving the nutritional quality of the poultry meat to appeal to consumer requirements. The interrelated importance of human diet and health status is an ancient subject. Human foods as a lifestyle factor is involved in the incidence of many types of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Recent reports suggest that not only the quantity but also the composition of dietary fat is an important factor to prevent these metabolic diseases in human populations. It has been reported that some dietary fats are able to reduce lipid synthesis and increase fatty acid oxidation and diet-mediated thermogenesis. The outcome of this change is a superior animal product with lower fat content. There is evidence of dissimilar mechanisms of action of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. Dietary fatty acids have various effects on cellular metabolism, and many of these effects are carried out through the alteration of gene expression. This review will focus on the control of body fat by gene expression in avians.

  8. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D.

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs. PMID:26863414

  9. Dietary Variation and Evolution of Gene Copy Number among Dog Breeds.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Taylor; Jagoda, Evelyn; Capellini, Terence D

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged human interactions and artificial selection have influenced the genotypic and phenotypic diversity among dog breeds. Because humans and dogs occupy diverse habitats, ecological contexts have likely contributed to breed-specific positive selection. Prior to the advent of modern dog-feeding practices, there was likely substantial variation in dietary landscapes among disparate dog breeds. As such, we investigated one type of genetic variant, copy number variation, in three metabolic genes: glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR), phytanol-CoA 2-hydroxylase (PHYH), and pancreatic α-amylase 2B (AMY2B). These genes code for proteins that are responsible for metabolizing dietary products that originate from distinctly different food types: sugar, meat, and starch, respectively. After surveying copy number variation among dogs with diverse dietary histories, we found no correlation between diet and positive selection in either GCKR or PHYH. Although it has been previously demonstrated that dogs experienced a copy number increase in AMY2B relative to wolves during or after the dog domestication process, we demonstrate that positive selection continued to act on amylase copy number in dog breeds that consumed starch-rich diets in time periods after domestication. Furthermore, we found that introgression with wolves is not responsible for deterioration of positive selection on AMY2B among diverse dog breeds. Together, this supports the hypothesis that the amylase copy number expansion is found universally in dogs.

  10. Impact of improving dietary amino acid balance for lactating sows on efficiency of dietary amino acid utilization and transcript abundance of genes encoding lysine transporters in mammary tissue.

    PubMed

    Huber, L; de Lange, C F M; Ernst, C W; Krogh, U; Trottier, N L

    2016-11-01

    Lactating multiparous Yorkshire sows ( = 64) were used in 2 experiments to test the hypothesis that reducing dietary CP intake and improving AA balance through crystalline AA (CAA) supplementation improves apparent dietary AA utilization efficiency for milk production and increases transcript abundance of genes encoding Lys transporter proteins in mammary tissue. In Exp. 1, 40 sows were assigned to 1 of 4 diets: 1) high CP (HCP; 16.0% CP, as-fed basis; analyzed concentration), 2) medium-high CP (MHCP; 15.7% CP), 3) medium-low CP (MLCP; 14.3% CP), and 4) low CP (LCP; 13.2% CP). The HCP diet was formulated using soybean meal and corn as the only Lys sources. The reduced-CP diets contained CAA to meet estimated requirements for essential AA that became progressively limiting with reduction in CP concentration, that is, Lys, Ile, Met + Cys, Thr, Trp, and Val. Dietary standardized ileal digestible (SID) Lys concentration was 80% of the estimated requirement. In Exp. 2, 24 sows were assigned to the HCP or LCP diets. In Exp. 1, blood samples were postprandially collected 15 h on d 3, 7, 14, and 18 of lactation and utilization efficiency of dietary AA for milk production was calculated during early (d 3 to 7) and peak (d 14 to 18) lactation. Efficiency values were estimated from daily SID AA intakes and milk AA yield, with corrections for maternal AA requirement for maintenance and AA contribution from body protein losses. In Exp. 2, mammary tissue was biopsied on d 4 and 14 of lactation to determine the mRNA abundance of genes encoding Lys transporter proteins. In peak lactation, Lys, Thr, Trp, and Val utilization efficiency increased with decreasing dietary CP (linear for Trp and Val, < 0.05; in sows fed the MHCP diet vs. sows fed the HCP diet for Lys and Thr, < 0.05). Total essential and nonessential 15-h postprandial serum AA concentrations increased with decreasing dietary CP (linear, = 0.09 and < 0.05, respectively), suggesting increased maternal body protein

  11. Digital imaging approaches for phenotyping whole plant nitrogen and phosphorus response in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Poiré, Richard; Chochois, Vincent; Sirault, Xavier R R; Vogel, John P; Watt, Michelle; Furbank, Robert T

    2014-08-01

    This work evaluates the phenotypic response of the model grass (Brachypodium distachyon (L.) P. Beauv.) to nitrogen and phosphorus nutrition using a combination of imaging techniques and destructive harvest of shoots and roots. Reference line Bd21-3 was grown in pots using 11 phosphorus and 11 nitrogen concentrations to establish a dose-response curve. Shoot biovolume and biomass, root length and biomass, and tissue phosphorus and nitrogen concentrations increased with nutrient concentration. Shoot biovolume, estimated by imaging, was highly correlated with dry weight (R(2) > 0.92) and both biovolume and growth rate responded strongly to nutrient availability. Higher nutrient supply increased nodal root length more than other root types. Photochemical efficiency was strongly reduced by low phosphorus concentrations as early as 1 week after germination, suggesting that this measurement may be suitable for high throughput screening of phosphorus response. In contrast, nitrogen concentration had little effect on photochemical efficiency. Changes in biovolume over time were used to compare growth rates of four accessions in response to nitrogen and phosphorus supply. We demonstrate that a time series image-based approach coupled with mathematical modeling provides higher resolution of genotypic response to nutrient supply than traditional destructive techniques and shows promise for high throughput screening and determination of genomic regions associated with superior nutrient use efficiency. © 2014 CSIRO Journal of Integrative Plant Biology © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Associations between dietary patterns and gene expression profiles of healthy men and women: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diet regulates gene expression profiles by several mechanisms. The objective of this study was to examine gene expression in relation with dietary patterns. Methods Two hundred and fifty four participants from the greater Quebec City metropolitan area were recruited. Two hundred and ten participants completed the study protocol. Dietary patterns were derived from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) by factor analysis. For 30 participants (in fasting state), RNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and expression levels of 47,231 mRNA transcripts were assessed using the Illumina Human-6 v3 Expression BeadChips®. Microarray data was pre-processed with Flexarray software and analysed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Results Two dietary patterns were identified. The Prudent dietary pattern was characterised by high intakes of vegetables, fruits, whole grain products and low intakes of refined grain products and the Western dietary pattern, by high intakes of refined grain products, desserts, sweets and processed meats. When individuals with high scores for the Prudent dietary pattern where compared to individuals with low scores, 2,083 transcripts were differentially expressed in men, 1,136 transcripts in women and 59 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. For the Western dietary pattern, 1,021 transcripts were differentially expressed in men with high versus low scores, 1,163 transcripts in women and 23 transcripts were overlapping in men and women. IPA reveals that genes differentially expressed for both patterns were present in networks related to the immune and/or inflammatory response, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Conclusion Gene expression profiles were different according to dietary patterns, which probably modulate the risk of chronic diseases. Trial Registration NCT: NCT01343342 PMID:23398686

  13. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid modify gene expression in liver, muscles, and fat tissues of finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Tous, N; Theil, P K; Lauridsen, C; Lizardo, R; Vilà, B; Esteve-Garcia, E

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate underlying mechanisms of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on lipid metabolism in various tissues of pigs. Sixteen gilts (73 ± 3 kg) were fed a control (containing sunflower oil) or an experimental diet in which 4% of sunflower oil was replaced by CLA, and slaughtered at an average BW of 117 ± 4.9 kg. Transcription of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), fatty acid synthase (FAS), sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), delta-6-desaturase (D6D), and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) were determined by real-time PCR in longissimus thoracis (LT) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles, LT subcutaneous and SM intermuscular fat, and in the liver. Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed using gas chromatography in these tissues, except for SM intermuscular fat. Dietary CLA increased PPARγ in LT muscle (P < 0.05), whereas CLA reduced PPARα transcription in all tissues studied (P < 0.05) with the exception of intermuscular fat. Transcription of genes related to FA synthesis was reduced by CLA in SM muscle and liver (SREBP1, both P < 0.1; ACC, P < 0.01 in SM; and FAS, P < 0.01 in liver), whereas CLA reduced (P < 0.05) LPL and D6D transcriptions in SM muscle and reduced (P < 0.05) SCD in liver but increased (P < 0.05) SCD in LT muscle and intermuscular fat. Saturated FA were increased in all studied tissues (P < 0.01), while monosaturated and polyunsaturated FA were reduced in a tissue-specific way by CLA. It was concluded that dietary CLA affected transcription of genes and fat metabolism in a tissue-specific manner.

  14. Dietary intake alters gene expression in colon tissue: possible underlying mechanism for the influence of diet on disease

    PubMed Central

    Pellatt, Andrew J.; Mullany, Lila E.; Wolff, Roger K.; Pellatt, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the association between diet and disease is well documented, the biologic mechanisms involved have not been entirely elucidated. In this study, we evaluate how dietary intake influences gene expression to better understand the underlying mechanisms through which diet operates. Methods We used data from 144 individuals who had comprehensive dietary intake and gene expression data from RNAseq using normal colonic mucosa. Using the DESeq2 statistical package, we identified genes that showed statistically significant differences in expression between individuals in high-intake and low-intake categories for several dietary variables of interest adjusting for age and sex. We examined total calories, total fats, vegetable protein, animal protein, carbohydrates, trans-fatty acids, mutagen index, red meat, processed meat, whole grains, vegetables, fruits, fiber, folate, dairy products, calcium, and prudent and western dietary patterns. Results Using a false discovery rate of less than 0.1, meat-related foods were statistically associated with 68 dysregulated genes, calcium with three dysregulated genes, folate with four dysregulated genes, and nonmeat-related foods with 65 dysregulated genes. With a more stringent false discovery rate of less than 0.05, there were nine meat-related dysregulated genes and 23 nonmeat-related genes. Ingenuity pathway analysis identified three major networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to meat-related dietary variables and three networks among genes identified as dysregulated with respect to nonmeat-related variables. The top networks (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis network score >30) associated with meat-related genes were (i) cancer, organismal injury, and abnormalities, tumor morphology, and (ii) cellular function and maintenance, cellular movement, cell death, and survival. Among genes related to nonmeat consumption variables, the top networks were (i) hematological system development and function

  15. Dietary restriction protects against diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocellular tumorigenesis by restoring the disturbed gene expression profile

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ting; Sun, Wenjie; Zhang, Mohan; Ge, Juan; He, Yansu; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Yifan; Yang, Wei; Shen, Han-ming; Yang, Jun; Zhu, Xinqiang; Yu, Peilin

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal and prevalent malignancies, worse still, there are very limited therapeutic measures with poor clinical outcomes. Dietary restriction (DR) has been known to inhibit spontaneous and induced tumors in several species, but the mechanisms are little known. In the current study, by using a diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC mice model, we found that DR significantly reduced the hepatic tumor number and size, delayed tumor development, suppressed proliferation and promoted apoptosis. Further transcriptome sequencing of liver tissues from the DEN and the DEN accompanied with DR (DEN+DR) mice showed that DEN induced profound changes in the gene expression profile, especially in cancer-related pathways while DR treatment reversed most of the disturbed gene expression induced by DEN. Finally, transcription factor enrichment analysis uncovered the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) probably functioned as the main regulator of gene changes, orchestrating the protective effects of DR on DEN induced HCC. Taken together, by the first comprehensive transcriptome analysis, we elucidate that DR protects aginst DEN-induced HCC by restoring the disturbed gene expression profile, which holds the promise to provide effective molecular targets for cancer therapies. PMID:28262799

  16. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at p< 0

  17. APOA2, dietary fat and body mass index: replication of a gene-diet interaction in three independent populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Nutrigenetics studies the role of genetic variation on interactions between diet and health aimed at providing more personalized dietary advice. However, replication has been very low and our aim was to study the interaction between a functional polymorphism of the APOA2 gene, food intak...

  18. Dietary selenium intake increases exon-specific DNA methylation of p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. Our previous studies suggest that dietary selenium (Se) may alter DNA methylation, and the purpose of this study was to inv...

  19. Dietary selenomethionine intake increases exon-specific DNA methylation of p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. Our previous studies suggest that dietary selenium (Se) may alter DNA methylation, and the purpose of this study was to inv...

  20. Body weight and abdominal fat gene expression profile in response to a novel hydroxycitric acid-based dietary supplement.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Rink, Cameron; Khanna, Savita; Phillips, Christina; Bagchi, Debasis; Bagchi, Manashi; Sen, Chandan K

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is a global public health problem, with about 315 million people worldwide estimated to fall into the WHO-defined obesity categories. Traditional herbal medicines may have some potential in managing obesity. Botanical dietary supplements often contain complex mixtures of phytochemicals that have additive or synergistic interactions. The dried fruit rind of Garcinia cambogia, also known as Malabar tamarind, is a unique source of (-)-hydroxycitric acid (HCA), which exhibits a distinct sour taste and has been safely used for centuries in Southeastern Asia to make meals more filling. Recently it has been demonstrated that HCA-SX or Super Citrimax, a novel derivative of HCA, is safe when taken orally and that HCA-SX is bioavailable in the human plasma as studied by GC-MS. Although HCA-SX has been observed to be conditionally effective in weight management in experimental animals as well as in humans, its mechanism of action remains to be understood. We sought to determine the effects of low-dose oral HCA-SX on the body weight and abdominal fat gene expression profile of Sprague-Dawley rats. We observed that at doses relevant for human consumption dietary HCA-SX significantly contained body weight growth. This response was associated with lowered abdominal fat leptin expression while plasma leptin levels remained unaffected. Repeated high-density microarray analysis of 9960 genes and ESTs present in the fat tissue identified a small set (approximately 1% of all genes screened) of specific genes sensitive to dietary HCA-SX. Other genes, including vital genes transcribing for mitochondrial/nuclear proteins and which are necessary for fundamental support of the tissue, were not affected by HCA-SX. Under the current experimental conditions, HCA-SX proved to be effective in restricting body weight gain in adult rats. Functional characterization of HCA-SX-sensitive genes revealed that upregulation of genes encoding serotonin receptors represent a distinct effect of

  1. Dietary cholesterol fails to stimulate the human cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene (CYP7A1) in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Agellon, Luis B; Drover, Victor A B; Cheema, Sukhinder K; Gbaguidi, G Franck; Walsh, Annemarie

    2002-06-07

    Dietary cholesterol has been shown to have a stimulatory effect on the murine cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene (Cyp7a1), but its effect on human cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase gene (CYP7A1) expression in vivo is not known. A transgenic mouse strain harboring the human CYP7A1 gene and homozygous for the disrupted murine Cyp7a1 gene was created. Cholesterol feeding increased the expression of the endogenous modified Cyp7a1 allele but failed to stimulate the human CYP7A1 transgene. In transfected hepatoma cells, 25-hydroxycholesterol increased murine Cyp7a1 gene promoter activity, whereas the human CYP7A1 gene promoter was unresponsive. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated the interaction of the liver X receptor alpha (LXRalpha): retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimer, a transcription factor complex that is activated by oxysterols, with the murine Cyp7a1 gene promoter, whereas no binding to the human CYP7A1 gene promoter was detected. The results demonstrate that the human CYP7A1 gene is not stimulated by dietary cholesterol in the intact animal, and this is attributable to the inability of the CYP7A1 gene promoter to interact with LXRalpha:RXR.

  2. The action of a dietary retinoid on gene expression and cancer induction in electron-irradiated rat skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Fredric J.; Chen, Shuaili; Xu, Guijuan; Wu, Feng; Tang, Moon-Shong

    2002-01-01

    Current models of radiation carcinogenesis generally assume that the DNA is damaged in a variety of ways by the radiation and that subsequent cell divisions contribute to the conversion of the damage to heritable mutations. Cancer may seem complex and intractable, but its complexity provides multiple opportunities for preventive interventions. Mitotic inhibitors are among the strongest cancer preventive agents, not only slowing the growth rate of preneoplasias but also increasing the fidelity of DNA repair processes. Ionizing radiation, including electrons, is a strong inducer of cancer in rat skin, and dietary retinoids have shown potent cancer preventive activity in the same system. A non-toxic dietary dose of retinyl acetate altered gene expression levels 24 hours after electron irradiation of rat skin. Of the 8740 genes on an Affymetrix rat expression array, the radiation significantly (5 fold or higher) altered 188, while the retinoid altered 231, including 16 radiation-altered genes that were reversely altered. While radiation strongly affected the expression of stress response, immune/inflammation and nucleic acid metabolism genes, the retinoid most strongly affected proliferation-related genes, including some significant reversals, such as, keratin 14, retinol binding protein, and calcium binding proteins. These results point to reversal of proliferation-relevant genes as a likely basis for the anti-radiogenic effects of dietary retinyl acetate.

  3. The action of a dietary retinoid on gene expression and cancer induction in electron-irradiated rat skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Fredric J.; Chen, Shuaili; Xu, Guijuan; Wu, Feng; Tang, Moon-Shong

    2002-01-01

    Current models of radiation carcinogenesis generally assume that the DNA is damaged in a variety of ways by the radiation and that subsequent cell divisions contribute to the conversion of the damage to heritable mutations. Cancer may seem complex and intractable, but its complexity provides multiple opportunities for preventive interventions. Mitotic inhibitors are among the strongest cancer preventive agents, not only slowing the growth rate of preneoplasias but also increasing the fidelity of DNA repair processes. Ionizing radiation, including electrons, is a strong inducer of cancer in rat skin, and dietary retinoids have shown potent cancer preventive activity in the same system. A non-toxic dietary dose of retinyl acetate altered gene expression levels 24 hours after electron irradiation of rat skin. Of the 8740 genes on an Affymetrix rat expression array, the radiation significantly (5 fold or higher) altered 188, while the retinoid altered 231, including 16 radiation-altered genes that were reversely altered. While radiation strongly affected the expression of stress response, immune/inflammation and nucleic acid metabolism genes, the retinoid most strongly affected proliferation-related genes, including some significant reversals, such as, keratin 14, retinol binding protein, and calcium binding proteins. These results point to reversal of proliferation-relevant genes as a likely basis for the anti-radiogenic effects of dietary retinyl acetate.

  4. Dietary protein intake affects expression of genes for lipid metabolism in porcine skeletal muscle in a genotype-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; He, Lingyun; Tan, Bie; Deng, Jinping; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Yinghui; Geng, Meimei; Yin, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-04-14

    Skeletal muscle is a major site for the oxidation of fatty acids (FA) in mammals, including humans. Using a swine model, we tested the hypothesis that dietary protein intake regulates the expression of key genes for lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. A total of ninety-six barrows (forty-eight pure-bred Bama mini-pigs (fatty genotype) and forty-eight Landrace pigs (lean genotype)) were fed from 5 weeks of age to market weight. Pigs of fatty or lean genotype were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments (low- or adequate-protein diet), with twenty-four individually fed pigs per treatment. Our data showed that dietary protein levels affected the expression of genes involved in the anabolism and catabolism of lipids in the longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles in a genotype-dependent manner. Specifically, Bama mini-pigs had more intramuscular fat, SFA and MUFA, as well as elevated mRNA expression levels of lipogenic genes, compared with Landrace pigs. In contrast, Bama mini-pigs had lower mRNA expression levels of lipolytic genes than Landrace pigs fed an adequate-protein diet in the growing phase. These data are consistent with higher white-fat deposition in Bama mini-pigs than in Landrace pigs. In conclusion, adequate provision of dietary protein (amino acids) plays an important role in regulating the expression of key lipogenic genes, and the growth of white adipose tissue, in a genotype- and tissue-specific manner. These findings have important implications for developing novel dietary strategies in pig production.

  5. A common polymorphism near the interleukin-6 gene modifies the association between dietary fat intake and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cuda, Cristina; Garcia-Bailo, Bibiana; Karmali, Mohamed; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Badawi, Alaa

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests a role for inflammation in the development of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, have been associated with insulin resistance, and dietary lipids can increase cytokine production. The objective of this study was to determine whether a single nucleotide polymorphism near the IL6 gene (rs7801406) modifies the relationship between dietary fat and markers of insulin sensitivity. Methods Subjects were healthy men and women aged 20–29 years from the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Dietary intake was estimated using a one-month semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were taken for genotyping and biomarker measurement. Results The single nucleotide polymorphism was not associated with any of the measures of insulin sensitivity. However, it modified the relationship between total dietary fat and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.053 for interaction). Total fat intake was positively related to HOMA-IR in individuals homozygous for the G allele (β = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = 0.03), but not among heterozygotes. There was an inverse relationship between total fat intake and HOMA-IR in individuals who were homozygous for the A allele (β = −0.012 ± 0.006, P = 0.047). Conclusion These findings suggest that dietary fat influences insulin sensitivity differently depending on genotype. PMID:22334790

  6. A common polymorphism near the interleukin-6 gene modifies the association between dietary fat intake and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cuda, Cristina; Garcia-Bailo, Bibiana; Karmali, Mohamed; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Badawi, Alaa

    2012-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests a role for inflammation in the development of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, have been associated with insulin resistance, and dietary lipids can increase cytokine production. The objective of this study was to determine whether a single nucleotide polymorphism near the IL6 gene (rs7801406) modifies the relationship between dietary fat and markers of insulin sensitivity. Subjects were healthy men and women aged 20-29 years from the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Dietary intake was estimated using a one-month semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were taken for genotyping and biomarker measurement. The single nucleotide polymorphism was not associated with any of the measures of insulin sensitivity. However, it modified the relationship between total dietary fat and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.053 for interaction). Total fat intake was positively related to HOMA-IR in individuals homozygous for the G allele (β = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = 0.03), but not among heterozygotes. There was an inverse relationship between total fat intake and HOMA-IR in individuals who were homozygous for the A allele (β = -0.012 ± 0.006, P = 0.047). These findings suggest that dietary fat influences insulin sensitivity differently depending on genotype.

  7. The potential of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids to modulate eicosanoid synthesis and reproduction in Daphnia magna: a gene expression approach.

    PubMed

    Schlotz, Nina; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2012-08-01

    Nutritional ecology of the aquatic model genus Daphnia has received much attention in past years in particular with regard to dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) which are crucial for growth and reproduction. Besides their significant role as membrane components, C20 PUFAs serve as precursors for eicosanoids, hormone-like mediators of reproduction, immunity and ion transport physiology. In the present study we investigate transcriptomic changes in Daphnia magna in response to different algal food organisms substantially differing in their PUFA composition using quantitative real-time PCR and relate them to concomitantly documented life history data. The selection of target genes includes representatives that have previously been shown to be responsive to the eicosanoid biosynthesis inhibitor ibuprofen. The beneficial effect of C20 PUFA-rich food on reproduction and population growth rates was accompanied by an increased vitellogenin (DmagVtg1) gene expression in D. magna. Additionally, genes involved in eicosanoid signaling were particularly influenced by dietary C20 PUFA availability. For example, the cyclooxygenase gene (Cox), coding for a central enzyme in the eicosanoid pathway, was highly responsive to the food treatments. Our results suggest that dietary PUFAs are fundamental in D. magna physiology as substrate for eicosanoid synthesis and that these eicosanoids are important for D. magna reproduction.

  8. Dietary Zinc Oxide Modulates Antioxidant Capacity, Small Intestine Development, and Jejunal Gene Expression in Weaned Piglets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui; Lv, Hang; Chen, Zhuang; Wang, Li; Wu, Xiuju; Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Weina; Liang, Rui; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-02-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary zinc oxide (ZnO) on the antioxidant capacity, small intestine development, and jejunal gene expression in weaned piglets. Ninety-six 21-day-old piglets were randomly assigned to three dietary treatments. Each treatment had eight replicates with four piglets per replicate. The piglets were fed either control diet (control) or control diet supplemented with in-feed antibiotics (300 mg/kg chlortetracycline and 60 mg/kg colistin sulfate) or pharmacological doses of ZnO (3000 mg/kg). The experiment lasted 4 weeks. Blood samples were collected at days 14 and 28, while intestinal samples were harvested at day 28 of the experiment. Dietary high doses of ZnO supplementation significantly increased the body weight (BW) at day 14 and average daily gain (ADG) of days 1 to 14 in weaned piglets, when compared to control group (P < 0.05). The incidence of diarrhea of piglets fed ZnO-supplemented diets, at either days 1 to 14, days 14 to 28, or the overall experimental period, was significantly decreased in comparison with those in other groups (P < 0.05). Supplementation with ZnO increased the villus height of the duodenum and ileum in weaned piglets and decreased the crypt depth of the duodenum, when compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). Dietary ZnO supplementation decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration at either day 14 or day 28, but increased total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) at day 14, when compared to that in the control (P < 0.05). ZnO supplementation upregulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin in the jejunum mucosa of weaned piglets, compared to those in the control (P < 0.05). The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) mRNA expression in the jejunum mucosa was downregulated in the ZnO-supplemented group, compared with the control (P < 0.05). Both in-feed antibiotics and ZnO supplementation decreased the m

  9. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Rise, Matthew L.; Spitsbergen, Jan M.; Hori, Tiago S.; Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven; McGraw, Joseph E.; Goetz, Giles; Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ng TCDD / g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days (d) after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 d. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ng TCDD / g fish) in whole fish at 28 d. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 d and 42 d revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 d. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down-regulated gene among each group based on microarray data, and their QPCR validations are consistent with microarray data for the 10 and 100 ppb TCDD treatment groups after 28-d exposure (p< 0.05). In addition, in the 100 ppb group at 28d, expression of complement component C3-1 and trypsin-1 precursor have a more than 10-fold induction from the microarray experiments

  10. Gene expression and pathologic alterations in juvenile rainbow trout due to chronic dietary TCDD exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Rise, Matthew L; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Hori, Tiago S; Mieritz, Mark; Geis, Steven; McGraw, Joseph E; Goetz, Giles; Larson, Jeremy; Hutz, Reinhold J; Carvan, Michael J

    2013-09-15

    The goal of this project was to use functional genomic methods to identify molecular biomarkers as indicators of the impact of TCDD exposure in rainbow trout. Specifically, we investigated the effects of chronic dietary TCDD exposure on whole juvenile rainbow trout global gene expression associated with histopathological analysis. Juvenile rainbow trout were fed Biodiet starter with TCDD added at 0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 ppb (ngTCDD/g food), and fish were sampled from each group at 7, 14, 28 and 42 days after initiation of feeding. 100 ppb TCDD caused 100% mortality at 39 days. Fish fed with 100 ppb TCDD food had TCDD accumulation of 47.37 ppb (ngTCDD/g fish) in whole fish at 28 days. Histological analysis from TCDD-treated trout sampled from 28 and 42 days revealed that obvious lesions were found in skin, oropharynx, liver, gas bladder, intestine, pancreas, nose and kidney. In addition, TCDD caused anemia in peripheral blood, decreases in abdominal fat, increases of remodeling of fin rays, edema in pericardium and retrobulbar hemorrhage in the 100 ppb TCDD-treated rainbow trout compared to the control group at 28 days. Dose- and time-dependent global gene expression analyses were performed using the cGRASP 16,000 (16K) cDNA microarray. TCDD-responsive whole body transcripts identified in the microarray experiments have putative functions involved in various biological processes including growth, cell proliferation, metabolic process, and immune system processes. Nine microarray-identified genes were selected for QPCR validation. CYP1A3 and CYP1A1 were common up-regulated genes and HBB1 was a common down-regulated gene among each group based on microarray data, and their QPCR validations are consistent with microarray data for the 10 and 100 ppb TCDD treatment groups after 28 days exposure (p<0.05). In addition, in the 100 ppb group at 28 days, expression of complement component C3-1 and trypsin-1 precursor have a more than 10-fold induction from the microarray

  11. A Molecular-Level Landscape of Diet-Gut Microbiome Interactions: Toward Dietary Interventions Targeting Bacterial Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yueqiong; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT As diet is considered the major regulator of the gut ecosystem, the overall objective of this work was to demonstrate that a detailed knowledge of the phytochemical composition of food could add to our understanding of observed changes in functionality and activity of the gut microbiota. We used metatranscriptomic data from a human dietary intervention study to develop a network that consists of >400 compounds present in the administered plant-based diet linked to 609 microbial targets in the gut. Approximately 20% of the targeted bacterial proteins showed significant changes in their gene expression levels, while functional and topology analyses revealed that proteins in metabolic networks with high centrality are the most “vulnerable” targets. This global view and the mechanistic understanding of the associations between microbial gene expression and dietary molecules could be regarded as a promising methodological approach for targeting specific bacterial proteins that impact human health. PMID:26507230

  12. Modulation of Cholesterol-Related Gene Expression by Dietary Fiber Fractions from Edible Mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Caz, Víctor; Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Largo, Carlota; Tabernero, María; Santamaría, Mónica; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Marín, Francisco R; Reglero, Guillermo; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2015-08-26

    Mushrooms are a source of dietary fiber (DF) with a cholesterol-lowering effect. However, their underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The effect of DF-enriched fractions from three mushrooms species on cholesterol-related expression was studied in vitro. The Pleurotus ostreatus DF fraction (PDF) was used in mice models to assess its potential palliative or preventive effect against hypercholesterolemia. PDF induced a transcriptional response in Caco-2 cells, suggesting a possible cholesterol-lowering effect. In the palliative setting, PDF reduced hepatic triglyceride likely because Dgat1 was downregulated. However, cholesterol-related biochemical data showed no changes and no relation with the observed transcriptional modulation. In the preventive setting, PDF modulated cholesterol-related genes expression in a manner similar to that of simvastatin and ezetimibe in the liver, although no changes in plasma and liver biochemical data were induced. Therefore, PDF may be useful reducing hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Because it induced a molecular response similar to hypocholesterolemic drugs in liver, further dose-dependent studies should be carried out.

  13. Dietary folate and related micronutrients, folate-metabolising genes, and ovarian cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Dixon, S C; Ibiebele, T I; Protani, M M; Beesley, J; deFazio, A; Crandon, A J; Gard, G B; Rome, R M; Webb, P M; Nagle, C M

    2014-03-01

    Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and methylation and is implicated in tumour progression. Few studies have examined its role in ovarian cancer survival. Our objective was to determine relationships between intake of folate, related one-carbon nutrients, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in folate-metabolising genes and survival following ovarian cancer diagnosis. This analysis included 1270 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed in 2002-2006. Pre-diagnostic and some post-diagnostic lifestyle, dietary, and sociodemographic information was collected via self-administered questionnaires. DNA samples were genotyped for SNPs in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), methionine synthase (MTR) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) genes. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox regression. Multivariate analyses did not identify associations between higher pre-diagnostic intake of folate, folic acid, vitamins B2, B6, and B12, methionine, betaine or choline and survival overall. In stratified analyses, higher folic acid and folate intake was associated with significantly worse survival among women with mucinous tumours (HRs per 100 μg 1.30 and 1.43, respectively) and smokers (HRs per 100 μg 1.23 and 1.16 respectively). There was also a suggestion that higher supplemental folic acid use post-diagnosis was associated with worse survival (HR per 100 μg 1.03, 95%CI 1.00-1.05). MTHFR SNP rs2066470 was significantly associated with survival (per allele HR 0.81, 95%CI 0.67-0.98). Our data provide little evidence that folate intake affects ovarian cancer survival. However, combined effects with smoking, and findings within the mucinous subtype and for post-diagnosis folic acid, warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Altered gene expression of epigenetic modifying enzymes in response to dietary supplementation with linseed oil.

    PubMed

    Li, Ran; Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M

    2017-05-01

    Recently we showed that 5% linseed oil (LSO) and 5% safflower oil (SFO) supplementation of cow's diets reduced milk fat yield by 30·38 and 32·42% respectively, accompanied by differential expression of genes and regulation by microRNAs (miRNA). This research communication addresses the hypothesis that epigenetic regulation could be involved in the observed milk fat reduction. Thus, this study investigated the gene expression pattern of major epigenetic modifying enzymes in response to dietary supplementation with LSO or SFO. Twenty-six Canadian Holstein cows in mid lactation were randomly assigned to two groups (13/group) and fed a control diet for 28 d (day -28 to -1) (control period- CP) followed by a treatment period (TP) (control diet supplemented with 5% LSO (LSO treatment) or 5% SFO (SFO treatment) of 28 d (day +1 to +28). After treatment, cows in the two groups were returned to the control diet for another 28 d (day +29 to +56) (post treatment period-PTP). Milk samples were collected on day -1 (CP), +7, +28 (TP) and +56 (PTP) for RNA isolation and measurement of the expression of thirteen epigenetic modifying genes including two DNA methytrasferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A), four histone acetylases (HAT1, KAT2A, KAT5 and CREBBP), five histone deacetylases (HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, SIRT1 and SIRT2) and two histone methytransferases (EHMT2 and PRMT1) by qPCR. Linseed oil supplementation significantly repressed the expression of EHMT2, HDAC2 and HDAC3 on day +7 (P < 0·05) and KAT2A and SIRT2 on day +28 (P < 0·05) as compared with the control period (day -1) while SFO had no effect. When LSO was withdrawn, the expression of some of the genes increased slightly but did not reach control (day -1) levels at the end of the PTP. Our study demonstrated a significant role of LSO in the epigenetic regulation of fatty acid synthesis as compared to SFO. The effect of LSO may be related to its higher degree of unsaturation and might represent a different regulatory mechanism which

  15. Prepartal dietary energy level affects peripartal bovine blood neutrophil metabolic, antioxidant, and inflammatory gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Bu, D P; Vailati Riboni, M; Khan, M J; Graugnard, D E; Luo, J; Cardoso, F C; Loor, J J

    2015-08-01

    During the dry period, cows can easily overconsume higher-grain diets, a scenario that could impair immune function during the peripartal period. Objectives were to investigate the effects of energy overfeeding on expression profile of genes associated with inflammation, lipid metabolism, and neutrophil function, in 12 multiparous Holstein cows (n=6/dietary group) fed control [CON, 1.34 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM)] or higher-energy (HE, 1.62 Mcal/kg of DM) diets during the last 45 d of pregnancy. Blood was collected to evaluate 43 genes in polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) isolated at -14, 7, and 14 d relative to parturition. We detected greater expression of inflammatory-related cytokines (IL1B, STAT3, NFKB1) and eicosanoid synthesis (ALOX5AP and PLA2G4A) in HE cows than in CON cows. Around parturition, all cows had a close balance in mRNA expression of the pro-inflammatory IL1B and the anti-inflammatory IL10, with greater expression of both in cows fed HE than CON. The expression of CCL2, LEPR, TLR4, IL6, and LTC4S was undetectable. Cows in the HE group had greater expression of genes involved in PMNL adhesion, motility, migration, and phagocytosis, which was similar to expression of genes related to the pro-inflammatory cytokine. This response suggests that HE cows experienced a chronic state of inflammation. The greater expression of G6PD in HE cows could have been associated with the greater plasma insulin, which would have diverted glucose to other tissues. Cows fed the HE diet also had greater expression of transcription factors involved in metabolism of long-chain fatty acids (PPARD, RXRA), suggesting that immune cells might be predisposed to use endogenous ligands such as nonesterified fatty acids available in the circulation when glucose is in high demand for milk synthesis. The lower overall expression of SLC2A1 postpartum than prepartum supports this suggestion. Targeting interleukin-1β signaling might be of value in terms of controlling

  16. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Gang; Xu, Zhenjiang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. - Highlights: • Dietary β-glucan supplementation increases the abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae in the intestine. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation changes the topological roles of OTUs in the ecological network. • Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on the immune response of intestine of sea cucumber.

  17. Combined meta-genomics analyses unravel candidate genes for the grain dietary fiber content in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Quraishi, Umar Masood; Murat, Florent; Abrouk, Mickael; Pont, Caroline; Confolent, Carole; Oury, François Xavier; Ward, Jane; Boros, Danuta; Gebruers, Kurt; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M; Bedo, Zoltan; Saulnier, Luc; Guillon, Fabienne; Balzergue, Sandrine; Shewry, Peter R; Feuillet, Catherine; Charmet, Gilles; Salse, Jerome

    2011-03-01

    Grain dietary fiber content in wheat not only affects its end use and technological properties including milling, baking and animal feed but is also of great importance for health benefits. In this study, integration of association genetics (seven detected loci on chromosomes 1B, 3A, 3D, 5B, 6B, 7A, 7B) and meta-QTL (three consensus QTL on chromosomes 1B, 3D and 6B) analyses allowed the identification of seven chromosomal regions underlying grain dietary fiber content in bread wheat. Based either on a diversity panel or on bi-parental populations, we clearly demonstrate that this trait is mainly driven by a major locus located on chromosome 1B associated with a log of p value >13 and a LOD score >8, respectively. In parallel, we identified 73 genes differentially expressed during the grain development and between genotypes with contrasting grain fiber contents. Integration of quantitative genetics and transcriptomic data allowed us to propose a short list of candidate genes that are conserved in the rice, sorghum and Brachypodium chromosome regions orthologous to the seven wheat grain fiber content QTL and that can be considered as major candidate genes for future improvement of the grain dietary fiber content in bread wheat breeding programs.

  18. Effects of dietary selenium deficiency or excess on gene expression of selenoprotein N in chicken muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiu-li; Zhang, Zi-wei; Shan, An-shan; Xu, Shi-wen

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies have determined the effects of dietary selenium (Se) supplementation on selenoprotein N (SelN, SEPN1), selenophosphate synthetase-1 (SPS1), and selenocysteine-synthase (SecS) mRNA abundance in chicken skeletal and cardiac muscles. To investigate collective responses of these genes to dietary Se concentrations ranging from deficiency to moderately high level in muscle tissues of chicken, 1-day-old chickens were exposed to a diet of deficient Se and supplemented with Se (0.15 mg Se/kg and 1.50 mg Se/kg) as sodium selenite in the feed for 35 days. Muscle tissues (flight, breast, leg, and cardiac muscles) were collected and examined for Se content and mRNA levels of SelN on days 1, 15, 25, and 35 days, respectively. Moreover, SPS1 and SecS mRNA levels were analyzed. The results showed that the expression of SelN gene in cardiac muscle responded to dietary Se concentrations. SelN gene was downregulated in the Se deficiency group (L group), and upregulated in the Se excess group (H group) compared with the moderate Se group (M group) (P < 0.05) in cardiac muscle. Se deficiency mainly unregulated SelN mRNA level in skeletal muscles compared with M group. Excess dietary Se mainly resulted in the upregulation of SelN mRNA level in skeletal muscles compared with the M group. SecS mRNA levels responded to dietary Se concentrations showed a similar change compared with SelN in cardiac muscle. SPS1 mRNA levels responded to dietary Se concentrations showed a downregulation in L group and upregulation in H group. However, SelN mRNA levels displayed a different expression pattern in different skeletal and cardiac muscles. Moreover, Se also regulated the levels of SPS1 and SecS mRNAs. In summary, Se regulated the expression of SelN gene and affected the mRNA levels of SecS and SPS1. The level of Se in the feed may regulate SelN biosynthesis by affecting the levels of SPS1 and SecS mRNA.

  19. Interactions between beta-2 adrenoceptor gene variation, cardiovascular control and dietary sodium in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Eisenach, John H; Schroeder, Darrell R; Pavey, Emily S; Penheiter, Alan R; Knutson, Jean N; Turner, Stephen T; Joyner, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Dietary sodium affects function of the beta-2 adrenoceptor (ADRB2). We tested the hypothesis that haplotype variation in the ADRB2 gene would influence the cardiovascular and regional vasodilator responses to sympathoexcitatory manoeuvres following low, normal and high sodium diets, and ADRB2-mediated forearm vasodilation in the high sodium condition. Seventy-one healthy young adults were grouped by double homozygous haplotypes: Arg16+Gln27 (n = 31), the rare Gly16+Gln27 (n = 10) and Gly16+Glu27 (n = 30). Using a randomized cross-over design, subjects were studied following 5 days of controlled low, normal and high sodium with 1 month or longer between diets (and low hormone phase of the menstrual cycle). All three visits utilized ECG and finger plethysmography for haemodynamic measures, and the high sodium visit included a brachial arterial catheter for forearm vasodilator responses to isoprenaline with plethysmography. Lymphocytes were sampled for ex vivo analysis of ADRB2 density and binding conformation. We found a main effect of haplotype on ADRB2 density (P = 0.03) with the Gly16+Glu27 haplotype having the greatest density (low, normal, high sodium: 12.9 ± 0.9, 13.5 ± 0.9 and 13.6 ± 0.8 fmol mg(-1) protein, respectively) and Arg16+Gln27 having the least (9.3 ± 0.6, 10.1 ± 0.5 and 10.3 ± 0.6  fmol mg(-1) protein, respectively), but there were no sodium or haplotype effects on receptor binding conformation. In the mental stress trial, there was a main effect of haplotype on cardiac output (P = 0.04), as Arg16+Gln27 had the lowest responses. Handgrip and forearm vasodilation yielded no haplotype differences, and no correlations were present for ADRB2 density and haemodynamics. Our findings support cell-based evidence that ADRB2 haplotype influences ADRB2 protein expression independent of dietary sodium, yet the haemodynamic consequences appear modest in healthy humans.

  20. Interactions between beta-2 adrenoceptor gene variation, cardiovascular control and dietary sodium in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Eisenach, John H; Schroeder, Darrell R; Pavey, Emily S; Penheiter, Alan R; Knutson, Jean N; Turner, Stephen T; Joyner, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Dietary sodium affects function of the beta-2 adrenoceptor (ADRB2). We tested the hypothesis that haplotype variation in the ADRB2 gene would influence the cardiovascular and regional vasodilator responses to sympathoexcitatory manoeuvres following low, normal and high sodium diets, and ADRB2-mediated forearm vasodilation in the high sodium condition. Seventy-one healthy young adults were grouped by double homozygous haplotypes: Arg16+Gln27 (n = 31), the rare Gly16+Gln27 (n = 10) and Gly16+Glu27 (n = 30). Using a randomized cross-over design, subjects were studied following 5 days of controlled low, normal and high sodium with 1 month or longer between diets (and low hormone phase of the menstrual cycle). All three visits utilized ECG and finger plethysmography for haemodynamic measures, and the high sodium visit included a brachial arterial catheter for forearm vasodilator responses to isoprenaline with plethysmography. Lymphocytes were sampled for ex vivo analysis of ADRB2 density and binding conformation. We found a main effect of haplotype on ADRB2 density (P = 0.03) with the Gly16+Glu27 haplotype having the greatest density (low, normal, high sodium: 12.9 ± 0.9, 13.5 ± 0.9 and 13.6 ± 0.8 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively) and Arg16+Gln27 having the least (9.3 ± 0.6, 10.1 ± 0.5 and 10.3 ± 0.6  fmol mg−1 protein, respectively), but there were no sodium or haplotype effects on receptor binding conformation. In the mental stress trial, there was a main effect of haplotype on cardiac output (P = 0.04), as Arg16+Gln27 had the lowest responses. Handgrip and forearm vasodilation yielded no haplotype differences, and no correlations were present for ADRB2 density and haemodynamics. Our findings support cell-based evidence that ADRB2 haplotype influences ADRB2 protein expression independent of dietary sodium, yet the haemodynamic consequences appear modest in healthy humans. PMID:25260632

  1. Evidence for negative selection of gene variants that increase dependence on dietary choline in a Gambian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Matt J.; Corbin, Karen D.; Hellenthal, Garrett; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Dominguez-Salas, Paula; Moore, Sophie E.; Owen, Jennifer; Prentice, Andrew M.; Hennig, Branwen J.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2015-01-01

    Choline is an essential nutrient, and the amount needed in the diet is modulated by several factors. Given geographical differences in dietary choline intake and disparate frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in choline metabolism genes between ethnic groups, we tested the hypothesis that 3 SNPs that increase dependence on dietary choline would be under negative selection pressure in settings where choline intake is low: choline dehydrogenase (CHDH) rs12676, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 1 (MTHFD1) rs2236225, and phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) rs12325817. Evidence of negative selection was assessed in 2 populations: one in The Gambia, West Africa, where there is historic evidence of a choline-poor diet, and the other in the United States, with a comparatively choline-rich diet. We used 2 independent methods, and confirmation of our hypothesis was sought via a comparison with SNP data from the Maasai, an East African population with a genetic background similar to that of Gambians but with a traditional diet that is higher in choline. Our results show that frequencies of SNPs known to increase dependence on dietary choline are significantly reduced in the low-choline setting of The Gambia. Our findings suggest that adequate intake levels of choline may have to be reevaluated in different ethnic groups and highlight a possible approach for identifying novel functional SNPs under the influence of dietary selective pressure.—Silver, M. J., Corbin, K. D., Hellenthal, G., da Costa, K.-A., Dominguez-Salas, P., Moore, S. E., Owen, J., Prentice, A. M., Hennig, B. J., Zeisel, S. H. Evidence for negative selection of gene variants that increase dependence on dietary choline in a Gambian cohort. PMID:25921832

  2. Dietary fat proportionately enhances oxidative stress and glucose intolerance followed by impaired expression of the genes associated with mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Das, Nabanita; Mandala, Ashok; Bhattacharjee, Sudarshan; Mukherjee, Debasri; Bandyopadhyay, Debasish; Roy, Sib Sankar

    2017-04-19

    Consumption of food that surpasses the metabolic necessity of the body leads to an epidemic condition termed obesity, which causes several metabolic disorders including oxidative damage. Dietary intervention can enlighten the mechanisms and therapeutics associated with these metabolic disorders. The reported studies related to diet include fat of different kinds and from different sources, however they lack dose response aspects. Our study highlighted the importance of dietary fat modification in modulating oxidative stress-induced glucose intolerance. Animals were maintained on a diet with a varied content of fat (30%/45%/60%) for 12 weeks and the 'withdrawal' group was fed a standard diet for another 10 weeks. The diet containing 60 energy% of fat displayed glucose intolerance, high ALT, low GSH levels and tissue-specific modulation of the prooxidant/antioxidant enzymatic activities in the liver/muscles. Prolonged sustenance of the 60 energy% fat containing diet-fed rats on standard diet led to the alteration of antioxidant activities, reversing the oxidative damage. Notably, the 'withdrawal' group displayed an organ-specific response towards dietary modification where the recovery of the antioxidant activities was observed to be much more pronounced in the liver as compared to the muscle. Further, we identified the differential expression of liver/muscle-specific genes associated with oxidative stress and mitochondrial biogenesis in response to the differing fat content. These genes can serve as markers for HFD-induced metabolic complications involving the liver/muscle. Altogether, our study has highlighted the novel area where obesity-induced oxidative stress linked alterations expressed diet and organ specific responses that are recovered by altering the dietary regimen. Future investigation of dietary modulation will open nascent avenues for developing therapeutic modalities addressing obesity-related metabolic complications.

  3. Hepatic transcriptome analysis and identification of differentially expressed genes response to dietary oxidized fish oil in loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Li, Yang; Liang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Longfei; Yan, Jie; Wei, Yanxing; Gao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    RNA sequencing and short-read assembly were utilized to produce a transcriptome of livers from loaches (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) fed with three different diets respectively containing fresh fish oil (FO group), medium oxidized fish oil (MO group) and high oxidized fish oil (HO group). A total of 60,663 unigenes were obtained in this study, with mean length 848.74 bp. 50,814, 49,584 and 49,814 unigenes were respectively obtained from FO, MO and HO groups. There were 2,343 differentially expressed genes between FO and MO, with 855 down- and 1,488 up-regulated genes in the MO group. 2,813 genes were differentially expressed between FO and HO, including 1,256 down- and 1,552 up-regulated genes in the HO group. 2,075 differentially expressed genes were found in the comparison of MO and HO, including 1,074 up- and 1,001 down-regulated genes in the MO group. Some differentially expressed genes, such as fatty acid transport protein (fatp), fatty acid binding protein (fabp), apolipoprotein (apo), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (ppar-γ), acetyl-CoA synthetase (acs) and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (alox5), were involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting these genes in the loach were responsive to dietary oxidized fish oil. Results of transcriptome profilings here were validated using quantitative real time PCR in fourteen randomly selected unigenes. The present study provides insights into hepatic transcriptome profile of the loach, which is a valuable resource for studies of loach genomics. More importantly, this study identifies some important genes responsible for dietary oxidized fish oil, which will benefit researches of lipid metabolism in fish.

  4. Hepatic transcriptome analysis and identification of differentially expressed genes response to dietary oxidized fish oil in loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Li, Yang; Liang, Xiao; Cao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Longfei; Yan, Jie; Wei, Yanxing; Gao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    RNA sequencing and short-read assembly were utilized to produce a transcriptome of livers from loaches (Misgurnus anguillicaudatus) fed with three different diets respectively containing fresh fish oil (FO group), medium oxidized fish oil (MO group) and high oxidized fish oil (HO group). A total of 60,663 unigenes were obtained in this study, with mean length 848.74 bp. 50,814, 49,584 and 49,814 unigenes were respectively obtained from FO, MO and HO groups. There were 2,343 differentially expressed genes between FO and MO, with 855 down- and 1,488 up-regulated genes in the MO group. 2,813 genes were differentially expressed between FO and HO, including 1,256 down- and 1,552 up-regulated genes in the HO group. 2,075 differentially expressed genes were found in the comparison of MO and HO, including 1,074 up- and 1,001 down-regulated genes in the MO group. Some differentially expressed genes, such as fatty acid transport protein (fatp), fatty acid binding protein (fabp), apolipoprotein (apo), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (ppar-γ), acetyl-CoA synthetase (acs) and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (alox5), were involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting these genes in the loach were responsive to dietary oxidized fish oil. Results of transcriptome profilings here were validated using quantitative real time PCR in fourteen randomly selected unigenes. The present study provides insights into hepatic transcriptome profile of the loach, which is a valuable resource for studies of loach genomics. More importantly, this study identifies some important genes responsible for dietary oxidized fish oil, which will benefit researches of lipid metabolism in fish. PMID:28212448

  5. Effect of dietary lysine on performance and expression of electron transport chain genes in the pectoralis major muscle of broilers.

    PubMed

    Brito, C O; Dutra, J L L; Dias, T N; Barbosa, L T; Nascimento, C S; Pinto, A P G; Albino, L F T; Fernandes, R P M; Macário, M S; Melo, J S

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary lysine on performance, protein deposition and respiratory chain gene expression in male broilers. A total of 252 Cobb 500 broilers were distributed, in a completely randomized design, into four treatments with seven replicates of nine birds per experimental unit. Experimental treatments consisted of diets based on corn and soybean meal, with four levels of digestible lysine: 1.016%, 1.099%, 1.182% and 1.265%. The increase in the level of digestible lysine in the diet provided higher weight gains, feed efficiency and body protein deposition. Birds fed the lowest level of dietary lysine (1.016%) showed a lower expression of genes such as NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (ND1), cytochrome b (CYTB) and cytochrome c oxidase subunits I (COX I), II (COX II) and III (COX III), displaying the worst performance and body protein deposition. This demonstrates the relationship existing between the expression of the evaluated genes and the performance responses. In conclusion, results indicate that broilers fed diets with higher levels of digestible lysine have increased messenger RNA expression of some genes coded in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ND1, CYTB, COX I, COX II and COX III). It may be stated that diets with proper levels of digestible lysine, within the 'ideal protein' concept, promote the expression of genes, which increases the mitochondrial energy, thereby fostering body protein deposition and the performance of broilers in the starter phase.

  6. Dietary exposure of 17-alpha ethinylestradiol modulates physiological endpoints and gene signaling pathways in female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Colli-Dula, Reyna-Cristina; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Kroll, Kevin J; Prucha, Melinda S; Kozuch, Marianne; Barber, David S; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-11-01

    17Alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), used for birth control in humans, is a potent estrogen that is found in wastewater at low concentrations (ng/l). EE2 has the ability to interfere with the endocrine system of fish, affecting reproduction which can result in population level effects. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary exposure to EE2 would alter gene expression patterns and key pathways in the liver and ovary and whether these could be associated with reproductive endpoints in female largemouth bass during egg development. Female LMB received 70ng EE2/g feed (administered at 1% of body weight) for 60 days. EE2 dietary exposure significantly reduced plasma vitellogenin concentrations by 70%. Hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices were also decreased with EE2 feeding by 38.5% and 40%, respectively. Transcriptomic profiling revealed that there were more changes in steady state mRNA levels in the liver compared to the ovary. Genes associated with reproduction were differentially expressed, such as vitellogenin in the liver and aromatase in the gonad. In addition, a set of genes related with oxidative stress (e.g. glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase) were identified as altered in the liver and genes associated with the immune system (e.g. complement component 1, and macrophage-inducible C-type lectin) were altered in the gonad. In a follow-up study with 0.2ng EE2/g feed for 60 days, similar phenotypic and gene expression changes were observed that support these findings with the higher concentrations. This study provides new insights into how dietary exposure to EE2 interferes with endocrine signaling pathways in female LMB during a critical period of reproductive oogenesis.

  7. Dietary exposure of 17-alpha ethinylestradiol modulates physiological endpoints and gene signaling pathways in female largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    PubMed Central

    Colli-Dula, Reyna-Cristina; Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Kozuch, Marianne; Barber, David S.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2014-01-01

    17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2), used for birth control in humans, is a potent estrogen that is found in wastewater at low concentrations (ng/L). EE2 has the ability to interfere with the endocrine system of fish, affecting reproduction which can result in population level effects. The objective of this study was to determine if dietary exposure to EE2 would alter gene expression patterns and key pathways in the liver and ovary and whether these could be associated with reproductive endpoints in female largemouth bass during egg development. Female LMB received 70 ng EE2/g feed (feed administered at 1% of body weight) for 60 days. EE2 dietary exposure significantly reduced plasma vitellogenin concentrations by 70%. Hepatosomatic and gonadosomatic indices were also decreased with EE2 feeding by 38.5% and 40%, respectively. Transcriptomic profiling revealed that there were more changes in steady state mRNA levels in the liver compared to the ovary. Genes associated with reproduction were differentially expressed such as vitellogenin in the liver and aromatase in the gonad. In addition, a set of genes related with oxidative stress (e.g. glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase) were identified as altered in the liver and genes associated with the immune system (e.g. complement component 1, and macrophage-inducible C-type lectin) were altered in the gonad. In a follow-up study with 0.2 ng EE2/g feed for 60 days, similar phenotypic and gene expression changes were observed that support these findings with the higher concentrations. This study provides new insights into how dietary exposure to EE2 interferes with endocrine signaling pathways in female LMB during a critical period of reproductive oogenesis. PMID:25203422

  8. Dietary emulsifiers directly alter human microbiota composition and gene expression ex vivo potentiating intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Benoit; Van de Wiele, Tom; De Bodt, Jana; Marzorati, Massimo; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2017-08-01

    The intestinal microbiota plays a central role in the development of many chronic inflammatory diseases including IBD and metabolic syndrome. Administration of substances that alter microbiota composition, including the synthetic dietary emulsifiers polysorbate 80 (P80) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), can promote such inflammatory disorders. However, that inflammation itself impacts microbiota composition has obfuscated defining the extent to which these compounds or other substances act directly upon the microbiota versus acting on host parameters that promote inflammation, which subsequently reshapes the microbiota. We examined the direct impact of CMC and P80 on the microbiota using the mucosal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (M-SHIME) model that maintains a complex stable human microbiota in the absence of a live host. This approach revealed that both P80 and CMC acted directly upon human microbiota to increase its proinflammatory potential, as revealed by increased levels of bioactive flagellin. The CMC-induced increase in flagellin was rapid (1 day) and driven by altered microbiota gene expression. In contrast, the P80-induced flagellin increase occurred more slowly and was closely associated with altered species composition. Transfer of both emulsifier-treated M-SHIME microbiotas to germ-free recipient mice recapitulated many of the host and microbial alterations observed in mice directly treated with emulsifiers. These results demonstrate a novel paradigm of deconstructing host-microbiota interactions and indicate that the microbiota can be directly impacted by these commonly used food additives, in a manner that subsequently drives intestinal inflammation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Phenotypic plasticity, trade-offs and gene expression changes accompanying dietary restriction and switches in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Er-Hu; Hou, Qiu-Li; Wei, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-05-16

    In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary restriction (DR) and variable diets on phenotypes and gene expression in oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pests in the family Tephritidae around the world. As expected, we found that DR altered the B. dorsalis phenotypes by significantly increasing stress resistance and lifespan, but reduced egg production when compared with the control diet. The results suggested a trade-off between reproduction versus somatic maintenance (stress resistance) and lifespan in B. dorsalis. Diet also had a significant effect on hatchability, and DR could increase the egg hatching success of B. dorsalis. Furthermore, DR up-regulated metabolic pathways involved in energy homeostasis and down-regulated pathways in egg production, which might mediate trade-offs between somatic maintenance and reproduction under DR regimes. The gene expression profiles in response to the acute dietary switches indicated that the digestive and metabolic pathways maybe involved in the adaptability of flies to variable dietary resources. In summary, the research facilitates a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the B. dorsalis' phenotypic adjustments to the different qualities of the available diets.

  10. Effects of Dietary Fibers on Weight Gain, Carbohydrate Metabolism and Gastric Ghrelin Gene Expression in High Fat Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q.; Zuberi, Aamir; Zhang, Xian H.; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects for three types of dietary fibers, i.e. sugar cane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY) and cellulose (CEL) on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into four groups that consumed high fat-diets or high fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL respectively. After baseline measurements were assessed for body weight, plasma insulin, glucose, leptin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), animals were treated for 12 weeks. Parameters were re-evaluated at end of study. Whereas there was no difference at the baseline, body weight gains in the PSY and SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL group at end of study, No difference in body weight was observed between the PSY and SCF animals. Body composition analysis demonstrated that fat mass in the SCF group was considerably lower than in the CEL and HFD groups. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin and areas under curve of IPGTT were also significantly lower in the SCF and PSY groups than in the CEL and HFD groups. Moreover, fasting plasma concentrations of leptin were significantly lower and GLP-1 level was two-fold higher in the SCF and PSY mice than in the HFD and CEL mice. Ghrelin mRNA levels of stomach in SCF groups were significantly lower than in CEL and HFD groups as well. These results suggest differences in response to dietary fiber intake in this animal model as high fat diets incorporating dietary fibers such as SCF and PSY appeared to attenuate weight gain, enhance insulin sensitivity, and modulate leptin and GLP-1 secretion and gastric ghrelin gene expression. PMID:17998014

  11. Dietary sodium propionate affects mucosal immune parameters, growth and appetite related genes expression: Insights from zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Safari, Roghieh; Dadar, Maryam

    2017-03-01

    Propionate is a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) that improves physiological and pathophysiological properties. However, there is limited information available about the effects of SCFAs on mucosal immune parameters as well as growth and appetite related genes expression. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sodium propionate (SP) intake on the mucosal immune parameters, growth and appetite related genes expression using zebrafish (Danio rerio) as model organism. Zebrafish fed control or diet supplemented with different levels (0.5, 1 and 2%) of SP for 8weeks. At the end of feeding trial, the expression of the key genes related to growth and appetite (GH, IGF1, MYSTN and Ghrl) was evaluated. Also, mucosal immune parameters (Total Ig, lysozyme and protease activity) were studied in skin mucus of zebrafish. The results showed that dietary administration of SP significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated the expression of GH, IGF1 and down-regulated MYSTN gene. Also, feeding zebrafish with SP supplemented diet significantly increased appetite related gene expression (P<0.05) with a more pronounced effect in higher inclusion levels. Compared with control group, the expression of appetite related gene (Ghrl) was remarkably (P<0.05) higher in SP fed zebrafish. Also, elevated mucosal immune parameters was observed in zebrafish fed SP supplemented diet. The present results revealed beneficial effects of dietary SP on mucosal immune response and growth and appetite related genes expression. These results also highlighted the potential use of SP as additive in human diets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic perturbation of key central metabolic genes extends lifespan in Drosophila and affects response to dietary restriction

    PubMed Central

    Talbert, Matthew E.; Barnett, Brittany; Hoff, Robert; Amella, Maria; Kuczynski, Kate; Lavington, Erik; Koury, Spencer; Brud, Evgeny; Eanes, Walter F.

    2015-01-01

    There is a connection between nutrient inputs, energy-sensing pathways, lifespan variation and aging. Despite the role of metabolic enzymes in energy homeostasis and their metabolites as nutrient signals, little is known about how their gene expression impacts lifespan. In this report, we use P-element mutagenesis in Drosophila to study the effect on lifespan of reductions in expression of seven central metabolic enzymes, and contrast the effects on normal diet and dietary restriction. The major observation is that for five of seven genes, the reduction of gene expression extends lifespan on one or both diets. Two genes are involved in redox balance, and we observe that lower activity genotypes significantly extend lifespan. The hexokinases also show extension of lifespan with reduced gene activity. Since both affect the ATP/ADP ratio, this connects with the role of AMP-activated protein kinase as an energy sensor in regulating lifespan and mediating caloric restriction. These genes possess significant expression variation in natural populations, and our experimental genotypes span this level of natural activity variation. Our studies link the readout of energy state with the perturbation of the genes of central metabolism and demonstrate their effect on lifespan. PMID:26378219

  13. Genetic perturbation of key central metabolic genes extends lifespan in Drosophila and affects response to dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Talbert, Matthew E; Barnett, Brittany; Hoff, Robert; Amella, Maria; Kuczynski, Kate; Lavington, Erik; Koury, Spencer; Brud, Evgeny; Eanes, Walter F

    2015-09-22

    There is a connection between nutrient inputs, energy-sensing pathways, lifespan variation and aging. Despite the role of metabolic enzymes in energy homeostasis and their metabolites as nutrient signals, little is known about how their gene expression impacts lifespan. In this report, we use P-element mutagenesis in Drosophila to study the effect on lifespan of reductions in expression of seven central metabolic enzymes, and contrast the effects on normal diet and dietary restriction. The major observation is that for five of seven genes, the reduction of gene expression extends lifespan on one or both diets. Two genes are involved in redox balance, and we observe that lower activity genotypes significantly extend lifespan. The hexokinases also show extension of lifespan with reduced gene activity. Since both affect the ATP/ADP ratio, this connects with the role of AMP-activated protein kinase as an energy sensor in regulating lifespan and mediating caloric restriction. These genes possess significant expression variation in natural populations, and our experimental genotypes span this level of natural activity variation. Our studies link the readout of energy state with the perturbation of the genes of central metabolism and demonstrate their effect on lifespan. © 2015 The Author(s).

  14. [Association of peroxisome proliferator-activated-receptors-gamma C161-->T gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome and dietary predisposition].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Guo, Hong-Wei; Wan, Wen-Tao; Luo, Xuan; Zhang, Shi-Xiu; Xue, Kun; Ma, Yi-Yi

    2008-07-01

    To study the genotype frequencies of peroxisome proliferators-activated -receptors-gamma C161-->T gene and its possible association with the metabolic syndrome and dietary intakes. The PCR-PFLP method was used to detect the polymorphism of PPARgammaC161-->T gene of 224 adults with metabolic syndrome and 224 normal adults in Shanghai. Their physical examinations, dietary investigation and the serum biochemistry were analyzed. (1) The genotype frequencies of PPARgamma C161-->T CC, CT and TT were 32.4%, 49.6% and 18.0% respectively, which were in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. There was no significant difference in the distribution of genotypes or allele between the metabolic syndrome group and the control group, and the result was the same between male and female subjects. (2) The levels of body mass index,waist width and hip width were significantly different among three genotypes groups. Subjects of the CT genotype had the highest levels. (3) There was significant difference in the negative correlation with the intake of protein and serum TG levels in the metabolic syndrome group. The results suggested PPARgamma gene C161-->T should be associated with body mass index, waist width and hip width. It might contribute to the heterogeneity in diet response to TG.

  15. Dietary specialization drives multiple independent losses and gains in the bitter taste gene repertoire of Laurasiatherian Mammals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijin; Liu, Guangjian; Hailer, Frank; Orozco-terWengel, Pablo; Tan, Xinxin; Tian, Jundong; Yan, Zhongze; Zhang, Baowei; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste perception is essential for species with selective food intake, enabling them to avoid unpalatable or toxic items. Previous studies noted a marked variation in the number of TAS2R genes among various vertebrate species, but the underlying causes are not well understood. Laurasiatherian mammals have highly diversified dietary niche, showing repeated evolution of specialized feeding preferences in multiple lineages and offering a unique chance to investigate how various feeding niches are associated with copy number variation for bitter taste receptor genes. Here we investigated the evolutionary trajectories of TAS2Rs and their implications on bitter taste perception in whole-genome assemblies of 41 Laurasiatherian species. The number of intact TAS2Rs copies varied considerably, ranging from 0 to 52. As an extreme example of a narrow dietary niche, the Chinese pangolin possessed the lowest number of intact TAS2Rs (n = 2) among studied terrestrial vertebrates. Marine mammals (cetacea and pinnipedia), which swallow prey whole, presented a reduced copy number of TAS2Rs (n = 0-5). In contrast, independent insectivorous lineages, such as the shrew and insectivorous bats possessed a higher TAS2R diversity (n = 52 and n = 20-32, respectively), exceeding that in herbivores (n = 9-22) and omnivores (n = 18-22). Besides herbivores, insectivores in Laurasiatheria tend to have more functional TAS2Rs in comparison to carnivores and omnivores. Furthermore, animals swallowing food whole (cetacean, pinnipedia and pangolin) have lost most functional TAS2Rs. These findings provide the most comprehensive view of the bitter taste gene repertoire in Laurasiatherian mammals to date, casting new light on the relationship between losses and gains of TAS2Rs and dietary specialization in mammals.

