Science.gov

Sample records for dietary stearate promote

  1. High levels of dietary stearate promote adiposity and deteriorate hepatic insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about the role of specific saturated fatty acids in the development of high fat diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we have studied the effect of stearate in high fat diets (45% energy as fat) on whole body energy metabolism and tissue specific insulin sensitivity. Methods C57Bl/6 mice were fed a low stearate diet based on palm oil or one of two stearate rich diets, one diet based on lard and one diet based on palm oil supplemented with tristearin (to the stearate level of the lard based diet), for a period of 5 weeks. Ad libitum fed Oxidative metabolism was assessed by indirect calorimetry at week 5. Changes in body mass and composition was assessed by DEXA scan analysis. Tissue specific insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp analysis and Western blot at the end of week 5. Results Indirect calorimetry analysis revealed that high levels of dietary stearate resulted in lower caloric energy expenditure characterized by lower oxidation of fatty acids. In agreement with this metabolic phenotype, mice on the stearate rich diets gained more adipose tissue mass. Whole body and tissue specific insulin sensitivity was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and analysis of insulin induced PKBser473 phosphorylation. Whole body insulin sensitivity was decreased by all high fat diets. However, while insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by peripheral tissues was impaired by all high fat diets, hepatic insulin sensitivity was affected only by the stearate rich diets. This tissue-specific pattern of reduced insulin sensitivity was confirmed by similar impairment in insulin-induced phosphorylation of PKBser473 in both liver and skeletal muscle. Conclusion In C57Bl/6 mice, 5 weeks of a high fat diet rich in stearate induces a metabolic state favoring low oxidative metabolism, increased adiposity and whole body insulin resistance characterized by severe hepatic insulin resistance. These results

  2. Promoting Healthy Dietary Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie A.

    This chapter reviews the research on promoting healthy dietary behaviors in all youth, not just those who exhibit problems such as obesity or eating disorders. The first section of this chapter presents a rationale for addressing healthy dietary behavior with children and adolescents, on the basis of the impact of these behaviors on short- and…

  3. Promoting Healthy Dietary Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Cheryl L.; Story, Mary; Lytle, Leslie A.

    This chapter reviews the research on promoting healthy dietary behaviors in all youth, not just those who exhibit problems such as obesity or eating disorders. The first section of this chapter presents a rationale for addressing healthy dietary behavior with children and adolescents, on the basis of the impact of these behaviors on short- and…

  4. Cation-controlled crystal growth of silver stearate: cryo-TEM investigation of lithium vs sodium stearate.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingshan; McCormick, Alon V; Davis, H Ted; Whitcomb, David R

    2010-02-16

    Cryo-TEM, SAXS, and light microscopy techniques were used to probe the morphology and kinetics of silver stearate self-assembly and crystallization from the reaction of silver nitrate with lithium stearate. Unlike the reaction of sodium stearate with silver nitrate, which proceeds via micelle aggregation, the lithium stearate forms vesicles that drastically change the reaction kinetics of the silver stearate nucleation and self-assembly process. In addition, even with excess silver nitrate present, only about 80% of the lithium stearate can be converted to silver stearate. The presence of the residual lithium stearate inhibits the silver stearate crystal growth process. Consequently, no silver stearate micelle aggregates of any significant size form, unlike the system utilizing sodium stearate. Instead, significantly smaller silver stearate crystals result from lithium stearate compared to the silver stearate crystals from sodium stearate and provide an opportunity to further control silver stearate self-assembly and crystal growth.

  5. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate...

  6. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate...

  7. 21 CFR 182.8994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 182.8994 Section 182.8994 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chickedema factor. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 582.5994 Section 582.5994 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chick...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 182.8994 Section 182.8994 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chickedema factor. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  10. 21 CFR 182.8994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 182.8994 Section 182.8994 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chickedema factor. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 582.5994 Section 582.5994 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chick...

  12. 21 CFR 582.5994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 582.5994 Section 582.5994 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chick...

  13. 21 CFR 582.5994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 582.5994 Section 582.5994 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chick...

  14. 21 CFR 182.8994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 182.8994 Section 182.8994 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc stearate. 582.5994 Section 582.5994 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chick...

  16. 21 CFR 182.8994 - Zinc stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc stearate. 182.8994 Section 182.8994 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8994 Zinc stearate. (a) Product. Zinc stearate prepared from stearic acid free from chickedema factor. (b) Conditions of use. This...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1440 - Magnesium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium stearate. 184.1440 Section 184.1440 Food... GRAS § 184.1440 Magnesium stearate. (a) Magnesium stearate (Mg(C17H34COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 557-04-0) is the magnesium salt of stearic acid. It is produced as a white precipitate by the addition of an...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as... of this ingredient as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) as a direct human food ingredient is...

  3. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... calcium or sodium salts of a fatty acid mixture that is predominately stearic acid. Associated fatty acids, including palmitic acid and minor amounts of lauric, myristic, pentadecanoic, margaric, arachidic, and other...

  4. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... calcium or sodium salts of a fatty acid mixture that is predominately stearic acid. Associated fatty acids, including palmitic acid and minor amounts of lauric, myristic, pentadecanoic, margaric, arachidic, and other...

  5. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... calcium or sodium salts of a fatty acid mixture that is predominately stearic acid. Associated fatty acids, including palmitic acid and minor amounts of lauric, myristic, pentadecanoic, margaric, arachidic, and other...

  6. Fisetin: A Dietary Antioxidant for Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Syed, Deeba N.; Ahmad, Nihal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diet-derived antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects, including their role in the chemoprevention of cancer. In general, botanical antioxidants have received much attention, as they can be consumed for longer periods of time without any adverse effects. Flavonoids are a broadly distributed class of plant pigments that are regularly consumed in the human diet due to their abundance. One such flavonoid, fisetin (3,3′,4′,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), is found in various fruits and vegetables, such as strawberry, apple, persimmon, grape, onion, and cucumber. Recent Advances: Several studies have demonstrated the effects of fisetin against numerous diseases. It is reported to have neurotrophic, anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, and other health beneficial effects. Critical Issues: Although fisetin has been reported as an anticarcinogenic agent, further in-depth in vitro and in vivo studies are required to delineate the mechanistic basis of its observed effects. In this review article, we describe the multiple effects of fisetin with special emphasis on its anticancer activity as investigated in cell culture and animal models. Future Directions: Additional research focused toward the identification of molecular targets could lead to the development of fisetin as a chemopreventive/chemotherapeutic agent against cancer and other diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 151–162. PMID:23121441

  7. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as...

  8. Promotion of gastrointestinal tract tumors in animals: dietary factors.

    PubMed Central

    Newberne, P M; Schrager, T

    1983-01-01

    The biological mode of action of tumor promoters, exemplified by the phorbol esters, is a subject of intensive study in a number of laboratories. A few investigators have recently begun to examine the role of dietary nutrients in tumor promotion, but the available data are sparse and interpretation difficult. A few examples are provided to indicate that some nutrients may be important in the promotion of cancer. However, the fine dividing line between effects on initiation or on promotion, so clearly shown in the mouse two-stage skin cancer model, is not so clear as yet in models used for studies in nutritional carcinogenesis. The animal models for these studies have been primarily rats, mice and hamsters. These have shown that nutrients which appear to have promotion activity are zinc deficiency and 13-cis-retinoic acid for the esophagus; vitamin A deficiency and lipotrope deficiency for the forestomach, unsaturated fat and vitamin A deficiency for liver and colon, lipotrope deficiency for the liver; selenium for the liver. It is probably more correct at this early stage of investigation to consider the effects of nutrients acting either during the time of exposure to the carcinogen, or, after such exposure and when no detectable carcinogen is found in the animals tissues, rather than as promoters in the strict sense. PMID:6873033

  9. Phytosterol stearate esters elicit similar responses on plasma lipids and cholesterol absorption but different responses on fecal neutral sterol excretion and hepatic free cholesterol in male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Hang, Jiliang; Dussault, Patrick H; Carr, Timothy P

    2011-07-01

    The dietary impact of specific phytosterols incorporated into phytosterol fatty acid esters has not been elucidated. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that phytosterol esters containing different sterol moieties (sitosterol, sitostanol, or stigmasterol) but the same fatty acid moiety (stearic acid) produce different effects on cholesterol metabolism. Male Syrian hamsters were fed sitosterol, sitostanol, and stigmasterol stearate esters (25 g/kg diet) in an atherogenic diet containing cholesterol (1.2 g/kg) and coconut oil (80 g/kg). The phytosterol stearates produced no decrease in cholesterol absorption or plasma non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol despite a reduction in liver free cholesterol in hamsters fed both sitosterol and sitostanol stearate diets. In addition, sitosterol stearate significantly increased fecal esterified and total neutral sterol excretion. Stigmasterol stearate did not differ from control in neutral sterol excretion, plasma lipids, or hepatic lipid concentration. Sitosterol stearate demonstrated the highest level of net intestinal hydrolysis, whereas sitostanol and stigmasterol stearate equivalently demonstrated the lowest. The cholesterol-lowering effect in liver-but not plasma-and the limited presence of fecal free sterols indicate that intact (unhydrolyzed) phytosterol stearates may impact cholesterol metabolism by mechanisms unrelated to the role of free phytosterols. The consumption of phytosterol esters at 2.5% of the diet elicited only modest impacts on cholesterol metabolism, although sitosterol stearate had a slightly greater therapeutic impact by lowering liver free cholesterol and increasing esterified and total neutral sterol fecal excretion, possibly due to a greater level of intestinal hydrolysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of Lithium Stearate: Processing Aid for Filled Elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    E. Eastwood; C. Densmore

    2007-02-05

    This topical report presents work completed to characterize lithium stearate so a replacement supplier could be identified. Lithium stearate from Alfa Aesar and Chemtura was obtained and characterized along with the current material from Witco. Multiple methods were used to characterize the materials including Karl Fischer, FT-IR, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis.

  11. Preparation and Physical Properties of Starch Stearates of Low to High Degree of Substitution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch stearates of degree of substitution (DS) 0.07-2.40 were prepared by heating dry starch and vinyl stearate in the ionic liquid BMIM dca at 75 Degrees C. Starch stearate of low DS (0.07) was insoluble in water but formed a gel and absorbed over seven times its weight of water. Starch stearate...

  12. 21 CFR 178.3690 - Pentaerythritol adipate-stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... Pentaerythritol adipate-stearate has the following specifications: (1) Melting point (dropping) of 55-58 °C as determined by ASTM method D566-76 (Reapproved 1982), “Standard Test Method for Dropping Point of Lubricating...

  13. Salt Promotes Passive Overconsumption of Dietary Fat in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P; Costanzo, Andrew; Newman, Lisa P; Keast, Russell Sj

    2016-04-01

    Excess fat consumption has been linked to the development of obesity. Fat and salt are a common and appetitive combination in food; however, the effect of either on food intake is unclear. Fat taste sensitivity has been negatively associated with dietary fat intake, but how fat taste sensitivity influences the intake of fat within a meal has, to our knowledge, not yet been investigated. Our objectives were, first, to investigate the effects of both fat and salt on ad libitum food intake and, second, to investigate the effects of fat taste sensitivity on satiation responses to fat and whether this was affected by salt. Forty-eight healthy adults [16 men and 32 women, aged 18-54 y, body mass index (kg/m(2)): 17.8-34.4] were recruited and their fat taste sensitivity was measured by determination of the detection threshold of oleic acid (18:1n-6). In a randomized 2 × 2 crossover design, participants attended 4 lunchtime sessions after a standardized breakfast. Meals consisted of elbow macaroni (56%) with sauce (44%); sauces were manipulated to be1) low-fat (0.02% fat, wt:wt)/low-salt (0.06% NaCl, wt:wt),2) low-fat/high-salt (0.5% NaCl, wt:wt),3) high-fat (34% fat, wt:/wt)/low-salt, or4) high-fat/high-salt. Ad libitum intake (primary outcome) and eating rate, pleasantness, and subjective ratings of hunger and fullness (secondary outcomes) were measured. Salt increased food and energy intakes by 11%, independent of fat concentration (P= 0.022). There was no effect of fat on food intake (P= 0.6), but high-fat meals increased energy intake by 60% (P< 0.001). A sex × fat interaction was found (P= 0.006), with women consuming 15% less by weight of the high-fat meals than the low-fat meals. Fat taste sensitivity was negatively associated with the intake of high-fat meals but only in the presence of low salt (fat taste × salt interaction on delta intake of high-fat - low-fat meals;P= 0.012). The results suggest that salt promotes passive overconsumption of energy in adults

  14. Effectiveness of Community-based Intervention to Promote Iran's Food-based Dietary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shariatjafari, Shadab; Omidvar, Nasrin; Shakibazadeh, Elham; Majdzadeh, Reza; Minaei, Mina; Gholamzade, Mahya

    2012-04-01

    Dietary Guidelines are considered as a useful tool for the promotion of healthy dietary behaviors. In Iran, despite the development of the latest National Food-Based Dietary Guidelines, in 2006, it has not been introduced at the community level yet. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention program to promote Iran's Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (IFBDGs) in urban adult women. A sample of 435 healthy women, aged 26 to 54 years, was randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. The intervention group was designed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). Each subject in the intervention group received three sessions of group education on IFBDGs and the food guide pyramid and participated in a healthy cooking class. Dietary intake, cognitive outcomes related to the constructs of the HBM, physical activity, and the BMI were measured in both groups before, immediately, and one month after the intervention. The outcome measures were compared with the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), by adjusting for baseline values. The intervention group had a significantly lower total daily energy intake than the control group after the intervention (P=.000). The adjusted differences in the changes of body mass index from the baseline were significant in both post intervention measurements in the intervention group compared to the controls. The intervention designed based on the Health Belief Model was effective in improving the adherence to FBDGs and could serve as a basic model for the promotion of healthy nutrition behavior among women in the primary health care setting.

  15. Increasing the stearate content in seed oil of Brassica juncea by heterologous expression of MlFatB affects lipid content and germination frequency of transgenic seeds.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Sinha, Saheli; Das, Natasha; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acids from dietary lipids can impart both beneficial and harmful health effects. The compositional balance between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids plays a decisive role in maintaining the physiological harmony, proper growth and development in the human system. In case of Brassica juncea seed oil, the level of saturated fatty acid, especially desirable stearate is very much lower than the recommended value, along with a high content of nutritionally undesirable erucic acid. Therefore, in order to shift the carbon flux towards the production of stearate at the expense of erucate, the MlFatB gene encoding a FatB thioesterase from Madhuca longifolia (latifolia) was expressed heterologously in seed tissues of B. juncea. The functional MlFatB competed with the highly active endogenous BjFatA thioesterase, and the transgenic B. juncea lines showed noteworthy changes in their seed fatty acid profiles. The proportion of stearate increased up to 16-fold, constituting almost 31% of the total fatty acids along with the production of arachidic acid in significant amount (up to ∼11%). Moreover, the content of erucate was reduced up to 71% in the seed oils of transgenic lines. Although a nutritionally desirable fatty acid profile was achieved, the transgenic seeds exhibit reduction or abolition of seed germination in addition to a decrease in seed lipid content. The findings of the present study revealing the stearoyl-ACP thioesterase-mediated enhancement of the stearate content that is associated with reduced germination frequency of transgenic B. juncea seeds, may explain why no natural or induced stearate-rich Brassica has been found or developed. Furthermore, this study also suggests that the newly characterized MlFatB is a potential candidate gene for refined metabolic engineering strategy in B. juncea or other plant species for increasing stearate content in seed oil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Dietary, food service, and mealtime interventions to promote food intake in acute care adult patients.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Grace; Pizzola, Lisa; Keller, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition is common in acute care hospitals. During hospitalization, poor appetite, medical interventions, and food access issues can impair food intake leading to iatrogenic malnutrition. Nutritional support is a common intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. "Food first" approaches have also been developed and evaluated. This scoping review identified and summarized 35 studies (41 citations) that described and/or evaluated dietary, foodservice, or mealtime interventions with a food first focus. There were few randomized control trials. Individualized dietary treatment leads to improved food intake and other positive outcomes. Foodservices that promote point-of-care food selection are promising, but further research with food intake and nutritional outcomes is needed. Protected mealtimes have had insufficient implementation, leading to mixed results, while mealtime assistance, particularly provided by volunteers or dietary staff, appears to promote food intake. A few innovative strategies were identified but further research to develop and evaluate food first approaches is needed.

  17. Identification of attributes that promote the adoption and implementation of 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As part of a larger study, this research was to identify attributes of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs) that would promote their adoption and implementation by participants in a nutrition intervention. Project procedures were guided by the Diffusion of Innovations (DOI) theory. To identif...

  18. Developing Food-Based Dietary Guidelines to Promote Healthy Diets and Lifestyles in the Eastern Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Janice L.; Samuda, Pauline M.; Molina, Veronika; Regis, Theresa Marietta; Severin, Merlyn; Finlay, Betty; Prevost, Jacqueline Lancaster

    2007-01-01

    Obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are becoming leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Eastern Caribbean countries of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica. To promote healthful diets and lifestyles and encourage behavioral changes, Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) were developed for the…

  19. Developing Food-Based Dietary Guidelines to Promote Healthy Diets and Lifestyles in the Eastern Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Janice L.; Samuda, Pauline M.; Molina, Veronika; Regis, Theresa Marietta; Severin, Merlyn; Finlay, Betty; Prevost, Jacqueline Lancaster

    2007-01-01

    Obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are becoming leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Eastern Caribbean countries of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica. To promote healthful diets and lifestyles and encourage behavioral changes, Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) were developed for the…

  20. Synthesis and properties of phosphono-derivatives of methyl stearate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A series of phosphono-derivatives of methyl stearate (PhDMS) were synthesized from methyl oleate and dialkyl H-phosphonates (dialkyl-phosphites). The alkyl groups in the phosphonates were methyl, ethyl, and butyl. The reaction can be carried to 98+% completion with a radical initiator. It is possibl...

  1. Complex systems model of dietary choice with implications for improving diets and promoting vegetarianism.

    PubMed

    Phillips, C V

    1999-09-01

    An important step toward improving nutrition and promoting vegetarianism in the general population is to understand how consumers make dietary choices. Researchers from many clinical and social sciences are interested in dietary choice but have not combined their research into a comprehensive model to explain consumer actions. No one model has offered a good explanation for the fact that, although many people successfully change their diet significantly (often toward health-improving, plant-based diets) and are happy with the change, the public and health professionals often perceive dietary change as being difficult and unlikely to succeed. I have termed these observations "the paradox of dietary change." The present computer model uses the emerging science of complex systems analysis, which offers an intuitive method for studying evidence about dietary choice from many fields, including public health, clinical science, economics, sociology, marketing, and genetics, and for combining individual choice with social interaction. The results suggest an explanation for the paradox and methods for helping society shift toward healthier and more plant-based diets. In particular, they suggest how and why major changes might be easier to make than incremental ones, and why this makes dietary change seem more difficult to consumers than it actually is.

  2. Characterization of TiO2 nanoparticles surface modified with aluminum stearate.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Terry A; Everall, Neil J; Tooley, Ian R

    2005-03-29

    This paper uses measurements of adsorption and vibrational spectra (DRIFTS, ATR, and Raman) to characterize TiO2 (rutile) nanoparticles that have been surface treated with aluminum and stearate, "aluminum stearate". From these measurements, we have developed a model of titania particles covered by patches of "alumina". Vibrational spectra, particularly the spectra of the carboxylate headgroups, show that the stearate then adsorbs on both the titania and the alumina. Surprisingly, the distribution of the stearate between alumina and titania is sensitive to the presence of water. As the water content decreases, the relative amounts of stearate on titania, rather than alumina, increase, and this increase is accompanied by a less ordered structuring of the stearate tails, as evidenced by a shift of the C-H stretching bands to higher frequencies and a broadening of the 1296 cm(-1) Raman band. This effect is consistent with earlier observations that the presence of water reduced the bonding of stearate headgroups to the surface of titania. We have also shown that the dispersion in C12-C15 alkyl benzoate of aluminum stearate coated titania is sensitive to the presence of small amounts, approximately 4%, of water. Finally, we have demonstrated that surface stearate, like surface alumina, reduces the rate of phototocatalytic oxidation of 2-propanol. A 7% stearate coating reduces acetone formation by a factor of 4. There is no evidence from these studies that, during the oxidation experiment, 2-propanol displaces stearate from the titania surface.

  3. Eutrophication and the dietary promotion of sea turtle tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Celia M.; Dailer, Meghan L.; Kawachi, Migiwa

    2014-01-01

    The tumor-forming disease fibropapillomatosis (FP) has afflicted sea turtle populations for decades with no clear cause. A lineage of α-herpesviruses associated with these tumors has existed for millennia, suggesting environmental factors are responsible for its recent epidemiology. In previous work, we described how herpesviruses could cause FP tumors through a metabolic influx of arginine. We demonstrated the disease prevails in chronically eutrophied coastal waters, and that turtles foraging in these sites might consume arginine-enriched macroalgae. Here, we test the idea using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to describe the amino acid profiles of green turtle (Chelonia mydas) tumors and five common forage species of macroalgae from a range of eutrophic states. Tumors were notably elevated in glycine, proline, alanine, arginine, and serine and depleted in lysine when compared to baseline samples. All macroalgae from eutrophic locations had elevated arginine, and all species preferentially stored environmental nitrogen as arginine even at oligotrophic sites. From these results, we estimate adult turtles foraging at eutrophied sites increase their arginine intake 17–26 g daily, up to 14 times the background level. Arginine nitrogen increased with total macroalgae nitrogen and watershed nitrogen, and the invasive rhodophyte Hypnea musciformis significantly outperformed all other species in this respect. Our results confirm that eutrophication substantially increases the arginine content of macroalgae, which may metabolically promote latent herpesviruses and cause FP tumors in green turtles. PMID:25289187

  4. Effectiveness of Community-based Intervention to Promote Iran's Food-based Dietary Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Shariatjafari, Shadab; Omidvar, Nasrin; Shakibazadeh, Elham; Majdzadeh, Reza; Minaei, Mina; Gholamzade, Mahya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dietary Guidelines are considered as a useful tool for the promotion of healthy dietary behaviors. In Iran, despite the development of the latest National Food-Based Dietary Guidelines, in 2006, it has not been introduced at the community level yet. The present study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention program to promote Iran's Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (IFBDGs) in urban adult women. Methods: A sample of 435 healthy women, aged 26 to 54 years, was randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. The intervention group was designed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM). Each subject in the intervention group received three sessions of group education on IFBDGs and the food guide pyramid and participated in a healthy cooking class. Dietary intake, cognitive outcomes related to the constructs of the HBM, physical activity, and the BMI were measured in both groups before, immediately, and one month after the intervention. The outcome measures were compared with the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), by adjusting for baseline values. Results: The intervention group had a significantly lower total daily energy intake than the control group after the intervention (P=.000). The adjusted differences in the changes of body mass index from the baseline were significant in both post intervention measurements in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusions: The intervention designed based on the Health Belief Model was effective in improving the adherence to FBDGs and could serve as a basic model for the promotion of healthy nutrition behavior among women in the primary health care setting. PMID:22624081

  5. Cranberry interacts with dietary macronutrients to promote healthy aging in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cecilia; Yolitz, Jason; Alberico, Thomas; Laslo, Mara; Sun, Yaning; Wheeler, Charles T; Sun, Xiaoping; Zou, Sige

    2014-08-01

    Botanicals possess numerous bioactivities, and some promote healthy aging. Dietary macronutrients are major determinants of life span. The interaction between botanicals and macronutrients that modulates life span is not well understood. Here, we investigated the effect of a cranberry-containing botanical on life span and the influence of macronutrients on the longevity-related effect of cranberry in Drosophila. Flies were supplemented with cranberry on three dietary conditions: standard, high sugar-low protein, and low sugar-high protein diets. We found that cranberry slightly extended life span in males fed with the low sugar-high protein diet but not with other diets. Cranberry extended life span in females fed with the standard diet and more prominently the high sugar-low protein diet but not with the low sugar-high protein diet. Life-span extension was associated with increased reproduction and higher expression of oxidative stress and heat shock response genes. Moreover, cranberry improved survival of sod1 knockdown and dfoxo mutant flies but did not increase wild-type fly's resistance to acute oxidative stress. Cranberry slightly extended life span in flies fed with a high-fat diet. These findings suggest that cranberry promotes healthy aging by increasing stress responsiveness. Our study reveals an interaction of cranberry with dietary macronutrients and stresses the importance of considering diet composition in designing interventions for promoting healthy aging.

  6. Cranberry Interacts With Dietary Macronutrients to Promote Healthy Aging in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cecilia; Yolitz, Jason; Alberico, Thomas; Laslo, Mara; Sun, Yaning; Wheeler, Charles T.; Sun, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Botanicals possess numerous bioactivities, and some promote healthy aging. Dietary macronutrients are major determinants of life span. The interaction between botanicals and macronutrients that modulates life span is not well understood. Here, we investigated the effect of a cranberry-containing botanical on life span and the influence of macronutrients on the longevity-related effect of cranberry in Drosophila. Flies were supplemented with cranberry on three dietary conditions: standard, high sugar–low protein, and low sugar–high protein diets. We found that cranberry slightly extended life span in males fed with the low sugar–high protein diet but not with other diets. Cranberry extended life span in females fed with the standard diet and more prominently the high sugar–low protein diet but not with the low sugar–high protein diet. Life-span extension was associated with increased reproduction and higher expression of oxidative stress and heat shock response genes. Moreover, cranberry improved survival of sod1 knockdown and dfoxo mutant flies but did not increase wild-type fly’s resistance to acute oxidative stress. Cranberry slightly extended life span in flies fed with a high-fat diet. These findings suggest that cranberry promotes healthy aging by increasing stress responsiveness. Our study reveals an interaction of cranberry with dietary macronutrients and stresses the importance of considering diet composition in designing interventions for promoting healthy aging. PMID:24149429

  7. Structural properties of magnesium stearate pseudopolymorphs: effect of temperature.

    PubMed

    Bracconi, Pierre; Andrès, Cyrille; Ndiaye, Augustin

    2003-08-27

    A thorough review of the relevant literature reveals that the interaction between water vapour and magnesium stearate, in contrast to many other metal soaps, is not properly understood. The structural modifications associated with the up-take or loss of water of vegetable-derived commercial magnesium stearate powders exposed to humid air or vacuum at room temperature are investigated using standard powder X-ray diffractometry. It is found that in such conditions magnesium stearate reacts reversibly with the vapour phase with structural consequences very similar to the high temperature transition between the crystalline and rotator phases of other anhydrous metal soaps. When temperature is increased under dry nitrogen the diffraction band characteristic of the rotator phase shifts towards higher angle values and the corresponding lattice spacing increases at the rate of 6.9x10(-4)C(-1). Melting takes place gradually above 100 degrees C as revealed by the collapse of the diffraction band and the growth of the broader diffusion band characteristic of the liquid state. Full clarification of the structure of the hydrated and dried phases proves impossible based on powder diffraction spectra obtained with conventional high resolution X-ray diffraction equipment.

  8. Reduction in cholesterol absorption is enhanced by stearate-enriched plant sterol esters in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Heather E; Guderian, David M; Wray, Curtis A; Dussault, Patrick H; Schlegel, Vicki L; Carr, Timothy P

    2006-11-01

    Consumption of plant sterol esters reduces plasma LDL cholesterol concentration by inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption. Commercially available plant sterol esters are prepared by esterifying free sterols to fatty acids from edible plant oils such as canola, soybean, and sunflower. To determine the influence of the fatty acid moiety on cholesterol metabolism, plant sterol esters were made with fatty acids from soybean oil (SO), beef tallow (BT), or purified stearic acid (SA) and fed to male hamsters for 4 wk. A control group fed no plant sterol esters was also included. Hamsters fed BT and SA had significantly lower cholesterol absorption and decreased concentrations of plasma non-HDL cholesterol and liver esterified cholesterol, and significantly greater fecal sterol excretion than SO and control hamsters. Cholesterol absorption was lowest in hamsters fed SA (7.5%), whereas it was 72.9% in control hamsters. Cholesterol absorption was correlated with fecal sterol excretion (r = -0.72, P < 0.001), liver cholesterol concentration (r = 0.88, P < 0.001), and plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration (r = 0.85, P < 0.001). A multiple regression model that included each sterol ester type vs. cholesterol absorption indicated that intake of steryl stearate was the only dietary component that contributed significantly to the model (R2 = -0.75, P < 0.001). Therefore, our results demonstrate that BT and SA are more effective than SO in reducing cholesterol absorption, liver cholesterol, and plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration, suggesting that cardioprotective benefits can be achieved by consuming stearate-enriched plant sterol esters.

  9. Dietary cholesterol promotes repair of demyelinated lesions in the adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Stefan A.; Gerndt, Nina; Winchenbach, Jan; Stumpf, Sina K.; Hosang, Leon; Odoardi, Francesca; Ruhwedel, Torben; Böhler, Carolin; Barrette, Benoit; Stassart, Ruth; Liebetanz, David; Dibaj, Payam; Möbius, Wiebke; Edgar, Julia M.; Saher, Gesine

    2017-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder in which remyelination failure contributes to persistent disability. Cholesterol is rate-limiting for myelin biogenesis in the developing CNS; however, whether cholesterol insufficiency contributes to remyelination failure in MS, is unclear. Here, we show the relationship between cholesterol, myelination and neurological parameters in mouse models of demyelination and remyelination. In the cuprizone model, acute disease reduces serum cholesterol levels that can be restored by dietary cholesterol. Concomitant with blood-brain barrier impairment, supplemented cholesterol directly supports oligodendrocyte precursor proliferation and differentiation, and restores the balance of growth factors, creating a permissive environment for repair. This leads to attenuated axon damage, enhanced remyelination and improved motor learning. Remarkably, in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, cholesterol supplementation does not exacerbate disease expression. These findings emphasize the safety of dietary cholesterol in inflammatory diseases and point to a previously unrecognized role of cholesterol in promoting repair after demyelinating episodes. PMID:28117328

  10. Science in Liquid Dietary Supplement Promotion: The Misleading Case of Mangosteen Juice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Liquid dietary supplements represent a fast growing market segment, including botanically-based beverages containing mangosteen, acai, and noni. These products often resemble fruit juice in packaging and appearance, but may contain pharmacologically active ingredients. While little is known about the human health effects or safety of consuming such products, manufacturers make extensive use of low-quality published research to promote their products. This report analyzes the science-based marketing claims of two of the most widely consumed mangosteen liquid dietary supplements, and compares them to the findings of the research being cited. The reviewer found that analyzed marketing claims overstate the significance of findings, and fail to disclose severe methodological weaknesses of the research they cite. If this trend extends to other related products that are similarly widely consumed, it may pose a public health threat by misleading consumers into assuming that product safety and effectiveness are backed by rigorous scientific data. PMID:22454810

  11. Science in liquid dietary supplement promotion: the misleading case of mangosteen juice.

    PubMed

    Lobb, Ano L

    2012-02-01

    Liquid dietary supplements represent a fast growing market segment, including botanically-based beverages containing mangosteen, acai, and noni. These products often resemble fruit juice in packaging and appearance, but may contain pharmacologically active ingredients. While little is known about the human health effects or safety of consuming such products, manufacturers make extensive use of low-quality published research to promote their products. This report analyzes the science-based marketing claims of two of the most widely consumed mangosteen liquid dietary supplements, and compares them to the findings of the research being cited. The reviewer found that analyzed marketing claims overstate the significance of findings, and fail to disclose severe methodological weaknesses of the research they cite. If this trend extends to other related products that are similarly widely consumed, it may pose a public health threat by misleading consumers into assuming that product safety and effectiveness are backed by rigorous scientific data.

  12. Dietary and genetic obesity promote liver inflammation and tumorigenesis by enhancing IL-6 and TNF expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Eek Joong; Lee, Jun Hee; Yu, Guann-Yi; He, Guobin; Ali, Syed Raza; Holzer, Ryan G; Osterreicher, Christoph H; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Karin, Michael

    2010-01-22

    Epidemiological studies indicate that overweight and obesity are associated with increased cancer risk. To study how obesity augments cancer risk and development, we focused on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the common form of liver cancer whose occurrence and progression are the most strongly affected by obesity among all cancers. We now demonstrate that either dietary or genetic obesity is a potent bona fide liver tumor promoter in mice. Obesity-promoted HCC development was dependent on enhanced production of the tumor-promoting cytokines IL-6 and TNF, which cause hepatic inflammation and activation of the oncogenic transcription factor STAT3. The chronic inflammatory response caused by obesity and enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF may also increase the risk of other cancers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary and genetic obesity promote liver inflammation and tumorigenesis by enhancing IL-6 and TNF expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eek Joong; Lee, Jun Hee; Yu, Guann-Yi; He, Guobin; Ali, Syed Raza; Holzer, Ryan G; Österreicher, Christoph H.; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Karin, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological studies indicate that overweight and obesity are associated with increased cancer risk. To study how obesity augments cancer risk and development, we focused on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the common form of liver cancer whose occurrence and progression are the most strongly affected by obesity amongst all cancers. We now demonstrate that either dietary or genetic obesity is a potent bona fide liver tumor promoter in mice. Obesity-promoted HCC development was dependent on enhanced production of the tumor promoting cytokines IL-6 and TNF, which cause hepatic inflammation and activation of the oncogenic transcription factor STAT3. The chronic inflammatory response caused by obesity and enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF may also increase the risk of other cancers. PMID:20141834

  14. Ethanol diversely alters palmitate, stearate and oleate metabolism in the liver and pancreas of rats using the deuterium oxide single tracer

    PubMed Central

    Boros, Laszlo G.; Deng, Qinggao; Pandol, Stephen J.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Go, Vay Liang W.; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine tissue specific effects of alcohol on fatty acid synthesis and distribution as related to functional changes in triglyceride transport and membrane formation. Methods Tissue fatty acid profile, and de novo lipogenesis were determined in adult male Wistar rats after 5 weeks of ethanol feeding using deuterated water and GC/MS. Liver and pancreas fatty acid profiles and new synthesis fractions were compared with those from control rats on an isocaloric diet. Results Fatty acid ratios in the liver indicated that there was an over two-fold accumulation of stearate to that of palmitate, with an apparent decrease in oleate content. On the other hand, in the pancreas there was a 17% decrease in the stearate to palmitate ratio, while oleate to palmitate ratio was increased by 30%. The fractions of deuterium labeled palmitate and stearate were substantially reduced in the liver and pancreas of the alcohol treated animals. Deuterium labeling of oleate was reduced in the liver but not in the pancreas consistent with the oleate/stearate ratios in these tissues. Conclusions Long-term alcohol exposure results in opposite effects on the desaturase activity in the liver and pancreas limiting fatty acid transport in the liver but promoting the exocrine function of the pancreas. PMID:19248221

  15. Ethanol diversely alters palmitate, stearate, and oleate metabolism in the liver and pancreas of rats using the deuterium oxide single tracer.

    PubMed

    Boros, Laszlo G; Deng, Qinggao; Pandol, Stephen J; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Go, Vay Liang W; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul

    2009-03-01

    To determine tissue-specific effects of alcohol on fatty acid synthesis and distribution as related to functional changes in triglyceride transport and membrane formation. Tissue fatty acid profile and de novo lipogenesis were determined in adult male Wistar rats after 5 weeks of ethanol feeding using deuterated water and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Liver and pancreas fatty acid profiles and new synthesis fractions were compared with those from control rats on an isocaloric diet. Fatty acid ratios in the liver indicated that there was a more than 2-fold accumulation of stearate to that of palmitate, with an apparent decrease in oleate content. On the other hand, in the pancreas, there was a 17% decrease in the stearate-to-palmitate ratio, whereas the oleate-to-palmitate ratio was increased by 30%. The fractions of deuterium-labeled palmitate and stearate were substantially reduced in the liver and pancreas of the alcohol-treated animals. Deuterium labeling of oleate was reduced in the liver but not in the pancreas, consistent with the oleate/stearate ratios in these tissues. Long-term alcohol exposure results in opposite effects on the desaturase activity in the liver and pancreas, limiting fatty acid transport in the liver but promoting the exocrine function of the pancreas.

  16. Dietary Emulsifier-Induced Low-Grade Inflammation Promotes Colon Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Viennois, Emilie; Merlin, Didier; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Chassaing, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    The increased risks conferred by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to the development of colorectal cancer gave rise to the term "colitis-associated cancer" and the concept that inflammation promotes colon tumorigenesis. A condition more common than IBD is low-grade inflammation, which correlates with altered gut microbiota composition and metabolic syndrome, both present in many cases of colorectal cancer. Recent findings suggest that low-grade inflammation in the intestine is promoted by consumption of dietary emulsifiers, a ubiquitous component of processed foods, which alter the composition of gut microbiota. Here, we demonstrate in a preclinical model of colitis-induced colorectal cancer that regular consumption of dietary emulsifiers, carboxymethylcellulose or polysorbate-80, exacerbated tumor development. Enhanced tumor development was associated with an altered microbiota metagenome characterized by elevated levels of lipopolysaccharide and flagellin. We found that emulsifier-induced alterations in the microbiome were necessary and sufficient to drive alterations in major proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways thought to govern tumor development. Overall, our findings support the concept that perturbations in host-microbiota interactions that cause low-grade gut inflammation can promote colon carcinogenesis. Cancer Res; 77(1); 27-40. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Developing food-based dietary guidelines to promote healthy diets and lifestyles in the Eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Albert, Janice L; Samuda, Pauline M; Molina, Verónika; Regis, Theresa Marietta; Severin, Merlyn; Finlay, Betty; Prevost, Jacqueline Lancaster

    2007-01-01

    Obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes are becoming leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the Eastern Caribbean countries of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Grenada, and Dominica. To promote healthful diets and lifestyles and encourage behavioral changes, Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) were developed for the general population in each of these countries. This paper reports on the comprehensive process of developing the guidelines through consensus building among stakeholders, technical assessments and priority setting, and use of qualitative methods to field test messages to ensure public understanding and motivation. Nutritionists in each country received training and support from the Food and Agriculture Organization and the Pan American Health Organization's nutritionists.

  18. Supplementing dietary sugar promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress-independent insulin resistance and fatty liver in goose.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tuoyu; Zhao, Xing; Xia, Lili; Liu, Long; Li, Fuyuan; Yang, Biao; Wang, Qianqian; Montgomery, Sean; Cui, Hengmi; Gong, Daoqing

    2016-08-05

    It is known that endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) contributes to insulin resistance (IR) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in mammals. However, we recently demonstrated that overfeeding with a traditional diet (mainly consisting of cooked maize) does not induce ERS in goose. As cellular studies show that high glucose and palmitate can trigger ERS in mammalian cells, we hypothesized that supplementing sugar to the traditional diet could induce ERS, thus promoting insulin resistance and fatty liver. To test the hypothesis, we first treated goose primary hepatocytes with high glucose (25 mM and 50 mM) and palmitate (0.5 mM) supplemented with or without 0.25 mM oleate. Data indicated that, as in mammalian cells, high glucose and palmitate indeed induced ERS in goose primary hepatocytes, and palmitate-induced ERS was suppressed by supplemental 0.25 mM oleate. We then tested the hypothesis with an in vivo study, in which Landes geese overfed with traditional or novel diets (i.e., the traditional diet supplemented with sugar) were compared with control geese (normally fed with cooked maize) for ERS, IR and fatty liver. The differences in glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and postprandial blood glucose between the geese overfed with traditional and novel diets suggested that supplementing dietary sugar promoted IR. This promotion was accompanied with an increasing trend of liver weight and abdominal fat weight relative to body weight. Surprisingly, compared to overfeeding with the traditional diet, overfeeding with the novel diet did not induce ERS, even further suppressed ERS in goose fatty liver. Together, our findings suggest that supplementing dietary sugar promotes ERS-independent IR and fatty liver in goose. It is intriguing to discover the factor(s) protecting goose liver from ERS as well as the non-ERS mechanism underlying IR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A liver stress-endocrine nexus promotes metabolic integrity during dietary protein dilution.

    PubMed

    Maida, Adriano; Zota, Annika; Sjøberg, Kim A; Schumacher, Jonas; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd P; Pfenninger, Anja; Christensen, Marie M; Gantert, Thomas; Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Rothermel, Ulrike; Schmoll, Dieter; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Iovanna, Juan L; Stemmer, Kerstin; Kiens, Bente; Herzig, Stephan; Rose, Adam J

    2016-09-01

    Dietary protein intake is linked to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although dietary protein dilution (DPD) can slow the progression of some aging-related disorders, whether this strategy affects the development and risk for obesity-associated metabolic disease such as T2D is unclear. Here, we determined that DPD in mice and humans increases serum markers of metabolic health. In lean mice, DPD promoted metabolic inefficiency by increasing carbohydrate and fat oxidation. In nutritional and polygenic murine models of obesity, DPD prevented and curtailed the development of impaired glucose homeostasis independently of obesity and food intake. DPD-mediated metabolic inefficiency and improvement of glucose homeostasis were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), but required expression of liver-derived fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in both lean and obese mice. FGF21 expression and secretion as well as the associated metabolic remodeling induced by DPD also required induction of liver-integrated stress response-driven nuclear protein 1 (NUPR1). Insufficiency of select nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) was necessary and adequate for NUPR1 and subsequent FGF21 induction and secretion in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that DPD promotes improved glucose homeostasis through an NEAA insufficiency-induced liver NUPR1/FGF21 axis.

  20. [Health-promoting education in nutrition as a factor modifying dietary habits in menopausal women].

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Mariola

    2004-01-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating effects of health-promoting education in nutrition on changes in incorrect dietary habits and on effects of those changes on blood parameters regarded as diagnostic for medical purposes. The study, carried out in 1991-2003, involved 1648 women aged 45-54 years with Body Bass Index (BMI) higher than 30 and 40, i.e., indicative of second and third degree obesity. The women participated in a 4-month-long nutrition course. The classes, held once a week and two 45-minute periods each, were taught to groups of 20-22 individuals. The curriculum encompassed information on: fundamentals of alimentary tract function; physiological role and sources of as well as demand for basic nutrients, vitamins, micro- and macroelements; the role of water and acid-base equilibrium in nutrition; nutrition-based prophylaxis of circulatory diseases, insulin-independent diabetes, and diet-depending cancers; and numerous other problems of physiology and dietetics. The 4-month-long period of health-promoting education in nutrition was found to result in significant improvement of dietary habits (increased consumption of dairy products, whole-meal grain products, pulses, fruits, vegetables, and fluids, accompanied by a reduced intake of meat products, sugar, and sweets). The changes gave rise to a slow, but consistent body weight reduction and normalisation of contents of hormones and blood biochemical components analysed.

  1. A liver stress-endocrine nexus promotes metabolic integrity during dietary protein dilution

    PubMed Central

    Maida, Adriano; Zota, Annika; Sjøberg, Kim A.; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd P.; Pfenninger, Anja; Christensen, Marie M.; Gantert, Thomas; Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Rothermel, Ulrike; Schmoll, Dieter; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Iovanna, Juan L.; Stemmer, Kerstin; Herzig, Stephan; Rose, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary protein intake is linked to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although dietary protein dilution (DPD) can slow the progression of some aging-related disorders, whether this strategy affects the development and risk for obesity-associated metabolic disease such as T2D is unclear. Here, we determined that DPD in mice and humans increases serum markers of metabolic health. In lean mice, DPD promoted metabolic inefficiency by increasing carbohydrate and fat oxidation. In nutritional and polygenic murine models of obesity, DPD prevented and curtailed the development of impaired glucose homeostasis independently of obesity and food intake. DPD-mediated metabolic inefficiency and improvement of glucose homeostasis were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), but required expression of liver-derived fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in both lean and obese mice. FGF21 expression and secretion as well as the associated metabolic remodeling induced by DPD also required induction of liver-integrated stress response–driven nuclear protein 1 (NUPR1). Insufficiency of select nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) was necessary and adequate for NUPR1 and subsequent FGF21 induction and secretion in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that DPD promotes improved glucose homeostasis through an NEAA insufficiency–induced liver NUPR1/FGF21 axis. PMID:27548521

  2. Practical experience in development and promotion of food-based dietary guidelines in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sirichakwal, Prapaisri P; Sranacharoenpong, Kitti

    2008-01-01

    Although under-nutrition problems have been decreasing in Thailand, non-communicable diseases have become leading causes of death and disability. Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGs) is a key strategy to promote healthy daily food consumption and appropriate lifestyles. The development consists of qualitative and quantitative parts. The purposes were 1) to assist consumers in making healthy dietary choices and disease prevention; 2) to guide governmental agencies in nutrition implementations, promotion of healthy food products and education programs; 3) to assist national and local agencies in policy formulations and implementations; 4) to assist healthcare providers in primary diseases prevention efforts. The procedures to develop FBDGs specifically were to 1) set nutritional goals based on Thai DRI and RDI; 2) assign the units used for one portion of each food group; 3) quantify the size and number of servings of the major food groups, using the nutritive value calculated by the popularity vote method from secondary data; 4) evaluate the nutritive value of recommended amounts from combinations; 5) develop and test several food guide models based on Thai people's understanding and cultures; 6) implement through educational tools for the nationwide public units; 7) offer training programs, monitoring and evaluation in various populations to be performed by Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) and other academic sections. In long run successful FBDGs, there must not only be support from policy makers and cooperation between nutritionists from universities and the MOPH, but also application of ongoing activities such as "Sweet Enough Campaign Network" or "School Lunch Program"

  3. 21 CFR 178.3505 - Glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxy-stearate).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxy-stearate). 178.3505... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3505 Glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxy-stearate). Glyceryl tri... calcium carbonate/glyceryl tri-(12-acetoxystearate) mixture is used as an adjuvant in polymers in contact...

  4. Extruded foams prepared from high amylose starch with sodium stearate to form amylose inclusion complexes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Starch foams were prepared from high amylose corn starch in the presence and absence of sodium stearate and PVOH to determine how the formation of amylose-sodium stearate inclusion complexes and the addition of PVOH would affect foam properties. Low extrusion temperatures were used, and X-ray diffra...

  5. Beef meat promotion of dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis biomarkers is suppressed by dietary calcium.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Fabrice; Santarelli, Raphaëlle; Taché, Sylviane; Guéraud, Françoise; Corpet, Denis E

    2008-05-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. We have previously shown that haemin, Hb and red meat promote carcinogen-induced preneoplastic lesions: aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) in rats. We have also shown that dietary Ca, antioxidant mix and olive oil inhibit haemin-induced ACF promotion, and normalize faecal lipoperoxides and cytotoxicity. Here we tested if these strategies are effective also against red meat promotion in dimethylhydrazine-induced rats. Three diets with 60 % beef meat were supplemented with calcium phosphate (31 g/kg), antioxidant agents (rutin and butylated hydroxyanisole, 0.05 % each) and olive oil (5 %). ACF, MDF, faecal water cytotoxicity, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and urinary 1,4-dihydroxynonane mercapturic acid (DHN-MA) were measured. Beef meat diet increased the number of ACF (+30 %) and MDF (+100 %) (P < 0.001), which confirms our previous findings. Promotion was associated with increased faecal water TBARs ( x 4) and cytotoxicity ( x 2), and urinary DHN-MA excretion ( x 15). Ca fully inhibited beef meat-induced ACF and MDF promotion, and normalized faecal TBARS and cytotoxicity, but did not reduce urinary DHN-MA. Unexpectedly, high-calcium control diet-fed rats had more MDF and ACF in the colon than low-Ca control diet-fed rats. Antioxidant mix and olive oil did not normalize beef meat promotion nor biochemical factors. The results confirm that haem causes promotion of colon carcinogenesis by red meat. They suggest that Ca can reduce colorectal cancer risk in meat-eaters. The results support the concept that toxicity associated with the excess of a useful nutrient may be prevented by another nutrient.

  6. An Aluminum Magnesium Hydroxide Stearate-based Skin Barrier Protection Cream Used for the Management of Eczematous Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhambri, Sanjay; Michaels, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Eczematous dermatoses can often be very difficult to treat. An aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream has recently become available for clinical use. Aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream provides an alternative option in treating these dermatoses while providing barrier protection against external allergens and irritants. This article reviews various studies evaluating aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream. PMID:21212843

  7. Quantitative assessment of dietary intake in adults with Type 1 diabetes following flexible insulin therapy education with an active promotion of dietary freedom.

    PubMed

    Knight, Brigid A; Hickman, Ingrid J; Gibbons, Kristen; McIntyre, Harold D

    2016-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines for diabetes include dietary guidelines to address the increased risk of cardiovascular disease. To identify impact of flexible insulin education with an active promotion of dietary freedom on energy and macronutrient intake and achievement of nutrient recommendations in adults with Type 1 diabetes. Dietary assessment was performed prior to and 12months following flexible insulin education. Nutrient intake and the proportion achieving the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) nutrient guidelines were compared at baseline and post course. Dietary data were available for 46 participants. Post course reductions were seen in median [IQR] energy kcal/d (1799 [1521-1931] to 1592 [1378-1940], p=0.002), fibre g/1000kcal (14 [12-16] to 13 [11-15], p=0.047), protein g/day (89 ([78-108] to 82 [74-93], p=0.001) and carbohydrate g/day (198 [172-330] to 162 [143-204], p=<0.001). The proportion experiencing at least 1 severe hypoglycaemia event over 12months was significantly reduced (χ(2)=7.7, p=0.006) from baseline (n=13, 26%) to post course (n=3, 6%). Achievement of EASD guidelines was poor and did not change post course. Flexible insulin education with an active promotion of dietary freedom does not appear to 'worsen' the achievement of EASD nutrition guidelines in adults with Type 1 diabetes. On the contrary, the dietary changes observed were reductions in energy, carbohydrate and protein intake. Flexible insulin education may offer benefits in enabling reduced energy intake without increasing hypoglycaemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Using a Smartphone Application to Promote Healthy Dietary Behaviours and Local Food Consumption.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jason; Sadler, Richard; Clark, Andrew; O'Connor, Colleen; Milczarek, Malgorzata; Doherty, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone "apps" are a powerful tool for public health promotion, but unidimensional interventions have been ineffective at sustaining behavioural change. Various logistical issues exist in successful app development for health intervention programs and for sustaining behavioural change. This study reports on a smartphone application and messaging service, called "SmartAPPetite," which uses validated behaviour change techniques and a behavioural economic approach to "nudge" users into healthy dietary behaviours. To help gauge participation in and influence of the program, data were collected using an upfront food survey, message uptake tracking, experience sampling interviews, and a follow-up survey. Logistical and content-based issues in the deployment of the messaging service were subsequently addressed to strengthen the effectiveness of the app in changing dietary behaviours. Challenges included creating relevant food goal categories for participants, providing messaging appropriate to self-reported food literacy and ensuring continued participation in the program. SmartAPPetite was effective at creating a sense of improved awareness and consumption of healthy foods, as well as drawing people to local food vendors with greater frequency. This work serves as a storehouse of methods and best practices for multidimensional local food-based smartphone interventions aimed at improving the "triple bottom line" of health, economy, and environment.