  16. Dietary Restriction Mitigates Cocaine-Induced Alterations of Olfactory Bulb Cellular Plasticity and Gene Expression, and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiangru; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Hall, F. Scott; Perona, Maria T.G.; Pistell, Paul J.; Lathia, Justin D; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Becker, Kevin G; Ladenheim, Bruce; Niklason, Laura E; Uhl, George R.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Because the olfactory system plays a major role in food consumption, and because “food addiction” and associated morbidities have reached epidemic proportions, we tested the hypothesis that dietary energy restriction can modify adverse effects of cocaine on behavior and olfactory cellular and molecular plasticity. Mice maintained on an alternate day fasting (ADF) diet exhibited increased baseline locomotion and increased cocaine-sensitized locomotion during cocaine conditioning, despite no change in cocaine conditioned place preference, compared to mice fed ad libitum. Levels of dopamine and its metabolites in the olfactory bulb (OB) were suppressed in mice on the ADF diet compared to mice on the control diet, independent of acute or chronic cocaine treatment. The expression of several enzymes involved in dopamine metabolism including tyrosine hydroxylase, monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOA), and catechol-O-methyltransferase were significantly reduced in OBs of mice on the ADF diet. Both acute and chronic administration of cocaine suppressed the production of new OB cells, and this effect of cocaine was attenuated in mice on the ADF diet. Cocaine administration to mice on the control diet resulted in up-regulation of OB genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism, synaptic plasticity, cellular stress responses, and calcium- and cyclic AMP-mediated signaling, whereas multiple olfactory receptor genes were down-regulated by cocaine treatment. ADF abolished many of the effects of cocaine on OB gene expression. Our findings reveal that dietary energy intake modifies the neural substrates underlying some of the behavioral and physiological responses to repeated cocaine treatment, and also suggest novel roles for the olfactory system in addiction. The data further suggest that modification of dietary energy intake could provide a novel potential approach to addiction treatments. PMID:20456017

  17. Mediterranean dietary pattern and VEGF +405 G/C gene polymorphisms in patients with metabolic syndrome: An aspect of gene-nutrient interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hajiluian, Ghazaleh; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Jahangiry, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the relationship between Mediterranean dietary pattern, anthropometric and metabolic biomarkers and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) +405 G/C gene polymorphism in patient with metabolic syndrome (Mets). Materials and methods In this study 150 patients with Mets and 50 healthy subjects were enrolled. Dietary intakes were evaluated with a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and Mediterranean dietary quality index (Med-DQI) was assessed. Anthropometric assessments and blood pressure measurement were performed. Biochemical assays including fasting serum glucose (FSG), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), liver enzymes and lipid profiles were also assessed. Polymorphism of +405 G/C VEGF gene was determined utilizing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragments length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Results Serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly lower and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) concentrations and FSG were significantly higher in metabolic syndrome patients compared with control group (P < 0.05). Metabolic syndrome group with high consumption of “cholesterol” had significantly upper serum TG; also high consumption of “fish” and “vegetables-fruits” was associated with a significantly lower serum LDL concentrations. In metabolic syndrome patients with CC genotype, mean score of “saturated fatty acid” subgroup was significantly higher compared with other genotypes; whereas, in healthy individuals, mean score of “fruit-vegetable” subgroup in individuals of CC and GG genotype was significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusion Our findings indicated a significant relationship between Mediterranean dietary quality index and both anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. We also indicated a higher “saturated fatty acid” intake in CC genotype among metabolic syndrome patients. PMID:28212431

  18. Intestinal microbiota and immune related genes in sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) response to dietary β-glucan supplementation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Xu, Zhenjiang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo

    2015-02-27

    β-glucan is a prebiotic well known for its beneficial outcomes on sea cucumber health through modifying the host intestinal microbiota. High-throughput sequencing techniques provide an opportunity for the identification and characterization of microbes. In this study, we investigated the intestinal microbial community composition, interaction among species, and intestinal immune genes in sea cucumber fed with diet supplemented with or without β-glucan supplementation. The results show that the intestinal dominant classes in the control group are Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, whereas Alphaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, and Verrucomicrobiae are enriched in the β-glucan group. Dietary β-glucan supplementation promoted the proliferation of the family Rhodobacteraceae of the Alphaproteobacteria class and the family Verrucomicrobiaceae of the Verrucomicrobiae class and reduced the relative abundance of the family Flavobacteriaceae of Flavobacteria class. The ecological network analysis suggests that dietary β-glucan supplementation can alter the network interactions among different microbial functional groups by changing the microbial community composition and topological roles of the OTUs in the ecological network. Dietary β-glucan supplementation has a positive impact on immune responses of the intestine of sea cucumber by activating NF-κB signaling pathway, probably through modulating the balance of intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dietary fish oil and curcumin combine to modulate colonic cytokinetics and gene expression in dextran sodium sulphate-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qian; Ivanov, Ivan; Zlatev, Zlatomir Z.; Alaniz, Robert C.; Weeks, Brad R.; Callaway, Evelyn S.; Goldsby, Jennifer S.; Davidson, Laurie A.; Fan, Yang-Yi; Zhou, Lan; Lupton, Joanne R.; McMurray, David N.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Both fish oil (FO) and curcumin have potential as anti-tumour and anti-inflammatory agents. To further explore their combined effects on dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis, C57BL/6 mice were randomised to four diets (2 × 2 design) differing in fatty acid content with or without curcumin supplementation (FO, FO + 2 % curcumin, maize oil (control, MO) or MO + 2 % curcumin). Mice were exposed to one or two cycles of DSS in the drinking-water to induce either acute or chronic intestinal inflammation, respectively. FO-fed mice exposed to the single-cycle DSS treatment exhibited the highest mortality (40 %, seventeen of forty-three) compared with MO with the lowest mortality (3 %, one of twenty-nine) (P = 0·0008). Addition of curcumin to MO increased (P = 0·003) mortality to 37 % compared with the control. Consistent with animal survival data, following the one- or two-cycle DSS treatment, both dietary FO and curcumin promoted mucosal injury/ulceration compared with MO. In contrast, compared with other diets, combined FO and curcumin feeding enhanced the resolution of chronic inflammation and suppressed (P < 0·05) a key inflammatory mediator, NF-κB, in the colon mucosa. Mucosal microarray analysis revealed that dietary FO, curcumin and FO plus curcumin combination differentially modulated the expression of genes induced by DSS treatment. These results suggest that dietary lipids and curcumin interact to regulate mucosal homeostasis and the resolution of chronic inflammation in the colon. PMID:21401974

  20. Dietary fish oil and curcumin combine to modulate colonic cytokinetics and gene expression in dextran sodium sulphate-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Qian; Ivanov, Ivan; Zlatev, Zlatomir Z; Alaniz, Robert C; Weeks, Brad R; Callaway, Evelyn S; Goldsby, Jennifer S; Davidson, Laurie A; Fan, Yang-Yi; Zhou, Lan; Lupton, Joanne R; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2011-08-01

    Both fish oil (FO) and curcumin have potential as anti-tumour and anti-inflammatory agents. To further explore their combined effects on dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis, C57BL/6 mice were randomised to four diets (2 × 2 design) differing in fatty acid content with or without curcumin supplementation (FO, FO+2 % curcumin, maize oil (control, MO) or MO+2 % curcumin). Mice were exposed to one or two cycles of DSS in the drinking-water to induce either acute or chronic intestinal inflammation, respectively. FO-fed mice exposed to the single-cycle DSS treatment exhibited the highest mortality (40 %, seventeen of forty-three) compared with MO with the lowest mortality (3 %, one of twenty-nine) (P = 0·0008). Addition of curcumin to MO increased (P = 0·003) mortality to 37 % compared with the control. Consistent with animal survival data, following the one- or two-cycle DSS treatment, both dietary FO and curcumin promoted mucosal injury/ulceration compared with MO. In contrast, compared with other diets, combined FO and curcumin feeding enhanced the resolution of chronic inflammation and suppressed (P < 0·05) a key inflammatory mediator, NF-κB, in the colon mucosa. Mucosal microarray analysis revealed that dietary FO, curcumin and FO plus curcumin combination differentially modulated the expression of genes induced by DSS treatment. These results suggest that dietary lipids and curcumin interact to regulate mucosal homeostasis and the resolution of chronic inflammation in the colon.

  1. Dietary intake in the Personalized Medicine Research Project: a resource for studies of gene-diet interaction.

    PubMed

    Strobush, Lacie; Berg, Richard; Cross, Deanna; Foth, Wendy; Kitchner, Terrie; Coleman, Laura; McCarty, Catherine A

    2011-01-28

    between the use of supplements and APOE4. The PMRP dietary data can benefit studies of gene-environment interactions and the development of common diseases.

  2. Dietary intake in the Personalized Medicine Research Project: a resource for studies of gene-diet interaction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    ). Findings suggest a possible correlation between the use of supplements and APOE4. The PMRP dietary data can benefit studies of gene-environment interactions and the development of common diseases. PMID:21276236

  3. High dietary fat exacerbates weight gain and obesity in female liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablated mice.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Storey, Stephen M; Landrock, Kerstin K; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-02-01

    Since liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) facilitates uptake/oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in cultured transfected cells and primary hepatocytes, loss of L-FABP was expected to exacerbate weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat. Male and female wild-type (WT) and L-FABP gene-ablated mice, pair-fed a defined isocaloric control or high fat diet for 12 weeks, consumed equal amounts of food by weight and kcal. Male WT mice gained weight faster than their female WT counterparts regardless of diet. L-FABP gene ablation enhanced weight gain more in female than male mice-an effect exacerbated by high fat diet. Dual emission X-ray absorptiometry revealed high-fat fed male and female WT mice gained mostly fat tissue mass (FTM). L-FABP gene ablation increased FTM in female, but not male, mice-an effect also exacerbated by high fat diet. Concomitantly, L-FABP gene ablation decreased serum beta-hydroxybutyrate in male and female mice fed the control diet and, even more so, on the high-fat diet. Thus, L-FABP gene ablation decreased fat oxidation and sensitized all mice to weight gain as whole body FTM and LTM-with the most gain observed in FTM of control vs high-fat fed female L-FABP null mice. Taken together, these results indicate loss of L-FABP exacerbates weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat.

  4. Alteration of gene expression in mammary gland tissue of dairy cows in response to dietary unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mach, N; Jacobs, A A A; Kruijt, L; van Baal, J; Smits, M A

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of supplementing unprotected dietary unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) from different plant oils on gene expression in the mammary gland of grazing dairy cows. A total of 28 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows in mid-lactation were blocked according to parity, days in milk, milk yield and fat percentage. The cows were then randomly assigned to four UFA sources based on rapeseed, soybean, linseed or a mixture of the three oils for 23 days, after which, all 28 cows were switched to a control diet for an additional 28 days. On the last day of both periods, mammary gland biopsies were taken to study genome-wide differences in gene expression on Affymetrix GeneChip® Bovine Genome Arrays (no. 900493) by ServiceXS (Leiden, The Netherlands). Supplementation with UFAs resulted in increased milk yield but decreased milk fat and protein percentages. Furthermore, the proportion of de novo fatty acids (FAs) in the milk was reduced, whereas that of long-chain FAs increased. Applying a statistical cut-off of false discovery rate of q-values <0.05 together with an absolute fold change of 1.3, a total of 972 genes were found to be significantly affected through UFA supplementation, indicating that large transcriptional adaptations occurred in the mammary gland when grazing dairy cows were supplemented with unprotected dietary UFA. Gene sets related to cell development and remodeling, apoptosis, nutrient metabolic process, as well as immune system response were predominantly downregulated during UFA supplementation. Such molecular knowledge on the physiology of the mammary gland might provide the basis for further functional research on dairy cows.

  5. New Genes Tied to Endocrine, Metabolic, and Dietary Regulation of Lifespan from a Caenorhabditis elegans Genomic RNAi Screen

    PubMed Central

    Dillin, Andrew; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Most of our knowledge about the regulation of aging comes from mutants originally isolated for other phenotypes. To ask whether our current view of aging has been affected by selection bias, and to deepen our understanding of known longevity pathways, we screened a genomic Caenorhabditis elegans RNAi library for clones that extend lifespan. We identified 23 new longevity genes affecting signal transduction, the stress response, gene expression, and metabolism and assigned these genes to specific longevity pathways. Our most important findings are (i) that dietary restriction extends C. elegans' lifespan by down-regulating expression of key genes, including a gene required for methylation of many macromolecules, (ii) that integrin signaling is likely to play a general, evolutionarily conserved role in lifespan regulation, and (iii) that specific lipophilic hormones may influence lifespan in a DAF-16/FOXO-dependent fashion. Surprisingly, of the new genes that have conserved sequence domains, only one could not be associated with a known longevity pathway. Thus, our current view of the genetics of aging has probably not been distorted substantially by selection bias. PMID:16103914

  6. [Effect of dietary restriction during development on the level of expression of longevity-associated genes in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Vaĭserman, A M; Koliada, A K; Zabuga, O G

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that dietary restriction (DR) may substantially affect the life span (LS) of various model organisms including Drosophila melanogaster. In our recent studies, it has been revealed that the reduction of the content of main nutrients in larval medium may lead to an increase of flies' LS. Analysis of these data suggested that the most likely candidate for such long-term adaptive changes is insects' epigenome (i.e., persistent changes in the activity of genes that are not related to changes in the DNA structure). To examine whether the observed effects may be associated with long-term changes in the epigenetic regulation of genes associated with aging and longevity, in the present study we determined the level of expression of InR and Sir2 genes that are related to the effects of DR. In the larvae developed in DR conditions, the significant increase in the level of transcription of both these genes compared to the controls has been detected. The adult males have shown a significant increase in the level of expression of InR gene while no such changes were observed in females. The Sir2 gene expression level was not different from the control level in adults of both sexes. It has been suggested that larval nutritional stress may lead to the induction of adaptive epigenetic rearrangements and, therefore, it can extend the flies' longevity.

  7. APOA5 Gene Variation Interacts with Dietary Fat Intake to Modulate Obesity and Circulating Triglycerides in a Mediterranean Population12

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Moreno, Carmen; Ordovás, Jose M.; Smith, Caren E.; Baraza, Juan C.; Lee, Yu-Chi; Garaulet, Marta

    2011-01-01

    APOA5 is one of the strongest regulators of plasma TG concentrations; nevertheless, its mechanisms of action are poorly characterized. Genetic variability at the APOA5 locus has also been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk; however, this predisposition could be attenuated in the context of a prudent diet as traditionally consumed in the Mediterranean countries. We have investigated the interaction between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the APOA5 gene (-1131T > C) and dietary fat that may modulate TG-rich lipoprotein concentrations and anthropometric measures in overweight and obese participants. We recruited 1465 participants from a Spanish population (20–65 y old; BMI 25–40 kg/m2) attending outpatient obesity clinics. Consistent with previous reports, we found an association between the APOA5-1131T > C SNP and TG-rich lipoprotein concentrations that were higher in carriers of the minor allele than in noncarriers (P < 0.001). Moreover, we found a significant genotype-dietary fat interaction for obesity traits. Participants homozygous for the −1131T major allele had a positive association between fat intake and obesity, whereas in those carrying the APOA5−1131C minor allele, higher fat intakes were not associated with higher BMI. Likewise, we found genotype-dietary fat interactions for TG-rich lipoproteins (P < 0.001). In conclusion, we have replicated previous gene-diet interactions between APOA5 -1131T > C SNP and fat intake for obesity traits and detected a novel interaction for TG-rich lipoprotein concentrations. Our data support the hypothesis that the minor C-allele may protect those consuming a high-fat diet from obesity and elevated concentrations of TG-rich lipoproteins. PMID:21209257

  8. Effects of supplementing dietary laminarin and fucoidan on intestinal morphology and the immune gene expression in the weaned pig.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A M; Sweeney, T; O'Shea, C J; Doyle, D N; O'Doherty, J V

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown the benefit of combining seaweed extracts laminarin (LAM) and fucoidan (FUC) on improving growth in piglets' performance after weaning. A 2 × 2 factorial experiment was conducted to investigate the interaction between FUC (0 and 240 mg/kg) and LAM (0 and 300 mg/kg) levels on gut morphology and colonic cytokine gene expression in the weaned pig. Twenty-eight piglets (6.9 kg BW) were assigned to 1 of 4 dietary treatments for 8 d after weaning and then sacrificed. The dietary treatments were as follows: (i) basal diet, (ii) basal diet + 240 mg/kg FUC, (iii) basal diet + 300 mg/kg LAM, and (iv) basal diet + 300 mg/kg LAM and 240 mg/kg FUC. There was an interaction (P < 0.01) between LAM and FUC supplementation on duodenal villous height and the villus height to crypt depth ratio. Pigs offered the LAM or FUC diet singularly had an increased villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratio compared with pigs offered the basal diet. However, there was no effect of the LAM and FUC combination diet on morphology. Pigs offered the LAM-supplemented diets had a lower IL-6 (P < 0.05), IL-17 (P < 0.001), and IL-1β (P < 0.001) mRNA expression in the colon compared with pigs offered diets without LAM supplementation. In conclusion, the enhancement in intestinal structure and downregulation of inflammatory cytokine gene expression obtained suggest that LAM may provide a dietary means to improve gut health in weaned pigs.

  9. APOA5 gene variation interacts with dietary fat intake to modulate obesity and circulating triglycerides in a Mediterranean population.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Carmen; Ordovás, Jose M; Smith, Caren E; Baraza, Juan C; Lee, Yu-Chi; Garaulet, Marta

    2011-03-01

    APOA5 is one of the strongest regulators of plasma TG concentrations; nevertheless, its mechanisms of action are poorly characterized. Genetic variability at the APOA5 locus has also been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk; however, this predisposition could be attenuated in the context of a prudent diet as traditionally consumed in the Mediterranean countries. We have investigated the interaction between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the APOA5 gene (-1131T > C) and dietary fat that may modulate TG-rich lipoprotein concentrations and anthropometric measures in overweight and obese participants. We recruited 1465 participants from a Spanish population (20-65 y old; BMI 25-40 kg/m(2)) attending outpatient obesity clinics. Consistent with previous reports, we found an association between the APOA5-1131T > C SNP and TG-rich lipoprotein concentrations that were higher in carriers of the minor allele than in noncarriers (P < 0.001). Moreover, we found a significant genotype-dietary fat interaction for obesity traits. Participants homozygous for the -1131T major allele had a positive association between fat intake and obesity, whereas in those carrying the APOA5-1131C minor allele, higher fat intakes were not associated with higher BMI. Likewise, we found genotype-dietary fat interactions for TG-rich lipoproteins (P < 0.001). In conclusion, we have replicated previous gene-diet interactions between APOA5 -1131T > C SNP and fat intake for obesity traits and detected a novel interaction for TG-rich lipoprotein concentrations. Our data support the hypothesis that the minor C-allele may protect those consuming a high-fat diet from obesity and elevated concentrations of TG-rich lipoproteins.

  10. Adiponectin Gene Variants Are Associated with Insulin Sensitivity in Response to Dietary Fat Consumption in Caucasian Men2

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; López-Miranda, José; Cruz-Teno, Cristina; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Jiménez-Gómez, Yolanda; Fernández, Juan Marcelo; Gómez, Maria José; Marín, Carmen; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; Ordovás, José María

    2008-01-01

    Adiponectin (adipoQ) gene variants have been associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. Our aim was to examine whether the presence of several polymorphisms at the adipoQ gene locus (-11391 G > A, 11377 C > G, 45 T > G, and 276 G > T) influences the insulin sensitivity to dietary fat. Healthy volunteers (30 men and 29 women) consumed 3 diets for 4 wk each: an initial period during which all subjects consumed a SFA-rich diet (38% total fat, 20% SFA), followed by a carbohydrate-rich diet (CHO) (30% total fat, 55% carbohydrate) or a monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-rich diet (38% total fat, 22% MUFA) following a randomized, crossover design. After participants consumed each diet, we tested peripheral insulin sensitivity with the insulin suppression test and measured plasma adiponectin concentrations. C/C homozygous men for the -11377 C > G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) had a significantly greater decrease in the steady-state plasma glucose concentrations when changing from the SFA-rich (8.95 ± 0.6 mmol/L) to the MUFA-rich (6.04 ± 0.31 mmol/L) and CHO-rich (6.35 ± 0.38 mmol/L) diets than did those carrying the minor G allele (SFA, 6.65 ± 0.4 mmol/L; MUFA, 6.45 ± 0.4 mmol/L; CHO, 5.83 ± 0.3 mmol/L) (P sex × gene × diet interaction = 0.016). These differences did not occur in female participants. Furthermore, C/C men had lower plasma adiponectin concentrations than did C/C women (P sex × gene interaction = 0.015), independently of the dietary fat consumed. None of the variables examined were significantly associated with -11426 A > G, 45T > G, or 276 G > T SNP. In conclusion, C/C homozygous men for the -11377 C > G SNP at adipoQ gene were significantly less insulin resistant after consumption of the MUFA- and CHO-rich diets compared with the SFA-rich diet. This information should help in the identification of vulnerable populations or persons who will benefit from more personalized and mechanism-based dietary recommendations. PMID

  11. Tissue-specific regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene expression by dietary soya protein isolate in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chao Wu; Wood, Carla; Huang, Wenxin; L'Abbé, Mary R; Gilani, G Sarwar; Cooke, Gerard M; Curran, Ivan

    2006-06-01

    We have recently reported that intake of soya protein isolate (SPI) inhibited the DNA-binding activities of hepatic thyroid hormone receptor (TR). The genes for acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a rate-limiting enzyme in fatty acid synthesis, contain the thyroid hormone response element in their promoters and are regulated by TR. The present study has examined the effect of long-term feeding of SPI and soya isoflavones (ISF) on the gene expression and protein phosphorylation of different ACC isoforms in different tissues and plasma triacylglycerol (TAG) levels in rats. Sprague-Dawley female rats were fed diets containing 20 % casein or alcohol-washed SPI with or without supplemental ISF for 70, 190 and 310 d. SPI intake significantly reduced plasma TAG concentrations compared with casein, whereas supplemental ISF had no effect. Hepatic ACCalpha and ACCbeta mRNA abundance and protein content were markedly lower in the rats fed SPI than in those fed casein. The protein contents of ACCalpha in the kidney and ACCbeta, the predominant isoform in the heart and kidney, were unchanged by dietary SPI. The ratios of phospho-ACCalpha/ACCalpha and phospho-ACCbeta/ACCbeta were not different among dietary groups in all tissues measured. The present study demonstrates that ingestion of SPI decreases plasma TAG level and down-regulates ACCalpha and ACCbeta gene expression in the liver but not in the heart and kidney. The results indicate that the effect of SPI is tissue-specific and that alteration of ACC gene expression rather than phosphorylation status may play a major role in the regulation of ACC activities by soya proteins.

  12. The effect of dietary fat intake on hepatic gene expression in LG/J AND SM/J mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The liver plays a major role in regulating metabolic homeostasis and is vital for nutrient metabolism. Identifying the genetic factors regulating these processes could lead to a greater understanding of how liver function responds to a high-fat diet and how that response may influence susceptibilities to obesity and metabolic syndrome. In this study we examine differences in hepatic gene expression between the LG/J and SM/J inbred mouse strains and how gene expression in these strains is affected by high-fat diet. LG/J and SM/J are known to differ in their responses to a high-fat diet for a variety of obesity- and diabetes-related traits, with the SM/J strain exhibiting a stronger phenotypic response to diet. Results Dietary intake had a significant effect on gene expression in both inbred lines. Genes up-regulated by a high-fat diet were involved in biological processes such as lipid and carbohydrate metabolism; protein and amino acid metabolic processes were down regulated on a high-fat diet. A total of 259 unique transcripts exhibited a significant diet-by-strain interaction. These genes tended to be associated with immune function. In addition, genes involved in biochemical processes related to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) manifested different responses to diet between the two strains. For most of these genes, SM/J had a stronger response to the high-fat diet than LG/J. Conclusions These data show that dietary fat impacts gene expression levels in SM/J relative to LG/J, with SM/J exhibiting a stronger response. This supports previous data showing that SM/J has a stronger phenotypic response to high-fat diet. Based upon these findings, we suggest that SM/J and its cross with the LG/J strain provide a good model for examining non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its role in metabolic syndrome. PMID:24499025

  13. Gene and noncoding RNA regulation underlying photoreceptor protection: microarray study of dietary antioxidant saffron and photobiomodulation in rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan; Valter, Krisztina; Bisti, Silvia; Eells, Janis; Stone, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To identify the genes and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) involved in the neuroprotective actions of a dietary antioxidant (saffron) and of photobiomodulation (PBM). Methods We used a previously published assay of photoreceptor damage, in which albino Sprague Dawley rats raised in dim cyclic illumination (12 h 5 lux, 12 h darkness) were challenged by 24 h exposure to bright (1,000 lux) light. Experimental groups were protected against light damage by pretreatment with dietary saffron (1 mg/kg/day for 21 days) or PBM (9 J/cm2 at the eye, daily for 5 days). RNA from one eye of four animals in each of the six experimental groups (control, light damage [LD], saffron, PBM, saffronLD, and PBMLD) was hybridized to Affymetrix rat genome ST arrays. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of 14 selected genes was used to validate the microarray results. Results LD caused the regulation of 175 entities (genes and ncRNAs) beyond criterion levels (p<0.05 in comparison with controls, fold-change >2). PBM pretreatment reduced the expression of 126 of these 175 LD-regulated entities below criterion; saffron pretreatment reduced the expression of 53 entities (50 in common with PBM). In addition, PBM pretreatment regulated the expression of 67 entities not regulated by LD, while saffron pretreatment regulated 122 entities not regulated by LD (48 in common with PBM). PBM and saffron, given without LD, regulated genes and ncRNAs beyond criterion levels, but in lesser numbers than during their protective action. A high proportion of the entities regulated by LD (>90%) were known genes. By contrast, ncRNAs were prominent among the entities regulated by PBM and saffron in their neuroprotective roles (73% and 62%, respectively). Conclusions Given alone, saffron and (more prominently) PBM both regulated significant numbers of genes and ncRNAs. Given before retinal exposure to damaging light, thus while exerting their neuroprotective action, they regulated much larger numbers of entities

  14. Sex differences in body composition, fat storage, and gene expression profile in Caenorhabditis elegans in response to dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Miersch, Claudia; Döring, Frank

    2013-07-02

    The metabolic and health-promoting effects of dietary restriction (DR) have been extensively studied in several species. The response to DR with respect to sex is essentially unknown. To address this question, we used the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans to analyze body composition and gene expression in males and hermaphrodites in response to DR. Unexpectedly, DR increased the fat-to-fat-free mass ratio and enlarged lipid droplets in both sexes to a similar extent. These effects were linked to a downregulation of the lipase-like 5 (lipl-5) gene in both sexes at two developmental stages. By contrast, the reductions in body size, protein content, and total RNA content in response to DR were more pronounced in hermaphrodites than in males. Functional enrichment analysis of gene expression data showed a DR-induced downregulation of several embryogenesis-associated genes concomitant with an ongoing expression of sperm-associated genes in hermaphrodites. In conclusion, DR increases fat stores in both sexes of C. elegans in the form of large and possibly lipolysis-resistant lipid droplets and markedly alters the reproductive program in hermaphrodites but not in males.

  15. Prolonged Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess Does Not Globally Affect Selenoprotein Gene Expression and/or Protein Production in Various Tissues of Pigs123

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Qiaoshan; Tang, Jiayong; Li, Ke; Xia, Xin-Jie; Wang, Kang-Ning; Li, Kui; Lei, Xin Gen

    2012-01-01

    We previously determined the effects of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency or excess on mRNA abundance of 12 selenoprotein genes in pig tissues. In this study, we determined the effect of dietary Se on mRNA levels of the remaining porcine selenoprotein genes along with protein production of 4 selenoproteins (Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels) and body glucose homeostasis. Weanling male pigs (n = 24) were fed a Se-deficient (<0.02 mg Se/kg), basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.3, or 3.0 mg Se/kg as Se-enriched yeast (Angel Yeast) for 16 wk. Although mRNA abundance of the 13 selenoproteins in 10 tissues responded to dietary Se in 3 patterns, there was no common regulation for any given gene across all tissues or for any given tissue across all genes. Dietary Se affected (P < 0.05) 2, 3, 3, 5, 6, 7, 7, and 8 selenoprotein genes in muscle, hypothalamus, liver, kidney, heart, spleen, thyroid, and pituitary, respectively. Protein abundance of Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels in 6 tissues was regulated (P < 0.05) by dietary Se concentrations in 3 ways. Compared with those fed 0.3 mg Se/kg, pigs fed 3.0 mg Se/kg became hyperinsulinemic (P < 0.05) and had lower (P < 0.05) tissue levels of serine/threonine protein kinase. In conclusion, dietary Se exerted no global regulation of gene transcripts or protein levels of individual selenoproteins across porcine tissues. Pigs may be a good model for studying mechanisms related to the potential prodiabetic risk of high-Se intake in humans. PMID:22739382

  16. Prolonged dietary selenium deficiency or excess does not globally affect selenoprotein gene expression and/or protein production in various tissues of pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Qiaoshan; Tang, Jiayong; Li, Ke; Xia, Xin-Jie; Wang, Kang-Ning; Li, Kui; Lei, Xin Gen

    2012-08-01

    We previously determined the effects of dietary selenium (Se) deficiency or excess on mRNA abundance of 12 selenoprotein genes in pig tissues. In this study, we determined the effect of dietary Se on mRNA levels of the remaining porcine selenoprotein genes along with protein production of 4 selenoproteins (Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels) and body glucose homeostasis. Weanling male pigs (n = 24) were fed a Se-deficient (<0.02 mg Se/kg), basal diet supplemented with 0, 0.3, or 3.0 mg Se/kg as Se-enriched yeast (Angel Yeast) for 16 wk. Although mRNA abundance of the 13 selenoproteins in 10 tissues responded to dietary Se in 3 patterns, there was no common regulation for any given gene across all tissues or for any given tissue across all genes. Dietary Se affected (P < 0.05) 2, 3, 3, 5, 6, 7, 7, and 8 selenoprotein genes in muscle, hypothalamus, liver, kidney, heart, spleen, thyroid, and pituitary, respectively. Protein abundance of Gpx1, Sepp1, Selh, and Sels in 6 tissues was regulated (P < 0.05) by dietary Se concentrations in 3 ways. Compared with those fed 0.3 mg Se/kg, pigs fed 3.0 mg Se/kg became hyperinsulinemic (P < 0.05) and had lower (P < 0.05) tissue levels of serine/threonine protein kinase. In conclusion, dietary Se exerted no global regulation of gene transcripts or protein levels of individual selenoproteins across porcine tissues. Pigs may be a good model for studying mechanisms related to the potential prodiabetic risk of high-Se intake in humans.

  17. Dietary vegetable oils: effects on the expression of immune-related genes in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) intestine.

    PubMed

    Montero, Daniel; Benitez-Dorta, Vanessa; Caballero, María José; Ponce, Marian; Torrecillas, Silvia; Izquierdo, Marisol; Zamorano, María Jesús; Manchado, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    The decreased availability of fish oil, traditionally used as oil source in marine aquafeeds, has lead to the search for alternatives oils. Vegetable oils (VO) are being extensively used as lipid sources in marine fish diets, inducing an imbalance on certain dietary fatty acids. Alteration on the dietary ratio of w-6/w-3 has been described to have detrimental effects on fish immunity. Senegalese sole has high susceptibility to stress and diseases, and little is known on the effects of dietary VO on its immunity. In this study, Senegalese sole juveniles were fed diets (56% crude protein, 12% crude lipid) containing linseed (100LO), soybean (100SO) or fish (100FO) oils as unique oil source. Growth, cortisol and intestinal fatty acid composition were determined after 90 days. Moreover, at the final of the experiment a stress test (5 min of net chasing) was carried out. To evaluate the effect of diets and stress on intestine immunology, expression profiles of a set of 53 immune-related genes using RT-qPCR was also performed. The use of VO did not induced changes in fish growth, but affected fatty acid profile of intestine and expression of immune-related genes. The use of SO (rich in n-6 fatty acids) induced an over-expression of those genes related to complement pathway, recognizing pathogen associated to molecular patterns, defensive response against bacteria, defensive response against viruses, antigen differentiation, cytokines and their receptors. This general over-expression could indicate an activation of inflammatory processes in fish gut. When a stress was applied, a decrease of mRNA levels of different immune-related genes with respect to the unstressed control could be observed in fish fed 100FO. However, fish fed 100LO, with a higher ALA/LA ratio, seemed to ameliorate the effects of combined effects of FO substitution plus stressful situation whereas fish fed 100SO did not show this type of response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Is Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor (PBR) Gene Expression Involved in Breast Cancer Suppression by Dietary Soybean Protein?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) by which dietary soy protein may offer its tumor suppressing effect. We developed a breast cancer model in female rats ...30, 2006) APPROVED STATEMENT OF WORK Task 1. To develop a breast cancer model by administration of DMBA to female rats fed a diet containing...for PBRs from breast epithelial cells (Specific Aim 6) Study 1. Beneficial Effects of Soy Protein in Breast Cancer Development in Female Rats

  19. The stability and degradation of dietary DNA in the gastrointestinal tract of mammals: implications for horizontal gene transfer and the biosafety of GMOs.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Aurora; Raddadi, Noura; Sorlini, Claudia; Nordgrd, Lise; Nielsen, Kaare Magne; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    The fate of dietary DNA in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of animals has gained renewed interest after the commercial introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMO). Among the concerns regarding GM food, are the possible consequences of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of recombinant dietary DNA to bacteria or animal cells. The exposure of the GIT to dietary DNA is related to the extent of food processing, food composition, and to the level of intake. Animal feeding studies have demonstrated that a minor amount of fragmented dietary DNA may resist the digestive process. Mammals have been shown to take up dietary DNA from the GIT, but stable integration and expression of internalized DNA has not been demonstrated. Despite the ability of several bacterial species to acquire external DNA by natural transformation, in vivo transfer of dietary DNA to bacteria in the intestine has not been detected in the few experimental studies conducted so far. However, major methodological limitations and knowledge gaps of the mechanistic aspects of HGT calls for methodological improvements and further studies to understand the fate of various types of dietary DNA in the GIT.

  20. Influence of dietary antioxidants and fatty acids on neutrophil mediated bacterial killing and gene expression in healthy Beagles.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean A; Chinn, Rachel M; Vorachek, William R; Gorman, M Elena; Greitl, Joe L; Joshi, Dinesh K; Jewell, Dennis E

    2011-02-15

    Dietary (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil have been used to modulate immune function in many mammalian species. Together, dietary antioxidants and behavioral enrichment have been shown to enhance neutrophil phagocytosis in geriatric Beagle dogs. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the effects of vitamins E and C, in combination with dietary fish oil, on neutrophil mediated bacterial killing, and on transcript levels of selected neutrophil mRNA. Fifty adult Beagle dogs were randomized into five dietary treatment groups for 60 days. All foods were complete and balanced and met the nutrient profiles of AAFCO for adult dogs. For 60 days before study initiation, dogs consumed a pretrial food that contained 74 IU/kg vitamin E and 0 mg/kg vitamin C. The five experimental foods were confirmed by analytical methods to contain ≥640 IU/kg vitamin E and 130 mg/kg vitamin C (as fed). Experimental foods ranged from low levels of EPA and DHA (pretrial food and lowest experimental food had 0.01% EPA and no detectable DHA) to the highest experimental food with 0.25% EPA and 0.17% DHA. Ex vivo bactericidal activity of activated, peripheral-blood neutrophils against Lactococcus lactis was determined after 1 h incubation. Bactericidal activity was calculated as a percentage of control values (bacteria incubated in media without neutrophils). Transcript levels of genes involved in neutrophil-mediated immune functions were determined by real-time qPCR. Dogs in all treatment groups had increased serum vitamin E concentration (P<0.01). After consuming experimental food for 60 days, neutrophils from dogs in all 5 treatment groups also had increased bactericidal activity (P<0.01). Dietary fish oil however, had no effect on bactericidal activity. Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the change in neutrophil mediated bacterial killing was significantly correlated to changes in gene expression of interleukin-8 receptor (IL-8R), interleukin converting enzyme

  1. Dietary Flavanols Modulate the Transcription of Genes Associated with Cardiovascular Pathology without Changes in Their DNA Methylation State

    PubMed Central

    Boby, Céline; Leroux, Christine; Declerck, Ken; Szarc vel Szic, Katarzyna; Heyninck, Karen; Laukens, Kris; Bizet, Martin; Defrance, Matthieu; Dedeurwaerder, Sarah; Calonne, Emilie; Fuks, Francois; Haegeman, Guy; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Bast, Aalt; Weseler, Antje R.

    2014-01-01

    Background In a recent intervention study, the daily supplementation with 200 mg monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF) from grape seeds for 8 weeks revealed a vascular health benefit in male smokers. The objective of the present study was to determine the impact of MOF consumption on the gene expression profile of leukocytes and to assess changes in DNA methylation. Methodology/Principal Findings Gene expression profiles were determined using whole genome microarrays (Agilent) and DNA methylation was assessed using HumanMethylation450 BeadChips (Illumina). MOF significantly modulated the expression of 864 genes. The majority of the affected genes are involved in chemotaxis, cell adhesion, cell infiltration or cytoskeleton organisation, suggesting lower immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells. This was corroborated by in vitro experiments showing that MOF exposure of monocytes attenuates their adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) reporter gene assays confirmed that MOF decrease the activity of NF-κB. Strong inter-individual variability in the leukocytes' DNA methylation was observed. As a consequence, on group level, changes due to MOF supplementation could not be found. Conclusion Our study revealed that an 8 week daily supplementation with 200 mg MOF modulates the expression of genes associated with cardiovascular disease pathways without major changes of their DNA methylation state. However, strong inter-individual variation in leukocyte DNA methylation may obscure the subtle epigenetic response to dietary flavanols. Despite the lack of significant changes in DNA methylation, the modulation of gene expression appears to contribute to the observed vascular health effect of MOF in humans. PMID:24763279

  2. Dietary zinc status reversibly alters both the feeding behaviors of the rats and gene expression patterns in diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Okada, Shinji; Abuyama, Moe; Yamamoto, Ryo; Kondo, Takashi; Narukawa, Masataka; Misaka, Takumi

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional status influences feeding behaviors, food preferences, and taste sensations. For example, zinc-deficient rats have been reported to show reduced and cyclic food intake patterns with increased preferences for NaCl. Although some impairments of the central nervous and endocrine systems have been speculated to be involved in these phenomena, the effects of short-term zinc deficiency on the brain have not been well examined to date. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the gene expression patterns in the rat diencephalon, which is a portion of the brain that includes the hypothalamus and thalamus, after short-term zinc deficiency and also during zinc recovery. The rats showed reduced and cyclic food intake patterns with increased salt preferences after a 10-day dietary zinc deficiency. A comparative analysis of their diencephalons using cDNA microarrays revealed that approximately 1% of the genes expressed in the diencephalons showed significantly altered expression levels. On the other hand, a 6-day zinc supplementation following the deprivation allowed for the recovery to initial food intake behaviors and salt preferences. The expression levels of most of the genes that had been altered by exposure to zinc deficient conditions were also recovered. These results show that feeding behaviors, taste preferences and gene expression patterns in the diencephalon respond quickly to changing zinc levels. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Polymorphisms in Genes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation Interact with Dietary Fat Intakes to Modulate the Plasma TG Response to a Fish Oil Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Rudkowska, Iwona; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    A large inter-individual variability in the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation has been observed. The objective was to examine gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response after a fish oil supplementation, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes. Two hundred and eight (208) participants were recruited in the greater Quebec City area. The participants completed a six-week fish oil supplementation (5 g fish oil/day: 1.9–2.2 g EPA and 1.1 g DHA). Dietary fat intakes were measured using three-day food records. SNPs within RXRA, CPT1A, ACADVL, ACAA2, ABCD2, ACOX1 and ACAA1 genes were genotyped using TAQMAN methodology. Gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response were observed for SNPs within RXRA (rs11185660, rs10881576 and rs12339187) and ACOX1 (rs17583163) genes. For rs11185660, fold changes in RXRA gene expression levels were different depending on SFA intakes for homozygotes T/T. Gene-diet interaction effects of SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes may be important in understanding the inter-individual variability in plasma TG levels and in the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation. PMID:24647074

  4. Polymorphisms in genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation interact with dietary fat intakes to modulate the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation.

    PubMed

    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Rudkowska, Iwona; Lemieux, Simone; Couture, Patrick; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2014-03-18

    A large inter-individual variability in the plasma triglyceride (TG) response to an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) supplementation has been observed. The objective was to examine gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response after a fish oil supplementation, between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes. Two hundred and eight (208) participants were recruited in the greater Quebec City area. The participants completed a six-week fish oil supplementation (5 g fish oil/day: 1.9-2.2 g EPA and 1.1 g DHA). Dietary fat intakes were measured using three-day food records. SNPs within RXRA, CPT1A, ACADVL, ACAA2, ABCD2, ACOX1 and ACAA1 genes were genotyped using TAQMAN methodology. Gene-diet interaction effects on the plasma TG response were observed for SNPs within RXRA (rs11185660, rs10881576 and rs12339187) and ACOX1 (rs17583163) genes. For rs11185660, fold changes in RXRA gene expression levels were different depending on SFA intakes for homozygotes T/T. Gene-diet interaction effects of SNPs within genes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation and dietary fat intakes may be important in understanding the inter-individual variability in plasma TG levels and in the plasma TG response to a fish oil supplementation.

  5. Dietary intake alters behavioral recovery and gene expression profiles in the brain of juvenile rats that have experienced a concussion.

    PubMed

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; Ma, Irene; Esser, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) research has made minimal progress diagnosing who will suffer from lingering symptomology or generating effective treatment strategies. Research demonstrates that dietary intake affects many biological systems including brain and neurological health. This study determined if exposure to a high fat diet (HFD) or caloric restriction (CR) altered post-concussion susceptibility or resiliency using a rodent model of pediatric concussion. Rats were maintained on HFD, CR, or standard diet (STD) throughout life (including the prenatal period and weaning). At postnatal day 30, male and female rats experienced a concussion or a sham injury which was followed by 17 days of testing. Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus tissue was collected for molecular profiling. Gene expression changes in BDNF, CREB, DNMT1, FGF-2, IGF1, LEP, PGC-1α, SIRT1, Tau, and TERT were analyzed with respect to injury and diet. Analysis of telomere length (TL) using peripheral skin cells and brain tissue found that TL in skin significantly correlated with TL in brain tissue and TL was affected by dietary intake and injury status. With respect to mTBI outcomes, diet was correlated with recovery as animals on the HFD often displayed poorer performance than animals on the CR diet. Molecular analysis demonstrated that diet induced epigenetic changes that can be associated with differences in individual predisposition and resiliency to post-concussion syndrome.

  6. Dietary intake alters behavioral recovery and gene expression profiles in the brain of juvenile rats that have experienced a concussion

    PubMed Central

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; Ma, Irene; Esser, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) research has made minimal progress diagnosing who will suffer from lingering symptomology or generating effective treatment strategies. Research demonstrates that dietary intake affects many biological systems including brain and neurological health. This study determined if exposure to a high fat diet (HFD) or caloric restriction (CR) altered post-concussion susceptibility or resiliency using a rodent model of pediatric concussion. Rats were maintained on HFD, CR, or standard diet (STD) throughout life (including the prenatal period and weaning). At postnatal day 30, male and female rats experienced a concussion or a sham injury which was followed by 17 days of testing. Prefrontal cortex and hippocampus tissue was collected for molecular profiling. Gene expression changes in BDNF, CREB, DNMT1, FGF-2, IGF1, LEP, PGC-1α, SIRT1, Tau, and TERT were analyzed with respect to injury and diet. Analysis of telomere length (TL) using peripheral skin cells and brain tissue found that TL in skin significantly correlated with TL in brain tissue and TL was affected by dietary intake and injury status. With respect to mTBI outcomes, diet was correlated with recovery as animals on the HFD often displayed poorer performance than animals on the CR diet. Molecular analysis demonstrated that diet induced epigenetic changes that can be associated with differences in individual predisposition and resiliency to post-concussion syndrome. PMID:25698949

  7. Dietary wolfberry upregulates carotenoid metabolic genes and enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of db/db diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huifeng; Wark, Logan; Ji, Hua; Willard, Lloyd; Jaing, Yu; Han, Jing; He, Hui; Ortiz, Edlin; Zhang, Yunong; Medeiros, Denis M; Lin, Dingbo

    2013-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether dietary wolfberry altered carotenoid metabolic gene expression and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of diabetic mice. Six-week-old male db/db and wild-type mice were fed the control or wolfberry diets for 8 weeks. At study termination, liver and retinal tissues were collected for analysis by transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and HPLC. Wolfberry elevated zeaxanthin and lutein levels in the liver and retinal tissues and stimulated expression of retinal scavenger receptor class B type I, glutathione S-transferase Pi 1, and β,β-carotene 9',10'-oxygenase 2, and induced activation and nuclear enrichment of retinal AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPK-α2). Furthermore, wolfberry attenuated hypoxia and mitochondrial stress as demonstrated by declined expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and heat shock protein 60. Wolfberry enhanced retinal mitochondrial biogenesis in diabetic retinas as demonstrated by reversed mitochondrial dispersion in the retinal pigment epithelium, increased mitochondrial copy number, elevated citrate synthase activity, and upregulated expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Consumption of dietary wolfberry could be beneficial to retinoprotection through reversal of mitochondrial function in diabetic mice. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Gene expression in the liver of female, but not male mice treated with rapamycin resembles changes observed under dietary restriction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhen; Sunchu, Bharath; Fok, Wilson C; Alshaikh, Nahla; Pérez, Viviana I

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that in mice the extension in lifespan by rapamycin is sexually dimorphic, in that it has a larger effect in females than males. In a previous study we showed that in male C57BL6 mice, rapamycin had less profound effects in both gene expression and liver metabolites when compared to dietary restriction (DR), but no data was available in females. Because recent studies showed that rapamycin increases longevity in a dose dependent manner and at every dose tested the effect remains larger in females than in males, we hypothesized that rapamycin should have a stronger effect on gene expression in females, and this effect could be dose dependent. To test this hypothesis, we measured the changes in liver gene expression induced by rapamycin (14 ppm) with a focus on several genes involved in pathways known to play a role in aging and that are altered by DR. To investigate whether any effects are dose dependent, we also analyzed females treated with two additional doses of rapamycin (22 and 42 ppm). We observed striking differences between male and female in gene expression at 14 ppm, where females have a larger response to rapamycin than males, and the effects of rapamycin in females resemble what we observed under DR. However, these effects were generally not dose dependent. These data support the notion that female mice respond better to rapamycin, and at least with the set of genes studied here, the effect of rapamycin in females resemble the effect of DR.

  9. Dietary phytochemicals modulate skin gene expression profiles and result in reduced lice counts after experimental infection in Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Jodaa Holm, Helle; Wadsworth, Simon; Bjelland, Anne-Kari; Krasnov, Aleksei; Evensen, Øystein; Skugor, Stanko

    2016-05-10

    The use of phytochemicals is a promising solution in biological control against salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis). Glucosinolates belong to a diverse group of compounds used as protection against herbivores by plants in the family Brassicaceae, while in vertebrates, ingested glucosinolates exert health-promoting effects due to their antioxidant and detoxifying properties as well as effects on cell proliferation and growth. The aim of this study was to investigate if Atlantic salmon fed two different doses of glucosinolate-enriched feeds would be protected against lice infection. The effects of feeding high dose of glucosinolates before the infection, and of high and low doses five weeks into the infection were studied. Skin was screened by 15 k oligonucleotide microarray and qPCR. A 25 % reduction (P < 0.05) in lice counts was obtained in the low dose group and a 17 % reduction in the high dose group compared to fish fed control feed. Microarray analysis revealed induction of over 50 interferon (IFN)-related genes prior to lice infection. Genes upregulated five weeks into the infection in glucosinolate-enriched dietary groups included Type 1 pro-inflammatory factors, antimicrobial and acute phase proteins, extracellular matrix remodeling proteases and iron homeostasis regulators. In contrast, genes involved in muscle contraction, lipid and glucose metabolism were found more highly expressed in the skin of infected control fish. Atlantic salmon fed glucosinolates had a significantly lower number of sea lice at the end of the experimental challenge. Feeding glucosinolates coincided with increased expression of IFN-related genes, and higher expression profiles of Type 1 immune genes late into the infection. In addition, regulation of genes involved in the metabolism of iron, lipid and sugar suggested an interplay between metabolism of nutrients and mechanisms of resistance.

  10. 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene polymorphisms, dietary linoleic acid, and risk for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; John, Esther M; Ingles, Sue Ann

    2008-10-01

    The n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid 5-lipoxygenase pathway has been shown to play a role in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer. We conducted a population-based case-control study among Latina, African-American, and White women from the San Francisco Bay area to examine the association of the 5-lipoxygenase gene (ALOX5) and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein gene (ALOX5AP) with breast cancer risk. Three ALOX5AP polymorphisms [poly(A) microsatellite, -4900 A>G (rs4076128), and -3472 A>G (rs4073259)] and three ALOX5 polymorphisms [Sp1-binding site (-GGGCGG-) variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism, -1279 G>T (rs6593482), and 760 G>A (rs2228065)] were genotyped in 802 cases and 888 controls. We did not find significant main effects of ALOX5 and ALOX5AP genotypes on breast cancer risk that were consistent across race or ethnicity; however, there was a significant interaction between the ALOX5AP -4900 A>G polymorphism and dietary linoleic acid intake (P=0.03). Among women consuming a diet high in linoleic acid (top quartile of intake, >17.4 g/d), carrying the AA genotype was associated with higher breast cancer risk (age- and race-adjusted odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.9) compared with carrying genotypes AG or GG. Among women consuming dietary fat and breast cancer should take into account genetic predisposition related to n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism.

  11. Dietary L-arginine supplementation differentially regulates expression of lipid-metabolic genes in porcine adipose tissue and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bie; Yin, Yulong; Liu, Zhiqiang; Tang, Wenjie; Xu, Haijun; Kong, Xiangfeng; Li, Xinguo; Yao, Kang; Gu, Wanting; Smith, Stephen B; Wu, Guoyao

    2011-05-01

    Obesity is a major health crisis worldwide and new treatments are needed to fight this epidemic. Using the swine model, we recently reported that dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation promotes muscle gain and reduces body-fat accretion. The present study tested the hypothesis that Arg regulates expression of key genes involved in lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Sixteen 110-day-old barrows were fed for 60 days a corn- and soybean-meal-based diet supplemented with 1.0% Arg or 2.05% L-alanine (isonitrogenous control). Blood samples, longissimus dorsi muscle and overlying subcutaneous adipose tissue were obtained from 170-day-old pigs for biochemical studies. Serum concentrations of leptin, alanine and glutamine were lower, but those for Arg and proline were higher in Arg-supplemented pigs than in control pigs. The percentage of oleic acid was higher but that of stearic acid and linoleic acid was lower in muscle of Arg-supplemented pigs, compared with control pigs. Dietary Arg supplementation increased mRNA levels for fatty acid synthase in muscle, while decreasing those for lipoprotein lipase, glucose transporter-4, and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-α in adipose tissue. Additionally, mRNA levels for hormone sensitive lipase were higher in adipose tissue of Arg-supplemented pigs compared with control pigs. These results indicate that Arg differentially regulates expression of fat-metabolic genes in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue, therefore favoring lipogenesis in muscle but lipolysis in adipose tissue. Our novel findings provide a biochemical basis for explaining the beneficial effect of Arg in improving the metabolic profile in mammals (including obese humans). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dietary fatty acids affect mitochondrial phospholipid compositions and mitochondrial gene expression of rainbow trout liver at different ages.

    PubMed

    Almaida-Pagán, P F; De Santis, C; Rubio-Mejía, O L; Tocher, D R

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are among the first responders to various stressors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and organisms. Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL), particularly cardiolipin (CL), and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, liver mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, lipid peroxidation, and mtDNA gene expression were analyzed in rainbow trout fed three diets with the same base formulation but with lipid supplied either by fish oil (FO), rapeseed oil (RO), or high DHA oil (DHA) during 6 weeks. Specifically, two feeding trials were performed using fish from the same population of two ages (1 and 3 years), and PL class compositions of liver mitochondria, fatty acid composition of individual PL classes, TBARS content, and mtDNA expression were determined. Dietary fatty acid composition strongly affected mitochondrial membrane composition from trout liver but observed changes did not fully reflect the diet, particularly when it contained high DHA. The changes were PL specific, CL being particularly resistant to changes in DHA. Some significant differences observed in expression of mtDNA with diet may suggest long-term dietary effects in mitochondrial gene expression which could affect electron transport chain function. All the changes were influenced by fish age, which could be related to the different growth rates observed between 1- and 3-year-old trout but that could also indicate age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes.

  13. Daily variations in dietary lysine content alter the expression of genes related to proteolysis in chicken pectoralis major muscle.

    PubMed

    Tesseraud, Sophie; Bouvarel, Isabelle; Collin, Anne; Audouin, Estelle; Crochet, Sabine; Seiliez, Iban; Leterrier, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Amino acids are known to be anabolic factors that affect protein metabolism, but the response of animals to daily amino acid changes is little understood. We aimed to test the effects of feeding birds with alternations of diets varying in lysine content on the expression of genes related to proteolysis in chicken muscle. Cyclic feeding programs with 2 diets, each given for 24 h during 48-h cycles, were carried out from 10 d of age. Three programs were used: 1) control treatment with continuous distribution of a complete diet containing standard medium lysine level (ML; 11.9 g/kg); 2) alternation of diets with high (HL) and low (LL) lysine levels; 3) alternation of ML and LL diets, where LL = 70%, ML = 100%, HL = 130% of standard lysine level. The Pectoralis major muscles were sampled after 2 wk of cyclic feeding. Measurements included the expression patterns of 6 genes involved in proteolysis, and mammalian target of rapamycin and Forkhead box-O transcription factor (FoxO) signaling. Cathepsin B, m-calpain, and E3 ubiquitin ligases Muscle Ring Finger-1 and Muscle Atrophy F box were significantly overexpressed in chickens transiently fed the LL diet, whereas the mRNA levels of 20S proteasome C2 subunit and ubiquitin remained unchanged. Modifications of E3 ubiquitin ligase expression can be partly explained by significant changes in FoxO phosphorylation with cyclic dietary treatments. Our results suggest timing-sensitive regulation of proteolysis in chicken muscle according to dietary treatment and a high metabolism capacity to compensate for changes in amino acid supply, which might be used for nutritional purposes.

  14. Dietary selenium and prolonged exercise alter gene expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes in equine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    White, S H; Johnson, S E; Bobel, J M; Warren, L K

    2016-07-01

    Untrained Thoroughbred horses (6 mares and 6 geldings; 11 yr [SE 1] and 565 kg [SE 11]) were used to evaluate antioxidant gene expression and enzyme activity in blood and skeletal muscle in response to prolonged exercise after receiving 2 levels of dietary selenium for 36 d: 0.1 (CON; = 6) or 0.3 mg/kg DM (SEL; = 6). Horses were individually fed 1.6% BW coastal bermudagrass hay, 0.4% BW whole oats, and a mineral/vitamin premix containing no Se. Sodium selenite was added to achieve either 0.1 or 0.3 mg Se/kg DM in the total diet. On d 35, horses underwent 2 h of submaximal exercise in a free-stall exerciser. Blood samples were obtained before (d 0) and after 34 d of Se supplementation and on d 35 to 36 immediately after exercise and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Biopsies of the middle gluteal muscle were obtained on d 0, before exercise on d 34, and at 6 and 24 h after exercise. Supplementation with Se above the NRC requirement (SEL) increased serum Se ( = 0.011) and muscle thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) activity ( = 0.051) but had no effect on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in plasma, red blood cell (RBC) lysate, or muscle in horses at rest. Serum creatine kinase activity increased ( < 0.0001) in response to prolonged exercise but was not affected by dietary treatment. Serum lipid hydroperoxides were affected by treatment ( = 0.052) and were higher ( = 0.012) in horses receiving CON than SEL immediately following exercise. Muscle expression of was unchanged at 6 h but increased ( = 0.005) 2.8-fold 24 h after exercise, whereas muscle TrxR activity remained unchanged. Glutathione peroxidase activity increased in plasma (P < 0.0001) and decreased in RBC lysate ( = 0.010) after prolonged exercise. A Se treatment × time interaction was observed for RBC GPx activity (P = 0.048). Muscle and expression and GPx activity did not change during the 24-h period after exercise. Level of dietary Se had no overall effect on expression of , , , , , , or in muscle following

  15. Dietary resveratrol supplementation normalizes gene expression in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jency; Garg, Manohar Lal; Smith, Doug William

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes is associated with cognitive impairment and brain aging, with alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity implicated in these changes. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, readily implemented strategies are increasingly needed in order to protect the brain's cognitive functions. One possibility is resveratrol (RES) (3,5,4- trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenol of the phytoalexin family that has been shown to be protective in a number of neuropathology paradigms. In the present study, we sought to determine whether dietary supplementation with RES has potential for the protection of cognitive functions in diabetes. Diabetes was induced using streptozotocin, and once stable, animals received AIN93G rodent diet supplemented with RES for 6 weeks. Genome-wide expression analysis was conducted on the hippocampus and genes of interest were confirmed by quantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of the hippocampus revealed that RES supplementation of the diabetic group resulted in 481 differentially expressed genes compared to non-supplemented diabetic mice. Intriguingly, gene expression that was previously found significantly altered in the hippocampus of diabetic mice, and that is implicated in neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity (Hdac4, Hat1, Wnt7a, ApoE), was normalized following RES supplementation. In addition, pathway analysis revealed Jak-Stat signaling was the most significantly enriched pathway. The Jak-Stat pathway induces a pro-inflammatory signaling cascade, and we found most genes involved in this cascade (e.g. Il15, Il22, Socs2, Socs5) had significantly lower expression following RES supplementation. These data indicate RES could be neuroprotective and beneficial for the maintenance of cognitive function in diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel gene-by-environment interactions: APOB and NPC1L1 variants affect the relationship between dietary and total plasma cholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel S.; Burt, Amber A.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Jarvik, Ella R.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Plasma cholesterol level is a key risk factor in CVD pathogenesis. Genetic and dietary variation both influence plasma cholesterol; however, little is known about dietary interactions with genetic variants influencing the absorption and transport of dietary cholesterol. We sought to determine whether gut expressed variants predicting plasma cholesterol differentially affected the relationship between dietary and plasma cholesterol levels in 1,128 subjects (772/356 in the discovery/replication cohorts, respectively). Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within three genes (APOB, CETP, and NPC1L1) were significantly associated with plasma cholesterol in the discovery cohort. These were subsequently evaluated for gene-by-environment (GxE) interactions with dietary cholesterol for the prediction of plasma cholesterol, with significant findings tested for replication. Novel GxE interactions were identified and replicated for two variants: rs1042034, an APOB Ser4338Asn missense SNP and rs2072183 (in males only), a synonymous NPC1L1 SNP in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs 5′ of NPC1L1. This study identifies the presence of novel GxE and gender interactions implying that differential gut absorption is the basis for the variant associations with plasma cholesterol. These GxE interactions may account for part of the “missing heritability” not accounted for by genetic associations. PMID:23482652

  17. Effects of dietary neutral detergent fiber and starch ratio on rumen epithelial cell morphological structure and gene expression in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Zhao, M; Zhao, L S; Xu, J C; Loor, J J; Bu, D P

    2017-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio on rumen epithelial morphological structure and gene expression. Eight primiparous dairy cows including 4 ruminally fistulated cows were assigned to 4 total mixed rations with neutral detergent fiber to starch ratios of 0.86, 1.18, 1.63, and 2.34 in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design. The duration of each period was 21 d including 14 d for adaptation and 7 d for sampling. Rumen epithelial papillae were collected from the ruminally fistulated cows for morphological structure examination and mRNA expression analysis using quantitative real-time PCR of several genes related to volatile fatty acid absorption and metabolism, and cellular growth. Increasing dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio resulted in a linear increase in the thickness of the stratum spinosum and basale. In contrast, expression of HMGCS2 (encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of ketone bodies) decreased linearly, whereas the expression of MCT2 (encoding a transporter of volatile fatty acid) increased linearly with increasing dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio. As dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio increased, expression of IGFBP5 (a gene related to the growth of rumen epithelial papillae) decreased, whereas IGFBP6 expression increased. Both of these IGFBP genes are regulated by short-chain fatty acids. Overall, the data indicate that dietary neutral detergent fiber to starch ratio can alter the thickness of the rumen epithelial papillae partly through changes in expression of genes associated with regulating volatile fatty acid absorption, metabolism, and cell growth. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Increasing levels of dietary crystalline methionine affect plasma methionine profiles, ammonia excretion, and the expression of genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Rolland, Marine; Skov, Peter V; Larsen, Bodil K; Holm, Jørgen; Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Dalsgaard, Johanne

    2016-08-01

    Strictly carnivorous fish with high requirements for dietary protein, such as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are interesting models for studying the role of amino acids as key regulators of intermediary metabolism. Methionine is an essential amino acid for rainbow trout, and works as a signalling factor in different metabolic pathways. The study investigated the effect of increasing dietary methionine intake on the intermediary metabolism in the liver of juvenile rainbow trout. For this purpose, five diets were formulated with increasing methionine levels from 0.60 to 1.29% dry matter. The diets were fed in excess for six weeks before three sampling campaigns carried out successively to elucidate (i) the hepatic expression of selected genes involved in lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolism; (ii) the postprandial ammonia excretion; and (iii) the postprandial plasma methionine concentrations. The transcript levels of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism (fatty acid synthase, glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 a), gluconeogenesis (fructose-1,6-biphosphatase) and amino acid catabolism (alanine amino transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase) were significantly affected by the increase in dietary methionine. Changes in gene expression reflected to some extent the decrease in ammonia excretion (P=0.022) and in the hepatosomatic index (HSI; P<0.001) when dietary methionine increased. Postprandial plasma methionine concentrations correlated positively with the dietary level (P<0.001) at the different sampling points. The study shows that the expression of several genes related to the hepatic intermediary metabolism in rainbow trout responded in a dose-dependent manner to increasing levels of dietary methionine.

  19. Dietary lipid levels impact lipoprotein lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, and fatty acid synthetase gene expression in three tissues of adult GIFT strain of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Juan; Wu, Fan; Yang, Chang-Geng; Jiang, Ming; Liu, Wei; Wen, Hua

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dietary lipids on growth performance, body composition, serum parameters, and expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in adult genetically improved farmed tilapia (GIFT strain) of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. We randomly assigned adult male Nile tilapia (average initial body weight = 220.00 ± 9.54 g) into six groups consisting of four replicates (20 fish per replicate). Fish in each group were hand-fed a semi-purified diets containing different lipid levels [3.3 (the control group), 28.4, 51.4, 75.4, 101.9, and 124.1 g kg(-1)] for 8 weeks. The results indicated that there was no obvious effect in feeding rate among all groups (P > 0.05). The highest weight gain, specific growth rate, and protein efficiency ratio in 75.4 g kg(-1) diet group were increased by 23.31, 16.17, and 22.02 % than that of fish in the control group (P < 0.05). Protein retention ratio was highest in 51.4 g kg(-1) diet group. The results revealed that the optimum dietary lipid level for maximum growth performance is 76.6-87.9 g kg(-1). Increasing dietary lipid levels contributed to increased tissue and whole body lipid levels. Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased, and polyunsaturated fatty acids increased with increasing dietary lipid levels. With the exception of MUFAs, the fatty acid profiles of liver and muscle were similar. Dietary lipid levels were negatively correlated with low-density lipoprotein- cholesterol content and positively with triacylglycerol and glucose contents. In the lipid-fed groups, there was a significant down-regulation of fatty acid synthase (FAS) mRNA in liver, muscle, and visceral adipose tissues. There was a rapid up-regulation of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA in muscle and liver with increasing dietary lipid levels. In visceral adipose tissue, LPL mRNA was significantly down-regulated in the lipid-fed groups. Dietary lipids increased hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) m

  20. Dietary lutein modulates growth and survival genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Kanakasabai, Saravanan; Gokarn, Sarita V; Krueger, Eric G; Bright, John J

    2015-02-01

    Lutein is a carotenoid pigment present in fruits and vegetables that has anti-inflammatory and antitumor properties. In this study, we examined the effect of lutein on proliferation and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer (PC-3) cells. We found that in vitro culture of PC-3 cells with lutein induced mild decrease in proliferation that improved in combination treatment with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists and other chemotherapeutic agents. Flow cytometry analyses showed that lutein improved drug-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer. Gene array and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that lutein altered the expression of growth and apoptosis-associated biomarker genes in PC-3 cells. These findings highlight that lutein modulates the expression of growth and survival-associated genes in prostate cancer cells.

  1. Dietary fish protein alters blood lipid concentrations and hepatic genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the rat model.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Anjali; Bettzieche, Anja; Hirche, Frank; Brandsch, Corinna; Stangl, Gabriele I; Eder, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    It is known that various dietary plant proteins are capable of influencing the lipid metabolism of human subjects and animals when compared with casein. Less, however, is known about the effects of fish protein on the cholesterol and triacylglycerol metabolism. Therefore, two experiments were conducted in which rats were fed diets containing 200 g of either fish protein, prepared from Alaska pollack fillets, or casein, which served as control, per kilogram, over 20 and 22 d, respectively. As parameters of lipid metabolism, the concentrations of cholesterol and triacylglycerols in the plasma and liver, the faecal excretion of bile acids and the hepatic expression of genes encoding proteins involved in lipid homeostasis were determined. In both experiments, rats fed fish protein had higher concentrations of cholesteryl esters in the liver, a lower concentration of cholesterol in the HDL fraction (rho > 1.063 kg/l) and lower plasma triacylglycerol concentrations than rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The gene expression analysis performed in experiment 2 showed that rats fed fish protein had higher relative mRNA concentrations of sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-2, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, LDL receptor, apo AI, scavenger receptor B1 and lecithin-cholesterol-acyltransferase in their liver than did rats fed casein (P < 0.05). The faecal excretion of bile acids and the mRNA concentrations of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, SREBP-1c and corresponding target genes were not altered. These findings show that fish protein had multiple effects on plasma and liver lipids that were at least in part caused by an altered expression of the hepatic genes involved in lipid homeostasis.