  9. Promoting healthy dietary behaviour through personalised nutrition: technology push or technology pull?

    PubMed

    Stewart-Knox, Barbara; Rankin, Audrey; Kuznesof, Sharron; Poínhos, Rui; Vaz de Almeida, Maria Daniel; Fischer, Arnout; Frewer, Lynn J

    2015-05-01

    The notion of educating the public through generic healthy eating messages has pervaded dietary health promotion efforts over the years and continues to do so through various media, despite little evidence for any enduring impact upon eating behaviour. There is growing evidence, however, that tailored interventions such as those that could be delivered online can be effective in bringing about healthy dietary behaviour change. The present paper brings together evidence from qualitative and quantitative studies that have considered the public perspective of genomics, nutrigenomics and personalised nutrition, including those conducted as part of the EU-funded Food4Me project. Such studies have consistently indicated that although the public hold positive views about nutrigenomics and personalised nutrition, they have reservations about the service providers' ability to ensure the secure handling of health data. Technological innovation has driven the concept of personalised nutrition forward and now a further technological leap is required to ensure the privacy of online service delivery systems and to protect data gathered in the process of designing personalised nutrition therapies.

  10. Using a Smartphone Application to Promote Healthy Dietary Behaviours and Local Food Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Jason; Sadler, Richard; Clark, Andrew; O'Connor, Colleen; Milczarek, Malgorzata; Doherty, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Smartphone “apps” are a powerful tool for public health promotion, but unidimensional interventions have been ineffective at sustaining behavioural change. Various logistical issues exist in successful app development for health intervention programs and for sustaining behavioural change. This study reports on a smartphone application and messaging service, called “SmartAPPetite,” which uses validated behaviour change techniques and a behavioural economic approach to “nudge” users into healthy dietary behaviours. To help gauge participation in and influence of the program, data were collected using an upfront food survey, message uptake tracking, experience sampling interviews, and a follow-up survey. Logistical and content-based issues in the deployment of the messaging service were subsequently addressed to strengthen the effectiveness of the app in changing dietary behaviours. Challenges included creating relevant food goal categories for participants, providing messaging appropriate to self-reported food literacy and ensuring continued participation in the program. SmartAPPetite was effective at creating a sense of improved awareness and consumption of healthy foods, as well as drawing people to local food vendors with greater frequency. This work serves as a storehouse of methods and best practices for multidimensional local food-based smartphone interventions aimed at improving the “triple bottom line” of health, economy, and environment. PMID:26380298

  11. Mfge8 promotes obesity by mediating the uptake of dietary fats and serum fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Khalifeh-Soltani, Amin; McKleroy, William; Sakuma, Stephen; Cheung, Yuk Yin; Tharp, Kevin; Qiu, Yifu; Turner, Scott M; Chawla, Ajay; Stahl, Andreas; Atabai, Kamran

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acids are integral mediators of energy storage, membrane formation and cell signaling. The pathways that orchestrate uptake of fatty acids remain incompletely understood. Expression of the integrin ligand Mfge8 is increased in human obesity and in mice on a high-fat diet, but its role in obesity is unknown. We show here that Mfge8 promotes the absorption of dietary triglycerides and the cellular uptake of fatty acid and that Mfge8-deficient (Mfge8(-/-)) mice are protected from diet-induced obesity, steatohepatitis and insulin resistance. Mechanistically, we found that Mfge8 coordinates fatty acid uptake through αvβ3 integrin- and αvβ5 integrin-dependent phosphorylation of Akt by phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase and mTOR complex 2, leading to translocation of Cd36 and Fatp1 from cytoplasmic vesicles to the cell surface. Collectively, our results imply a role for Mfge8 in regulating the absorption and storage of dietary fats, as well as in the development of obesity and its complications.

  12. Mfge8 promotes obesity by mediating the uptake of dietary fats and serum fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Khalifeh-Soltani, Amin; McKleroy, William; Sakuma, Stephen; Cheung, Yuk Yin; Tharp, Kevin; Qiu, Yifu; Turner, Scott M; Chawla, Ajay; Stahl, Andreas; Atabai, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids are integral mediators of energy storage, membrane formation and cell signaling. The pathways that orchestrate uptake of fatty acids remain incompletely understood. Expression of the integrin ligand Mfge8 is increased in human obesity and in mice on a high-fat diet, but its role in obesity is unknown. We show here that Mfge8 promotes the absorption of dietary triglycerides and the cellular uptake of fatty acid and that Mfge8-deficient (Mfge8−/−) mice are protected from diet-induced obesity, steatohepatitis and insulin resistance. Mechanistically, we found that Mfge8 coordinates fatty acid uptake through αvβ3 integrin– and αvβ5 integrin–dependent phosphorylation of Akt by phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase and mTOR complex 2, leading to translocation of Cd36 and Fatp1 from cytoplasmic vesicles to the cell surface. Collectively, our results imply a role for Mfge8 in regulating the absorption and storage of dietary fats, as well as in the development of obesity and its complications. PMID:24441829

  13. Dietary modification in a workplace health promotion program in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Moy, Foong Ming; Ab Sallam, Atiya; Wong, Mee Lian

    2008-10-01

    Lifestyle modification is effective in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to promote healthy lifestyle behaviours to prevent cardiovascular disease. This study was a quasi-experimental trial with a follow up of two years. The intervention group (n = 102) received intensive individual and group counselling on diet and physical activity. The comparison group (n = 84) was given minimal education through mail and group counselling. Following the intervention, both groups reduced their total fat intake through a replacement in carbohydrate intake. The saturated fat and cholesterol intake was also reduced with a larger magnitude in the intervention group. Fruits and vegetables consumption was increased within the intervention group. The intervention group showed a statistically significant reduction in their mean total cholesterol levels with an intervention effect of -0.38 (95% C.I. = -0.63, -0.14) mmol/l. This study has achieved moderate improvement in dietary intakes as well as the total cholesterol of the participants.

  14. Degradability Enhancement of Poly(Lactic Acid) by Stearate-Zn3Al LDH Nanolayers

    PubMed Central

    Eili, Mahboobeh; Shameli, Kamyar; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2012-01-01

    Recent environmental problems and societal concerns associated with the disposal of petroleum based plastics throughout the world have triggered renewed efforts to develop new biodegradable products compatible with our environment. This article describes the preparation, characterization and biodegradation study of poly(lactic acid)/layered double hydroxide (PLA/LDH) nanocomposites from PLA and stearate-Zn3Al LDH. A solution casting method was used to prepare PLA/stearate-Zn3Al LDH nanocomposites. The anionic clay Zn3Al LDH was firstly prepared by co-precipitation method from a nitrate salt solution at pH 7.0 and then modified by stearate anions through an ion exchange reaction. This modification increased the basal spacing of the synthetic clay from 8.83 Å to 40.10 Å. The morphology and properties of the prepared PLA/stearate-Zn3Al LDH nanocomposites were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile tests as well as biodegradation studies. From the XRD analysis and TEM observation, the stearate-Zn3Al LDH lost its ordered stacking-structure and was greatly exfoliated in the PLA matrix. Tensile test results of PLA/stearate-Zn3Al LDH nanocomposites showed that the presence of around 1.0–3.0 wt % of the stearate-Zn3Al LDH in the PLA drastically improved its elongation at break. The biodegradation studies demonstrated a significant biodegradation rate improvement of PLA in the presence of stearate-Zn3Al LDH nanolayers. This effect can be caused by the catalytic role of the stearate groups in the biodegradation mechanism leading to much faster disintegration of nanocomposites than pure PLA. PMID:22942682

  15. Degradability enhancement of poly(lactic acid) by stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH nanolayers.

    PubMed

    Eili, Mahboobeh; Shameli, Kamyar; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Yunus, Wan Md Zin Wan

    2012-01-01

    Recent environmental problems and societal concerns associated with the disposal of petroleum based plastics throughout the world have triggered renewed efforts to develop new biodegradable products compatible with our environment. This article describes the preparation, characterization and biodegradation study of poly(lactic acid)/layered double hydroxide (PLA/LDH) nanocomposites from PLA and stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH. A solution casting method was used to prepare PLA/stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH nanocomposites. The anionic clay Zn(3)Al LDH was firstly prepared by co-precipitation method from a nitrate salt solution at pH 7.0 and then modified by stearate anions through an ion exchange reaction. This modification increased the basal spacing of the synthetic clay from 8.83 Å to 40.10 Å. The morphology and properties of the prepared PLA/stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH nanocomposites were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile tests as well as biodegradation studies. From the XRD analysis and TEM observation, the stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH lost its ordered stacking-structure and was greatly exfoliated in the PLA matrix. Tensile test results of PLA/stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH nanocomposites showed that the presence of around 1.0-3.0 wt % of the stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH in the PLA drastically improved its elongation at break. The biodegradation studies demonstrated a significant biodegradation rate improvement of PLA in the presence of stearate-Zn(3)Al LDH nanolayers. This effect can be caused by the catalytic role of the stearate groups in the biodegradation mechanism leading to much faster disintegration of nanocomposites than pure PLA.

  16. Telephone counseling promotes dietary change in healthy adults: results of a pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Newman, Vicky A; Flatt, Shirley W; Pierce, John P

    2008-08-01

    Telephone counseling is increasingly reported to be an effective behavior change strategy, but more studies in broader populations are needed. This uncontrolled pilot trial investigated whether a 3-month/eight-call telephone counseling intervention could promote dietary changes associated with reduced chronic disease risk in adults consuming <5.0 servings of vegetables and fruits daily. Between 2002 and 2004, 97 adults (mean age 46 years; range 21 to 84 years) completed the intervention and a follow-up assessment at 6 months. Approximately half were of nonwhite ethnicity (53%). The majority were women (95%) and had never had cancer (89%). The intervention promoted daily intakes of three to five vegetable servings, two to four fruit servings, and three whole-grain and/or beans/legumes servings. Average total daily intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans/legumes, fiber, and fat were assessed at baseline and at 6 months, each by a set of three 24-hour recalls. Plasma carotenoids were measured on a subsample (n=41) as an objective biomarker of vegetable and fruit intake. Change in mean self-reported dietary intake (ie, vegetables, fruit, whole grains, beans/legumes, fiber, and fat) and plasma carotenoids were compared by paired t tests. The intervention was associated with a significant (P<0.001) increase in vegetable servings per day (baseline 2.1 servings per day, 6 months 3.5 servings per day; 67% increase), fruit servings per day (baseline 1.4 servings per day, 6 months 2.4 servings per day; 71% increase), and whole-grain and/or bean servings per day (baseline 1.0 serving per day, 6 months 1.4 servings per day; 40% increase). These changes were corroborated by a significant (P<0.001) increase in total plasma carotenoids. This 3-month/eight-call telephone counseling intervention was associated with dietary change in healthy adults consuming fewer than five servings per day of vegetables and fruit at study entry.

  17. Interaction of tablet disintegrants and magnesium stearate during mixing I: Effect on tablet disintegration.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, G K; Smallenbroek, A J; Lerk, C F

    1981-12-01

    The effect of magnesium stearate on the disintegration of tablets was studied. Three different preblends, containing a slightly or a strongly swelling disintegrant, were mixed before compression with magnesium stearate for different time periods. The results show that a strongly swelling disintegrant, such as sodium starch glycolate in contrast to potato starch, can reduce the deteriorating effect of hydrophobic lubricants on tablet disintegration. However, the interaction between magnesium stearate and potato starch or sodium starch glycolate and the resulting differences in disintegration characteristics can be masked by the use of disks in the USP disintegration apparatus.

  18. Dietary cholesterol promotes AOM-induced colorectal cancer through activating the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Du, Qianming; Wang, Qing; Fan, Huimin; Wang, Jianing; Liu, Xiuting; Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Hu, Rong

    2016-04-01

    Prolonged ingestion of a cholesterol-enriched diet induces chronic, auto-inflammatory responses resulting in significant health problems including colorectal cancer. Inflammasomes are thought to mediate intestinal homeostasis, and their dysregulation contributes to inflammatory bowel diseases and colitis-associated cancer (CAC). However, in vitro and in vivo information regarding the inflammation-inducing and tumor-promoting effect of cholesterol is lacking. Here we show that the cholesterol promoted colon carcinogenesis in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated mice through activating the NLRP3 inflammasome. High cholesterol diet (HCD) significantly increased inflammatory responses and tumor burden. Cholesterol crystals, detected in the colon of mice fed with HCD, also promoted NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages, as indicated by elevated expression of cleaved caspase-1, formation of NLRP3-ASC-caspase-1 complex assembly, and higher IL-1β secretion. Importantly, cholesterol was found to inhibit the activity of AMPKα in macrophages, leading to a significant production of mitochondrial ROS, which in turn activated the NLRP3 inflammasome. Moreover, crystal uptake and cathepsin B accounted for cholesterol crystal-induced inactivation of AMPKα. Finally, HCD-induced increase in IL-1β secretion, macrophage infiltration and tumor burden was diminished by the deletion of NLRP3 in AOM-treated mice. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the pro-inflammatory and cancer-promoting effects of HCD are mediated by the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. Our study extended our knowledge on how dietary choices can influence processes involved in chronic inflammatory disorders and colorectal cancer.

  19. Food and Beverage Promotions in Minnesota Secondary Schools: Secular Changes, Correlates, and Associations with Adolescents' Dietary Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Nicole; Davey, Cynthia S.; Coombes, Brandon; Caspi, Caitlin; Kubik, Martha Y.; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe promotions for unhealthy and healthy foods and beverages within Minnesota secondary schools from 2008 to 2012, and to examine associations with school-level coordination of environmental improvements and students' dietary behaviors. Methods: The Minnesota School Health Profiles and Minnesota…

  20. Food and Beverage Promotions in Minnesota Secondary Schools: Secular Changes, Correlates, and Associations with Adolescents' Dietary Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Nicole; Davey, Cynthia S.; Coombes, Brandon; Caspi, Caitlin; Kubik, Martha Y.; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe promotions for unhealthy and healthy foods and beverages within Minnesota secondary schools from 2008 to 2012, and to examine associations with school-level coordination of environmental improvements and students' dietary behaviors. Methods: The Minnesota School Health Profiles and Minnesota…

  1. High-dose dietary zinc promotes prostate intraepithelial neoplasia in a murine tumor induction model.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Hwii; Woo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Jin Wook; Choi, Hoon; Kang, Seok Ho; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Park, Hong Seok; Cheon, Jun

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the role of high-dose dietary zinc in the process of prostate malignancy, 60 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: tumor induction with carcinogen and hormone (group 1), oral zinc administration without tumor induction (group 2), oral zinc administration with tumor induction (group 3) and a control without zinc administration or tumor induction (group 4). Zinc was supplied orally in the form of zinc sulfate heptahydrate dissolved in drinking water to groups 2 and 3 for 20 weeks. Although the serum level of zinc measured at 20 weeks was maintained similarly in each group (P = 0.082), intraprostatic zinc concentrations were statistically different. Group 1 prostates contained the least amount of zinc in both the dorsolateral and ventral lobes at levels of 36.3 and 4.8 microg g(-1), respectively. However, in group 3, zinc levels increased in both lobes to 59.3 and 12.1 microg g(-1), respectively, comparable with that of group 4 (54.5 +/- 14.6 and 14.1 +/- 2.4 microg g(-1)). In spite of these increases in zinc concentration, the prevalence of prostate intraepithelial neoplasm was rather increased in group 3 (53.3% and 46.7%) compared with group 1 (33.3% and 33.3%) in both dorsolateral and ventral prostate lobes. Although prostate intraepithelial neoplasm did not develop in any prostate in group 4, zinc administration did induce prostate intraepithelial neoplasm in group 2 (46.7% and 40.0%). Thus, although high dietary zinc increased intraprostatic zinc concentrations, it promoted, instead of preventing, prostate intraepithelial neoplasm in a murine prostate malignancy induction model.

  2. Aluminum exposure for 60days at an equivalent human dietary level promotes peripheral dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Caroline Silveira; Vera, Gema; Ocio, José Antonio Uranga; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Miguel, Marta; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2017-08-25

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic associated with a number of chronic human diseases. We investigated the effects of Al exposure at doses similar to human dietary levels and at a high level exposure to Al on the peripheral nervous system. Wistar male rats were divided into two major groups and received orally: 1) First group - Low level - rats were subdivided and treated for 60days: a) Control - received ultrapure water; b) AlCl3 - received Al at 8.3mg/kg body weight (bw) for 60days; and 2) Second group - High level - rats were subdivided and treated for 42days: C) Control - received ultrapure water through oral gavage; d) AlCl3 - received Al at 100mg/kg bw for 42days. Von Frey hair test, plantar test, the presence of catalepsy and the spontaneous motor activity were investigated. Reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity, immunohistochemistry to investigate the nerve inflammation and, the specific presence of Al in the sciatic nerve fibers were investigated. Al exposure at a representative human dietary level promotes the development of mechanical allodynia, catalepsy, increased inflammation in the sciatic nerve, systemic oxidative stress and, is able to be retained in the sciatic nerve. The effects of low-dose Al were similar to those found in rats exposed to Al at a dose much higher (100mg/kg). Our findings suggest that Al may be considered toxic for the peripheral nervous system, thus inducing peripheral dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dietary fish oil promotes colonic apoptosis and mitochondrial proton leak in oxidatively stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Ran, Qitao; Toyokuni, Shinya; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Callaway, Evelyn S; Lupton, Joanne R; Chapkin, Robert S

    2011-08-01

    An alteration of mitochondrial function can result in disruption of redox homeostasis and is associated with abnormal cancer cell growth. Manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) are two of the most important antioxidant defense enzymes that protect cells against oxidative stress. We had previously shown that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) promote colonocyte apoptosis, a marker of colon cancer risk, in part by enhancing phospholipid oxidation. To elucidate the mechanisms regulating oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in vivo, we fed heterozygous SOD2(Het), Gpx4(Het), and transgenic Gpx4(Tg) mice diets containing either 15% corn oil by weight (CO, enriched in n-6 PUFA) or 3.5% CO + 11.5% fish oil (FO, enriched in n-3 PUFA) for 4 weeks. Our data showed that (i) genetic predeposition to oxidative stress facilitates apoptosis in the mouse colon (Gpx4(Het) > SOD2(Het) > Wt > Gpx4(Tg)), (ii) dietary n-3 PUFA have an additive effect on the induction of apoptosis in Gpx4(Het) and SOD2(Het) mice; and (iii) dietary n-3 PUFA reverse the phenotype in oxidatively protected Gpx4(Tg) mice by elevating apoptosis to a level observed in wild-type (Wt; control) animals. Complimentary experiments examining colonic mitochondrial bioenergetic profiles indicate that FO-fed mice exhibit a significantly (P < 0.05) increased respiration-induced proton leak relative to control CO treatment. This finding was consistent with a loss of membrane potential in response to chronic oxidative stress and supports the contention that n-3 PUFA alter mitochondrial metabolic activity, thereby enhancing apoptosis and reducing colon cancer risk.

  4. Dietary Epicatechin Promotes Survival of Obese Diabetic Mice and Drosophila melanogaster123

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongwei; Fu, Zhuo; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Zhen, Wei; LeRoith, Tanya; Meaney, Mary Pat; Voelker, Kevin A.; Jia, Zhenquan; Grange, Robert W.; Liu, Dongmin

    2011-01-01

    The lifespan of diabetic patients is 7–8 y shorter than that of the general population because of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications and damage to other organs such as the liver and skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the effects of epicatechin, one of the major flavonoids in cocoa, on health-promoting effects in obese diabetic (db/db) mice (0.25% in drinking water for 15 wk) and Drosophila melanogaster (0.01–8 mmol/L in diet). Dietary intake of epicatechin promoted survival in the diabetic mice (50% mortality in diabetic control group vs. 8.4% in epicatechin group after 15 wk of treatment), whereas blood pressure, blood glucose, food intake, and body weight gain were not significantly altered. Pathological analysis showed that epicatechin administration reduced the degeneration of aortic vessels and blunted fat deposition and hydropic degeneration in the liver caused by diabetes. Epicatechin treatment caused changes in diabetic mice that are associated with a healthier and longer lifespan, including improved skeletal muscle stress output, reduced systematic inflammation markers and serum LDL cholesterol, increased hepatic antioxidant glutathione concentration and total superoxide dismutase activity, decreased circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 (from 303 ± 21 mg/L in the diabetic control group to 189 ± 21 mg/L in the epicatechin-treated group), and improved AMP-activated protein kinase-α activity in the liver and skeletal muscle. Consistently, epicatechin (0.1–8 mmol/L) also promoted survival and increased mean lifespan of Drosophila. Therefore, epicatechin may be a novel food-derived, antiaging compound. PMID:21525262

  5. Dietary epicatechin promotes survival of obese diabetic mice and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Si, Hongwei; Fu, Zhuo; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Zhen, Wei; Leroith, Tanya; Meaney, Mary Pat; Voelker, Kevin A; Jia, Zhenquan; Grange, Robert W; Liu, Dongmin

    2011-06-01

    The lifespan of diabetic patients is 7-8 y shorter than that of the general population because of hyperglycemia-induced vascular complications and damage to other organs such as the liver and skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the effects of epicatechin, one of the major flavonoids in cocoa, on health-promoting effects in obese diabetic (db/db) mice (0.25% in drinking water for 15 wk) and Drosophila melanogaster (0.01-8 mmol/L in diet). Dietary intake of epicatechin promoted survival in the diabetic mice (50% mortality in diabetic control group vs. 8.4% in epicatechin group after 15 wk of treatment), whereas blood pressure, blood glucose, food intake, and body weight gain were not significantly altered. Pathological analysis showed that epicatechin administration reduced the degeneration of aortic vessels and blunted fat deposition and hydropic degeneration in the liver caused by diabetes. Epicatechin treatment caused changes in diabetic mice that are associated with a healthier and longer lifespan, including improved skeletal muscle stress output, reduced systematic inflammation markers and serum LDL cholesterol, increased hepatic antioxidant glutathione concentration and total superoxide dismutase activity, decreased circulating insulin-like growth factor-1 (from 303 ± 21 mg/L in the diabetic control group to 189 ± 21 mg/L in the epicatechin-treated group), and improved AMP-activated protein kinase-α activity in the liver and skeletal muscle. Consistently, epicatechin (0.1-8 mmol/L) also promoted survival and increased mean lifespan of Drosophila. Therefore, epicatechin may be a novel food-derived, antiaging compound.

  6. Extraction of stearate salts from plastic materials used in pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Jenke, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Plastic materials are widely used in medical items such as solution containers, infusion sets, transfer tubing, devices, processing equipment and systems, filters, and the like. Components in medical items can leach out of such items when they are contacted by a therapeutic product or product-related solution. Stearic acid and stearate salts are commonly present in medical and food packaging, either as plastic additives, processing aids, or contaminants, and their leaching from plastics is well documented. With a pK(a) in the range of 5.1 to 5.6 and limited aqueous solubility (log P(o/w) greater than 8), the leaching of stearic acid (and its related metal salts) into pharmaceutical products is expected to be strongly dependent on the product's pH and polarity. In order to establish and understand the leaching behavior of stearate-containing materials, three compounds (stearic acid, calcium stearate, and zinc stearate) and four polymeric materials containing these compounds were contacted with aqueous buffers in the pH range of 2.5 to 11. The leached levels of calcium, zinc, stearate, palmitate, and total organic carbon (TOC) were measured in the resulting solutions and are reported. For materials containing only stearic acid or salts themselves, the extraction of these entities is pH-dependent. At low pH, the cation counter-ions of the stearate salts are extracted from the plastic materials by a process that can loosely be termed ion exchange. At intermediate pH, little or no extraction of the stearates occurs. At high pH, the stearates are extracted from the materials to a very limited extent due to the solubility of the acid and/or salts in the extraction medium.

  7. Non-debye dielectric response in monolithic layers of silver stearate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastro, R. A.; Goryaev, M. A.; Smirnov, A. P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports on the results of investigations of the electrophysical properties of silver stearate by the methods of dielectric spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The mechanisms of charge transfer and dielectric relaxation in silver stearate have been established. It has been found that there is a critical temperature T = 338 K, which is probably related to the low-temperature phase transition in the system under investigation.

  8. Production of calcium-stearate by lipase using hydrogenated beef tallow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyang-Bok; Kwon, Jin-Soo; Kim, Young-Bum; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2009-05-01

    Calcium-stearate has been traditionally produced by chemical methods, producing wastes and requiring high energy because of high temperature operation. To achieve enzymatic production of calcium-stearate at unfavorable conditions, i.e., pH 10 and 60 degrees C, suitable lipase was selected and reaction conditions were optimized using calcium hydroxide and hydrogenated beef tallow as substrates. Under optimum conditions, 95% of beef tallow, in 2.5 h, was converted into calcium-stearate by using commercial lipase SDL 451. Investigation of the time-course reaction revealed that fatty acid was initially produced by lipase, followed by conversion into calcium-stearate. The fatty acid production rate was faster than that of the conversion into calcium-stearate at the beginning of the reaction. Alkaline pH, originating from the addition of calcium hydroxide, increased the converting reaction. This is the first report demonstrating that chemical production of calcium-stearate can be replaced by enzymatic reaction, thereby creating a cleaner process.

  9. The dietary profile of socially vulnerable participants in health promotion programs in a brazilian metropolis.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Raquel de Deus; Horta, Paula Martins; dos Santos, Luana Caroline; Lopes, Aline Cristine Souza

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the dietary profile of participants who used two health promotion services located in socially vulnerable areas in a Brazilian metropolis. A cross-sectional comparative study was conducted with participants (n = 370) aged ≥ 20 years who joined two services of the Academias da Cidade program in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The study participants engaged in physical activity and nutritional education actions directed by the services from 2009 to 2010. The sociodemographic and economic conditions and health and nutrition profiles of each individual were assessed. Participants from a high social-risk who used the service did not demonstrate adequate intake of vegetables (54.6 versus 43.6%; p = 0.038), sweets (33.5 versus 23.2%; p = 0.030), soft drinks (28.5 versus 11.9%; p < 0.001), artificial juice (34.7 versus 22.6%; p = 0.011), and processed meat (48.8 versus 32.7; p = 0.002). However, in the other service, lower social vulnerability, a higher prevalence of abdominal adiposity (60.7 versus 43.0%; p = 0.004) and consumption of high-fat meat products (53.0 versus 36.5%; p = 0.002) was observed. Participants who used both services demonstrated inadequate food intake compatible with the development of chronic disease profiles. However, the participants in each service were distinct from each other. This suggests that promotion of healthy eating should to contemplate the territory and its interface with people health.

  10. Dietary Phytochemicals Promote Health by Enhancing Antioxidant Defence in a Pig Model

    PubMed Central

    Selby-Pham, Sophie N. B.; Cottrell, Jeremy J.; Ng, Ken

    2017-01-01

    Phytochemical-rich diets are protective against chronic diseases and mediate their protective effect by regulation of oxidative stress (OS). However, it is proposed that under some circumstances, phytochemicals can promote production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vitro, which might drive OS-mediated signalling. Here, we investigated the effects of administering single doses of extracts of red cabbage and grape skin to pigs. Blood samples taken at baseline and 30 min intervals for 4 hours following intake were analyzed by measures of antioxidant status in plasma, including Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. In addition, dose-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by the same extracts was measured in untreated commercial pig plasma in vitro. Plasma from treated pigs showed extract dose-dependent increases in non-enzymatic (plasma TEAC) and enzymatic (GPx) antioxidant capacities. Similarly, extract dose-dependent increases in H2O2 were observed in commercial pig plasma in vitro. The antioxidant responses to extracts by treated pigs were highly correlated with their respective yields of H2O2 production in vitro. These results support that dietary phytochemicals regulate OS via direct and indirect antioxidant mechanisms. The latter may be attributed to the ability to produce H2O2 and to thereby stimulate cellular antioxidant defence systems. PMID:28708113

  11. Challenges in detecting magnesium stearate distribution in tablets.

    PubMed

    Lakio, Satu; Vajna, Balázs; Farkas, István; Salokangas, Henri; Marosi, György; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2013-03-01

    Magnesium stearate (MS) is the most commonly used lubricant in pharmaceutical industry. During blending, MS particles form a thin layer on the surfaces of the excipient and drug particles prohibiting the bonding from forming between the particles. This hydrophobic layer decreases the tensile strength of tablets and prevents water from penetrating into the tablet restraining the disintegration and dissolution of the tablets. Although overlubrication of the powder mass during MS blending is a well-known problem, the lubricant distribution in tablets has traditionally been challenging to measure. There is currently no adequate analytical method to investigate this phenomenon. In this study, the distribution of MS in microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) tablets was investigated using three different blending scales. The crushing strength of the tablets was used as a secondary response, as its decrease is known to result from the overlubrication. In addition, coating of the MCC particles by MS in intact tablets was detected using Raman microscopic mapping. MS blending was more efficient in larger scales. Raman imaging was successfully applied to characterize MS distribution in MCC tablets despite low concentration of MS. The Raman method can provide highly valuable visual information about the proceeding of the MS blending process. However, the measuring set-up has to be carefully planned to establish reliable and reproducible results.

  12. Synthesis of manganese stearate for high density polyethylene (HDPE) and its biodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aras, Neny Rasnyanti M.; Arcana, I. Made

    2015-09-01

    An oxidant additive is one type of additive used for oxo-biodegradable polymers. This additive was prepared by reaction multivalent transition metals and fatty acids to accelerate the degradation process of polymers by providing a thermal treatment or irradiation with light. This study focused on the synthesis of manganese stearate as an additive for application in High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), and the influence of manganese stearate on the characteristics of HDPE including their biodegradability. Manganese stearate was synthesized by the reaction of stearic acid with sodium hydroxide, and sodium stearate formed was reacted with manganese chloride tetrahydrate to form manganese stearate with a melting point of 100-110 °C. Based on the FTIR spectrum showed absorption peak at wave number around 1560 cm-1 which is an asymmetric vibration of CO functional group that binds to the manganese. The films of oxo-biodegradable polymer were prepared by blending HDPE and manganese stearate additives at various concentrations with using the polymer melting method, followed heating at a temperature of 50°C and 70°C for 10 days. The characterizations of the oxo-biodegradable polymers were carried out by analysis the functional groups (FTIR and ATR),thermal properties (TGA), surface properties (SEM), as well as analysis of the biodegradability (the biodegradation test by using activated sludge, % weight loss). Based on COi indicate that the additive of manganese stearate is active in oxidizing polymer by heating treatment. Results of biodegradation by microorganisms from activated sludge showed that the percentage weight loss of polymers increase with the increasing incubation time and the concentration of manganese stearate in HDPE. Biodegradability of HDPE with the addition of manganese stearate and followed by heating at a higher temperature was better observed. The highest percentage weight loss was obtained at the polymer with concentration of 0.2% manganese stearate

  13. Synthesis of manganese stearate for high density polyethylene (HDPE) and its biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Aras, Neny Rasnyanti M. Arcana, I Made

    2015-09-30

    An oxidant additive is one type of additive used for oxo-biodegradable polymers. This additive was prepared by reaction multivalent transition metals and fatty acids to accelerate the degradation process of polymers by providing a thermal treatment or irradiation with light. This study focused on the synthesis of manganese stearate as an additive for application in High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), and the influence of manganese stearate on the characteristics of HDPE including their biodegradability. Manganese stearate was synthesized by the reaction of stearic acid with sodium hydroxide, and sodium stearate formed was reacted with manganese chloride tetrahydrate to form manganese stearate with a melting point of 100-110 °C. Based on the FTIR spectrum showed absorption peak at wave number around 1560 cm{sup −1} which is an asymmetric vibration of CO functional group that binds to the manganese. The films of oxo-biodegradable polymer were prepared by blending HDPE and manganese stearate additives at various concentrations with using the polymer melting method, followed heating at a temperature of 50°C and 70°C for 10 days. The characterizations of the oxo-biodegradable polymers were carried out by analysis the functional groups (FTIR and ATR),thermal properties (TGA), surface properties (SEM), as well as analysis of the biodegradability (the biodegradation test by using activated sludge, % weight loss). Based on COi indicate that the additive of manganese stearate is active in oxidizing polymer by heating treatment. Results of biodegradation by microorganisms from activated sludge showed that the percentage weight loss of polymers increase with the increasing incubation time and the concentration of manganese stearate in HDPE. Biodegradability of HDPE with the addition of manganese stearate and followed by heating at a higher temperature was better observed. The highest percentage weight loss was obtained at the polymer with concentration of 0.2% manganese

  14. Dietary glucarate as anti-promoter of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Walaszek, Z; Hanausek-Walaszek, M; Minton, J P; Webb, T E

    1986-09-01

    Using as a criterion the inhibition of serum beta-glucuronidase activity, dietary calcium D-glucarate is shown to serve as an efficient slow-release source in vivo of D-glucaro-1,4-lactone, the potent endogenous inhibitor of this enzyme. Using the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene model of mammary tumor induction in rats it is shown for the first time that feeding the rats calcium D-glucarate-supplemented diet after treatment with the carcinogen, inhibits tumor development by over 70%. Supportive evidence is presented for the theory that calcium D-glucarate inhibits or delays the promotion phase of mammary carcinogenesis by lowering endogenous levels of estradiol and precursors of 17-ketosteroids. Therefore, dietary glucarate can be used to lower blood and tissue levels of beta-glucuronidase, and in turn of those carcinogens and promoting agents which are excreted, at least in part, as glucuronide conjugates.

  15. Dietary approaches to hypertension: a call to pharmacists to promote lifestyle changes.

    PubMed

    Earl, Grace L; Henstenburg, Jule Anne

    2012-01-01

    To describe guideline updates regarding a dietary approach to preventing or treating hypertension and to encourage pharmacists to provide education to patients on the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and reducing dietary sodium intake. Abstracts and published articles identified by searching Medline (January 2001 to July 2011) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (January 2001 to July 2011) using the terms hypertension, cardiovascular risk, risk reduction behavior, health behavior, community pharmacy services, counseling, diet, and sodium-restricted diet, as well as reports from the Institute of Medicine and Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010. In the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010, the recommended daily dietary sodium intakes for individuals with hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes was reduced to less than 1,500 mg per day. All other healthy individuals are recommended to achieve dietary sodium intakes of less than 2,300 mg per day. Americans are consuming excessive amounts of dietary sodium in the form of processed foods, which poses a barrier to blood pressure control. Pharmacists should recommend the DASH diet as a way to reduce intake of dietary sodium and use available nutrition resources found on the ChooseMyPlate.gov and Food and Drug Administration websites. Pharmacists should integrate approaches using behavioral and motivational strategies to provide education that is culturally sensitive and appeals to individuals with marginal health literacy. Community and ambulatory practice pharmacists, as well as collaborative practice models between pharmacists and physicians, should optimize medication management and incorporate lifestyle interventions that reduce dietary sodium intake as part of a comprehensive approach to improve hypertension outcomes.

  16. Dietary polyamines promote the growth of azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, J E; Reistad, R; Eliassen, K A; Sjaastad, O V; Alexander, J

    1997-10-01

    We have examined whether dietary polyamines influence the formation and initial growth of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. Effects of a combination of dietary polyamines at three dose levels (putrescine: 50, 280, 740 nmol/g; spermidine: 10, 261, 763 nmol/g; spermine: 1, 31, 91 nmol/g) in the polyamine-poor AIN-76A diet were studied in animals in two different experimental situations: animals treated with AOM alone and animals treated with AOM + difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a specific inhibitor of endogenous polyamine synthesis. In both experimental situations, dietary polyamines enhanced the growth of ACF, expressed as the number of large ACF (foci with three or more aberrant crypts, ACF > or = 3), whereas the formation of ACF, expressed as the number of ACF, was apparently not altered. In animals treated with AOM alone, maximal growth enhancing effect on ACF was nearly obtained with the median level of dietary polyamine. In rats fed a low polyamine diet, basic AIN-76A, DFMO reduced the growth of AOM-induced ACF by 83%. This inhibitory effect of DFMO was counteracted by dietary polyamines in a dose-dependent manner, and it was abolished at the highest level of polyamines. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that dietary polyamines are able to enhance the growth of AOM-induced ACF. Further, dietary polyamines reversed the DFMO-caused inhibition of ACF growth, probably by compensating for the DFMO-reduced endogenous polyamine synthesis.

  17. The Gastrointestinal Tract as a Key Target Organ for the Health-Promoting Effects of Dietary Proanthocyanidins.

    PubMed

    Cires, María José; Wong, Ximena; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Gotteland, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PACs) are polymers of flavan-3-ols abundant in many vegetable foods and beverages widely consumed in the human diet. There is increasing evidence supporting the beneficial impact of dietary PACs in the prevention and nutritional management of non-communicable chronic diseases. It is considered that PACs with a degree of polymerization >3 remain unabsorbed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and accumulate in the colonic lumen. Accordingly, the GI tract may be considered as a key organ for the healthy-promoting effects of dietary PACs. PACs form non-specific complexes with salivary proteins in mouth, originating the sensation of astringency, and with dietary proteins, pancreatic enzymes, and nutrient transporters in the intestinal lumen, decreasing the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. They also exert antimicrobial activities, interfering with cariogenic or ulcerogenic pathogens in the mouth (Streptococcus mutans) and stomach (Helicobacter pylori), respectively. Through their antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties, PACs decrease inflammatory processes in animal model of gastric and colonic inflammation. Interestingly, they exert prebiotic activities, stimulating the growth of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. as well as some butyrate-producing bacteria in the colon. Finally, PACs are also metabolized by the gut microbiota, producing metabolites, mainly aromatic acids and valerolactones, which accumulate in the colon and/or are absorbed into the bloodstream. Accordingly, these compounds could display biological activities on the colonic epithelium or in extra-intestinal tissues and, therefore, contribute to part of the beneficial effects of dietary PACs.

  18. The Gastrointestinal Tract as a Key Target Organ for the Health-Promoting Effects of Dietary Proanthocyanidins

    PubMed Central

    Cires, María José; Wong, Ximena; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Gotteland, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PACs) are polymers of flavan-3-ols abundant in many vegetable foods and beverages widely consumed in the human diet. There is increasing evidence supporting the beneficial impact of dietary PACs in the prevention and nutritional management of non-communicable chronic diseases. It is considered that PACs with a degree of polymerization >3 remain unabsorbed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and accumulate in the colonic lumen. Accordingly, the GI tract may be considered as a key organ for the healthy-promoting effects of dietary PACs. PACs form non-specific complexes with salivary proteins in mouth, originating the sensation of astringency, and with dietary proteins, pancreatic enzymes, and nutrient transporters in the intestinal lumen, decreasing the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids. They also exert antimicrobial activities, interfering with cariogenic or ulcerogenic pathogens in the mouth (Streptococcus mutans) and stomach (Helicobacter pylori), respectively. Through their antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties, PACs decrease inflammatory processes in animal model of gastric and colonic inflammation. Interestingly, they exert prebiotic activities, stimulating the growth of Lactobacillus spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. as well as some butyrate-producing bacteria in the colon. Finally, PACs are also metabolized by the gut microbiota, producing metabolites, mainly aromatic acids and valerolactones, which accumulate in the colon and/or are absorbed into the bloodstream. Accordingly, these compounds could display biological activities on the colonic epithelium or in extra-intestinal tissues and, therefore, contribute to part of the beneficial effects of dietary PACs. PMID:28097121

  19. Family food environment and dietary behaviors likely to promote fatness in 5-6 year-old children.

    PubMed

    Campbell, K J; Crawford, D A; Ball, K

    2006-08-01

    The family food environment (FFE) is likely to exert important influences on young children's eating. Examination of multiple aspects of the FFE may provide useful insights regarding which of these might most effectively be targeted to prevent childhood obesity. To assess the associations between the FFE and a range of obesity-promoting dietary behaviors in 5-6-year-old children. Cross-sectional study. Five hundred and sixty families sampled from three socio-economically distinct areas. Predictors included parental perceptions of their child's diet, food availability, child feeding practices, parental modeling of eating and food preparation and television (TV) exposure. Dietary outcomes included energy intake, vegetable, sweet snack, savory snack and high-energy (non-dairy) fluid consumption. Multiple linear regression analyses, adjusted for all other predictor variables and maternal education, showed that several aspects of the FFE were associated with dietary outcomes likely to promote fatness in 5-6-year-old children. For example, increased TV viewing time was associated with increased index of energy intake, increased sweet snack and high-energy drink consumption, and deceased vegetable intake. In addition, parent's increased confidence in the adequacy of their child's diet was associated with increased consumption of sweet and savory snacks and decreased vegetable consumption. This study substantially extends previous research in the area, providing important insights with which to guide family-based obesity prevention strategies.

  20. High dietary fat intake during lactation promotes development of diet-induced obesity in male offspring of mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Kitano, Yasuna; Honma, Taro; Kijima, Ryo; Ikeda, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    The maternal nutritional status during pregnancy and lactation influences the risk of obesity in offspring, but the details of this phenomenon are unclear. In particular, there is little information on the influence on the offspring of the maternal nutritional status during lactation only. Therefore, in this study, we examined the influence of high dietary fat intake in dams during lactation on the risk of obesity in offspring, using C57BL/6J mice. The mice were fed a control diet (CD) during pregnancy. After birth, dams were fed a CD or a high-fat diet (HD) during lactation (3 wk). Fat and energy were significantly increased in milk from dams fed a HD during lactation. Male offspring were weaned at 3 wk old and fed a CD for 4 wk, which resulted in no significant difference in their physique. Four weeks after weaning, the offspring (7 wk old) were fed a CD or HD for 4 wk to induce obesity. High dietary fat intake in dams and offspring promoted lipid accumulation in white adipose tissue and adipocyte hypertrophy in male offspring. The underlying mechanism may involve an increase in expression of Lpl and a decrease in expression of Hsl in white adipose tissue of offspring. In conclusion, our results show that high dietary fat intake during lactation promotes development of diet-induced obesity in male offspring.

  1. Inverted polymer solar cells with enhanced fill factor by inserting the potassium stearate interfacial modification layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiangsheng; Jiu, Tonggang E-mail: fangjf@nimte.ac.cn; Li, Bairu; Kuang, Chaoyang; Chen, Qiushan; Ma, Sushuang; Fang, Junfeng E-mail: fangjf@nimte.ac.cn; Shu, Jie

    2016-05-02

    A thin potassium stearate (KSt) film combined with an optimized ZnO film was introduced to improve the fill factor (FF) of highly efficient inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements were used to show that the introduction of KSt did not change the morphology of interlayer. On the contrary, it is beneficial for the spread of the active layer on the interlayer. The origin of enhanced FF was systematically studied by the ideal current-voltage model for a single heterojunction solar cell and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On the basis of the data analysis, the reduced charge recombination loss was responsible for this improved FF. At last, when KSt was replaced by sodium stearate (NaSt), the similar experiment phenomenon was observed. This indicates that inserting a metallic stearate modified layer is a promising strategy to enhance inverted PSCs performance.

  2. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  3. Lipases efficiently stearate and cutinases acetylate the surface of arabinoxylan films.

    PubMed

    Stepan, A M; Anasontzis, G E; Matama, T; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Olsson, L; Gatenholm, P

    2013-08-10

    This is the first report on successful enzyme catalyzed surface esterification of hemicellulose films. Enzyme catalyzed surface acetylation with vinyl acetate and stearation with vinyl stearate were studied on rye arabinoxylan (AX) films. Different surface analytical techniques (FT-IR, TOF-SIMS, ESCA, CA) show that lipases from Mucor javanicus, Rhizopus oryzae and Candida rugosa successfully surface stearate AX films and that a cutinase from Fusarium solani pisi surface acetylates these films. The specificities of cutinase and lipases were also compared, and higher activity was observed for lipases utilizing long alkyl chain substrates while higher activity was observed for cutinase utilizing shorter alkyl chain substrates. The contact angle analysis showed films with increased initial hydrophobicity on the surfaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inverted polymer solar cells with enhanced fill factor by inserting the potassium stearate interfacial modification layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangsheng; Jiu, Tonggang; Li, Bairu; Kuang, Chaoyang; Chen, Qiushan; Ma, Sushuang; Shu, Jie; Fang, Junfeng

    2016-05-01

    A thin potassium stearate (KSt) film combined with an optimized ZnO film was introduced to improve the fill factor (FF) of highly efficient inverted polymer solar cells (PSCs). Atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements were used to show that the introduction of KSt did not change the morphology of interlayer. On the contrary, it is beneficial for the spread of the active layer on the interlayer. The origin of enhanced FF was systematically studied by the ideal current-voltage model for a single heterojunction solar cell and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. On the basis of the data analysis, the reduced charge recombination loss was responsible for this improved FF. At last, when KSt was replaced by sodium stearate (NaSt), the similar experiment phenomenon was observed. This indicates that inserting a metallic stearate modified layer is a promising strategy to enhance inverted PSCs performance.

  5. Dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids robustly promotes neurovascular restorative dynamics and improves neurological functions after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Hailian; Zhang, Hui; Leak, Rehana K.; Shi, Yejie; Hu, Xiaoming; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating neurological disease with no satisfactory therapies to preserve long-term neurological function, perhaps due to the sole emphasis on neuronal survival in most preclinical studies. Recent studies have revealed the importance of protecting multiple cell types in the injured brain, such as oligodendrocytes and components of the neurovascular unit, before long-lasting recovery of function can be achieved. For example, revascularization in the ischemic penumbra is critical to provide various neurotrophic factors that enhance the survival and activity of neurons and other progenitor cells, such as oligodendrocyte precursor cells. In the present study, we hypothesized that chronic dietary supplementation with fish oil promotes post-stroke angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and oligodendrogenesis, thereby leading to long-term functional improvements. Mice received dietary supplementation with n-3 PUFA-enriched fish oil for three months before and up to one month after stroke. As expected, dietary n-3 PUFAs significantly increased levels of n-3 PUFAs in the brain and improved long-term behavioral outcomes after cerebral ischemia. n-3 PUFAs also robustly improved revascularization and angiogenesis and boosted the survival of NeuN/BrdU labeled newborn neurons up to 35 days after stroke injury. Furthermore, these pro-neurogenic effects were accompanied by robust oligodendrogenesis. Thus, this is the first study to demonstrate that chronic dietary intake of n-3 PUFAs is an effective prophylactic measure to not only protect against ischemic injury for the long term but also to actively promote neurovascular restorative dynamics and brain repair. PMID:25771800

  6. Reduced use of antibiotic growth promoters in diets fed to weanling pigs: dietary tools, part 1.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, J E

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotics improve health and productive performance of pigs. There is increasing evidence that other dietary ingredients may provide similar, but probably not identical, benefits. A properly prepared immune egg product, spray-dried plasma, or a high level of dietary zinc can provide protection against enteric infection in young pigs. Spray-dried plasma also increases growth rate dramatically, and zinc increases it substantially. The evidence in refereed publications also indicates that organic acids increase growth rate substantially, but does not clearly identify the most effective acid or combination of acids. Whey proteins, lactose, mannan oligosaccharide, or a high level of dietary copper provides a modest but useful increase in growth rate. It is not clear whether conventional egg products or other milk proteins may be beneficial. There are many other feed ingredients commercially available that may improve health and productive performance of pigs.

  7. An Aluminum Magnesium Hydroxide Stearate-based Skin Barrier Protection Cream Used for the Management of Eczematous Dermatitis: A Summary of Completed Studies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Bhambri, Sanjay; Michaels, Brent

    2008-11-01

    Eczematous dermatoses can often be very difficult to treat. An aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream has recently become available for clinical use. Aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream provides an alternative option in treating these dermatoses while providing barrier protection against external allergens and irritants. This article reviews various studies evaluating aluminum magnesium hydroxide stearate-based cream.

  8. Impact of solid-state properties on lubrication efficacy of magnesium stearate.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Phanidhara; Chawla, Garima; Kaushal, Aditya M; Bansal, Arvind K

    2005-01-01

    The advent of high-speed tableting and slug capsule-filling machines has ushered in an increasingly important role for the lubricants to enact during manufacturing of dosage forms. Although lubricants help in processing, they can also adversely affect the flow properties and dissolution profile of the drug. It is thus critical to maintain a balance between these two behaviors, by understanding the underlying mechanisms and using their optimum concentration in the formulation. The source and manufacturing process inculcate different solid-state properties to magnesium stearate, the most commonly used lubricant, leading to variations in its lubrication efficacy. However, there has been no complete study relating the lubrication efficacy of magnesium stearate to various levels of solid state. Hence, this study was aimed at comprehensively scrutinizing the role of molecular, particle, and bulk level properties of solid state on the lubrication efficacy of magnesium stearate. A method based on net work done during compression using texture analyzer, was developed and validated to analyze its performance. Particle and bulk-level properties were studied using microscopy, particle size analysis, and particle surface area determination, and molecular level was characterized using thermal, spectroscopic, and crystallographic methods. Interplay of solid-state characteristics such as particle size, degree of agglomeration, and crystal habit were found to markedly influence the lubrication potential of magnesium stearate.

  9. All-natural nitrite and nitrate containing dietary supplement promotes nitric oxide production and reduces triglycerides in humans.