  2. Maternal dietary betaine supplementation modifies hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes via epigenetic mechanisms in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Cai, Demin; Jia, Yimin; Lu, Jingyu; Yuan, Mengjie; Sui, Shiyan; Song, Haogang; Zhao, Ruqian

    2014-11-14

    To elucidate the effects of maternal dietary betaine supplementation on hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes in newborn piglets and the involved epigenetic mechanisms, we fed gestational sows with control or betaine-supplemented diets (3 g/kg) throughout pregnancy. Neonatal piglets born to betaine-supplemented sows had higher serum methionine concentration and hepatic content of betaine, which was associated with significantly up-regulated hepatic expression of glycine N-methyltransferase. Prenatal betaine exposure increased hepatic cholesterol content and modified the hepatic expression of cholesterol metabolic genes in neonatal piglets. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 was down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) was down-regulated at the mRNA level, but up-regulated at the protein level, in betaine-exposed piglets. The transcriptional repression of HMGCR was associated with CpG island hypermethylation and higher repressive histone mark H3K27me3 (histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation) on the promoter, whereas increased HMGCR protein content was associated with significantly decreased expression of miR-497. Furthermore, LDL receptor was significantly down-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets, which was associated with promoter CpG hypermethylation. In addition, the expression of cholesterol-27α-hydroxylase (CYP27α1) was up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels, while the expression of cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7α1) was increased at the mRNA level, but unchanged at the protein level associated with increased expression of miR-181. These results indicate that maternal betaine supplementation increases hepatic cholesterol content in neonatal piglets through epigenetic regulations of cholesterol metabolic genes, which involve alterations in DNA and histone methylation and in the expression of microRNA targeting these genes.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of VHL gene mutations in renal cell carcinoma patients: relation to dietary and other factors.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Jiang, Yongwen; Ma, Xin; Yang, Ke; Egevad, Lars; Lindblad, Per

    2002-05-01

    Carcinogenic chemicals act through DNA damage and mitogenic effects. No established mechanism explains the cancer preventive effects, if any, of food items, such as vegetables and fruit. If such data were available, preferably on tumor-initiating genes, the evidence for the protective effects would become stronger. The von Hipple-Lindau (VHL) gene is the tumor suppressor gene predisposing to both sporadic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and von Hippel-Lindau disease. We have earlier analyzed VHL mutations in RCCs from 102 Swedish patients identified in a case-control study and here examine associations between patient characteristics, including dietary habits and mutations, considering the type of mutation. The results are given as odds ratios (OR), separately for smokers and all patients. In univariate analysis, consumption of vegetables and citrus fruit decreased the frequency of VHL mutations among smokers and citrus fruit among all patients. In multivariate analysis of smokers' characteristics, welding fumes showed a risk of 5.63 for multiple VHL mutations. In smokers, citrus fruit decreased the OR of GC to AT mutations to 0.13 and that of multiple mutations to 0.17; vegetables decreased the OR for single mutations to 0.22. Among all subjects, welding fumes were a risk factor and citrus fruit a protective factor. Additionally, an intake of selenium protected against multiple mutations. The present results provide evidence that the intake of vegetables, selenium and particularly of citrus fruit protects the renal VHL gene from mutational insults that may be endogenous or common in a population. Even though most of the associations are biologically plausible, and vegetables and fruit were an a priori hypothesis, fortuitous results cannot be ruled out in this relatively small study.

  4. [Effects of different dietary fatty acid on expression of nuclear receptor genes in breast cancer of rats].

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Mi, Man-tian; Wang, Bin; Zhu, Jun-dong; Zhu, Da-peng; Yuan, Jia-lin

    2007-07-01

    To study the effects of different dietary fatty acid on the expression of nuclear receptor genes in the breast cancer of rats. Fifty-day-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on eight different diets containing following fatty acids: saturated fatty acid (SFA); monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA); n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA); n-3 PUFA; 1:1 n-6/n-3; 5:1 n-6/n-3; 10:1 n-6/n-3; 1:2:1 S/M/P (n-6/n-3 at 1:1). The rats were given a single intraperitoneal injection of methyl-nitrosourea (MNU) at 50 mg/kg body weight to establish the rat model of mammary carcinogenesis, the ultrastructure changes of mammary gland cells in rats were observed by transmission electron microscope, the cell proliferation activity was detected by BrdU-labeled immunocytochemistry, and the expression of PPARbeta and PPARgamma mRNA were assayed by RT-PCR. There was no breast cancer occurring in control groups and the MNU-treated n-3 PUFA group, and the ultrastructure and proliferation activity of mammary gland cells in these groups were normal. In contrast, there appeared obvious marker of adenocarcinomas in mammary gland cells of MNU-induced breast cancer, and a high cell proliferation activity was found in tumor growth-enhancing groups (SFA, MUFA, n-6 PUFA, 5:1 n-6/n-3, 10:1 n-6/n-3 and S/M/P, 21% - 22% of BrdU-labeled cells), while a low cell proliferation activity was detected in rats fed with 1:1 n-6/n-3 diet (13% of BrdU-labeled cells, P < 0.05). Moreover, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), as important nuclear receptor genes of relating lipid metabolism, the expressions of PPARbeta and PPARgamma mRNA were significantly up-regulated in mammary adipose tissues of MNU-induced breast cancer as compared with the control groups, but the expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) in rats fed with 1:1 n-6/n-3 group were lowest (P < 0.05). The different dietary fatty acid compositions should diversely adjust the expression of PPARs gene in

  5. The effect of sodium alginate on the immune response of tiger shrimp via dietary administration: activity and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Hung; Yeh, Shinn-Pyng; Kuo, Chin-Ming; Cheng, Winton; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2006-10-01

    The total haemocyte count (THC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (release of superoxide anions), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as expressions of beta-1,3-glucan-binding protein (betaGBP), prophenoloxidase (proPO), peroxinectin (PE), cytosolic SOD (cyt-SOD), penaeidin-5 (PA-5), and a single whey acidic protein (WAP) domain protein (SWDP) gene were determined in the tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (15.6-19.5g) which had individually been fed diets containing sodium alginate at 0, 1.0, or 2.0gkg(-1) for 5months. Results showed that shrimp fed a diet containing 1.0 and 2.0gkg(-1) sodium alginate had significantly increased SOD activity but decreased respiratory bursts. The expressions of betaGBP, PE, cyt-SOD, PA-5, and SWDP were significantly elevated in shrimp fed the dietary administration to modify immune genes expression of shrimp.

  6. Differential transcriptional modulation of duplicated fatty acid-binding protein genes by dietary fatty acids in zebrafish (Danio rerio): evidence for subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization of duplicated genes.

    PubMed

    Karanth, Santhosh; Lall, Santosh P; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Wright, Jonathan M

    2009-09-02

    In the Duplication-Degeneration-Complementation (DDC) model, subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization have been proposed as important processes driving the retention of duplicated genes in the genome. These processes are thought to occur by gain or loss of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. We tested the DDC model by determining the transcriptional induction of fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps) genes by dietary fatty acids (FAs) in zebrafish. We chose zebrafish for this study for two reasons: extensive bioinformatics resources are available for zebrafish at zfin.org and zebrafish contains many duplicated genes owing to a whole genome duplication event that occurred early in the ray-finned fish lineage approximately 230-400 million years ago. Adult zebrafish were fed diets containing either fish oil (12% lipid, rich in highly unsaturated fatty acid), sunflower oil (12% lipid, rich in linoleic acid), linseed oil (12% lipid, rich in linolenic acid), or low fat (4% lipid, low fat diet) for 10 weeks. FA profiles and the steady-state levels of fabp mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA in intestine, liver, muscle and brain of zebrafish were determined. FA profiles assayed by gas chromatography differed in the intestine, brain, muscle and liver depending on diet. The steady-state level of mRNA for three sets of duplicated genes, fabp1a/fabp1b.1/fabp1b.2, fabp7a/fabp7b, and fabp11a/fabp11b, was determined by reverse transcription, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). In brain, the steady-state level of fabp7b mRNAs was induced in fish fed the linoleic acid-rich diet; in intestine, the transcript level of fabp1b.1 and fabp7b were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich diet; in liver, the level of fabp7a mRNAs was elevated in fish fed the low fat diet; and in muscle, the level of fabp7a and fabp11a mRNAs were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich or the low fat diets. In all cases, induction of the steady-state level of

  7. Dietary starch intake modifies the relation between copy number variation in the salivary amylase gene and BMI.

    PubMed

    Rukh, Gull; Ericson, Ulrika; Andersson-Assarsson, Johanna; Orho-Melander, Marju; Sonestedt, Emily

    2017-07-01

    Background: Studies have shown conflicting associations between the salivary amylase gene (AMY1) copy number and obesity. Salivary amylase initiates starch digestion in the oral cavity; starch is a major source of energy in the diet.Objective: We investigated the association between AMY1 copy number and obesity traits, and the effect of the interaction between AMY1 copy number and starch intake on these obesity traits.Design: We first assessed the association between AMY1 copy number (genotyped by digital droplet polymerase chain reaction) and obesity traits in 4800 individuals without diabetes (mean age: 57 y; 60% female) from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Cohort. Then we analyzed interactions between AMY1 copy number and energy-adjusted starch intake (obtained by a modified diet history method) on body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage.Results:AMY1 copy number was not associated with BMI (P = 0.80) or body fat percentage (P = 0.38). We observed a significant effect of the interaction between AMY1 copy number and starch intake on BMI (P-interaction = 0.007) and body fat percentage (P-interaction = 0.03). Upon stratification by dietary starch intake, BMI tended to decrease with increasing AMY1 copy numbers in the low-starch intake group (P = 0.07) and tended to increase with increasing AMY1 copy numbers in the high-starch intake group (P = 0.08). The lowest mean BMI was observed in the group of participants with a low AMY1 copy number and a high dietary intake of starch.Conclusions: Our findings suggest an effect of the interaction between starch intake and AMY1 copy number on obesity. Individuals with high starch intake but low genetic capacity to digest starch had the lowest BMI, potentially because larger amounts of undigested starch are transported through the gastrointestinal tract, contributing to fewer calories extracted from ingested starch. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Gene expression, serum amino acid levels, and growth performance of pigs fed dietary leucine and lysine at different ratios.

    PubMed

    García, H; Morales, A; Araiza, A; Htoo, J K; Cervantes, M

    2015-03-06

    We examined 96 pigs (28.1 ± 0.83 kg) to analyze the effect of Leu:Lys ratios on expression of the cationic amino acid transporters b(0,+) and CAT-1 in the jejunum and liver as well as myosin expression in 2 muscles to estimate the optimum standardized ileal digestible (SID) Leu:Lys ratio for growth rate and efficiency. A wheat-and wheat bran-based diets were formulated to meet the requirements of SID amino acids other than Leu (0.70%) and Lys (0.80%). L-Leu was added to the basal diet in 5 SID Leu:Lys ratios (88, 100, 120, 140, and 160% in diets 1-5). Tissue samples were collected from 8 pigs with ratios of 88, 120, and 160%. Relative expression of b(0,+), CAT-1, and myosin was analyzed. b(0,+) expression in the jejunum was higher but lower in the liver of pigs with the 120% ratio compared to those with the 88 or 160% ratio; myosin expression in longissimus dorsi was also higher in pigs with the 120% ratio (P < 0.05). CAT-1 was lower in the jejunum and longissimus dorsi of pigs with 120 or 160% ratios than in pigs with 88%. Serum concentration of nearly all amino acids decreased with excess dietary Leu (P < 0.05). The SID Leu:Lys of 104 and 109% optimized average daily gain and feed conversion ratio, respectively. Thus, the dietary Leu:Lys ratio affects the expression of genes coding for amino acid transporters and myosin, the availability of Lys, and the growth rate and efficiency in pigs.

  9. Dietary exposure to Aroclor 1254 alters gene expression in Xenopus laevis frogs.

    PubMed

    Jelaso, Anna M; DeLong, Cari; Means, Jay; Ide, Charles F

    2005-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental pollutants that contribute to worldwide health problems. Despite data associating PCBs with adverse health effects, decisions to clean up contaminated sites remain controversial. Cleanup decisions are typically based on risk assessment methods that are not sensitive enough to detect subtle changes in health. We have recently shown that gene expression signatures can serve as sensitive molecular biomarkers of exposure and related health effects. Our initial studies were carried out with developing Xenopus laevis tadpoles that were exposed to the PCB mixture Aroclor 1254 (A1254) for 2 days. A1254 was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and added to the aquarium water for rapid loading of PCBs into the tadpole tissue. These studies showed that increases in the expression of specific genes occurred independent of adverse health effects, and decreases in specific genes correlated with the appearance of observable health effects, including decreased survival and gross morphological and behavioral abnormalities. In this report, we extend our previous work to test the use of gene expression signatures as biomarkers in frogs exposed to PCBs through the diet from early tadpole stages through metamorphosis. This work showed that chronic low-dose exposure to A1254 (24 ppm) in food produced tissue levels of 17 ppm and increased gene expression of nerve growth factor and proopiomelanocortin independent of adverse health effects. Exposure to higher doses of A1254 (200 ppm) produced tissue levels of 80 ppm and increased expression of p450 1A1, also, independent of adverse health effects. This work provides further evidence for the use of gene expression changes as biomarkers of exposure to PCBs.

  10. Optimizing Dietary Restriction for Genetic Epistasis Analysis and Gene Discovery in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Mair, William; Panowski, Siler H.; Shaw, Reuben J.; Dillin, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) increases mammalian lifespan and decreases susceptibility to many age-related diseases. Lifespan extension due to DR is conserved across a wide range of species. Recent research has focused upon genetically tractable model organisms such as C. elegans to uncover the genetic mechanisms that regulate the response to DR, in the hope that this information will provide insight into the mammalian response and yield potential therapeutic targets. However, no consensus exists as to the best protocol to apply DR to C. elegans and potential key regulators of DR are protocol-specific. Here we define a DR method that better fulfills criteria required for an invertebrate DR protocol to mirror mammalian studies. The food intake that maximizes longevity varies for different genotypes and informative epistasis analysis with another intervention is only achievable at this ‘optimal DR’ level. Importantly therefore, the degree of restriction imposed using our method can easily be adjusted to determine the genotype-specific optimum DR level. We used this protocol to test two previously identified master regulators of DR in the worm. In contrast to previous reports, we find that DR can robustly extend the lifespan of worms lacking the AMP-activated protein kinase catalytic subunit AAK2 or the histone deacetylase SIR-2.1, highlighting the importance of first optimizing DR to identify universal regulators of DR mediated longevity. PMID:19229346

  11. Effect of maternal dietary energy types on placenta nutrient transporter gene expressions and intrauterine fetal growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Zhuo, Yong; Fang, Zheng-feng; Che, Lian-qiang; Wu, De

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of maternal dietary energy types on the mRNA expressions of the placental nutrient transporter and intrauterine fetal growth and to examine whether altered intrauterine fetal growth could be associated with different gene expressions relating to fetal energy metabolism and DNA methylation. Seventy-two 3-mo-old rats were allocated to one of four groups: low fat/low fiber (L-L), low fat/high fiber, high fat/low fiber (H-L), or high fat/high fiber. Rats were fed the treatment diets 4 wk before mating and continued in pregnancy until sample collections were obtained on days 13.5 and 17.5 of pregnancy. The fetal weight in the L-L group was significantly lower than that in the H-L group (P < 0.05). The placental nutrient transporter mRNA expressions of glucose transporter-3 (Slc2a3) and cationic amino acid transporter-1 (Slc7a1) in the L-L group with a decreased fetal weight were downregulated compared with that in the H-L group with an increased fetal weight. However, placental Slc2a1 and the system A amino acid transporter gene Slc38a4 mRNA expressions were adaptively upregulated by the L-L diet with a decreased fetal weight (P < 0.05). For the placental imprinted gene Igf-2 and H19 expressions, lower Igf-2 and higher H19 expressions were associated with the decreased fetal growth in the L-L group compared with the H-L group with an increased fetal weight. Different fetal growth was associated with different DNA methyltransferase-1 and methyltransferase-3a expressions (P > 0.05) and energy metabolism-related genes. Collectively, these results demonstrated that intrauterine fetal growth could be affected by different energy intake types through placenta nutrient transporter gene expressions, and different fetal growths were associated with altered fetal genes related to DNA methylation and energy metabolism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene variant (rs9939609) with dietary intake in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Tiina; Lindström, Jaana; Paananen, Jussi; Eriksson, Johan G; Karhunen, Leila; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uusitupa, Matti

    2012-11-28

    A cluster of variants in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with the common form of obesity. Well-documented dietary data are required for identifying how the genetic risk can be modified by dietary factors. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between the FTO risk allele (rs9939609) and dietary intake, and to evaluate how dietary intake affects the association between FTO and BMI in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study during a mean follow-up of 3·2 years. A total of 479 (BMI >25 kg/m2) men and women were genotyped for rs9939609. The participants completed a 3 d food record at baseline and before every annual study visit. The average intakes at baseline and during the years 1, 2 and 3 were calculated. At baseline, the FTO variant rs9939609 was not associated with the mean values of total energy intake, macronutrients or fibre. At baseline, a higher BMI by the FTO risk genotype was detected especially in those who reported a diet high in fat with mean BMI of 30·6 (sd 4·1), 31·3 (sd 4·6) and 34·5 (sd 6·2) kg/m2 for TT, TA and AA carriers, respectively (P =0·005). Higher BMI was also observed in those who had a diet low in carbohydrates (P =0·028) and fibre (P =0·015). However, in the analyses adjusted for total energy intake, age and sex, significant interactions between FTO and dietary intakes were not found. These findings suggest that the association between the FTO genotype and obesity is influenced by the components of dietary intake, and the current dietary recommendations are particularly beneficial for those who are genetically susceptible for obesity.

  13. Coexisting role of fasting or feeding and dietary lipids in the control of gene expression of enzymes involved in the synthesis of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Sánchez González, Raúl; Sánchez García, Apolos M; Lòpez-Alarcòn, Mardia

    2012-03-15

    In the liver, maintaining lipid homeostasis is regulated by physiological and exogenous factors. These lipids are synthesized by Fasn, elongases and desaturases. Interactions in an organism among these factors are quite complex and, to date, relatively little is known about them. The aim of this study was to evaluate the coexisting role of physiological (insulin, fasting and feeding) and exogenous (dietary lipids) factors in the control of gene expression of Fasn, elongases and desaturases via Srebf-1c in liver from rats. Gene expression of encoding enzymes for fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid composition was evaluated in liver from rats in fasting and feeding (at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after feeding) when food intake (adequate or high-lipid diet) was synchronized to a restricted period of 7h. Fasn, Scd and Fads2 were induced during 120 min after initial feeding in both dietary groups. This induction may be activated in part by insulin via Srebf-1c. Also, we showed for the first time that Elovl7 may be regulated by insulin and dietary lipids. The failure to synthesize saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids is consistent with a downregulation of Fasn and Scd, respectively, by dietary lipids. A higher content of LC-PUFAs was observed due to a high expression of Elovl2 and Elovl5, although Fads2 was suppressed by dietary lipids. Therefore, elongases may have a mechanism that is Srebf-1c-independent. This study suggests that a high-lipid diet triggers, during 120 min after initial feeding, a tight coordination among de novo lipogenesis, elongation, and desaturation and may not always be regulated by Srebf-1c. Finally, upregulation by feeding (insulin) of Fasn, Scd, Fads2 and Srebf-1c is insufficient to compensate for the inhibitory effect of dietary lipids.

  14. Dietary exposure of largemouth bass to OCPs changes expression of genes important for reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Barber, D.S.; Gross, T.S.; Johnson, K.G.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Szabo, N.J.; Denslow, N.D.

    2006-01-01

    Dieldrin and p,p???-DDE are ubiquitous contaminants known to act as endocrine disruptors, causing impaired development and reproduction in fish and wildlife. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which dieldrin and p,p???-DDE cause endocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), fish were exposed subchronically through the diet to both contaminants. Following 120 days of exposure, p,p???-DDE decreased estradiol in females, but increased 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Dieldrin on the other hand, decreased estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Both pesticides also altered steady state mRNA expression levels of a set of genes chosen to represent three possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption: (1) direct interaction with soluble sex steroid receptors, (2) biosynthesis of endogenous sex hormones, and (3) metabolism of endogenous hormones. p,p???-DDE acted as a weak estrogen, increasing the expression of vitellogenin and estrogen receptor ?? in the liver. p,p???-DDE also altered the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of endogenous hormones as well as their metabolism. Dieldrin, on the other hand, only altered expression of vitellogenin and not estrogen receptor ??. Dieldrin also altered the expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis and metabolism, and it dramatically lowered plasma hormone levels. Both pesticides targeted expression of genes involved in all three modes of action, suggesting that they each have multiple modes of action. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary exposure of largemouth bass to OCPs changes expression of genes important for reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Barber, David S.; Gross, Timothy S.; Johnson, Kevin G.; Sepúlveda, María S.; Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D.

    2007-01-01

    Dieldrin and p,p′-DDE are ubiquitous contaminants known to act as endocrine disruptors, causing impaired development and reproduction in fish and wildlife. In order to elucidate the mechanisms by which dieldrin and p,p′-DDE cause endocrine disruption in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), fish were exposed subchronically through the diet to both contaminants. Following 120 days of exposure, p,p′-DDE decreased estradiol in females, but increased 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Dieldrin on the other hand, decreased estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone in both sexes. Both pesticides also altered steady state mRNA expression levels of a set of genes chosen to represent three possible mechanisms of endocrine disruption: (1) direct interaction with soluble sex steroid receptors, (2) biosynthesis of endogenous sex hormones, and (3) metabolism of endogenous hormones. p,p′-DDE acted as a weak estrogen, increasing the expression of vitellogenin and estrogen receptor α in the liver. p,p′-DDE also altered the expression of genes involved in the synthesis of endogenous hormones as well as their metabolism. Dieldrin, on the other hand, only altered expression of vitellogenin and not estrogen receptor α . Dieldrin also altered the expression of genes involved in hormone synthesis and metabolism, and it dramatically lowered plasma hormone levels. Both pesticides targeted expression of genes involved in all three modes of action, suggesting that they each have multiple modes of action. PMID:16765462

  16. Profile of select hepatic insulin signaling pathway genes in response to 2-aminoanthracene dietary ingestion.

    PubMed

    Mattis, N D; Jay, J W; Barnett, G W; Rosaldo, J J; Howerth, E W; Means, J C; Gato, W E

    2014-01-01

    Some genes that regulate various processes such as insulin signaling, glucose metabolism, fatty acid, and lipid biosynthesis were profiled. The objective of the current investigation is to examine the mRNA expression of some genes that mediate insulin signaling due to 2AA toxicity. 2AA is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that has been detected in broiled food and tobacco smoke. Twenty-four post-weaning 3-4-week-old F344 male rats were exposed to 0 mg/kg-diet, 50 mg/kg-diet, 75 mg/kg-diet, and 100 mg/kgdiet 2AA for 2 weeks and 4 weeks. The mRNA expression of AKT1, G6PC, GCK, GLUT4, INSR, IRS1, PP1R3C, PAMPK, SOCS 2, and SREBF1 was determined by qRTPCR followed by the quantification of G6PC and AMPK via ELISA. The results suggest that 2AA modulates these genes depending on the length of exposure. Up-regulation of AMPK and SOCS2 genes in animals treated with 100 mg/kg-diet and 50 mg/kg-diet, respectively, during 14 days of feeding was noted. G6PC expression was inhibited in the 2-week group while being dose-dependently increased in the 4-week group. Hepatic activity of G6PC was enhanced significantly in the livers of rats that ingested 2AA. It appears that 2AA intoxication leads to the activation of irs1 and akt1 genes in the liver. Quantified AMPK amounts increased significantly in the short-term treatment group. Dose-dependent rise of AMPK in animals treated to 2AA showed an increased production of hepatic AMPK in response to the toxicity of 2AA in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. In contrast, the reduction in AMPK concentration in treated animals within the 4-week set indicated an adaptive recovery.

  17. Dietary fermentable fiber upregulated immune related genes expression, increased innate immune response and resistance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) against Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Yarahmadi, Peyman; Kolangi Miandare, Hamed; Farahmand, Hamid; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein

    2014-12-01

    This trial was carried out to investigate the effects of dietary administration of Vitacel(®), a commercial fermentable fiber, on immune related genes (Lysozyme, TNFα and HSP70) expression, innate immune response and resistance of rainbow trout against Aeromonas hydrophila. 120 healthy rainbow trout (81.65 ± 1.49 g) were distributed in six fiberglass tanks assigned to two treatments. The treatments were feeding rainbow trout with diets supplemented with 0 (control) or 10 g kg(-1) Vitacel(®) for 45 days. The results revealed that administration of fermentable fiber significantly (P < 0.05) upregulated lysozyme and TNFα gene expression. HSP70 gene expression was significantly lower in Vitacel(®) fed fish at the end of trial (P < 0.05). Furthermore dietary administrations of Vitacel(®) remarkably elevated rainbow trout innate immune parameters include serum lysozyme, ACH50, bactericidal activity and agglutination antibody titer (P < 0.05). Administration of 10 g kg(-1) Vitacel(®) significantly increased rainbow trout resistance against A. hydrophila (P < 0.05). The results of present study revealed that dietary Vitacel(®) can upregulates immune related genes expression and elevates innate immune response and disease resistance of rainbow trout. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary quercetin supplementation increases serum antioxidant capacity and alters hepatic gene expression profile in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liting; Wu, Jianquan; Yang, Jijun; Wei, Jingyu; Gao, Weina; Guo, Changjiang

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of quercetin on hepatic gene expression profile in rats. Twenty male Wistar rats were divided into the control group and the quercetin-treated group, in which a diet containing 0.5% quercetin was provided. After two weeks of feeding, serum and liver samples were collected. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, including serum ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) values and levels of ascorbic acid, vitamin E (VE), glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured. The hepatic gene expression profile was examined using a microarray technique. The results showed that serum FRAP value, levels of ascorbic acid and VE were increased significantly, whereas serum levels of GSH and MDA were not changed significantly after quercetin supplementation. The microarray analysis revealed that some hepatic genes involved in phase 2 reaction, metabolism of cholesterol and homocysteine, and energy production were expressed differentially in response to quercetin administration. These findings provide a molecular basis for the elucidation of the actions played by quercetin in vivo.

  19. Dietary ascorbic acid modulates the expression profile of stress protein genes in hepatopancreas of adult Pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai Ino.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenglong; Wang, Jia; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen

    2014-12-01

    by influencing gene expression of antioxidant proteins, but excessive dietary AA (829.8 and 4967.5 mg kg(-1)) induced oxidative stress in Pacific abalone H. discus hannai. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dietary soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression changes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shangxin; Hooiveld, Guido J.; Li, Mengjie; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xinglian; Muller, Michael; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a comprehensive comparison of the effects of soy and meat proteins given at the recommended level on physiological markers of metabolic syndrome and the hepatic transcriptome. Male rats were fed semi-synthetic diets for 1 wk that differed only regarding protein source, with casein serving as reference. Body weight gain and adipose tissue mass were significantly reduced by soy but not meat proteins. The insulin resistance index was improved by soy, and to a lesser extent by meat proteins. Liver triacylglycerol contents were reduced by both protein sources, which coincided with increased plasma triacylglycerol concentrations. Both soy and meat proteins changed plasma amino acid patterns. The expression of 1571 and 1369 genes were altered by soy and meat proteins respectively. Functional classification revealed that lipid, energy and amino acid metabolic pathways, as well as insulin signaling pathways were regulated differently by soy and meat proteins. Several transcriptional regulators, including NFE2L2, ATF4, Srebf1 and Rictor were identified as potential key upstream regulators. These results suggest that soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression responses in rats and provide novel evidence and suggestions for the health effects of different protein sources in human diets. PMID:26857845

  1. Dietary soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression changes in rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Shangxin; Hooiveld, Guido J; Li, Mengjie; Zhao, Fan; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Xinglian; Muller, Michael; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-02-09

    This study reports on a comprehensive comparison of the effects of soy and meat proteins given at the recommended level on physiological markers of metabolic syndrome and the hepatic transcriptome. Male rats were fed semi-synthetic diets for 1 wk that differed only regarding protein source, with casein serving as reference. Body weight gain and adipose tissue mass were significantly reduced by soy but not meat proteins. The insulin resistance index was improved by soy, and to a lesser extent by meat proteins. Liver triacylglycerol contents were reduced by both protein sources, which coincided with increased plasma triacylglycerol concentrations. Both soy and meat proteins changed plasma amino acid patterns. The expression of 1571 and 1369 genes were altered by soy and meat proteins respectively. Functional classification revealed that lipid, energy and amino acid metabolic pathways, as well as insulin signaling pathways were regulated differently by soy and meat proteins. Several transcriptional regulators, including NFE2L2, ATF4, Srebf1 and Rictor were identified as potential key upstream regulators. These results suggest that soy and meat proteins induce distinct physiological and gene expression responses in rats and provide novel evidence and suggestions for the health effects of different protein sources in human diets.

  2. Glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene polymorphism affects postprandial lipemic response in a dietary intervention study

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Haiqing; Pollin, Toni I.; Damcott, Coleen M.; McLenithan, John C.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Postprandial triglyceridemia is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, most of the genes that influence postprandial triglyceridemia are not known. We evaluated whether a common nonsynonymous SNP rs1260326/P446L in the glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR) gene influenced variation in the postprandial lipid response after a high-fat challenge in seven hundred and seventy participants in the Amish HAPI Heart Study who underwent an oral high-fat challenge and had blood samples taken in the fasting state and during the postprandial phase at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours. We found that the minor T allele at rs1260326 was associated with significantly higher fasting TG levels after adjusting for age, sex, and family structure (Pa = 0.06 for additive model, and Pr=0.0003 for recessive model). During the fat challenge, the T allele was associated with significantly higher maximum TG level (Pa = 0.006), incremental maximum TG level (Pa = 0.006), TG area under the curve (Pa = 0.02) and incremental TG area under the curve (Pa = 0.03). Our data indicate that the rs1260326 T allele of GCKR is associated with both higher fasting levels of TG as well as the postprandial TG response, which may result in higher atherogenic risk. PMID:19526250

  3. APOA2, Dietary Fat and Body Mass Index: Replication of a Gene-Diet Interaction in Three Independent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Corella, Dolores; Peloso, Gina; Arnett, Donna K.; Demissie, Serkalem; Cupples, L Adrienne; Tucker, Katherine; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Parnell, Laurence D.; Coltell, Oscar; Lee, Yu-Chi; Ordovas, Jose M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Nutrigenetics studies the role of genetic variation on interactions between diet and health aimed at providing more personalized dietary advice. However, replication has been very low. Our aim was to study the interaction between a functional APOA2 polymorphism, food intake and body mass index (BMI) in independent populations to replicate findings and to increase their evidence level. Methods Cross-sectional, follow-up (20 years) and case-control analyses were undertaken in three independent populations. We analyzed gene-diet interactions between the APOA2 -265T>C polymorphism and saturated fat (SATFAT) intake on BMI and obesity in 3,462 subjects from three American populations: Framingham (1,454 Whites), GOLDN (1,078 Whites) and Boston-Puerto Rican studies (930 Hispanics of Caribbean origin). Results Prevalence of CC subjects ranged from 11-15%. We identified statistically significant interactions between the APOA2 -265T>C and SATFAT on BMI in all three populations. Thus, the magnitude of the difference in BMI between the CC and TT+TC subjects differed by SATFAT. A mean increase of 6.2% BMI (ranging from 4.3%-7.9%; P<0.05), was observed between genotypes with high (>=22g/d), but not with low SATFAT intake in all studies. Likewise, the CC genotype was significantly associated with higher obesity prevalence in all populations only in the high-SATFAT stratum. Meta-analysis estimations of obesity for CC compared with TT+TC subjects were: OR=1.84, 95%CI:1.38-2.47; P<0.0001 in the high-SATFAT stratum, but no association was detected in the low-SATFAT stratum (OR=0.81, 95%CI:0.59-1.11;P=0.181). Conclusions For the first time, a gene-diet interaction influencing BMI and obesity has been strongly and consistently replicated in three independent populations. PMID:19901143

  4. Antioxidative Dietary Compounds Modulate Gene Expression Associated with Apoptosis, DNA Repair, Inhibition of Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Likui; Gao, Shijuan; Jiang, Wei; Luo, Cheng; Xu, Maonian; Bohlin, Lars; Rosendahl, Markus; Huang, Wenlin

    2014-01-01

    Many dietary compounds are known to have health benefits owing to their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. To determine the molecular mechanism of these food-derived compounds, we analyzed their effect on various genes related to cell apoptosis, DNA damage and repair, oxidation and inflammation using in vitro cell culture assays. This review further tests the hypothesis proposed previously that downstream products of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) called electrophilic oxo-derivatives induce antioxidant responsive elements (ARE), which leads to cell proliferation under antioxidative conditions. Our findings support this hypothesis and show that cell proliferation was inhibited when COX-2 was down-regulated by polyphenols and polysaccharides. Flattened macrophage morphology was also observed following the induction of cytokine production by polysaccharides extracted from viili, a traditional Nordic fermented dairy product. Coix lacryma-jobi (coix) polysaccharides were found to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential and induce caspase-3- and 9-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, polyphenols from blueberries were involved in the ultraviolet-activated p53/Gadd45/MDM2 DNA repair system by restoring the cell membrane potential. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by saponin extracts of ginsenoside (Ginsen) and Gynostemma and inhibition of S100A4 by coix polysaccharides inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. These observations suggest that antioxidants and changes in cell membrane potential are the major driving forces that transfer signals through the cell membrane into the cytosol and nucleus, triggering gene expression, changes in cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis or DNA repair. PMID:25226533

  5. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid affects blood parameters, liver morphology and expression of selected hepatic genes in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Koronowicz, A A; Banks, P; Szymczyk, B; Leszczyńska, T; Master, A; Piasna, E; Szczepański, W; Domagała, D; Kopeć, A; Piątkowska, E; Laidler, P

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research were to investigate the effect of a conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched diet on Isa Brown laying hen health status and to provide a comprehensive analysis of changes in blood parameters, liver morphology and selected hepatic gene expression. Hens were allocated to the control and experimental group (diet enriched with 0.75% CLA) for a total period of 4 m. At the end of the experiment half of the hens from each group were slaughtered for analyses. The remaining hens were transferred to an organic farm for the next 5 m and fed on the diet without CLA supplementation. The CLA-enriched diet resulted in significant changes in blood and serum parameters; specifically, haematocrit (HCT), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and white blood cells (WBC) count were decreased compared to the control. The total cholesterol (TC) was not significantly affected while the triacylglycerol's (TG) concentration was elevated. The activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was significantly increased in the CLA-supplemented group, while aspartate aminotransferase (AST) showed an increasing tendency. Liver biopsies showed pathological changes classified as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Additionally, the expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acids synthesis (ME1, ACLY, ACC, FASN, SCD1), oxidation (CPT1α, PPARA), detoxification processes (Cytochrome P450, CYP, Flavin-containing monooxygenase, FMO3), oxidative stress (NOX4, XbP1) and inflammation (IL6, TNFα) were elevated. Cessation of CLA supplementation for 5 m of organic farming resulted in normalisation of blood and hepatic parameters to the levels observed in control hens. The results of this study indicate that dietary CLA triggers an integrated stress response in laying hens and activates mechanisms involved in liver detoxification.

  6. Effects of dietary fatty acids on mitochondrial phospholipid compositions, oxidative status and mitochondrial gene expression of zebrafish at different ages.

    PubMed

    Betancor, M B; Almaida-Pagán, P F; Hernández, A; Tocher, D R

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial decay is generally associated with impairment in the organelle bioenergetics function and increased oxidative stress, and it appears that deterioration of mitochondrial inner membrane phospholipids (PL) and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are among the main mechanisms involved in this process. In the present study, mitochondrial membrane PL compositions, oxidative status (TBARS content and SOD activity) and mtDNA gene expression of muscle and liver were analyzed in zebrafish fed two diets with lipid supplied either by rapeseed oil (RO) or a blend 60:40 of RO and DHA500 TG oil (DHA). Two feeding trials were performed using zebrafish from the same population of two ages (8 and 21 months). Dietary FA composition affected fish growth in 8-month-old animals, which could be related to an increase in stress promoted by diet composition. Lipid peroxidation was considerably higher in mitochondria of 8-month-old zebrafish fed the DHA diet than in animals fed the RO diet. This could indicate higher oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, very likely due to increased incorporation of DHA in PL of mitochondrial membranes. Lipids would be among the first molecules affected by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and lipid peroxidation could propagate oxidative reactions that would damage other molecules, including mtDNA. Mitochondrial lipid peroxidation and gene expression of 21-month-old fish showed lower responsiveness to diet composition than those of younger fish. Differences found in the effect of diet composition on mitochondrial lipids between the two age groups could be indicating age-related changes in the ability to maintain structural homeostasis of mitochondrial membranes.

  7. Vitamin D in a Northern Canadian First Nation Population: Dietary Intake, Serum Concentrations and Functional Gene Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, Linda; Mookherjee, Neeloffer; Slater, Joyce; Slivinski, Caroline; Singer, Matthew; Whaley, Chris; Denechezhe, Lizette; Matyas, Sara; Turner-Brannen, Emily; Nickerson, Peter; Orr, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    The wide spectrum of vitamin D activity has focused attention on its potential role in the elevated burden of disease in a northern Canadian First Nations (Dené) cohort. Vitamin D insufficiency, and gene polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) have been implicated in susceptibility to infectious and chronic diseases. The objectives of this study were to determine the contribution of vitamin D from food, and measure the serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OHD3) and VDBP in Dené participants. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the dysregulation of the innate immune response were typed and counted. Potential correlations between the SNPs and serum concentrations of 25-OHD3 and VDBP were evaluated. Venous blood was collected in summer and winter over a one-year period and analyzed for 25-OHD3 and VDBP concentrations (N = 46). A questionnaire was administered to determine the amount of dietary vitamin D consumed. Sixty-one percent and 30% of the participants had 25-OHD3 serum concentrations <75 nmol/L in the winter and summer respectively. Mean vitamin D binding protein concentrations were within the normal range in the winter but below normal in the summer. VDBP and VDR gene polymorphisms affect the bioavailability and regulation of 25-OHD3. The Dené had a high frequency of the VDBP D432E-G allele (71%) and the Gc1 genotype (90%), associated with high concentrations of VDBP and a high binding affinity to 25-OHD3. The Dené had a high frequency of VDR Fok1-f allele (82%), which has been associated with a down-regulated Th1 immune response. VDBP and VDR polymorphisms, and low winter 25-OHD3 serum concentrations may be risk factors for infectious diseases and chronic conditions related to the dysregulation of the vitamin D pathway. PMID:23185470

  8. Selenoprotein Gene Expression in Thyroid and Pituitary of Young Pigs Is Not Affected by Dietary Selenium Deficiency or Excess1–3

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ji-Chang; Zhao, Hua; Li, Jun-Gang; Xia, Xin-Jie; Wang, Kang-Ning; Zhang, Ya-Jun; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Ying; Lei, Xin Gen

    2009-01-01

    Expression and function of selenoproteins in endocrine tissues remain unclear, largely due to limited sample availability. Pigs have a greater metabolic similarity and tissue size than rodents as a model of humans for that purpose. We conducted 2 experiments: 1) we cloned 5 novel porcine selenoprotein genes; and 2) we compared the effects of dietary selenium (Se) on mRNA levels of 12 selenoproteins, activities of 4 antioxidant enzymes, and Se concentrations in testis, thyroid, and pituitary with those in liver of pigs. In Experiment 1, porcine Gpx2, Sephs2, Sep15, Sepn1, and Sepp1 were cloned and demonstrated 84–94% of coding sequence homology to human genes. In Experiment 2, weanling male pigs (n = 30) were fed a Se-deficient (0.02 mg Se/kg) diet added with 0, 0.3, or 3.0 mg Se/kg as Se-enriched yeast for 8 wk. Although dietary Se resulted in dose-dependent increases (P < 0.05) in Se concentrations and GPX activities in all 4 tissues, it did not affect the mRNA levels of any selenoprotein gene in thyroid or pituitary. Testis mRNA levels of Txnrd1 and Sep15 were decreased (P < 0.05) by increasing dietary Se from 0.3 to 3.0 mg/kg. Comparatively, expressions of Gpx2, Gpx4, Dio3, and Sep15 were high in pituitary and Dio1, Sepp1, Sephs2, and Gpx1 were high in liver. In conclusion, the mRNA abundances of the 12 selenoprotein genes in thyroid and pituitary of young pigs were resistant to dietary Se deficiency or excess. PMID:19357213

  9. Dietary Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    EGRP's goals in Dietary Assessment are to increase the precision of dietary intake estimates by improving self-report of dietary intake and the analytic procedures for processing reported information.

  10. Effects of dietary zinc on gene expression of antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins in hepatopancreas of abalone Haliotis discus hannai.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chenglong; Zhang, Wenbing; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhong, Xiaoli

    2011-06-01

    The expression patterns of different genes encoding antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins were investigated, in present study, by real-time quantitative PCR in the hepatopancreas of abalone Haliotis discus hannai fed with different levels of dietary zinc (6.69, 33.8, 710.6 and 3462.5 mg/kg) for 20 weeks. The antioxidant enzymes include Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase (CAT), mu-glutathione-s-transferase (mu-GST) and thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx). The results showed that the mRNA expression of these antioxidant enzymes increased and reached the maximum at the dietary zinc level of 33.8 mg/kg, and then dropped progressively. Expression levels of the heat shock proteins (HSP26, HSP70 and HSP90) firstly increased at 33.8 mg/kg dietary Zn level, and reached to the maximum at 710.6 mg/kg, then dropped at 3462.5 mg/kg (p<0.05). Excessive dietary Zn (710.6 and 3462.5 mg/kg) significantly increases the Zn content and significantly decreases the total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in hepatopancreas (p<0.05). These findings showed that dietary Zn (33.8 mg/kg) could highly trigger the expression levels of antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins, but excessive dietary Zn (710.6 and 3462.5 mg/kg) induces a high oxidative stress in abalone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene -308 G/A polymorphism modulates the relationship between dietary fat intake, serum lipids, and obesity risk in black South African women.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Yael T; van der Merwe, Lize; Carstens, Madelaine; Collins, Malcolm; Jennings, Courtney; Levitt, Naomi S; Lambert, Estelle V; Goedecke, Julia H

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of obesity and related disease risk is high in black South African (SA) women, possibly influenced by the dietary transition associated with urbanization. This study explored interactions between dietary fat intake and the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFA) -308 G/A polymorphism on obesity, insulin resistance, and serum lipid concentrations in urbanized black SA women. Normal-weight (n = 105) and obese (n = 118) women underwent measurements of body composition, fat distribution, fasting serum lipids, glucose and insulin concentrations, and dietary intake. Participants were genotyped for the functional TNFA -308 G/A polymorphism. The genotype or allele frequency of the TNFA -308 G/A polymorphism did not differ between the BMI groups. However, when dietary fat intake was 30% of total energy intake [percentage energy (%E)], the odds of being obese with the TNFA GA+AA genotype was only 12% of that with GG, but increasing intake of dietary fat (%E) was associated with a significantly faster rate of increase in obesity risk in women with the TNFA GA+AA genotype compared with those with the GG genotype (P = 0.036). There were significant diet-gene interactions between alpha-linolenic acid (%E) and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio (P = 0.036), and PUFA (%E) and LDL cholesterol levels (P = 0.026), with participants with the A allele being more responsive to changes in relative fat intake. The TNFA -308 G/A polymorphism modified the relationship between dietary fat intake, obesity risk, and serum lipid concentrations in black SA women.

  12. A dietary phytochemical alters caste-associated gene expression in honey bees

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wenfu; Schuler, Mary A.; Berenbaum, May R.

    2015-01-01

    In the eusocial honey bee Apis mellifera, with reproductive queens and sterile workers, a female larva’s developmental fate depends on its diet; nurse bees feed queen-destined larvae exclusively royal jelly, a glandular secretion, but worker-destined larvae receive royal jelly for 3 days and subsequently jelly to which honey and beebread are added. RNA-Seq analysis demonstrated that p-coumaric acid, which is ubiquitous in honey and beebread, differentially regulates genes involved in caste determination. Rearing larvae in vitro on a royal jelly diet to which p-coumaric acid has been added produces adults with reduced ovary development. Thus, consuming royal jelly exclusively not only enriches the diet of queen-destined larvae but also may protect them from inhibitory effects of phytochemicals present in the honey and beebread fed to worker-destined larvae. PMID:26601244

  13. Impact of SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation and dietary cholesterol on hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Klipsic, Devon; Landrock, Danilo; Martin, Gregory G.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Mackie, John T.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    While a high-cholesterol diet induces hepatic steatosis, the role of intracellular sterol carrier protein-2/sterol carrier protein-x (SCP-2/SCP-x) proteins is unknown. We hypothesized that ablating SCP-2/SCP-x [double knockout (DKO)] would impact hepatic lipids (cholesterol and cholesteryl ester), especially in high-cholesterol-fed mice. DKO did not alter food consumption, and body weight (BW) gain decreased especially in females, concomitant with hepatic steatosis in females and less so in males. DKO-induced steatosis in control-fed wild-type (WT) mice was associated with 1) loss of SCP-2; 2) upregulation of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP); 3) increased mRNA and/or protein levels of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP1 and SREBP2) as well as increased expression of target genes of cholesterol synthesis (Hmgcs1 and Hmgcr) and fatty acid synthesis (Acc1 and Fas); and 4) cholesteryl ester accumulation was also associated with increased acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT2) in males. DKO exacerbated the high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatic cholesterol and glyceride accumulation, without further increasing SREBP1, SREBP2, or target genes. This exacerbation was associated both with loss of SCP-2 and concomitant downregulation of Ceh/Hsl, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), MTP, and/or L-FABP protein expression. DKO diminished the ability to secrete excess cholesterol into bile and oxidize cholesterol to bile acid for biliary excretion, especially in females. This suggested that SCP-2/SCP-x affects cholesterol transport to particular intracellular compartments, with ablation resulting in less to the endoplasmic reticulum for SREBP regulation, making more available for cholesteryl ester synthesis, for cholesteryl-ester storage in lipid droplets, and for bile salt synthesis and/or secretion. These alterations are significant findings, since they affect key processes in regulation of sterol metabolism. PMID:26113298

  14. Broilers fed dietary vitamins harbor higher diversity of cecal bacteria and higher ratio of Clostridium, Faecalibacterium, and Lactobacillus than broilers with no dietary vitamins revealed by 16S rRNA gene clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-heng; Peng, Huan-wei; Wright, André-Denis G; Bai, Shi-ping; Ding, Xue-mei; Zeng, Qiu-feng; Li, Hua; Zheng, Ping; Su, Zhuo-wei; Cui, Ren-yong; Zhang, Ke-ying

    2013-09-01

    Research on the interaction between dietary vitamins and intestinal bacteria is poorly understood. To investigate the effect of dietary vitamins on the cecal bacterial communities, 2 bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from pooled PCR products obtained from the cecal digesta of 28-d broilers fed diets with vitamins (V) at the NRC level or with no vitamins (NV). The results showed that BW gain and average feed intake of V broilers was significantly higher (P < 0.01) than NV broilers, whereas the feed/gain ratio was significantly lower (P < 0.01) in V broilers. A total of 188 and 185 clones were sequenced for the NV and V broilers, respectively. Sequence identity criterion of 98% was used to assign sequences to operational taxonomic units (OTU). Clones from the NV group broilers were assigned to 14 OTU, with 33% clones affiliated with the genus Clostridium, 19% affiliated with the genera Escherichia/Shigella, 14% affiliated with the genus Bacteroides, and the remaining clones (34%) affiliated with 5 other bacterial genera (Faecalibacterium, Parasporobacterium, Ruminococcus, Streptococcus, and Subdoligranulum). Clones from the V group broilers were assigned to 23 OTU, with 46% of the clones affiliated with the genus Clostridium, 11% affiliated with the genus Fecalibacterium, and the remaining clones (43%) affiliated with 8 other genera (Anaerofilum, Lactobacillus, Anaerotruncus, Oscillibacter, Alistipes, Gracilibacter, Acetivibrio, and Haloplasma). Three OTU assigned to Clostridium, Faecalibacterium, and Ruminoccus were shared between the 2 libraries. Shannon diversity index showed the V broilers exhibited significantly higher bacterial diversity (P = 0.05), and Libshuff analysis indicated that the community structure between the 2 groups was significantly different (P < 0.0001). These results suggest that lack of dietary vitamins can increase the ratio of facultative pathogenic bacteria and decrease the diversity of bacteria in the cecum of

  15. Interactive effects of dietary lipid and phenotypic feed efficiency on the expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Eya, Jonathan C; Ukwuaba, Vitalis O; Yossa, Rodrigue; Gannam, Ann L

    2015-04-07

    A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10), 20% (40/20) and 30% (40/30) dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass) or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g) full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency) on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1), cytb (Cytochrome b), cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1), cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2) and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6) and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha), ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta), pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta) and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP) in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish.

  16. Interactive Effects of Dietary Lipid and Phenotypic Feed Efficiency on the Expression of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Involved in the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Eya, Jonathan C.; Ukwuaba, Vitalis O.; Yossa, Rodrigue; Gannam, Ann L.

    2015-01-01

    A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10), 20% (40/20) and 30% (40/30) dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass) or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g) full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency) on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1), cytb (Cytochrome b), cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1), cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2) and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6) and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha), ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta), pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha), pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta) and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha) in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP) in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish. PMID:25853266

  17. Dietary rescue of altered metabolism gene reveals unexpected Drosophila mating cues[S

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, François; Chauvel, Isabelle; Flaven-Pouchon, Justin; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    To develop and reproduce, animals need long-chain MUFAs and PUFAs. Although some unsaturated FAs (UFAs) can be synthesized by the organism, others must be provided by the diet. The gene, desat1, involved in Drosophila melanogaster UFA metabolism, is necessary for both larval development and for adult sex pheromone communication. We first characterized desat1 expression in larval tissues. Then, we found that larvae in which desat1 expression was knocked down throughout development died during the larval stages when raised on standard food. By contrast pure MUFAs or PUFAs, but not saturated FAs, added to the larval diet rescued animals to adulthood with the best effect being obtained with oleic acid (C18:1). Male and female mating behavior and fertility were affected very differently by preimaginal UFA-rich diet. Adult diet also strongly influenced several aspects of reproduction: flies raised on a C18:1-rich diet showed increased mating performance compared with flies raised on standard adult diet. Therefore, both larval and adult desat1 expression control sex-specific mating signals. A similar nutrigenetics approach may be useful in other metabolic mutants to uncover cryptic effects otherwise masked by severe developmental defects. PMID:26759364

  18. Dietary rescue of altered metabolism gene reveals unexpected Drosophila mating cues.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, François; Chauvel, Isabelle; Flaven-Pouchon, Justin; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2016-03-01

    To develop and reproduce, animals need long-chain MUFAs and PUFAs. Although some unsaturated FAs (UFAs) can be synthesized by the organism, others must be provided by the diet. The gene, desat1, involved in Drosophila melanogaster UFA metabolism, is necessary for both larval development and for adult sex pheromone communication. We first characterized desat1 expression in larval tissues. Then, we found that larvae in which desat1 expression was knocked down throughout development died during the larval stages when raised on standard food. By contrast pure MUFAs or PUFAs, but not saturated FAs, added to the larval diet rescued animals to adulthood with the best effect being obtained with oleic acid (C18:1). Male and female mating behavior and fertility were affected very differently by preimaginal UFA-rich diet. Adult diet also strongly influenced several aspects of reproduction: flies raised on a C18:1-rich diet showed increased mating performance compared with flies raised on standard adult diet. Therefore, both larval and adult desat1 expression control sex-specific mating signals. A similar nutrigenetics approach may be useful in other metabolic mutants to uncover cryptic effects otherwise masked by severe developmental defects. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Dietary Methionine Restriction Regulates Liver Protein Synthesis and Gene Expression Independently of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2 Phosphorylation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Ashley P; Jonsson, William O; Bargoud, Albert R; Mirek, Emily T; Peelor, Frederick F; Wang, Yongping; Gettys, Thomas W; Kimball, Scot R; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L; Wek, Ronald C; Anthony, Tracy G

    2017-06-01

    Background: The phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (p-eIF2) during dietary amino acid insufficiency reduces protein synthesis and alters gene expression via the integrated stress response (ISR).Objective: We explored whether a Met-restricted (MR) diet activates the ISR to reduce body fat and regulate protein balance.Methods: Male and female mice aged 3-6 mo with either whole-body deletion of general control nonderepressible 2 (Gcn2) or liver-specific deletion of protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (Perk) alongside wild-type or floxed control mice were fed an obesogenic diet sufficient in Met (0.86%) or an MR (0.12% Met) diet for ≤5 wk. Ala enrichment with deuterium was measured to calculate protein synthesis rates. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity of eIF2B was measured alongside p-eIF2 and hepatic mRNA expression levels at 2 d and 5 wk. Metabolic phenotyping was conducted at 4 wk, and body composition was measured throughout. Results were evaluated with the use of ANOVA (P < 0.05).Results: Feeding an MR diet for 2 d did not increase hepatic p-eIF2 or reduce eIF2B activity in wild-type or Gcn2(-/-) mice, yet many genes transcriptionally regulated by the ISR were altered in both strains in the same direction and amplitude. Feeding an MR diet for 5 wk increased p-eIF2 and reduced eIF2B activity in wild-type but not Gcn2(-/-) mice, yet ISR-regulated genes altered in both strains similarly. Furthermore, the MR diet reduced mixed and cytosolic but not mitochondrial protein synthesis in both the liver and skeletal muscle regardless of Gcn2 status. Despite the similarities between strains, the MR diet did not increase energy expenditure or reduce body fat in Gcn2(-/-) mice. Finally, feeding the MR diet to mice with Perk deleted in the liver increased hepatic p-eIF2 and altered body composition similar to floxed controls.Conclusions: Hepatic activation of the ISR resulting from an MR diet does not require p-eIF2. Gcn2 status

  20. Dietary salecan reverts partially the metabolic gene expressions and NMR-based metabolomic profiles from high-fat-diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Li, Minghui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Xi; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that dietary salecan (a water-soluble β-glucan) effectively reduces high-fat-diet-induced adiposity through disturbing bile-acid-promoted emulsification in mice. However, the effects of salecan on metabolic genes and metabolites involved in lipid accumulation are mostly unknown. Here, we confirmed that dietary 3% and 6% salecan for 4 weeks markedly decreased fat accumulation in liver and adipose tissue in high-fat-diet rats, displaying a decrease in mRNA levels of SREBP1-C, FAS, SCD1 and ACC1 involved in de novo lipogenesis and a reduction of levels of GPAT1, DGAT1 and DGAT2 related to triglyceride synthesis. Dietary salecan also increased the mRNA levels of PPARα and CYP7A1, which are related to fatty acid oxidation and cholesterol decomposition, respectively. In the (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic analysis, both the serum and liver metabolite profiles differed among the control groups, and the metabolic profiles of the salecan groups were shifted toward that of the low-fat-diet group. Metabolites analysis showed that salecan significantly increased hepatic glutathione and betaine levels which are related to regulation of cellular reactive oxygen species. These data demonstrate that dietary salecan not only disturbed fat digestion and absorption but also influenced lipid accumulation and metabolism in diet-induced obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. High dietary saturated fat intake accentuates obesity risk associated with the fat mass and obesity-associated gene in adults.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Catherine M; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; McManus, Ross; Hercberg, Serge; Lairon, Denis; Planells, Richard; Roche, Helen M

    2012-05-01

    Fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) is the strongest genetic determinant of obesity identified to date. Dietary fat is a key environmental factor that may interact with genotype to affect risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). This study investigated associations among FTO rs9939609, obesity measures, and MetS phenotypes in adults and determined potential modulation by dietary fat intake at baseline and after a 7.5-y follow-up when MetS cases and controls were selected. FTO rs9939609 genotype, biochemical, dietary, and lifestyle measurements were determined in the LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX study (n = 1754). FTO rs9939609 A allele carriers had a higher risk of being overweight or obese [OR = 1.66 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.57); P = 0.02] and of having a larger abdominal circumference [OR = 1.42 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.99); P = 0.04] compared with the TT homozygotes. These associations were independent of physical activity and energy intake and were maintained over the follow-up period, particularly in the MetS individuals. High dietary SFA intake (≥ 15.5% energy) and a low dietary PUFA:SFA intake ratio (<0.38) further accentuated the risk of having a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and being abdominally obese. Non-risk allele carriers appeared to be unresponsive to dietary SFA intake or to the dietary PUFA:SFA intake ratio with respect to obesity measures. In conclusion, FTO rs9939609 was associated with obesity measures, especially in those with the MetS, which was further exacerbated by high dietary SFA intake at baseline and 7.5 y later. These data indicate important novel modulation of genetic risk by dietary fat exposure in individuals with increased cardiometabolic risk.

  2. Effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, dietary fat intakes and gene-diet interactions on peak particle diameters of low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Bouchard-Mercier, Annie; Godin, Gaston; Lamarche, Benoît; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2011-01-01

    The risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is modulated by gene-diet interactions. The objective of this study was to examine whether gene-diet interactions affect peak particle diameters (PPD) of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The study included 674 participants. A food frequency questionnaire was administered to obtain dietary information. LDL-PPD was determined by non-denaturing 2-16% polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gene polymorphisms PPARα L162V (rs1800206), PPARγ P12A (rs1801282) and PPARδ -87T→C (rs2016520) were determined by PCR-RFLP. Among carriers of thePPARα L162V polymorphism, gene-diet interaction effects on LDL-PPD were observed with saturated fat (p=0.0005) and total dietary fat (p=0.006). Among PPARα V162 carriers, subjects with higher saturated fat intakes had smaller LDL-PPD than those with lower intakes (254.23±2.74 vs. 256.21±2.61 Å, respectively, p=0.007). Among subjects homozygous for the PPARα L162 allele, those with higher saturated fat intakes had larger LDL-PPD than those with lower saturated fat intakes (255.86±2.66 vs. 255.05±2.65 Å, respectively, p=0.01). Gene-diet interactions were also found for PPARγ P12A polymorphism with saturated fat intake (p=0.04) and for PPARδ -87T→C with the polyunsaturated/saturated fat ratio (p=0.0013). These results stress that dietary factors should be included in studies determining the effect of different polymorphisms on CVD risk factors. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Effect of ID ACE gene polymorphism on dietary composition and obesity-related anthropometric parameters in the Czech adult population.

    PubMed

    Bienertova-Vasku, Julie; Bienert, Petr; Sablikova, Lenka; Slovackova, Lenka; Forejt, Martin; Piskackova, Zlata; Kucerova, Lenka; Heczkova, Katerina; Brazdova, Zuzana; Vasku, Anna

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible associations between insertion/deletion (ID) polymorphism in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) (dbSNP rs 4646994) with the food intake and body composition in the Czech non-obese, obese and extremely obese populations. A total of 453 various-weighted individuals were enrolled in the study and were according to their BMI assigned into following subgroups, such as obese (30 /=40) and non-obese (20 < BMI < 30) subjects. Both the obese cases and the non-obese controls underwent the identical subset of standardized examinations (BMI, % body fat, waist-to-hip ratio, skin fold thickness, native dietary composition examined by 7-day food records, etc.). No significant case-control differences in genotype distributions or allelic frequencies were observed. There were no differences in genotype frequencies between males and females either. The prevalence of obesity was significantly higher among subjects with the II genotype (42 %) when compared with those with DD (36%) and those with ID (37%) genotypes (P = 0.04). When compared with carbohydrate intake in the whole studied cohort, the odds ratios of carrying the DD allele in the morbidly obese cohort were 0.84 (95% CI 0.34, 2.10, P = 0.17), 0.27 (0.07, 0.98, P = 0.02), and 4.25 (1.44, 12.51, P = 0.005) in those individuals consuming <210, 210-260, and >260 g of carbohydrates/day, respectively. Based on our findings, the ID ACE polymorphism could represent a gene modulator of carbohydrate intake in morbidly obese Czech population; the strong significant effect of DD genotype was observed in the phenotypes of extreme obesity with the highest carbohydrate intake.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco: Molecular Characterization, Tissue Expression, and Expression Responses to Dietary Copper Deficiency and Excess

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yu-Feng; Luo, Zhi; Huang, Chao; Chen, Qi-Liang; Pan, Ya–Xiong; Xu, Yi-Huan

    2015-01-01

    Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones [glucose-regulated protein 78 (grp78) and calreticulin (crt)] and three ER stress sensors [PKR-like ER kinase (perk), inositol requiring enzyme (ire)-1α, and activating transcription factor (atf)-6α] cDNAs were first characterized from yellow catfish, Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. The predicted amino acid sequences for the yellow catfish grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α revealed that the proteins contained all of the structural features that were characteristic of the five genes in other species, including the KDEL motif, signal peptide, sensor domain, and effector domain. mRNAs of the five genes mentioned above were expressed in various tissues, but their mRNA levels varied among tissues. Dietary Cu excess, but not Cu deficiency, activated the chaperones (grp78 and crt) and folding sensors in ER, and the UPR signaling pathways (i.e., perk–eif2α and the ire1–xbp1) in a tissue-specific manner. For the first time, our study cloned grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α genes in yellow catfish and demonstrated their differential expression among tissues. Moreover, the present study also indicated differential regulation of these ER stress–related genes by dietary Cu deficiency and excess, which will be beneficial for us to evaluate effects of dietary Cu levels in fish at the molecular level, based on the upstream pathway of lipid metabolism (the ER) and thus provide novel insights regarding the nutrition of Cu in fish. PMID:26276384

  5. Effects of Dietary Restriction on the Expression of Lipid Metabolism and Growth Hormone Signaling Genes in the Longissimus dorsi Muscle of Korean Cattle Steers

    PubMed Central

    Kang, H. J.; Trang, N. H.; Baik, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study determined the effects of dietary restriction on growth and the expression of lipid metabolism and growth hormone signaling genes in the longissimus dorsi muscle (LM) of Korean cattle. Thirty-one Korean cattle steers (average age 10.5 months) were allocated to normal (N; n = 16) or dietary restriction (DR; n = 15) groups. The feeding trial consisted of two stages: for the 8-month growing period, the DR group was fed 80% of the food intake of the normal diet, and for the 6-month growth-finishing period, the DR group was fed a DR total mixed ration with 78.4% of the crude protein and 64% of the net energy for gain of the normal diet. The LM was biopsied 5 months (period 1 [P1] at 15.5 months of age) and 14 months (period 2 [P2] at 24.5 months of age) after the start of feeding. The mRNA levels were determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Body weight, daily feed intake, average daily gain, and feed efficiency were lower in the DR group compared with the normal group at both P1 and P2. At P1, the lipogenic fatty acid synthase (FASN) mRNA levels were lower (p<0.05) in the DR group compared with the normal group. The DR group tended (p = 0.06) to have higher of levels of growth hormone receptor (GHR) mRNA than the normal group. At P2, the DR group tended to have lower (p = 0.06) androgen receptor (AR) mRNA levels than the normal group. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that dietary restriction partially decreases the transcription of lipogenic FASN and growth hormone signaling AR genes, but increases transcription of the GHR gene. These changes in gene transcription might affect body fat accumulation and the growth of the animals. PMID:26104528

  6. Microarray analysis of gene expression in liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in response to chronic dietary administration of NDGA to high-fructose fed dyslipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Shen, Wen-Jun; Li, Yihang; Bittner, Alex; Bittner, Stefanie; Tabassum, Juveria; Cortez, Yuan F; Kraemer, Fredric B; Azhar, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), the main metabolite of Creosote Bush, has been shown to have profound effects on the core components of metabolic syndrome, including lowering of blood glucose, free fatty acids and triglyceride levels, attenuating elevated blood pressure in several rodent models of dyslipidemia, and improving body weight, insulin resistance, diabetes and hypertension. In the present study, a high-fructose diet fed rat model of hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis was employed to investigate the global transcriptional changes in the lipid metabolizing pathways in three insulin sensitive tissues: liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in response to chronic dietary administration of NDGA. Sprague-Dawley male rats (SD) were fed a chow (control) diet, high-fructose diet (HFrD) or HFrD supplemented with NDGA (2.5 g/kg diet) for eight weeks. Dietary administration of NDGA decreased plasma levels of TG, glucose, and insulin, and attenuated hepatic TG accumulation. DNA microarray expression profiling indicated that dietary administration of NDGA upregulated the expression of certain genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and their transcription regulator, PPARα, decreased the expression of a number of lipogenic genes and relevant transcription factors, and differentially impacted the genes of fatty acid transporters, acetyl CoA synthetases, elongases, fatty acid desaturases and lipid clearance proteins in liver, skeletal muscle and adipose tissues. These findings suggest that NDGA ameliorates hypertriglyceridemia and steatosis primarily by inhibiting lipogenesis and enhancing fatty acid catabolism in three major insulin responsive tissues by altering the expression of key enzyme genes and transcription factors involved in de novo lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Genes in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco: Molecular Characterization, Tissue Expression, and Expression Responses to Dietary Copper Deficiency and Excess.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu-Feng; Luo, Zhi; Huang, Chao; Chen, Qi-Liang; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Xu, Yi-Huan

    2015-08-13

    Two endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones [glucose-regulated protein 78 (grp78) and calreticulin (crt)] and three ER stress sensors [PKR-like ER kinase (perk), inositol requiring enzyme (ire)-1α, and activating transcription factor (atf)-6α] cDNAs were first characterized from yellow catfish, Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. The predicted amino acid sequences for the yellow catfish grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α revealed that the proteins contained all of the structural features that were characteristic of the five genes in other species, including the KDEL motif, signal peptide, sensor domain, and effector domain. mRNAs of the five genes mentioned above were expressed in various tissues, but their mRNA levels varied among tissues. Dietary Cu excess, but not Cu deficiency, activated the chaperones (grp78 and crt) and folding sensors in ER, and the UPR signaling pathways (i.e., perk-eif2α and the ire1-xbp1) in a tissue-specific manner. For the first time, our study cloned grp78, crt, perk, ire-1α, and atf-6α genes in yellow catfish and demonstrated their differential expression among tissues. Moreover, the present study also indicated differential regulation of these ER stress-related genes by dietary Cu deficiency and excess, which will be beneficial for us to evaluate effects of dietary Cu levels in fish at the molecular level, based on the upstream pathway of lipid metabolism (the ER) and thus provide novel insights regarding the nutrition of Cu in fish.