    PubMed

    Zand, Janet; Lanza, Frank; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2011-04-01

    There is an emerging paradigm that certain foods promote nitric oxide (NO) production from the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite to NO, providing an endothelium independent source of bioactive NO. We hypothesize that a unique formulation containing nitrate-rich beetroot along with Hawthorn berry shown to have a robust nitrite reductase activity would improve NO status in humans and modify cardiovascular risk factors. The trial was conducted at the Houston Institute for Clinical Research in Houston, Texas. Inclusion criteria for this double-blinded, placebo-controlled study were patients older than 40 years with 3 or more of the following cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension, obesity, hyperlipidemia, smoking, sedentary, family history of cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Subjects were instructed to take either the NO dietary supplement called Neo40 Daily® or placebo twice daily on an empty stomach for 30 days. Patients taking the NO dietary supplement twice a day for 30 days led to a significant increase in both plasma nitrite (P < .01) and nitrate (P < .0001), indicating an increase in systemic NO availability. There was a statistically significant reduction in 72% of patients with elevated triglycerides (>150 mg/dL) after 30 days compared with their starting levels before taking the NO dietary supplement (168 ± 17 mg/dL vs 232 ± 19 mg/dL, P = .02). The strategy of formulating a combination of natural products and botanicals chosen specifically for their NO activity shows promise in restoring NO homeostasis in human subjects at risk for cardiovascular disease for use as a dietary supplement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dietary Iron Enhances Colonic Inflammation and IL-6/IL-11-Stat3 Signaling Promoting Colonic Tumor Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Desiree S.; Fu, S. Kristine; Forrest, Cynthia H.; Croft, Kevin D.; Olynyk, John K.; Lawrance, Ian C.; Trinder, Debbie

    2013-01-01

    Chronic intestinal inflammation and high dietary iron are associated with colorectal cancer development. The role of Stat3 activation in iron-induced colonic inflammation and tumorigenesis was investigated in a mouse model of inflammation-associated colorectal cancer. Mice, fed either an iron-supplemented or control diet, were treated with azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). Intestinal inflammation and tumor development were assessed by endoscopy and histology, gene expression by real-time PCR, Stat3 phosphorylation by immunoblot, cytokines by ELISA and apoptosis by TUNEL assay. Colonic inflammation was more severe in mice fed an iron-supplemented compared with a control diet one week post-DSS treatment, with enhanced colonic IL-6 and IL-11 release and Stat3 phosphorylation. Both IL-6 and ferritin, the iron storage protein, co-localized with macrophages suggesting iron may act directly on IL-6 producing-macrophages. Iron increased DSS-induced colonic epithelial cell proliferation and apoptosis consistent with enhanced mucosal damage. DSS-treated mice developed anemia that was not alleviated by dietary iron supplementation. Six weeks post-DSS treatment, iron-supplemented mice developed more and larger colonic tumors compared with control mice. Intratumoral IL-6 and IL-11 expression increased in DSS-treated mice and IL-6, and possibly IL-11, were enhanced by dietary iron. Gene expression of iron importers, divalent metal transporter 1 and transferrin receptor 1, increased and iron exporter, ferroportin, decreased in colonic tumors suggesting increased iron uptake. Dietary iron and colonic inflammation synergistically activated colonic IL-6/IL-11-Stat3 signaling promoting tumorigenesis. Oral iron therapy may be detrimental in inflammatory bowel disease since it may exacerbate colonic inflammation and increase colorectal cancer risk. PMID:24223168

  11. Dietary medium-chain triglycerides promote oral allergic sensitization and orally induced anaphylaxis to peanut protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianing; Wang, Yu; Tang, Lihua; de Villiers, Willem J S; Cohen, Donald; Woodward, Jerold; Finkelman, Fred D; Eckhardt, Erik R M

    2013-02-01

    The prevalence of peanut allergies is increasing. Peanuts and many other allergen sources contain significant amounts of triglycerides, which affect absorption of antigens but have unknown effects on sensitization and anaphylaxis. We recently reported that dietary medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which bypass mesenteric lymph and directly enter portal blood, reduce intestinal antigen absorption into blood compared with long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), which stimulate mesenteric lymph flow and are absorbed in chylomicrons through mesenteric lymph. We sought to test how dietary MCTs affect food allergy. C3H/HeJ mice were fed peanut butter protein in MCT, LCT (peanut oil), or LCT plus an inhibitor of chylomicron formation (Pluronic L81). Peanut-specific antibodies in plasma, responses of the mice to antigen challenges, and intestinal epithelial cytokine expression were subsequently measured. MCT suppressed antigen absorption into blood but stimulated absorption into Peyer patches. A single gavage of peanut protein with MCT, as well as prolonged feeding in MCT-based diets, caused spontaneous allergic sensitization. MCT-sensitized mice experienced IgG-dependent anaphylaxis on systemic challenge and IgE-dependent anaphylaxis on oral challenge. MCT feeding stimulated jejunal-epithelial thymic stromal lymphopoietin, Il25, and Il33 expression compared with that seen after LCT feeding and promoted T(H)2 cytokine responses in splenocytes. Moreover, oral challenges of sensitized mice with antigen in MCT significantly aggravated anaphylaxis compared with challenges with the LCT. Importantly, the effects of MCTs could be mimicked by adding Pluronic L81 to LCTs, and in vitro assays indicated that chylomicrons prevent basophil activation. Dietary MCTs promote allergic sensitization and anaphylaxis by affecting antigen absorption and availability and by stimulating T(H)2 responses. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  12. Dietary medium-chain triglycerides promote oral allergic sensitization and orally induced anaphylaxis to peanut protein in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianing; Wang, Yu; Tang, Lihua; de Villiers, Willem JS; Cohen, Donald; Woodward, Jerold; Finkelman, Fred D; Eckhardt, Erik RM

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence of peanut allergies is rising. Peanuts and many other allergen sources contain significant amounts of triglycerides, which affect absorption of antigens but have unknown effects on sensitization and anaphylaxis. We recently reported that dietary medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), which bypass mesenteric lymph and directly enter portal blood, reduce intestinal antigen absorption into blood compared to long-chain triglycerides (LCT), which stimulate mesenteric lymph flow and are absorbed in chylomicrons via mesenteric lymph. OBJECTIVE Test how dietary MCT affect food allergy. METHODS C3H/HeJ mice were fed peanut butter protein in MCT, LCT (peanut oil), or LCT plus an inhibitor of chylomicron formation (Pluronic L81; “PL81”). Peanut-specific antibodies in plasma, responses of the mice to antigen challenges, and intestinal epithelial cytokine expression were subsequently measured. RESULTS MCT suppressed antigen absorption into blood, but stimulated absorption into Peyer's patches. A single gavage of peanut protein with MCT as well as prolonged feeding in MCT-based diets caused spontaneous allergic sensitization. MCT-sensitized mice experienced IgG-dependent anaphylaxis upon systemic challenge and IgE-dependent anaphylaxis upon oral challenge. MCT feeding stimulated jejunal-epithelial TSLP, IL-25 and IL-33 expression compared to LCT, and promoted Th2 cytokine responses in splenocytes. Moreover, oral challenges of sensitized mice with antigen in MCT significantly aggravated anaphylaxis compared to challenges with LCT. Importantly, effects of MCT could be mimicked by adding PL81 to LCT, and in vitro assays indicated that chylomicrons prevent basophil activation. CONCLUSION Dietary MCT promote allergic sensitization and anaphylaxis by affecting antigen absorption and availability and by stimulating Th2 responses. PMID:23182172

  13. Synthesis of cobalt stearate as oxidant additive for oxo-biodegradable polyethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Asriza, Ristika O.; Arcana, I Made

    2015-09-30

    Cobalt stearate is an oxidant additives that can initiate a process of degradation in high density polyethylene (HDPE). To determine the effect of cobalt stearate in HDPE, oxo-biodegradable polyethylene film was given an irradiation with UV light or heating at various temperature. After given a heating, the FTIR spectra showed a new absorption peak at wave number 1712 cm{sup −1} indicating the presence of carbonyl groups in polymers, whereas after irradiation with UV light is not visible the presence of this absorption peak. The increase concentration of cobalt stearate added in HDPE and the higher heating temperature, the intensity of the absorption peak of the carbonyl group increased. The increasing intensity of the carbonyl group absorption is caused the presence of damage in the film surface after heating, and this result is supported by analysis the surface properties of the film with using SEM. Biodegradation tests were performed on oxo-biodegradable polyethylene film which has been given heating or UV light with using activated sludge under optimal conditions the growth of microorganisms. After biodegradation, the maximum weight decreased by 23% in the oxo-biodegradable polyethylene film with a cobalt stearate concentration of 0.2% and after heating at a temperature of 75 °C for 10 days, and only 0.69% in the same film after irradiation UV light for 10 days. Based on the results above, cobalt stearate additive is more effective to initiate the oxidative degradation of HDPE when it is initiated by heating compared to irradiation with UV light.

  14. Solvent-free acid-catalyzed ring-opening of epoxidized oleochemicals using stearates/stearic acid, and its applications.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byung-Jun Kollbe; Kraft, Stefan; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2012-03-07

    Toxic solvent and strong acid catalysts causing environmental issues have been mainly used for ring-opening of epoxidized oleochemicals. Here, we demonstrated that magnesium stearate (Mg-stearate) was a high efficient catalyst for solvent-free ring-opening of epoxidized methyl oleate, a model compound of midchain epoxide. Mg-stearate resulted in the highest yield (95%) and conversion rate (99%) toward midchain alkoxyesters under the same conditions (160 °C, 12 h) superior to other fatty acid derivatives such as a Lewis acid (lithium and sodium stearate) and Brønsted acid (stearic acid). Based on this chemical study, we synthesized biogrease and thermoplastic using epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) and Mg-stearate via one-pot, solvent-free, and purification-free process. Mg-stearate played a significant role as a reactant for epoxide ring-opening and as a thickener when excess loading rate was used; viscosity increased from 1800 to 4500 Pa·s at 25 °C when ESO:Mg-stearate increased from 1:1 equiv to 1:2, then behaved like thermoplastics (T(g) = -27 °C, T(m) = 90 °C) with 1:4.

  15. DLL4 promotes continuous adult intestinal lacteal regeneration and dietary fat transport

    PubMed Central

    Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Cisarovsky, Christophe; Demir, Cansaran Saygili; Bruand, Marine; Jaquet, Muriel; Davanture, Suzel; Ragusa, Simone; Siegert, Stefanie; Dormond, Olivier; Benedito, Rui; Radtke, Freddy; Luther, Sanjiv A.; Petrova, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    The small intestine is a dynamic and complex organ that is characterized by constant epithelium turnover and crosstalk among various cell types and the microbiota. Lymphatic capillaries of the small intestine, called lacteals, play key roles in dietary fat absorption and the gut immune response; however, little is known about the molecular regulation of lacteal function. Here, we performed a high-resolution analysis of the small intestinal stroma and determined that lacteals reside in a permanent regenerative, proliferative state that is distinct from embryonic lymphangiogenesis or quiescent lymphatic vessels observed in other tissues. We further demonstrated that this continuous regeneration process is mediated by Notch signaling and that the expression of the Notch ligand delta-like 4 (DLL4) in lacteals requires activation of VEGFR3 and VEGFR2. Moreover, genetic inactivation of Dll4 in lymphatic endothelial cells led to lacteal regression and impaired dietary fat uptake. We propose that such a slow lymphatic regeneration mode is necessary to match a unique need of intestinal lymphatic vessels for both continuous maintenance, due to the constant exposure to dietary fat and mechanical strain, and efficient uptake of fat and immune cells. Our work reveals how lymphatic vessel responses are shaped by tissue specialization and uncover a role for continuous DLL4 signaling in the function of adult lymphatic vasculature. PMID:26529256

  16. Factors influencing the dietary response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern in healthy women from the Quebec City metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Julie; Lamarche, Benoît; Lemieux, Simone

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and baseline food habits on the dietary response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern and maintenance of dietary modifications in 73 healthy women. The 12-week nutritional intervention in free-living conditions consisted of two group courses and seven individual sessions with a dietitian. A follow-up visit was performed 12 weeks after the end of the intervention (week 24). A Mediterranean dietary score was derived from a food frequency questionnaire, administered at 0, 6, 12 and 24 weeks. Marital status, socioeconomic level, educational level and household size did not seem to influence the dietary response, whereas women without children followed more closely dietary advice than women with children (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3-10.0). Planning food purchases in function of weekly discounts was also associated with better dietary response to the intervention (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.3-8.8). Nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern was effective in modifying food habits of healthy women. The fact of having children or not and food purchase habits seem to influence the response to a nutritional intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern.

  17. Food and beverage promotions in Minnesota secondary schools: secular changes, correlates, and associations with adolescents’ dietary behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nicole; Davey, Cynthia S.; Coombes, Brandon; Caspi, Caitlin; Kubik, Martha Y.; Nanney, Marilyn S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to describe promotions for unhealthy and healthy foods and beverages within Minnesota secondary schools from 2008 to 2012, and to examine associations with school-level coordination of environmental improvements and students’ dietary behaviors. METHODS The Minnesota School Health Profiles and Minnesota Student Survey data were used along with National Center for Education Statistics data to conduct analyses accounting for school-level demographics. RESULTS There was no significant improvement over time in the proportion of schools that banned advertising for unhealthy products in school buildings, on school grounds, on buses, or in publications. Whereas more than two-thirds of schools had implemented strategies focused on the promotion of fruits/vegetables by 2012, only 37% labeled healthful foods with appealing names and just 17% used price incentives to encourage healthy choices. The number of stakeholders representing different roles on school health councils was positively correlated with implementation of healthy food and beverage promotion strategies. Little evidence was found to support an influence of in-school advertising bans or promotions on students’ diets. CONCLUSIONS Policy changes are needed to protect students from food and beverage advertising and additional opportunities exist to reduce disparities in the selection of healthy options at school. PMID:25388594

  18. Food and beverage promotions in Minnesota secondary schools: secular changes, correlates, and associations with adolescents' dietary behaviors.

    PubMed

    Larson, Nicole; Davey, Cynthia S; Coombes, Brandon; Caspi, Caitlin; Kubik, Martha Y; Nanney, Marilyn S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe promotions for unhealthy and healthy foods and beverages within Minnesota secondary schools from 2008 to 2012, and to examine associations with school-level coordination of environmental improvements and students' dietary behaviors. The Minnesota School Health Profiles and Minnesota Student Survey data were used along with National Center for Education Statistics data to conduct analyses accounting for school-level demographics. There was no significant improvement over time in the proportion of schools that banned advertising for unhealthy products in school buildings, on school grounds, on buses, or in publications. Whereas more than two thirds of schools had implemented strategies focused on the promotion of fruits/vegetables by 2012, only 37% labeled healthful foods with appealing names and just 17% used price incentives to encourage healthy choices. The number of stakeholders representing different roles on school health councils was positively correlated with implementation of healthy food and beverage promotion strategies. Little evidence was found to support an influence of in-school advertising bans or promotions on students' diets. Policy changes are needed to protect students from food and beverage advertising and additional opportunities exist to reduce disparities in the selection of healthy options at school. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  19. The effect of dietary glycine on the hepatic tumor promoting activity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in rats.

    PubMed

    Bunaciu, Rodica Petruta; Tharappel, Job C; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Robertson, Larry W; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Spear, Brett T; Glauert, Howard P

    2007-10-08

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitious lipophilic environmental pollutants. Some of the PCB congeners and mixtures of congeners have tumor promoting activity in rat liver. The mechanism of their activity is not fully understood and is likely to be multifactorial. The aim of this study was to investigate if the resident liver macrophages, Kupffer cells, are important in the promoting activity of PCBs. The hypothesis of this study was that the inhibition of Kupffer cell activity would inhibit hepatic tumor promotion by PCBs in rats. To test our hypothesis, we studied the effects of Kupffer cell inhibition by dietary glycine (an inhibitor of Kupffer cell secretory activity) in a rat two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model using 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153, a non-dioxin-like PCB) or 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB-77, a dioxin-like PCB) as promoters. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 150 mg/kg) was administered to female Sprague-Dawley rats, which were then placed on an unrefined diet containing 5% glycine (or casein as nitrogen control) starting two weeks after DEN administration. On the third day after starting the diets, rats received PCB-77 (300 micromol/kg), PCB-153 (300 micromol/kg), or corn oil by i.p. injection. The rats received a total of 4 PCB injections, administered every 14 days. The rats were euthanized on the 10th day after the last PCB injection, and the formation of altered hepatic foci expressing placental glutathione S-transferase (PGST) and the rate of DNA synthesis in these foci and in the normal liver tissue were determined. Glycine did not significantly affect foci number or volume. PCB-153 did not significantly increase the focal volume, but increased the number of foci per liver, but only in the rats not fed glycine; PCB-77 increased both the foci number and their volume in both glycine-fed and control rats. Glycine did not alter the PCB content of the liver, but did increase the activity of 7-benzyloxyresorufin O

  20. The Effect of Dietary Glycine on the Hepatic Tumor Promoting Activity of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bunaciu, Rodica Petruta; Tharappel, Job C.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Korwel, Izabela; Robertson, Larry W.; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Spear, Brett T.; Glauert, Howard P.

    2007-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitious lipophilic environmental pollutants. Some of the PCB congeners and mixtures of congeners have tumor promoting activity in rat liver. The mechanism of their activity is not fully understood and is likely to be multifactorial. The aim of this study was to investigate if the resident liver macrophages, Kupffer cells, are important in the promoting activity of PCBs. The hypothesis of this study was that the inhibition of Kupffer cell activity would inhibit hepatic tumor promotion by PCBs in rats. To test our hypothesis, we studied the effects of Kupffer cell inhibition by dietary glycine (an inhibitor of Kupffer cell secretory activity) in a rat two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model using 2,2’,4,4’,5,5’-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153, a non-dioxin-like PCB) or 3,3’,4,4’-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB-77, a dioxin-like PCB) as promoters. Diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 150 mg/kg) was administered to female Sprague Dawley rats, which were then placed on an unrefined diet containing 5% glycine (or casein as nitrogen control) starting two weeks after DEN administration. On the third day after starting the diets, rats received PCB-77 (300 μmol/kg), PCB-153 (300 μmol/kg), or corn oil by i.p. injection. The rats received a total of 4 PCB injections, administered every 14 days. The rats were euthanized on the 10th day after the last PCB injection, and the formation of altered hepatic foci expressing placental glutathione S-transferase (PGST) and the rate of DNA synthesis in these foci and in the normal liver tissue were determined. Glycine did not significantly affect foci number or volume. PCB-153 did not significantly increase the focal volume, but increased the number of foci per liver, but only in the rats not fed glycine; PCB-77 increased both the foci number and their volume in both glycine-fed and control rats. Glycine did not alter the PCB content of the liver, but did increase the activity of 7-benzyloxyresorufin O

  1. A Lebanese dietary pattern promotes better diet quality among older adults: findings from a national cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Lamis; Hwalla, Nahla; Itani, Leila; Chamieh, Marie Claire; Mehio-Sibai, Abla; Naja, Farah

    2016-04-19

    Proper nutrition is critical for healthy aging and maintaining functional independence. Limited research has been done on the assessment of dietary patterns of older adults and their association with diet quality indices. This study was conducted to identify, characterize, and evaluate the dietary patterns and diet quality of older adults in Lebanon, a middle-income country undergoing nutrition transition. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted on a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults aged >50 years (n = 525). Socio-demographic, anthropometric, and lifestyle variables were collected through interviews, and dietary intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Five commonly used diet quality indices (DQIs) were calculated, including the Alternative Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), the alternate Mediterranean diet score (aMed), the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) style diet score, and the Lebanese Mediterranean Diet index. Dietary patterns (DPs) were derived using exploratory factor analysis. Associations of identified DPs with energy, energy-adjusted nutrients, and DQIs were evaluated by Pearson's correlations. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to examine correlates of DPs. Three DPs were derived: Lebanese, Western, and High Protein/Alcohol patterns. The Lebanese pattern had highest correlations with fiber, folate, vitamin C, and all five DQIs. The Western was positively associated with energy and sodium and was inversely correlated with fiber, most vitamins, and a number of DQIs, namely AHEI, aMED, and DASH-style diet score. Highest correlations with intakes of proteins and fat were observed for the High Protein/Alcohol pattern. The Lebanese pattern was associated with female gender, education, nonsmoking and physical activity, whereas the Western pattern was associated with adverse health behaviors, including smoking, skipping breakfast, and physical inactivity

  2. Effects of dietary retinyl acetate on the promotion of hepatic enzyme-altered foci by polybrominated biphenyls in initiated rats.

    PubMed

    Rezabek, M S; Sleight, S D; Jensen, R K; Aust, S D

    1989-08-01

    Vitamin A inhibits the development of some chemically-induced tumours. Since polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) are hepatic tumour promoters and they affect vitamin A homeostasis in rats, we put forward the hypothesis that dietary levels of vitamin A would influence tumour promotion by PBBs. In the study described here, female Sprague-Dawley rats were initiated on day 1 by ip administration of diethylnitrosamine. On day 7 after initiation, the rats were fed a vitamin A-deficient basal diet that was supplemented with either 2000 IU (low-vitamin A) or 200,000 IU (high-vitamin A) retinyl acetate/kg feed. From day 30 after initiation until the end of the study the following PBBs were added to the diets: Firemaster BP-6 (10 ppm), 2,4,5,2',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl (10 ppm) or 3,4,5,3',4',5'-hexabromobiphenyl (1 ppm). The control animals received low- or high-vitamin A diets containing no PBBs. On day 180, the rats were necropsied, sections of various tissues were stained for histopathological examination and an evaluation of hepatic enzyme-altered foci was performed. Numbers of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive foci/cm3 liver and the mean volumes of these foci were lower in the high-vitamin A groups than those in the corresponding low-vitamin A groups, but these differences were not significant. The percentage of the liver volume occupied by foci was significantly greater in the low-vitamin A with 345-HBB group than in the corresponding high-vitamin A group. Thus, high dietary levels of vitamin A had some inhibitory effect on the promotion of hepatic-altered foci by 345-HBB in initiated rats.

  3. A Small Amount of Dietary Carbohydrate Can Promote the HFD-Induced Insulin Resistance to a Maximal Level

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Huailan; Gu, Haihua; Zha, Longying; Cai, Junwei; Li, Xuefeng; Liu, Zhenqi; Bennett, Brian J.; He, Ling; Cao, Wenhong

    2014-01-01

    Both dietary fat and carbohydrates (Carbs) may play important roles in the development of insulin resistance. The main goal of this study was to further define the roles for fat and dietary carbs in insulin resistance. C57BL/6 mice were fed normal chow diet (CD) or HFD containing 0.1–25.5% carbs for 5 weeks, followed by evaluations of calorie consumption, body weight and fat gains, insulin sensitivity, intratissue insulin signaling, ectopic fat, and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle. The role of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the HFD-induced insulin resistance was determined in mice. The role of fat in insulin resistance was also examined in cultured cells. HFD with little carbs (0.1%) induced severe insulin resistance. Addition of 5% carbs to HFD dramatically elevated insulin resistance and 10% carbs in HFD was sufficient to induce a maximal level of insulin resistance. HFD with little carbs induced ectopic fat accumulation and oxidative stress in liver and skeletal muscle and addition of carbs to HFD dramatically enhanced ectopic fat and oxidative stress. HFD increased hepatic expression of key gluconeogenic genes and the increase was most dramatic by HFD with little carbs, and inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis prevented the HFD-induced insulin resistance. In cultured cells, development of insulin resistance induced by a pathological level of insulin was prevented in the absence of fat. Together, fat is essential for development of insulin resistance and dietary carb is not necessary for HFD-induced insulin resistance due to the presence of hepatic gluconeogenesis but a very small amount of it can promote HFD-induced insulin resistance to a maximal level. PMID:25055153

  4. A food fair to promote dietary change in the Stockholm cancer prevention programme.

    PubMed

    Kanström, L; Haglund, B J; Holm, L E

    1992-08-01

    Involving organizations is crucial when developing community intervention strategies aimed at dietary change. This case study describes the use of a food fair as a change agent. The aim of the food fair was to obtain commitment and build up a network in the community comprised of professionals in the fields of food production, food distribution and information. The fair was organized in 1989 and intended to disseminate knowledge and information about healthy foods and encourage food industries, test kitchens and also publishing companies to develop and present products in accordance with the dietary objectives of the Stockholm Cancer Prevention Programme (ie a simultaneous reduction of fat and an increase in fibre intake). The food fair consisted of exhibitions and conferences/seminars. Policy makers, journalists, people in the educational and health professions and those working with food were invited to participate. Nearly 60 companies and organizations made presentations at the exhibition and 1,000 professionals attended the conferences and seminars. In all, 6,400 people visited the fair. Seventy-eight trade journals and newspapers and three radio stations reported on the fair. The food fair was so well received that a second fair was arranged in 1991.

  5. Dietary rice bran promotes resistance to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in mice.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay; Henderson, Angela; Forster, Genevieve M; Goodyear, Andrew W; Weir, Tiffany L; Leach, Jan E; Dow, Steven W; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2012-07-04

    Dietary rice bran consists of many bioactive components with disease fighting properties; including the capacity to modulate the gut microbiota. Studies point to the important roles of the gut microbiota and the mucosal epithelium in the establishment of protection against enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella. The ability of rice bran to reduce the susceptibility of mice to a Salmonella infection has not been previously investigated. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incorporation of rice bran into the diet would inhibit the colonization of Salmonella in mice through the induction of protective mucosal responses. Mice were fed diets containing 0%, 10% and 20% rice bran for one week prior to being orally infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. We found that mice consuming the 10 and 20% rice bran diets exhibited a reduction in Salmonella fecal shedding for up to nine days post-infection as compared to control diet fed animals (p < 0.05). In addition, we observed decreased concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IL-12 (p < 0.05) as well as increased colonization of native Lactobacillus spp. in rice bran fed mice (p < 0.05). Furthermore, in vitro experiments revealed the ability of rice bran extracts to reduce Salmonella entry into mouse small intestinal epithelial cells. Increasing rice bran consumption represents a novel dietary means for reducing susceptibility to enteric infection with Salmonella and potentially via induction of native Lactobacillus spp.

  6. High dietary calcium to phosphorus ratio and alkali-forming potential as factors promoting silica urolithiasis in sheep.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S R; Emerick, R J; Pritchard, R H

    1990-02-01

    Sheep were used to study factors previously found to promote silica urolithiasis in a rat model. In addition to high silica, these dietary factors included elevated calcium, a high calcium to phosphorus ratio and alkali-forming effects. Wether lambs had ad libitum access to a diet of 50% of grass hay and 50% ground oats plus supplement. Diet analysis was 3.4% total SiO2, .29% calcium, .25% phosphorus, 11.3% CP and 28% ADF. Treatments (40 lambs/treatment) consisted of a control (C), limestone to increase dietary calcium to .6% (L), L + 1% sodium bicarbonate (LS) and L + 1% ammonium chloride (LA). After a 91-d experimental period followed by a 56-d postexperimental finishing period, silica kidney deposits were found in all treatments, and SiO2 made up 74% to 97% of the urolithic ash. Kidney urolith incidences in the four treatments were C, 7/40; L, 12/40; LS, 20/40; and LA, 9/40. A higher urolith incidence in LS (LS vs C, P less than .05) and a trend toward a higher incidence in L (L vs C, P less than .2), accompanied by elevated urine pH (L = LS greater than C greater than LA, P less than .01), lend support to the concept that high-silica diets having high calcium to phosphorus ratios and alkali-forming potentials contribute to silica urolithiasis.

  7. Dietary Polyphenols Promote Growth of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and Attenuate High-Fat Diet–Induced Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carmody, Rachel N.; Kuhn, Peter; Moskal, Kristin; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Turnbaugh, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols protect against metabolic syndrome, despite limited absorption and digestion, raising questions about their mechanism of action. We hypothesized that one mechanism may involve the gut microbiota. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 1% Concord grape polyphenols (GP). Relative to vehicle controls, GP attenuated several effects of HFD feeding, including weight gain, adiposity, serum inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]α, interleukin [IL]-6, and lipopolysaccharide), and glucose intolerance. GP lowered intestinal expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase) and a gene for glucose absorption (Glut2). GP increased intestinal expression of genes involved in barrier function (occludin) and limiting triglyceride storage (fasting-induced adipocyte factor). GP also increased intestinal gene expression of proglucagon, a precursor of proteins that promote insulin production and gut barrier integrity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR of cecal and fecal samples demonstrated that GP dramatically increased the growth of Akkermansia muciniphila and decreased the proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, consistent with prior reports that similar changes in microbial community structure can protect from diet-induced obesity and metabolic disease. These data suggest that GP act in the intestine to modify gut microbial community structure, resulting in lower intestinal and systemic inflammation and improved metabolic outcomes. The gut microbiota may thus provide the missing link in the mechanism of action of poorly absorbed dietary polyphenols. PMID:25845659

  8. Dietary intervention in acne: Attenuation of increased mTORC1 signaling promoted by Western diet.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  9. Aluminum Exposure at Human Dietary Levels for 60 Days Reaches a Threshold Sufficient to Promote Memory Impairment in Rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Caroline S; Alterman, Caroline D C; Peçanha, Franck M; Vassallo, Dalton V; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B; Miguel, Marta; Wiggers, Giulia A

    2017-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a significant environmental contaminant. While a good deal of research has been conducted on the acute neurotoxic effects of Al, little is known about the effects of longer-term exposure at human dietary Al levels. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 60-day Al exposure at low doses for comparison with a model of exposure known to produce neurotoxicity in rats. Three-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two major groups: (1) low aluminum levels, and (2) a high aluminum level. Group 1 rats were treated orally by drinking water for 60 days as follows: (a) control-received ultrapure drinking water; (b) aluminum at 1.5 mg/kg b.w., and (c) aluminum at 8.3 mg/kg b.w. Group 2 rats were treated through oral gavages for 42 days as follows: (a) control-received ultrapure water; (b) aluminum at 100 mg/kg b.w. We analyzed cognitive parameters, biomarkers of oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Al treatment even at low doses promoted recognition memory impairment seen in object recognition memory testing. Moreover, Al increased hippocampal reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, reduced antioxidant capacity, and decreased AChE activity. Our data demonstrate that 60-day subchronic exposure to low doses of Al from feed and added to the water, which reflect human dietary Al intake, reaches a threshold sufficient to promote memory impairment and neurotoxicity. The elevation of oxidative stress and cholinergic dysfunction highlight pathways of toxic actions for this metal.

  10. Release of albumin from oligoester plastic matrices: effect of magnesium oxide and bivalent stearates.

    PubMed

    Kladnícková, I; Dittrich, M; Klein, T; Pokorová, D

    2006-01-01

    Biodegradable implantable matrices containing bovine serum albumin were prepared from oligoesters by melting, and subsequently tested on in vitro albumin release. The linear poly (DL-lactic acid) and the branched terpolymer of DL-lactic acid, glycolic acid, and mannitol were synthesized. Products were of similar molecular weight and possessed different thermal and swelling characteristics. Oligoesters were loaded with 4% albumin and plasticized by 30% triacetin. Other additives added into the matrices as albumin stabilizers were divalent stearates and magnesium oxide. The influences of oligomer molecules constitution, divalent ion stearates or magnesium oxide addition, and triacetin concentration on the albumin release were quantified. SDS-PAGE revealed protein hydrolysis during the dissolution tests.

  11. Lipase immobilized catalytically active membrane for synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Qing, Weihua; Ren, Zhongqi; Li, Wei; Chen, Jiangrong

    2014-11-01

    A composite catalytically active membrane immobilized with Candida rugosa lipase has been prepared by immersion phase inversion technique for enzymatic synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor. SEM images showed that a "sandwich-like" membrane structure with a porous lipase-PVA catalytic layer uniformly coated on a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/polyethersulfone (PES) bilayer was obtained. Optimum conditions for lipase immobilization in the catalytic layer were determined. The membrane was proved to exhibit superior thermal stability, pH stability and reusability than free lipase under similar conditions. In the case of pervaporation coupled synthesis of lauryl stearate, benefited from in-situ water removal by the membrane, a conversion enhancement of approximately 40% was achieved in comparison to the equilibrium conversion obtained in batch reactors. In addition to conversion enhancement, it was also found that excess water removal by the catalytically active membrane appears to improve activity of the lipase immobilized.

  12. Reduced use of antibiotic growth promoters in diets fed to weanling pigs: dietary tools, part 2.

    PubMed

    Stein, Hans H; Kil, Dong Y

    2006-01-01

    Diets formulated to maximize performance of weanling pigs need to support the development of intestinal tissue, support intestinal colonization with beneficial, mainly lactic acid-producing bacteria, and support development of the intestinal and overall immune system. This objective is not likely to be achieved using one single strategy, but there is strong evidence that diets formulated with cereal grains other than corn, with a low concentration of crude protein and with the use of direct-fed microbials, will improve intestinal health and performance of weanling pigs. Further improvements may be observed if the grain part of the diet is fermented prior to feeding or if the diet is fed in a liquid form, but the need for specialized equipment limit the implementation of this strategy. Dietary supplements such as essential oils and nucleosides or nucleotides may also be useful, but more research is needed to verify the effects of these substances.

  13. Importance of dietary fat during initiation versus promotion in rat mammary cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hasler, C.M.; Bennink, M.R.

    1986-03-05

    This study was designed to determine if the fat content of the diet would alter 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) initiation of mammary carcinogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed the AIN-76 (high carbohydrate, HC) diet or a modified AIN-76 diet (high fat (37/sup 5/), HF) prior to initiation. The HF diet had the same energy to nutrient ratio as the HC diet. Two groups were fed either the HC or the HF diet during the initiation and promotion phase (HC-HC and HF-HF groups). A third group was fed the HF diet 20 days before and 12 days after initiation and then were fed the HC diet during the promotion phase (HF-HC group). Weight gain during promotion was similar for the HC-HC and HF-HC groups, but the HF-HF group gained 41% more weight. The HC-HC group had significantly fewer tumors than the HF-HF or HF-HC groups (HC-HC = 1.45 tumors/rat; HF-HF = 2.75 and HF-HC = 3.63). Surprisingly, feeding the HC diet during promotion did not cause a decrease in tumorigenesis (there was actually a non-significant increase). This work demonstrates that the fat (energy) content of the diet during DMBA initiation is critical. Furthermore, the fat (energy) content of the diet during initiation was more critical than during promotion.

  14. Effects of Sucrose Stearate Addition on the Quality Improvement of Ready-To-Eat Samgyetang During Storage at 25℃

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The effects of sucrose stearate at various concentrations (0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.3%, w/v) on the physico-chemical characteristics of ready-to-eat (RTE) Samgyetang were investigated during storage at 25℃ for 12 mon. Over the storage duration, the addition of sucrose stearate had no significant effects on the proximate composition of Samgyetang, including meat, broth, and porridge, or the hardness and spreadability of the porridge, although it resulted in significantly higher CIE L* values for the porridge. The CIE L* values of Samgyetang porridge with added sucrose stearate increased until 9 mon, while the control decreased until 6 mon, and the values for both changed insignificantly thereafter. The breast meat of Samgyetang treated with sucrose stearate showed higher percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acid after 3 mon and lower percentages of monounsaturated fatty acid after 6 mon compared to the control (p<0.05), while no significant differences were observed with the different sucrose stearate concentrations (p>0.05). The overall sensory acceptability scores were higher at sucrose stearate concentrations of 0.2% or 0.3% after 6 mon and at 0.1% after 9 mon compared to those of the control. PMID:26761503

  15. A molecular dynamics study of CaCO3 nanoparticles in a hydrophobic solvent with a stearate co-surfactant.

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, Michael S; Heyes, David M; Breakspear, Angela; Chahine, Samir; Dini, Daniele

    2015-05-28

    Stearates containing overbased detergent nanoparticles (NPs) are used as acid neutralising additives in automotive and marine engine oils. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the self-assembly of calcium carbonate, calcium stearate as a co-surfactant and stabilising surfactants of such NPs in a model explicit molecular hydrophobic solvent have been carried out using a methodology described first by Bodnarchuk et al. [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2014, 118, 21092]. The cores and particles as a whole become more elongated with stearate, and the surfactant molecules are more spaced out in this geometry than in their stearate-free counterparts. The rod dimensions are found to be largely independent of the surfactant type for a given amount of CaCO3. The corresponding particles without stearate were more spherical, the precise shape depending to a greater extent on the chemical architecture of the surfactant molecule. The rod-shaped stearate containing nanoparticles penetrated a model water droplet to a greater depth than the corresponding near-spherical particle, which is possibly facilitated by the dissociation of nanoparticle surfactant molecules onto the surface of the water in this process. These simulations are the first to corroborate the nanoparticle-water penetration mechanism proposed previously by experimental groups investigating the NP acid neutralisation characteristics.

  16. Effect of europium(II) stearate on the mechanical properties and the oxidation resistance of UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Luis A; Knowlton, Christopher B; Kunze, Joachim; Jacobs, Joshua J; Wimmer, Markus A; Laurent, Michel P

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this pilot study is to investigate the effect of europium(II) stearate additive on the mechanical properties and oxidation resistance of an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), which has been used as an articulating surface in prosthetic devices for many years. It is hypothesized in this study that combining the UHMWPE with lanthanide stearates could enhance oxidation resistance, leading to better preservation of the material's mechanical integrity. Compression molded UHMWPE was doped at 0, 375 and 750 ppm of europium(II) stearate, γ-irradiated to 35 kGy in a nitrogen atmosphere, and accelerated aged in accordance with the ASTM standard F2003-02. Non-irradiated and nonaged samples were used as controls. Miniature samples were comparatively tested for mechanical properties using the small punch test. Oxidation indices (OIs) were obtained through the FTIR spectroscopy on thin film sections of all irradiated samples. The UHMWPE doped with the europium(II) stearate had the same small punch test curve shape as the conventional UHMWPE control; the ultimate displacement remained unchanged (approximately 4.33±0.02 mm), while the ultimate load and work-to-failure exhibited only small changes (<7.5% and <5.0%, respectively). The doped material was more resistant to oxidation than the control material, retaining 83% of its as-irradiated work-to-failure after irradiation and accelerated aging, versus only 53% for the control. Accelerated aging changed the average oxidation index of the control group from 0.07 to 0.40; whereas the average oxidation indices changed from 0.03 to 0.15 and from 0.05 to 0.13 for the 375 ppm and the 750 ppm doped condition, respectively.

  17. Liquid crystal physical gel formed by cholesteryl stearate for light scattering display material.

    PubMed

    Leaw, W L; Mamat, C R; Triwahyono, S; Jalil, A A; Bidin, N

    2016-12-01

    A liquid crystal physical gel was prepared by the self-assembly of cholesteryl stearate in a nematic liquid crystal, 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl. The electro-optical properties were tuned by varying the gelator concentration and the gelation conditions. Polarized optical microscopy revealed that cholesteric cholesteryl stearate induced chiral nematic phase in 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl during the gelation process. As a result, a plate-like gel structure consisting of spherical micropores was formed, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy showed that the liquid crystal director orientations in these macrophase-separated structures were massively randomised. For these reasons, the liquid crystal physical gel generated a strong light scattering effect. For 48.0wt% cholesteryl stearate gelled 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl, the turbid appearance could be switched to a transparent state using a 5.0V alternating current. The response time was about 3.7μs. This liquid crystal physical gel has potential for use in light scattering electro-optical displays.

  18. Promoter methylation of E-cadherin, p16, and RAR-beta(2) genes in breast tumors and dietary intake of nutrients important in one-carbon metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aberrant DNA methylation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis, and the availability of dietary factors involved in 1-carbon metabolism may contribute to aberrant DNA methylation. We investigated the association of intake of folate, vitamins B(2), B(6), B(12), and methionine with promoter methylat...

  19. Dietary inclusion effects of phytochemicals as growth promoters in animal production.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Grijalva, Nidia Vanessa; Pinelli-Saavedra, Araceli; Muhlia-Almazan, Adriana; Domínguez-Díaz, David; González-Ríos, Humberto

    2017-01-01

    Growth promoters have been widely used as a strategy to improve productivity, and great benefits have been observed throughout the meat production chain. However, the prohibition of growth promoters in several countries, as well as consumer rejection, has led industry and the academy to search for alternatives. For decades, the inclusion of phytochemicals in animal feed has been proposed as a replacement for traditional growth promoters. However, there are many concerns about the application of phytochemicals and their impact on the various links in the meat production chain (productive performance, carcass and meat quality). Therefore, the effects of these feed additives are reviewed in this article, along with their potential safety and consumer benefits, to understand the current state of their use. In summary, the replacement of traditional growth promoters in experiments with broilers yielded benefits in all aspects of the meat production chain, such as improvements in productive performance and carcass and meat quality. Although the effects in pigs have been similar to those observed in broilers, fewer studies have been carried out in pigs, and there is a need to define the types of phytochemicals to be used and the appropriate stages for adding such compounds. In regard to ruminant diets, few studies have been conducted, and their results have been inconclusive. Therefore, it is necessary to propose more in vivo studies to determine other strategies for phytochemical inclusion in the production phases and to select the appropriate types of compounds. It is also necessary to define the variables that will best elucidate the mechanism(s) of action that will enable the future replacement of synthetic growth promoters with phytochemical feed additives.

  20. Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Benoit; Koren, Omry; Goodrich, Julia K; Poole, Angela C; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Ley, Ruth E; Gewirtz, Andrew T

    2015-03-05

    The intestinal tract is inhabited by a large and diverse community of microbes collectively referred to as the gut microbiota. While the gut microbiota provides important benefits to its host, especially in metabolism and immune development, disturbance of the microbiota-host relationship is associated with numerous chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease and the group of obesity-associated diseases collectively referred to as metabolic syndrome. A primary means by which the intestine is protected from its microbiota is via multi-layered mucus structures that cover the intestinal surface, thereby allowing the vast majority of gut bacteria to be kept at a safe distance from epithelial cells that line the intestine. Thus, agents that disrupt mucus-bacterial interactions might have the potential to promote diseases associated with gut inflammation. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that emulsifiers, detergent-like molecules that are a ubiquitous component of processed foods and that can increase bacterial translocation across epithelia in vitro, might be promoting the increase in inflammatory bowel disease observed since the mid-twentieth century. Here we report that, in mice, relatively low concentrations of two commonly used emulsifiers, namely carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80, induced low-grade inflammation and obesity/metabolic syndrome in wild-type hosts and promoted robust colitis in mice predisposed to this disorder. Emulsifier-induced metabolic syndrome was associated with microbiota encroachment, altered species composition and increased pro-inflammatory potential. Use of germ-free mice and faecal transplants indicated that such changes in microbiota were necessary and sufficient for both low-grade inflammation and metabolic syndrome. These results support the emerging concept that perturbed host-microbiota interactions resulting in low-grade inflammation can promote adiposity and its associated metabolic effects

  1. Dietary emulsifiers impact the mouse gut microbiota promoting colitis and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chassaing, Benoit; Koren, Omry; Goodrich, Julia; Poole, Angela; Srinivasan, Shanthi; Ley, Ruth E.; Gewirtz, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The intestinal tract is inhabited by a large diverse community of microbes collectively referred to as gut microbiota. While gut microbiota provide important benefits to its host, especially in metabolism and immune development, disturbance of the microbiota-host relationship is associated with numerous chronic inflammatory diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the group of obesity-associated diseases collectively referred to as metabolic syndrome. A primary means by which the intestine is protected from its microbiota is via multilayered mucus structures that cover the intestinal surface thus allowing the vast majority of gut bacteria to be kept at a safe distance from epithelial cells that line the intestine 1. Thus, agents that disrupt mucus-bacterial interactions might have the potential to promote diseases associated with gut inflammation. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that emulsifiers, detergent-like molecules that are a ubiquitous component of processed foods and that can increase bacterial translocation across epithelia in vitro 2, might be promoting the post-mid 20th century increase in IBD 3. Herein, we observed that, in mice, relatively low concentrations of two commonly used emulsifiers, namely carboxymethylcellulose and polysorbate-80, induced low-grade inflammation and obesity/metabolic syndrome in WT hosts and promoted robust colitis in mice predisposed to this disorder. Emulsifier-induced metabolic syndrome was associated with microbiota encroachment, altered species composition, and increased pro-inflammatory potential. Use of germ-free mice and fecal transplants indicated that such changes in microbiota were necessary and sufficient for both low-grade inflammation and metabolic syndrome. These results support the emerging concept that perturbed host-microbiota interactions resulting in low-grade inflammation can promote adiposity and its associated metabolic effects. Moreover, they suggest that broad use of

  2. Dietary effects on initiation and promotion during hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrich, S.; Pitot, H.C.

    1986-03-05

    Female F344/N rats were initiated with diethylnitrosamine (10 mg/kg) 24 hours following a 70% partial hepatectomy. They were fed for 1 week on diets without added promoting agents and then placed on a cereal-based NIH-07 diet, an AIN semipurified diet, or a semipurified diet described by Pariza (PD) for varying periods of time in the presence and absence of the promoting agent, phenobarbital (PB). After 6 months on the diets animals were sacrificed and serial frozen sections of the liver stained for gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), canalicular ATPase, and glucose-6-phosphatase. The number and phenotype of altered foci (AF) were determined by quantitative stereology. Livers from rats fed the AIN or PD diets + PB after the first week post-initiation had fewer AF than groups fed the NIH-07 + PB. Livers of rats fed semipurified diets exhibited little periportal GGT staining, while such was extensive in livers of animals fed the NIH-07 diet. Livers of animals receiving the NIH-07 diet from the time of initiation exhibited significantly more AF than those fed PB with semipurified diets. Rats initiated on the semipurified diets and transferred to the NIH-07 diet + PB exhibited the highest number of AF. These studies indicate that cereal-based diets contain factors which inhibit initiation but act to enhance promotion during hepatocarcinogenesis.

  3. An essential role of Ffar2 (Gpr43) in dietary fibre-mediated promotion of healthy composition of gut microbiota and suppression of intestinal carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sivaprakasam, S; Gurav, A; Paschall, A V; Coe, G L; Chaudhary, K; Cai, Y; Kolhe, R; Martin, P; Browning, D; Huang, L; Shi, H; Sifuentes, H; Vijay-Kumar, M; Thompson, S A; Munn, D H; Mellor, A; McGaha, T L; Shiao, P; Cutler, C W; Liu, K; Ganapathy, V; Li, H; Singh, N

    2016-01-01

    Composition of the gut microbiota has profound effects on intestinal carcinogenesis. Diet and host genetics play critical roles in shaping the composition of gut microbiota. Whether diet and host genes interact with each other to bring specific changes in gut microbiota that affect intestinal carcinogenesis is unknown. Ability of dietary fibre to specifically increase beneficial gut microbiota at the expense of pathogenic bacteria in vivo via unknown mechanism is an important process that suppresses intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis. Free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2 or GPR43) is a receptor for short-chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate and butyrate), metabolites of dietary fibre fermentation by gut microbiota. Here, we show FFAR2 is down modulated in human colon cancers than matched adjacent healthy tissue. Consistent with this, Ffar2−/− mice are hypersusceptible to development of intestinal carcinogenesis. Dietary fibre suppressed colon carcinogenesis in an Ffar2-dependent manner. Ffar2 played an essential role in dietary fibre-mediated promotion of beneficial gut microbiota, Bifidobacterium species (spp) and suppression of Helicobacter hepaticus and Prevotellaceae. Moreover, numbers of Bifidobacterium is reduced, whereas those of Prevotellaceae are increased in human colon cancers than matched adjacent normal tissue. Administration of Bifidobacterium mitigated intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis in Ffar2−/− mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that interplay between dietary fibre and Ffar2 play a key role in promoting healthy composition of gut microbiota that stimulates intestinal health. PMID:27348268

  4. Dietary Polyphenols Promote Growth of the Gut Bacterium Akkermansia muciniphila and Attenuate High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roopchand, Diana E; Carmody, Rachel N; Kuhn, Peter; Moskal, Kristin; Rojas-Silva, Patricio; Turnbaugh, Peter J; Raskin, Ilya

    2015-08-01

    Dietary polyphenols protect against metabolic syndrome, despite limited absorption and digestion, raising questions about their mechanism of action. We hypothesized that one mechanism may involve the gut microbiota. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) containing 1% Concord grape polyphenols (GP). Relative to vehicle controls, GP attenuated several effects of HFD feeding, including weight gain, adiposity, serum inflammatory markers (tumor necrosis factor [TNF]α, interleukin [IL]-6, and lipopolysaccharide), and glucose intolerance. GP lowered intestinal expression of inflammatory markers (TNFα, IL-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase) and a gene for glucose absorption (Glut2). GP increased intestinal expression of genes involved in barrier function (occludin) and limiting triglyceride storage (fasting-induced adipocyte factor). GP also increased intestinal gene expression of proglucagon, a precursor of proteins that promote insulin production and gut barrier integrity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantitative PCR of cecal and fecal samples demonstrated that GP dramatically increased the growth of Akkermansia muciniphila and decreased the proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes, consistent with prior reports that similar changes in microbial community structure can protect from diet-induced obesity and metabolic disease. These data suggest that GP act in the intestine to modify gut microbial community structure, resulting in lower intestinal and systemic inflammation and improved metabolic outcomes. The gut microbiota may thus provide the missing link in the mechanism of action of poorly absorbed dietary polyphenols. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Synergistic effects of high dietary calcium and exogenous parathyroid hormone in promoting osteoblastic bone formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuxu; Zhou, Min; Zhang, Qunhu; Liu, Huan; Xu, Yong; Shu, Lei; Zhang, Jue; Miao, Dengshun; Ren, Yongxin

    2015-03-28

    In the present study, we investigated whether high dietary Ca and exogenous parathyroid hormone 1-34 fragments (PTH 1-34) have synergistic effects on bone formation in adult mice, and explored the related mechanisms. Adult male mice were fed a normal diet, a high-Ca diet, a PTH-treated diet, or a high-Ca diet combined with subcutaneously injected PTH 1-34 (80 μg/kg per d) for 4 weeks. Bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, osteoblast number, alkaline phosphatase (ALP)- and type I collagen-positive areas, and the expression levels of osteoblastic bone formation-related genes and proteins were increased significantly in mice fed the high-Ca diet, the PTH-treated diet, and, even more dramatically, the high-Ca diet combined with PTH. Osteoclast number and surface and the ratio of receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL):osteoprotegerin (OPG) were decreased in the high-Ca diet treatment group, increased in the PTH treatment group, but not in the combined treatment group. Furthermore, third-passage osteoblasts were treated with high Ca (5 mM), PTH 1-34 (10⁻⁸ M) or high Ca combined with PTH 1-34. Osteoblast viability and ALP activity were increased in either the high Ca-treated or PTH-treated cultures and, even more dramatically, in the cultures treated with high Ca plus PTH, with consistent up-regulation of the expression levels of osteoblast proliferation and differentiation-related genes and proteins. These results indicate that dietary Ca and PTH play synergistic roles in promoting osteoblastic bone formation by stimulating osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate the serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigen.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Masato; Hosono, Akira; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Kihara-Fujioka, Miran; Hachimura, Satoshi; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2010-08-16

    Colonization of the gut by commensal bacteria modulates the induction of oral tolerance and allergy. However, how these intestinal bacteria modulate antigen-specific T cell responses induced by oral antigens remains unclear. In order to investigate this, we used germ-free (GF) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor transgenic (OVA23-3) mice. Conventional (CV) or GF mice were administered an OVA-containing diet. Cytokine production by CD4(+) cells from spleen (SP), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) was evaluated by ELISA, as was the peripheral antibody titer. T cell phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry. CD4(+) cells from the SP and MLN of CV and GF mice fed an OVA diet for 3 weeks produced significantly less IL-2 than the corresponding cells from mice receiving a control diet, suggesting that oral tolerance could be induced at the T cell level in the systemic and intestinal immune systems of both bacterial condition of mice. However, we also observed that the T cell hyporesponsiveness induced by dietary antigen was delayed in the systemic immune tissues and was weaker in the intestinal immune tissues of the GF mice. Intestinal MLN and PP CD4(+) T cells from these animals also produced lower levels of IL-10, had less activated/memory type CD45RB(low) cells, and expressed lower levels of CTLA-4 but not Foxp3 compared to their CV counterparts. Furthermore, GF mice produced higher serum levels of OVA-specific antibodies than CV animals. CD40L expression by SP CD4(+) cells from GF mice fed OVA was higher than that of CV mice. These results suggest that intestinal commensal bacteria promote T cell hyporesponsiveness and down-regulate serum antibody responses induced by dietary antigens through modulation of the intestinal and systemic T cell phenotype. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of dietary fat and selenium fed during initiation or promotion on the development of preneoplastic lesions in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, S.; Parker, R.S.