  8. Functional genomics reveals increases in cholesterol biosynthetic genes and highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis after dietary substitution of fish oil with vegetable oils in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, Michael J; Villeneuve, Laure AN; Obach, Alex; Jensen, Linda; Bron, James E; Tocher, Douglas R; Taggart, John B

    2008-01-01

    Background There is an increasing drive to replace fish oil (FO) in finfish aquaculture diets with vegetable oils (VO), driven by the short supply of FO derived from wild fish stocks. However, little is known of the consequences for fish health after such substitution. The effect of dietary VO on hepatic gene expression, lipid composition and growth was determined in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), using a combination of cDNA microarray, lipid, and biochemical analysis. FO was replaced with VO, added to diets as rapeseed (RO), soybean (SO) or linseed (LO) oils. Results Dietary VO had no major effect on growth of the fish, but increased the whole fish protein contents and tended to decrease whole fish lipid content, thus increasing the protein:lipid ratio. Expression levels of genes of the highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) and cholesterol biosynthetic pathways were increased in all vegetable oil diets as was SREBP2, a master transcriptional regulator of these pathways. Other genes whose expression was increased by feeding VO included those of NADPH generation, lipid transport, peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, a marker of intracellular lipid accumulation, and protein and RNA processing. Consistent with these results, HUFA biosynthesis, hepatic β-oxidation activity and enzymic NADPH production were changed by VO, and there was a trend for increased hepatic lipid in LO and SO diets. Tissue cholesterol levels in VO fed fish were the same as animals fed FO, whereas fatty acid composition of the tissues largely reflected those of the diets and was marked by enrichment of 18 carbon fatty acids and reductions in 20 and 22 carbon HUFA. Conclusion This combined gene expression, compositional and metabolic study demonstrates that major lipid metabolic effects occur after replacing FO with VO in salmon diets. These effects are most likely mediated by SREBP2, which responds to reductions in dietary cholesterol. These changes are sufficient to maintain whole body cholesterol

  9. Effects of dietary octacosanol supplementation on laying performance, egg quality, serum hormone levels, and expression of genes related to the reproductive axis in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Long, L; Wu, S G; Yuan, F; Zhang, H J; Wang, J; Qi, G H

    2016-09-24

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary octacosanol supplementation on laying performance, egg quality, serum hormone levels, and gene expression related to reproductive axis in laying hens to confirm the reproduction-promoting function of octacosanol. In total, 360 Hy-Line Brown (67-wk-old) laying hens were randomly assigned to one of three treatments with 0, 5, and 10 mg octacosanol (extracted from rice bran, purity >92%)/kg feed. The feeding trial lasted for 10 weeks. The results showed that the dietary addition of 5 and 10 mg/kg octacosanol improved feed efficiency by 4.9% and 3.4% (P < 0.01), increased the albumen height by 20.5% and 13.3% (P < 0.01), the Haugh unit score by 12.9% and 8.7% (P < 0.01), and the eggshell strength by 39.5% and 24.5% (P < 0.01), respectively, compared with the control diet. Dietary octacosanol addition significantly affected serum triiodothyronine, estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone levels (P < 0.05), and progesterone and luteinizing hormone level (P < 0.01). Compared with the control, dietary addition of octacosanol at 5 mg/kg promoted the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) mRNA expression in different-sized follicles, and significantly increased the FSHR mRNA expression of granulosa cells from the F2 and F3 follicles (P < 0.05). Dietary supplementation with both 5 and 10 mg/kg octacosanol promoted the mRNA expression of luteinizing hormone receptor and prolactin receptor in different-sized follicles, and significantly up-regulated the expression levels in F1 granulosa cells (P < 0.05). The ovarian weight was significantly increased with the dietary addition of 5 mg/kg octacosanol (P < 0.05). The numbers of small yellow follicles and large white follicles were increased with the addition of dietary 5 and 10 mg/kg octacosanol (P < 0.01). This study provides evidence that octacosanol has the capacity to improve reproductive performance, indicating that it is a potentially effective

  10. Associations between HDL-cholesterol and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase and lipoprotein lipase genes are modified by dietary fat intake in African American and White adults.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Jennifer A; Steffen, Lyn M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R

    2007-10-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism influence plasma HDL-C concentrations. We examined whether dietary fat intake modified relations between HDL-C and polymorphisms in hepatic lipase (LIPC-514C-->T), cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP TaqIB), and lipoprotein lipase (LPL S447X) genes. Diet (food frequency questionnaire), plasma lipids, and LIPC, CETP, and LPL genotypes were assessed in approximately 12,000 White and African American adults. In both races and all genotypes studied, minor allele homozygotes had highest HDL-C concentrations compared to the other genotypes (P<0.001). However, main effects were modified by usual dietary fat intake. In African Americans - women somewhat more strongly than men -LIPC TT homozygotes with fat intake >or=33.2% of energy had approximately 3-4 mg/dL higher HDL-C concentrations than CC and CT genotypes. In contrast, when fat intake was <33.2% of energy, TT homozygotes had HDL-C concentrations approximately 3.5mg/dL greater than those with the CC genotype but not different from those with the CT genotype (P(interaction)=0.013). In Whites, LPLGG homozygotes had greatest HDL-C at lower total, saturated, and monounsaturated fat intakes but lowest HDL-C at higher intakes of these fats (P(interaction)Dietary fat did not modify associations between CETP and HDL-C. In conclusion, these data show that plasma HDL-C differs according to LIPC, LPL, and CETP genotypes. In the case of LIPC and LPL, data suggest dietary fat modifies these relations.

  11. Effects of dietary sea cucumber saponin on the gene expression rhythm involved in circadian clock and lipid metabolism in mice during nighttime-feeding.

    PubMed

    Wen, Min; Cui, Jie; Xu, Jie; Xue, Yong; Wang, Jingfeng; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    In mammals, clock rhythms exist not only in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which is entrained by light/dark (LD) cycles, but also in most peripheral tissues. Recent studies have revealed that most physiology and behavior are subject to well-controlled daily oscillations; similarly, metabolic state influences the diurnal rhythm too. Previous studies have indicated that dietary sea cucumber saponin (SCS) could improve glucose and lipid metabolism of rodent. However, whether SCS could affect the expression of clock genes, which is involved in lipid metabolism, is unknown at present. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of SCS on the clock and clock-controlled genes involved in lipid metabolism. ICR male mice were divided into a control and SCS group mice (add 0.03% sea cucumber saponin to regular chow) and were fed at night (2030-0830 hours). After 2 weeks, clock genes expression in brain and liver, blood glucose, hormones, and lipid metabolic markers were analyzed. The results showed that dietary SCS caused alteration in rhythms and/or amplitudes of clock genes was more significant in brain than in liver. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARα), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), together with their target genes carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) showed marked changes in rhythm and/or amplitude in SCS group mice. These results suggested that SCS could affect the daily expression patterns of clock genes in brain and liver tissues, and alter the clock-controlled genes involved in lipid metabolism.

  12. Genes and environment as predisposing factors in autoimmunity: acceleration of spontaneous thyroiditis by dietary iodide in NOD.H2(h4) mice.

    PubMed

    Kolypetri, Panayota; King, Justin; Larijani, Mani; Carayanniotis, George

    2015-01-01

    In the field of autoimmune thyroiditis, NOD.H2(h4) mice have attracted significant and increasing attention since they not only develop spontaneous disease but they present thyroiditis with accelerated incidence and severity if they ingest iodide through their drinking water. This animal model highlights the interplay between genetic and dietary factors in the triggering of autoimmune disease and offers new opportunities to study immunoregulatory parameters influenced by both genes and environment. Here, we review experimental findings with this mouse model of thyroiditis.

  13. Dietary β-glucans differentially modulate immune and stress-related gene expression in lymphoid organs from healthy and Aeromonas hydrophila-infected rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Douxfils, Jessica; Fierro-Castro, Camino; Mandiki, S N M; Emile, Wakson; Tort, Lluis; Kestemont, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Although β-glucans stimulating effects have already been demonstrated on the immune system of numerous animal species, available data remain relatively variable and more research should be done regarding the complexity of underlying mechanisms. In this context, the present study aimed to evaluate the stress and immune-related effects of dietary β-glucans (i.e. Macrogard(®)) by considering a number of influencing factors such as the dose (0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.5% in food), feeding duration (15 versus 30 days), tissue (blood, kidney, spleen, gills) and infection status (healthy or infected). Blood parameters (lysozyme, ACH50 activities, leucocyte populations) and mRNA expression level of several immune- and stress-related genes (TFN-α1, IL-1β, IL10, COX-2, TGF-β, MC2R, HSP70) were measured. Our results suggest that spleen may be a highly responsive organ to dietary β-glucans both in healthy or infected fish, and that this organ may therefore significantly contribute to the immune reinforcement induced by such immunostimulatory diet. Our study further reveals that overdoses of β-glucans and/or prolonged medication can lead to a non-reactive physiological status and, consequently, to a poor immune response. All in all, the current data emphasizes the need for further extensive research in the field of dietary β-glucans as a preventive method for farmed fish protection.

  14. Effect of Dietary Zinc Oxide on Morphological Characteristics, Mucin Composition and Gene Expression in the Colon of Weaned Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Pieper, Robert; Rieger, Juliane; Vahjen, Wilfried; Davin, Roger; Plendl, Johanna; Meyer, Wilfried; Zentek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The trace element zinc is often used in the diet of weaned piglets, as high doses have resulted in positive effects on intestinal health. However, the majority of previous studies evaluated zinc supplementations for a short period only and focused on the small intestine. The hypothesis of the present study was that low, medium and high levels of dietary zinc (57, 164 and 2,425 mg Zn/kg from zinc oxide) would affect colonic morphology and innate host defense mechanisms across 4 weeks post-weaning. Histological examinations were conducted regarding the colonic morphology and neutral, acidic, sialylated and sulphated mucins. The mRNA expression levels of mucin (MUC) 1, 2, 13, 20, toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, 4, interleukin (IL)-1β, 8, 10, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) were also measured. The colonic crypt area increased in an age-depending manner, and the greatest area was found with medium concentration of dietary zinc. With the high concentration of dietary zinc, the number of goblet cells containing mixed neutral-acidic mucins and total mucins increased. Sialomucin containing goblet cells increased age-dependently. The expression of MUC2 increased with age and reached the highest level at 47 days of age. The expression levels of TLR2 and 4 decreased with age. The mRNA expression of TLR4 and the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 were down-regulated with high dietary zinc treatment, while piglets fed with medium dietary zinc had the highest expression. It is concluded that dietary zinc level had a clear impact on colonic morphology, mucin profiles and immunological traits in piglets after weaning. Those changes might support local defense mechanisms and affect colonic physiology and contribute to the reported reduction of post-weaning diarrhea. PMID:24609095

  15. Dietary antioxidants at supranutritional doses modulate skeletal muscle heat shock protein and inflammatory gene expression in sheep exposed to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, S S; Celi, P; Fahri, F T; Leury, B J; Dunshea, F R

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic heat (thermal) stress and dietary antioxidant supplementation on the expression of heat shock proteins and inflammatory genes in the skeletal muscle of sheep. Twenty-four Merino × Poll Dorset crossbred ewes were allocated to either a control (10 IU vitamin E and 0.24 mg Se/kg DM) or high-antioxidant (VitE+Se; 100 IU vitamin E and 1.20 mg Se/kg DM) diet and were exposed to 2 thermal (temperature) treatments (thermoneutral [TN]: 18°C-21°C and 26%-30% relative humidity; heat stress [HS]: 28°C-40°C and 40%-50% relative humidity) for 1 wk. Physiological parameters were recorded daily, and muscle biopsies were conducted at the end of thermal treatments. Total RNA was extracted from muscle samples and reverse transcribed to cDNA for real-time PCR analysis. Respiration rates and rectal temperature were increased in response to HS (84.2 vs. 161 breaths per minute and 39.52°C vs. 40.06°C for TN and HS conditions, respectively; P < 0.001). There were interactions between dietary and thermal treatments, indicating that dietary antioxidant supplementation reduced respiration rate (P = 0.097) and rectal temperature (P = 0.086) of sheep during HS but not TN conditions. Skeletal muscle heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) mRNA abundance was increased by HS (1.3-fold; P < 0.050) but was not changed (P = 0.77) by dietary antioxidant supplementation. The expression of skeletal muscle heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) mRNA was increased (P < 0.001) 3.5-fold by HS and tended (P = 0.08) to be increased by dietary antioxidant supplementation. Although there were no main effects of diet (P = 0.42) or HS (P = 0.47) on skeletal muscle HSP90 mRNA expression, there was an interaction (P = 0.040) such that HSP90 mRNA expression was increased (P = 0.010) in antioxidant-supplemented sheep under HS compared to TN conditions. Skeletal muscle nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and tissue necrosis factor α (TNF-α) m

  16. The tumor necrosis factor-α gene -238G>A polymorphism, dietary fat intake, obesity risk and serum lipid concentrations in black and white South African women.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Y T; van der Merwe, L; Evans, J; Collins, M; Lambert, E V; September, A; Goedecke, J H

    2012-12-01

    This study explored interactions between dietary fat intake and the tumor necrosis factor-α gene (TNFA) -238G>A polymorphism (rs361525) on adiposity and serum lipid concentrations in apparently healthy premenopausal black and white South African (SA) women. Normal-weight (N=107) and obese (N=120) black, and normal-weight (N=89) and obese (N=62) white SA women underwent measurements of body composition, fasting lipids and dietary intake, and were genotyped for the -238G>A polymorphism. Black women had a higher -238GA genotype frequency than white women (P<0.001), but there were no differences between body mass index groups. Black women with the -238A allele had a greater body fat % than those with the GG genotype (P<0.001). Further, in black women, with increasing polyunsaturated:saturated fat ratio and omega-6 (n-6):omega-3 (n-3) ratio, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations decreased, and total cholesterol (T-C):HDL-C ratio increased in those with the GA genotype but not the GG genotype. In addition, with increasing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake (percentage of total energy intake, %E), T-C:HDL-C ratio decreased in those with the GA genotype, but not in those with the GG genotype. In white SA women, with increasing eicosapentaenoic acid (%E) intake, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations decreased in those with the GG genotype but not the GA genotype. The -238G>A polymorphism was associated with body fatness in black women. Interactions between -238G>A genotypes and dietary fat intake on serum lipids and adiposity differed depending on dietary fat intake, but those for serum lipids were not the same in black and white SA women.

  17. New Primers Targeting Full-Length Ciliate 18S rRNA Genes and Evaluation of Dietary Effect on Rumen Ciliate Diversity in Dairy Cows.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Shengguo; Zhang, Yangdong; Sun, Peng; Bu, Dengpan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the full-length 18S rRNA gene sequences of rumen ciliates is more reliable for taxonomical classification and diversity assessment than the analysis of partial hypervariable regions only. The objective of this study was to develop new oligonucleotide primers targeting the full-length 18S rRNA genes of rumen ciliates, and to evaluate the effect of different sources of dietary fiber (corn stover or a mixture of alfalfa hay and corn silage) and protein (mixed rapeseed, cottonseed, and/or soybean meals) on rumen ciliate diversity in dairy cows. Primers were designed based on a total of 137 previously reported ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences. The 3'-terminal sequences of the newly designed primers, P.1747r_2, P.324f, and P.1651r, demonstrated >99% base coverage. Primer pair D (P.324f and P.1747r_2) was selected for the cloning and sequencing of ciliate 18S rRNA genes because it produced a 1423-bp amplicon, and did not amply the sequences of other eukaryotic species, such as yeast. The optimal species-level cutoff value for distinguishing between the operational taxonomic units of different ciliate species was 0.015. The phylogenetic analysis of full-length ciliate 18S rRNA gene sequences showed that distinct ciliate profiles were induced by the different sources of dietary fiber and protein. Dasytricha and Entodinium were the predominant genera in the ruminal fluid of dairy cattle, and Dasytricha was significantly more abundant in cows fed with corn stover than in cows fed with alfalfa hay and corn silage.

  18. Association and Interaction Effect of AGTR1 and AGTR2 Gene Polymorphisms with Dietary Pattern on Metabolic Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease in Malaysian Adults.

    PubMed

    Yap, Roseline Wai Kuan; Shidoji, Yoshihiro; Yap, Wai Sum; Masaki, Motofumi

    2017-08-09

    Gene-diet interaction using a multifactorial approach is preferred to study the multiple risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examined the association and gene-diet interaction effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) gene (rs5186), and type 2 receptor (AGTR2) gene (rs1403543) polymorphisms on metabolic risk factors of CVD in Malaysian adults. CVD parameters (BMI, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and TC/HDL-C ratio), and constructed dietary patterns "vegetables, fruits, and soy diet" (VFSD), and "rice, egg, and fish diet" (REFD) were obtained from previous studies. Genotyping analysis was performed by real-time PCR using Taqman probes. The subjects were 507 adults (151 Malays; 179 Chinese; and 177 Indians). Significant genetic associations were obtained on blood lipids for rs5186 in Malays and Chinese, and rs1403543 in Chinese females. The significant gene-diet interaction effects after adjusting for potential confounders were: rs5186 × VFSD on blood pressure in Malays (p = 0.016), and in Chinese on blood lipids for rs5186 × REFD (p = 0.009-0.023), and rs1403543 × VFSD in female subjects (p = 0.001-0.011). Malays and Chinese showed higher risk for blood pressure and/or lipids involving rs5186 and rs1403543 SNPs together with gene-diet interactions, but not Indians.

  19. Association and Interaction Effect of AGTR1 and AGTR2 Gene Polymorphisms with Dietary Pattern on Metabolic Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Disease in Malaysian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Roseline Wai Kuan; Shidoji, Yoshihiro; Yap, Wai Sum; Masaki, Motofumi

    2017-01-01

    Gene-diet interaction using a multifactorial approach is preferred to study the multiple risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examined the association and gene-diet interaction effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1) gene (rs5186), and type 2 receptor (AGTR2) gene (rs1403543) polymorphisms on metabolic risk factors of CVD in Malaysian adults. CVD parameters (BMI, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin, total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and TC/HDL-C ratio), and constructed dietary patterns “vegetables, fruits, and soy diet” (VFSD), and “rice, egg, and fish diet” (REFD) were obtained from previous studies. Genotyping analysis was performed by real-time PCR using Taqman probes. The subjects were 507 adults (151 Malays; 179 Chinese; and 177 Indians). Significant genetic associations were obtained on blood lipids for rs5186 in Malays and Chinese, and rs1403543 in Chinese females. The significant gene-diet interaction effects after adjusting for potential confounders were: rs5186 × VFSD on blood pressure in Malays (p = 0.016), and in Chinese on blood lipids for rs5186 × REFD (p = 0.009–0.023), and rs1403543 × VFSD in female subjects (p = 0.001–0.011). Malays and Chinese showed higher risk for blood pressure and/or lipids involving rs5186 and rs1403543 SNPs together with gene-diet interactions, but not Indians. PMID:28792482

  20. Interaction between a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma gene polymorphism and dietary fat intake in relation to body mass.

    PubMed

    Memisoglu, Asli; Hu, Frank B; Hankinson, Susan E; Manson, JoAnn E; De Vivo, Immaculata; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J

    2003-11-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a critical regulator of adipogenesis. PPAR gamma+/- mice are resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and thus PPAR gamma may mediate physiological responses to dietary fat in other mammals. The aim of this study was to determine whether the human PPAR gamma proline to alanine substitution polymorphism (Pro12Ala) modifies the association between dietary fat and adiposity and plasma lipids. Subjects (n=2141) were controls selected for three case-control studies nested within the Nurses' Health Study, a large ongoing prospective cohort study. Associations between intake of total fat, fat subtypes and BMI were different in PPAR gamma 12Ala variant allele-carriers compared with non-carriers. Among homozygous wild-type Pro/Pro individuals, those in the highest quintile of total fat intake, had significantly higher mean body mass index (BMI) compared with those in the lowest quintile (27.3 versus 25.4 kg/m2, respectively; P-trend<0.0001) whereas among 12Ala variant allele-carriers there was no significant trend observed between dietary fat intake and BMI (P-trend=0.99; P-interaction=0.003). In contrast, intake of monounsaturated fat was not associated with BMI among homozygous wild-type women but was inversely associated with BMI among 12Ala variant allele-carriers (mean in lowest quintile=27.6 versus mean in highest quintile=25.5 kg/m2; P-trend=0.006; P-interaction=0.003). The relationship between dietary fat intake and plasma lipid concentrations also differed according to PPAR gamma genotype. These data suggest that PPAR gamma genotype is an important factor in physiological responses to dietary fat in humans.

  1. Lipidomic evidence that lowering the typical dietary palmitate to oleate ratio in humans decreases the leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    PubMed

    Kien, C Lawrence; Bunn, Janice Y; Fukagawa, Naomi K; Anathy, Vikas; Matthews, Dwight E; Crain, Karen I; Ebenstein, David B; Tarleton, Emily K; Pratley, Richard E; Poynter, Matthew E

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported that lowering the high, habitual palmitic acid (PA) intake in ovulating women improved insulin sensitivity and both inflammatory and oxidative stress. In vitro studies indicate that PA can activate both cell membrane toll-like receptor-4 and the intracellular nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptor protein (NLRP3). To gain further insight into the relevance to human metabolic disease of dietary PA, we studied healthy, lean and obese adults enrolled in a randomized, crossover trial comparing 3-week, high-PA (HPA) and low-PA/high-oleic-acid (HOA) diets. After each diet, both hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivities were measured, and we assessed cytokine concentrations in plasma and in supernatants derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) as well as proinflammatory gene expression in skeletal muscle. Insulin sensitivity was unaffected by diet. Plasma concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α was higher during the HPA diet. Lowering the habitually high PA intake by feeding the HOA diet resulted in lower secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α by PBMCs, as well as lower relative mRNA expression of cJun and NLRP3 in muscle. Principal components analysis of 156 total variables coupled to analysis of covariance indicated that the mechanistic pathway for the differential dietary effects on PBMCs involved changes in the PA/OA ratio of tissue lipids. Our results indicate that lowering the dietary and tissue lipid PA/OA ratio resulted in lower leukocyte production of proinflammatory cytokines and muscle expression of redox-sensitive genes, but the relevance to diabetes risk is uncertain.

  2. Fish Oil Slows Prostate Cancer Xenograft Growth Relative to Other Dietary Fats and is Associated with Decreased Mitochondrial and Insulin Pathway Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Jessica C.; Masko, Elizabeth M.; Wu, Chenwei; Keenan, Melissa M.; Pilla, Danielle M.; Aronson, William J.; Chi, Jen-Tsan A.; Freedland, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous mouse studies suggest that decreasing dietary fat content can slow prostate cancer (PCa) growth. To our knowledge, no study has yet compared the effect of multiple different fats on PCa progression. We sought to systematically compare the effect of fish oil, olive oil, corn oil, and animal fat on PCa progression. Methods A total of 96 male SCID mice were injected with LAPC-4 human PCa cells. Two weeks following injection, mice were randomized to a fish oil, olive oil, corn oil, or animal fat-based Western diet (35% kcals from fat). Animals were euthanized when tumors reached 1,000mm3. Serum was collected at sacrifice and assayed for PSA, insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and PGE-2 levels. Tumors were also assayed for PGE-2 and COX-2 levels and global gene expression analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays. Results Mice weights and tumor volumes were equivalent across groups at randomization. Overall, fish oil consumption was associated with improved survival, relative to other dietary groups (p=0.014). On gene expression analyses, the fish oil group had decreased signal in pathways related to mitochondrial physiology and insulin synthesis/secretion. Conclusions In this xenograft model, we found that consuming a diet in which fish oil was the only fat source slowed tumor growth and improved survival, compared to mice consuming diets composed of olive oil, corn oil, or animal fat. While prior studies showed that the amount of fat is important for PCa growth, the current study suggests that type of dietary fat consumed may also be important. PMID:23877027

  3. Fish oil slows prostate cancer xenograft growth relative to other dietary fats and is associated with decreased mitochondrial and insulin pathway gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, J C; Masko, E M; Wu, C; Keenan, M M; Pilla, D M; Aronson, W J; Chi, J-Ta; Freedland, S J

    2013-12-01

    Previous mouse studies suggest that decreasing dietary fat content can slow prostate cancer (PCa) growth. To our knowledge, no study has yet compared the effect of multiple different fats on PCa progression. We sought to systematically compare the effect of fish oil, olive oil, corn oil and animal fat on PCa progression. A total of 96 male severe combined immunodeficient mice were injected with LAPC-4 human PCa cells. Two weeks following injection, mice were randomized to a Western diet based on fish oil, olive oil, corn oil or animal fat (35% kilocalories from fat). Animals were euthanized when tumor volumes reached 1000 mm(3). Serum was collected at death and assayed for PSA, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF-1-binding protein-3 and prostaglandin E-2 (PGE-2) levels. Tumors were also assayed for PGE-2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels, and global gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix microarrays. Mice weights and tumor volumes were equivalent across groups at randomization. Overall, fish oil consumption was associated with improved survival relative to other dietary groups (P=0.014). On gene expression analyses, the fish oil group had decreased signal in pathways related to mitochondrial physiology and insulin synthesis/secretion. In this xenograft model, we found that consuming a diet in which fish oil was the only fat source slowed tumor growth and improved survival compared with that in mice consuming diets composed of olive oil, corn oil or animal fat. Although prior studies showed that the amount of fat is important for PCa growth, this study suggests that the type of dietary fat consumed may also be important.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of unfolded protein response genes from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) and their expression in response to dietary fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kai; Yan, Jing; Li, Songlin; Wang, Tianjiao; Xu, Wei; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui

    2017-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a mechanism to cope with perturbed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) functions or accumulation of unfolded protein in the ER in eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, the UPR also participates in a number of physiological and pathological processes, such as nutrient sensing, lipid synthesis, and inflammatory response. In this study, four UPR-related genes (GRP78/BiP, ATF6α, XBP1 and CHO) were isolated characterized from large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea), and their expression in response to dietary lipid sources (various fatty acids) such as fish oil (FO), palmic acid (PA), olive oil (OO), sunflower oil (SO), and perilla oil (PO), were examined following feeding. The results showed that the four UPR-related proteins contained highly conserved functional domains and had the closest phylogenetic relationships with other fishes. Additionally, these genes were ubiquitously expressed in large yellow croaker, as in zebrafish and medaka. Moreover, GRP78, ATF6α and spliced XBP1 (XBP1s) mRNA levels in the liver, not in adipose tissue, were significantly increased in the SO group compared to the other groups (P<0.05). These results indicated that dietary SO activated UPR, and the activation of UPR might provide a mechanism to improve ER function, but probably stimulated lipid synthesis and caused inflammatory response in the liver of large yellow croaker.

  5. Expression of growth-related genes in the mouse placenta is influenced by interactions between intestinal nematode (Heligmosomoides bakeri) infection and dietary protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Starr, Lisa M; Koski, Kristine G; Scott, Marilyn E

    2016-02-01

    Intestinal nematode infection and dietary protein deficiency are common during pregnancy and both have been shown to impair fetal growth in humans, livestock and laboratory animals. The placenta has been linked to fetal growth but its role in mediating the response to maternal infection and protein deficiency is not understood. We used microarrays to test the hypothesis that maternal intestinal nematode infection and protein deficiency alter the expression of placental genes related to fetal growth. Placentas were obtained on day 18 of pregnancy from CD-1 mice fed protein sufficient (24%) or protein deficiency (6%) isoenergetic diets and either uninfected or infected with Heligmosomoides bakeri. Gene expression was analysed using the Affymetrix GeneChip 2.0 ST mouse array (n=3/experimental group). Differentially expressed genes were identified using two-way ANOVA (P<0.02, fold-change >1.25) and pathway analyses were performed using DAVID software. Expression changes for selected genes were confirmed using qPCR. Heligmosomoides bakeri infection down-regulated 109 transcripts, including genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, and up-regulated 214 transcripts, including genes involved in ATP binding and hemopoiesis. Up-regulation of hemopoiesis genes may explain increased placental mass previously reported in H. bakeri-infected mice. Protein deficiency down-regulated 141 annotated transcripts, including genes involved in cell motility and endopeptidase activity, and up-regulated 131 annotated transcripts, including genes related to hemopoiesis. A statistical interaction was detected for 248 transcripts, including several genes with known functions in fetal growth. Notably, expression of the gene Irs1 (insulin receptor substrate) was lower in infected dams but only when they were fed a protein sufficient diet. Also, expression of several genes, including Igf1r (insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor) and Prl (prolactin) was up-regulated by infection in protein

  6. Dietary Lactobacillus acidophilus modulated skin mucus protein profile, immune and appetite genes expression in gold fish (Carassius auratus gibelio).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Marjan; Kolangi Miandare, Hamed; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein; Yarahmadi, Peyman

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of dietary Lactobacillus acidophilus on skin mucus protein pattern, immune and appetite related genes expression as well as growth performance in gold fish (Carassius auratus gibelio). Three hundred healthy gold fish (2.5 ± 0.05) juveniles were randomly distributed in 12 glass aquariums (400-L; 25 fish per aquaria) and fed experimental diets contain different levels of L. acidophilus (0, 1.5 × 10(8), 3 × 10(8) and 6 × 10(8)) for 8 weeks. SDS-PAGE analysis of skin mucus protein profile at the end of the feeding trial revealed differences in protein profile of probiotic fed fish and control group; even three new bands were observed in L. acidophilus treated groups. Furthermore, fish fed 6 × 10(8) CFU g(-1) supplemented diet showed up-regulation of both TNF-1α and TNF-2α gene expression (P < 0.05). Evaluation of appetite related gene expression showed down-regulation of ghrelin in probiotic fed fish compared those of control treatment (P < 0.05). However, administration of different levels of L. acidophilus had no significant effects on growth performance (P > 0.05). These results demonstrated that while no beneficial effects on growth performance, dietary L. acidophilus affects immune and appetite related genes expression as well as skin mucus protein profile. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of intestinal gene expression by dietary zinc status: effectiveness of cDNA arrays for expression profiling of a single nutrient deficiency.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, R K; Moore, J B; Green, C L; Cousins, R J

    2001-11-20

    Mammalian nutritional status affects the homeostatic balance of multiple physiological processes and their associated gene expression. Although DNA array analysis can monitor large numbers of genes, there are no reports of expression profiling of a micronutrient deficiency in an intact animal system. In this report, we have tested the feasibility of using cDNA arrays to compare the global changes in expression of genes of known function that occur in the early stages of rodent zinc deficiency. The gene-modulating effects of this deficiency were demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR measurements of altered mRNA levels for metallothionein 1, zinc transporter 2, and uroguanylin, all of which have been previously documented as zinc-regulated genes. As a result of the low level of inherent noise within this model system and application of a recently reported statistical tool for statistical analysis of microarrays [Tusher, V.G., Tibshirani, R. & Chu, G. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 5116-5121], we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly identify the modest changes in mRNA abundance produced by this single micronutrient deficiency. Among the genes identified by this array profile are intestinal genes that influence signaling pathways, growth, transcription, redox, and energy utilization. Additionally, the influence of dietary zinc supply on the expression of some of these genes was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Overall, these data support the effectiveness of cDNA array expression profiling to investigate the pleiotropic effects of specific nutrients and may provide an approach to establishing markers for assessment of nutritional status.

  8. Modulation of intestinal gene expression by dietary zinc status: Effectiveness of cDNA arrays for expression profiling of a single nutrient deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Raymond K.; Moore, J. Bernadette; Green, Calvert L.; Cousins, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian nutritional status affects the homeostatic balance of multiple physiological processes and their associated gene expression. Although DNA array analysis can monitor large numbers of genes, there are no reports of expression profiling of a micronutrient deficiency in an intact animal system. In this report, we have tested the feasibility of using cDNA arrays to compare the global changes in expression of genes of known function that occur in the early stages of rodent zinc deficiency. The gene-modulating effects of this deficiency were demonstrated by real-time quantitative PCR measurements of altered mRNA levels for metallothionein 1, zinc transporter 2, and uroguanylin, all of which have been previously documented as zinc-regulated genes. As a result of the low level of inherent noise within this model system and application of a recently reported statistical tool for statistical analysis of microarrays [Tusher, V.G., Tibshirani, R. & Chu, G. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 5116–5121], we demonstrate the ability to reproducibly identify the modest changes in mRNA abundance produced by this single micronutrient deficiency. Among the genes identified by this array profile are intestinal genes that influence signaling pathways, growth, transcription, redox, and energy utilization. Additionally, the influence of dietary zinc supply on the expression of some of these genes was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. Overall, these data support the effectiveness of cDNA array expression profiling to investigate the pleiotropic effects of specific nutrients and may provide an approach to establishing markers for assessment of nutritional status. PMID:11717422

  9. Gestational dietary betaine supplementation suppresses hepatic expression of lipogenic genes in neonatal piglets through epigenetic and glucocorticoid receptor-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cai, Demin; Wang, Junjian; Jia, Yimin; Liu, Haoyu; Yuan, Mengjie; Dong, Haibo; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Methyl donors play critical roles in nutritional programming through epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here we fed gestational sows with control or betaine-supplemented diets (3g/kg) throughout the pregnancy to explore the effects of maternal methyl-donor nutrient on neonatal expression of hepatic lipogenic genes. Betaine-exposed piglets demonstrated significantly lower liver triglyceride content associated with down-regulated hepatic expression of lipogenic genes acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c. Moreover, s-adenosyl methionine to s-adenosyl homocysteine ratio was elevated in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets, which was accompanied by DNA hypermethylation on FAS and SCD gene promoters and more enriched repression histone mark H3K27me3 on SCD gene promoter. Furthermore, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding to SCD gene promoter was diminished along with reduced serum cortisol and liver GR protein content in betaine-exposed piglets. GR-mediated SCD gene regulation was confirmed in HepG2 cells in vitro. Dexamethasone (Dex) drastically increased the luciferase activity of porcine SCD promoter, while the deletion of GR response element on SCD promoter significantly attenuated Dex-mediated SCD transactivation. In addition, miR-let-7e, miR-1285 and miR-124a, which respectively target porcine SCD, ACC and GR, were significantly up-regulated in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets, being in accordance with decreased protein content of these three genes. Taken together, our results suggest that maternal dietary betaine supplementation during gestation attenuates hepatic lipogenesis in neonatal piglets via epigenetic and GR-mediated mechanisms.

  10. Effect of dietary fish oil on fatty acid deposition and expression of cholesterol homeostasis controlling genes in the liver and plasma lipid profile: comparison of two animal models.

    PubMed

    Komprda, T; Rozíková, V; Zamazalová, N; Škultéty, O; Vícenová, M; Trčková, M; Faldyna, M

    2016-10-16

    The objective of the present study was to compare hepatic fatty acid deposition, plasma lipid level and expression of cholesterol homeostasis controlling genes in the liver of rats (Wistar Albino; n = 32) and pigs (Large White × Landrace; n = 32) randomly assigned into two groups of 16 animals each and fed 10 weeks the diet with either 2.5% of fish oil (F; source of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, EPA+DHA) or 2.5% of palm oil (P; high content of saturated fatty acids; control). F-rats deposited in the liver three times less EPA, but 1.3 times more DHA than F-pigs (p < 0.05). Dietary fish oil relative to palm oil increased PPARα and SREBP-2 gene expression much strongly (p < 0.01) in the pig liver in comparison with the rat liver, but expression of Insig-1 and Hmgcr genes in the liver of the F-pigs relative to the expression of these genes in the liver of the P-pigs was substantially lower (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively) as compared to rats. When plasma lipid concentration in the F-animals was expressed as a ratio of the plasma concentration in the P-counterparts, dietary fish oil decreased HDL cholesterol less (p < 0.01), but LDL cholesterol and triacylglycerols more (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively) in rats than in pigs: more favourable effect of fish oil on rat plasma lipids in comparison with pigs can therefore be concluded. Concentration of total cholesterol and both its fractions in the rat plasma was negatively correlated (p < 0.01) with hepatic DHA, but also with unsaturated myristic and palmitic acid respectively. It has been concluded that regarding the similarity of the plasma lipid levels to humans, porcine model can be considered superior; however, using this model, dietary fish oil at the tested amount (2.5%) was not able to improve plasma lipid markers in comparison with saturated palm oil.

  11. Interleukin-6 Gene Polymorphisms, Dietary Fat Intake, Obesity and Serum Lipid Concentrations in Black and White South African Women

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Yael T.; van der Merwe, Lize; Evans, Juliet; Collins, Malcolm; Lambert, Estelle V.; September, Alison; Goedecke, Julia H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated interactions between dietary fat intake and IL-6 polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white South African (SA) women. Normal-weight and obese, black and white women underwent measurements of body composition, serum lipids and dietary fat intake, and were genotyped for the IL-6 −174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms. In black women the IVS4 +869 G allele was associated with greater adiposity, and with increasing dietary fat intake adiposity increased in the IVS3 +281 GT+GG and IVS4 +869 AA or AG genotypes. In white women, with increasing omega-3 (n-3) intake and decreasing n-6:n-3 ratio, body mass index (BMI) decreased in those with the −174 C allele, IVS3 +281 T allele and IVS4 +869 AG genotype. In the white women, those with the IVS3 +281 T allele had lower triglycerides. Further, with increasing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA); triglyceride and total cholesterol:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (T-C:HDL-C) ratio decreased in those with the −174 C allele. In black women, with increasing total fat intake, triglycerides and T-C:HDL-C ratio increased in those with the IVS4 +869 G allele. This study is the first to show that dietary fat intake modulates the relationship between the IL-6 −174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white SA women. PMID:24962479

  12. Interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms, dietary fat intake, obesity and serum lipid concentrations in black and white South African women.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Yael T; van der Merwe, Lize; Evans, Juliet; Collins, Malcolm; Lambert, Estelle V; September, Alison V; Goedecke, Julia H

    2014-06-24

    This study investigated interactions between dietary fat intake and IL-6 polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white South African (SA) women. Normal-weight and obese, black and white women underwent measurements of body composition, serum lipids and dietary fat intake, and were genotyped for the IL-6 -174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms. In black women the IVS4 +869 G allele was associated with greater adiposity, and with increasing dietary fat intake adiposity increased in the IVS3 +281 GT+GG and IVS4 +869 AA or AG genotypes. In white women, with increasing omega-3 (n-3) intake and decreasing n-6:n-3 ratio, body mass index (BMI) decreased in those with the -174 C allele, IVS3 +281 T allele and IVS4 +869 AG genotype. In the white women, those with the IVS3 +281 T allele had lower triglycerides. Further, with increasing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA); triglyceride and total cholesterol:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (T-C:HDL-C) ratio decreased in those with the -174 C allele. In black women, with increasing total fat intake, triglycerides and T-C:HDL-C ratio increased in those with the IVS4 +869 G allele. This study is the first to show that dietary fat intake modulates the relationship between the IL-6 -174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white SA women.

  13. Replacement of dietary fish oil by vegetable oils affects humoral immunity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines genes in gilthead sea bream Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Montero, D; Mathlouthi, F; Tort, L; Afonso, J M; Torrecillas, S; Fernández-Vaquero, A; Negrin, D; Izquierdo, M S

    2010-12-01

    Commercial gilthead sea bream feeds are highly energetic, fish oil traditionally being the main lipid source. But the decreased fish oil production together with the increased prices of this oil encourages its substitution by vegetable oils, imposing new nutritional habits to aquaculture species. Partial replacement of fish oil by vegetable oils in diets for marine species allows good feed utilization and growth but may affect fish health, since imbalances in dietary fatty acids may alter fish immunological status. The effect of dietary oils on different aspects of fish immune system has been reported for some species, but very little is known about the effect of dietary oils on immune-related genes expression in fish. Thus, the objective of this study was to elucidate the role of dietary oils on the expression of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) and Interleukine 1β (IL-1β) on intestine and head kidney after exposure to the bacterial pathogen Photobacterium damselae sp. piscicida. For that purpose, 5 iso-nitrogenous and iso-lipidic diets (45% crude protein, 22% crude lipid content) were formulated. Anchovy oil was the only lipid source used in the control diet (FO), but in the other diets, fish oil was totally (100%) or partially (70%) substituted by linseed (rich in n-3 fatty acids) or soybean (rich in n-6 fatty acids) (100L, 100S, 70L, 70S). Fish were fed experimental diets during 80 days and after this period were exposed to an experimental intestinal infection with the pathogen. Serum and tissue samples were obtained at pre-infection and after 1, 3 and 7 days of infection. RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription from intestine and head kidney and the level expression of TNF-α and IL-1β were assayed by using quantitative real time PCR. The expression level of genes analysed was represented as relative value, using the comparative Ct method (2(-ΔΔCt)). Serum anti-bacterial activity was measured as

  14. Effects of dietary tannic acid on the growth, hepatic gene expression, and antioxidant enzyme activity in Brandt's voles (Microtus brandti).

    PubMed

    Ye, Man-Hong; Nan, Yan-Lei; Ding, Meng-Meng; Hu, Jun-Bang; Liu, Qian; Wei, Wan-Hong; Yang, Sheng-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the physiological and biochemical responses of Brandt's voles to the persistent presence of dietary tannic acid. The diet for animals in the experimental group was supplemented with 3% dietary tannic acid for 5weeks. The control group received a commercial lab chow. No significant differences were detected in body weight, organ (heart, kidney, and liver) weights, and organ parameters between animals from two groups. However, voles in the experimental group had significantly higher daily food intake, increased contents of proline and histidine in saliva and feces after protein hydrolysis, and elevated hepatic expression of transferrin than the control. Our results suggested the existence of adaptive strategies developed in Brandt's voles to overcome the adverse effects of dietary tannic acid. (1) Food consumption was increased to satisfy their nutritional demands. (2) The secretion of tannic-acid-binding salivary proteins was promoted. (3) The absorption of iron was enhanced. These alterations contributed to neutralize the negative effects of tannic acid and maintain body mass in animals supplemented with tannic acid. As the result of the consumption of tannic acid, hepatic expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase was significantly decreased, while the overall potential of the antioxidant system, characterized by increased hepatic enzymatic activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, was enhanced. Our results also implied the involvement of tannic acid in the regulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in voles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of elevated dietary iron on the gastrointestinal expression of Nramp genes and iron homeostasis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Hamilton, Charmain D; Niyogi, Som

    2013-04-01

    Diet is the primary source of iron (Fe) for freshwater fish, and the absorption of Fe is believed to occur via the Nramp family of divalent metal transporters (also called DMT1). Presently, the homeostatic regulation of dietary Fe absorption in fish is poorly understood. This study examined the gastrointestinal mRNA expression of two Nramp isoforms, Nramp-β and Nramp-γ, in the freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), following exposure to elevated dietary Fe [1,256 mg Fe/kg food vs. 136 mg Fe/kg food (control)] for 14 days. The physiological performance, plasma Fe status and tissue-specific accumulation of Fe were also evaluated. In general, the mRNA expression level of Nramp was higher in the intestine relative to the stomach. Interestingly, fish fed on a high-Fe diet exhibited a significant induction in Nramp expression after 7 days, followed by a decrease to the level observed in control fish on day 14. The increase in Nramp expression correlated with the elevated gastrointestinal and plasma Fe concentrations. However, the hepatic Fe concentration remained unchanged during the entire exposure period, indicating strong homeostatic regulation of hepatic Fe level in fish. Fish appeared to handle increased systemic Fe level by elevating the plasma transferrin level, thereby enhancing the Fe-binding capacity in the plasma. Overall, our study provides new interesting insights into the homeostatic regulation of dietary Fe uptake and handling in freshwater fish.

  16. De novo assembly and characterization of seabass Lateolabrax japonicus transcriptome and expression of hepatic genes following different dietary phosphorus/calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kang-Le; Ji, Zhong-Li; Rahimnejad, Samad; Zhang, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ling; Song, Kai

    2017-08-09

    Fish farming seriously influences the aquatic environment because most dietary phosphorus (P) is excreted in the effluent. To increase the P utilization in fish, molecular techniques should be explored given the remarkable development of these techniques. Thus, to identify the candidate genes related to P utilization and molecular alterations following administration of a P-deficient diet in seabass Lateolabrax japonicus, we assessed the de novo pituitary, gill, intestine, liver, kidney, scales and vertebra transcriptomes, and we compared the expression of hepatic genes with three diets varying in P and Ca levels: diet I (0.4% P, 0.3% Ca), diet II (0.8% P, 0.3% Ca), and diet III (0.8% P, 3% Ca). In total, we identified 99,392 unigenes, and 37,086 (37.31%) unigenes were annotated. The results showed that 48 unigenes were significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated, while 55 genes were significantly down-regulated in the liver of group I compared with group II. Offering the P-sufficient and high Ca diet, diet III significantly up-regulated 24 unigenes and down-regulated 46 genes in the liver. There were significant differences in the regulation of 8 unigenes (3 up-regulated and 5 down-regulated) between groups II and III. Gene ontology (GO) functional enrichment and KEGG pathway analysis of differently expressed genes were performed for each pair of groups. The GO analysis showed that a large number of biological processes were significantly altered between P-deficient and P-sufficient treatments (I vs II and I vs III). Comparing group I and group II, seven KEGG terms were enriched significantly: glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, one carbon pool by folate, arginine and proline metabolism, the biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid elongation, drug metabolism-cytochrome P450, and fatty acid metabolism. There was no significantly enriched KEGG pathway between groups II and III. In conclusion, our study revealed that a P-deficient diet could increase

  17. Dietary administration of β-1,3/1,6-glucan and probiotic strain Shewanella putrefaciens, single or combined, on gilthead seabream growth, immune responses and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Villanueva, Laura T; Tovar-Ramírez, Dariel; Gisbert, Enric; Cordero, Héctor; Guardiola, Francisco A; Cuesta, Alberto; Meseguer, José; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Esteban, Maria A

    2014-07-01

    It is widely known that β-glucans and probiotic bacteria are good immunostimulants for fish. In the present work we have evaluated the dietary effect of β-1,3/1,6-glucan (isolated from Laminarina digitata) and Pdp 11 (Shewanella putrefaciens, probiotic isolated from gilthead seabream skin), single or combined, on growth, humoural (seric level of total IgM antibodies and peroxidase and antiprotease activities) and cellular innate immune response (peroxidase and phagocytic activities of head-kidney leucocytes), as well as the expression of immune-related genes in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata). Four treatment groups were established: control (non-supplemented diet), Pdp 11 (10(9) cfu g(-1)), β-1,3/1,6-glucan (0.1%) and β-1,3/1,6-glucan + Pdp 11 (0.1% and 10(9) cfu g(-1), respectively). Fish were sampled after 1, 2 and 4 weeks of feeding. Interestingly, all supplemented diets produced increments in the seabream growth rates, mainly the Pdp 11-suplemented diet. Overall, Pdp 11 dietary administration resulted in decreased serum IgM levels and peroxidase activity. However, the seric antiprotease activity was increased in fish fed with both supplements together. Furthermore, β-1,3/1,6-glucan and combined diet increased phagocytic activity after 2 or 4 weeks. At gene level, IL-1β and INFγ transcripts were always up-regulated in HK but only the interleukin reached significance after 4 weeks in the group fed with β-glucan. On the contrary, IgM gene expression tended to be down-regulated being significant after 1 week in seabream specimens fed with β-glucan or β-glucan plus Pdp 11. These results suggest that β-1,3/1,6-glucan and Pdp 11 modulate the immune response and stimulates growth of the gilthead seabream, one of the species with the highest rate of production in Mediterranean aquaculture.

  18. The nutrigenetic influence of the interaction between dietary vitamin E and TXN and COMT gene polymorphisms on waist circumference: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Mansego, Maria L; De Marco, Griselda; Ivorra, Carmen; Lopez-Izquierdo, Raúl; Morcillo, Sonsoles; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; González-Albert, Verónica; Martinez, Fernando; Soriguer, Federico; Martín-Escudero, Juan C; Redon, Josep; Chaves, F Javier

    2015-09-02

    Abdominal obesity (AO) is a common modifiable risk factor for certain non-communicable diseases associated with enhanced oxidative stress (OS). The objective of this work was to investigate whether the interaction between antioxidant vitamin intake and OS-related polymorphisms modulates gene-associated anthropometry in a Spanish population. A total of 246 subjects with AO, and 492 age and gender matched non-AO subjects were included in the study. Anthropometric, biochemical, and OS parameters, and antioxidant dietary intake data were assessed using validated procedures. DNA from white blood cells was isolated and the genotype of seven polymorphisms from genes involved in OS (pro-oxidant and antioxidant) were analyzed using the SNPlex system. The effects of the c.-793T > C polymorphism on promoter activity and thus thioredoxin (TXN) activity were examined using reporter assays. The AO group had higher 8-Oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine levels and took in less vitamin A and vitamin E compared to the non-AO group. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the rs2301241 polymorphism in TXN and rs740603 in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) were associated with waist circumference (WC) and AO. Moreover, these polymorphisms were more strongly associated with variations in WC in subjects with low vitamin E intakes. A promoter assay revealed that the T to C conversion at c.-793 (rs2301241) induced a more than two fold increase in reporter gene expression. WC is associated both with dietary vitamin E intake and genetic variants of TXN and COMT suggesting that existence of a complex nutrigenetic pathway that involves regulation of AO.

  19. Dietary conjugated linoleic acid supplementation alters the expression of genes involved in the endocannabinoid system in the bovine endometrium and increases plasma progesterone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, A; Dirandeh, E; Ansari Pirsaraei, Z; Shohreh, B

    2016-10-01

    Endocannabinoids are derived from phospholipids and reduce fertility by interfering with implantation. Identification of changes in the expression of genes of the endocannabinoid system as a result of dietary inclusion of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is critical to the advancement of our understanding of the nutritional regulation of uterine function. An experiment was conducted on transition cows to evaluate the expression of key endocannabinoid genes in bovine endometrium in response to dietary supplementation with CLA. A total of 16 cows were randomly assigned to two treatments: (1) control (75 g/day palm oil) and (2) CLA (75 g/day CLA) from 21 days prepartum to Day 42 postpartum. Cows underwent uterine biopsy on days 21 and 42 postpartum. The abundance of mRNA encoding endocannabinoid receptor (CNR2), N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPEPLD), fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), N-acylethanolamine acid amidase (NAAA), and monoglyceride lipase (MGLL) was measured by real-time PCR. Results reported that relative levels of mRNA encoding CNR2 and NAPEPLD were decreased (P < 0.05) compared with control cows between Days 21 and 42 postpartum. Relative levels of mRNA coding for NAAA and MGLL were not different (P > 0.05) in the same situation. Mean plasma progesterone concentrations were higher in CLA-fed cows compared with control cows at Day 42 postpartum (3.51 and 1.42 ng/mL, respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that the beneficial effects of a diet enriched with CLA are the result of a decrease in relative gene expression of the endocannabinoid receptor (CNR2) and enzymes that synthesize fatty acid amides (NAPEPLD) and of an increase in the expression of PTGS2 that in turn can oxidate endocannabinoids and consequently resulted in increased plasma progesterone concentrations during early lactation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A systems biology approach using transcriptomic data reveals genes and pathways in porcine skeletal muscle affected by dietary lysine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Meeting the increasing market demands for pork products requires improvement of the feed efficiency of growing pigs. The use of Affymetrix Porcine Gene 1.0 ST array containing 19,211 genes in this study provides a comprehensive gene expression profile of skeletal muscle of finishing pigs in response...

  1. Potential costs of bacterial infection on storage protein gene expression and reproduction in queenless Apis mellifera worker bees on distinct dietary regimes.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Anete Pedro; Martins, Juliana Ramos; Guidugli-Lazzarini, Karina Rosa; Macedo, Liliane Maria Fróes; Bitondi, Márcia Maria Gentile; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2012-09-01

    Insects are able to combat infection by initiating an efficient immune response that involves synthesizing antimicrobial peptides and a range of other defense molecules. These responses may be costly to the organism, resulting in it exploiting endogenous resources to maintain homeostasis or support defense to the detriment of other physiological needs. We used queenless worker bees on distinct dietary regimes that may alter hemolymph protein storage and ovary activation to investigate the physiological costs of infection with Serratia marcescens. The expression of the genes encoding the storage proteins vitellogenin and hexamerin 70a, the vitellogenin receptor, and vasa (which has a putative role in reproduction), was impaired in the infected bees. This impairment was mainly evident in the bees fed beebread, which caused significantly higher expression of these genes than did royal jelly or syrup, and this was confirmed at the vitellogenin and hexamerin 70a protein levels. Beebread was also the only diet that promoted ovary activation in the queenless bees, but this activation was significantly impaired by the infection. The expression of the genes encoding the storage proteins apolipophorins-I and -III and the lipophorin receptor was not altered by infection regardless the diet provided to the bees. Similarly, the storage of apolipophorin-I in the hemolymph was only slightly impaired by the infection, independently of the supplied diet. Taken together these results indicate that, infection demands a physiological cost from the transcription of specific protein storage-related genes and from the reproductive capacity.

  2. Effect of dietary arginine on growth, intestinal enzyme activities and gene expression in muscle, hepatopancreas and intestine of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Chen, Gangfu; Feng, Lin; Kuang, Shengyao; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Weidan; Li, Shuhong; Tang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoqiu

    2012-07-01

    The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that dietary arginine promotes digestion and absorption capacity, and, thus, enhances fish growth. This improvement might be related to the target of rapamycin (TOR) and eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP). A total of 1200 juvenile Jian carp, Cyprinus carpio var. Jian, with an average initial weight of 6.33 (SE 0.03) g, were fed with diets containing graded concentrations of arginine, namely, 9.8 (control), 12.7, 16.1, 18.5, 21.9 and 24.5 g arginine/kg diet for 9 weeks. An real-time quantitative PCR analysis was performed to determine the relative expression of TOR and 4E-BP in fish muscle, hepatopancreas and intestine. Dietary arginine increased (P < 0.05): (1) glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase activities in muscle and hepatopancreas; (2) intestine and hepatopancreas protein content, folds height, and trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and creatine kinase activities in intestine; (3) Lactobacillus counts; (4) relative expression of TOR in the muscle, hepatopancreas and distal intestine (DI); (5) relative expression of 4E-BP in proximal intestine (PI) and mid-intestine (MI), as compared with the control group. In contrast, dietary arginine reduced (P < 0.05): (1) plasma ammonia content; (2) Aeromonas hydrophila and Escherichia coli counts; (3) relative expression of TOR in PI and MI; (4) relative expression of 4E-BP in the muscle, hepatopancreas and DI. The arginine requirement estimated by specific growth rate using quadratic regression analysis was found to be 18.0 g/kg diet. These results indicate that arginine improved fish growth, digestive and absorptive ability and regulated the expression of TOR and 4E-BP genes.

  3. Hepatic Fat Accumulation Is Modulated by the Interaction between the rs738409 Variant in the PNPLA3 Gene and the Dietary Omega6/Omega3 PUFA Intake

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Nicola; Savoye, Mary; Kim, Grace; Marotto, Katie; Shaw, Melissa M.; Pierpont, Bridget; Caprio, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Background A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), the rs738409, in the patatin like phospholipase 3 gene (PNPLA3) has been recently associated with increased hepatic steatosis and ALT levels in adults and children. Given the potential role of PNPLA3 in fatty liver development, we aimed to explore whether the influence of PNPLA3 genotype on hepatic fat in obese youth might be modulated by dietary factors such as essential omega polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) intake. Materials and Methods We studied 127 children and adolescents (56 boys, 71 girls; 58 Caucasians; 30 African Americans and 39 Hispanics; mean age 14.7±3.3; mean BMI 30.7±7.2). The dietary composition was assessed by the Nutrition Data System for Research (NDS-R version 2011). The patients underwent a MRI study to assess the liver fat content (HFF%), ALT measurement and the genotyping of the rs738409 SNP by automatic sequencing. Results As previously observed, HFF% and ALT levels varied according to the genotype in each ethnicity. ALT levels and HFF% were significantly influenced by the interaction between genotype and omega-6/omega-3 PUFA ratio (n-6/n-3), p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively. HFF% and ALT levels were, in fact, related to the n-6/n-3 consumption only in subjects homozygote for the G allele of the rs738409 (r2 = 0.45, p =  0.001 and r2 = 0.40, p = 0.006, respectively). Conclusions These findings suggest that the association of a high dietary n-6/n-3 PUFA with fatty liver and liver damage in obese youths may be driven by a predisposing genotype. PMID:22629460

  4. Accumulation of copper in the kidney of pigs fed high dietary zinc is due to metallothionein expression with minor effects on genes involved in copper metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zetzsche, A; Schunter, N; Zentek, J; Pieper, R

    2016-05-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of high dietary zinc (Zn) oxide on trace element accumulation in various organs with special emphasis on the kidney. A total of 40 weaned piglets were allocated into two groups with 16 and 24 piglets each receiving a diet containing normal (NZn; 100mg Zn/kg) or high (HZn; 2,100mg Zn/kg) Zn concentration, respectively. After two weeks, eight piglets from each treatment were killed and organ samples were taken. Eight piglets from the remaining 16 pigs fed HZn diets were changed to NZn diets (CZn). All remaining piglets were killed after another two weeks for organ sampling. Trace element concentration was determined in the jejunum, liver, kidney, pancreas, bone (metacarpal IV), spleen, lung, thymus, tonsils and lymph nodes of jejunum, ileum and colon. Kidney mRNA expression of Zn transporter ZnT1 and ZIP4, genes involved in Cu metabolism (Ctr1, Atox1, SOD1, ATP7A, CCS, CP) and divalent metal ion transport (DMT1) and binding (MT-1a, MT-2b, MT-3) were determined. The Zn concentration in jejunum, liver, pancreas tissue and metacarpal IV was higher (P<0.05) in HZn group compared with NZn and CZn groups. Trace element concentration in organs of CZn pigs was similar to those fed NZn diets. Zn concentration in muscle, lung and lymphatic organs as thymus, tonsils, spleen and lymph nodes of jejunum, ileum and colon did not differ between the groups. Zn and Cu were positively correlated (R=0.67; P<0.05) in the kidney. No significant differences for Cu chaperones, Cu transporters and Cu-dependent factors were determined despite decreased expression of Atox1 after two weeks and increased Ctr1 expression over time in the HZn group. Expression of MT-1a, MT-2b and MT-3 were significantly higher in HZn fed pigs with most pronounced effects for MT-1a > MT-2b > MT-3. Gene expression of MTs in pigs fed CZn diets did not differ from pigs fed NZn diets. The data suggest that high dietary Zn feeding in pigs leads to Cu co-accumulation in the

  5. Dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Massey, Patrick B

    2002-01-01

    The amount of published information on dietary supplements mushroomed in the 1990s. In fewer than 5 years, publications increased at least 100-fold in the medical literature alone. Dietary supplements are an uncharted territory that warrants complete and accurate exploration. One should not be surprised that disease and illness may respond to dietary supplements. Nutrition is the foundation to good health, and dietary supplements may prove to be some of the most powerful medicines ever discovered. An especially exciting discovery is that dietary supplements may enhance the effects of specific drugs. This discovery may lead to more effective and safer protocols for the treatment of cancer, heart and lung disease, and a host of chronic medical conditions. Information about dietary supplements is becoming more common in the popular medical literature and is creating increased curiosity and an increased awareness. The explosion of the dietary supplement market is compelling physicians to become aware of dietary supplements. Whether or not they are used in clinical practice is a decision for the individual physician. Given the increasing number of patients who are using dietary supplements, however, it is imperative that physicians have a good understanding of this topic. Considering the increasing complexity and magnitude of this topic, physician specialization may be essential. There are many good reference books, review articles, and internet sites on specific supplements that probably should be part of every physician's reference library. The accompanying box provides a brief list of such sources.

  6. Dietary wolfberry up-regulates carotenoid metabolic genes and enhances mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of db/db diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huifeng; Wark, Logan; Ji, Hua; Willard, Lloyd; Jaing, Yu; Han, Jing; He, Hui; Ortiz, Edlin; Zhang, Yunong; Medeiros, Denis M; Lin, Dingbo

    2013-01-01

    Scope Our aim was to investigate whether dietary wolfberry altered carotenoid metabolic gene expression and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis in the retina of diabetic mice. Methods and Results Six-week-old male db/db and wild type mice were fed the control or wolfberry diets for 8 weeks. At study termination, liver and retinal tissues were collected for analysis by transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and HPLC. Wolfberry elevated zeaxanthin and lutein levels in the liver and retinal tissues and stimulated expression of retinal scavenger receptor class B type I, glutathione S-transferase Pi 1, and β,β-carotene 9’,10’-oxygenase 2, and induced activation and nuclear enrichment of retinal AMP-activated protein kinase α2 (AMPKα2). Furthermore, wolfberry attenuated hypoxia and mitochondrial stress as demonstrated by declined expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and heat shock protein 60. Wolfberry enhanced retinal mitochondrial biogenesis in diabetic retinas as demonstrated by reversed mitochondrial dispersion in the retinal pigment epithelium, increased mitochondrial copy number, elevated citrate synthase activity, and up-regulated expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1 α, nuclear respiratory factor 1, and mitochondrial transcription factor A. Conclusion Consumption of dietary wolfberry could be beneficial to retinoprotection through reversal of mitochondrial function in diabetic mice. PMID:23505020

  7. Dietary DHA reduces downstream endocannabinoid and inflammatory gene expression and epididymal fat mass while improving aspects of glucose use in muscle in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Carlson, M E; Kuchel, G A; Newman, J W; Watkins, B A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Endocannabinoid system (ECS) overactivation is associated with increased adiposity and likely contributes to type 2 diabetes risk. Elevated tissue cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and circulating endocannabinoids (ECs) derived from the n-6 polyunsaturated acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occur in obese and diabetic patients. Here we investigate whether the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the diet can reduce ECS overactivation (that is, action of ligands, receptors and enzymes of EC synthesis and degradation) to influence glycemic control. This study targets the ECS tonal regulation of circulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle as its primary end point. Design: Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a semipurified diet containing DHA or the control lipid. Serum, skeletal muscle, epididymal fat pads and liver were collected after 62 and 118 days of feeding. Metabolites, genes and gene products associated with the ECS, glucose uptake and metabolism and inflammatory status were measured. Results: Dietary DHA enrichment reduced epididymal fat pad mass and increased ECS-related genes, whereas it reduced downstream ECS activation markers, indicating that ECS activation was diminished. The mRNA of glucose-related genes and proteins elevated in mice fed the DHA diet with increases in DHA-derived and reductions in AA-derived EC and EC-like compounds. In addition, DHA feeding reduced plasma levels of various inflammatory cytokines, 5-lipoxygenase-dependent inflammatory mediators and the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that DHA feeding altered ECS gene expression to reduce CB1 activation and reduce fat accretion. Furthermore, the DHA diet led to higher expression of genes associated with glucose use by muscle in mice, and reduced those associated with systemic inflammatory status. PMID:26219414

  8. Dietary DHA reduces downstream endocannabinoid and inflammatory gene expression and epididymal fat mass while improving aspects of glucose use in muscle in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Carlson, M E; Kuchel, G A; Newman, J W; Watkins, B A

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoid system (ECS) overactivation is associated with increased adiposity and likely contributes to type 2 diabetes risk. Elevated tissue cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and circulating endocannabinoids (ECs) derived from the n-6 polyunsaturated acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occur in obese and diabetic patients. Here we investigate whether the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the diet can reduce ECS overactivation (that is, action of ligands, receptors and enzymes of EC synthesis and degradation) to influence glycemic control. This study targets the ECS tonal regulation of circulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle as its primary end point. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a semipurified diet containing DHA or the control lipid. Serum, skeletal muscle, epididymal fat pads and liver were collected after 62 and 118 days of feeding. Metabolites, genes and gene products associated with the ECS, glucose uptake and metabolism and inflammatory status were measured. Dietary DHA enrichment reduced epididymal fat pad mass and increased ECS-related genes, whereas it reduced downstream ECS activation markers, indicating that ECS activation was diminished. The mRNA of glucose-related genes and proteins elevated in mice fed the DHA diet with increases in DHA-derived and reductions in AA-derived EC and EC-like compounds. In addition, DHA feeding reduced plasma levels of various inflammatory cytokines, 5-lipoxygenase-dependent inflammatory mediators and the vasoconstrictive 20-HETE. This study provides evidence that DHA feeding altered ECS gene expression to reduce CB1 activation and reduce fat accretion. Furthermore, the DHA diet led to higher expression of genes associated with glucose use by muscle in mice, and reduced those associated with systemic inflammatory status.