    1986-03-05

    Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB1)-induced ..gamma..-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive foci in rat liver were assessed in animals fed different levels of fat and selenium (Se) during either initiation (IN) or promotion (PR). Male Sprague Dawley rats (50g) were divided into 12 groups. One of six modified AIN-76 experimental diets were fed to groups 1-6 during weeks 1-4.5 (IN) and to groups 7-12 during weeks 4.5-15 (PR). During weeks 3-4, 13 rats/group received 10 daily doses of AFB1 (.4 mg/kg bwt/dose, i.g.). Two levels of corn oil (2% and 20%) were fed, each containing 3 levels of Se: < 0.02; 0.15; 2.5 (IN) or 1.9 (PR) ppm. When not fed the experimental diets rats were fed a standard AIN-76 diet. In groups 1-6, 0.03% phenobarbital was added to the standard diet. At week 15 rats were sacrificed. Compared to all low-fat groups, the high-fat diets with either < 0.02 or 0.15 ppm Se fed during IN resulted in a marked increase in mean diameter of GGT-positive foci and % liver section occupied by foci. In rats fed high-fat 2.5 ppm Se, preneoplastic development was decreased below all low-fat groups. During PR, Se status but not dietary fat level influenced foci formation. Rats fed < 0.02 ppm Se had greater mean diameter of foci and % section occupied by foci than either 0.15 or 1.9 ppm Se. Thus, an interaction was observed between dietary fat and selenium during IN, but not during PR.

  8. The Dietary Polysaccharide Maltodextrin Promotes Salmonella Survival and Mucosal Colonization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Kourtney P.; Homer, Craig R.; Kessler, Sean P.; Dixon, Laura J.; Kabi, Amrita; Gordon, Ilyssa O.; Johnson, Erin E.; de la Motte, Carol A.; McDonald, Christine

    2014-01-01

    In the latter half of the 20th century, societal and technological changes led to a shift in the composition of the American diet to include a greater proportion of processed, pre-packaged foods high in fat and carbohydrates, and low in dietary fiber (a “Western diet”). Over the same time period, there have been parallel increases in Salmonella gastroenteritis cases and a broad range of chronic inflammatory diseases associated with intestinal dysbiosis. Several polysaccharide food additives are linked to bacterially-driven intestinal inflammation and may contribute to the pathogenic effects of a Western diet. Therefore, we examined the effect of a ubiquitous polysaccharide food additive, maltodextrin (MDX), on clearance of the enteric pathogen Salmonella using both in vitro and in vivo infection models. When examined in vitro, murine bone marrow-derived macrophages exposed to MDX had altered vesicular trafficking, suppressed NAPDH oxidase expression, and reduced recruitment of NADPH oxidase to Salmonella-containing vesicles, which resulted in persistence of Salmonella in enlarged Rab7+ late endosomal vesicles. In vivo, mice consuming MDX-supplemented water had a breakdown of the anti-microbial mucous layer separating gut bacteria from the intestinal epithelium surface. Additionally, oral infection of these mice with Salmonella resulted in increased cecal bacterial loads and enrichment of lamina propria cells harboring large Rab7+ vesicles. These findings indicate that consumption of processed foods containing the polysaccharide MDX contributes to suppression of intestinal anti-microbial defense mechanisms and may be an environmental priming factor for the development of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:25000398

  9. Sex Promotes Spatial and Dietary Segregation in a Migratory Shorebird during the Non-Breeding Season

    PubMed Central

    Catry, Teresa; Alves, José A.; Gill, Jennifer A.; Gunnarsson, Tómas G.; Granadeiro, José P.

    2012-01-01

    Several expressions of sexual segregation have been described in animals, especially in those exhibiting conspicuous dimorphism. Outside the breeding season, segregation has been mostly attributed to size or age-mediated dominance or to trophic niche divergence. Regardless of the recognized implications for population dynamics, the ecological causes and consequences of sexual segregation are still poorly understood. We investigate the foraging habits of a shorebird showing reversed sexual dimorphism, the black-tailed godwit Limosa limosa, during the winter season, and found extensive segregation between sexes in spatial distribution, microhabitat use and dietary composition. Males and females exhibited high site-fidelity but differed in their distributions at estuary-scale. Male godwits (shorter-billed) foraged more frequently in exposed mudflats than in patches with higher water levels, and consumed more bivalves and gastropods and fewer polychaetes than females. Females tended to be more frequently involved and to win more aggressive interactions than males. However, the number of aggressions recorded was low, suggesting that sexual dominance plays a lesser role in segregation, although its importance cannot be ruled out. Dimorphism in the feeding apparatus has been used to explain sex differences in foraging ecology and behaviour of many avian species, but few studies confirmed that morphologic characteristics drive individual differences within each sex. We found a relationship between resource use and bill size when pooling data from males and females. However, this relationship did not hold for either sex separately, suggesting that differences in foraging habits of godwits are primarily a function of sex, rather than bill size. Hence, the exact mechanisms through which this segregation operates are still unknown. The recorded differences in spatial distribution and resource use might expose male and female to distinct threats, thus affecting population

  10. An economic evaluation of adaptive e-learning devices to promote weight loss via dietary change for people with obesity.

    PubMed

    Miners, Alec; Harris, Jody; Felix, Lambert; Murray, Elizabeth; Michie, Susan; Edwards, Phil

    2012-07-07

    The prevalence of obesity is over 25 % in many developed countries. Obesity is strongly associated with an increased risk of fatal and chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Therefore it has become a major public health concern for many economies. E-learning devices are a relatively novel approach to promoting dietary change. The new generation of devices are 'adaptive' and use interactive electronic media to facilitate teaching and learning. E-Learning has grown out of recent developments in information and communication technology, such as the Internet, interactive computer programmes, interactive television and mobile phones. The aim of this study is to assess the cost-effectiveness of e-learning devices as a method of promoting weight loss via dietary change. An economic evaluation was performed using decision modelling techniques. Outcomes were expressed in terms of Quality-Adjusted Life-Years (QALYs) and costs were estimated from a health services perspective. All parameter estimates were derived from the literature. A systematic review was undertaken to derive the estimate of relative treatment effect. The base case results from the e-Learning Economic Evaluation Model (e-LEEM) suggested that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was approximately £102,000 per Quality-Adjusted Life-Year (QALY) compared to conventional care. This finding was robust to most alternative assumptions, except a much lower fixed cost of providing e-learning devices. Expected value of perfect information (EVPI) analysis showed that while the individual level EVPI was arguably negligible, the population level value was between £37 M and £170 M at a willingness to pay between £20,000 to £30,000 per additional QALY. The current economic evidence base suggests that e-learning devices for managing the weight of obese individuals are unlikely to be cost-effective unless their fixed costs are much lower than estimated or future devices prove to

  11. Microstructure and Electrical Resistivity of Low-Temperature-Cured Silver Films Prepared Using Silver Oxide and Silver Stearate Pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong-Ching; Lin, Pang; Lu, Chun-An; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2009-01-01

    In this study, paste formulations containing silver oxide coated with a metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) agent of silver stearate were prepared without using any silver powders or silver flakes. Results indicate that all pastes appear to have a pseudoplastic flow property that is acceptable for roll-to-roll printing and screen printing. The pastes were screen-printed on an alumina substrate and then thermally treated in a range of temperatures. The lowest electrical resistivity of 13.2 ×10-6 Ω·cm was obtained for the film prepared from paste with a Ag2O/silver stearate ratio of 100:5 at a solid loading of 80 wt % in the solvent α-terpineol, after being cured at 160 °C for 5 min, which meets the requirements of low-temperature and high-speed manufacturing for practical applications. The low resistivity of the film is facilitated by the combination of Ag2O and silver stearate added to the paste. Ag2O produces a high density of silver matrix after being reduced at low temperatures, and the presence of silver stearate contributes to the rheological behavior of the paste after dissolution in the solvent. Coexistence of Ag2O and silver stearate induces their simultaneous transformation to the silver form at temperatures below 160 °C.

  12. New generation of nuclear fuels: Stability of different stearates under high doses gamma irradiation in the manufacturing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeau, D.; Esnouf, S.; Gracia, J.; Audubert, F.; Ferry, M.

    2017-07-01

    In the future reactors, the pellets radioactivity will increase due to the modification of the plutonium concentration. The stability of the organic additive used as lubricating/deagglomerating agent has thus to be evaluated. Up to now, zinc stearate is employed, but new additives are tested in this study and compared to zinc stearate. In a first part of this paper, the order of magnitude of the dose deposited in the stearates has been estimated. Afterward, three different stearates have been irradiated, using gamma-rays at doses as high as 2000 kGy. Two atmospheres of irradiation were tested, i.e. inert atmosphere and air. Samples were characterized using the following analytical tools: mass spectrometry, thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy. The objective is the evaluation of the ageing of these materials. In the nuclear fuel pellets manufacturing context, the candidate which could replace zinc stearate, if this one is too degraded to fulfill its role of lubricant in the pellets of the future manufacturing, has been determined.

  13. Amended final report on the safety assessment of glyceryl dilaurate, glyceryl diarachidate, glyceryl dibehenate, glyceryl dierucate, glyceryl dihydroxystearate, glyceryl diisopalmitate, glyceryl diisostearate, glyceryl dilinoleate, glyceryl dimyristate, glyceryl dioleate, glyceryl diricinoleate, glyceryl dipalmitate, glyceryl dipalmitoleate, glyceryl distearate, glyceryl palmitate lactate, glyceryl stearate citrate, glyceryl stearate lactate, and glyceryl stearate succinate.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    irritation in a single insult patch test, but mild skin irritation reactions to a foundation containing the same concentration were observed. A trade mixture containing an unspecified concentration of Glyceryl Dibehenate did not induce irritation or significant cutaneous intolerance in a 48-h occlusive patch test. In maximization tests, neither an eye shadow nor a foundation containing 1.5% Glyceryl Dilaurate was a skin sensitizer. Sensitization was not induced in subjects patch tested with 50% w/w Glyceryl Dioleate in a repeated insult, occlusive patch test. Glyceryl Palmitate Lactate (50% w/v) did not induce skin irritation or sensitization in subjects patch tested in a repeat-insult patch test. Phototoxicity or photoallergenicity was not induced in healthy volunteers tested with a lipstick containing 1.0% Glyceryl Rosinate. Two diacylglycerols, 1-oleoyl-2-acetoyl-sn-glycerol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol, did not alter cell proliferation (as determined by DNA synthesis) in normal human dermal fibroblasts in vitro at doses up to 10 microg/ml. In the absence of initiation, Glyceryl Distearate induced a moderate hyperplastic response in randomly bred mice of a tumor-resistant strain, and with 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) initiation, an increase in the total cell count was observed. In a glyceryl monoester study, a single application of DMBA to the skin followed by 5% Glyceryl Stearate twice weekly produced no tumors, but slight epidermal hyperplasia at the site of application. Glyceryl Dioleate induced transformation in 3-methylcholanthrene-initiated BALB/3T3 A31-1-1 cloned cells in vitro. A tumor-promoting dosing regimen that consisted of multiple applications of 10 mumol of a 1,2-diacylglycerol (sn-1,2-didecanoylglycerol) to female mice twice daily for 1 week caused more than a 60% decrease in protein kinase C (PKC) activity and marked epidermal hyperplasia. Applications of 10 micromol sn-1,2-didecanoylglycerol twice weekly for 1 week caused a decrease in

  14. Effects of a dietary intervention promoting the adoption of a Mediterranean food pattern on fast-food consumption among healthy French-Canadian women.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Alexandra; Goulet, Julie; Riverin, Mélissa; Lamarche, Benoît; Lemieux, Simone

    2010-12-01

    It is expected that a dietary intervention based on the traditional Mediterranean food pattern should be associated with a reduction in fast-food consumption but this has never been tested before. We assessed the impact of a 12-week dietary intervention, promoting the adoption of a Mediterranean food pattern, on fast-food consumption among seventy-one healthy women aged between 30 and 65 years. The dietary intervention consisted of two group sessions and seven individual sessions with a dietitian. To determine the Mediterranean dietary score (MedScore) and fast-food consumption, an FFQ was administered. During the 12-week intervention, the MedScore significantly increased (from 21.1 (SD 3.6) units at baseline to 28.6 (SD 4.4) units at week 12, P < 0.0001), while the fast-food consumption significantly decreased (from 51.7 (SD 46.4) g/d at baseline to 20.5 (SD 18.2) g/d at week 12, P < 0.0001). Moreover, women who had a higher consumption of fast food at baseline decreased their fast-food consumption to the most (r - 0.50, P < 0.0001). When four subgroups were formed on the basis of median values of Medscore and fast-food consumption changes, it was found that only the subgroup of women which increased the most their MedScore and decreased the most their fast-food consumption experienced a significant decrease in BMI (P < 0.01). In conclusion, a dietary intervention promoting the Mediterranean food pattern led to a decrease in fast-food consumption among healthy women even if it was not a specific target of the intervention. Dietary strategies for increasing intake of healthy foods may be a useful approach for decreasing intake of less healthy foods.

  15. A nutritional intervention promoting a Mediterranean food pattern does not affect total daily dietary cost in North American women in free-living conditions.

    PubMed

    Goulet, Julie; Lamarche, Benoît; Lemieux, Simone

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of adopting a Mediterranean diet on dietary cost and energy density in free-living conditions. The 12-wk nutritional intervention consisted of 2 group courses and 7 individual sessions with a dietician in a sample of 73 healthy women. To evaluate the dietary response to the nutritional intervention, a registered dietician administered a FFQ at 0, 6, 12, and 24 wk. Total daily dietary cost was calculated using a price list including all items from the FFQ. Our findings indicated that daily energy cost evaluated at wk 12 vs. wk 0 [1046 +/- 217 vs. 967 +/- 192 kJ/Canadian dollars (CAN$), respectively, P = 0.18] and total daily dietary cost (8.61 +/- 2.13 vs. 8.75 +/- 2.50 CAN$/d per participant, respectively, P = 0.58) did not change. Total daily energy density at wk 12 decreased compared with wk 0 (2.56 +/- 0.76 vs. 2.20 +/- 0.67 kJ/g; P < 0.0001). Adherence to the Mediterranean diet led to increased cost related to vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts and seeds, canola/olive oil, whole grains, poultry, and fish (P < or = 0.01) and to reduced dietary cost for red meat, refined grains, desserts and sweets, and fast food (P < or = 0.008). In conclusion, these data suggest that adherence to a nutritional intervention program promoting the Mediterranean food pattern is not associated with increased daily dietary cost or energy cost but led to a reduction in energy density. Consequently, increased cost should not be considered a barrier to the promotion and adoption of a Mediterranean diet.

  16. Ageing effects on the magnetic properties of Mn12-based Acetate and Stearate SMMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Apoorva; Verma, Shilpi; Singh, Priti; Gupta, Anurag

    2017-10-01

    A study of ageing effects on the magnetic properties of Single-Molecule-Magnets (SMMs) of the Mn12 based Acetate, ([Mn12O12(CH3COO)16(H2O)4]·2CH3COOH·4H2O (1) and Stearate, [Mn12O12(CH3(CH2)16COO)11(CH3COO)5(H2O)4] (2) complexes has been carried out. Detailed magnetization (M) measurements as a function of temperature (T ∼ 1.8-10 K), magnetic field (H ∼ 0 to ±40 kOe) and time (t) have been performed on relatively fresh samples (1A and 2A) and samples aged for ∼4 weeks (1B and 2B) of both Mn12-Acetate and Mn12-Stearate. The blocking temperatures (TB) extracted from the measured M(T) lie between ∼3.0 and 3.4 K for all the four samples. In all cases, below TB, the M-H loops exhibit hysteresis with periodic steps. Interestingly, the ageing process leads to significant changes in the magnetic response of both the complexes. With ageing the Mn12-Acetate exhibits a large increase in the magnetization drop near zero-field, but the estimated anisotropy energy barrier (U) remains unchanged ∼71 K. Whereas, in the case of Mn12-Stearate ageing results in a change of U from ∼52 K (2A) to ∼35 K (2B). The results are discussed in terms of possible ageing induced changes in the structural and chemical environment of the SMMs.

  17. Development of sucrose stearate-based nanoemulsions and optimisation through γ-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Klang, Victoria; Matsko, Nadejda; Raupach, Karoline; El-Hagin, Nivine; Valenta, Claudia

    2011-09-01

    Nanoemulsions aimed at dermal drug delivery are usually stabilised by natural lecithins. However, lecithin has a high tendency towards self-aggregation and is prone to chemical degradation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop nanoemulsions with improved structure and long-term stability by employing a natural sucrose ester mixture as sole surfactant. A thorough comparison between the novel sucrose stearate-based nanoemulsions and corresponding lecithin-based nanoemulsions revealed that the sucrose ester is superior in terms of emulsifying efficiency, droplet formation as well as physical and chemical stability. The novel formulations exhibited a remarkably homogeneous structure in cryo TEM investigations, as opposed to the variable structure observed for lecithin-based systems. The in vitro skin permeation rates of lipophilic drugs from sucrose stearate nanoemulsions were comparable to those obtained with their lecithin-based counterparts. Furthermore, it was observed that addition of γ-cyclodextrin led to enhanced skin permeation of the steroidal drug fludrocortisone acetate from 9.99±0.46 to 55.10±3.67 μg cm(-2) after 24 h in the case of sucrose stearate-based systems and from 9.98±0.64 to 98.62±24.89 μg cm(-2) after 24 h in the case of lecithin-based systems. This enhancement effect was significantly stronger in formulations based on lecithin (P<0.05), which indicates that synergistic mechanisms between the surfactant and the cyclodextrin are involved. Cryo TEM images suggest that the cyclodextrin is incorporated into the interfacial film, which might alter drug release rates and improve the droplet microstructure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of pH sensitive polymeric nanoparticles of erythromycin stearate

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Sulekha; Prajapati, Atin B.; Bhadra, Dipankar

    2016-01-01

    Context: Bioavailability of conventional tablet of erythromycin stearate is low as it is unstable at acidic pH and also shows a low dissolution rate. Objective: It was proposed to protect it from the acidic condition of the stomach along with an increase in dissolution rate by formulating pH sensitive nanoparticles. Materials and Methods: The nanoparticles were prepared by the solvent evaporation technique using different quantities of Eudragit L100-55 and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Size reduction was achieved by high speed homogenization technique using Digital Ultra Turrax homogenizer. The formulation was optimized using 32 factorial design, keeping drug polymer ratio and surfactant concentration as independent variables. Particle size, entrapment efficiency, and drug-release (DR) were studied as dependent variables. Results: Optimized batch containing 1:0.3 erythromycin stearate: Eudragit L100-55 ratio and 1.0% PVA showed 8.24 ± 0.71% DR in pH 1.2 in 1-h and 90.38 ± 5.97% in pH 5.5 and pH 6.8 within 2-h, respectively. Discussion: The optimized batch exhibited lower release in acidic pH and faster release in higher pH compared to the marketed preparation. Conclusion: Thus the present study concludes that pH sensitive nanoparticles of erythromycin stearate increases the dissolution of the drug in intestinal pH and also protect it from acidic pH, which may help in improving the bioavailability of erythromycin. PMID:27134466

  19. Promotion of bone growth by dietary soy protein isolate: Comparision with dietary casein, whey hydrolysate and rice protein isolate in growing female rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of different dietary protein sources(casein (CAS), soy protein isolate (SPI), whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) and rice protein isolate (RPI)) on bone were studied in intact growing female rats and in ovarectomized (OVX) rats showing sex steroid deficiency-induced bone loss. In addition, S...

  20. Characterization of Synthesized and Commercial Forms of Magnesium Stearate Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Powder X-Ray Diffraction, and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Sean P; Nethercott, Matthew J; Mays, Christopher J; Winquist, Nickolas T; Arthur, Donia; Calahan, Julie L; Sethi, Manish; Pardue, Daniel S; Kim, Junghyun; Amidon, Gregory; Munson, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium stearate is the salt of a complex mixture of fatty acids, with the majority being stearate and palmitate. It has multiple crystalline forms and, potentially, an amorphous form. Magnesium stearate is used in the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry as a powder lubricant, and typically is added at low levels (∼1%) during the manufacturing process and blended for a relatively short time (∼5 min). Proper levels and mixing times are needed, as too short a mixing time or too small a quantity will result in improper lubrication, and too much can negatively impact dissolution rates. The complex mixture of multiple fatty acids and crystalline forms in magnesium stearate leads to variability between commercial sources, and switching between sources can impact both the amount of lubricant and mixing time needed for proper lubrication. In order to better understand the complex nature of magnesium stearate, a variety of analytical techniques were used to characterize both synthesized and commercial magnesium stearate samples. The results show that correlation among differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and other techniques provides a unique insight into the forms of magnesium stearate. Finally, the ability to monitor form changes of magnesium stearate in an intact tablet using solid-state NMR spectroscopy is shown. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Superhydrophobic honeycomb-like cobalt stearate thin films on aluminum with excellent anti-corrosion properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jiawei; Sarkar, D. K.; Chen, X.-Grant

    2017-06-01

    Superhydrophobic cobalt stearate thin films with excellent anti-corrosion properties were successfully fabricated on aluminum substrates via electrodeposition process. The water-repellent properties were attributed to the honeycomb-like micro-nano structure as well as low surface energy of cobalt stearate. The correlation between the surface morphology, composition as well as wetting properties and the molar ratio of inorganic cobalt salt (Co(NO3)2) and organic stearic acid (SA) abbreviated as Co/SA, in the electrolyte were studied carefully. The optimum superhydrophobic surface obtained on the electrodeposited cathodic aluminum substrate, in the mixed ethanolic solution with Co/SA molar ratio of 0.2, was found to have a maximum contact angle of 161°. The polarization resistance of superhydrophobic aluminum substrates was calculated as high as 1591 kΩ cm2, which is determined to be two orders of magnitude larger than that of the as-received aluminum substrate as 27 kΩ cm2. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was also employed to evaluate the corrosion resistance properties of these samples. Furthermore, electrical equivalent circuits (EEC) have been suggested in order to better understand the corrosion phenomena on these surfaces based on the corresponding EIS data.

  2. Difference in the lubrication efficiency of bovine and vegetable-derived magnesium stearate during tabletting.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhay; Hamad, Mazen L; Tawakkul, Mobin; Sayeed, Vilayat A; Khan, Mansoor A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate and compare the functionality of bovine fatty acids-derived (MgSt-B) and vegetable fatty acids-derived (MgSt-V) magnesium stearate powders when used for the lubrication of granules prepared by high-shear (HSG) and fluid bed (FBG) wet granulation methods. The work included evaluation of tablet compression and ejection forces during tabletting and dissolution testing of the compressed tablets. Granules prepared by both granulation methods required significantly lower ejection force (p < 0.01) when lubricated with the MgSt-V powder as compared to those lubricated with the MgSt-B powder. Granules prepared by the HSG method and lubricated with the MgSt-V powder also required significantly lower compression force (p < 0.01) to produce tablets of similar weight and hardness as compared to those lubricated with the MgSt-B powder. The dissolution profiles were not affected by these differences and were the same for tablets prepared by same granulation method and lubricated with either magnesium stearate powder. The results indicate significant differences (p < 0.01) between lubrication efficiency of the MgSt-B and the MgSt-V powders and emphasize the importance of functionality testing of the MgSt powders to understand the impact of these differences.