  9. Dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake modulates impact of Insertion/Deletion polymorphism of ApoB gene on obesity risk in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Masoumeh; Sotoudeh, Gity; Djalali, Mahmoud; Alvandi, Ehsan; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Sojoudi, Fereshteh; Koohdani, Fariba

    2016-10-01

    The goal of the study described here was to determine whether dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake modulates the association between ApoB Ins/Del polymorphism and obesity in type 2 diabetic patients. In this cross-sectional study, 700 patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited in Tehran. Weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Dietary intake was assessed using a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. ApoB genotyping was performed with 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We observed a significant interaction between Ins/Del genotype and dietary ω-3 PUFA intake with respect to BMI, WC, and obesity risk in both unadjusted (P = 0.007, P = 0.001, and P = 0.021, respectively) and adjusted (P = 0.007, P = 0.04, and P = 0.002, respectively) samples. Thus, the carriers of the Del allele were only associated with lower BMI (P = 0.01) and WC (P = 0.002) among individuals with high ω-3 PUFA intake (≥0.6% of energy), but not in those with low ω-3 PUFA intake (<0.6%). Also, when dietary ω-3 PUFA was <0.6%, general obesity risk in carriers of the Del allele was about 1.6 times higher than that of Ins/Ins homozygotes (odds ratio = 1.59, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-2.52, P = 0.039). But with high ω-3 PUFA intake (≥0.6%), the risk was 0.46 times lower (odds ratio = 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.25-0.79, P = 0.003). Moreover, a similar interaction was observed in central obesity only in men after adjustment for confounder variables (P = 0.041). These findings support the hypothesis that a diet high in ω-3 PUFA (≥0.6%) can decrease the obesity risk in carriers of the Del allele of ApoB gene. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Improvements in growth performance, bone mineral status and nutrient digestibility in pigs following the dietary inclusion of phytase are accompanied by modifications in intestinal nutrient transporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vigors, Stafford; Sweeney, Torres; O'Shea, Cormac J; Browne, John A; O'Doherty, John V

    2014-09-14

    Phytase (PHY) improves growth performance, nutrient digestibility and bone structure in pigs; however, little is known about its effects on intestinal nutrient transporter gene expression. In the present study, a 44 d experiment was carried out using forty-eight pigs (11·76 (sem 0·75) kg) assigned to one of three dietary treatment groups to measure growth performance, coefficient of apparent ileal digestibility (CAID), coefficient of apparent total tract nutrient digestibility (CATTD) and intestinal nutrient transporter gene expression. Dietary treatments during the experimental period were as follows: (1) a high-P (HP) diet containing 3·4 g/kg available P and 7·0 g/kg Ca; (2) a low-P (LP) diet containing 1·9 g/kg available P and 5·9 g/kg Ca; (3) a PHY diet containing LP diet ingredients+1000 phytase units (FTU)/kg of PHY. The PHY diet increased the average daily gain (P< 0·05) and final body weight (P< 0·01) and decreased the feed conversion ratio (P< 0·05) compared with the LP diet. Pigs fed the PHY diet had a higher CAID of gross energy compared with those fed the HP and LP diets (P< 0·001). Pigs fed the PHY diet had increased CAID of P (P< 0·01) and CATTD of Ca and P (P< 0·001) compared with those fed the LP diet. The PHY diet increased the gene expression of the peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1/SLC15A1) (P< 0·05) in the ileum compared with the LP diet. The LP diet decreased the gene expression of the sodium-glucose-linked transporter 1 (SGLT1/SLC5A1) and GLUT2/SLC2A2 (P< 0·05) and increased the expression of membrane Ca channel (TRPV6) and calbindin compared with the HP diet (P< 0·001). In conclusion, feeding a diet supplemented with PHY improves growth performance and nutrient digestibility as well as increases the gene expression of the peptide transporter PEPT1.

  11. Activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by dietary isoflavones: role of NO in Nrf2-mediated antioxidant gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mann, Giovanni E; Rowlands, David J; Li, Francois Y L; de Winter, Patricia; Siow, Richard C M

    2007-07-15

    The endothelium plays a key role in the maintenance of vascular homeostasis, and increased oxidative stress in vascular disease leads to reduced nitric oxide bioavailability and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation of resistance vessels. Although epidemiological evidence suggests that diets containing high amounts of natural antioxidants afford protection against coronary heart disease (CHD), antioxidant supplementation trials have largely reported only marginal health benefits. There is controversy concerning the cardiovascular benefits of prolonged estrogen/progestin or soy isoflavone therapy for postmenopausal women and patients with an increased risk of CHD. Research on the potential health benefits of soy isoflavones and other polyphenols contained in red wine, green and black tea and dark chocolate developed rapidly during the 1990's, and recent clinical trials and studies in animal models and cultured endothelial cells provide important and novel insights into the mechanisms by which dietary polyphenols afford protection against oxidative stress. In this review, we highlight that NO and reactive oxygen radicals may mediate dietary polyphenol induced activation of Nrf2, which in turn triggers antioxidant response element (ARE) driven transcription of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant defense enzymes in vascular cells.

  12. Gene-dietary fat interaction, bone mineral density and bone speed of sound in Children: a twin study in China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Liu, Huijuan; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ji; Wang, Youfa

    2015-01-01

    Scope Dietary fat correlates with bone mineral density (BMD). We tested the association between fat intake and BMD, and tested if fat intake modified the degree of genetic influence on BMD and bone speed of sound (SOS). Methods and results We included 622 twins aged 7–15 y from South China. Data on anthropometry, dietary intake, BMD, and SOS were collected. Quantitative genetic analyses of structural equation models were fit using the Mx statistical package. The within-pair intra-class correlations (ICC) for BMD in DZ twins were nearly half of that for MZ twins (ICC=0.39 vs 0.70). The heritability of BMD and SOS were 71% and 79%. Phenotypic correlation between fat intake and SOS was significant (r=−0.19, p=0.04). SOS was negatively correlated with fat intake in boys (r=−0.11, p=0.05), but not in girls. Full Cholesky decomposition models showed SOS has a strong genetic correlation with fat intake (rA =−0.88, 95% CI=−0.94, 0.01); the environmental correlation between fat intake and SOS was weak (rE =−0.04, 95% CI=−0.20, 0.13). Fat intake modified the additive genetic effects on BMD. Conclusion Genetic factors explained 71% and 79% of individual variance in BMD and SOS, respectively. Low fat intake counteracts genetic predisposition to low BMD. PMID:25546604

  13. Quantity and source of dietary protein influence metabolite production by gut microbiota and rectal mucosa gene expression: a randomized, parallel, double-blind trial in overweight humans.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Martin; Portune, Kevin Joseph; Steuer, Nils; Lan, Annaïg; Cerrudo, Victor; Audebert, Marc; Dumont, Florent; Mancano, Giulia; Khodorova, Nadezda; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Airinei, Gheorghe; Tomé, Daniel; Benamouzig, Robert; Davila, Anne-Marie; Claus, Sandrine Paule; Sanz, Yolanda; Blachier, François

    2017-10-01

    Background: Although high-protein diets (HPDs) are frequently consumed for body-weight control, little is known about the consequences for gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity and for large intestine mucosal homeostasis. Moreover, the effects of HPDs according to the source of protein need to be considered in this context.Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the quantity and source of dietary protein on microbiota composition, bacterial metabolite production, and consequences for the large intestinal mucosa in humans.Design: A randomized, double-blind, parallel-design trial was conducted in 38 overweight individuals who received a 3-wk isocaloric supplementation with casein, soy protein, or maltodextrin as a control. Fecal and rectal biopsy-associated microbiota composition was analyzed by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. Fecal, urinary, and plasma metabolomes were assessed by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. Mucosal transcriptome in rectal biopsies was determined with the use of microarrays.Results: HPDs did not alter the microbiota composition, but induced a shift in bacterial metabolism toward amino acid degradation with different metabolite profiles according to the protein source. Correlation analysis identified new potential bacterial taxa involved in amino acid degradation. Fecal water cytotoxicity was not modified by HPDs, but was associated with a specific microbiota and bacterial metabolite profile. Casein and soy protein HPDs did not induce inflammation, but differentially modified the expression of genes playing key roles in homeostatic processes in rectal mucosa, such as cell cycle or cell death.Conclusions: This human intervention study shows that the quantity and source of dietary proteins act as regulators of gut microbiota metabolite production and host gene expression in the rectal mucosa, raising new questions on the impact of HPDs on the large intestine mucosa homeostasis. This trial was registered at

  14. Combined effects of dietary arginine, leucine and protein levels on fatty acid composition and gene expression in the muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of crossbred pigs.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Marta S; Pires, Virgínia M R; Alfaia, Cristina M; Luxton, Richard; Doran, Olena; Bessa, Rui J B; Prates, José A M

    2014-05-01

    The cumulative effects of dietary arginine, leucine and protein levels on fat content, fatty acid composition and mRNA levels of genes controlling lipid metabolism in pig longissimus lumborum muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) were investigated. The experiment was performed on fifty-four intact male pigs (Duroc × Pietrain × Large White × Landrace crossbred), with a live weight ranging from 59 to 92 kg. The pigs were randomly assigned to one of six experimental treatments (n 9). The treatments followed a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement, with two levels of arginine supplementation (0 v. 1 %) and three levels of a basal diet (normal protein diet, NPD; reduced protein diet, RPD; reduced protein diet to achieve 2 % of leucine, RPDL). The results showed that dietary arginine supplementation did not affect the intramuscular fat (IMF) content and back fat thickness, but increased the total fat in SAT. This effect was associated with an increase in fatty acid synthase (FASN) and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) mRNA levels in SAT, which suggests that arginine might be involved in the differential regulation of some key lipogenic genes in pig muscle and SAT. The increase in IMF content under the RPD, with or without leucine supplementation, was accompanied by increased FASN and SCD mRNA levels. Arginine supplementation did not influence the percentage of main fatty acids, while the RPD had a significant effect on fatty acid composition in both tissues. Leucine supplementation of RPD did not change IMF, total fat of SAT and back fat thickness, but increased 16 : 0 and 18 : 1cis-9 and decreased 18 : 2n-6 in muscle.

  15. Pilot study on the effects of dietary conjugated linoleic acid on tumorigenesis and gene expression in PyMT transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Margaret; Schroeder, Joyce A.; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Besselsen, David G.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Pandey, Ritu; Thompson, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a class of commercially available fatty acids that have been associated with anticancer properties in rodent models of chemical carcinogenesis. We conducted a pilot study to examine the antitumor effect of dietary CLA in a polyoma virus-middle T antigen (PyMT) mouse model of invasive breast cancer. Virgin 4-week-old PyMT mice were administered a mixed-isomer CLA diet (1% wt/wt) or control AIN-93G diet for 4 weeks (N = 6 and 5, respectively) and tumor burden was assessed at 8 weeks of age. Thoracic mammary glands were prepared as whole mounts with other glands being formalin fixed and paraffin embedded for histology and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Total RNA was prepared for microarray and real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis. Western blots were performed for protein expression analysis. Tumor incidence was significantly increased in CLA-treated animals compared with controls (P = 0.009) and occurred with extensive lobular–alveolar expansion and loss of mammary adipose tissue. More than 100 genes were downregulated ≥2-fold in the CLA-treated group compared with controls, including adipose-specific markers, as wells as cytoskeletal and adhesion-related genes. This was supported by dramatic decreases in the epithelial adherens E-cadherin and β-catenin as demonstrated by IHC. Taken together, these results suggest that dietary CLA affects the mammary stromal environment, leading to tumor progression and cellular expansion in the PyMT mouse model. Further studies of the potential for cancer promotion are needed, especially because mixed-isomer CLA formulations are sold commercially as a nutritional supplement. PMID:20624750

  16. Effect of dietary leucine on the growth parameters and expression of antioxidant, immune, and inflammatory genes in the head kidney of Labeo rohita fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sib Sankar; Sen, Shib Sankar; Chi, Cheng; Kim, Hyoun Joong; Yun, Saekil; Park, Se Chang; Sukumaran, V

    2015-09-15

    The present investigation evaluated the effects of dietary leucine (Leu) on growth performance, head kidney antioxidant status, and gene expression in Labeo rohita juveniles. Fish were fed with six isonitrogenous diets containing graded levels of Leu at 0.75 (control), 1.7, 3.2, 4.6, 6.3, and 7.6 g Leu kg(-1) of feed for 8 weeks. Compared with the control group, appropriate Leu supplementation significantly enhanced the percent weight gain (PWG), feed intake (FI), and protein efficiency ratio (PER) (P<0.05) but decreased the plasma ammonia content (PAC) (P<0.05). Similarly, optimal Leu supplementation stimulated head kidney glutathione (GSH) content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities as compared to the control group; however, a reverse trend was observed in malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Further, relative gene-expression levels of lysozyme, complement C3, β-microglobulin, immunoglobulin-M, SOD, GPx, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), natural killer-cell enhancing factor β (NKEF-β), and toll-like receptor-22 (TLR22) in the head kidney were enhanced (P<0.05) at leucine levels of 4.6 g kg(-1) of feed. Conversely, the mRNA levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in head kidney were down-regulated by Leu supplementation. Collectively, our results revealed that appropriate Leu supplementation improved fish growth and antioxidant capacity, and regulated the mRNA levels of related signalling molecules in L. rohita juveniles. Based on the quadratic regression analysis of PWG, PER, and PAC, the optimum dietary leucine requirements of L. rohita juveniles were estimated to be 4.7, 4.5, and 4.8 g kg(-1) of feed.

  17. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  18. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 expression is suppressed by dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids. A mechanism for the coordinate suppression of lipogenic genes by polyunsaturated fats.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Nakamura, M T; Cho, H P; Clarke, S D

    1999-08-13

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) coordinately suppress the transcription of a wide array of hepatic lipogenic genes including fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Interestingly, the over-expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) induces the expression of all of the enzymes suppressed by PUFA. This observation led us to hypothesize that PUFA coordinately inhibit lipogenic gene transcription by suppressing the expression of SREBP-1. Our initial studies revealed that the SREBP-1 and FAS mRNA contents of HepG2 cells were reduced by 20:4(n-6) in a dose-dependent manner (i.e. EC(50) approximately 10 microM), whereas 18:1(n-9) had no effect. Similarly, supplementing a fat-free, high glucose diet with oils rich in (n-6) or (n-3) PUFA reduced the hepatic content of precursor and nuclear SREBP-1 60 and 85%, respectively; however, PUFA had no effect on the nuclear content of upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1. The PUFA-dependent decrease in nuclear content of mature SREBP-1 was paralleled by a 70-90% suppression in FAS gene transcription. In contrast, dietary 18:1(n-9), i.e. triolein, had no inhibitory influence on the expression of SREBP-1 or FAS. The decrease in hepatic expression of SREBP-1 and FAS associated with PUFA ingestion was mimicked by supplementing the fat-free diet with the PPARalpha-activator, WY 14, 643. Interestingly, nuclear run-on assays revealed that changes in SREBP-1 mRNA abundance were not accompanied by changes in SREBP-1 gene transcription. These results support the concept that PUFA coordinately inhibit lipogenic gene transcription by suppressing the expression of SREBP-1 and that the PUFA regulation of SREBP-1 appears to occur at the post-transcriptional level.

  19. Age-related changes in cellular protection, purification, and inflammation-related gene expression: role of dietary phytonutrients.

    PubMed

    Mastaloudis, Angela; Wood, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Oxidative injury and inflammation are intimately involved in the aging process and the development of age-related diseases. To date, most nutritional antiaging strategies have focused solely on the delivery of exogenous antioxidants to combat the negative effects of aging. A promising new strategy is to identify nutrients and phytochemicals that can directly target intrinsic cytoprotective mechanisms, including modulation of the expression of (1) genes involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics, (2) genes involved in the synthesis and regulation of intrinsic antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes, (3) genes involved in the regulation of inflammation, and (4) vitagenes. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the age-related changes in gene expression related to oxidative stress, detoxification, and inflammatory processes, and to discuss natural compounds with the potential to oppose age-related changes in gene expression related to these processes, which therefore may be suitable for use in human antiaging research.

  20. Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid and Hepatic Steatosis: Species-Specific Effects on Liver and Adipose Lipid Metabolism and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Diwakar; Kadegowda, Anil Kumar G.; Erdman, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To summarize the recent studies on effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on hepatic steatosis and hepatic and adipose lipid metabolism highlighting the potential regulatory mechanisms. Methods. Sixty-four published experiments were summarized in which trans-10, cis-12 CLA was fed either alone or in combination with other CLA isomers to mice, rats, hamsters, and humans were compared. Summary and Conclusions. Dietary trans-10, cis-12 CLA induces a severe hepatic steatosis in mice with a more muted response in other species. Regardless of species, when hepatic steatosis was present, a concurrent decrease in body adiposity was observed, suggesting that hepatic lipid accumulation is a result of uptake of mobilized fatty acids (FA) from adipose tissue and the liver's inability to sufficiently increase FA oxidation and export of synthesized triglycerides. The potential role of liver FA composition, insulin secretion and sensitivity, adipokine, and inflammatory responses are discussed as potential mechanisms behind CLA-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:21869929

  1. Dietary and genetic effects on age-related loss of gene silencing reveal epigenetic plasticity of chromatin repression during aging.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Du, Guyu; Tobias, Ethan; Wood, Jason G; Whitaker, Rachel; Neretti, Nicola; Helfand, Stephen L

    2013-11-01

    During aging, changes in chromatin state that alter gene transcription have been postulated to result in expression of genes that are normally silenced, leading to deleterious age-related effects on cellular physiology. Despite the prevalence of this hypothesis, it is primarily in yeast that loss of gene silencing with age has been well documented. We use a novel position effect variegation (PEV) reporter in Drosophila melanogaster to show that age-related loss of repressive heterochromatin is associated with loss of gene silencing in metazoans and is affected by Sir2, as it is in yeast. The life span-extending intervention, calorie restriction (CR), delays the age-related loss of gene silencing, indicating that loss of gene silencing is a component of normal aging. Diet switch experiments show that such flies undergo a rapid change in their level of gene silencing, demonstrating the epigenetic plasticity of chromatin during aging and highlighting the potential role of diet and metabolism in chromatin maintenance, Thus, diet and related interventions may be of therapeutic importance for age-related diseases, such as cancer.

  2. Dietary plant extracts modulate gene expression profiles in ileal mucosa of weaned pigs after an Escherichia coli infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Song, M; Che, T M; Lee, J J; Bravo, D; Maddox, C W; Pettigrew, J E

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to characterize the effects of infection with a pathogenic F-18 Escherichia coli and 3 different plant extracts on gene expression of ileal mucosa in weaned pigs. Weaned pigs (total = 64, 6.3 ± 0.2 kg BW, and 21-d old) were housed in individual pens for 15 d, 4 d before and 11 d after the first inoculation (d 0). Treatments were in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement: with or without an F-18 E. coli challenge and 4 diets (a nursery basal, control diet [CON], 10 ppm of capsicum oleoresin [CAP], garlic botanical [GAR], or turmeric oleoresin [TUR]). Results reported elsewhere showed that the plant extracts reduced diarrhea in challenged pigs. Total RNA (4 pigs/treatment) was extracted from ileal mucosa of pigs at d 5 post inoculation. Double-stranded cDNA was amplified, labeled, and further hybridized to the microarray, and data were analyzed in R. Differential gene expression was tested by fitting a mixed linear model in a 2 × 4 factorial ANOVA. Bioinformatics analysis was conducted by DAVID Bioinformatics Resources 6.7 (DAVID; National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID, NIH], http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov). The E. coli infection altered (P < 0.05) the expression of 240 genes in pigs fed the CON (148 up- and 92 down-regulated). Compared with the infected CON, feeding CAP, GAR, or TUR altered (P < 0.05) the expression of 52 genes (18 up, 34 down), 117 genes (34 up- and 83 down-regulated), or 84 genes (16 up- and 68 down-regulated), respectively, often counteracting the effects of E. coli. The E. coli infection up-regulated (P < 0.05) the expression of genes related to the activation of immune response and complement and coagulation cascades, but down-regulated (P < 0.05) the expression of genes involved in protein synthesis and accumulation. Compared with the CON, feeding CAP and GAR increased (P < 0.05) the expression of genes related to integrity of membranes in infected pigs, indicating enhanced gut mucosa health. Moreover

  3. Dietary Chromium Restriction of Pregnant Mice Changes the Methylation Status of Hepatic Genes Involved with Insulin Signaling in Adult Male Offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Sun, Xiaofang; Xiao, Xinhua; Zheng, Jia; Li, Ming; Yu, Miao; Ping, Fan; Wang, Zhixin; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    Maternal undernutrition is linked with an elevated risk of diabetes mellitus in offspring regardless of the postnatal dietary status. This is also found in maternal micro-nutrition deficiency, especial chromium which is a key glucose regulator. We investigated whether maternal chromium restriction contributes to the development of diabetes in offspring by affecting DNA methylation status in liver tissue. After being mated with control males, female weanling 8-week-old C57BL mice were fed a control diet (CON, 1.19 mg chromium/kg diet) or a low chromium diet (LC, 0.14 mg chromium/kg diet) during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning, some offspring were shifted to the other diet (CON-LC, or LC-CON), while others remained on the same diet (CON-CON, or LC-LC) for 29 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, and oral glucose tolerance test was performed to evaluate the glucose metabolism condition. Methylation differences in liver from the LC-CON group and CON-CON groups were studied by using a DNA methylation array. Bisulfite sequencing was carried out to validate the results of the methylation array. Maternal chromium limitation diet increased the body weight, blood glucose, and serum insulin levels. Even when switched to the control diet after weaning, the offspring also showed impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. DNA methylation profiling of the offspring livers revealed 935 differentially methylated genes in livers of the maternal chromium restriction diet group. Pathway analysis identified the insulin signaling pathway was the main process affected by hypermethylated genes. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed that some genes in insulin signaling pathway were hypermethylated in livers of the LC-CON and LC-LC group. Accordingly, the expression of genes in insulin signaling pathway was downregulated. There findings suggest that maternal chromium restriction diet results in glucose intolerance in male offspring through alterations in DNA methylation which

  4. Dietary Chromium Restriction of Pregnant Mice Changes the Methylation Status of Hepatic Genes Involved with Insulin Signaling in Adult Male Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Sun, Xiaofang; Xiao, Xinhua; Zheng, Jia; Li, Ming; Yu, Miao; Ping, Fan; Wang, Zhixin; Qi, Cuijuan; Wang, Tong; Wang, Xiaojing

    2017-01-01

    Maternal undernutrition is linked with an elevated risk of diabetes mellitus in offspring regardless of the postnatal dietary status. This is also found in maternal micro-nutrition deficiency, especial chromium which is a key glucose regulator. We investigated whether maternal chromium restriction contributes to the development of diabetes in offspring by affecting DNA methylation status in liver tissue. After being mated with control males, female weanling 8-week-old C57BL mice were fed a control diet (CON, 1.19 mg chromium/kg diet) or a low chromium diet (LC, 0.14 mg chromium/kg diet) during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning, some offspring were shifted to the other diet (CON-LC, or LC-CON), while others remained on the same diet (CON-CON, or LC-LC) for 29 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, and oral glucose tolerance test was performed to evaluate the glucose metabolism condition. Methylation differences in liver from the LC-CON group and CON-CON groups were studied by using a DNA methylation array. Bisulfite sequencing was carried out to validate the results of the methylation array. Maternal chromium limitation diet increased the body weight, blood glucose, and serum insulin levels. Even when switched to the control diet after weaning, the offspring also showed impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. DNA methylation profiling of the offspring livers revealed 935 differentially methylated genes in livers of the maternal chromium restriction diet group. Pathway analysis identified the insulin signaling pathway was the main process affected by hypermethylated genes. Bisulfite sequencing confirmed that some genes in insulin signaling pathway were hypermethylated in livers of the LC-CON and LC-LC group. Accordingly, the expression of genes in insulin signaling pathway was downregulated. There findings suggest that maternal chromium restriction diet results in glucose intolerance in male offspring through alterations in DNA methylation which

  5. Dietary control of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiguang; Cai, Ling; Tu, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Organisms must be able to rapidly alter gene expression in response to changes in their nutrient environment. This review summarizes evidence that epigenetic modifications of chromatin depend on particular metabolites of intermediary metabolism, enabling the facile regulation of gene expression in tune with metabolic state. Nutritional or dietary control of chromatin is an often-overlooked, yet fundamental regulatory mechanism directly linked to human physiology. Nutrient-sensitive epigenetic marks are dynamic, suggesting rapid turnover, and may have functions beyond the regulation of gene transcription, including pH regulation and as carbon sources in cancer cells. PMID:26094239

  6. Effects of human food grade titanium dioxide nanoparticle dietary exposure on Drosophila melanogaster survival, fecundity, pupation and expression of antioxidant genes.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Boris; Cvetković, Vladimir J; Mitrović, Tatjana Lj

    2016-02-01

    The fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster was exposed to the human food grade of E171 titanium dioxide (TiO2). This is a special grade of TiO2 which is frequently omitted in nanotoxicology studies dealing with TiO2, yet it is the most relevant grade regarding oral exposure of humans. D. melanogaster larvae were exposed to 0.002 mg mL(-1), 0.02 mg mL(-1), 0.2 mg mL(-1), and 2 mg mL(-1) of TiO2 in feeding medium, and the survival, fecundity, pupation time, and expression of genes involved in oxidative stress response were monitored. TiO2 did not affect survival but significantly increased time to pupation (p < 0.001). Fecundity of D. melanogaster was unaffected by the treatment. Expression of the gene for catalase was markedly downregulated by the treatment, while the effect on the downregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 was less pronounced. After four days of dietary exposure TiO2 was present in a significant amount in larvae, but was not transferred to adults during metamorphosis. Two individuals with aberrant phenotype similar to previously described gold nanoparticles induced mutant phenotypes were detected in the group exposed to TiO2. In general, TiO2 showed little toxicity toward D. melanogaster at concentrations relevant to oral exposure of humans.

  7. Effects of dietary phospholipid on lipase activity, antioxidant capacity and lipid metabolism-related gene expression in large yellow croaker larvae (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Cai, Zuonan; Feng, Shuoheng; Xiang, Xiaojun; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-11-01

    It was previously shown that lipid content of the whole larvae body fed the phospholipid (PL)-devoid diet was significantly lower than that of larvae fed PL-supplemented diets (P<0.05) (Feng et al., unpublished results). The mechanisms involved remain unclear and were explored from the perspective of fatty acids delivery, uptake, synthesis and oxidation in the present study. Besides, this study was also designed to investigate the effect of dietary PL on antioxidant capacity in large yellow croaker larvae (Larimichthys crocea). Triplicate groups of larvae (initial body weight: 3.86±0.24mg) were fed three isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets with increasing levels of PL (2.53%, 6.32% and 12.7%) eight times daily for 30days. Results showed that the specific activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly higher in 12.7% PL group compared to those in 2.53% PL group (P<0.05), while an opposite trend was observed for MDA content (P<0.05). The specific activity of lipase and the mRNA abundance of fatty acids delivery and uptake-related genes, including lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase and fatty acids translocase (cluster of differentiation) were significantly higher in 12.7% PL group than those in 2.52% group (P<0.05). Compared to 2.53% PL group, the transcript levels of fatty acid synthase and stearoyl-CoA desaturase I were significantly lower in 6.32% PL group (P<0.05), while peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor α, carnitine palmitoyl transferase-I and acyl CoA oxidase mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in 12.7% PL group (P<0.05). These results indicated that dietary PL could enhance antioxidant capacity of larvae. Dietary PL might regulate lipid metabolism in large yellow croaker larvae by modulating fatty acids delivery, uptake, synthesis and oxidation at transcriptional level and improved fatty acids delivery and uptake might be responsible for higher body lipid content in 6.32% and 12.7% groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and low dietary iron alter behavior, induce iron deficiency anemia, and modulate hippocampal gene expression in female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Burns, Monika; Amaya, Aldo; Bodi, Caroline; Ge, Zhongming; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ennis, Kathleen; Wang, Timothy C; Georgieff, Michael; Fox, James G

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori), a bacterial pathogen, is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is a strong risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Environmental conditions, such as poor dietary iron resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), enhance H.pylori virulence and increases risk for gastric cancer. IDA affects billions of people worldwide, and there is considerable overlap between regions of high IDA and high H.pylori prevalence. The primary aims of our study were to evaluate the effect of H.pylori infection on behavior, iron metabolism, red blood cell indices, and behavioral outcomes following comorbid H. pylori infection and dietary iron deficiency in a mouse model. C57BL/6 female mice (n = 40) were used; half were placed on a moderately iron deficient (ID) diet immediately post-weaning, and the other half were maintained on an iron replete (IR) diet. Half were dosed with H.pylori SS1 at 5 weeks of age, and the remaining mice were sham-dosed. There were 4 study groups: a control group (-Hp, IR diet) as well as 3 experimental groups (-Hp, ID diet; +Hp, IR diet; +Hp,ID diet). All mice were tested in an open field apparatus at 8 weeks postinfection. Independent of dietary iron status, H.pylori -infected mice performed fewer exploratory behaviors in the open field chamber than uninfected mice (p<0.001). Hippocampal gene expression of myelination markers and dopamine receptor 1 was significantly downregulated in mice on an ID diet (both p<0.05), independent of infection status. At 12 months postinfection, hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration were significantly lower in +Hp, ID diet mice compared to all other study groups. H.pylori infection caused IDA in mice maintained on a marginal iron diet. The mouse model developed in this study is a useful model to study the neurologic, behavioral, and hematologic impact of the common human co-morbidity of H. pylori infection and IDA.

  9. Effects of dietary corn gluten meal on growth performance and protein metabolism in relation to IGF-I and TOR gene expression of juvenile cobia ( Rachycentron canadum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yiwen; Ai, Qinghui; Mai, Kangsen; Zhang, Wenbing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Liufu, Zhiguo

    2013-09-01

    A growth experiment was conducted on cobia ( Rachycentron canadum, initial weight 108.2 g ± 3.0 g) to investigate the effects of dietary corn gluten meal (CGM) levels on the fish growth, whole body composition and protein metabolism in relation to specific gene expression. Five isonitrogenous (crude protein 45%) and isoenergetic (gross energy 20 kJ g-1) practical diets were formulated by replacing 0% (the control), 17.5%, 35.0%, 52.5%, and 70.0% of fish meal (FM) protein with CGM protein. No significant differences were observed in the survival, feed intake (FI), specific growth rate (SGR), feed efficiency (FE) and protein productive value (PPV) among fish fed diets with 0%, 17.5%, 35.0%, and 52.5% of CGM protein. However, these indices were significantly lower in fish fed the diet with 70.0% of CGM protein than those in fish fed the control diet ( P < 0.05). The whole-body crude protein and lipid contents were significantly lower while the whole-body moisture content was significantly higher in fish fed the diet with 70.0% of CGM protein compared with the control group ( P < 0.05). When 70.0% of FM protein was replaced by CGM, plasma total protein and cholesterol contents were significantly lower than those in the control group ( P < 0.05). Fish fed the diet with 70.0% of CGM protein had significantly lower hepatic insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) expression levels than those in the control group ( P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed in hepatic target of rapamycin (TOR), dorsal muscle IGF-I and TOR expression levels among dietary treatments. Results of the present study indicated that 52.5% of FM protein could be replaced by CGM in the diets without significant influences on the growth, feed utilization and protein metabolism of juvenile cobia. The present results might be useful for developing cost effective and sustainable cobia dietary formulations.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and low dietary iron alter behavior, induce iron deficiency anemia, and modulate hippocampal gene expression in female C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Monika; Amaya, Aldo; Bodi, Caroline; Ge, Zhongming; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Ennis, Kathleen; Wang, Timothy C.; Georgieff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori), a bacterial pathogen, is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease and is a strong risk factor for development of gastric cancer. Environmental conditions, such as poor dietary iron resulting in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), enhance H.pylori virulence and increases risk for gastric cancer. IDA affects billions of people worldwide, and there is considerable overlap between regions of high IDA and high H.pylori prevalence. The primary aims of our study were to evaluate the effect of H.pylori infection on behavior, iron metabolism, red blood cell indices, and behavioral outcomes following comorbid H. pylori infection and dietary iron deficiency in a mouse model. C57BL/6 female mice (n = 40) were used; half were placed on a moderately iron deficient (ID) diet immediately post-weaning, and the other half were maintained on an iron replete (IR) diet. Half were dosed with H.pylori SS1 at 5 weeks of age, and the remaining mice were sham-dosed. There were 4 study groups: a control group (-Hp, IR diet) as well as 3 experimental groups (-Hp, ID diet; +Hp, IR diet; +Hp,ID diet). All mice were tested in an open field apparatus at 8 weeks postinfection. Independent of dietary iron status, H.pylori -infected mice performed fewer exploratory behaviors in the open field chamber than uninfected mice (p<0.001). Hippocampal gene expression of myelination markers and dopamine receptor 1 was significantly downregulated in mice on an ID diet (both p<0.05), independent of infection status. At 12 months postinfection, hematocrit (Hct) and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration were significantly lower in +Hp, ID diet mice compared to all other study groups. H.pylori infection caused IDA in mice maintained on a marginal iron diet. The mouse model developed in this study is a useful model to study the neurologic, behavioral, and hematologic impact of the common human co-morbidity of H. pylori infection and IDA. PMID:28355210

  11. Dietary fish oil did not prevent sleep deprived rats from a reduction in adipose tissue adiponectin gene expression.

    PubMed

    de Mattos, Ana Barbosa Marcondes; Pinto, Mônica Jordão S; Oliveira, Cristiane; Biz, Carolina; Ribeiro, Eliane Beraldi; do Nascimento, Claudia Maria Oller; Andersen, Monica Levy; Tufik, Sergio; Oyama, Lila Missae

    2008-11-05

    Sleep deprivation in humans has been related to weight gain and consequently, increased risk for insulin resistance. In contrast, there is a significant loss of weight in sleep deprived rats suggesting a state of insulin resistance without obesity interference. Thus, we aimed to assess the effects of a rich fish oil dietetic intervention on glucose tolerance, serum insulin and adiponectin, and adipose tissue gene expression of adiponectin and TNF-alpha of paradoxically sleep deprived (PSD) rats. The study was performed in thirty day-old male Wistar randomly assigned into two groups: rats fed with control diet (soybean oil as source of fat) and rats fed with a fish oil rich diet. After 45 days of treatment, the animals were submitted to PSD or maintained as home cage control group for 96 h. Body weight and food intake were carefully monitored in all groups. At the end of PSD period, a glucose tolerance test was performed and the total blood and adipose tissues were collected. Serum insulin and adiponectin were analyzed. Adipose tissues were used for RT-PCR to estimate the gene expression of adiponectin and TNF-alpha. Results showed that although fish oil diet did not exert any effect upon these measurements, PSD induced a reduction in adiponectin gene expression of retroperitoneal adipose tissues, with no change in serum adiponectin concentration or in adiponectin and TNF-alpha gene expression of epididymal adipose tissue. Thus, the stress induced by sleep deprivation lead to a desbalance of adiponectin gene expression.

  12. Dietary supplementation with polyunsaturated fatty acid during pregnancy modulates DNA methylation at IGF2/H19 imprinted genes and growth of infants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Sun; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Biessy, Carine; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Sly, Peter D.; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Rivera, Juan; Herceg, Zdenko

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of imprinted genes is regarded as a highly plausible explanation for linking dietary exposures in early life with the onset of diseases during childhood and adulthood. We sought to test whether prenatal dietary supplementation with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) during pregnancy may modulate epigenetic states at birth. This study was based on a randomized intervention trial conducted in Mexican pregnant women supplemented daily with 400 mg of DHA or a placebo from gestation week 18–22 to parturition. We applied quantitative profiling of DNA methylation states at IGF2 promoter 3 (IGF2 P3), IGF2 differentially methylated region (DMR), and H19 DMR in cord blood mononuclear cells of the DHA-supplemented group (n = 131) and the control group (n = 130). In stratified analyses, DNA methylation levels in IGF2 P3 were significantly higher in the DHA group than the control group in preterm infants (P = 0.04). We also observed a positive association between DNA methylation levels and maternal body mass index; IGF2 DMR methylation was higher in the DHA group than the control group in infants of overweight mothers (P = 0.03). In addition, at H19 DMR, methylation levels were significantly lower in the DHA group than the control group in infants of normal weight mothers (P = 0.01). Finally, methylation levels at IGF2/H19 imprinted regions were associated with maternal BMI. These findings suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may be modulated by DHA, with potential impacts on child growth and development. PMID:25293351

  13. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion—A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  14. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion-A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further.

  15. Maternal dietary protein affects transcriptional regulation of myostatin gene distinctively at weaning and finishing stages in skeletal muscle of Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiujuan; Wang, Jinquan; Li, Runsheng; Yang, Xiaojing; Sun, Qinwei; Albrecht, Elke; Zhao, Ruqian

    2011-07-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is suggested to mediate the effect of maternal nutrition on offspring phenotype, yet the mechanisms underlying such adaptive gene regulation is elusive. In this study, we determined the effects of maternal dietary protein on transcriptional regulation of MSTN in skeletal muscle of pig offspring. Fourteen Meishan sows were fed either low-protein (LP) or standard-protein (SP) diets throughout gestation and lactation. MSTN expression in the longissimus dorsi muscle was determined both at weaning and finishing stages. Myostatin mRNA abundance was downregulated at weaning, but upregulated at finishing in LP pigs, indicating stage-specific transcriptional regulation. At weaning, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) in muscle nuclear lysate was decreased in LP piglets, associated with diminished binding of C/EBPβ to all the 3 putative binding sites in MSTN promoter. None of the four histone modification marks investigated showed differences between SP and LP piglets. Among 12 microRNAs predicted to target MSTN, none was differently expressed. At finishing stage, C/EBPβ content remained unchanged, but the binding of C/EBPβ to two of the 3 putative binding sites increased in LP pigs. Histone H3 acetylation and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation on MSTN promoter were increased, while histone H3 lysine 9 monomethylation was decreased in LP pigs. Moreover, expression of ssc-miR-136 and ssc-miR-500 was significantly reduced. These results indicate that maternal dietary protein affects MSTN expression through distinct regulatory mechanisms at different stages. The immediate effect at weaning is mediated by C/EBPβ binding without epigenetic modifications, whereas the long-term effect at finishing stage involves both C/EBPβ binding and epigenetic regulations, including histone modification and microRNA expression.

  16. Regulation of tissue LC-PUFA contents, Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase (FADS2) gene expression and the methylation of the putative FADS2 gene promoter by different dietary fatty acid profiles in Japanese seabass (Lateolabrax japonicus).

    PubMed

    Xu, Houguo; Dong, Xiaojing; Ai, Qinghui; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Zuo, Rantao

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the influences of different dietary fatty acid profiles on the tissue content and biosynthesis of LC-PUFA in a euryhaline species Japanese seabass reared in seawater. Six diets were prepared, each with a characteristic fatty acid: Diet PA: Palmitic acid (C16:0); Diet SA: Stearic acid (C18:0); Diet OA: Oleic acid (C18:1n-9); Diet LNA: α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3); Diet N-3 LC-PUFA: n-3 LC-PUFA (DHA+EPA); Diet FO: the fish oil control. A 10-week feeding trial was conducted using juvenile fish (29.53 ± 0.86 g). The results showed that Japanese seabass had limited capacity to synthesize LC-PUFA and fish fed PA, SA, OA and LNA showed significantly lower tissue n-3 LC-PUFA contents compared to fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO. The putative gene promoter and full-length cDNA of FADS2 was cloned and characterized. The protein sequence was confirmed to be homologous to FADS2s of marine teleosts and possessed all the characteristic features of microsomal fatty acid desaturases. The FADS2 transcript levels in liver of fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO were significantly lower than those in fish fed other diets except LNA while Diet PA significantly up-regulated the FADS2 gene expression compared to Diet LNA, N-3 LC-PUFA and FO. Inversely, fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO showed significantly higher promoter methylation rates of FADS2 gene compared to fish fed the LC-PUFA deficient diets. These results suggested that Japanese seabass had low LC-PUFA synthesis capacity and LC-PUFA deficient diets caused significantly reduced tissue n-3 LC-PUFA contents. The liver gene expression of FADS2 was up-regulated in groups enriched in C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n-9 respectively but not in the group enriched in C18:3n-3 compared to groups with high n-3 LC-PUFA contents. The FADS2 gene expression regulated by dietary fatty acids was significantly negatively correlated with the methylation rate of putative FADS2 gene promoter.

  17. [Nutrigenomics--bioactive dietary components].

    PubMed

    Gętek, Monika; Czech, Natalia; Fizia, Katarzyna; Białek-Dratwa, Agnieszka; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Kokot, Teresa; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa

    2013-04-05

    Nutrigenomics analyzes relations between diet and genes, and identifies mechanisms in which food and nutrition affect health and lifestyles and noncommunicable diseases (R. Chadwick, 2004). Bioactive dietary components are signal molecules that carry information from the external environment and affect in terms of quantity and quality in the process of gene expression. The biological effect of bioactive dietary components depends on various of physiological processes that can occur within a few genes. Polymorphism of genes can change their function and physiological response of the body for nutrients. Bioactive dietary components work on at least two levels of the expression of genes as factors regulating chromatin structure and as factors directly regulate the activity of nuclear receptors. The processes of synthesis and DNA repair are regulated by some of vitamins, macro-and micro-elements. They provide, among others, cofactors of enzymes that catalyze the replication of DNA methylation and its repair. DNA methylation profile may change under the influence of diet, single nucleotide polymorphisms and environmental factors. Bioactive dietary components may directly affect the process of gene expression by acting as ligands for nuclear receptors. Sensitive to dietary group of nuclear receptors are sensory receptors. This group includes, among others receptor PPAR (peroxisome proliferator activated), responsible for energy metabolism and receptors LXR (liver X receptor), FXR (farnesoid X receptor) and RXR, which is responsible for the metabolism of cholesterol.

  18. CLOCK gene variation is associated with incidence of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in type-2 diabetic subjects: dietary modulation in the PREDIMED randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Corella, Dolores; Asensio, Eva M; Coltell, Oscar; Sorlí, José V; Estruch, Ramón; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Castañer, Olga; Arós, Fernando; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Ortega-Azorín, Carolina; Fiol, Miquel; Espino, Javier Díez; Díaz-López, Andrés; Fitó, Montserrat; Ros, Emilio; Ordovás, José M

    2016-01-07

    -carriers having decreased risk (HR: 0.61; 95 % CI 0.40-0.94; P = 0.024 versus CC) in the multivariable-adjusted model. In agreement with our previous results showing a protective effect of the G-allele against hyperglycemia, we extended our findings by reporting a novel association with lower T2D incidence and also suggesting a dietary modulation. Moreover, we report for the first time an association between a CLOCK polymorphism and stroke in T2D subjects, suggesting that core clock genes may significantly contribute to increased CVD risk in T2D.

  19. Dietary lysine affected the expression of genes related to lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle of finishing pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been reported that some amino acids can function as signaling molecules to regulate skeletal muscle growth in mammals. This study was conducted to identify those genes that may be regulated by amino acid lysine and responsible for muscle growth and meat quality of pigs. Nine crossbred barrows...

  20. Dietary selenomethionine increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Yan, Lin; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Uthus, Eric O

    2011-08-01

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. This study was to investigate whether selenium (Se) affects the methylation of globe genomic DNA and the exon-specific p53 gene. Three groups of rats (n = 6-7/group) were fed the AIN-93G basal diet supplemented with 0 [Se deficient (D)], 0.15 [Se adequate (A)], or 4 mg [Se supranutritional (S)] (Se as l-selenomethionine)/kg diet for 104 d, respectively. Rats fed the A or S diet had greater plasma and liver glutathione peroxidase activity, liver thioredoxin reductase activity, and plasma homocysteine concentration than those fed the D diet. However, compared with the A diet, rats fed the S diet did not further increase these Se-dependent enzyme activities or homocysteine concentration. In contrast, Se concentrations in kidney, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and plasma were increased in a Se-dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats fed the S diet had significantly less global liver genomic DNA methylation than those fed the D diet. However, the S diet significantly increased the methylation of the p53 gene (exons 5-8) but not the β-actin gene (exons 2-3) DNA in liver and colon mucosa compared with those fed the D diet. Taken together, long-term Se consumption not only affects selenoprotein enzyme activities, homocysteine, tissue Se concentrations, and global genomic DNA methylation but also increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in a Se-dose-dependent manner in rat liver and colon mucosa.

  1. Dietary phosphorus affects the growth of larval Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Marc C; Woods, H Arthur; Harrison, Jon F; Elser, James J

    2004-03-01

    Although phosphorus has long been considered an important factor in the growth of diverse biota such as bacteria, algae, and zooplankton, insect nutrition has classically focused on dietary protein and energy content. However, research in elemental stoichiometry has suggested that primary producer biomass has similar N:P ratios in aquatic and terrestrial systems, and phosphorus-rich herbivores in freshwater systems frequently face phosphorus-limited nutritional conditions. Therefore, herbivorous insects should also be prone to phosphorus limitation. We tested this prediction by rearing Manduca sexta larvae on artificial and natural (Datura wrightii leaves) diets containing varying levels of phosphorus (approximately 0.20, 0.55, or 1.2% phosphorus by dry weight). For both artificial and natural diets, increased dietary phosphorus significantly increased growth rates and body phosphorus contents, and shortened the time to the final instar molt. Caterpillars did not consistently exhibit compensatory feeding for phosphorus on either type of diet. The growth and body phosphorus responses were not explicable by changes in amounts of potassium or calcium, which co-varied with phosphorus in the diets. Concentrations of phosphorus in D. wrightii leaves collected in the field varied over a range in which leaf phosphorus is predicted to affect M. sexta's growth rates. These results suggest that natural variation in dietary phosphorus is likely to affect the growth rate and population dynamics of M. sexta, and perhaps larval insects more generally.

  2. Dietary whey reduces energy intake and alters hypothalamic gene expression in obese phyto-oestrogen-deprived male rats.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María F; Stoker, Cora; Lazzarino, Gisela P; Canesini, Guillermina; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge G

    2016-09-01

    Removing dietary phyto-oestrogens in adult male rats causes obesity and diabetes. As whey proteins have been reported to reduce food intake and improve glucose homoeostasis, we investigated whether they could attenuate susceptibility to obesity and diabetes due to phyto-oestrogen deprivation. To this end, thirty male Wistar rats were fed a high-phyto-oestrogen (HP) or a phyto-oestrogen-free (PF) diet for 10 weeks; six rats from each group were killed. The remaining HP animals (six animals) continued receiving the HP diet for 6 weeks. The remaining PF rats (twelve rats) were divided in two groups: one was given the PF diet and the other a variation of the PF diet plus whey protein (PF-W). Body weight, food intake and adipose tissue weights were recorded. Hypothalamic mRNA expressions of orexigenic (neuropeptide Y, agouti-related protein (AgRP)) and anorexigenic (pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine-amphetamine-related transcript (CART)) neuropeptides were quantified by real-time PCR. Serum glucose, insulin and total thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone, testosterone and oestradiol were assessed. After 10 weeks of PF diet, increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake, with up-regulation of AgRP and down-regulation of POMC', were observed. Longer treatment exacerbated these results, increased total T4 levels, reduced oestradiol levels and impaired glucose homoeostasis. PF-W reduced energy intake and increased POMC expression; however, body weight and adiposity remained unchanged. PF-W could not prevent the hormonal changes or the high circulating glucose levels induced by phyto-oestrogen deprivation, but reduced fasting insulin. These data demonstrate that, although 6 weeks of whey administration could not prevent obesity in phyto-oestrogen-deprived rats, the reduction in energy intake and circulating insulin could be beneficial with longer treatments.

  3. Polymorphisms in genes involved in folate metabolism modify the association of dietary and circulating folate and vitamin B-6 with cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Luciana Y; D'Almeida, Vania; Villa, Luisa L; Franco, Eduardo L; Cardoso, Marly A

    2013-12-01

    High folate intake has been suggested as an important factor in cancer prevention; however, previous studies on the relation among folate intake, serum folate, and plasma homocysteine (hcy) are controversial. We conducted a hospital-based, case-control study in Brazil investigating associations between dietary and circulating vitamins B-6 and B-12 and folate, hcy, genotypes of folate-metabolizing enzyme methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, A1298C), 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR A2756G), methionine synthase reductase (MTRR A66G), and reduced folate carrier (RFC1 G80A) and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grades 1 (CIN1), 2 (CIN2), and 3 (CIN3). The study was composed by 453 controls, 140 CIN1, 126 CIN2, and 231 CIN3. We investigated the joint effects of genetic variants of folate-related genes using genetic risk scores (GRSs) by summing the number of risk alleles for CIN1 and CIN2+ (CIN2 and CIN3 cases). The OR (95% CI) for CIN1 and CIN2+ per each risk allele were 1.29 (1.01, 1.65) and 1.22 (1.01, 1.46), respectively. An association between folate intake and CIN2+ was observed only after stratification according to GRS: crude OR (95% CI) for lower folate intake and GRS ≥ 4 was 1.67 (0.92, 3.04) (P-trend < 0.001) compared with higher folate intake (above the median) and GRS ≤ 3. The CIN2+ risk of lower serum vitamin B-6 and GRS ≥ 4 was 2.14 (0.92, 5.02) (P-trend = 0.05) and lower serum folate (below the median) and GRS ≥ 4 was 0.49 (0.20, 1.17) (P-trend = 0.05) after adjustment for confounding variables and human papillomavirus infection. Our data suggest that polymorphisms in genes related to folate metabolism modify the association of dietary and circulating folate and vitamin B-6 with cervical neoplasia.

  4. Physical and Flavor Characteristics, Fatty Acid Profile, Antioxidant Status and Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Expression Changes in Young Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) Fillets Fed Dietary Valine

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of dietary valine on the physical and flavor characteristics, fatty acid (FA) profile, antioxidant status and Nrf2-dependent antioxidant enzyme gene expression in the muscle of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) fed increasing levels of valine (4.3, 8.0, 10.6, 13.1, 16.9 and 19.1 g/kg) for 8 weeks. Compared with the control group, the group fed valine showed improved physical characteristics of fish fillets (increased relative shear force, hydroxyproline, protein and lipid levels and decreased cathepsin B and L activities, as well as cooking loss, were observed). Moreover, valine improved the flavor of young grass carp fillets by increasing the amino acid (AA) concentration in fish muscle (increased aspartic acid, threonine, glutamine, cystine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine, arginine and valine concentrations were observed). Additionally, optimal valine supplementation increased the potential health benefits to humans by decreasing the saturated FA (C15:0 and C16:0) concentration and increasing the unsaturated FA (monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs), such as C16:1, C18:1c+t and C20:1, and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs), such as C18:3n-3, C20:2 and C22:6) concentration. In addition, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and the activities of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), catalase (CAT) and Selenium-dependent glutathione peroxydase (Se-GPx) increased under valine supplementation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the SOD1, CAT and Se-GPx mRNA levels increased with dietary valine levels, possibly due to the up-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), target of rapamycin (TOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and the down-regulation of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) in muscle (P < 0.05). In conclusion, valine improved the physical and flavor characteristics, FA profile, and antioxidant status and regulated the expression of the antioxidant enzyme genes Nrf2, Keap1, TOR

  5. Physical and Flavor Characteristics, Fatty Acid Profile, Antioxidant Status and Nrf2-Dependent Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Expression Changes in Young Grass Carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) Fillets Fed Dietary Valine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of dietary valine on the physical and flavor characteristics, fatty acid (FA) profile, antioxidant status and Nrf2-dependent antioxidant enzyme gene expression in the muscle of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) fed increasing levels of valine (4.3, 8.0, 10.6, 13.1, 16.9 and 19.1 g/kg) for 8 weeks. Compared with the control group, the group fed valine showed improved physical characteristics of fish fillets (increased relative shear force, hydroxyproline, protein and lipid levels and decreased cathepsin B and L activities, as well as cooking loss, were observed). Moreover, valine improved the flavor of young grass carp fillets by increasing the amino acid (AA) concentration in fish muscle (increased aspartic acid, threonine, glutamine, cystine, methionine, leucine, tyrosine, phenylalanine, lysine, histidine, arginine and valine concentrations were observed). Additionally, optimal valine supplementation increased the potential health benefits to humans by decreasing the saturated FA (C15:0 and C16:0) concentration and increasing the unsaturated FA (monounsaturated FAs (MUFAs), such as C16:1, C18:1c+t and C20:1, and polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs), such as C18:3n-3, C20:2 and C22:6) concentration. In addition, the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and the activities of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), catalase (CAT) and Selenium-dependent glutathione peroxydase (Se-GPx) increased under valine supplementation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the SOD1, CAT and Se-GPx mRNA levels increased with dietary valine levels, possibly due to the up-regulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), target of rapamycin (TOR) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and the down-regulation of Kelch-like-ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) in muscle (P < 0.05). In conclusion, valine improved the physical and flavor characteristics, FA profile, and antioxidant status and regulated the expression of the antioxidant enzyme genes Nrf2, Keap1, TOR

  6. Dietary fatty acid distribution modifies obesity risk linked to the rs9939609 polymorphism of the fat mass and obesity-associated gene in a Spanish case-control study of children.

    PubMed

    Moleres, Adriana; Ochoa, M Carmen; Rendo-Urteaga, Tara; Martínez-González, M Angel; Azcona San Julián, M Cristina; Martínez, J Alfredo; Marti, Amelia

    2012-02-01

    The rs9939609 polymorphism of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene has been widely associated with childhood obesity in several European cohorts. This association appears to be dependent on dietary macronutrients. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate whether dietary fatty acid intake distribution could interact with this FTO genetic variation and obesity in a Spanish case-control study of children and adolescents. A total of 354 Spanish children and adolescents aged 6-18 years (49 % males) were genotyped for the rs9939609 variant of the FTO gene. Anthropometric parameters were taken and energy intake was measured. We observed an interaction between the consumption of SFA (percentage of total energy) and PUFA:SFA ratio and obesity risk linked to the rs9939609 SNP of the FTO gene. In the study population of the present study, the risk allele carriers consuming more than 12·6 % SFA (of total energy) had an increased obesity risk compared with TT carriers. In a similar way, A allele carriers with an intake ratio lower than 0·43 PUFA:SFA presented a higher obesity risk than TT subjects. In summary, the present study reports for the first time the influence of dietary fatty acid distribution on the effect of the rs9939609 polymorphism of the FTO gene on children and adolescents' obesity risk.

  7. Effect of dietary fish oil on the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in liver and skeletal muscle of lactating sows.

    PubMed

    Gessner, D K; Gröne, B; Rosenbaum, S; Most, E; Hillen, S; Becker, S; Erhardt, G; Reiner, G; Eder, K

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that dietary supplementation of fish oil as a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) influences the expression of target genes of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBP)-1 and (SREBP)-2 involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis and fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism in the liver, and moreover activates the expression of target genes of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)-α involved in TAG and fatty acid catabolism in liver and skeletal muscle. Twenty lactating sows were fed a control diet or a fish oil diet with either 50 g of a mixture of palm oil and soya bean oil (4:1, w/w) or fish oil per kg. The diet of the fish oil group contained 19.1 g of n-3 PUFA (mainly 20:5 n-3 and 22:6 n-3) per 100 g of total fatty acids, while the diet of the control group contained 2.4 g of n-3 PUFA (mainly 18:3 n-3) per 100 g of total fatty acids. The fish oil group had reduced relative mRNA concentrations of various target genes of SREBP-1 involved in fatty acid and TAG synthesis in comparison with the control group (p < 0.05). Relative mRNA concentrations of target genes of PPARα involved in fatty acid catabolism in both liver and muscle, and mRNA concentrations of target genes of SREBP-2 involved in cholesterol synthesis and uptake were not influenced by fish oil supplementation. Concentrations of cholesterol and TAG in plasma, fat content of milk and weight gains of litters during the suckling period were not different between the two groups of sows. In conclusion, this study suggests that fish oil has only minor effects on hepatic lipid metabolism, which are non-critical with respect to milk production in sows. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto affects the dietary response in mouse white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ronkainen, Justiina; Huusko, Tuija J; Soininen, Raija; Mondini, Eleonora; Cinti, Francesca; Mäkelä, Kari A; Kovalainen, Miia; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Sebert, Sylvain; Savolainen, Markku J; Salonurmi, Tuire

    2015-03-18

    Common variants of human fat mass- and obesity-associated gene Fto have been linked with higher body mass index, but the biological explanation for the link has remained obscure. Recent findings suggest that these variants affect the homeobox protein IRX3. Here we report that FTO has a role in white adipose tissue which modifies its response to high-fat feeding. Wild type and Fto-deficient mice were exposed to standard or high-fat diet for 16 weeks after which metabolism, behavior and white adipose tissue morphology were analyzed together with adipokine levels and relative expression of genes regulating white adipose tissue adipogenesis and Irx3. Our results indicate that Fto deficiency increases the expression of genes related to adipogenesis preventing adipocytes from becoming hypertrophic after high-fat diet. In addition, we report a novel finding of increased Irx3 expression in Fto-deficient mice after high-fat feeding indicating a complex link between FTO, IRX3 and fat metabolism.

  9. The effects of dietary supplementation of methionine on genomic stability and p53 gene promoter methylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cátia Lira Do; Bueno, Rafaela de Barros E Lima; Burim, Regislaine Valéria; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2011-05-18

    Methionine is a component of one-carbon metabolism and a precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor for DNA methylation. When methionine intake is high, an increase of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is expected. DNA methyltransferases convert SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). A high intracellular SAH concentration could inhibit the activity of DNA methyltransferases. Therefore, high methionine ingestion could induce DNA damage and change the methylation pattern of tumor suppressor genes. This study investigated the genotoxicity of a methionine-supplemented diet. It also investigated the diet's effects on glutathione levels, SAM and SAH concentrations and the gene methylation pattern of p53. Wistar rats received either a methionine-supplemented diet (2% methionine) or a control diet (0.3% methionine) for six weeks. The methionine-supplemented diet was neither genotoxic nor antigenotoxic to kidney cells, as assessed by the comet assay. However, the methionine-supplemented diet restored the renal glutathione depletion induced by doxorubicin. This fact may be explained by the transsulfuration pathway, which converts methionine to glutathione in the kidney. Methionine supplementation increased the renal concentration of SAH without changing the SAM/SAH ratio. This unchanged profile was also observed for DNA methylation at the promoter region of the p53 gene. Further studies are necessary to elucidate this diet's effects on genomic stability and DNA methylation.

  10. The effect of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) on growth performance, fatty acid composition and expression of ARA metabolism-related genes in larval half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuhui; Li, Songlin; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Ai, Qinghui

    2015-05-28

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary arachidonic acid (ARA) on growth performance, fatty acid composition and ARA metabolism-related gene expression in larval half-smooth tongue sole (Cynoglossus semilaevis). Larvae (35 d after hatching, 54 (SEM 1) mg) were fed diets with graded concentrations of ARA (0.01, 0.39, 0.70, 1.07, 1.42 and 2.86 % dry weight) five times per d to apparent satiation for 30 d. Results showed that increased dietary ARA concentration caused a significant non-linear rise to a plateau in survival rate, final body weight and thermal growth coefficient, and the maximum values occurred with the 1.42 % ARA treatment. As dietary ARA increased to 1.07 or 1.42 %, activities of trypsin, leucine aminopeptidase and alkaline phosphatase levels increased, but they decreased with higher ARA concentrations. The fatty acid composition of tongue sole larvae was almost well correlated with their dietary fatty acid profiles, and the EPA content of the larvae decreased with increasing dietary ARA. Meanwhile, the partial sequences of COX-1a (cyclo-oxygenase-1a), COX-1b (cyclo-oxygenase-1b), COX-2 (cyclo-oxygenase-2), 5-LOX (5-lipoxygenase) and CYP2J6-like (cytochrome P450 2J6-like) were also obtained. Both COX-2 and 5-LOX mRNA expression levels significantly increased to a plateau in an 'L'-shaped manner as dietary ARA increased to 1.07 or 1.42 %, but no significant differences were found in the gene expression of COX-1a, COX-1b or CYP2J6-like. These results suggest that 1.07-1.42 % dietary ARA was beneficial to the growth performance of larval tongue sole, and the regulation of dietary ARA on the growth performance of larvae was probably involved in altering the mRNA expression of COX-2 and 5-LOX.

  11. Differential gene expression associated with dietary methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Basu, Niladri; Goetz, Giles; Jiang, Nan; Hutz, Reinhold J; Tonellato, Peter J; Carvan, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate conserved biomarkers that could be used in most species of teleost fish at most life-stages. We investigated the effects of sublethal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on developing rainbow trout and zebrafish. Juvenile rainbow trout and young adult zebrafish were fed food with MeHg added at 0, 0.5, 5, and 50 ppm. Atomic absorption spectrometry was applied to measure whole body total Hg levels, and pathologic analysis was performed to identify MeHg-induced toxicity. Fish at 6 weeks were sampled from each group for microarray analysis using RNA from whole fish. MeHg-exposed trout and zebrafish did not show overt signs of toxicity or pathology, nor were significant differences seen in mortality, length, mass, or condition factor. The accumulation of MeHg in trout and zebrafish exhibited dose- and time-dependent patterns during 6 weeks, and zebrafish exhibited greater assimilation of total Hg than rainbow trout. The dysregulated genes in MeHg-treated fish have multiple functional annotations, such as iron ion homeostasis, glutathione transferase activity, regulation of muscle contraction, troponin I binding and calcium-dependent protein binding. Genes were selected as biomarker candidates based on their microarray data and their expression was evaluated by QPCR. Unfortunately, these genes are not good consistent biomarkers for both rainbow trout and zebrafish from QPCR evaluation using individual fish. Our conclusion is that biomarker analysis for aquatic toxicant assessment using fish needs to be based on tissue-, sex- and species-specific consideration.

  12. Differential gene expression associated with dietary methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Basu, Niladri; Goetz, Giles; Jiang, Nan; Hutz, Reinhold J.; Tonellato, Peter J.; Carvan, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify and evaluate conserved biomarkers that could be used in most species of teleost fish at most life-stages. We investigated the effects of sublethal methylmercury (MeHg) exposure on developing rainbow trout and zebrafish. Juvenile rainbow trout and young adult zebrafish were fed food with MeHg added at 0, 0.5, 5 and 50 ppm. Atomic absorption spectrometry was applied to measure whole body total Hg levels, and pathologic analysis was performed to identify MeHg-induced toxicity. Fish at six weeks were sampled from each group for microarray analysis using RNA from whole fish. MeHg-exposed trout and zebrafish did not show overt signs of toxicity or pathology, nor were significant differences seen in mortality, length, mass, or condition factor. The accumulation of MeHg in trout and zebrafish exhibited dose- and time-dependent patterns during six weeks, and zebrafish exhibited greater assimilation of total Hg than rainbow trout. The dysregulated genes in MeHg-treated fish have multiple functional annotations, such as iron ion homeostasis, glutathione transferase activity, regulation of muscle contraction, troponin I binding and calcium-dependent protein binding. Genes were selected as biomarker candidates based on their microarray data and their expression was evaluated by QPCR. Unfortunately, these genes are not good consistent biomarkers for both rainbow trout and zebrafish from QPCR evaluation using individual fish. Our conclusion is that biomarker analysis for aquatic toxicant assessment using fish needs to be based on tissue-, sex- and species-specific consideration. PMID:23529582

  13. Effects of different dietary conditions on the expression of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like protease genes in the digestive system of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Spit, Jornt; Zels, Sven; Dillen, Senne; Holtof, Michiel; Wynant, Niels; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2014-05-01

    While technological advancements have recently led to a steep increase in genomic and transcriptomic data, and large numbers of protease sequences are being discovered in diverse insect species, little information is available about the expression of digestive enzymes in Orthoptera. Here we describe the identification of Locusta migratoria serine protease transcripts (cDNAs) involved in digestion, which might serve as possible targets for pest control management. A total of 5 putative trypsin and 15 putative chymotrypsin gene sequences were characterized. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these are distributed among 3 evolutionary conserved clusters. In addition, we have determined the relative gene expression levels of representative members in the gut under different feeding conditions. This study demonstrated that the transcript levels for all measured serine proteases were strongly reduced after starvation. On the other hand, larvae of L. migratoria displayed compensatory effects to the presence of Soybean Bowman Birk (SBBI) and Soybean Trypsin (SBTI) inhibitors in their diet by differential upregulation of multiple proteases. A rapid initial upregulation was observed for all tested serine protease transcripts, while only for members belonging to class I, the transcript levels remained elevated after prolonged exposure. In full agreement with these results, we also observed an increase in proteolytic activity in midgut secretions of locusts that were accustomed to the presence of protease inhibitors in their diet, while no change in sensitivity to these inhibitors was observed. Taken together, this paper is the first comprehensive study on dietary dependent transcript levels of proteolytic enzymes in Orthoptera. Our data suggest that compensatory response mechanisms to protease inhibitor ingestion may have appeared early in insect evolution.

  14. Dietary methyl donors, methyl metabolizing enzymes, and epigenetic regulators: diet-gene interactions and promoter CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    de Vogel, Stefan; Wouters, Kim A D; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; van Schooten, Frederik J; de Goeij, Anton F P M; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; van Engeland, Manon; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2011-01-01

    Dietary methyl donors might influence DNA methylation during carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Among 609 CRC cases and 1,663 subcohort members of the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (n = 120,852), we estimated CRC risk according to methyl donor intake across genotypes of folate metabolizing enzymes and methyltransferases.Although diet-gene interactions were not statistically significant, methionine intake was inversely associated with CRC among subjects having both common rs2424913 and rs406193 DNMT3B C > T genotypes (highest versus lowest tertile: RR = 0.44; p (trend) = 0.05). Likewise, vitamin B2 was modestly inversely associated among individuals with the MTHFR c.665CC (rs1801133) genotype (RR = 0.66; p (trend) = 0.08), but with a significant reduced risk when ≤ 1 rare allele occurred in the combination of folate metabolizing enzymes MTHFR, MTRR and MTR (RR = 0.30; p (trend) = 0.005). Folate or vitamin B6 were neither inversely associated with CRC nor was methyl donor intake associated with the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP).Despite the absence of heterogeneity across genotypes, might an effect of methyl donors on CRC be more pronounced among individuals carrying common variants of folate metabolizing enzymes or DNA methyltransferases. Combining genotypes may assist to reveal diet associations with CRC, possibly because rare variants of related genes may collectively affect specific metabolic pathways or enzymatic functions.

  15. Circulating levels of endocannabinoids and oxylipins altered by dietary lipids in older women are likely associated with previously identified gene targets.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Bruce A; Kim, Jeffrey; Kenny, Anne; Pedersen, Theresa L; Pappan, Kirk L; Newman, John W

    2016-11-01

    Postmenopausal women (PMW) report marginal n-3 PUFA intakes and are at risk of chronic diseases associated with the skeletal, muscular, neuroendocrine, and cardiovascular systems. How n-3 PUFA affect the amounts of endocannabinoids (ECs) and oxylipins (OLs) of metabolic and physiologic importance in PMW is not clear. Based on our recent findings that dietary n-3 PUFA alter gene targets of the EC system and lower pro-inflammatory OL we proceeded to characterize these actions in blood of PMW. Our aim was to determine levels of the ECs, OLs, and global metabolites (GM) in white PMW (75±7y), randomized in a double-masked manner, from baseline to 6mo after receiving a fish oil supplement of n-3 PUFA (720mg 20:5n3+480mg 22:6n3/d, n=20) or placebo (1.8g oleic acid/d, n=20). ECs and OLs in serum were determined by UPLC-MS/MS and GM by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS. Plasma 20:5n3 and 22:6n3 levels increased in PMW given fish oil. EC n-6 acyl-ethanolamides, arachidonate-derived diols were decreased and 20:5n3 and 22:6n3 diols, epoxides, and alcohols were increased in PMW given fish oil. GM analysis revealed that n-3 PUFA supplementation increased renal steroid hormone and proteolytic metabolite levels in PMW. Herein, we confirm that gene targets of the EC system, previously found as modifiable by n-3 PUFA result in changes in the levels of ECs and OLs in PMW. This study shows phenotypic responses (in levels) to n-3 PUFA supplementation in PMW and increases of n-3 acyl-ethanolamide and n-3-derived OL of clinical considerations in aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Inorganic Dietary Selenium Supplementation on Selenoprotein and Lipid Metabolism Gene Expression Patterns in Liver and Loin Muscle of Growing Lambs.

    PubMed

    Juszczuk-Kubiak, Edyta; Bujko, Kamila; Cymer, Monika; Wicińska, Krystyna; Gabryszuk, Mirosław; Pierzchała, Mariusz

    2016-08-01

    Effect of selenium (Se) supplementation on the selenoprotein and lipid metabolism gene expression patterns in ruminants, especially in lambs is not yet fully understood. The aim of study was to evaluate the effect of Se supplementation on the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns of selected selenoproteins and genes related to lipid metabolism in growing lambs. The experiment was conducted on 48 Polish Merino lambs divided into two groups (n = 24): control (C)-lambs fed with a basal diet (BD) with no Se supplementation, and supplemented (S)-lambs fed with a BD, supplemented with 0.5 mg Se/kg as sodium selenate for 8 weeks. Expression of 12 selenoproteins and six genes related to lipid metabolism was analyzed in the liver and longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle of growing lambs by qPCR. Significant differences were found in the expression of GPX1, GPX2, SEPM, SEPW1, SEP15, SEPGS2, and TXNRD1 in the liver, and GPX1, SEPP1, SEPN1, SEPW1, SEP15, and MSRB1 in the LD muscle between S and C lambs. Se supplementation mainly upregulated SEPW1, SEP15 (P < 0.001; P < 0.01) mRNA expression in the liver, and GPX1, SEPP1, SEPN1, SEPW1 (P < 0.001; P < 0.01) in the muscle of S group. On the other hand, significant decrease in GPX2 (P < 0.01), SEPM (P < 0.001), and SEPHS2 (P < 0.01) mRNA expression levels were observed in the liver of S group of lambs. Se supplementation did not affect PON1, LXRα, and PPARα mRNA expression levels, but a significant increase in mRNA levels of APOE and LPL in the LD muscle (P < 0.05) as well as LPL (P < 0.05) in the liver were noticed in the group of Se supplemented lambs. Our study confirmed that, in lambs, similarly to other species, mRNA expression patterns of several selenoproteins highly depend on dietary Se levels, and their expression is ruled by hierarchical principles and tissue-specific mechanisms. Moreover, the study showed that changes Se intake leads to different levels of genes expression related

  17. Dietary choline modulates immune responses, and gene expressions of TOR and eIF4E-binding protein2 in immune organs of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Li, Shu-Hong; Feng, Lin; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2013-09-01

    The present work evaluates the effects of various levels of dietary choline on immune parameters, immune-related gene expression and protection against Aeromonas hydrophila (AH) in juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed with six different experimental diets containing graded levels of choline at 165 (choline-deficient control), 310, 607, 896, 1167 and 1820 mg kg(-1) diet for 65 days. At the end of the feeding trail, Fish were challenged with AH and mortalities were recorded over 17 days. Dietary choline significantly enhanced spleen and head kidney weights, spleen index, red blood cell and white blood cell counts, and intestinal Lactobacillus counts of juvenile Jian carp; whereas, intestinal Escherichia coli and A. hydrophila counts decreased. Moreover, the post-challenge survival rate, leucocyte phagocytic capacity, serum lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities, hemagglutination titer, complement 3 and 4 contents, immunoglobulin M content, and anti-AH antibody titer were significantly enhanced by choline and the lowest in choline-deficient group, while serum total iron-binding capacity was the highest in choline-deficient group. The relative gene expressions of interleukin 10 in spleen and head kidney, target of rapamycin (TOR) in spleen and eIF4E-binding protein2 (4E-BP2) in head kidney significantly increased with increasing of dietary choline up to a certain point. However, the relative gene expressions of interleukin 1β, tumor necrosis factor α and transforming growth factor β2 in spleen and head kidney, TOR in head kidney and 4E-BP2 in spleen significantly decreased. In conclusion, dietary choline improved disease resistance, enhanced the immune function, and regulated immune-related gene expression of juvenile Jian carp.

  18. Dietary phenylalanine-improved intestinal barrier health in young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with increased immune status and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes and related signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Li, Wen; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Jiang, Jun; Tang, Ling; Wu, Pei; Tang, Wu-Neng; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-08-01

    The present work evaluated the effects of dietary phenylalanine (Phe) on the intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript abundance, and the gene expression of immune- and antioxidant-related signalling molecules in the intestine. In addition, the dietary Phe (and Phe + Tyr) requirement of young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) was also estimated. Fish were fed fish meal-casein-gelatin based diets (302.3 g crude protein kg(-1)) containing 3.4 (basal diet), 6.1, 9.1, 11.5, 14.0 and 16.8 g Phe kg(-1) with a fixed amount of 10.7 g tyrosine kg(-1) for 8 weeks. The results showed that Phe deficiency or excess Phe reduced the lysozyme and acid phosphatase activities and complement C 3 content in the intestine (P < 0.05). Moreover, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), occludin and claudin c mRNA levels were highest in the fish fed the diet containing 11.5 g Phe kg(-1) (P < 0.05). However, claudin 12 and claudin b mRNA levels were not significantly affected by dietary Phe (P > 0.05). Gene expression of interleukin-10 (IL-10), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), target of rapamycin (TOR) and inhibitor of nuclear factor κBα (IκBα) in proximal intestine (PI), mid intestine (MI) and distal intestine (DI) increased as dietary Phe increased up to 6.1, 9.1, 11.5 and 14.0 g kg(-1), respectively (P < 0.05). However, interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nuclear factor-κB p65 (NF-κB p65) mRNA levels showed opposite tendencies. In addition, the mRNA level of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was significantly lower in the intestinal tissue of the group fed a diet with Phe levels of 16.8 g kg(-1) than in those of other groups (P < 0.05). The expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) gene was increased as dietary Phe increased up to 9.1 g kg(-1) (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Phe improved intestinal immune status, and regulated gene expression of cytokines, tight junction proteins, antioxidant enzymes, NF-κB p65, IκBα, TOR, and Nrf2 in the fish

  19. Differential expression profiles of Streptococcus mutans ftf, gtf and vicR genes in the presence of dietary carbohydrates at early and late exponential growth phases.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, Moshe; Tam, Avshalom; Feldman, Mark; Steinberg, Doron

    2006-09-04

    Dental caries is one of the most common infectious diseases that affects humans. Streptococcus mutans, the main pathogenic bacterium associated with dental caries, produces a number of extracellular sucrose-metabolizing enzymes, such as glucosyltransferases (GTFB, GTFC and GTFD) and fructosyltransferase (FTF). The cooperative action of these enzymes is essential for sucrose-dependent cellular adhesion and biofilm formation. A global response regulator (vicR) plays important roles in S. mutans ftf and gtf expression in response to a variety of stimuli. A real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain-reaction was used to quantify the relative levels of ftf, gtfB, gtfC, gtfD and vicR transcription of S. mutans in the presence of various dietary carbohydrates: sucrose, D-glucose, D-fructose, D-glucitol (D-sorbitol), D-mannitol and xylitol. Ftf was highly expressed at late exponential phase in the presence of sorbitol and mannitol. GtfB was highly expressed in the presence of all the above carbohydrates except for xylitol at early exponential growth phase and glucose and fructose at late exponential growth phase. Similar to gtfB, the expression of gtfC was also induced with the presence of all the tested carbohydrates except for xylitol at early growth and glucose and fructose at late exponential phase. In addition, no effect of mannitol on gtfC expression at early exponential phase was observed. GtfD was less influenced compared to the gtfB and gtfC, demonstrating enhanced expression especially in the presence of sorbitol, glucose, mannitol and xylitol at early exponential phase and mannitol at late exponential phase. VicR expression was induced only at the presence of xylitol at late exponential phase, and a decrease in expression was recorded at early exponential phase. Our findings show that dietary carbohydrates have a major influence on the transcription of ftf, gtfB, gtfC and gtfD, but less on vicR. Sorbitol and mannitol, which are considered as noncariogenic

  20. Dietary olive oil and menhaden oil mitigate induction of lipogenesis in hyperinsulinemic corpulent JCR:LA-cp rats: microarray analysis of lipid-related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Elam, Marshall B; Wilcox, Henry G; Cagen, Lauren M; Park, Edwards A; Raghow, Rajendra; Patel, Divyen; Kumar, Poonam; Sheybani, Ali; Russell, James C

    2004-12-01

    In the corpulent James C. Russell corpulent (JCR:LA-cp) rat, hyperinsulinemia leads to induction of lipogenic enzymes via enhanced expression of sterol-regulatory-binding protein (SREBP)-1c. This results in increased hepatic lipid production and hypertriglyceridemia. Information regarding down-regulation of SREBP-1c and lipogenic enzymes by dietary fatty acids in this model is limited. We therefore assessed de novo hepatic lipogenesis and hepatic and plasma lipids in corpulent JCR rats fed diets enriched in olive oil or menhaden oil. Using microarray and Northern analysis, we determined the effect of these diets on expression of mRNA for lipogenic enzymes and other proteins related to lipid metabolism. In corpulent JCR:LA-cp rats, both the olive oil and menhaden oil diets reduced expression of SREBP-1c, with concomitant reductions in hepatic triglyceride content, lipogenesis, and expression of enzymes related to lipid synthesis. Unexpectedly, expression of many peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-dependent enzymes mediating fatty acid oxidation was increased in livers of corpulent JCR rats. The menhaden oil diet further increased expression of these enzymes. Induction of SREBP-1c by insulin is dependent on liver x receptor (LXR)alpha. Although hepatic expression of mRNA for LXR itself was not increased in corpulent rats, expression of Cyp7a1, an LXR-responsive gene, was increased, suggesting increased LXR activity. Expression of mRNA encoding fatty acid translocase and ATP-binding cassette subfamily DALD member 3 was also increased in livers of corpulent JCR rats, indicating a potential role for these fatty acid transporters in the pathogenesis of disordered lipid metabolism in obesity. This study clearly demonstrates that substitution of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid for carbohydrate in the corpulent JCR:LA-cp rat reduces de novo lipogenesis, at least in part, by reducing hepatic expression of SREBP-1c and that strategies directed toward reducing

  1. Dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Madar, Z; Thorne, R

    1987-01-01

    Studies done on dietary fiber (DF) over the past five years are presented in this Review. The involvement of dietary fiber in the control of plasma glucose and lipid levels is now established. Two dietary fiber sources (soybean and fenugreek) were studied in our laboratory and are discussed herein. These sources were found to be potentially beneficial in the reduction of plasma glucose in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus subjects. They are shown to be acceptable by human subjects and are easy to use either in a mixture of milk products and in cooking. The mechanism by which dietary fiber alters the nutrient absorption is also discussed. The effect of DF on gastric emptying, transit time, adsorption and glucose transport may contribute to reducing plasma glucose and lipid levels. DF was found to be effective in controlling blood glucose and lipid levels of pregnant diabetic women. Dietary fiber may also be potentially beneficial in the reduction of exogenous insulin requirements in these subjects. However, increased consumption of DF may cause adverse side effects; the binding capabilities of fiber may affect nutrient availability, particularly that of minerals and prolonged and high DF dosage supplementation must be regarded cautiously. This is particularly true when recommending such a diet for pregnant or lactating women, children or subjects with nutritional disorders. Physiological effects of DF appear to depend heavily on the source and composition of fiber. Using a combination of DF from a variety of sources may reduce the actual mass of fiber required to obtain the desired metabolic effects and will result in a more palatable diet. Previously observed problems, such as excess flatus, diarrhea and mineral malabsorption would also be minimized.

  2. Dietary açai modulates ROS production by neutrophils and gene expression of liver antioxidant enzymes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Joyce Ferreira da Costa; Magalhães, Cíntia Lopes de Brito; Costa, Daniela Caldeira; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lúcia

    2011-01-01

    Açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) has recently emerged as a promising source of natural antioxidants. Because increased oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant defense mechanisms are important factors in the development of diabetic complications and many health claims have been reported for açai, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the possible protective effects of açai on the production of reactive oxygen species by neutrophils and on the liver antioxidant defense system in control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diet supplementation with 2% açai was found to increase mRNA levels for gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione peroxidase in liver tissue and to decrease reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils. Compared to control animals, diabetic rats exhibited lower levels of mRNA coding for Zn-superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and higher levels of reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and carbonyl proteins in hepatic tissues. Although açai supplementation was not effective in restore gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in diabetic rats, it showed a protective effect, decreasing thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels and increasing reduced glutathione content in the liver. These findings suggest that açai can modulate reactive oxygen species production by neutrophils and that it has a significant favorable effect on the liver antioxidant defense system under fisiological conditions of oxidative stress and partially revert deleterious effects of diabetes in the liver. PMID:22128218

  3. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K

    2015-11-03

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual's genetic and environmental context. Copyright © 2015 Williams et al.

  4. Metabolomic and Gene Expression Profiles Exhibit Modular Genetic and Dietary Structure Linking Metabolic Syndrome Phenotypes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephanie; Dew-Budd, Kelly; Davis, Kristen; Anderson, Julie; Bishop, Ruth; Freeman, Kenda; Davis, Dana; Bray, Katherine; Perkins, Lauren; Hubickey, Joana; Reed, Laura K.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors influence complex disease in humans, such as metabolic syndrome, and Drosophila melanogaster serves as an excellent model in which to test these factors experimentally. Here we explore the modularity of endophenotypes with an in-depth reanalysis of a previous study by Reed et al. (2014), where we raised 20 wild-type genetic lines of Drosophila larvae on four diets and measured gross phenotypes of body weight, total sugar, and total triglycerides, as well as the endophenotypes of metabolomic and whole-genome expression profiles. We then perform new gene expression experiments to test for conservation of phenotype-expression correlations across different diets and populations. We find that transcript levels correlated with gross phenotypes were enriched for puparial adhesion, metamorphosis, and central energy metabolism functions. The specific metabolites L-DOPA and N-arachidonoyl dopamine make physiological links between the gross phenotypes across diets, whereas leucine and isoleucine thus exhibit genotype-by-diet interactions. Between diets, we find low conservation of the endophenotypes that correlate with the gross phenotypes. Through the follow-up expression study, we found that transcript-trait correlations are well conserved across populations raised on a familiar diet, but on a novel diet, the transcript-trait correlations are no longer conserved. Thus, physiological canalization of metabolic phenotypes breaks down in a novel environment exposing cryptic variation. We cannot predict the physiological basis of disease in a perturbing environment from profiles observed in the ancestral environment. This study demonstrates that variation for disease traits within a population is acquired through a multitude of physiological mechanisms, some of which transcend genetic and environmental influences, and others that are specific to an individual’s genetic and environmental context. PMID:26530416

  5. Effect of Linseed Oil Dietary Supplementation on Fatty Acid Composition and Gene Expression in Adipose Tissue of Growing Goats

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, M.; Rajion, M. A.; Goh, Y. M.; Sazili, A. Q.; Schonewille, J. T.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of feeding oil palm frond silage based diets with added linseed oil (LO) containing high α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3), namely, high LO (HLO), low LO (LLO), and without LO as the control group (CON) on the fatty acid (FA) composition of subcutaneous adipose tissue and the gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α, PPAR-γ, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) in Boer goats. The proportion of C18:3n-3 in subcutaneous adipose tissue was increased (P < 0.01) by increasing the LO in the diet, suggesting that the FA from HLO might have escaped ruminal biohydrogenation. Animals fed HLO diets had lower proportions of C18:1 trans-11, C18:2n-6, CLA cis-9 trans-11, and C20:4n-6 and higher proportions of C18:3n-3, C22:5n-3, and C22:6n-3 in the subcutaneous adipose tissue than animals fed the CON diets, resulting in a decreased n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratio (FAR) in the tissue. In addition, feeding the HLO diet upregulated the expression of PPAR-γ (P < 0.05) but downregulated the expression of SCD (P < 0.05) in the adipose tissue. The results of the present study show that LO can be safely incorporated in the diets of goats to enrich goat meat with potential health beneficial FA (i.e., n-3 FA). PMID:23484090

  6. Dietary assessment methods: dietary records.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rosa M; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-02-26

    Dietary records or food diaries can be highlighted among dietary assessment methods of the current diet for their interest and validity. It is a prospective, open-ended survey method collecting data about the foods and beverages consumed over a previously specified period of time. Dietary records can be used to estimate current diet of individuals and population groups, as well as to identify groups at risk of inadequacy. It is a dietary assessment method interesting for its use in epidemiological or in clinical studies. High validity and precision has been reported for the method when used following adequate procedures and considering the sufficient number of days. Thus, dietary records are often considered as a reference method in validation studies. Nevertheless, the method is affected by error and has limitations due mainly to the tendency of subjects to report food consumption close to those socially desirable. Additional problems are related to the high burden posed on respondents. The method can also influence food behavior in respondents in order to simplify the registration of food intake and some subjects can experience difficulties in writing down the foods and beverages consumed or in describing the portion sizes. Increasing the number of days observed reduces the quality of completed diet records. It should also be considered the high cost of coding and processing information collected in diet records. One of the main advantages of the method is the registration of the foods and beverages as consumed, thus reducing the problem of food omissions due to memory failure. Weighted food records provide more precise estimates of consumed portions. New Technologies can be helpful to improve and ease collaboration of respondents, as well as precision of the estimates, although it would be desirable to evaluate the advantages and limitations in order to optimize the implementation.

  7. Pseudogenization of the umami taste receptor gene Tas1r1 in the giant panda coincided with its dietary switch to bamboo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huabin; Yang, Jian-Rong; Xu, Huailiang; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2010-12-01

    Although it belongs to the order Carnivora, the giant panda is a vegetarian with 99% of its diet being bamboo. The draft genome sequence of the giant panda shows that its umami taste receptor gene Tas1r1 is a pseudogene, prompting the proposal that the loss of the umami perception explains why the giant panda is herbivorous. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced all six exons of Tas1r1 in another individual of the giant panda and five other carnivores. We found that the open reading frame (ORF) of Tas1r1 is intact in all these carnivores except the giant panda. The rate ratio (ω) of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions in Tas1r1 is significantly higher for the giant panda lineage than for other carnivore lineages. Based on the ω change and the observed number of ORF-disrupting substitutions, we estimated that the functional constraint on the giant panda Tas1r1 was relaxed ∼ 4.2 Ma, with its 95% confidence interval between 1.3 and 10 Ma. Our estimate matches the approximate date of the giant panda's dietary switch inferred from fossil records. It is probable that the giant panda's decreased reliance on meat resulted in the dispensability of the umami taste, leading to Tas1r1 pseudogenization, which in turn reinforced its herbivorous life style because of the diminished attraction of returning to meat eating in the absence of Tas1r1. Nonetheless, additional factors are likely involved because herbivores such as cow and horse still retain an intact Tas1r1.

  8. Pseudogenization of the Umami Taste Receptor Gene Tas1r1 in the Giant Panda Coincided with its Dietary Switch to Bamboo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huabin; Yang, Jian-Rong; Xu, Huailiang; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2010-01-01

    Although it belongs to the order Carnivora, the giant panda is a vegetarian with 99% of its diet being bamboo. The draft genome sequence of the giant panda shows that its umami taste receptor gene Tas1r1 is a pseudogene, prompting the proposal that the loss of the umami perception explains why the giant panda is herbivorous. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced all six exons of Tas1r1 in another individual of the giant panda and five other carnivores. We found that the open reading frame (ORF) of Tas1r1 is intact in all these carnivores except the giant panda. The rate ratio (ω) of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions in Tas1r1 is significantly higher for the giant panda lineage than for other carnivore lineages. Based on the ω change and the observed number of ORF-disrupting substitutions, we estimated that the functional constraint on the giant panda Tas1r1 was relaxed ∼4.2 Ma, with its 95% confidence interval between 1.3 and 10 Ma. Our estimate matches the approximate date of the giant panda's dietary switch inferred from fossil records. It is probable that the giant panda's decreased reliance on meat resulted in the dispensability of the umami taste, leading to Tas1r1 pseudogenization, which in turn reinforced its herbivorous life style because of the diminished attraction of returning to meat eating in the absence of Tas1r1. Nonetheless, additional factors are likely involved because herbivores such as cow and horse still retain an intact Tas1r1. PMID:20573776

  9. Dietary Aloe Vera Supplementation Improves Facial Wrinkles and Elasticity and It Increases the Type I Procollagen Gene Expression in Human Skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soyun; Lee, Serah; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Dong Hun; Won, Chong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Min

    2009-01-01

    Background No studies have yet been undertaken to determine the effect of aloe gel on the clinical signs and biochemical changes of aging skin. Objective We wanted to determine whether dietary aloe vera gel has anti-aging properties on the skin. Methods Thirty healthy female subjects over the age of 45 were recruited and they received 2 different doses (low-dose: 1,200 mg/d, high-dose: 3,600 mg/d) of aloe vera gel supplementation for 90 days. Their baseline status was used as a control. At baseline and at completion of the study, facial wrinkles were measured using a skin replica, and facial elasticity was measured by an in vivo suction skin elasticity meter. Skin samples were taken before and after aloe intake to compare the type I procollagen and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) mRNA levels by performing real-time RT-PCR. Results After aloe gel intake, the facial wrinkles improved significantly (p<0.05) in both groups, and facial elasticity improved in the lower-dose group. In the photoprotected skin, the type I procollagen mRNA levels were increased in both groups, albeit without significance; the MMP-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in the higher-dose group. Type I procollagen immunostaining was substantially increased throughout the dermis in both groups. Conclusion Aloe gel significantly improves wrinkles and elasticity in photoaged human skin, with an increase in collagen production in the photoprotected skin and a decrease in the collagen-degrading MMP-1 gene expression. However, no dose-response relationship was found between the low-dose and high-dose groups. PMID:20548848

  10. Influence of the sex-linked dwarfing gene (dw) on the lipid composition of plasma, egg yolk and abdominal fat pad in White Leghorn laying hens: effect of dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Burghelle-Mayeur, C; Demarne, Y; Mérat, P

    1989-10-01

    The levels and fatty acid composition of lipids were determined in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL, d less than 1.006), yolk and abdominal adipose tissue of normal (Dw) and sex-linked dwarf (dw) White Leghorn laying hens. Effects of adding 4% tallow to the diet were also examined. In 40-wk-old hens, neither plasma lipids (triglycerides, phospholipids and cholesterol), VLDL levels, nor the chemical composition of VLDL was altered by the dw gene or dietary fat. Dwarfism reduced egg and yolk weights. Though the yolk lipid content was similar in normal and dwarf hens, yolk from dwarfs had slightly more phospholipids and less triglycerides than yolk from normal hens. Higher linoleic acid [18:2(n-6)] and lower oleic acid [18:1(n-9)] levels were observed in triglycerides of VLDL, yolk and adipose tissue from dwarf hens. In addition, the dietary fatty acid pattern had a greater influence on the fatty acid composition of the yolk lipid major precursors (VLDL triglycerides) in dwarf laying hens than in normal hens. These results suggest that the dwarfing gene might reduce the hepatic de novo fatty acid synthesis and/or dwarf hens might incorporate more dietary lipids into yolk than do normal hens.

  11. Dietary fibre.

    PubMed

    Escudero Alvarez, E; González Sánchez, P

    2006-05-01

    Currently and after 30 years of research, dietary fibre is part of what is considered a healthy diet. There is no single definition yet comprising the different components of dietary fibre and its functions. The main factors of fibre are complex carbohydrates and lignin, although new products may be included in the future within the concept of fibre. Dietary fibres reach the large bowel and are attacked by colonic microflora, yielding short chain fatty acids, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane as fermentation products. Short chain fatty acids represent a way of recovering energy and they are also implicated in other beneficial functions for the human organism. Although there are no yet conclusive data on recommendations of different types of fibre, it is still appropriate to indicate a diet providing 20-35 g/day of fibre from different sources. There is a consensus to recommend a mixture of fibres or fibre like soybean polysaccharide for constipation. There are few conclusive data, still, on the benefit of fibre on prevention of colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, a fibre-rich diet is recommended from early years of life since it is often associated to a lifestyle that in the long term helps controlling other risk factors.

  12. Genome-wide linkage and positional candidate gene study of blood pressure response to dietary potassium intervention: the genetic epidemiology network of salt sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Tanika N; Hixson, James E; Rao, Dabeeru C; Mei, Hao; Rice, Treva K; Jaquish, Cashell E; Shimmin, Lawrence C; Schwander, Karen; Chen, Chung-Shuian; Liu, Depei; Chen, Jichun; Bormans, Concetta; Shukla, Pramila; Farhana, Naveed; Stuart, Colin; Whelton, Paul K; He, Jiang; Gu, Dongfeng

    2010-12-01

    Genetic determinants of blood pressure (BP) response to potassium, or potassium sensitivity, are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide linkage scan and positional candidate gene analysis to identify genetic determinants of potassium sensitivity. A total of 1906 Han Chinese participants took part in a 7-day high-sodium diet followed by a 7-day high-sodium plus potassium dietary intervention. BP measurements were obtained at baseline and after each intervention using a random-zero sphygmomanometer. Significant linkage signals (logarithm of odds [LOD] score, >3) for BP responses to potassium were detected at chromosomal regions 3q24-q26.1, 3q28, and 11q22.3-q24.3. Maximum multipoint LOD scores of 3.09 at 3q25.2 and 3.41 at 11q23.3 were observed for absolute diastolic BP (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses, respectively. Linkage peaks of 3.56 at 3q25.1 and 3.01 at 11q23.3 for percent DBP response and 3.22 at 3q25.2, 3.01 at 3q28, and 4.48 at 11q23.3 for percent MAP response also were identified. Angiotensin II receptor, type 1 (AGTR1), single-nucleotide polymorphism rs16860760 in the 3q24-q26.1 region was significantly associated with absolute and percent systolic BP responses to potassium (P=0.0008 and P=0.0006, respectively). Absolute (95% CI) systolic BP responses for genotypes C/C, C/T, and T/T were -3.71 (-4.02 to -3.40), -2.62 (-3.38 to -1.85), and 1.03 (-3.73 to 5.79) mm Hg, respectively, and percent responses (95% CI) were -3.07 (-3.33 to -2.80), -2.07 (-2.74 to -1.41), and 0.90 (-3.20 to 4.99), respectively. Similar trends were observed for DBP and MAP responses. Genetic regions on chromosomes 3 and 11 may harbor important susceptibility loci for potassium sensitivity. Furthermore, the AGTR1 gene was a significant predictor of BP responses to potassium intake.

  13. Genome-wide Linkage and Positional Candidate Gene Study of Blood Pressure Response to Dietary Potassium Intervention: The GenSalt Study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Tanika N.; Hixson, James E.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Mei, Hao; Rice, Treva K.; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Shimmin, Lawrence C.; Schwander, Karen; Chen, Chung-Shuian; Liu, Depei; Chen, Jichun; Bormans, Concetta; Shukla, Pramila; Farhana, Naveed; Stuart, Colin; Whelton, Paul K.; He, Jiang; Gu, Dongfeng

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic determinants of BP response to potassium, or potassium sensitivity, are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide linkage scan and positional candidate gene analysis to identify genetic determinants of potassium sensitivity. Methods and Results 1,906 Han Chinese participants took part in a 7-day high-sodium followed by a 7-day high-sodium plus potassium dietary intervention. BP measurements were obtained at baseline and following each intervention using a random-zero sphygmomanometer. Significant linkage signals (LOD>3) for BP responses to potassium were detected at chromosomal regions 3q24-q26.1, 3q28, and 11q22.3-q24.3. Maximum multipoint LOD scores of 3.09 at 3q25.2 and 3.41 at 11q23.3 were observed for absolute DBP and MAP responses, respectively. Linkage peaks of 3.56 at 3q25.1 and 3.01 at 11q23.3 for percent DBP response and 3.22 at 3q25.2, 3.01 at 3q28, and 4.48 at 11q23.3 for percent MAP response were also identified. AGTR1 SNP rs16860760 in the 3q24-q26.1 region was significantly associated with absolute and percent systolic (SBP) responses to potassium (p-values=0.0008 and 0.0006, respectively). Absolute SBP responses (95% CI) for genotypes C/C, C/T, and T/T were: −3.71 (−4.02, −3.40), −2.62 (−3.38, −1.85), and 1.03 (−3.73, 5.79) mmHg, respectively; and percent responses (95% CI) were: −3.07 (−3.33, −2.80), −2.07 (−2.74, −1.41), and 0.90 (−3.20, 4.99), respectively. Similar trends were observed for DBP and MAP responses. Conclusions Genetic regions on chromosomes 3 and 11 may harbor important susceptibility loci for potassium sensitivity. Furthermore, the AGTR1 gene was a significant predictor of BP responses to potassium intake. Clinical Trial Registration Information http://clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00721721 PMID:20861505

  14. Significance of Dietary Antioxidants for Health

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Since evidence became available that free radicals were involved in mechanisms for the development of major diseases, including cardiovascular disease and cancer, there has been considerable research into the properties of natural dietary antioxidants. However, it has become clear that dietary antioxidants can only have beneficial effects in vivo by radical scavenging or effects on redox potential if they are present in tissues or bodily fluids at sufficient concentrations. For many dietary components, absorption is limited or metabolism into derivatives reduces the antioxidant capacity. For many dietary phytochemicals, direct antioxidant effects may be less important for health than other effects including effects on cell signalling or gene expression in vivo. PMID:22312245

  15. Effects of different dietary lipid level on the growth, survival and immune-relating genes expression in Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sheng-peng; Li, Jin-feng; Wu, Xiao-chun; Zhong, Wei-jing; Xian, Jian-an; Liao, Shao-an; Miao, Yu-tao; Wang, An-li

    2013-05-01

    Five feeding trials based on the isonitrogenous and isoenergetic experimental diets containing 34% protein, 6%, 8%, 10%, 12% or 14% lipid respectively in the circulating water culture system for both 30 and 60 days were conducted to investigate the effect of the dietary lipid level on the growth and immunity in white shirmp, Litopenaeus vannamei adults. The body weight and specific growth rate of white shrimp in different treatments indicated that shrimps fed the diet of 12% lipid level for 30d and 10% lipid level for 60d had the best developmental status. The ability of respiratory burst in hemocytes was improved as the increase of dietary lipid level. The transcripts of LGBP and pPO were sensitive to the dietary lipid in hemocyte and hepatopancreas respectively. The activities of CAT, GPx and AKP were increased to a certain extend according to dietary lipid level. Qualification of MDA showed the lowest level in the sample subjected to 12% lipid level diet, indicating an optimal utilization of the dietary lipid and an efficient clearance of MDA in vivo. These results suggested that dietary lipid level of 10-12% significantly tunes the growth and enhance the immune abilities mainly via ROS pathway of L. vannamei.

  16. Effect of dietary glutamine on growth performance, non-specific immunity, expression of cytokine genes, phosphorylation of target of rapamycin (TOR), and anti-oxidative system in spleen and head kidney of Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai; Zhang, Jing-Xiu; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of dietary glutamine on the growth performance, cytokines, target of rapamycin (TOR), and antioxidant-related parameters in the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). Fish were fed the basal (control) and glutamine-supplemented (12.0 g glutamine kg(-1) diet) diets for 6 weeks. Results indicated that the dietary glutamine supplementation improved the growth performance, spleen protein content, serum complement 3 content, and lysozyme activity in fish. In the spleen, glutamine down-regulated the expression of the interleukin 1 and interleukin 10 genes, and increased the level of phosphorylation of TOR protein. In the head kidney, glutamine down-regulated the tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 10 gene expressions, phosphorylated and total TOR protein levels, while up-regulated the transforming growth factor β2 gene expression. Furthermore, the protein carbonyl content was decreased in the spleen of fish fed glutamine-supplemented diet; conversely, the anti-hydroxyl radical capacity and glutathione content in the spleen were increased by glutamine. However, diet supplemented with glutamine did not affect the lipid peroxidation, anti-superoxide anion capacity, and antioxidant enzyme activities in the spleen. Moreover, all of these antioxidant parameters in the head kidney were not affected by glutamine. Results from the present experiment showed the importance of dietary supplementation of glutamine in benefaction of the growth performance and several components of the innate immune system, and the deferential role in cytokine gene expression, TOR kinase activity, and antioxidant status between the spleen and head kidney of juvenile Jian carp.

  17. Effect of dietary consumption as a modifier on the association between FTO gene variants and excess body weight in children from an admixed population in Brazil: the Social Changes, Asthma and Allergy in Latin America (SCAALA) cohort study.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Marília; Nunes de Oliveira Costa, Gustavo; Lima Barreto, Maurício; Alexandrina Figueredo, Camila; Maria Alcantara-Neves, Neuza; Cunha Rodrigues, Laura; Maria Alvim de Matos, Sheila; Leovigildo Fiaccone, Rosemeire; Oliveira, Pablo; Rocha, Aline; de Cássia Ribeiro-Silva, Rita

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies have shown associations of variants of the FTO gene with body weight, but none of these have involved Latin American populations with a high level of miscegenation, as is seen in the north-eastern Brazilian population. This study evaluated the association between SNP in the FTO gene and excess weight in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. In addition, the effect of diet as a modifier on this association was also investigated. This cross-sectional study included 1191 participants aged 4-11 years, who were genotyped for 400 variants of the FTO gene. Direct anthropometric measures were made and dietary data were obtained by 24-h food recall. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the associations of interest. Overall, 11·2 % of the individuals included in the study were overweight/obese. Interactions were identified between the percentage energy intake from proteins and obesity risk linked to the rs62048379 SNP (P interaction=0·01) and also between fat intake (PUFA:SFA ratio) and obesity risk linked to the rs62048379 SNP (P interaction=0·01). The T allele for the variant rs62048379 was positively associated with overweight/obesity in individuals whose percentage energy intake from protein was above the median (OR 2·00; 95 % CI 1·05, 3·82). The rs62048379 SNP was also associated with overweight/obesity in individuals whose PUFA:SFA ratio was below the median (OR 1·63; 95 % CI 1·05, 2·55). The association between FTO gene variants and excess body weight can be modulated by dietary characteristics, particularly by fatty acid distribution and dietary protein intake in children.

  18. Effects of breed and dietary nutrient density on the growth performance, blood metabolite, and genes expression of target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathway of female broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-q; Jiang, W; Tan, H-z; Zhang, D-x; Zhang, H-j; Wei, S; Yan, H-c

    2013-08-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of exchanged diets with identical energy level on characteristics of slow-growing (WENs Yellow-Feathered Chicken, WYFC) and fast-growing (White Recessive Rock Chicken, WRRC) female chickens. A total of 1450 WYFC and 1150 WRRC 1-day-old female hatchlings were used. A high-nutrient-density (HND) diet and a low-nutrient-density (LND) diet were formulated for three phases. A completely randomized experimental design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement (diet and breed), each with five replicates of 145 and 115 birds, was applied. The results showed that WRRC had a higher body weight (BW), average daily feed intake and average daily gain than WYFC throughout the experiment (p<.05). WYFC that were provided with HND groups had a higher BW only in the starter and grower phases, whereas WRRC had a higher BW in the HND group than in LND groups throughout the experiment. The feed:gain ratio and protein efficiency ratio (PER) were better for WRRC in the starter and grower phases; however, these ratios were better for WYFC in the finisher period. The LND groups had a higher PER throughout the experiment for both breeds (p<0.05). The breast and leg muscle weights were higher for WRRC compared with WYFC during the grower and finisher phases (p<0.05). WRRC had a lower liver index but higher serum UA and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) concentrations than WYFC (p<0.05). No diet effect was observed on organ indices, muscle yields or blood responses. The gene expressions of Rheb, TOR, S6K1 and 4E-BP1 in gastrocnemius muscle were the highest in the WYFC-LND groups at 63 and 105 days (p<0.05). These findings suggested that different genotypes respond differently to changes in dietary nutrient density and that lower-nutrient-density diets are optimal for the long-term housing of broiler chickens. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Effects of dietary administration of fenugreek seeds, alone or in combination with probiotics, on growth performance parameters, humoral immune response and gene expression of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    PubMed

    Bahi, A; Guardiola, F A; Messina, C; Mahdhi, A; Cerezuela, R; Santulli, A; Bakhrouf, A; Esteban, M A

    2017-01-01

    The use of immunostimulants is considered a promising preventive practice that may help to maintain animal welfare and a healthy environment, while increasing production and providing higher profits. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) of the dietary administration of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) seeds, alone or combined with one of the following probiotic strains: Bacillus licheniformis (TSB27), Lactobacillus plantarum or Bacillus subtilis (B46). Gilthead seabream were fed a control or one of the supplemented diets for 3 weeks. The effects of these supplemented diets on growth performance parameters and the humoral immune response (natural haemolytic complement, peroxidase, total IgM levels, proteases and antiproteases activities) were evaluated after 2 and 3 weeks of feeding. Simultaneously, the expression levels of some immune-relevant genes (igm, tcr-β, csfr1 and bd) were measured in the head-kidney. Interestingly, all probiotic supplemented diets increased seabream growth rates, especially the B. licheniformis supplemented diet. Generally, humoral immune parameters were enhanced by the dietary supplementation at the different time points measured. The results showed a significant increases in the immune parameters, principally in fish fed only fenugreek or fenugreek combined with B. subtilis. Furthermore, real time qPCR revealed that dietary supplementation significantly enhances the expression of immune-associated genes in the head-kidney, particularly igm gene expression. These results suggest that fenugreek alone or combined with one of the probiotic strains mentioned enhances the immune response of gilthead seabream, a species with one of the highest rates of production in marine aquaculture.

  20. Dietary fat interacts with the -514C>T polymorphism in the hepatic lipase gene promoter on plasma lipid profiles in a multiethnic Asian population: the 1998 Singapore National Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Tai, E Shyong; Corella, Dolores; Deurenberg-Yap, Mabel; Cutter, Jeffery; Chew, Suok Kai; Tan, Chee Eng; Ordovas, Jose M

    2003-11-01

    We have previously reported an interaction between -514C>T polymorphism at the hepatic lipase (HL) gene and dietary fat on high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism in a representative sample of white subjects participating in the Framingham Heart Study. Replication of these findings in other populations will provide proof for the relevance and consistency of this marker as a tool for risk assessment and more personalized cardiovascular disease prevention. Therefore, we examined this gene-nutrient interaction in a representative sample of Singaporeans (1324 Chinese, 471 Malays and 375 Asian Indians) whose dietary fat intake was recorded by a validated questionnaire. When no stratification by fat intake was considered, the T allele was associated with higher plasma HDL-C concentrations (P = 0.001), higher triglyceride (TG) concentrations (P = 0.001) and higher HDL-C/TG ratios (P = 0.041). We found a highly significant interaction (P = 0.001) between polymorphism and fat intake in determining TG concentration and the HDL-C/TG ratio (P = 0.001) in the overall sample even after adjustment for potential confounders. Thus, TT subjects showed higher TG concentrations only when fat intake supplied >30% of total energy. This interaction was also found when fat intake was considered as continuous (P = 0.035). Moreover, in the upper tertile of fat intake, TT subjects had 45% more TG than CC individuals (P < 0.01). For HDL-C concentration, the gene-diet interaction was significant (P = 0.015) only in subjects of Indian origin. In conclusion, our results indicate that there are differences in the association of -514C>T polymorphism with plasma lipids according to dietary intake and ethnic background. Specifically, the TT genotype is associated with a more atherogenic lipid profile when subjects consume diets with a fat content > 30%.

  1. Effects of dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio on fatty acid composition, free amino acid profile and gene expression of transporters in finishing pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengna; Duan, Yehui; Li, Yinghui; Tang, Yulong; Geng, Meimei; Oladele, Oso Abimbola; Kim, Sung Woo; Yin, Yulong

    2015-03-14

    Revealing the expression patterns of fatty acid and amino acid transporters as affected by dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio would be useful for further clarifying the importance of the balance between n-6 and n-3 PUFA. A total of ninety-six finishing pigs were fed one of four diets with the ratio of 1:1, 2·5:1, 5:1 and 10:1. Pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio of 5:1 had the highest (P< 0·05) daily weight gain, and those fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio of 1:1 had the largest loin muscle area (P< 0·01). The concentration of n-3 PUFA was raised as the ratio declined (P< 0·05) in the longissimus dorsi and subcutaneous adipose tissue. The contents of tryptophan, tasty amino acids and branched-chain amino acids in the longissimus dorsi were enhanced in pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1-5:1. The mRNA expression level of the fatty acid transporter fatty acid transport protein-1 (FATP-1) was declined (P< 0·05) in the longissimus dorsi of pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1-5:1, and increased (P< 0·05) in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 5:1 and 10:1. The expression profile of FATP-4 was similar to those of FATP-1 in the adipose tissue. The mRNA expression level of the amino acid transceptors LAT1 and SNAT2 was up-regulated (P< 0·05) in the longissimus dorsi of pigs fed the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1 and 2·5:1. In conclusion, maintaining the dietary n-6:n-3 PUFA ratios of 1:1-5:1 would facilitate the absorption and utilisation of fatty acids and free amino acids, and result in improved muscle and adipose composition.

  2. Performance, serum biochemical responses, and gene expression of intestinal folate transporters of young and older laying hens in response to dietary folic acid supplementation and challenge with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Jing, M; Munyaka, P M; Tactacan, G B; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; O, K; House, J D

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary folic acid (FA) supplementation on performance, serum biochemical indices, and mRNA abundance of intestinal folate transporters in young and older laying hens after acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Two experiments were conducted separately involving 48 Shaver White young laying hens (24 wk of age) in experiment 1 and 48 Shaver White older laying hens (58 wk of age) in experiment 2. Birds were fed 2 diets in a complete randomized design. The diets were wheat-soybean meal based, with or without supplemental 4 mg of FA/kg of diet. Birds were fed for 8 wk, during which time feed consumption and egg production were monitored. At the end of each feeding experiment, 6 hens from each dietary treatment were injected intravenously with 8 mg/kg of BW of either Escherichia coli LPS or sterile saline. Four hours after injection, blood and intestinal samples were collected for further analysis. Compared with the control, dietary FA supplementation increased egg weight and egg mass and decreased serum glucose levels in the young laying hens, and reduced serum uric acid in the older laying hens (P < 0.05). Relative to saline injection, plasma homocysteine, serum calcium, and phosphorus levels were found to be lower in both young and older laying hens after LPS challenge (P < 0.05). Other serum biochemical variables and the mRNA expression of 2 folate transport genes in the small and large intestine were differentially affected by LPS challenge, and some of those responses varied with the age of the birds. Additionally, interactions between diet and LPS challenge were specifically found in the older laying hens. In summary, in addition to improving production performance, there were effects of dietary FA supplementation and its interaction with LPS challenge on biochemical constituents, and age played a role in the development of responses to diet and bacterial LPS infections.

  3. Promoter methylation of E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta(2) genes in breast tumors and dietary intake of nutrients important in one-carbon metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aberrant DNA methylation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis, and the availability of dietary factors involved in 1-carbon metabolism may contribute to aberrant DNA methylation. We investigated the association of intake of folate, vitamins B(2), B(6), B(12), and methionine with promoter methylat...

  4. Effect of dietary calcium and 1,25-(OH)2D3 on the expression of calcium transport genes in calbindin-D9k and -D28k double knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sang-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Oh, Goo Taeg; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2009-02-06

    The phenotypes of calbindin-D9k (CaBP-9k) and -28k (CaBP-28k) single knockout (KO) mice are similar to wild-type (WT) mice due to the compensatory action of other calcium transport proteins. In this study, we generated CaBP-9k/CaBP-28k double knockout (DKO) mice in order to investigate the importance of CaBP-9k and CaBP-28k in active calcium processing. Under normal dietary conditions, DKO mice did not exhibit any changes in phenotype or the expression of active calcium transport genes as compared to WT or CaBP-28k KO mice. Under calcium-deficient dietary conditions, the phenotype and expression of calcium transport genes in CaBP-28k KO mice were similar to WT, whereas in DKO mice, serum calcium levels and bone length were decreased. The intestinal and renal expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid member 6 (TRPV6) mRNA was significantly decreased in DKO mice fed a calcium-deficient diet as compared to CaBP-28k KO or WT mice, and DKO mice died after 4 weeks on a calcium-deficient diet. Body weight, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone length were significantly reduced in all mice fed a calcium and 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3)-deficient diet, as compared to a normal diet, and none of the mice survived more than 4 weeks. These results indicate that deletion of CaBP-28k alone does not affect body calcium homeostasis, but that deletion of CaBP-9k and CaBP-28k has a significant effect on calcium processing under calcium-deficient conditions, confirming the importance of dietary calcium and 1,25-(OH)(2)D(3) during growth and development.

  5. Dietary Restriction and Nutrient Balance in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Leitão-Correia, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    Dietary regimens that favour reduced calorie intake delay aging and age-associated diseases. New evidences revealed that nutritional balance of dietary components without food restriction increases lifespan. Particular nutrients as several nitrogen sources, proteins, amino acid, and ammonium are implicated in life and healthspan regulation in different model organisms from yeast to mammals. Aging and dietary restriction interact through partially overlapping mechanisms in the activation of the conserved nutrient-signalling pathways, mainly the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IIS) and the Target Of Rapamycin (TOR). The specific nutrients of dietary regimens, their balance, and how they interact with different genes and pathways are currently being uncovered. Taking into account that dietary regimes can largely influence overall human health and changes in risk factors such as cholesterol level and blood pressure, these new findings are of great importance to fully comprehend the interplay between diet and humans health. PMID:26682004

  6. Hormetic Dietary Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Son, Tae Gen; Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Compelling evidence from epidemiological studies suggest beneficial roles of dietary phytochemicals in protecting against chronic disorders such as cancer, and inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. Emerging findings suggest that several dietary phytochemicals also benefit the nervous system and, when consumed regularly, may reduce the risk of disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The evidence supporting health benefits of vegetables and fruits provide a rationale for identification of the specific phytochemicals responsible, and for investigation of their molecular and cellular mechanisms of action. One general mechanism of action of phytochemicals that is emerging from recent studies is that they activate adaptive cellular stress response pathways. From an evolutionary perspective, the noxious properties of such phytochemicals play an important role in dissuading insects and other pests from eating the plants. However at the relatively small doses ingested by humans that consume the plants, the phytochemicals are not toxic and instead induce mild cellular stress responses. This phenomenon has been widely observed in biology and medicine, and has been described as ‘preconditioning’ or ‘hormesis’. Hormetic pathways activated by phytochemicals may involve kinases and transcription factors that induce the expression of genes that encode antioxidant enzymes, protein chaperones, phase-2 enzymes, neurotrophic factors and other cytoprotective proteins. Specific examples of such pathways include the sirtuin – FOXO pathway, the NF-κB pathway and the Nrf-2 –ARE pathway. In this article we describe the hormesis hypothesis of phytochemical actions with a focus on the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway as a prototypical example of a neuroprotective mechanism of action of specific dietary phytochemicals. PMID:18543123

  7. The effect of dietary folic acid on biochemical parameters and gene expression of three heat shock proteins (HSPs) of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) fingerling under acute high temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Sesay, Daniella Fatmata; Habte-Tsion, Habte-Michael; Zhou, Qunlan; Ren, Mingchun; Xie, Jun; Liu, Bo; Chen, Ruli; Pan, Liangkun

    2017-08-01

    The effects of dietary folic acid on biochemical parameters and gene expression of three heat shock proteins (HSPs) of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) fingerling under acute high temperature stress. Six dietary folic acid groups (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, and 10.0) mg/kg diets were designed and assigned into 18 tanks in three replicates each (300 l/tank) and were administered for 10 weeks in a re-circulated water system. The fingerlings with an initial weight of 27.0 ± 0.03 g were fed with their respective diets four times daily. At the end of the experiment, samples were collected before challenge, 0, 24, 72 h, and 7 days. Serum total protein (TP), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), cortisol, glucose, complement C3 (C3), complement C4 (C4, immunoglobulin M (IgM) hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), malondialdehyde (MDA), and the expression of heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), 70 (HSP70), and 90 (HSP90) were studied. The results showed that fish fed with dietary folic acid between 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mg/kg significantly (P < 0.05) increased serum TP, C3, C4 hepatic SOD, CAT, and the expression of HSP60, HSP70, and HSP90 before and after temperature challenge of 32 °C. Also, serum ALP, cortisol, glucose, and hepatic MDA were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by supplementation of dietary folic acid level 1.0, 2.0, and 5.0 mg/kg before and after the same temperature challenge of 32 °C. Before stress, 0, 24, 72 h, and 7 days significantly (P < 0.05) affects serum biochemical parameters, immune and antioxidant capacities, and expression level of three HSPs. Furthermore, there was no statistical evidence to show that dietary folic acid inclusion level and temperature duration have significant interactive effect on serum biochemical parameters, antioxidant parameters, and gene expression level (P > 0.05) of the three HSPs. However, there were statistical significant

  8. Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over alters offspring growth, skeletal mineralisation and tissue mRNA expressions of genes related to vitamin D, calcium and phosphorus homoeostasis in swine.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Laura A; Hernandez, Laura L; Laporta, Jimena; Crenshaw, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Maternal dietary vitamin D carry-over effects were assessed in young pigs to characterise skeletal abnormalities in a diet-induced model of kyphosis. Bone abnormalities were previously induced and bone mineral density (BMD) reduced in offspring from sows fed diets with inadequate vitamin D3. In a nested design, pigs from sows (n 23) fed diets with 0 (-D), 8·125 (+D) or 43·750 (++D) µg D3/kg from breeding through lactation were weaned and, within litter, fed nursery diets arranged as a 2×2 factorial design with 0 (-D) or 7·0 (+D) µg D3/kg, each with 95 % (95P) or 120 % (120P) of P requirements. Selected pigs were euthanised before colostrum consumption at birth (0 weeks, n 23), weaning (3 weeks, n 22) and after a growth period (8 weeks, n 185) for BMD, bone mechanical tests and tissue mRNA analysis. Pigs produced by +D or ++D sows had increased gain at 3 weeks (P<0·05), and at 8 weeks had increased BMD and improved femur mechanical properties. However, responses to nursery diets depended on maternal diets (P<0·05). Relative mRNA expressions of genes revealed a maternal dietary influence at birth in bone osteocalcin and at weaning in kidney 24-hydroxylase (P<0·05). Nursery treatments affected mRNA expressions at 8 weeks. Detection of a maternal and nursery diet interaction (P<0·05) provided insights into the long-term effects of maternal nutritional inputs. Characterising early stages of bone abnormalities provided inferences for humans and animals about maternal dietary influence on offspring skeletal health.

  9. Effects of dietary probiotic supplementation on LXRα and CYP7α1 gene expression, liver enzyme activities and fat metabolism in ducks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z; Mu, C; Chen, Y; Zhu, Z; Chen, C; Lan, L; Xu, Q; Zhao, W; Chen, G

    2015-04-01

    1. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary probiotic supplementation on liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7α1) mRNA levels, protein enzymatic activities and fat metabolism in Cherry Valley Pekin ducks. 2. A total of 750 one-day-old Cherry Valley Pekin ducks were randomly divided into 5 groups with three replicates of 50 ducks each in a completely randomised experiment. Each group was fed on a basal diet supplemented with 0, 500, 1000, 1500 or 2000 mg probiotics/kg. 3. Body rate and feed conversion ratio were highest and abdominal subcutaneous fat % was lowest at 1000 mg probiotic/kg. 4. The mRNA levels of LXRα and CYP7α1 in liver tissue was estimated by RT-PCR; serum triglyceride (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) concentrations were measured by ELISA. 5. The expression levels and enzyme activity of LXRα and CYP7α1 increased in conjunction with decreases in TG and TC concentrations following probiotic supplementation to a maximum at 1000 mg probiotics/kg and decreased thereafter. 6. It is concluded that dietary probiotics can enhance LXRα and CYP7α1 enzyme activities in the liver and reduce lipid concentrations and fat deposition in ducks.

  10. Dietary capsanthin, the main carotenoid in paprika (Capsicum annuum), alters plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and hepatic gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Koichi; Inakuma, Takahiro

    2009-12-01

    The effects of dietary capsanthin, the main carotenoid in paprika (Capsicum annuum), on lipid metabolism were examined. Young male Wistar rats were fed diets containing paprika powder, paprika organic solvent extract, residue of paprika extract, and purified capsanthin. Administration of purified capsanthin for 2 weeks resulted in a significant increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol (P < 0.05) without detectable differences in plasma total cholesterol and TAG concentrations. A statistically significant correlation (r 0.567; P < 0.001) was found between dietary capsanthin concentrations and plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Animals receiving diets containing two different capsanthin concentrations exhibited dose-dependent increases in plasma HDL-cholesterol (r 0.597; P < 0.005). While capsanthin was absent in the liver of animals fed the basal diet, it increased markedly in capsanthin-fed animals (P < 0.001). Quantitative analyses of hepatic mRNA levels revealed that capsanthin administration resulted in up-regulation of mRNA for apoA5 and lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), without significant differences in other mRNA levels related to HDL-cholesterol metabolism. These results suggest that capsanthin had an HDL-cholesterol-raising effect on plasma, and the potential to increase cholesterol efflux to HDL particles by increasing apoA5 levels and/or enhancement of LCAT activity.

  11. Challenges to recruitment and retention of African Americans in the gene-environment trial of response to dietary interventions (GET READI) for heart health

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Betty M.; Harsha, David W.; Bookman, Ebony B.; Hill, Yolanda R.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rodarte, Ruben Q.; Murla, Connie D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, challenges to recruiting African Americans specifically for a dietary feeding trial are examined, learning experiences gained and suggestions to overcome these challenges in future trials are discussed. A total of 333 individuals were randomized in the trial and 234 (167 sibling pairs and 67 parents/siblings) completed the dietary intervention and required DNA blood sampling for genetic analysis. The trial used multiple strategies for recruitment. Hand distributed letters and flyers through mass distribution at various churches resulted in the largest number (n = 153, 46%) of African Americans in the trial. Word of mouth accounted for the second largest number (n = 120, 36%) and included prior study participants. These two recruitment sources represented 82% (n = 273) of the total number of individuals randomized in GET READI. The remaining 18% (n = 60) consisted of a combination of sources including printed message on check stubs, newspaper articles, radio and TV appearances, screening events and presentations. Though challenging, the recruitment efforts for GET READI produced a significant number of African American participants despite the inability to complete the trial as planned because of low recruitment yields. Nevertheless, the recruitment process produced substantial numbers that successfully completed all study requirements. PMID:21865154

  12. Genetic analysis of colon tumors induced by a dietary carcinogen PhIP in CYP1A humanized mice: Identification of mutation of β-catenin/Ctnnb1 as the driver gene for the carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Anna; Guo, Xiangyi; Yang, Chung S

    2015-11-01

    Replacing mouse Cyp1a with human CYP1A enables the humanized CYP1A mice to mimic human metabolism of the dietary carcinogen, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), by N(2) -hydroxylation to a proximate carcinogen. Our previous study demonstrated that PhIP, combined with the dextrin sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, induces colon carcinogenesis in hCYP1A mice. Here, we employed whole exome sequencing and found multiple gene mutations in PhIP/DSS-induced colon tumors. Mutations in the exon 3 of Ctnnb1/β-catenin, however, were the predominant events. We further sequenced the key fragments of Apc, Ctnnb1, and Kras, because mutations of these genes in the humans are commonly found as the drivers of colorectal cancer. Mutations on either codon 32 or 34 in the exon 3 of Ctnnb1 were found in 39 out of 42 tumors, but no mutation was found in either Apc or Kras. The sequence context of codons 32 and 34 suggests that PhIP targets +3G in a TGGA motif of Ctnnb1. Since mutations that activate Wnt signal is a major driving force for human colorectal cancers, we conclude that the mutated β-catenin is the driver in PhIP/DSS-induced colon carcinogenesis. This result suggests that the colon tumors in hCYP1A mice mimic human colorectal carcinogenesis not only in the dietary etiology involving PhIP, but also in the aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling pathway as the driving force. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. The effect of banana (Musa acuminata) peels hot-water extract on the immunity and resistance of giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii via dietary administration for a long term: Activity and gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Rattanavichai, Wutti; Chen, Ying-Nan; Chang, Chin-Chyuan; Cheng, Winton

    2015-10-01

    The non-specific immune parameters, disease resistance and immune genes expressions in Macrobrachium rosenbergii were evaluated at 120 days of post feeding the diets containing the extracts of banana, Musa acuminate, fruit's peel (banana peels extract, BPE) at 0, 1.0, 3.0 and 6.0 g kg(-1). Results showed that prawns fed with a diet containing BPE at the level of 1.0, 3.0 and 6.0 g kg(-1) for 120 days had a significantly higher survival rate (30.0%, 40.0% and 56.7%, respectively) than those fed with the control diet after challenge with Lactococcus garvieae for 144 h, and the respective relative survival percentages were 22.2%, 33.3%, and 51.9%, respectively. Dietary BPE supplementation at 3.0 and/or 6.0 g kg(-1) for 120 days showed a significant increase total haemocyte count (THC), granular cell (GC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, phenoloxidase (PO) activity, transglutaminase (TG) activity, and phagocytic activity and clearance efficiency to L. garvieae infection, and meanwhile, the significant decrease in haemolymph clotting times and respiratory bursts (RBs) per haemocyte of prawns were revealed. Furthermore, the mRNA expressions of prophenoloxidase (proPO), lipopolysaccharide and β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP), peroxinectin (PE), transglutaminase (TG), and crustin (CT) were significantly increased. We therefore recommend that BPE can be used as an immunomodulator for prawns through dietary administration at 6.0 g kg(-1) for a long term (over 120 days) to modify immune responses and genes expression following the enhanced resistance against pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dietary DHA/EPA ratio affected tissue fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity, hematological characteristics and expression of lipid-related genes but not growth in juvenile black seabream (Acanthopagrus schlegelii).

    PubMed

    Jin, Min; Monroig, Óscar; Lu, You; Yuan, Ye; Li, Yi; Ding, Liyun; Tocher, Douglas R; Zhou, Qicun

    2017-01-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary docosahexaenoic to eicosapentaenoic acid ratio (DHA/EPA) on growth performance, fatty acid profiles, antioxidant capacity, hematological characteristics and expression of some lipid metabolism related genes of juvenile black seabream (Acanthopagrus schlegelii) of initial weight 9.47 ± 0.03 g. Five isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets (45% crude protein and 14% crude lipid) were formulated to contain graded DHA/EPA ratios of 0.65, 1.16, 1.60, 2.03 and 2.67. There were no differences in growth performance and feed utilization among treatments. Fish fed higher DHA/EPA ratios had higher malondialdehyde (MDA) contents in serum than lower ratios. Serum triacylglycerol (TAG) content was significantly higher in fish fed the lowest DHA/EPA ratio. Tissue fatty acid profiles reflected the diets despite down-regulation of LC-PUFA biosynthesis genes, fatty acyl desaturase 2 (fads2) and elongase of very long-chain fatty acids 5 (elovl5), by high DHA/EPA ratios. Expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (accα) and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A (cpt1a) were up-regulated by high DHA/EPA ratio, whereas sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (srebp-1) and hormone-sensitive lipase (hsl) were down-regulated. Fatty acid synthase (fas), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6pgd) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (pparα) showed highest expression in fish fed intermediate (1.16) DHA/EPA ratio. Overall, this study indicated that dietary DHA/EPA ratio affected fatty acid profiles and significantly influenced lipid metabolism including LC-PUFA biosynthesis and other anabolic and catabolic pathways, and also had impacts on antioxidant capacity and hematological characteristics.

  15. Cigarette smoking, dietary habits and genetic polymorphisms in GSTT1, GSTM1 and CYP1A1 metabolic genes: A case-control study in oncohematological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cerliani, María Belén; Pavicic, Walter; Gili, Juan Antonio; Klein, Graciela; Saba, Silvia; Richard, Silvina

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the association between oncohematological diseases and GSTT1/GSTM1/CYP1A1 polymorphisms, dietary habits and smoking, in an argentine hospital-based case-control study. METHODS This hospital-based case-control study involved 125 patients with oncohematological diseases and 310 control subjects. A questionnaire was used to obtain sociodemographic data and information about habits. Blood samples were collected, and DNA was extracted using salting out methods. Deletions in GSTT1 and GSTM1 (null genotypes) were addressed by PCR. CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism was detected by PCR-RFLP. Odds ratio (OR) and 95%CI were calculated to estimate the association between each variable studied and oncohematological disease. RESULTS Women showed lower risk of disease compared to men (OR 0.52, 95%CI: 0.34-0.82, P = 0.003). Higher levels of education (> 12 years) were significantly associated with an increased risk, compared to complete primary school or less (OR 3.68, 95%CI: 1.82-7.40, P < 0.001 adjusted for age and sex). With respect to tobacco, none of the smoking categories showed association with oncohematological diseases. Regarding dietary habits, consumption of grilled/barbecued meat 3 or more times per month showed significant association with an increased risk of disease (OR 1.72, 95%CI: 1.08-2.75, P = 0.02). Daily consumption of coffee also was associated with an increased risk (OR 1.77, 95%CI: 1.03-3.03, P = 0.03). Results for GSTT1, GSTM1 and CYP1A1 polymorphisms showed no significant association with oncohematological diseases. When analyzing the interaction between polymorphisms and tobacco smoking or dietary habits, no statistically significant associations that modify disease risk were found. CONCLUSION We reported an increased risk of oncohematological diseases associated with meat and coffee intake. We did not find significant associations between genetic polymorphisms and blood cancer. PMID:27777882

  16. Dietary linseed oil with or without malate increases conjugated linoleic acid and oleic acid in milk fat and and gene expression in mammary gland and milk somatic cells of lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Li, X Z; Choi, S H; Yan, C G; Shin, J S; Smith, S B

    2016-08-01

    Supplementary dietary plant oils have the potential to alter milk fatty acid composition in ruminants as a result of changes in the amount and kind of fatty acid precursors. We hypothesized that linseed oil in combination with malate (a key propionate precursor in the rumen) would increase ∆9 unsaturated fatty acids and specific gene expression in somatic cells and mammary glands of lactating goats. Twelve lactating goats were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design. Treatments included the basal diet (CON), the CON plus 4% linseed oil (LO), and the CON plus 4% linseed oil and 2% -malate (LOM). Relative to CON, the LO and LOM supplements increased the daily intake of palmitic (16:0), stearic (18:0), oleic (18:1-9), linoleic (18:2-6), α-linolenic (18:3-3), and γ-linolenic acids (18:2-6); α-linolenic acid intake was increased over 9-fold, from 6.77 to over 51 g/d ( < 0.02). The LO and LOM supplements increased daily milk yield, milk fat yield, and milk fat percentage ( < 0.05). The LOM supplement also increased milk lactose percentage and daily yield ( = 0.03). Both the LO and LOM supplements increased plasma glucose and total cholesterol and decreased plasma β-hydroxbutyrate concentrations ( = 0.03). The LO and LOM supplements increased concentrations of stearic acid; -vaccenic acid (TVA; 18:1-11); -9, -11 CLA; -10 -12 CLA; and α-linolenic acid in rumen fluid and increased the concentrations of oleic acid; TVA; -9, -11 CLA; -10, -12 CLA; and α-linolenic acid in plasma lipids and milk fat ( < 0.05). Conversely, the LO and LOM supplements decreased short- and medium-chain SFA, including lauric (12:0), myristic (14:0), and palmitic acids, in plasma and milk fat ( < 0.05). Relative mRNA levels for and () gene expression were increased in somatic cells and mammary gland tissue by LO and LOM ( < 0.05). We conclude that the higher intake and ruminal production of stearic acid promoted SCD gene expression in somatic cells and mammary tissue. Furthermore, milk somatic

  17. Dietary guidelines in singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin Lc

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Dietary Guidelines were developed with the aim of providing guidance on what dietary strategies can best address increasing rates of obesity and non-communicable chronic disease in Singapore. This set of dietary guidelines was developed with a local expert committee based on a review of scientific literature and data on current dietary patterns from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. Projected nutrient intakes from a diet adhering to the 2011 Dietary Guidelines were calculated using a local food composition database (FOCOS) and validated against nutrient recommendations. Acknowledging that dietary requirements differ between age groups, different sets of dietary guidelines have been developed and customised for different segments of the population. To date, Singapore has produced dietary guidelines for children and adolescents (focusing on establishing healthy lifelong eating patterns), adults (focusing on preventing obesity and reinforcing healthy eating patterns), and most recently, guidelines for older adults (>50 years of age) that address the issue of potential dietary insufficiency caused by age-related increases in nutrient requirements combined with a reduction in energy requirements. In Singapore, dietary guidelines have been used to inform and direct public policy and promote dietary patterns that meet nutrient requirements while reducing the risk of non-communicable chronic diseases. Examples of public policy include: national guidelines on food advertising and standards for food served in nursing homes; examples of public health promotion programmes include: the Healthier Choice Symbol Programme for packaged food products and programmes encouraging provision of healthier meals in hawker centres, restaurants, and school or workplace canteens.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor pathway genes and blood concentrations, dietary protein, and risk of prostate cancer in the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Travis, Ruth C; Appleby, Paul N; Allen, Naomi E; Lindström, Sara; Albanes, Demetrius; Ziegler, Regina G; McCullough, Marjorie L; Siddiq, Afshan; Barricarte, Aurelio; Berndt, Sonja I; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Chanock, Stephen J; Crawford, E David; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Giovannucci, Edward; Gu, Fangyi; Haiman, Christopher A; Hayes, Richard B; Hunter, David J; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Overvad, Kim; Polidoro, Silvia; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Stevens, Victoria L; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Virtamo, Jarmo; Willett, Walter C; Key, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that a high intake of dairy protein may increase prostate cancer risk by increasing the production of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1). Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been weakly associated with circulating concentrations of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), but none of these SNPs was associated with risk of prostate cancer. We examined whether an association between 16 SNPs associated with circulating IGF-1 or IGFBP-3 concentrations and prostate cancer exists within subgroups defined by dietary protein intake in 5,253 cases and 4,963 controls of European ancestry within the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). The BPC3 includes nested case-control studies within large North-American and European cohorts. Per allele odds ratios for prostate cancer for the SNPs were compared across tertiles of protein intake, which was expressed as the percentage of energy derived from total, animal, dairy or plant protein sources, using conditional logistic regression models. Total, animal, dairy and plant protein intakes were significantly positively associated with blood IGF-1 (P<0.01), but not with IGFBP-3 concentrations (P>0.10) or with risk of prostate cancer (P>0.20). After adjusting for multiple testing, the SNP-prostate cancer associations did not differ by intakes of protein, although two interactions by intake of plant protein were of marginal statistical significance (SSTR5 (somatostatin receptor 5) -rs197056 [uncorrected P for interaction, 0.001]; SSTR5-rs197057 [uncorrected P for interaction, 0.002]). We found no strong evidence that the associations between 16 IGF pathway SNPs and prostate cancer differed by intakes of dietary protein. PMID:23341348

  19. Dietary fish oil replacement by linseed oil: Effect on growth, nutrient utilization, tissue fatty acid composition and desaturase gene expression in silver barb (Puntius gonionotus) fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Madhusmita; Saha, Ashis; Pradhan, Avinash; Samanta, Mrinal; Giri, Shiba Shankar

    2017-03-01

    Silver barb (Puntius gonionotus) is considered a promising medium carp species for freshwater aquaculture in Asia. This study in silver barb was carried out to evaluate the effects of total or partial substitution of dietary fish oil (FO) with linseed oil (LO) on growth, nutrient utilization, whole-body composition, muscle and liver fatty acid composition. Fish (12.1±0.4g of initial body weight) were fed for 60days with five experimental iso-proteinous, iso-lipidic and iso-caloric diets in which FO (control diet) was replaced by 33.3%, 50%, 66.7% and 100% LO. Final weight, weight gain, percent weight gain, SGR decreased linearly (p<0.001) with increasing LO levels in the diets. Dietary LO substitution levels did not significantly (p>0.05) affect the feed conversion ratio (FCR), protein efficiency ratio (PER) and whole body proximate composition. Furthermore, enhanced level of LO increased α-linolenic acid (ALA; 18:3n3) and linoleic acid (LA; 18:2n6) and decreased eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5n3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n3) in muscle and liver. To understand the molecular mechanism of long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis, we cloned and characterized the fatty acyl Δ6 desaturase (Δ6 fad) cDNA and investigated its expression in various organs/tissues following replacement of FO with LO in the diet. The full-length Δ6 fad cDNA was 2056bp encoding 444 amino acids and was widely expressed in various organs/tissues. Replacement of FO with LO increased the expression of Δ6 fad mRNA in liver, muscle and intestine but no significant difference was found in the brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CLOCK gene variation is associated with incidence of type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in type-2 diabetic subjects: dietary modulation in the PREDIMED randomized trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background Circadian rhythms regulate key biological processes influencing metabolic pathways. Dysregulation is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Circadian rhythms are generated by a transcriptional autoregulatory feedback loop involving core clock genes. CLOCK...

  1. Effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids on growth, nonspecific immunity, expression of some immune related genes and disease resistance of large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) following natural infestation of parasites (Cryptocaryon irritans).

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rantao; Ai, Qinghui; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Wang, Jun; Xu, Houguo; Liufu, Zhiguo; Zhang, Yanjiao

    2012-02-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acid (n-3 HUFA) on growth, nonspecific immunity, expression of some immune related genes and disease resistance of juvenile large yellow croaker (Larmichthys crocea) following natural infestation of parasites (Cryptocaryon irritans). Six isoproteic and isolipidic diets were formulated with graded levels of n-3 HUFA ranging from 0.15% to 2.25% of the dry weight and the DHA/EPA was approximately fixed at 2.0. Each diet was randomly allocated to triplicate groups of fish in floating sea cages (1.0 × 1.0 × 1.5 m), and each cage was stocked with 60 fish (initial average weight 9.79 ± 0.6 g). Fish were fed twice daily (05:00 and 17:00) to apparent satiation for 58 days. Results showed that moderate n-3 HUFA level (0.98%) significantly enhanced growth compared with the control group (0.15% HUFA) (P < 0.05), while higher n-3 HUFA levels (1.37%, 1.79% and 2.25%) had detrimental effects on the growth though no significance was found (P > 0.05). Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) positive leucocytes percentage of head kidney and serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased with increasing n-3 HUFA from 0.15% to 0.60%, and decreased with further increase of n-3 HUFA from 0.60% to 2.25% (P < 0.05). Serum lysozyme activity increased significantly as n-3 HUFA increased from 0.15% to 1.37%, and then decreased with n-3 HUFA from 1.37% to 2.25% (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in phagocytosis index (PI) of head kidney leucocytes among dietary treatments (P > 0.05). The hepatic mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor 22 (TLR22) and Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) was significantly up-regulated in fish fed the diets with low or moderate levels, while in kidney this increment was only found at specific sampling time during the natural infestation of parasites. The 13 d cumulative mortality rate following natural infestation of parasites decreased

  2. Dietary Fat Intake Modifies the Effect of a Common Variant in the LIPC Gene on Changes in Serum Lipid Concentrations during a Long-Term Weight-Loss Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Ng, San San; Bray, George A; Ryan, Donna H; Sacks, Frank M; Ning, Guang; Qi, Lu

    2015-06-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of HDL and LDL. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified common variants in the HL gene (LIPC) associated with HDL cholesterol. We tested the effect of a common variant in LIPC on changes in blood lipids in response to weight-loss diets in the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies Trial. We genotyped LIPC rs2070895 in 743 overweight or obese adults aged 30-70 y (61% women) who were assigned to high-fat (40% energy) or low-fat (20% energy) diets for 2 y. We measured serum concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol at baseline and 2 y of intervention. At 2 y of intervention, dietary fat modified effects of the variant on changes in serum TC, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol (P-interaction: 0.0008, 0.004, and 0.03, respectively). In the low-fat group, as compared to the G allele, the A allele tended to be related to the decrease in TC and LDL cholesterol concentrations [TC (β ± SE): -5.5 ± 3.0, P = 0.07; LDL cholesterol: -4.8 ± 2.5, P = 0.06] and a lower increase in HDL cholesterol concentrations (β ± SE: -1.37 ± 0.69, P = 0.048), whereas an opposite effect in the high-fat diet group was evident [TC (β ± SE): 7.3 ± 2.7, P = 0.008; LDL cholesterol: 4.1 ± 2.3, P = 0.07], and there was no genetic effect on changes in HDL cholesterol concentrations (P = 0.54). Dietary fat intake modifies the effect of a common variant in LIPC on changes in serum lipids during a long-term weight-loss intervention in overweight or obese adults. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Predisposition of cows to mastitis in non-infected mammary glands: effects of dietary-induced negative energy balance during mid-lactation on immune-related genes.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Kasey M; Drackley, James K; Morin, Dawn E; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Everts, Robin E; Lewin, Harris A; Loor, Juan J

    2011-03-01

    Cows experiencing severe postpartal negative energy balance (NEB) are at greater risk of developing mastitis than cows in positive energy balance (PEB). Our objectives were to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles between lactating cows (n = 5/treatment) subjected to feed restriction to induce NEB and cows fed ad libitum to maintain PEB in order to identify genes involved in immune response and cellular metabolism that may predispose cows to an intramammary infection in non-infected mammary gland. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements, and cows fed PEB cows were fed the same diet ad libitum. At 5 days after feed restriction, one rear mammary gland from all cows was biopsied for RNA extraction and transcript profiling using microarray and quantitative PCR. Energy balance (NEB vs. PEB) resulted in 278 differentially expressed genes (DEG). Among up-regulated DEG (n = 180), Ingenuity Pathway Analysis® identified lipid metabolism (8) and molecular transport (14) as some of the most enriched molecular functions. Genes down-regulated by NEB (98) were associated with cell growth and proliferation (21) and cell death (18). Results indicate that DEG due to NEB in mid-lactation were associated with numerous biological functions but we did not identify genes that could, a priori, be associated with risk of intramammary infection in non-infected mammary glands. Further studies with early postpartal cows are required.

  4. Modulation of gene-expression profiles associated with sodium arsenite-induced cardiotoxicity by p-coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol.

    PubMed

    Prasanna, Nagalakshmi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, the purpose was to investigate the effect of p-coumaric acid on the mRNA-expression levels of inflammatory cytokines, transcription factor, MAP kinases, and apoptotic proteins by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the cardiac tissue of sodium arsenite exposed rats. Sodium arsenite administration (5 mg/kg/b.wt, once daily for 30 days) upregulated the mRNA-expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and tumor growth factor-beta), transcription factor (NF-Kb-Rel A), protein kinases (Janus kinase and p38), caspase 3, and proapoptotic protein Bax in the cardiac tissue of rats, but the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 mRNA expression was found be downregulated. However, p-coumaric acid (75, 100 mg/kg/b. wt. oral) pretreatment daily before the sodium arsenite exposure protected the changes in the above mRNA-expression profiles observed in the cardiac tissues. In conclusion, this study confirmed that p-coumaric acid could be a promising dietary agent for protecting against the sodium arsenite-induced cardiotoxicity.

  5. Dietary soy isoflavones differentially regulate expression of the lipid-metabolic genes in different white adipose tissues of the female Bama mini-pigs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoli; Li, Lili; Fan, Juexin; Zhang, Bin; Oso, A O; Xiao, Chaowu; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-22

    Soy isoflavones have been shown to affect lipid metabolism, however the underlying molecular mechanism(s) have not yet been fully understood. The present study, using female Bama mini-pig as a model, examined the effects of soy isoflavones on lipid metabolism and involved gene expression in different white adipose tissues. Female Bama Xiang mini-pigs of 35 days old were fed a basal diet (control, Con), or basal diet supplemented with increasing amounts of soy isoflavones (250, 500, or 1250 mg/kg diet) for 120 days. The results showed that soy isoflavones did not affect the body weight, but decreased the dorsal subcutaneous adipose tissue (DSA) mass and increased the mass of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASA) and perirenal adipose tissue (PRA). Besides, soy isoflavones decreased the expression of lipogenic genes and increased the expression of lipolytic genes in DSA, while the opposite effects were observed in ASA and PRA. In addition, the expression of lipoprotein lipase was down regulated in DSA while up regulated in ASA and PRA by soy isoflavones. Moreover, the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) was up regulated in DSA, and down regulated in ASA and PRA by soy isoflavones. Our results suggest that soy isoflavones affected the lipid metabolism in white adipose tissues of Bama mini-pigs in a site-specific manner, which might be mediated through PPARs and ERs regulated gene expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effects of dietary Immunogen on innate immune response, immune related genes expression and disease resistance of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Yar Ahmadi, Peyman; Farahmand, Hamid; Kolangi Miandare, Hamed; Mirvaghefi, Alireza; Hoseinifar, Seyed Hossein

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of prebiotic Immunogen on lysozyme, TNFα and HSP70 gene expression in head kidney, humoral innate immune parameters and resistant to Aeromonas hydrophila of rainbow trout. 120 healthy rainbow trout (81.65 ± 1.49 g) were distributed in six fiberglass tanks assigned to two groups fed control or diet supplemented with 2 g kg(-1) Immunogen for 45 days. The results revealed that administration of Immunogen significantly (P < 0.05) up regulated lysozyme and TNFα gene expression. HSP70 gene expression was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in Immunogen fed fish at the end of trial. Humoral innate immune parameters (lysozyme activity, ACH50 and bactericidal activity) were significantly (P < 0.05) increased whether 15 or 45 days after feeding on Immunogen supplemented diet. However, significant (P < 0.05) increase in agglutination antibody titer observed just after 45 days feeding on Immunogen. Rainbow trout fed with 2 g kg(-1) Immunogen showed remarkably higher resistance against A. hydrophila (64.44% survival) compared to the control group (24.44% survival). These results confirm that Immunogen can up regulates immune related genes expression, stimulates immune response that per se enhances disease resistance in rainbow trout. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dietary exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ether 47 (BDE-47) inhibits development and alters thyroid hormone-related gene expression in the brain of Xenopus laevis tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Yost, Alexandra T; Thornton, Leah M; Venables, Barney J; Sellin Jeffries, Marlo K

    2016-12-01

    Few studies have investigated the thyroid-disrupting effects of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) across multiple levels of biological organization in anurans, despite their suitability for the screening of thyroid disruptors. Therefore, the present study evaluated the effects of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) on development, thyroid histology and thyroid hormone-related gene expression in Xenopus laevis exposed to 0 (control), 50 (low), 500 (medium) or 5000μg BDE-47/g food (high) for 21days. Only the high dose of BDE-47 hindered growth and development; however, thyroid hormone-associated gene expression was downregulated in the brains of tadpoles regardless of dose. These results show that BDE-47 disrupts thyroid hormone signaling at the molecular and whole-organism levels and suggest that gene expression in the brain is a more sensitive endpoint than metamorphosis. Furthermore, the altered gene expression patterns among BDE-47-exposed tadpoles provide insight into the mechanisms of PBDE-induced thyroid disruption and highlight the potential for PBDEs to act as neurodevelopmental toxicants.

  8. Cross-omics gene and protein expression profiling in juvenile female mice highlights disruption of calcium and zinc signalling in the brain following dietary exposure to CB-153, BDE-47, HBCD or TCDD.

    PubMed

    Rasinger, J D; Carroll, T S; Lundebye, A K; Hogstrand, C

    2014-07-03

    The present study assessed if eating a diet of fish, spiked with persistent organic pollutants (POPs), affects gene and protein expression in the maturing mouse brain. Juvenile female Balb/c mice (22 days of age) were exposed for 28 days to fish-based diets spiked with the dioxin 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) or the non dioxin-like (NDL) chemicals hexabromocyclodocecane (HBCD), 2,2'4,4'-tetrabromodiphenylether (BDE-47) or 2,2'4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) at doses approximating their respective lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAEL). It was found that all POPs elicited changes in neural gene and protein expression profiles. Bioinformatic analysis of gene expression data highlighted the importance of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in dioxin toxicity and revealed that zinc regulation in the brain is targeted by TCDD through the AHR. Calcium homeostasis was affected by both TCDD and the NDL chemicals. In contrast to the transcriptomic analysis, the proteomics data did not allow for a clear distinction between DL and NDL responses in the juvenile brain but indicated that proteins associated with excitotoxicity were affected in all exposure groups. Integrated interpretation of data led to the conclusion that the dietary contaminants investigated in the present study breach the blood brain barrier (BBB) and accumulate in the juvenile brain where they may induce excitotoxic insults by dysregulation of the otherwise tightly controlled homeostasis of calcium and zinc. Overall, the findings of the present study highlight the need for further assessment of the risks associated with early life exposure to foodborne POPs.

  9. Tissue-specific expression and dietary regulation of chimeric mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase/human growth hormone gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Serra, D; Fillat, C; Matas, R; Bosch, F; Hegardt, F G

    1996-03-29

    We have studied the role of the mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) synthase gene in regulating ketogenesis. The gene exhibits expression in various tissues and it is regulated in a tissue-specific manner. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of this expression, we linked a 1148-base-pair portion of the mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase promoter to the human growth hormone (hGH) gene and analyzed the expression of the hGH reporter gene in transgenic mice. mRNA levels of hGH were observed in liver, testis, ovary, stomach, colon, cecum, brown adipose tissue, spleen, adrenal glands, and mammary glands from adult mice, and also in liver and stomach, duodenum, jejunum, brown adipose tissue, and heart of suckling mice. There was no expression either in kidney or in any other nonketogenic tissue. The comparison between these data and those of the endogenous mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase gene suggests that the 1148 base pairs of the promoter contain the elements necessary for expression in liver and testis, but an enhancer is necessary for full expression in intestine of suckling animals and that a silencer prevents expression in stomach, brown adipose tissue, spleen, adrenal glands, and mammary glands in wild type adult mice. In starvation, transgenic mice showed higher expression in liver than did wild type. Both refeeding and insulin injection reduced the expression. Fat diets, composed in each case of different fatty acids, produced similar expression levels, respectively, to those found in wild type animals, suggesting that long-, medium-, and short-chain fatty acids may exert a positive influence on the transcription rate in this 1148-base-pair portion of the promoter. The ketogenic capacity of liver and the blood ketone body levels were equal in transgenic mice and in nontransgenic mice.

  10. Modulation of DNA damage and alteration of gene expression during aflatoxicosis via dietary supplementation of Spirulina (Arthrospira) and Whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Aziza M; Abdel-Aziem, Sekena H; Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A

    2012-05-01

    Spirulina (SPN) and Whey protein (WPC) are being touted as functional foods with a number of health benefits. SPN is blue green algae while WPC is a protein complex derived from milk and both have strong antioxidant activity and provoke a free radical scavenging enzyme system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant potentials of SPN and WPC to regulate the alteration of genes' expression and counteract oxidative stress in rats during aflatoxecosis. Eighty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into eight groups, which included the control group, the group fed with aflatoxins (AFs)-contaminated diet (2.5 mg/kg diet) for 30 day, the group treated orally with WPC (300 mg/kg b.w.), the group treated orally with SPN (50 mg/kg b.w), the group treated orally with WPC plus SPN and the groups fed with AFs-contaminated diet and treated orally with WPC, SPN and/or WPC. Oxidative stress markers and gene expression were assayed in liver and testis and the damage of DNA was evaluated by DNA fragmentation and micronucleus tests. The results demonstrated that supplementation of SPN and/or WPC reduced the oxidative stress induced by AFs as indicated by decreased lipid peroxidation level, increased glutathione content and up-regulated PHGPx gene expression. Both agents succeed to inhibit DNA damage as indicated by the down-regulation of Fas gene expression, and decreased the percentage of DNA fragmentation and micronucleated erythrocytes. Moreover, WPC was found to be effective than SPN and the combined treatment was more effective than the single treatment. It could be concluded that both SPN and WPC induced a protective action and regulated the alteration of genes expression induced by AFs; however, the combined treatment may be useful than the single treatment.

  11. Dietary sunflower oil modulates milk fatty acid composition without major changes in adipose and mammary tissue fatty acid profile or related gene mRNA abundance in sheep.

    PubMed

    Castro-Carrera, T; Frutos, P; Leroux, C; Chilliard, Y; Hervás, G; Belenguer, A; Bernard, L; Toral, P G

    2015-04-01

    There are very few studies in ruminants characterizing mammary and adipose tissue (AT) expression of genes and gene networks for diets causing variations in milk fatty acid (FA) composition without altering milk fat secretion, and even less complementing this information with data on tissue FA profiles. This work was conducted in sheep in order to investigate the response of the mammary gland and the subcutaneous and perirenal AT, in terms of FA profile and mRNA abundance of genes involved in lipid metabolism, to a diet known to modify milk FA composition. Ten lactating Assaf ewes were randomly assigned to two treatments consisting of a total mixed ration based on alfalfa hay and a concentrate (60 : 40) supplemented with 0 (control diet) or 25 (SO diet) g of sunflower oil/kg of diet dry matter for 7 weeks. Milk composition, including FA profile, was analysed after 48 days on treatments. On day 49, the animals were euthanized and tissue samples were collected to analyse FA and mRNA abundance of 16 candidate genes. Feeding SO did not affect animal performance but modified milk FA composition. Major changes included decreases in the concentration of FA derived from de novo synthesis (e.g. 12:0, 14:0 and 16:0) and increases in that of long-chain FA (e.g. 18:0, c9-18:1, trans-18:1 isomers and c9,t11-CLA); however, they were not accompanied by significant variations in the mRNA abundance of the studied lipogenic genes (i.e. ACACA, FASN, LPL, CD36, FABP3, SCD1 and SCD5) and transcription factors (SREBF1 and PPARG), or in the constituent FA of mammary tissue. Regarding the FA composition of AT, the little influence of SO did not appear to be linked to changes in gene mRNA abundance (decreases of GPAM and SREBF1 in both tissues, and of PPARG in the subcutaneous depot). Similarly, the great variation between AT (higher contents of saturated FA and trans-18:1 isomers in the perirenal, and of cis-18:1, c9,t11-CLA and n-3 PUFA in the subcutaneous AT) could not be related to

  12. Influence of dietary sesamin, a bioactive compound on fatty acids and expression of some lipid regulating genes in Baltic Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Trattner, S; Ruyter, B; Ostbye, T K; Kamal-Eldin, A; Moazzami, A; Pan, J; Gjoen, T; Brännäs, E; Zlabek, V; Pickova, J

    2011-01-01

    The effects of inclusion of sesamin / episesamin in Baltic Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) diets based on vegetable oils were studied. The study was designed as a dose response study with two control diets, one diet based on fish oil (FO) and one diet based on a mixture of linseed and sunflower oil (6:4 by vol.) (MO). As experimental diets three different levels of inclusion of sesamin / episesamin (hereafter named sesamin) to the MO based diet and one diet based on sesame oil and linseed oil (SesO) (1:1 by vol.) were used. The dietary oils were mirrored in the fatty acid profile of the white muscle. Sesamin significantly decreased the levels of 18:3n-3 in the white muscle phospholipid (PL) fraction of all groups fed sesamin, no significant differences were found in the triacylglycerol fraction (TAG). Slightly increased levels of docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA) in PL and TAG were found in some of the sesamin fed groups. Sesamin significantly affected the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, scavenger receptor type B and hormone sensitive lipase, in agreement with previous studies on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) hepatocytes published by our group. No significant effects on toxicological response measured as ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity was found. The total cytochrome P450 enzymes were significantly higher in MO 0.29 and SesO group. The amount of alpha- and gamma-tocopherols in liver and the amount of gamma-tocopherol in white muscle were significantly lower in fish fed the FO diet compared to the MO diet, but no difference after inclusion of sesamin was found in this study. Increased inclusion of sesamin increased the levels of sesamin and episesamin in the liver, but did not affect the amounts in white muscle.

  13. The Dietary Isoflavone Daidzein Reduces Expression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes through PPARα/γ and JNK Pathways in Adipocyte and Macrophage Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yuri; Kanatsu, Junko; Toh, Mariko; Naka, Ayano; Kondo, Kazuo; Iida, Kaoruko

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-induced inflammation caused by adipocyte-macrophage interactions plays a critical role in developing insulin resistance, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) regulate inflammatory gene expression in these cells. Recently, the soy isoflavone daidzein was reported to act as a PPAR activator. We examined whether daidzein affected adipocyte-macrophage crosstalk via the regulation of PPARs. Co-cultures of 3T3-L1 adipocytes and RAW264 macrophages, or palmitate-stimulated RAW264 macrophages were treated with daidzein in the presence or absence of specific inhibitors for PPARs: GW6471 (a PPARα antagonist), and GW9662 (a PPARγ antagonist). Inflammatory gene expression was then determined. Daidzein significantly decreased chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2, known in humans as monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1 (MCP1)) and interleukin 6 (Il6) mRNA levels induced by co-culture. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, daidzein inversed the attenuation of adiponectin gene expression by co-culture, and these effects were inhibited by the PPAR-γ specific inhibitor. Daidzein also decreased Ccl2 and Il6 mRNA levels in RAW264 macrophages stimulated with palmitate or conditioned medium (CM) from hypertrophied 3T3-L1 adipocytes. This inhibitory effect on Il6 expression was abrogated by a PPAR-α inhibitor. Additionally, we examined the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways and found that daidzein significantly inhibited palmitate-induced phosphorylation of JNK. Our data suggest that daidzein regulates pro-inflammatory gene expression by activating PPAR-α and -γ and inhibiting the JNK pathway in adipocyte and macrophage co-cultures. These effects might be favorable in improving adipose inflammation, thus, treatment of daidzein may be a therapeutic strategy for chronic inflammation in obese adipose tissue. PMID:26901838

  14. Promoting Healthy Dietary Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie A.

    This chapter reviews the research on promoting healthy dietary behaviors in all youth, not just those who exhibit problems such as obesity or eating disorders. The first section of this chapter presents a rationale for addressing healthy dietary behavior with children and adolescents, on the basis of the impact of these behaviors on short- and…

  15. Using Dietary Supplements Wisely

    MedlinePlus

    ... you to take. If you experience any side effects that concern you, stop taking the dietary supplement, and contact your health care provider. You can report serious problems suspected with dietary supplements to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of ...

  16. Promoting Healthy Dietary Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie A.

    This chapter reviews the research on promoting healthy dietary behaviors in all youth, not just those who exhibit problems such as obesity or eating disorders. The first section of this chapter presents a rationale for addressing healthy dietary behavior with children and adolescents, on the basis of the impact of these behaviors on short- and…

  17. Molecular cloning and gene/protein expression of FAT/CD36 from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) and the regulation of its expression by dietary energy.

    PubMed

    Tian, Juan; Liu, Wei; Gao, Weihua; Wu, Fan; Yu, Lijuan; Lu, Xing; Yang, Chang-Geng; Jiang, Ming; Wen, Hua

    2017-01-18

    Fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36) functions as a membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter in various tissues in land animals. Not much is known about the CD36 molecule in teleost fish. Therefore, we studied CD36 in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella, ciCD36). The full-length complementary DNA sequence of ciCD36 was 1976 bp, with an ORF of 468 amino acids, which had high sequence similarity to the CD36 of common carp. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of ciCD36 was high in the intestine, heart, liver, visceral tissue, and brain, but absent in the kidney. The protein expression of ciCD36 was high in the brain, intestine, liver, heart, muscle, eye, visceral tissue, gonad, and gill, but not in the kidney. Four groups of grass carp (16 tanks) were fed three times daily to satiation with 17.2 kJ gross energy/g diet (control, CON), 19.4 kJ gross energy/g diet (more energy supplied by proteins, HP), 19.9 kJ gross energy/g diet (more energy supplied by fat, HF), and 19.1 kJ gross energy/g diet (more energy supplied by carbohydrate, HC) for 11 weeks, respectively. At the end of the feeding experiment, the fish were fasted for 48 h, and the brain, heart, intestine, and liver were sampled and designated as the 0-h samples. The fish were then fed a single meal of the above four diets, and these tissues were collected at 8- and 24-h intervals after refeeding to analyze ciCD36 mRNA and protein expression levels. The results showed that at the transcriptional and translational levels, ciCD36 expression was significantly affected by refeeding time and the different diets (P < 0.05), and the regulation of its transcription in different tissues varied. At the translational level, the protein expression levels decreased in the CON and HC groups, and increased in the HP and HF groups after refeeding. The results indicated that ciCD36 has a modulatory role in the adaptation to dietary high energy in grass carp. Translational regulation might

  18. Differential time-series expression of immune-related genes of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in response to dietary inclusion of beta-1,3-glucan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chi; Chang, Poh-Shing; Chen, Houng-Yung

    2008-01-01

    Time-series changes in transcript abundance of nine genes encoding important immune proteins in haemocytes or hepatopancreas of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei fed daily in a 1-week feeding trial diets containing three levels (0%, 0.2% or 1%) of beta-1,3-glucan from Schizophyllum commune were quantified by real-time PCR. As a whole, the immune modulation elicited by beta-glucan is bimodal, one swift reaction of up- or down-regulation occurred within 24h and a delayed regulation was commenced as late as 3-7days. Haemocyanin, crustin, prophenoloxidase (proPO) and transglutaminase (TGase) did not respond to the glucan treatment. While penaeidin 3 (Litvan PEN3) was swiftly down-regulated (0-24h), lysozyme and cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase (cMnSOD) were swiftly up-regulated (0-24h). In contrast, the two pattern recognition proteins (PRPs), beta-glucan binding protein-high density lipoprotein (BGBP-HDL) and lipopolysaccharide/beta-glucan binding protein (LGBP), showed a delayed up-regulation. Their expressions were not maximized until as late as 72h or 7days, respectively, which coincide with the initiation of reported immune enhancement (6-24days) of PO and SOD activity, phagocytosis and superoxide anion production in penaeid shrimp receiving glucan-containing diet. These immune responses could be the downstream effects of the two PRP gene up-regulation that predispose the shrimp to a state of high immune responsiveness. Increased dosage of beta-glucan from 2 to 10gkg(-1) diet did not affect the expressions of the genes, indicating the sufficiency of beta-glucan supplementation at 2gkg(-1) diet.

  19. Acute Effects of Dietary Fat on Inflammatory Markers and Gene Expression in First-Degree Relatives of Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pietraszek, Anna; Gregersen, Søren; Hermansen, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and their relatives (REL) carry an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Low-grade inflammation, an independent risk factor for CVD, is modifiable by diet. Subjects with T2D show elevated postprandial inflammatory responses to fat-rich meals, while information on postprandial inflammation in REL is sparse. AIM: To clarify whether medium-chain saturated fatty acids (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) have differential acute effects on low-grade inflammation in REL compared to controls (CON). METHODS: In randomized order, 17 REL and 17 CON ingested two fat-rich meals, with 72 energy percent from MUFA and 79 energy percent from mainly medium-chain SFA, respectively. Plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), adiponectin, and leptin were measured at baseline, 15 min, 60 min, and 240 min postprandially. Muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were taken at baseline and 210 min after the test meal, and expression of selected genes was analyzed. RESULTS: Plasma IL-6 increased (p < 0.001) without difference between REL and CON and between the meals, whereas plasma adiponectin and plasma hs-CRP were unchanged during the 240 min observation period. Plasma leptin decreased slightly in response to medium-chain SFA in both groups, and to MUFA in REL. Several genes were differentially regulated in muscle and adipose tissue of REL and CON. CONCLUSIONS: MUFA and medium-chain SFA elicit similar postprandial circulating inflammatory responses in REL and CON. Medium-chain SFA seems more proinflammatory than MUFA, judged by the gene expression in muscle and adipose tissue of REL and CON. PMID:22580729

  20. Ramadan Major Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. Results: We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). Conclusions: This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest. PMID:25593728

  1. Ramadan major dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-09-01

    There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest.

  2. Wild-type and IL10-null mice have differential colonic epithelial gene expression responses to dietary supplementation with synbiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis and inulin.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shiu-Ming; Chan, Wan-Chun; Hu, Zihua

    2014-03-01

    Prebiotic plus probiotic (synbiotic) supplementations promote fermentation and have shown anti-inflammatory activity in colonic epithelium. However, in many instances, patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have demonstrated adverse effects after prebiotic supplementation at a dose well tolerated by normal individuals. To test the hypothesis that the host inflammation affects the colonic epithelial response to increased fermentation, the gene expression of colonic epithelium was analyzed. In a 1-way experimental design to test the effect of supplements in wild-type mice using the standard diet formulated by the American Institute of Nutrition (AIN-93G) as the control diet, fermentable fiber inulin (5%) in the absence or presence of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis (Bb12) (10(8) CFU/kg diet) showed limited effects on gene expression as determined by whole-genome microarray. Bb12 supplementation alone was known not to increase fermentation and here instead significantly upregulated genes in nucleic acid metabolic processes. The effects of the synbiotic diet were then determined in mice exposed to LPS-induced inflammation in a 2-way experimental design testing the effect of diet and LPS. The microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses on the wild-type mice revealed that LPS-induced changes in the colonic epithelium were 4- to 10-fold less in the synbiotic diet group compared with the control diet group. Unlike the wild-type mice, anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL10)-null mice (susceptible to IBD) given the synbiotic diet, compared with those given the control diet, had 3- to 40-fold increased expression of inflammation-related genes such as Cxcl1 (chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 1) and S100a9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9) in the absence and presence of LPS exposure. These contrasting intestinal epithelial responses to increased fermentation in wild-type and IL10-null mice are similar

  3. Dietary oils mediate cortisol kinetics and the hepatic mRNA expression profile of stress-responsive genes in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) exposed to crowding stress. Implications on energy homeostasis and stress susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sánchez, Jaume; Borrel, Míriam; Bermejo-Nogales, Azucena; Benedito-Palos, Laura; Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Calduch-Giner, Josep A; Kaushik, Sadasivam

    2013-06-01

    Juveniles of gilthead sea bream were fed with plant protein-based diets with fish oil (FO diet) or vegetable oils (66VO diet) as dietary lipid sources. No differences in growth performance were found between both groups, and fish with an average body mass of 65-70 g were crowded (90-100 kg/m(3)) to assess the stress response within the 72 h after the onset of stressor. The rise in plasma cortisol and glucose levels was higher in stressed fish of group 66VO (66VO-S) than in FO group (FO-S), but the former stressed group regained more quickly the cortisol resting values of the corresponding non-stressed diet group. The cell-tissue repair response represented by derlin-1, 75 kDa glucose-regulated protein and 170 kDa glucose-regulated protein was triggered at a lower level in 66VO-S than in FO-S fish. This occurred in concert with a long-lasting up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptors, antioxidant enzymes, enzyme subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and enzymes involved in tissue fatty acid uptake and β-oxidation. This gene expression pattern allows a metabolic phenotype that is prone to "high power" mitochondria, which would support the replacement of fish oil with vegetable oils when theoretical requirements in essential fatty acids for normal growth are met by diet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dietary linseed oil in the maternal diet affects immunoglobulins, tissue fatty acid composition and expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, X L; Wang, N; Tian, M L; Wang, L; Liu, T; Zhang, X W; Shi, B M; Shan, A S

    2016-11-21

    This experiment investigated the effects of supplementing the maternal diet with linseed oil (LSO) and soya bean oil (SBO) on immunoglobulins, the fatty acid composition and hepatic expression of lipid metabolism-related genes in piglets. Multiparous sows (twenty-four per diet) were fed on diets containing a supplement of either SBO or LSO during last week of gestation and lactation. The results indicated that supplementation of maternal diet with LSO could improve the weaning weight of piglets and average daily gain (ADG) (p < 0.05). The concentration of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin A (IgA) was enhanced in sow plasma, colostrum and milk by the addition of LSO (p < 0.05). In addition, the concentration of 18: 3n-3 fatty acids was higher in the milk of LSO sows. Meanwhile, maternal supplementation with LSO increased the levels of plasma IgG, IgA and the tissues n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in piglets (p < 0.05). Correspondingly, the mRNA expression levels of hepatic ∆5-desaturase (D5D) and ∆6-desaturase (D6D) were higher, and fatty acid synthase (FAS) was lower in piglets from LSO-fed sows when compared with that in the SBO group. In conclusion, LSO supplementation of the maternal diet increases immunoglobulins, modifies the fatty acid composition and affects the gene of D5D and D6D expression of piglets.

  5. Effects of Dietary Selenium Against Lead Toxicity on mRNA Levels of 25 Selenoprotein Genes in the Cartilage Tissue of Broiler Chicken.

    PubMed

    Gao, H; Liu, C P; Song, S Q; Fu, J

    2016-07-01

    The interactions between the essential element selenium (Se) and the toxic element lead (Pb) have been reported extensively; however, little is known about the effect of Se on Pb toxicity and the expression pattern of selenoproteins in the cartilage of chicken. To investigate the effects of Se on Pb toxicity and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of selenoproteins in cartilage tissue, an in vitro study was performed on 1-day-old broiler chickens (randomly allocated into four groups) with diet of different concentration of Se and Pb. After 90 days, the meniscus cartilage and sword cartilage tissue were examined for the mRNA levels of 25 selenoprotein genes. The results showed that Se and Pb influenced the expression of selenoprotein genes in the chicken cartilage tissue. In detail, Se could alleviate the downtrend of the expression of Gpx1, Gpx2, Gpx4, Txnrd2, Txnrd3, Dio1, Dio2, Seli, Selu, Sepx1, Selk, Selw, Selo, Selm, Sep15, Sepnn1, Sels, and Selt induced by Pb exposure in the meniscus cartilage. In the sword cartilage, Se alleviated the downtrend of the expression of Gpx2, Gpx3, Gpx4, Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Dio2, Dio3, Seli, Selh, SPS2, Sepx1, Selk, Selw, Selo, Selm, Sep15, Selpb, Sepn1, and Selt induced by Pb exposure. The present study provided some compensated data about the roles of Se against Pb toxicity in the regulation of selenoprotein expression.

  6. Effects of dietary selenium deficiency on mRNA levels of twenty-one selenoprotein genes in the liver of layer chicken.

    PubMed

    Liu, C P; Fu, J; Lin, S L; Wang, X S; Li, S

    2014-06-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in many life forms due to its occurrence as selenocysteine (Sec) residue in selenoproteins. However, little is known about the expression pattern of selenoproteins in the liver of layer chicken. To investigate the effects of Se deficiency on the mRNA expressions of selenoproteins in the liver tissue of layer chickens, 1-day-old layer chickens were randomly allocated into two groups (n=120/group). The Se-deficient group (-Se) was fed a Se-deficient corn-soy basal diet; the Se-adequate group as control (+Se) was fed the same basal diet supplemented with Se at 0.15 mg/kg (sodium selenite). The liver tissue was collected and examined for mRNA levels of 21 selenoprotein genes at 15, 25, 35, 45, 55, and 65 days old. The data indicated that the mRNA expressions of Gpx1, Gpx2, Gpx3, Gpx4, Sepn1, Sepp1, Selo, Sepx1, Selu, Txnrd1, Txnrd2, Txnrd3, Dio1, Dio2, SPS2, Selm, SelPb, Sep15, and Sels were decreased (p<0.05), but not the levels of Dio3 and Seli (p>0.05). The results showed that the mRNA levels of 19 selenoprotein (except Seli and Dio3) genes in the layer chicken liver were regulated by diet Se level. The present study provided some compensated data about the roles of Se in the regulation of selenoproteins.

  7. Effect of dietary supplementation of probiotics and palm fruits extracts on the antioxidant enzyme gene expression in the mucosae of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    PubMed

    Esteban, M A; Cordero, H; Martínez-Tomé, M; Jiménez-Monreal, A M; Bakhrouf, A; Mahdhi, A

    2014-08-01

    Antioxidant activity is particularly important, since oxidation is an unavoidable reaction in all living bodies. At present, natural antioxidants to be used on food as an alternative to synthetic ones are being sought. Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) specimens were fed for 4 weeks with diets enriched with bacterial probiotics (Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 and Bacillus sp), single or in combination with Tunisian dates palm fruit extracts. The expression of the main antioxidant enzyme genes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase) in the mucosae (gut, skin and gill) was evaluated after 2 and 4 weeks. Previously, free radical scavenging and several antioxidant assays were developed to know the antioxidant properties present on the palm fruits extracts. The results demonstrated that experimental diets alter the expression of the studied antioxidant genes, primarily in the gill and skin. Furthermore, the tested probiotics and mainly, the aqueous date palm fruits extracts had significant antioxidant properties based on their protective effect against the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species, especially when administering during 4 weeks. For this reason, probiotics and date palm fruit extracts may serve as good natural antioxidants and could potentially be considered as a functional food ingredient for fish in farms.

  8. Effect of dietary copper and breed on gene products involved in copper acquisition, distribution, and use in Angus and Simmental cows and fetuses.

    PubMed

    Fry, R S; Spears, J W; Lloyd, K E; O'Nan, A T; Ashwell, M S

    2013-02-01

    1 (Atox1), cytochrome c oxidase assembly protein 17 (Cox17), and Cu metabolism MURR1 domain 1 (Commd1) were up-regulated (P ≤ 0.05) in-Cu vs. +Cu fetuses. In conclusion, less expression of duodenal Ctr1 and a tendency for less CTR1 (P = 0.10) and Atp7a (P = 0.08) suggest that Simmentals have a lesser ability to absorb and utilize dietary Cu, and may explain why Simmentals are more prone to Cu deficiency than Angus. Up-regulation of fetal liver Atox1, Cox17, and Commd1 in-Cu fetuses may reflect the great Cu demand by the fetus.

  9. Analysis of gene expression pattern reveals potential targets of dietary oleoylethanolamide in reducing body fat gain in C3H mice.

    PubMed

    Thabuis, Clémentine; Destaillats, Frédéric; Landrier, Jean-François; Tissot-Favre, Delphine; Martin, Jean-Charles

    2010-10-01

    Oleoylethanolamide (OEA) has been previously reported to regulate food intake and body weight gain when administered intraperitoneally. Nevertheless, little information is available with regard to oral administration. To assess whether oral OEA can also exert a similar effect on body fat, we fed C3H mice a high-fat diet supplemented with either 10 or 100 mg/kg body weight OEA for 4 weeks. OEA supplementation significantly lowered food intake over the 4 weeks and decreased adipose tissue mass. Plasma triglyceride levels were also significantly decreased by OEA treatment. In order to identify the potential molecular targets of OEA action, we screened the expression levels of 44 genes related to body fat mass and food intake in peripheral tissues. Adipose tissue fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), intestinal fatty acid transporter/cluster of differentiation 36 and the OEA receptor G-protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119) were among the most OEA-responsive genes. They were also associated with reduced body fat pads regardless of the dose. Adipose FAAH was found to be primarily associated with a decrease in food intake. Our data suggest that the anti-obesity activity of OEA partially relies on modulation of the FAAH pathway in adipose tissue. Another mechanism might involve modulation of the newly discovered GPR119 OEA signaling pathway in the proximal intestine. In conclusion, our study indicates that oral administration of OEA can effectively decrease obesity in the mouse model and that modulation of the endocannabinoid fatty acid ethanolamide pathway seems to play an important role both in adipose tissue and in small intestine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary oleanolic acid mediates circadian clock gene expression in liver independently of diet and animal model but requires apolipoprotein A1.

    PubMed

    Gabás-Rivera, Clara; Martínez-Beamonte, Roberto; Ríos, José L; Navarro, María A; Surra, Joaquín C; Arnal, Carmen; Rodríguez-Yoldi, María J; Osada, Jesús

    2013-12-01

    Oleanolic acid is a triterpene widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom and present in virgin olive oil at a concentration of 57 mg/kg. To test the hypotheses that its long-term administration could modify hepatic gene expression in several animal models and that this could be influenced by the presence of APOA1-containing high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), diets including 0.01% oleanolic acid were provided to Apoe- and Apoa1-deficient mice and F344 rats. Hepatic transcriptome was analyzed in Apoe-deficient mice fed long-term semipurified Western diets differing in the oleanolic acid content. Gene expression changes, confirmed by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, were sought for their implication in hepatic steatosis. To establish the effect of oleanolic acid independently of diet and animal model, male rats were fed chow diet with or without oleanolic acid, and to test the influence of HDL, Apoa1-deficient mice consuming the latter diet were used. In Apoe-deficient mice, oleanolic acid intake increased hepatic area occupied by lipid droplets with no change in oxidative stress. Bmal1 and the other core component of the circadian clock, Clock, together with Elovl3, Tubb2a and Cldn1 expressions, were significantly increased, while Amy2a5, Usp2, Per3 and Thrsp were significantly decreased in mice receiving the compound. Bmal1 and Cldn1 expressions were positively associated with lipid droplets. Increased Clock and Bmal1 expressions were also observed in rats, but not in Apoa1-deficient mice. The core liver clock components Clock-Bmal1 are a target of oleanolic acid in two animal models independently of the diets provided, and this compound requires APOA1-HDL for its hepatic action.

  11. Dietary RNAs: New Stories Regarding Oral Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Hirschi, Kendal D.; Farmer, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small RNAs, are important regulators of various developmental processes in both plants and animals. Several years ago, a report showed the detection of diet-derived plant miRNAs in mammalian tissues and their regulation of mammalian genes, challenging the traditional functions of plant miRNAs. Subsequently, multiple efforts have attempted to replicate these findings, with the results arguing against the uptake of plant dietary miRNAs in healthy consumers. Moreover, several reports suggest the potential for “false positive” detection of plant miRNAs in human tissues. Meanwhile, some research continues to suggest both the presence and function of dietary miRNAs in mammalian tissues. Here we review the recent literature and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of emerging work that suggests the feasibility of dietary delivery of miRNAs. We also discuss future experimental approaches to address this controversial topic. PMID:25942490

  12. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  13. Maternal high fat feeding and gestational dietary restriction: effects on offspring body weight, food intake and hypothalamic gene expression over three generations in mice.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Silvia Q; Della-Fera, Mary Anne; Proctor, Lindsey; Wickwire, Kathie; Ambati, Suresh; Baile, Clifton A

    2010-11-01

    Excessive gestational weight gain and maternal obesity have both been associated with increased incidence of obesity and metabolic disorder in offspring in both humans and animal models. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) whether mild gestational food restriction during the third trimester (GFR) would alter food intake and growth parameters of offspring, (2) whether effects of GFR depended on diet (high fat [HF] vs chow), (3) whether effects of excessive gestational weight gain (WG) would become magnified across generations, and (4) whether diet and GFR would alter hypothalamic gene expression in adult offspring. Three generations of female C57BL/6 mice were fed chow or HF diet, mated at 11 weeks of age and assigned to ad libitum feeding or 25% GFR. Offspring were fed the same diet as their mothers. Results showed (1) maternal gestational WG was positively correlated with offspring WG. (2) HF offspring weighed less (p<0.01) at weaning (WWT) but gained more during the 8 weeks after weaning than chow-fed offspring (p<0.05), resulting in higher final body weights (BW) (p<0.01). (3) HF males from GFR mothers had higher WWT (p<0.05), but subsequent WG and final BW were less (p<0.05) compared to males from ad lib mothers. (4) In the HF group, GFR also resulted in decreased FI (p<0.05) and FE (p<0.07) in offspring, compared to offspring from ad lib mothers. (5) In generation 3, hypothalamic expression of tyrosine hydroxylase was lower in HF males from GFR mothers compared to HF males from ad lib mothers (p<0.05). In conclusion, gender and maternal GFR had independent effects on growth and FI, and hypothalamic gene expression was dependent on both gender and maternal GFR in HF offspring. Even mild food restriction of obese mothers during pregnancy may have beneficial effects in reducing the risk or degree of obesity in offspring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Regulation of vascular endothelial genes by dietary flavonoids: structure-expression relationship studies and the role of the transcription factor KLF-2.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, Leyre; Pons, Zara; Margalef, Maria; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Muguerza, Begoña

    2015-03-01

    Physiological concentrations (1 μM) of 15 flavonoids were evaluated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) for their ability to affect endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) expression in order to establish the structural basis of their bioactivity. Flavonoid effects on eNOS transcription factor Krüpple like factor-2 (KLF-2) expression were also evaluated. All studied flavonoids appeared to be effective compounds for counteracting the oxidative stress-induced effects on vascular gene expression, indicating that flavonoids are an excellent source of functional endothelial regulator products. Notably, the more effective flavonoids for KLF-2 up-regulation resulted in the highest values for eNOS expression, showing that the increment of eNOS expression would take place through KLF-2 induction. Structure-activity relationship studies showed that the combinations of substructures on flavonoid skeleton that regulate eNOS expression are made up of the following elements: glycosylation and hydroxylation of C-ring, double bond C2=C3 at C-ring, methoxylation and hydroxylation of B-ring, ketone group in C4 at C-ring and glycosylation in C7 of A-ring, while flavonoid features involved in the reduction of vasoconstrictor ET-1 expression are as follows: double bond C2=C3 at C-ring glycosylation in C7 of A-ring and ketone group in C4 of C-ring.

  15. The effect of essential oils of dietary wormwood (Artemisia princeps), with and without added vitamin E, on oxidative stress and some genes involved in cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chung, Mi Ja; Kang, Ah-Young; Park, Sung-Ok; Park, Kuen-Woo; Jun, Hee-Jin; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2007-08-01

    Wormwood (Artemisia princeps) due to the abundance of antioxidant in its essential oils (EO), has been used as a traditional drug and health food in Korea. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiology of atherosclerosis thus antioxidative chemicals improves hepatic lipid metabolism partly by reducing oxysterol formation. The antioxidant activity was assessed using two methods, human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and the anti-DPPH free radical assays. It was found that the antioxidant activity of EO with vitamin E higher than EO alone. To study mechanisms accounting for the antiatherosclerotic properties of this wormwood EO, we examined the expression of key genes in cholesterol metabolism such as the LDL receptor, the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and sterol regulatory element binding proteins. The induction was increased up to twofold at 0.05 mg/mL of EO treatment in HepG2 cells for 24h. When EO (0.2 mg/mL) was co-incubated with vitamin E, interestingly, the LDL receptor was dramatically induced by 5-6-folds. HMG-CoA reductase did not change. However, treatment with the higher concentration resulted in cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that wormwood EO with vitamin E may be anti-atherogenic due to their inhibition of LDL oxidation and upregulation of the LDL receptor.

  16. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... and US Department of Agriculture Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database Toggle navigation Menu Home About DSID Mission Current ... values can be saved to build a small database or add to an existing database for national, ...

  17. Alternate dietary lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Krey, S H

    1982-09-01

    Various forms of vegetarian diets are discussed and evaluated for their nutritional adequacy. Health, philosophical, religious, ecological, and economic concerns are suggested as possible reasons for these alternate dietary lifestyles. Nutrients of specific concern ot the vegetarian are highlighted and suggestions given to help incorporate these in the diet, thereby avoiding marginal intakes. With judicious menu planning and careful thought to food selections, most vegetarian diets can supply excellent nutrition. Very restricted vegetarian diets or higher level macrobiotic diets may not be nutritionally complete, and individuals following these diets may benefit from special dietary counseling and dietary supplementation. Otherwise, these diets may place the adult as well as pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children at a nutritional risk. As vegetarian food habits are becoming more widespread, physicians and nutritionists must be knowledgeable about these alternate dietary lifestyles in order to counsel their patients appropriately, to understand the reasons for these eating habits, and to be supportive of the choice of diet.

  18. FDA 101: Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... has certain safety monitoring responsibilities. These include monitoring mandatory reporting of serious adverse events by dietary supplement ... Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas ...

  19. A preliminary study on T-786C endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene and renal hemodynamic and blood pressure responses to dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Dengel, D R; Brown, M D; Ferrell, R E; Reynolds, T H; Supiano, M A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of the T-786C endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene polymorphism on changes in renal hemodynamics and blood pressure due to Na(+) loading. Twenty-eight older (63+/-1 years), moderately obese (39+/-2 % fat) hypertensives had their glomerular filtration rate (GFR), renal plasma flow (RPF), blood pressure (BP) and plasma nitric oxide (NO(x)) levels determined after eight days of low (20 mEq) and high (200 mEq) Na(+) diets. The two Na(+) diets were separated by a 1-week washout period. Subjects were genotyped for the eNOS-786 site and were grouped on whether they were homozygous or heterozygous for the C allele (TC+CC, n=13) or only homozygous for the T allele (TT, n=15). The TC+CC genotype group had a significantly greater increase in diastolic (P=0.021) and mean arterial (P=0.018) BP and a significant decline in both RPF (P=0.007) and GFR (P=0.029) compared to the TT genotype group with Na(+) loading. Furthermore, Na(+) loading resulted in a significant (P=0.036) increase in plasma NO(x) in the TT, but not in the TC+CC genotype group as well as a trend (P=0.051) for an increase in urine NO(x) in TC+CC, but not in the TT genotype group. The increase in BP during Na(+) loading in older hypertensives was associated with the eNOS genotype and may be related to changes in renal hemodynamics due to changes in NO metabolism.

  20. Dietary intervention of cow ghee and soybean oil on expression of cell cycle and apoptosis related genes in normal and carcinogen treated rat mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Rani, Rita; Kansal, Vinod Kumar; Kaushal, Deepti; De, Sachinandan

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect of cow ghee (clarified butter fat) versus soybean oil on the expression of cyclins A and D1, and apoptosis regulating Bax, Bcl-2 and PKC-α genes in mammary gland of normal and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) treated rats. Two groups of 21 days old female rats were fed for 44 weeks diet containing cow ghee or soybean oil (10%). The animals were given DMBA (30 mg/kg body weight) through oral intubation after 5 weeks feeding. Another two groups fed similarly but not given DMBA served as respective controls. In control groups, the expression of cyclin A was similar on both cow ghee and soybean oil, but that of cyclin D1 was more on soybean oil diet. However, in DMBA treated groups, the expression levels of cyclins A and D1 were significantly greater on soybean oil than on cow ghee. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2 and PKC-α were similar in two control groups. However, in tumor tissue expression levels of Bcl-2 and PKC-α were significantly lower in cow ghee fed rats than in soybean oil fed ones, but Bax was similarly expressed in both DMBA treated groups. The pro-apoptotic ratio Bax/Bcl-2 increased and the anti-apoptotic ratio PKC-α(Bcl-2/Bax) decreased in cow ghee group compared to soybean oil group in DMBA treated rats. Hence, the decreased expressions of cyclins A and D1, Bcl-2 and PKC-α mediate the mechanism by which cow ghee protects from mammary carcinogenesis.

  1. Dietary modifiers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, L; Simonsen, N; Mottus, K

    1995-01-01

    Dietary components express a wide range of activities that can affect carcinogenesis. Naturally occurring substances in foods have been shown in laboratory experiments to serve as dietary antimutagens, either as bioantimutagens or as desmutagens. Dietary desmutagens may function as chemical inactivaters, enzymatic inducers, scavengers, or antioxidants. Dietary components may also act later in the carcinogenic process as tumor growth suppressors. Examples of dietary factors acting in each of these stages of carcinogenesis are presented, and potential anticarcinogens such as the carotenoids, tocopherols, phenolic compounds, glucosinolates, metal-binding proteins, phytoestrogens, and conjugated linoleic acid are discussed. Individual foods typically contain multiple potential anticarcinogens. Many of these substances can influence carcinogenesis through more than one mechanism. Some substances exhibit both anticarcinogenic and carcinogenic activity in vitro, depending on conditions. Epidemiologic research indicates that high fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with lower cancer risk. Little research has focused on the effects of single substances or single foods in man. Realization of the potential of foodborne substances to reduce the human burden of cancer will only be achieved with better measurement of dietary exposures and funding of multidisciplinary research in this area commensurate with its importance. PMID:8741780

  2. Dietary effect of Sargassum wightii fucoidan to enhance growth, prophenoloxidase gene expression of Penaeus monodon and immune resistance to Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Sivagnanavelmurugan, Madasamy; Thaddaeus, Bergmans Jude; Palavesam, Arunachalam; Immanuel, Grasian

    2014-08-01

    The polysaccharide fucoidan from brown seaweed Sargassum wightii was extracted and it was incorporated with pellet diets at three concentrations (0.1, 0.2 & 0.3%). The fucoidan incorporated diets were fed to shrimp Penaeus monodon for 60 days and the growth performance was assessed. The weight gain and SGR of control group was 6.83 g and 9.72%, respectively, but the weight gain and SGR of various concentrations (0.1-0.3%) of fucoidan incorporated diets fed groups of shrimp was increased from 7.30 to 8.20 g and 9.83 to 10.03%, respectively. After 60 days of feeding experiment, the relative quantification of prophenoloxidase gene of experimental groups over control group was analysed by RT-PCR and it was ranged between 2.13 and 7.95 fold increase within 33.52-34.61 threshold cycles, respectively at 0.1-0.3% concentrations of fucoidan. After 60 days of feeding experiment, the P. monodon were challenged with shrimp pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus and the mortality percentage was recorded daily up to 21 days. The reduction in mortality percentage of experimental groups over control group was recorded from 44.56 to 72.79%, respectively in 0.1-0.3% of fucoidan incorporated diets fed groups. During challenge experiment, all the immunological parameters such as THC, prophenoloxidase activity, respiratory burst activity, superoxide dismutase activity, phagocytic activity, bactericidal activity and bacterial clearance ability of experimental groups were significantly (P < 0.05) increased than control group. The V. parahaemolyticus load was enumerated from the infected shrimp at every 10 days intervals during challenge experiment. In control group, the Vibrio load was increased in hepatopancreas and muscle tissues from 10th to 21st days of challenge test. But in the experimental groups, the Vibrio load in both the tissues decreased positively from 10th to 21st days of challenge duration. It is concluded that the S. wightii fucoidan had enhanced the innate immunity and

  3. Effects of a 3 strain -based direct-fed microbial and dietary fiber concentration on growth performance and expression of genes related to absorption and metabolism of volatile fatty acids in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, N W; Owusu-Asiedu, A; Walsh, M C; McCann, J C; Loor, J J; Stein, H H

    2017-01-01

    Effects of a -based direct-fed microbial (DFM) on growth performance, plasma tumor necrosis factor ɑ (TNFɑ), relative gene expression, and intestinal VFA concentrations in weanling pigs fed low- or high-fiber diets were evaluated. Two hundred pigs (initial BW: 6.31 ± 0.73 kg) were allotted to 1 of 4 dietary treatments (5 pigs per pen and 10 pens per treatment). Treatments were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design with 2 diet types [low-fiber (LF) or high-fiber (HF)] and 2 concentrations of DFM (0 or 60 g DFM/t of feed). The DFM contained 1.5 × 10 cfu/g and was obtained from Danisco Animal Nutrition-DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Marlborough, UK. Phase 1 diets were fed for 2 wk post-weaning and phase 2 diets were fed over the following 29 d. Low fiber diets contained corn and soybean meal as main ingredients and HF diets contained corn, soybean meal, corn distillers dried grains with solubles (7.5 and 15.0% in phase 1 and 2, respectively), and wheat middlings (10.0%). Pigs and feed were weighed at the start and at the end of each phase, and ADG, ADFI, and G:F were calculated. At the conclusion of phase 2, blood was collected from 1 pig per pen and 1 pig per pen was sacrificed. Cecum and rectum contents were analyzed for VFA, and tissue samples were collected from the ileum, cecum, rectum, and liver to determine expression of genes related to absorption and metabolism of VFA using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Results indicated that feeding HF diets reduced ( ≤ 0.05) ADFI and ADG of pigs compared with feeding LF diets. Pigs fed DFM diets had improved ( ≤ 0.05) G:F compared with pigs fed non-DFM diets. Pigs fed LF diets had greater ( ≤ 0.05) BW at the end of phase 2 compared with pigs fed HF diets. The concentration of VFA in rectum contents was greater ( ≤ 0.05) in pigs fed LF diets than in pigs fed HF diets. The expression of in the rectum of pigs fed HF diets was greater ( ≤ 0.05) than for pigs fed LF diets, and pigs fed DFM

  4. Dietary supplements for football.

    PubMed

    Hespel, P; Maughan, R J; Greenhaff, P L

    2006-07-01

    Physical training and competition in football markedly increase the need for macro- and micronutrient intake. This requirement can generally be met by dietary management without the need for dietary supplements. In fact, the efficacy of most supplements available on the market is unproven. In addition, players must be cautious of inadequate product labelling and supplement impurities that may cause a positive drug test. Nonetheless, a number of dietary supplements may beneficially affect football performance. A high endurance capacity is a prerequisite for optimal match performance, particularly if extra time is played. In this context, the potential of low-dose caffeine ingestion (2 - 5 mg . kg body mass(-1)) to enhance endurance performance is well established. However, in the case of football, care must be taken not to overdose because visual information processing might be impaired. Scoring and preventing goals as a rule requires production of high power output. Dietary creatine supplementation (loading dose: 15 - 20 g . day(-1), 4 - 5 days; maintenance dose: 2 - 5 g g . day(-1)) has been found to increase muscle power output, especially during intermittent sprint exercises. Furthermore, creatine intake can augment muscle adaptations to resistance training. Team success and performance also depend on player availability, and thus injury prevention and health maintenance. Glucosamine or chondroitin may be useful in the treatment of joint pain and osteoarthritis, but there is no evidence to support the view that the administration of these supplements will be preventative. Ephedra-containing weight-loss cocktails should certainly be avoided due to reported adverse health effects and positive doping outcomes. Finally, the efficacy of antioxidant or vitamin C intake in excess of the normal recommended dietary dose is equivocal. Responses to dietary supplements can vary substantially between individuals, and therefore the ingestion of any supplement must be assessed

  5. Genetic susceptibility and dietary patterns in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ya-Yu; McGlynn, Katherine A; Hu, Ying; Cassidy, Anna B; Arnold, John; Engstrom, Paul F; Buetow, Kenneth H

    2003-09-01

    Cigarette smoking is the dominant risk factor for lung cancer, but only a minority of smokers ever develops tumors. Though genetic susceptibility is likely to explain some of the variability in risk, results from previous studies of genetic polymorphisms have been inconclusive. As diet may also affect the risk of lung cancer, it is possible that the degree of risk produced by smoking and genetic susceptibility varies, depending on diet. To assess this hypothesis, we conducted a case-control study to examine the effect of cigarette smoking, dietary patterns and variation in genes involved in phase II metabolism. A total of 254 individuals with lung cancer and 184 healthy controls were recruited for the study. To identify persons with similar dietary patterns, cluster analysis was performed using nutrient densities of four major dietary constituents: protein, carbohydrate, animal fat, and dietary fiber. Two groups of individuals were identified with distinct dietary patterns: (1) a group (n=241) with a high intake of animal fat and protein and a low intake of carbohydrates and dietary fiber (the 'unhealthy' pattern) and (2) a group (n=197) with a high intake of fiber and carbohydrate and a low intake of protein and animal fat (the 'healthy' pattern) [corrected]. On stratified analysis, several genotype/dietary pattern combinations were found to affect risk of lung cancer. Smokers who were not homozygous for the most common GSTP1 allele and had a healthy dietary pattern were at significantly lower risk than smokers who were homozygous for the GSTP1 common allele and who had an unhealthy dietary pattern (OR=0.16, 95%CI: 0.04-0.57). Among smokers who were GSTM1 null, persons with a healthy dietary pattern were at lower risk than persons with an unhealthy dietary pattern (OR: 0.46, 95%CI: 0.21-1.01). Among smokers with an unhealthy dietary patterns, persons with a His/His genotype in the exon 3 polymorphism of EPHX1 were at significantly lower risk that persons who were

  6. Dietary manipulation of histone structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of epigenetic alterations during cancer has gained increasing attention over the recent years and has resulted in a paradigm shift in our understanding of mechanisms leading to cancer susceptibility. These features are potentially reversible and may affect genomic stability and expression of genes, including tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. The reversible acetylation of histones is an important mechanism of gene regulation. Targeting the epigenome, including the use of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, is a novel strategy for cancer chemoprevention. We have found that sulforaphane (SFN), a compound found in cruciferous vegetables, inhibits HDAC activity in human colorectal and prostate cancer cells. The ability of SFN to target aberrant acetylation patterns, in addition to effects on phase 2 enzymes, may make it an effective chemoprevention agent. Other dietary agents such as butyrate, allyl sulfides and organoselenium compounds have also shown promise as HDAC inhibitors. These studies are significant because of the potential to qualify or change recommendations for high-risk cancer patients, thereby increasing their survival through simple dietary choices, such as incorporating easily accessible foods into a patient’s diet. The work to date provides a scientific foundation for future large-scale human clinical intervention studies with dietary agents that affect the epigenome. PMID:20436256

  7. Hyperkalemia from Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Villgran, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte problem in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is typically caused by medications in patients with poor kidney function. Patients with comorbodities such as heart failure and diabetes are predisposed to electrolyte problems. Salt substitutes and dietary supplements are uncommon causes of hyperkalemia, but we propose that they are under-recognized and underdiagnosed causes in patients with chronic kidney disease. Our case report and literature review illustrates that a careful dietary history is essential in patients presenting with electrolyte disorders, especially hyperkalemia. PMID:27924248

  8. Dietary proteins and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2014-01-17

    Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  9. Therapeutic role of dietary fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R.; Fedorak, R.; Frohlich, J.; McLennan, C.; Pavilanis, A.

    1993-01-01

    The current status of dietary fibre and fibre supplements in health and disease is reported, and the components of dietary fibre and its respective mechanical and metabolic effects with emphasis on its therapeutic potential are reviewed. Practical management guidelines are provided to help physicians encourage patients identified as having fibre deficiency to increase dietary fibre intake to the recommended level. PMID:8388284

  10. Children and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... and dietary supplements. This issue provides information about scope of use of complementary health practices by children , ... Systematic Reviews/Reviews/Meta-analyses (PubMed®) Randomized Controlled Trials (PubMed®) Research Spotlights National Survey Reports on CAM ...

  11. Online Dietary Supplement Resources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Internet is becoming an increasingly popular tool for finding nutrition-related information; therefore, nutrition professionals must know how to use it effectively. This article describes websites that dietitians and other health professionals can use to obtain reliable information on dietary s...

  12. Evolution of dietary antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Benzie, Iris F F

    2003-09-01

    Oxygen is vital for most organisms but, paradoxically, damages key biological sites. Oxygenic threat is met by antioxidants that evolved in parallel with our oxygenic atmosphere. Plants employ antioxidants to defend their structures against reactive oxygen species (ROS; oxidants) produced during photosynthesis. The human body is exposed to these same oxidants, and we have also evolved an effective antioxidant system. However, this is not infallible. ROS breach defences, oxidative damage ensues, accumulates with age, and causes a variety of pathological changes. Plant-based, antioxidant-rich foods traditionally formed the major part of the human diet, and plant-based dietary antioxidants are hypothesized to have an important role in maintaining human health. This hypothesis is logical in evolutionary terms, especially when we consider the relatively hypoxic environment in which humans may have evolved. In this paper, the human diet is discussed briefly in terms of its evolutionary development, different strategies of antioxidant defence are outlined, and evolution of dietary antioxidants is discussed from the perspectives of plant need and our current dietary requirements. Finally, possibilities in regard to dietary antioxidants, evolution, and human health are presented, and an evolutionary cost-benefit analysis is presented in relation to why we lost the ability to make ascorbic acid (vitamin C) although we retained an absolute requirement for it.

  13. Carbohydrate and dietary fiber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrate provides 50 to 60% of the calories consumed by the average American. Although relatively little carbohydrate is needed in the diet, carbohydrate spares protein and fat being metabolized for calories. The principal dietary carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Sugars (simple carbohydrat...

  14. Dietary supplements in sport.

    PubMed

    Burke, L M; Read, R S

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the dietary practices of athletes report that nutritional supplements are commonly used. Supplementation practices vary between sports and individual athletes; however, there is evidence that at least some athletes use a large number of supplements concurrently, often in doses that are very high in comparison with normal dietary intakes. In exploring supplementation practices we propose a classification system separating the supplements into dietary supplements and nutritional erogogenic aids. The dietary supplement is characterised as a product which can be used to address physiological or nutritional issues arising in sport. It may provide a convenient or practical means of consuming special nutrient requirements for exercise, or it may be used to prevent/reverse nutritional deficiencies that commonly occur among athletes. The basis of the dietary supplement is an understanding of nutritional requirements and physiological effects of exercise. When the supplement is used to successfully meet a physiological/nutritional goal arising in sport it may be demonstrated to improve sports performance. While there is some interest in refining the composition or formulation of some dietary supplements, the real interest belongs to the use or application of the supplement; i.e. educating athletes to understand and achieve their nutritional needs in a specific sports situation. The sports drink (carbohydrate-electrolyte replacement drink) is a well known example of a dietary supplement. Scientific attitudes towards the sports drink have changed over the past 20 years. Initial caution that carbohydrate-electrolyte fluids compromise gastric emptying during exercise has now been shown to be unjustified. Numerous studies have shown that 5 to 10% solutions of glucose, glucose polymers (maltodextrins) and other simple sugars all have suitable gastric emptying characteristics for the delivery of fluid and moderate amounts of carbohydrate substrate. The optimal

  15. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Persephone; Jurado, Leo-Felix

    2015-12-22

    Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ). Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA). Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA) and dietary intake was determined using the Block's Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208) = 0.193, p < 0.01), percentage fat intake (r(208) = 0.154, p < 0.05), percentage carbohydrate intake (r(208) = -0.172, p < 0.05), Body Mass Index (BMI) (r(208) = 0.216, p < 0.01) and waist circumference (r(208) = 0.161, p < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between Filipino dietary acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status.

  16. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Persephone; Jurado, Leo-Felix

    2015-01-01

    Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ). Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA). Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA) and dietary intake was determined using the Block’s Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208) = 0.193, p < 0.01), percentage fat intake (r(208) = 0.154, p < 0.05), percentage carbohydrate intake (r(208) = −0.172, p < 0.05), Body Mass Index (BMI) (r(208) = 0.216, p < 0.01) and waist circumference (r(208) = 0.161, p < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between Filipino dietary acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status. PMID:26703646

  17. [Dietary modification in hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Kloock, B; König, D

    2006-11-23

    Successful treatment of hypertension requires a holistic approach. In this connection, focusing on a healthy lifestyle, eating, drinking and consumption behavior and, finally, the quality of foodstuffs and the exercise habits of the patient represents an essential supplement to the classical forms of pharmaceutical treatment. The major dietary-physiological factors have been shown to be weight reduction, the monitoring of salt consumption, appropriate intake of fiber, a preference for vegetables, and a reduction of immoderate alcohol consumption.

  18. Dietary treatment of nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nouvenne, Antonio; Meschi, Tiziana; Guerra, Angela; Allegri, Franca; Prati, Beatrice; Borghi, Loris

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of idiopathic nephrolithiasis is increasing in rich countries. Dietary manipulation could contribute to the prevention of both its first appearance and the recurrence of the disease. The target of dietary treatment is to decrease the “urinary lithogenic risk factors” such as low urine volume, hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, hyperphosphaturia, hypocitraturia, hypomagnesuria and excessively alkaline or acid urinary pH. Due to the lack of randomized controlled trials focused on this problem, there is not ample evidence to confidently recommend dietary changes. Despite this, numerous recent and past experiences support modification of diet as having a primary role in the prevention of nephrolithiasis. In particular, it is recommended to limit animal protein and salt intake, to consume milk and derivatives in amounts corresponding to calcium intake of about 1200 mg/day and to assume fiber (40 g/day), vegetables and fruit daily avoiding foods with high oxalate content. Furthermore, vitamin C intake not exceeding 1500 mg/day plays a protective role as well as avoiding vitamin B6 deficiency and abstaining, if possible, from vitamin D supplements. Lastly, it is recommended to drink enough water to bring the urinary volume up to at least 2 L/day and, as much as possible, to use fresh or frozen products rather than prepacked or precooked foods which are often too rich in sodium chloride. PMID:22460996

  19. Natural Dietary Phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Racette, Susan B; Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical phytosterol studies are performed by adding purified supplements to smaller phytosterol amounts present in the natural diet. However, natural dietary phytosterols themselves may also have important effects on cholesterol metabolism. Epidemiological work using food frequency questionnaires to estimate dietary intake suggest that extremes of normal consumption may be associated with 3-14% changes in LDL cholesterol. Standardized food databases do not have enough phytosterol values to allow calculation of phytosterol intake for individuals outside of specialized studies. Natural diets contain phytosterol amounts ranging from less than 60 mg/2000 kcal to over 500 mg/2000 kcal. Physiological studies in which whole body cholesterol metabolism is investigated show large effects of natural dietary phytosterols on cholesterol absorption efficiency, cholesterol biosynthesis and cholesterol excretion which exceed the magnitude of changes in LDL cholesterol. The dual effects of natural phytosterols on both LDL-C and whole body cholesterol metabolism need to be considered in relating them to potential protection from coronary heart disease risk.

  20. Dietary hyperthyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Köhler, B; Stengel, C; Neiger, R

    2012-03-01

    Evaluation of dogs with elevated plasma thyroxine concentration fed raw food before and after changing the diet. Between 2006 and 2011 all dogs presented with an elevated plasma thyroxine concentration and a dietary history of feeding raw food were included. Thyroxine (reference interval: 19·3 to 51·5 nmol/L) and in many cases also thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations (reference interval: <0·30 ng/mL) were measured initially and after changing the diet. Twelve dogs were presented with a median age of five years. The median plasma thyroxine concentration was 156·1 (range of 79·7 to 391·9) nmol/L; in six dogs, thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration was measured and was <0·03 ng/mL in five dogs and 0·05 ng/mL in one dog. Six dogs showed clinical signs such as weight loss, aggressiveness, tachycardia, panting and restlessness while six dogs had no clinical signs. After changing the diet eight dogs were examined: thyroxine concentration normalised in all dogs and clinical signs resolved. Dietary hyperthyroidism can be seen in dogs on a raw meat diet or fed fresh or dried gullets. Increased plasma thyroxine concentration in a dog, either with or without signs of hyperthyroidism, should prompt the veterinarian to obtain a thorough dietary history. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  1. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  2. Dietary delivery: A new avenue for microRNA therapeutics?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many people carefully monitor their food choices, adhering to the philosophy that you are what you eat. Recent research adds to a new wrinkle to that old adage, suggesting that dietary small RNAs (sRNAs) can control the gene expression of the consumer and may provide an effective, noninvasive, and i...

  3. Beware of Fraudulent 'Dietary Supplements'

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Marketed as Dietary Supplements Hidden Risks of Erectile Dysfunction 'Treatments' Sold Online 'All Natural' Alternatives for Erectile Dysfunction: A Risky Proposition For More Information Questions and ...

  4. Dietary Patterns and CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Liu, Yang; Crews, Deidra C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and their clinicians seek ways to mitigate the risk of CKD progression and its associated complications. Emerging data suggest that dietary modifications may be beneficial adjuvant approaches to reducing the risk of adverse CKD outcomes. This review focuses on several different dietary patterns, including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension and Mediterranean diets, and their kidney health benefits. We discuss how healthful dietary patterns are lower in dietary acid load and how improving diet quality may slow the progression of CKD. We also discuss some barriers that may impede socially disadvantaged individuals from following healthful diets. Dietary patterns low in dietary acid load might slow the progression of CKD. Current evidence suggests that a reduction in dietary acid load could be beneficial in patients with CKD, but the supremacy of any particular diet is yet to be established. Additional randomized controlled dietary interventions among CKD patients are needed to inform evidence-based recommendations, which can be tailored to an individual's preferences and ability to access healthful foods. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The regulation of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Larissa L; Berry, Judith A

    2003-09-01

    To discuss the regulatory history of dietary supplements, define the term dietary supplement, clarify ingredient and nutrition information labeling, and discuss safety issues and implications for practice. Review of primary and secondary sources, including both Internet sites and journal articles. In the United States, 6 out of every 10 people use dietary supplements. For decades, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) protected the public from mislabeled and unsafe products by regulating as foods those dietary supplements that included only essential nutrients. The Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 included herbs as dietary supplements. When the Dietary Supplement and Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994 was passed, the FDA lost its regulatory power. The DSHEA expanded the definition of dietary supplements beyond essential nutrients. Dietary supplements are no longer considered food additives, which makes them exempt from prescreening or any safety and efficacy studies before they are released to the public. Under the DSHEA, the FDA may take action if a product poses a direct health threat and only after adverse health effects have already occurred. A good understanding of the regulatory procedures for dietary supplements will aid nurse practitioners (NPs) in patient education regarding these products. Patients should be advised to choose supplements that are made by nationally known food and drug manufacturers that belong to trade groups. NPs and patients can contact the manufacturer directly and can access government Internet sites for more product information.

  6. Regulation of somatic growth and gene expression of the GH-IGF system and PRP-PACAP by dietary lipid level in early juveniles of a teleost fish, the pejerrey (Odontesthes bonariensis).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Requeni, Pedro; Kraemer, Mauricio Néstor; Canosa, Luis Fabián

    2012-05-01

    Growth and mRNA levels of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its related peptide (PRP), and the system controlled by the growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) were analyzed in pejerrey fry fed with graded levels of dietary lipids: 10% (L10), 13% (L13) and 21% (L21). First, the full sequence of pejerrey PRP-PACAP was obtained by RT-PCR, using primers based on conserved fragments of teleosts PACAP sequences. The growth of the fish at 83 days after hatching (dah) and the GH mRNA levels were not significantly affected by the dietary treatment. Conversely, PRP-PACAP expression significantly decreased with increasing dietary lipids (L10 > L21). While GH receptor (GHR)-I and IGF-I transcripts did not differ among groups, GHR-II transcripts decreased in group L21. IGF-II expression apparently followed the same trend. These results in combination with the lower expression of the anorexigenic PRP-PACAP in fish fed diet L21 and the correlation analysis evidencing a particularly fine tuning of the GH-IGF system in group L13, suggest that this diet may cover the energy demands for growing pejerrey from 27 dah onwards. Our results show for first time in fish a differential response of PRP-PACAP transcripts to dietary manipulations, and confirm the sensitivity of the pejerrey GH-IGF system to changes in diet composition despite the lack of (or in advance to) a clear response of somatic growth.

  7. The -675 4G/5G polymorphism at the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) gene modulates plasma Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 concentrations in response to dietary fat consumption.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martínez, P; Adarraga-Cansino, M D; Fernández de la Puebla, R A; Blanco-Molina, A; Delgado-Lista, J; Marín, C; Ordovás, J M; López-Miranda, J; Pérez-Jiménez, F

    2008-04-01

    The objective of the study was to determine whether Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 (PAI-1) -675 4G/5G polymorphism is associated with the response of functional plasma PAI-1 concentrations to changes in the amount and quality of dietary fat in healthy subjects. PAI-1 is the major inhibitor of fibrinolysis, and a lower level of fibrinolytic activity could be implicated in an increased risk of IHD. Fifty-nine healthy Spanish volunteers (ten 4G/4G homozygotes, twenty-eight heterozygotes 4G/5G and twenty-one 5G/5G homozygotes) consumed three diets for periods of 4 weeks each: a SFA-rich diet (38 % fat, 20 % SFA), followed by a carbohydrate-rich diet (30 % fat, 55 % carbohydrate) and a MUFA-rich diet (38 % fat, 22 % MUFA) according to a randomized crossover design. At the end of each dietary period plasma lipid and functional plasma PAI-1 concentrations were determined. Subjects carrying the 4G allele (4G/4G and 4G/5G) showed a significant decrease in PAI-1 concentrations after the MUFA diet, compared with the SFA-rich and carbohydrate-rich diets (genotype x diet interaction: P = 0.028). 5G/5G homozygotes had the lowest plasma PAI-1 concentrations compared with 4G/4G and 4G/5G subjects (genotype: P = 0.002), without any changes as a result of the amount and the quality of the dietary fat. In summary, no differences in plasma PAI-1 concentration response were found after changes in dietary fat intake in 5G/5G homozygotes, although these subjects displayed the lowest concentrations of PAI-1. On the other hand, carriers of the 4G allele are more likely to hyper-respond to the presence of MUFA in the diet because of a greater decrease in PAI-1 concentrations.

  8. The role of dietary fat in adipose tissue metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, Maria Puy

    2007-10-01

    Energy intake and expenditure tend on average to remain adjusted to each other in order to maintain a stable body weight, which is only likely to be sustained if the fuel mix oxidised is equivalent to the nutrient content of the diet. Whereas protein and carbohydrate degradation and oxidation are closely adjusted to their intakes, fat balance regulation is less precise and that fat is more likely to be stored than oxidised. It has been demonstrated that dietary fatty acids have an influence not only on the fatty acid composition of membrane phospholipids, thus modulating several metabolic processes that take place in the adipocyte, but also on the composition and the quantity of different fatty acids in adipose tissue. Moreover, dietary fatty acids also modulate eicosanoid presence, which have hormone-like activities in lipid metabolism regulation in adipose tissue. Until recently, the adipocyte has been considered to be no more than a passive tissue for storage of excess energy. However, there is now compelling evidence that adipocytes have a role as endocrine secretory cells. Some of the adipokines produced by adipose tissue, such as leptin and adiponectin, act on adipose tissue in an autocrine/paracrine manner to regulate adipocyte metabolism. Furthermore, dietary fatty acids may influence the expression of adipokines. The nutrients are among the most influential of the environmental factors that determine the way adipose tissue genes are expressed by functioning as regulators of gene transcription. Therefore, not only dietary fat amount but also dietary fat composition influence adipose tissue metabolism.

  9. Dietary Patterns: Challenges and Opportunities in Dietary Patterns Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, increasing numbers of researchers have used dietary patterns to characterize the population’s diet and to examine associations between diet and disease outcomes. Many methods, primarily data-driven and index-based approaches, are available for characterizing dietary patterns in a p...

  10. National Children's Study Dietary Assessment Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    The National Children's Study dietary assessment workshop was an opportunity for experts in dietary assessment methodology to gather and discuss the current state of knowledge about methodologies used to assess dietary intake during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

  11. Dietary therapies for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kossoff, Eric H; Wang, Huei-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome) specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  12. Chapter 11: Dietary reference intakes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) are a set of recommendations intended to provide guidance in evaluating nutrient intakes and planning meals on the basis of nutrient adequacy. In contrast to their predecessor, Recommended Dietary Allowances last published in 1989, the DRIs differ in two ways: th...

  13. Dietary Approaches to Prevent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Lydia A.; Green, Torrance; Harrison, Teresa N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors. A substantial body of evidence from animal studies, epidemiologic studies, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials has demonstrated that certain dietary patterns and individual dietary elements play a prominent role in the development of hypertension. Changes in diet can lower blood pressure, prevent the development of hypertension, and reduce the risk of hypertension-related complications. Dietary strategies for the prevention of hypertension include reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing potassium intake, and adopting an overall dietary pattern such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet or a Mediterranean diet. In order to reduce the burden of blood pressure-related complications, efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted. PMID:24091874

  14. Dietary intake and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Abnet, Christian C; Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Though dietary factors are implicated in chronic disease risk, assessment of dietary intake has limitations, including problems with recall of complex food intake patterns over a long period of time. Diet and nutrient biomarkers may provide objective measures of dietary intake and nutritional status, as well as an integrated measure of intake, absorption and metabolism. Thus, the search for an unbiased biomarker of dietary intake and nutritional status is an important aspect of nutritional epidemiology. This chapter reviews types of biomarkers related to dietary intake and nutritional status, such as exposure biomarkers of diet and nutritional status, intermediate endpoints, and susceptibility. Novel biomarkers, such as biomarkers of physical fitness, oxidative DNA damage and tissue concentrations are also discussed.

  15. Impact of dietary precursor ALA versus preformed DHA on fatty acid profiles of eggs, liver and adipose tissue and expression of genes associated with hepatic lipid metabolism in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Neijat, M; Eck, P; House, J D

    2017-04-01

    Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA), including alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and preformed longer chain PUFA (LCPUFA, particularly docosahexaenoic acid, DHA) differ in their egg LCPUFA enrichment efficiency. However, mechanisms leading to these differences are unclear. To this end, omega-3 PUFA contents in different lipid classes, including triacylglycerol (TAG) and total phospholipid (PL) in yolk, liver and adipose, as well as the expression of key hepatic enzymes in lipid metabolism were evaluated in laying hens in response to changes in dietary supply. Seventy Lohmann hens (n=10/treatment) consumed either a control diet (0.03% total omega-3 PUFA), or the control with supplementation (0.20%, 0.40% and 0.60% total omega-3 PUFA) from either flaxseed oil or algal product, as sources of ALA (precursor) or DHA (preformed), respectively. The study was arranged in a completely randomized design, and data were analyzed using the Proc Mixed procedure of SAS. ALA accumulated as a function of intake (P<0.0001) in total and lipid classes of yolk, liver and adipose (TAG only) for ALA- and DHA-fed hens. Unlike flaxseed oil, preformed-DHA contributed to greater (P<0.0001) accumulation of LCPUFA in yolk total PL and TAG pool, as well as adipose TAG. This may relate to elevated (P<0.0001) expression of acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL1). No difference in hepatic EPA level in total lipids was noted between both treatment groups; EPAliver=2.1493x-0.0064; R(2)=0.70, P<0.0001 (x=dietary omega-3 PUFA). The latter result may highlight the role of hepatic EPA in the regulation of LCPUFA metabolism in laying hens. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Dietary pattern analysis for the evaluation of dietary guidelines.

    PubMed

    Willett, Walter C; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2008-01-01

    Dietary Guidelines for the promotion of overall good health and the prevention of disease often play an important role in setting nutritional policy and in the education of the public about healthy food choices. Although much has been written about adherence to such guidelines, until recently there was no evidence on whether adherence to specific dietary guidelines is associated with better health. As an outcome variable for such analyses, we have used the incidence of major chronic disease, which includes incidence of any major cardiovascular disease, cancer, or death from any cause excluding violence. We have evaluated the Dietary Guidelines for Americans using a scoring system called the Healthy Eating Index developed by the Department of Agriculture to quantify adherence to these guidelines. We found that adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid was associated with only a small reduction in major chronic disease risk in a population of over 100,000 US adult men and women. We also assessed whether an alternate index, which took into account the type of fat and quality of carbohydrate, would better predict risk. In contrast with the original Healthy Eating Index, adherence to the alternative index predicted lower rates of major chronic disease, and particularly cardiovascular disease, suggesting that the Dietary Guidelines were not offering optimal dietary guidance. These analyses suggest that dietary guidelines should be evaluated for their ability to predict the occurrence of major illness, and that such analyses can help refine these guidelines.

  17. Dietary intervention in acne

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  18. The genetics of childhood obesity and interaction with dietary macronutrients.

    PubMed

    Garver, William S; Newman, Sara B; Gonzales-Pacheco, Diana M; Castillo, Joseph J; Jelinek, David; Heidenreich, Randall A; Orlando, Robert A

    2013-05-01

    The genes contributing to childhood obesity are categorized into three different types based on distinct genetic and phenotypic characteristics. These types of childhood obesity are represented by rare monogenic forms of syndromic or non-syndromic childhood obesity, and common polygenic childhood obesity. In some cases, genetic susceptibility to these forms of childhood obesity may result from different variations of the same gene. Although the prevalence for rare monogenic forms of childhood obesity has not increased in recent times, the prevalence of common childhood obesity has increased in the United States and developing countries throughout the world during the past few decades. A number of recent genome-wide association studies and mouse model studies have established the identification of susceptibility genes contributing to common childhood obesity. Accumulating evidence suggests that this type of childhood obesity represents a complex metabolic disease resulting from an interaction with environmental factors, including dietary macronutrients. The objective of this article is to provide a review on the origins, mechanisms, and health consequences of obesity susceptibility genes and interaction with dietary macronutrients that predispose to childhood obesity. It is proposed that increased knowledge of these obesity susceptibility genes and interaction with dietary macronutrients will provide valuable insight for individual, family, and community preventative lifestyle intervention, and eventually targeted nutritional and medicinal therapies.

  19. Dietary sodium protects fish against copper-induced olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Azizishirazi, Ali; Dew, William A; Bougas, Berenice; Bernatchez, Louis; Pyle, Greg G

    2015-04-01

    Exposure to low concentrations of copper impairs olfaction in fish. To determine the transcriptional changes in the olfactory epithelium induced by copper exposure, wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were exposed to 20 μg/L of copper for 3 and 24h. A novel yellow perch microarray with 1000 candidate genes was used to measure differential gene transcription in the olfactory epithelium. While three hours of exposure to copper changed the transcription of only one gene, the transcriptions of 70 genes were changed after 24h of exposure to copper. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the effect of exposure duration on two specific genes of interest, two sub-units of Na/K-ATPase. At 24 and 48 h, Na/K-ATPase transcription was down-regulated by copper at olfactory rosettes. As copper-induced impairment of Na/K-ATPase activity in gills can be ameliorated by increased dietary sodium, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used to determine if elevated dietary sodium was also protective against copper-induced olfactory impairment. Measurement of the olfactory response of rainbow trout using electro-olfactography demonstrated that sodium was protective of copper-induced olfactory dysfunction. This work demonstrates that the transcriptions of both subunits of Na/K-ATPase in the olfactory epithelium of fish are affected by Cu exposure, and that dietary Na protects against Cu-induced olfactory dysfunction.

  20. [Dietary changes in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mayans, J A; García Campos, M; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Mata Rivera, N; Zárate Mondragón, F; Mason Cordero, T; Villarreal Espinosa, A

    2003-06-01

    Although the Mexican population has traditionally been malnourished, the prevalence of obesity in children and adults has increased by almost 50 % in the last 10 years. Recent studies show substantial changes in the nutritional status of Mexicans, especially in the pediatric population. Among the factors associated with the development of obesity are overeating, sedentariness, and genetics. The apparent economic development in Mexico, as well as the influence of dietary patterns from other countries, have contributed to modifying lifestyle. Despite measures taken by the health system, iron- and zinc-deficiency anemia continue to be prevalent. The present review aims to describe the changes that have taken place in Mexico in the last few decades leading to a generation of short and obese children, as well as to determine the associated factors in order to promote healthier eating patterns among the Mexican population.

  1. Dietary treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Moloney, M

    2000-11-01

    Numerous dietary treatments that purport to promote something unique for stimulating weight loss have been published. These treatments include fad diets, diets formulated by various commercial slimming clubs, very-low-energy diets (VLCD) and conventional diets. Fad diets may possibly reduce some weight short-term; however, there is no scientific basis to their long-term use. Commercial slimming clubs may be suitable for some individuals but they need to be properly assessed professionally. There are specific guidelines for the use of VLCD, which are only appropriate for short-term use. There is scientific evidence to suggest that conventional diets can produce both short- and long-term weight loss. A successful weight-loss programme depends on a multidisciplinary team approach. Management strategies should be devised for addressing issues such as goals, monitoring, follow-up, relapse and evaluation. Initial assessments should include medical, laboratory and anthropometric data, fitness level and dietary and behavioural attitudes. These results will form the basis of the treatment plan. Frequent visits to the clinic are fundamental in promoting continuing weight loss during the long-term maintenance stage of treatment. The visits should be made worthwhile for the patient. Realistic and attainable goals for diet, exercise and behaviour modification should be made. The diet should have a novel approach and be tailored to the needs of the patient. It should be adequate nutritionally, low in energy and fat. The overall aim should be to promote lifelong changes in lifestyle, improvement in quality of life and health risks.

  2. Dietary whole and cracked linseed increases the proportion of oleic and α-linolenic acids in adipose tissues and decreases stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, and fatty acid synthase gene expression in the longissimus thoracis muscle of Yanbian Yellow cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, X Z; Yan, C G; Yu, J; Gao, Q S; Choi, S H; Shin, J S; Smith, S B

    2017-02-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation of linseed in a beef cattle fattening diet would increase PUFA concentrations in intramuscular adipose tissue and depress (), (), and () gene expression by decreasing () expression. Conversely, supplemental linseed would upregulate expression of () and () in muscle of Yanbian Yellow steers. Thirty steers were assigned at random to 3 groups of 10 steers fed either the basal diet (corn grain and corn silage-based commercial concentrate [CON]), the CON diet plus 8% whole linseed (WLS; DM basis), or the CON diet plus 8% cracked linseed (CLS; DM basis) for 6 mo. The WLS and CLS supplements did not affect carcass weight, backfat thickness, or marbling scores ( > 0.10) but increased rib eye area and fat color (more yellow; < 0.05). The WLS and CLS diets decreased the proportions of 16:0 and 18:0 and increased the proportions of 18:1-9, 18:3-3, -9, -11 conjugated linoleic acid, total MUFA, and total PUFA in intramuscular, intermuscular, and subcutaneous adipose tissues. The WLS and CLS diets increased and gene expression whereas the supplements depressed , , , and gene expression in longissimus thoracis muscle, relative to CON muscle, consistent with our hypothesis. Because the WLS and CLS treatments did not affect any measure of carcass adiposity, these results indicated that linseed supplements promoted uptake of dietary lipids while concurrently depressing de novo fatty acid biosynthesis in adipose tissue.

  3. Effect of Synthetic Dietary Triglycerides: A Novel Research Paradigm for Nutrigenomics

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Linda M.; de Groot, Philip J.; Hooiveld, Guido J. E. J.; Koppen, Arjen; Kalkhoven, Eric; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2008-01-01

    Background The effect of dietary fats on human health and disease are likely mediated by changes in gene expression. Several transcription factors have been shown to respond to fatty acids, including SREBP-1c, NF-κB, RXRs, LXRs, FXR, HNF4α, and PPARs. However, it is unclear to what extent these transcription factors play a role in gene regulation by dietary fatty acids in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we take advantage of a unique experimental design using synthetic triglycerides composed of one single fatty acid in combination with gene expression profiling to examine the effects of various individual dietary fatty acids on hepatic gene expression in mice. We observed that the number of significantly changed genes and the fold-induction of genes increased with increasing fatty acid chain length and degree of unsaturation. Importantly, almost every single gene regulated by dietary unsaturated fatty acids remained unaltered in mice lacking PPARα. In addition, the majority of genes regulated by unsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid, were also regulated by the specific PPARα agonist WY14643. Excellent agreement was found between the effects of unsaturated fatty acids on mouse liver versus cultured rat hepatoma cells. Interestingly, using Nuclear Receptor PamChip® Arrays, fatty acid- and WY14643-induced interactions between PPARα and coregulators were found to be highly similar, although several PPARα-coactivator interactions specific for WY14643 were identified. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the effects of dietary unsaturated fatty acids on hepatic gene expression are almost entirely mediated by PPARα and mimic those of synthetic PPARα agonists in terms of regulation of target genes and molecular mechanism. Use of synthetic dietary triglycerides may provide a novel paradigm for nutrigenomics research. PMID:18301758

  4. Effect of the interaction between diet composition and the PPM1K genetic variant on insulin resistance and β cell function markers during weight loss: results from the Nutrient Gene Interactions in Human Obesity: implications for dietary guidelines (NUGENOB) randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Goni, Leticia; Qi, Lu; Cuervo, Marta; Milagro, Fermín I; Saris, Wim H; MacDonald, Ian A; Langin, Dominique; Astrup, Arne; Arner, Peter; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Svendstrup, Mathilde; Blaak, Ellen E; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Hansen, Torben; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2017-09-01

    Background: Circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids (AAAs) have been shown to be associated with insulin resistance and diabetes risk. The common rs1440581 T allele in the protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+ dependent 1K (PPM1K) gene has been related to elevated BCAA concentrations and risk of type 2 diabetes.Objective: In the present study, we tested whether dietary fat and carbohydrate intakes influenced the association between the rs1440581 PPM1K genetic variant and glucose-metabolism traits during weight loss.Design: The rs1440581 PPM1K genetic variant was genotyped in a total of 757 nondiabetic individuals who were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 energy-restricted diets that differed in macronutrient composition (low-fat diet: 20-25% fat, 15% protein, and 60-65% carbohydrate; high-fat diet: 40-45% fat, 15% protein, and 40-45% carbohydrate). The changes in fasting glucose, fasting insulin, insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance) and homeostasis model assessment of β cell function (HOMA-B) were measured after a mean ± SD weight loss of 6.8 ± 3.4 kg over 10 wk and analyzed according to the presence of the T allele of rs1440581.Results: The rs1440581 T allele was associated with a smaller improvement in glucose concentrations after the 10-wk dietary intervention (β ± SE: 0.05 ± 0.02 mg/dL; P = 0.03). In addition, significant gene-diet interactions were shown for the rs1440581 PPM1K genetic variant in relation to changes in insulin and HOMA-B (P-interaction = 0.006 and 0.002, respectively). In response to the high-fat diet, the T allele was associated with a higher reduction of insulin (β ± SE: -0.77 ± 0.40 μU/mL; P = 0.04) and HOMA-B (β ± SE: -13.2 ± 3.81; P = 0.003). An opposite effect was observed in the low-fat diet group, although in this group the T allele was marginally (P = 0.10) and not significantly (P = 0.24) associated with insulin and HOMA-B, respectively.Conclusion:PPM1K rs1440581 may

  5. Cancer Chemoprevention by Dietary Polyphenols: Promising Role for Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Link, Alexander; Balaguer, Francesc; Goel, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to heritable changes that are not encoded in the DNA sequence itself, but play an important role in the control of gene expression. In mammals, epigenetic mechanisms include changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs. Although epigenetic changes are heritable in somatic cells, these modifications are also potentially reversible, which makes them attractive and promising avenues for tailoring cancer preventive and therapeutic strategies. Burgeoning evidence in the last decade has provided unprecedented clues that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms in humans. Dietary polyphenols from green tea, turmeric, soybeans, broccoli and others have shown to possess multiple cell-regulatory activities within cancer cells. More recently, we have begun to understand that some of the dietary polyphenols may exert their chemopreventive effects in part by modulating various components of the epigenetic machinery in humans. In this article, we first discuss the contribution of diet and environmental factors on epigenetic alterations; subsequently, we provide a comprehensive review of literature on the role of various dietary polyphenols. In particular, we summarize the current knowledge on a large number of dietary agents and their effects on DNA methylation, histone modifications and regulation of expression of non-coding miRNAs in various in vitro and in vivo models. We emphasize how increased understanding of the chemopreventive effects of dietary polyphenols on specific epigenetic alterations may provide unique and yet unexplored novel and highly effective chemopreventive strategies for reducing the health burden of cancer and other diseases in humans. PMID:20599773

  6. Genetics of dietary habits and obesity - a twin study.

    PubMed

    Hasselbalch, Ann Louise

    2010-09-01

    Obesity has become a major health concern due to the increased risk of co-morbidities, resulting in decreased quality of life, stigmatization, reduced working ability and early death. This causes a great challenge for the health care systems and results in increased direct costs related to treatment of obesity and co-morbidities, as well as increased indirect costs related to reduced function and withdrawal from the labour market. Both between and within societies, large variation in the prevalence of overweight and obesity exists. This variation is caused by differences in environmental exposures as well as genetic differences between individuals, resulting in differentiated susceptibility to environmental exposures. The evidence for genetic influence on anthropometry has previously been established and has been estimated to be 60-70% based on twin studies. These inter-individual differences can, however, not explain the increase in obesity prevalence during the past 70 years. Environmental factors must therefore play an important role in the obesity epidemic. Habitual diet is one of many environmental factors that potentially contribute to the inter-individual differences in body fat mass, but only limited evidence for associations between habitual dietary intake and anthropometry exists. Differences in habitual dietary intake are also partly determined by differences in genes influencing smell and taste preferences. But, so far, only few studies have investigated genetic influences on dietary intake in adults and the interplay between diet, genes and obesity. The focus of the thesis was to investigate the genetic and environmental influence on habitual diet and obesity as well as the association between habitual diet and anthropometry. The thesis is based on structural equation modelling of twin data from the Danish Twin Registry with special focus on the GEMINAKAR twin study that was performed in 1997-2000. In this study, anthropometric traits of the twin pairs

  7. Dietary supplements for dysmenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Pattanittum, Porjai; Kunyanone, Naowarat; Brown, Julie; Sangkomkamhang, Ussanee S; Barnes, Joanne; Seyfoddin, Vahid; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2016-03-22

    Dysmenorrhoea refers to painful menstrual cramps and is a common gynaecological complaint. Conventional treatments include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), which both reduce myometrial activity (contractions of the uterus). A suggested alternative approach is dietary supplements. We used the term 'dietary supplement' to include herbs or other botanical, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and amino acids. We excluded traditional Chinese medicines. To determine the efficacy and safety of dietary supplements for treating dysmenorrhoea. We searched sources including the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycINFO (all from inception to 23 March 2015), trial registries, and the reference lists of relevant articles. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of dietary supplements for moderate or severe primary or secondary dysmenorrhoea. We excluded studies of women with an intrauterine device. Eligible comparators were other dietary supplements, placebo, no treatment, or conventional analgesia. Two review authors independently performed study selection, performed data extraction and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and adverse effects. We used a fixed-effect model to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data, and mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We presented data that were unsuitable for analysis either descriptively or in additional tables. We assessed the quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methods. We included 27 RCTs (3101 women). Most included studies were conducted amongst cohorts of students with primary dysmenorrhoea in their late teens or early twenties. Twenty-two studies were

  8. Evolutionary Adaptations to Dietary Changes

    PubMed Central

    Luca, F.; Perry, G.H.; Di Rienzo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Through cultural innovation and changes in habitat and ecology, there have been a number of major dietary shifts in human evolution, including meat eating, cooking, and those associated with plant and animal domestication. The identification of signatures of adaptations to such dietary changes in the genome of extant primates (including humans) may shed light not only on the evolutionary history of our species, but also on the mechanisms that underlie common metabolic diseases in modern human populations. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the major dietary shifts that occurred during hominin evolution, and we discuss the methods and approaches used to identify signals of natural selection in patterns of sequence variation. We then review the results of studies aimed at detecting the genetic loci that played a major role in dietary adaptations and conclude by outlining the potential of future studies in this area. PMID:20420525

  9. Evolutionary adaptations to dietary changes.

    PubMed

    Luca, F; Perry, G H; Di Rienzo, A

    2010-08-21

    Through cultural innovation and changes in habitat and ecology, there have been a number of major dietary shifts in human evolution, including meat eating, cooking, and those associated with plant and animal domestication. The identification of signatures of adaptations to such dietary changes in the genome of extant primates (including humans) may shed light not only on the evolutionary history of our species, but also on the mechanisms that underlie common metabolic diseases in modern human populations. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the major dietary shifts that occurred during hominin evolution, and we discuss the methods and approaches used to identify signals of natural selection in patterns of sequence variation. We then review the results of studies aimed at detecting the genetic loci that played a major role in dietary adaptations and conclude by outlining the potential of future studies in this area.

  10. Dietary polyphenols: Antioxidants or not?

    PubMed

    Croft, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Population studies have shown a strong association between dietary intake of polyphenols and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. These associations have been confirmed to some extent by intervention studies which have shown improvements in vascular function and blood pressure with certain polyphenols or food extracts rich in polyphenols. The mechanisms involved in the bioactivity of dietary polyphenols is still under active investigation. It is unlikely that polyphenols act as antioxidants in vivo. Evidence suggests that dietary polyphenols or their metabolites act as signalling molecules and can increase nitric oxide bioavailability and induce protective enzymes. This review will outline some of the key issues in dietary polyphenol research that suggest mechanistic insights into the action of these bioactive compounds. There are a number of issues that remain to be resolved in bridging the gap between observational studies and intervention trials using food extracts or pure polyphenol compounds.

  11. Changes of Dietary Fat and Carbohydrate Content Alter Central and Peripheral Clock in Humans.

    PubMed

    Pivovarova, Olga; Jürchott, Karsten; Rudovich, Natalia; Hornemann, Silke; Ye, Lu; Möckel, Simona; Murahovschi, Veronica; Kessler, Katharina; Seltmann, Anne-Cathrin; Maser-Gluth, Christiane; Mazuch, Jeannine; Kruse, Michael; Busjahn, Andreas; Kramer, Achim; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock coordinates numerous metabolic processes with light-dark and feeding regimens. However, in humans it is unknown whether dietary patterns influence circadian rhythms. We examined the effects of switching from a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet to a low-carbohydrate, high fat (LC/HFD) isocaloric diet on the central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans. Diurnal patterns of salivary cortisol and gene expression were analyzed in blood monocytes of 29 nonobese healthy subjects before and 1 and 6 weeks after the dietary switch. For this, we established a method of rhythm prediction by 3-time point data. The centrally driven cortisol rhythm showed a phase delay 1 and 6 weeks after the dietary switch to a LC/HFD as well as an amplitude increase. The dietary switch altered diurnal oscillations of core clock genes (PER1, PER2, PER3, and TEF) and inflammatory genes (CD14, CD180, NFKBIA, and IL1B). The LC/HFD also affected the expression of nonoscillating genes contributing to energy metabolism (SIRT1) and fat metabolism (ACOX3 and IDH3A). Expression of clock genes but not of salivary cortisol in monocytes tightly correlated with levels of blood lipids and with expression of metabolic and inflammatory genes. Our results suggest that the modulation of the dietary fat and carbohydrate content alters the function of the central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

  12. Dietary manipulation of mouse metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feige, Jérôme N; Lagouge, Marie; Auwerx, Johan

    2008-10-01

    The maintenance of metabolic homeostasis relies on the balanced intake of nutrients from food. Consequently, diet composition strongly impacts whole-body physiology. Dietary formulations with strong nutrient imbalances can lead to metabolic disorders, with lipids and simple sugars playing a prominent role. This unit describes how diet formulation can be modified to generate mouse models of human metabolic pathologies, and it details methodological procedures linked to dietary manipulations, including caloric restriction and introduction of a test compound.

  13. INSIG2 variants, dietary patterns, and metabolic risk in Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Baylin, Ana; Deka, Ranjan; Tuitele, John; Viali, Satupaitea; Weeks, Daniel E.; McGarvey, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives Association of insulin-induced gene 2 (INSIG2) variants with obesity has been confirmed in several but not all follow-up studies. Differences in environmental factors across populations may mask some genetic associations and therefore gene-environment interactions should be explored. We hypothesized that the association between dietary patterns and components of the metabolic syndrome could be modified by INSIG2 variants. Subjects/Methods We conducted a longitudinal study of adiposity and cardiovascular disease risk among 427 and 290 adults from Samoa and American Samoa (1990–95). Principal component analysis on food items from a validated FFQ was used to identify neo-traditional and modern dietary patterns. We explored gene-dietary pattern interactions with the INSIG2 variants rs9308762 and rs7566605. Results Results for American Samoans were mostly non-significant. In Samoa, the neo-traditional dietary pattern was associated with lower triglycerides, BMI, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose (all p-for-trend<0.05). The modern pattern was significantly associated with higher triglycerides, BMI, waist circumference, and lower HDL cholesterol (all p-for-trend<0.05). A significant interaction for triglycerides was found between the modern pattern and the rs9308762 polymorphism (p=0.04). Those from Samoa consuming the modern pattern have higher triglycerides if they are homozygous for the rs9308762 C allele. Conclusions The common INSIG2 rs9308762 variant was associated with poorer metabolic control and a greater sensitivity of trigylcerides to a modern dietary pattern. Environmental factors need to be taken into account when assessing genetic associations across and within populations. PMID:22968099

  14. Dietary patterns and prostatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sebastiano, Cimino; Vincenzo, Favilla; Tommaso, Castelli; Giuseppe, Sortino; Marco, Russo; Ivana, Caldarella; Giorgio, Russo; Massimo, Madonia; Giuseppe, Morgia

    2012-01-01

    Dietary patterns play a role on prostatic diseases in association with genetic, behavioral, occupational and environmental ones. Data from reviewed literature provide evidences of a possible relationship between dietary habits and the incidence of prostate disorders, even if it is not enough to justify a widespread adoption of new dietary habits. In this review the role of dietary patterns, including the use of supplements, in the prevention and treatment of the most frequent and known prostatic diseases, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) was analyzed. A limited number of well designed trials were identified in which diet and dietary supplement intervention appeared to slow disease progression. Although conclusive evidences are limited, the current data suggest that a diet low in total calories and fat, high in vegetables and fruits and that body weight control could be possibly effective in preventing prostatic diseases. On the other hand care must be taken to ensure that over-consumption of dietary supplements does not occur because it may be harmful.

  15. Dietary lipids and cancer.

    PubMed

    Granados, S; Quiles, J L; Gil, A; Ramírez-Tortosa, M C

    2006-05-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes of death in Western countries. Among the factors that contribute to the appearance of this disease, diet has a fundamental role, and specifically fats are the main component related to the increase in the incidence of cancerous diseases, particularly breast, colon-rectal, and prostate cancer. From dietary lipids, much attention has been given to the beneficial effects of fish oil, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids n-3 serie, as well as of olive oil, rich in monounsaturated fatty acids--primarily oleic acid. On the contrary, a negative effect has been reported for polyunsaturated fatty acids n-6 serie and for saturated fatty acids. Nutrition constitutes an important aspect of the life of cancer patients. Currently, nutritional formulas are being designed with supplements of polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids and other components such as arginine, RNA, lysine, etc., with the aim of ameliorating the effects of this pathology. The results demonstrate the lower morbility and therefore improved quality of life, a decline in mortality, and a reduction in related costs.

  16. Dietary habits and hearing.

    PubMed

    Rosenhall, Ulf; Idrizbegovic, Esma; Hederstierna, Christina; Rothenberg, Elisabet

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Objective: Study groups from three age cohorts of 70-75 year-olds were investigated to search for possible correlations between dietary habits and auditory function. A cross-sectional, epidemiological study. A total number of 524 people (275 women, 249 men) were recruited from three age cohorts. The study sample was representative of the general population. All participants answered a diet history and were tested with pure-tone audiometry. Eleven categories of food consumption were related to pure-tone averages of low-mid frequency hearing, and high frequency hearing. Two consistent correlations between diet and hearing were observed. One was a correlation between good hearing and a high consumption of fish in the male group. The other was a correlation between poor high frequency hearing and a high consumption of food rich in low molecular carbohydrates in both genders; a larger effect size was seen in females. The study indicates that diet is important for aural health in aging. According to this study fish is beneficial to hearing, whereas consumption of "junk food", rich in low molecular carbohydrates, is detrimental. Other correlations, e.g. between high consumption of antioxidants, were not demonstrated here, but cannot be excluded.

  17. 76 FR 55927 - Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New Dietary Ingredient Notifications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and... notice entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New Dietary Ingredient Notifications...

  18. β-Carotene-9',10'-oxygenase status modulates the impact of dietary tomato and lycopene on hepatic nuclear receptor-, stress-, and metabolism-related gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hsueh-Li; Moran, Nancy E; Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Ken M; Schwartz, Steven J; Erdman, John W; Pearl, Dennis K; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Clinton, Steven K

    2014-04-01

    Tomato and lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene) consumption is hypothesized to protect against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocarcinogenesis, processes that may depend upon diet and gene interactions. To investigate the interaction of tomato or lycopene feeding with β-carotene-9',10'-monooxygenase (Bco2) on hepatic metabolic and signaling pathways, male wild-type (WT) and Bco2(-/-) mice (3-wk-old; n = 36) were fed semi-purified control, 10% tomato powder-containing, or 0.25% lycopene beadlet-containing diets for 3 wk. Serum lycopene concentrations were higher in lycopene- and tomato-fed Bco2(-/-) mice compared with WT (P = 0.03). Tomato- and lycopene-fed mice had detectable hepatic apolipoprotein (apo)-6'-, apo-8'-, and apo-12'-lycopenal concentrations. Hepatic expression of β-carotene-15,15'-monooxygenase was increased in Bco2(-/-) mice compared with WT (P = 0.02), but not affected by diet. Evaluation of hepatic gene expression by focused quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction arrays for nuclear receptors and coregulators (84 genes) and stress and metabolism (82 genes) genes indicates that tomato feeding affected 31 genes (≥1.5-fold, P < 0.05) and lycopene feeding affected 19 genes, 16 of which were affected by both diets. Lycopene down-regulation of 7 nuclear receptors and coregulators, estrogen-related receptor-α, histone deacetylase 3, nuclear receptor coactivator 4, RevErbA-β, glucocorticoid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, and PPAR-γ, coactivator 1 β was dependent upon interaction with Bco2 status. Lycopene and tomato feeding induced gene expression patterns consistent with decreased lipid uptake, decreased cell proliferation and mitosis, down-regulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, and decreased expression of genes involved in retinoid X receptor heterodimer activation. Tomato feeding also caused expression changes consistent with down-regulation of DNA synthesis and terpenoid metabolism. These

  19. Dietary supplements in weight reduction.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Johanna T; Allison, David B; Coates, Paul M

    2005-05-01

    We summarize evidence on the role of dietary supplements in weight reduction, with particular attention to their safety and benefits. Dietary supplements are used for two purposes in weight reduction: (a) providing nutrients that may be inadequate in calorie-restricted diets and (b) for their potential benefits in stimulating weight loss. The goal in planning weight-reduction diets is that total intake from food and supplements should meet recommended dietary allowance/adequate intake levels without greatly exceeding them for all nutrients, except energy. If nutrient amounts from food sources in the reducing diet fall short, dietary supplements containing a single nutrient/element or a multivitamin-mineral combination may be helpful. On hypocaloric diets, the addition of dietary supplements providing nutrients at a level equal to or below recommended dietary allowance/adequate intake levels or 100% daily value, as stated in a supplement's facts box on the label, may help dieters to achieve nutrient adequacy and maintain electrolyte balance while avoiding the risk of excessive nutrient intakes. Many botanical and other types of dietary supplements are purported to be useful for stimulating or enhancing weight loss. Evidence of their efficacy in stimulating weight loss is inconclusive at present. Although there are few examples of safety concerns related to products that are legal and on the market for this purpose, there is also a paucity of evidence on safety for this intended use. Ephedra and ephedrine-containing supplements, with or without caffeine, have been singled out in recent alerts from the Food and Drug Administration because of safety concerns, and use of products containing these substances cannot be recommended. Dietitians should periodically check the Food and Drug Administration Web site ( www.cfsan.fda.gov ) for updates and warnings and alert patients/clients to safety concerns. Dietetics professionals should also consult authoritative sources for

  20. Dietary restriction: could it be considered as speed bump on tumor progression road?

    PubMed

    Cangemi, Antonina; Fanale, Daniele; Rinaldi, Gaetana; Bazan, Viviana; Galvano, Antonio; Perez, Alessandro; Barraco, Nadia; Massihnia, Daniela; Castiglia, Marta; Vieni, Salvatore; Bronte, Giuseppe; Mirisola, Mario; Russo, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Dietary restrictions, including fasting (or long-term starvation), calorie restriction (CR), and short-term starvation (STS), are considered a strong rationale that may protect against various diseases, including age-related diseases and cancer. Among dietary approaches, STS, in which food is not consumed during designed fasting periods but is typically not restricted during designated feeding periods, seems to be more suitable, because other dietary regimens involving prolonged fasting periods could worsen the health conditions of cancer patients, being they already naturally prone to weight loss. Until now, the limited amount of available data does not point to a single gene, pathway, or molecular mechanism underlying the benefits to the different dietary approaches. It is well known that the healthy effect is mediated in part by the reduction of nutrient-related pathways. The calorie restriction and starvation (long- and short-term) also suppress the inflammatory response reducing the expression, for example, of IL-10 and TNF-α, mitigating pro-inflammatory gene expression and increasing anti-inflammatory gene expression. The dietary restriction may regulate both genes involved in cellular proliferation and factors associated to apoptosis in normal and cancer cells. Finally, dietary restriction is an important tool that may influence the response to chemotherapy in preclinical models. However, further data are needed to correlate dietary approaches with chemotherapeutic treatments in human models. The aim of this review is to discuss the effects of various dietary approaches on the cancer progression and therapy response, mainly in preclinical models, describing some signaling pathways involved in these processes.

  1. Dietary Zinc Deficiency Exaggerates Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in Mice: Involvement of Intrahepatic and Extrahepatic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J.; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency. PMID:24155903

  2. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerates ethanol-induced liver injury in mice: involvement of intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Yantao; Sun, Xinguo; Song, Zhenyuan; McClain, Craig J; Zhou, Zhanxiang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that alcoholics have a lower dietary zinc intake compared to health controls. The present study was undertaken to determine the interaction between dietary zinc deficiency and ethanol consumption in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease. C57BL/6N mice were subjected to 8-week feeding of 4 experimental liquid diets: (1) zinc adequate diet, (2) zinc adequate diet plus ethanol, (3) zinc deficient diet, and (4) zinc deficient diet plus ethanol. Ethanol exposure with adequate dietary zinc resulted in liver damage as indicated by elevated plasma alanine aminotransferase level and increased hepatic lipid accumulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Dietary zinc deficiency alone increased hepatic lipid contents, but did not induce hepatic inflammation. Dietary zinc deficiency showed synergistic effects on ethanol-induced liver damage. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol effects on hepatic genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. Dietary zinc deficiency worsened ethanol-induced imbalance between hepatic pro-oxidant and antioxidant enzymes and hepatic expression of cell death receptors. Dietary zinc deficiency exaggerated ethanol-induced reduction of plasma leptin, although it did not affect ethanol-induced reduction of white adipose tissue mass. Dietary zinc deficiency also deteriorated ethanol-induced gut permeability increase and plasma endotoxin elevation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary zinc deficiency is a risk factor in alcoholic liver disease, and multiple intrahepatic and extrahepatic factors may mediate the detrimental effects of zinc deficiency.

  3. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  4. Cardiovascular benefits of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Satija, Ambika; Hu, Frank B

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between dietary fiber and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been extensively studied. There is considerable epidemiological evidence indicating an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and CVD risk. The association has been found to be stronger for cereal fiber than for fruit or vegetable fiber, and several studies have also found increased whole grain consumption to be associated with CVD risk reduction. In light of this evidence, recent US dietary guidelines have endorsed increased consumption of fiber rich whole grains. Regular consumption of dietary fiber, particularly fiber from cereal sources, may improve CVD health through multiple mechanisms including lipid reduction, body weight regulation, improved glucose metabolism, blood pressure control, and reduction of chronic inflammation. Future research should focus on various food sources of fiber, including different types of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as well as resistant starch in relation to CVD risk and weight control; explore the biological mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of fiber-rich diets; and study different ethnic groups and populations with varying sources of dietary fiber.

  5. Dietary Factors and Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Blumenthal, J A

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive decline is an increasingly important public health problem, with more than 100 million adults worldwide projected to develop dementia by 2050. Accordingly, there has been an increased interest in preventive strategies that diminish this risk. It has been recognized that lifestyle factors including dietary patterns, may be important in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia in later life. Several dietary components have been examined, including antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins. In addition, whole dietary eating plans, including the Mediterranean diet (MeDi), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, with and without weight loss, have become areas of increasing interest. Although prospective epidemiological studies have observed that antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins are associated with better cognitive functioning, randomized clinical trials have generally failed to confirm the value of any specific dietary component in improving neurocognition. Several randomized trials have examined the impact of changing 'whole' diets on cognitive outcomes. The MeDi and DASH diets offer promising preliminary results, but data are limited and more research in this area is needed.

  6. Dietary sodium manipulation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Zara; McKeever, Tricia

    2011-03-16

    There is a wide geographical variation in the prevalence of asthma and observational studies have suggested that dietary sodium may play a role. To assess the effect of dietary sodium manipulation on asthma control. We carried out a search using the Cochrane Airways Group asthma register. We searched the bibliographies of included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for additional studies. We carried out the most recent search in November 2010. We considered only RCTs that involved dietary sodium reduction or increased sodium intake in patients with asthma. Both review authors assessed study and extracted data. We conducted data analyses in RevMan 5 using mean differences and random effects. We identified a total of nine studies in relation to sodium manipulation and asthma, of which five were in people with asthma (318 participants), and four in people with exercise-induced asthma (63 participants). There were no significant benefits of salt restriction on the control of asthma. There was some evidence from the exercise-induced asthma studies that a low sodium diet may improve lung function after exercise and possibly baseline lung function, but this is based on findings from a very small numbers of participants. This review did not find any evidence that dietary sodium reduction significantly improves asthma control. Although dietary sodium reduction may result in improvements in lung function in exercise-induced asthma, the clinical significance of this effect is unclear.

  7. Dietary Factors and Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P.J.; Blumenthal, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive decline is an increasingly important public health problem, with more than 100 million adults worldwide projected to develop dementia by 2050. Accordingly, there has been an increased interest in preventive strategies that diminish this risk. It has been recognized that lifestyle factors including dietary patterns, may be important in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia in later life. Several dietary components have been examined, including antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins. In addition, whole dietary eating plans, including the Mediterranean diet (MeDi), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, with and without weight loss, have become areas of increasing interest. Although prospective epidemiological studies have observed that antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins are associated with better cognitive functioning, randomized clinical trials have generally failed to confirm the value of any specific dietary component in improving neurocognition. Several randomized trials have examined the impact of changing ‘whole’ diets on cognitive outcomes. The MeDi and DASH diets offer promising preliminary results, but data are limited and more research in this area is needed. PMID:26900574

  8. Global transcriptional response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in mouse liver and duodenum.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alejandra; Luukkaala, Tiina; Fleming, Robert E; Britton, Robert S; Bacon, Bruce R; Parkkila, Seppo

    2009-09-29

    Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in murine liver and duodenum. Illumina arrays containing over 47,000 probes were used to study global transcriptional changes. Quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) was used to validate the microarray results. In the liver, the expression of 151 genes was altered in Hfe(-/-) mice while dietary iron overload changed the expression of 218 genes. There were 173 and 108 differentially expressed genes in the duodenum of Hfe(-/-) mice and mice with dietary iron overload, respectively. There was 93.5% concordance between the results obtained by microarray analysis and Q-RT-PCR. Overexpression of genes for acute phase reactants in the liver and a strong induction of digestive enzyme genes in the duodenum were characteristic of the Hfe-deficient genotype. In contrast, dietary iron overload caused a more pronounced change of gene expression responsive to oxidative stress. In conclusion, Hfe deficiency caused a previously unrecognized increase in gene expression of hepatic acute phase proteins and duodenal digestive enzymes.

  9. Dietary phosphorus and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime

    2013-10-01

    High serum phosphate is linked to poor health outcome and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before or after the initiation of dialysis. Therefore, maintenance of normal serum phosphate levels is a major concern in the clinical care of this population with dietary phosphorus restriction and/or use of oral phosphate binders considered to be the best corrective care. This review discusses (1) evidence for an association between serum phosphate levels and bone and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in CKD patients as well as progression of kidney disease itself; (2) the relationship between serum phosphate and dietary phosphorus intake; and (3) implications from these data for future research. Increasing our understanding of the relationship between altered phosphorus metabolism and disease in CKD patients may clarify the potential role of excess dietary phosphorus as a risk factor for disease in the general population.

  10. Dietary Intake of Competitive Bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Spendlove, Jessica; Mitchell, Lachlan; Gifford, Janelle; Hackett, Daniel; Slater, Gary; Cobley, Stephen; O'Connor, Helen

    2015-07-01

    Competitive bodybuilders are well known for extreme physique traits and extremes in diet and training manipulation to optimize lean mass and achieve a low body fat. Although many of the dietary dogmas in bodybuilding lack scientific scrutiny, a number, including timing and dosing of high biological value proteins across the day, have more recently been confirmed as effective by empirical research studies. A more comprehensive understanding of the dietary intakes of bodybuilders has the potential to uncover other dietary approaches, deserving of scientific investigation, with application to the wider sporting, and potential health contexts, where manipulation of physique traits is desired. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of dietary intake practices of competitive bodybuilders, evaluate the quality and currency of the existing literature, and identify research gaps to inform future studies. A systematic search of electronic databases was conducted from the earliest record until March 2014. The search combined permutations of the terms 'bodybuilding', 'dietary intake', and 'dietary supplement'. Included studies needed to report quantitative data (energy and macronutrients at a minimum) on habitual dietary intake of competitive bodybuilders. The 18 manuscripts meeting eligibility criteria reported on 385 participants (n = 62 women). Most studies were published in the 1980-1990s, with three published in the past 5 years. Study methodological quality was evaluated as poor. Energy intake ranged from 10 to 24 MJ/day for men and from 4 to 14 MJ/day for women. Protein intake ranged from 1.9 to 4.3 g/kg for men and from 0.8 to 2.8 g/kg for women. Intake of carbohydrate and fat was <6 g/kg/day and below 30% of energy, respectively. Carbohydrate intakes were below, and protein (in men) intakes were higher than, the current recommendations for strength athletes, with no consideration for exploration of macronutrient quality or distribution over the day. Energy

  11. SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual Appendices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The appendices for the SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual include a sample food diary, backgorund information on the water concentration data used in SHEDS-Dietary, a food list, food definitions and sample code.

  12. Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166625.html Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol Eating them can reduce ... and Human Services. More Health News on Cholesterol Dietary Fats Heart Diseases--Prevention Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus ...

  13. Estimation of dietary arginine requirements for Longyan laying ducks.

    PubMed

    Xia, Weiguang; Fouad, Ahmed Mohamed; Chen, Wei; Ruan, Dong; Wang, Shuang; Fan, Qiuli; Wang, Ying; Cui, Yiyan; Zheng, Chuntian

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to establish the arginine requirements of Longyan ducks from 17 to 31 wk of age based on egg production, egg quality, plasma, and ovarian indices, as well as the expression of vitellogenesis-related genes. In total, 660 Longyan ducks with similar body weight at 15 wk of age were assigned randomly to 5 treatments, each with 6 replicates of 22 birds, and fed a corn-corn gluten meal basal diet (0.66% arginine) supplemented with either 0, 0.20%, 0.40%, 0.60%, or 0.80% arginine. Dietary arginine did not affect egg production by laying ducks, but it increased (linear, P < 0.01) the egg weight at 22 to 31 and 17 to 31 wk of age. Dietary arginine increased the yolk color score (linearly, P < 0.05) and the yolk percentage (quadratic, P < 0.05), where the maximum values were obtained with 1.26% arginine. Dietary arginine affected the total shell percentage and shell thickness, with the highest values using 1.46% arginine (P < 0.01). The weight and number of small yellow follicles (SYFs) increased (quadratic, P < 0.05) with the dietary arginine level and there was a quadratic response (P < 0.05) in terms of the SYFs weight/ovarian weight; the highest values were obtained in ducks fed 1.26% arginine. The plasma arginine concentration exhibited a quadratic (P < 0.05) response to dietary arginine. The plasma progesterone concentration decreased (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary arginine increased. The mRNA abundance of the very low density lipoprotein receptor-b increased in the second large yellow follicle membranes (quadratic, P < 0.05) with the dietary arginine level, where the highest value occurred with 1.26% arginine. According to the regression model, the dietary arginine requirements for Longyan laying ducks aged 17 to 31 wk are 1.06%, 1.13%, 1.22%, and 1.11% to obtain the maximum yolk percentage, SYFs number, SYFs weight, and SYFs weight/ovarian weight, respectively. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  14. 76 FR 39111 - Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New Dietary Ingredient Notifications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New... Dietary Supplements, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-850), Food and Drug Administration... NDI and any other dietary ingredients in the dietary supplement ``have been present in the food supply...

  15. Detection of antibiotic resistance in probiotics of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aloysius; Ngu, Davey Yueh Saint; Dan, Lydia Annabel; Ooi, Amanda; Lim, Renee Lay Hong

    2015-09-14

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer nutrition- and health-promoting benefits if consumed in adequate amounts. Concomitant with the demand for natural approaches to maintaining health is an increase in inclusion of probiotics in food and health products. Since probiotic bacteria act as reservoir for antibiotic resistant determinants, the transfer of these genes to pathogens sharing the same intestinal habitat is thus conceivable considering the fact that dietary supplements contain high amounts of often heterogeneous populations of probiotics. Such events can confer pathogens protection against commonly-used drugs. Despite numerous reports of antibiotic resistant probiotics in food and biological sources, the antibiogram of probiotics from dietary supplements remained elusive. Here, we screened five commercially available dietary supplements for resistance towards antibiotics of different classes. Probiotics of all batches of products were resistant towards vancomycin while batch-dependent resistance towards streptomycin, aztreonam, gentamycin and/or ciprofloxacin antibiotics was detected for probiotics of brands Bi and Bn, Bg, and L. Isolates of brand Cn was also resistant towards gentamycin, streptomycin and ciprofloxacin antibiotics. Additionally, we also report a discrepancy between the enumerated viable bacteria amounts and the claims of the manufacturers. This short report has highlighted the present of antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria from dietary supplements and therefore serves as a platform for further screenings and for in-depth characterization of the resistant determinants and the molecular machinery that confers the resistance.

  16. Comparison of children's dietary intake patterns with US dietary guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brady, L M; Lindquist, C H; Herd, S L; Goran, M I

    2000-09-01

    Monitoring dietary intake patterns among children is important in order to explore and prevent the onset of adult health problems. The aim of the present study was to compare children's dietary intakes with national recommendations and to determine whether sex or ethnic differences were evident. This was done using a methodology that allows assessment of intake from the major components of the Food Guide Pyramid developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA: US Department of Agriculture and US Department of Health and Human Services (1992)). The sample studied included 110 African-American and Caucasian males and females (mean age 9.9 years, BMI 20.1 kg/m2) from Birmingham, AL, USA, who were participating in a study investigating the development of obesity. Dietary data were based on three 24 h recalls and food group intake was determined using the USDA Pyramid Servicing Database. The results indicated that a high percentage of subjects failed to meet the recommended number of servings from each of the food groups. For example, only 5 % and 9 % met fruit and dietary group recommendations respectively. Consumption of foods from the Pyramid 'tip' (including discretionary fat and added sugar) contributed almost 50 % of the diet. African-Americans were more likely to meet requirements for the meat group, with a higher proportion of Caucasians meeting dietary recommendations. Males were more likely to meet the vegetable group guidelines although females consumed more energy per day from discretionary fat. In conclusion, these results suggest that implementation of nutrition education programmes may be important for promoting healthy nutrition among American children.

  17. 42 CFR 460.78 - Dietary services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dietary services. 460.78 Section 460.78 Public...) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.78 Dietary services. (a) Meal requirements. (1) Except as... meals that meet the participant's daily nutritional and special dietary needs. Each meal must meet the...

  18. 28 CFR 548.20 - Dietary practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.20 Dietary practices. (a) The Bureau... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dietary practices. 548.20 Section 548.20... religious dietary practice within the constraints of budget limitations and the security and orderly running...

  19. 28 CFR 548.20 - Dietary practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.20 Dietary practices. (a) The Bureau... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dietary practices. 548.20 Section 548.20... religious dietary practice within the constraints of budget limitations and the security and orderly running...

  20. 28 CFR 548.20 - Dietary practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS Religious Beliefs and Practices of Committed Offenders § 548.20 Dietary practices. (a) The Bureau... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dietary practices. 548.20 Section 548.20... religious dietary practice within the constraints of budget limitations and the security and orderly running...

  1. Effects of dietary Bacillus cereus G19, B. cereus BC-01, and Paracoccus marcusii DB11 supplementation on the growth, immune response, and expression of immune-related genes in coelomocytes and intestine of the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus Selenka).

    PubMed

    Yang, Gang; Tian, Xiangli; Dong, Shuanglin; Peng, Mo; Wang, Dongdong

    2015-08-01

    Probiotics have positive effects on the nutrient digestibility and absorption, immune responses, and growth of aquatic animals, including the sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus Selenka). A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of Bacillus cereus G19, B. cereus BC-01 and Paracoccus marcusii DB11 supplementation on the growth, immune response, and expression level of four immune-related genes (Aj-p105, Aj-p50, Aj-rel, and Aj-lys) in coelomocytes and the intestine of juvenile sea cucumbers. One group was fed the basal diet (control group), while three other groups were fed the basal diet supplemented with B. cereus G19 (G19 group), B. cereus BC-01 (BC group), or P. marcusii DB11 (PM group). The growth rate of sea cucumbers fed diets with probiotics supplementation was significantly higher than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Sea cucumbers in the G19 and PM groups had a significantly greater phagocytic activity of coelomocytes compared to the control group (P < 0.05),