  3. Impact of moisture and magnesium stearate functionality on manufacturability of wet granulated metformin tablets.

    PubMed

    Kestur, Umesh; Desai, Divyakant; Sharif, Shasad; Wong, Benjamin; Guo, Hang; Tang, Dan; Chan, Steven

    2017-09-01

    During the development of a wet granulated 850 mg metformin hydrochloride tablet formulation, the tablets exhibited high friability (>3% w/w) irrespective of the source of extra-granular magnesium stearate (MgSt). High friability values indicated that an anti-bonding effect of MgSt was too high to be overcome by 3.3% w/w povidone as a binder in the formulation with 1.5% w/w residual granule moisture. Increasing the povidone concentration up to 7% w/w showed limited improvement in friability, with tablets showing variable friability depending on MgSt source. Characterization of MgSt indicated differences in crystallinity, surface area and particle morphology between different vendors. In addition, a new bulk yield strength test, which determines the MgSt fragmentation tendency, was found to be indicative of the MgSt performance in the tablet formulation. To improve bonding properties of granules, residual granule moisture was increased to 2% w/w at different povidone concentrations. At 2% w/w residual granule moisture content, regardless of MgSt source, the tablets showed significant improvement in friability (∼0.6% w/w) even at the lowest povidone concentration (3.3% w/w). The bonding power of higher residual granule moisture had a greater impact than higher povidone concentration in overcoming the anti-bonding effects of magnesium stearate.

  4. Sucrose stearate-based proniosome-derived niosomes for the nebulisable delivery of cromolyn sodium.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elbary, A; El-laithy, H M; Tadros, M I

    2008-06-05

    A Novel approach was developed for the preparation of controlled release proniosome-derived niosomes, using sucrose stearates as non-ionic biocompatible surfactants for the nebulisable delivery of cromolyn sodium. Conventional niosomes were prepared by a reverse phase evaporation method followed by the preparation of proniosomes by spraying the optimized surfactant-lipid mixture of sucrose stearate, cholesterol and stearylamine in 7:3:0.3 molar ratio onto the surface of spray dried lactose powder. Proniosome-derived niosomes were obtained by hydrating proniosomes with 0.9% saline at 50 degrees C and mixing for approximately 2 min. All vesicles were evaluated for their particle size, morphological characteristics, entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, nebulisation efficiency and physical stability at 2-8 degrees C. In addition, coating carrier surface with the surfactant-lipid mixture, during preparation of proniosomes, resulted in smaller, free flowing, homogenous and smooth vesicles with high drug entrapment efficiency. Compared to a standard drug solution, a successful retardation of the drug release rate was achieved with the proniosome-derived niosomes, where the t50% value of the release profile was 18.1h compared to 1.8h. Moreover, high nebulisation efficiency percentage and good physical stability were also achieved. The results are very encouraging and offer an alternative approach to minimize the problems associated with conventional niosomes like degradation, sedimentation, aggregation and fusion.

  5. An attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopic study of gas adsorption on colloidal stearate-capped ZnO catalyst substrate.

    PubMed

    Silverwood, Ian P; Keyworth, Colin W; Brown, Neil J; Shaffer, Milo S P; Williams, Charlotte K; Hellgardt, Klaus; Kelsall, Geoff H; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2014-01-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy has been applied in situ to study gas adsorption on a colloidal stearate-capped zinc oxide (ZnO) surface. Infrared spectra of a colloidal stearate-capped ZnO catalyst substrate were assigned at room temperature using zinc stearate as a reference compound. Heating was shown to create a monodentate species that allowed conformational change to occur, leading to altered binding geometry of the stearate ligands upon cooling. CO2 and H2 adsorption measurements demonstrated that the ligand shell was permeable and did not cover the entire surface, allowing adsorption and reaction with at least some portion of the ZnO surface. It has been demonstrated that stearate ligands did not prevent the usual chemisorption processes involved in catalytic reactions on a model ZnO catalyst system, yet the ligand-support system is dynamic under representative reaction conditions.

  6. Postweaning Exposure to Dietary Zearalenone, a Mycotoxin, Promotes Premature Onset of Puberty and Disrupts Early Pregnancy Events in Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaoqin

    2013-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a mycotoxin commonly found in contaminated livestock feed and human food with levels in the range of ppb and low ppm. It was hypothesized that ZEA, an endocrine disruptor, could affect puberty and early pregnancy. To test this hypothesis, newly weaned (3 weeks old) C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to 0, 0.002, 4, 10, and 40 ppm ZEA and 0.05 ppm diethylstilbestrol (positive control) in phytoestrogen-free AIN-93G diet. Females exposed to 10 and 40 ppm ZEA diets showed earlier onset of vaginal opening. Those treated with 40 ppm ZEA diet also had earlier first copulation plug and irregular estrous cyclicity. At 8 weeks old, all females were mated with untreated stud males on AIN-93G diet during mating. Treatment resumed upon identification of a vaginal plug on gestation day 0.5 (D0.5). Embryo implantation was assessed on D4.5. Exposure to 40 ppm ZEA diet resulted in reduced percentage of plugged mice with implantation sites, distended uterine appearance, and retained expression of progesterone receptor in D4.5 uterine epithelium. To determine the exposure timing and mechanisms of disrupted embryo implantation, four groups of females were fed with 0 or 40 ppm ZEA diets during premating (weaning to mating) and postmating (D0.5–D4.5), respectively. Premating exposure to 40 ppm ZEA diet reduced fertilization rate, whereas postmating exposure to 40 ppm ZEA diet delayed embryo transport and preimplantation embryo development, which subsequently affected embryo implantation. These data demonstrate that postweaning exposure to dietary ZEA can promote premature onset of puberty and disrupt early pregnancy events. PMID:23291560

  7. Potassium Bicarbonate Attenuates the Urinary Nitrogen Excretion That Accompanies an Increase in Dietary Protein and May Promote Calcium Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ceglia, Lisa; Harris, Susan S.; Abrams, Steven A.; Rasmussen, Helen M.; Dallal, Gerard E.; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2009-01-01

    Context: Protein is an essential component of muscle and bone. However, the acidic byproducts of protein metabolism may have a negative impact on the musculoskeletal system, particularly in older individuals with declining renal function. Objective: We sought to determine whether adding an alkaline salt, potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3), allows protein to have a more favorable net impact on intermediary indices of muscle and bone conservation than it does in the usual acidic environment. Design: We conducted a 41-d randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of KHCO3 or placebo with a 16-d phase-in and two successive 10-d metabolic diets containing low (0.5 g/kg) or high (1.5 g/kg) protein in random order with a 5-d washout between diets. Setting: The study was conducted in a metabolic research unit. Participants: Nineteen healthy subjects ages 54–82 yr participated. Intervention: KHCO3 (up to 90 mmol/d) or placebo was administered for 41 d. Main Outcome Measures: We measured 24-h urinary nitrogen excretion, IGF-I, 24-h urinary calcium excretion, and fractional calcium absorption. Results: KHCO3 reduced the rise in urinary nitrogen excretion that accompanied an increase in protein intake (P = 0.015) and was associated with higher IGF-I levels on the low-protein diet (P = 0.027) with a similar trend on the high-protein diet (P = 0.050). KHCO3 was also associated with higher fractional calcium absorption on the low-protein diet (P = 0.041) with a similar trend on the high-protein diet (P = 0.064). Conclusions: In older adults, KHCO3 attenuates the protein-induced rise in urinary nitrogen excretion, and this may be mediated by IGF-I. KHCO3 may also promote calcium absorption independent of the dietary protein content. PMID:19050051

  8. Potassium bicarbonate attenuates the urinary nitrogen excretion that accompanies an increase in dietary protein and may promote calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Ceglia, Lisa; Harris, Susan S; Abrams, Steven A; Rasmussen, Helen M; Dallal, Gerard E; Dawson-Hughes, Bess

    2009-02-01

    Protein is an essential component of muscle and bone. However, the acidic byproducts of protein metabolism may have a negative impact on the musculoskeletal system, particularly in older individuals with declining renal function. We sought to determine whether adding an alkaline salt, potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3), allows protein to have a more favorable net impact on intermediary indices of muscle and bone conservation than it does in the usual acidic environment. We conducted a 41-d randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of KHCO3 or placebo with a 16-d phase-in and two successive 10-d metabolic diets containing low (0.5 g/kg) or high (1.5 g/kg) protein in random order with a 5-d washout between diets. The study was conducted in a metabolic research unit. Nineteen healthy subjects ages 54-82 yr participated. KHCO3 (up to 90 mmol/d) or placebo was administered for 41 d. We measured 24-h urinary nitrogen excretion, IGF-I, 24-h urinary calcium excretion, and fractional calcium absorption. KHCO3 reduced the rise in urinary nitrogen excretion that accompanied an increase in protein intake (P = 0.015) and was associated with higher IGF-I levels on the low-protein diet (P = 0.027) with a similar trend on the high-protein diet (P = 0.050). KHCO3 was also associated with higher fractional calcium absorption on the low-protein diet (P = 0.041) with a similar trend on the high-protein diet (P = 0.064). In older adults, KHCO3 attenuates the protein-induced rise in urinary nitrogen excretion, and this may be mediated by IGF-I. KHCO3 may also promote calcium absorption independent of the dietary protein content.

  9. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and heme iron induce oxidative stress biomarkers and a cancer promoting environment in the colon of rats.

    PubMed

    Guéraud, Françoise; Taché, Sylviane; Steghens, Jean-Paul; Milkovic, Lidija; Borovic-Sunjic, Suzana; Zarkovic, Neven; Gaultier, Eric; Naud, Nathalie; Héliès-Toussaint, Cécile; Pierre, Fabrice; Priymenko, Nathalie

    2015-06-01

    The end products of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) peroxidation, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), and isoprostanes (8-iso-PGF2α), are widely used as systemic lipid oxidation/oxidative stress biomarkers. However, some of these compounds have also a dietary origin. Thus, replacing dietary saturated fat by PUFAs would improve health but could also increase the formation of such compounds, especially in the case of a pro-oxidant/antioxidant imbalanced diet. Hence, the possible impact of dietary fatty acids and pro-oxidant compounds was studied in rats given diets allowing comparison of the effects of heme iron vs. ferric citrate and of ω-6- vs. ω-3-rich oil on the level of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress biomarkers. Rats given a heme iron-rich diet without PUFA were used as controls. The results obtained have shown that MDA and the major urinary metabolite of HNE (the mercapturic acid of dihydroxynonane, DHN-MA) were highly dependent on the dietary factors tested, while 8-iso-PGF2α was modestly but significantly affected. Intestinal inflammation and tissue fatty acid composition were checked in parallel and could only explain the differences we observed to a limited extent. Thus, the differences in biomarkers were attributed to the formation of lipid oxidation compounds in food or during digestion, their intestinal absorption, and their excretion into urine. Moreover, fecal extracts from the rats fed the heme iron or fish oil diets were highly toxic for immortalized mouse colon cells. Such toxicity can eventually lead to promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis, supporting the epidemiological findings between red meat intake and colorectal cancer risk. Therefore, the analysis of these biomarkers of lipid peroxidation/oxidative stress in urine should be used with caution when dietary factors are not well controlled, while control of their possible dietary intake is needed also because of their pro-inflammatory, toxic, and even

  10. Influence of magnesium stearate on the physicochemical and pharmacodynamic characteristics of insulin-loaded Eudragit entrapped mucoadhesive microspheres.

    PubMed

    Momoh, Mumuni A; Kenechukwu, Franklin C; Nnamani, Petra O; Umetiti, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    Effective oral insulin delivery has remained a challenge to the pharmaceutical industry. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of magnesium stearate on the properties of insulin-loaded Eudragit® RL 100 entrapped mucoadhesive microspheres. Microspheres containing Eudragit® RL 100, insulin, and varying concentrations of magnesium stearate (agglomeration-preventing agent) were prepared by emulsification-coacervation method and characterized with respect to differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), morphology, particle size, loading efficiency, mucoadhesive and micromeritics properties. The in vitro release of insulin from the microspheres was performed in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF, pH 7.2) while the in vivo hypoglycemic effect was investigated by monitoring the plasma glucose level of the alloxan-induced diabetic rats after oral administration. Stable, spherical, brownish, mucoadhesive, discrete and free flowing insulin-loaded microspheres were formed. While the average particle size and mucoadhesiveness of the microspheres increased with an increase in the proportion of magnesium stearate, loading efficiency generally decreased. After 12 h, microspheres prepared with Eudragit® RL 100: magnesium stearate ratios of 15:1, 15:2, 15:3 and 15:4 released 68.20 ± 1.57, 79.40 ± 1.52, 76.60 ± 1.93 and 70.00 ± 1.00 (%) of insulin, respectively. Reduction in the blood glucose level for the subcutaneously (sc) administered insulin was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) higher than for most of the formulations. However, the blood glucose reduction effect produced by the orally administered insulin-loaded microspheres prepared with four parts of magnesium stearate and fifteen parts of Eudragit® RL 100 after 12 h was equal to that produced by subcutaneously administered insulin solution. The results of this study can suggest that this carrier system could be an alternative for the delivery of insulin.

  11. Enhanced mammary progesterone receptor-A isoform activity in the promotion of mammary tumor progression by dietary soy in rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary contribution to breast cancer risk, recurrence, and progression remains incompletely understood. Increased consumption of soy and soy isoflavones is associated with reduced mammary cancer susceptibility in women and in rodent models of carcinogenesis. In rats treated with N-Methyl-N-Nitrosou...

  12. Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Hasan B.

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the promotion process in an academic medical center. A description of different promotional tracks, tenure and endowed chairs, and the process of submitting an application is provided. Finally, some practical advice about developing skills and attributes that can help with academic growth and promotion is dispensed. PMID:24436683

  13. Neuropeptide Y promoter polymorphism modifies effects of a weight-loss diet on 2-year changes of blood pressure: the preventing overweight using novel dietary strategies trial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomin; Qi, Qibin; Liang, Jun; Hu, Frank B; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is implicated in the regulation of blood pressure (BP), and NPY pathways in the hypothalamus are sensitive to dietary fat. We evaluated the potential effect of a functional variant rs16147 located in the NPY gene promoter region on the association between 2-year diet intervention and change in multiple BP measures in the randomized Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies Trial. The NPY rs16147 was genotyped in 723 obese adults who were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 diets differing in the target percentages of energy derived from fat, protein, and carbohydrate. The changes of 4 BP phenotypes, including systolic BP, diastolic BP, pulse pressure, and mean arterial pressure, during 2-year diet intervention were analyzed. In the total participants and participants with hypertension, we observed significant and consistent interactions between rs16147 genotype and dietary fat intake on changes in multiple BP phenotypes at 2 years (all P for interactions <0.05). The risk allele (C allele) was associated with a greater reduction of BP phenotypes in response to low-fat diet, whereas an opposite genetic effect was observed in response to high-fat diet. In addition, the C allele was related to greater changes in 4 BP phenotypes in hypertensive compared with nonhypertensive participants. Our data suggest that NPY rs16147 may modulate the association between dietary fat intake and changes in BP phenotypes, and the C allele exerts a long-term beneficial effect on lowering BP in response to low-fat diet in obese and hypertensive subjects.

  14. A field test of a web-based workplace health promotion program to improve dietary practices, reduce stress, and increase physical activity: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cook, Royer F; Billings, Douglas W; Hersch, Rebekah K; Back, Anita S; Hendrickson, April

    2007-06-19

    Most work sites engage in some form of health promotion programming designed to improve worker health and reduce health care costs. Although these programs have typically been delivered through combinations of seminars and print materials, workplace health promotion programs are increasingly being delivered through the Internet. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Web-based multimedia health promotion program for the workplace, designed to improve dietary practices, reduce stress, and increase physical activity. Using a randomized controlled trial design with pretest-posttest comparisons within each group, 419 employees of a human resources company were randomly assigned to the Web-based condition or to a condition that provided print materials on the same topics. All subjects were assessed at pretest and posttest through an online questionnaire containing multiple measures of health behavior and attitudes. The test period was 3 months. Questionnaire data were analyzed mainly by analysis of covariance and t tests. Retention rates were good for both groups-85% for the Web-based group and 87% for the print group. Subjects using the Web-based program performed significantly better than the print group on Attitudes Toward a Healthful Diet (F(1,415) = 7.104, P = .008) and Dietary Stage of Change (F(1,408) = 6.487, P = .01), but there were no significant group differences on the five other dietary measures. Both groups also showed improvement from pretest to posttest on most dietary measures, as indicated by significant t tests. Within the Web-based group, dosage analyses showed significant effects of the number of times the subject accessed the program on measures of Dietary Self-Efficacy (F(2,203) = 5.270, P = .003), Attitudes Toward a Healthful Diet (F(2,204) = 2.585, P = .045), and Dietary Stage of Change (F(2,200) = 4.627, P = .005). No significant differences were found between the two groups on measures of stress or physical

  15. A Field Test of a Web-Based Workplace Health Promotion Program to Improve Dietary Practices, Reduce Stress, and Increase Physical Activity: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Douglas W; Hersch, Rebekah K; Back, Anita S; Hendrickson, April

    2007-01-01

    Background Most work sites engage in some form of health promotion programming designed to improve worker health and reduce health care costs. Although these programs have typically been delivered through combinations of seminars and print materials, workplace health promotion programs are increasingly being delivered through the Internet. Objective The purpose of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a Web-based multimedia health promotion program for the workplace, designed to improve dietary practices, reduce stress, and increase physical activity. Methods Using a randomized controlled trial design with pretest-posttest comparisons within each group, 419 employees of a human resources company were randomly assigned to the Web-based condition or to a condition that provided print materials on the same topics. All subjects were assessed at pretest and posttest through an online questionnaire containing multiple measures of health behavior and attitudes. The test period was 3 months. Questionnaire data were analyzed mainly by analysis of covariance and t tests. Results Retention rates were good for both groups—85% for the Web-based group and 87% for the print group. Subjects using the Web-based program performed significantly better than the print group on Attitudes Toward a Healthful Diet (F1,415 = 7.104, P = .008) and Dietary Stage of Change (F1,408 = 6.487, P = .01), but there were no significant group differences on the five other dietary measures. Both groups also showed improvement from pretest to posttest on most dietary measures, as indicated by significant t tests. Within the Web-based group, dosage analyses showed significant effects of the number of times the subject accessed the program on measures of Dietary Self-Efficacy (F2,203 = 5.270, P = .003), Attitudes Toward a Healthful Diet (F2,204 = 2.585, P = .045), and Dietary Stage of Change (F2,200 = 4.627, P = .005). No significant differences were found between the two groups on measures

  16. Caught in a 'spiral'. Barriers to healthy eating and dietary health promotion needs from the perspective of unemployed young people and their service providers.

    PubMed

    Davison, Jenny; Share, Michelle; Hennessy, Marita; Knox, Barbara Stewart

    2015-02-01

    The number of young people in Europe who are not in education, employment or training (NEET) is increasing. Given that young people from disadvantaged backgrounds tend to have diets of poor nutritional quality, this exploratory study sought to understand barriers and facilitators to healthy eating and dietary health promotion needs of unemployed young people aged 16-20 years. Three focus group discussions were held with young people (n = 14). Six individual interviews and one paired interview with service providers (n = 7). Data were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically content analysed. Themes were then fitted to social cognitive theory (SCT). Despite understanding of the principles of healthy eating, a 'spiral' of interrelated social, economic and associated psychological problems was perceived to render food and health of little value and low priority for the young people. The story related by the young people and corroborated by the service providers was of a lack of personal and vicarious experience with food. The proliferation and proximity of fast food outlets and the high perceived cost of 'healthy' compared to 'junk' food rendered the young people low in self-efficacy and perceived control to make healthier food choices. Agency was instead expressed through consumption of junk food and drugs. Both the young people and service providers agreed that for dietary health promotion efforts to succeed, social problems needed to be addressed and agency encouraged through (individual and collective) active engagement of the young people themselves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary guidelines in singapore.

    PubMed

    Lee, Benjamin Lc

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Dietary Guidelines were developed with the aim of providing guidance on what dietary strategies can best address increasing rates of obesity and non-communicable chronic disease in Singapore. This set of dietary guidelines was developed with a local expert committee based on a review of scientific literature and data on current dietary patterns from the 2010 National Nutrition Survey. Projected nutrient intakes from a diet adhering to the 2011 Dietary Guidelines were calculated using a local food composition database (FOCOS) and validated against nutrient recommendations. Acknowledging that dietary requirements differ between age groups, different sets of dietary guidelines have been developed and customised for different segments of the population. To date, Singapore has produced dietary guidelines for children and adolescents (focusing on establishing healthy lifelong eating patterns), adults (focusing on preventing obesity and reinforcing healthy eating patterns), and most recently, guidelines for older adults (>50 years of age) that address the issue of potential dietary insufficiency caused by age-related increases in nutrient requirements combined with a reduction in energy requirements. In Singapore, dietary guidelines have been used to inform and direct public policy and promote dietary patterns that meet nutrient requirements while reducing the risk of non-communicable chronic diseases. Examples of public policy include: national guidelines on food advertising and standards for food served in nursing homes; examples of public health promotion programmes include: the Healthier Choice Symbol Programme for packaged food products and programmes encouraging provision of healthier meals in hawker centres, restaurants, and school or workplace canteens.

  18. Dietary antioxidant supplementation enhances lipid and protein oxidative stability of chicken broiler meat through promotion of antioxidant enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Delles, Rebecca M; Xiong, Youling L; True, Alma D; Ao, Touying; Dawson, Karl A

    2014-06-01

    Recent nutrigenomic studies have shown that animal nutrition can have a major influence on tissue gene expression. Dietary antioxidant supplements can enhance the quality of meat through modification of tissue metabolic processes. This study investigated the influence of dietary antioxidants and quality of oil on the oxidative and enzymatic properties of chicken broiler breast meat stored in an oxygen-enriched package (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2) in comparison with air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) or skin packaging systems during retail display at 2 to 4°C for up to 21 d. Broilers were fed either a diet with a low-oxidized (peroxide value 23 mEq of O2/kg) or high-oxidized (peroxide value 121 mEq of O2/kg) oil, supplemented with or without an algae-based Se yeast and organic mineral antioxidant pack for 42 d. Lipid and protein oxidation and tissue enzymatic activity were analyzed. In all packaging systems, lipid oxidation (TBA reactive substances) was inhibited by up to 32.5% (P < 0.05) with an antioxidant-supplemented diet when compared with diets without antioxidants, particularly in the HiOx and PVC systems. Protein sulfhydryls were significantly protected by antioxidant diets (e.g., by 14.6 and 17.8% for low-and high-oxidized dietary groups, respectively, in PVC d 7 samples). Glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in antioxidant-supplemented diets compared with the basal diet, regardless of oil quality. Also, serum carbonyls were lower in broilers fed a low-oxidized antioxidant-supplemented treatment. The results demonstrate that dietary antioxidants can minimize the oxidative instability of proteins and lipids, and the protection may be linked to improved cellular antioxidant enzymatic activity.

  19. Dietary antioxidant supplementation enhances lipid and protein oxidative stability of chicken broiler meat through promotion of antioxidant enzyme activity1

    PubMed Central

    Delles, Rebecca M.; Xiong, Youling L.; True, Alma D.; Ao, Touying; Dawson, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent nutrigenomic studies have shown that animal nutrition can have a major influence on tissue gene expression. Dietary antioxidant supplements can enhance the quality of meat through modification of tissue metabolic processes. This study investigated the influence of dietary antioxidants and quality of oil on the oxidative and enzymatic properties of chicken broiler breast meat stored in an oxygen-enriched package (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2) in comparison with air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) or skin packaging systems during retail display at 2 to 4°C for up to 21 d. Broilers were fed either a diet with a low-oxidized (peroxide value 23 mEq of O2/kg) or high-oxidized (peroxide value 121 mEq of O2/kg) oil, supplemented with or without an algae-based Se yeast and organic mineral antioxidant pack for 42 d. Lipid and protein oxidation and tissue enzymatic activity were analyzed. In all packaging systems, lipid oxidation (TBA reactive substances) was inhibited by up to 32.5% (P < 0.05) with an antioxidant-supplemented diet when compared with diets without antioxidants, particularly in the HiOx and PVC systems. Protein sulfhydryls were significantly protected by antioxidant diets (e.g., by 14.6 and 17.8% for low-and high-oxidized dietary groups, respectively, in PVC d 7 samples). Glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in antioxidant-supplemented diets compared with the basal diet, regardless of oil quality. Also, serum carbonyls were lower in broilers fed a low-oxidized antioxidant-supplemented treatment. The results demonstrate that dietary antioxidants can minimize the oxidative instability of proteins and lipids, and the protection may be linked to improved cellular antioxidant enzymatic activity. PMID:24879706

  20. Permeability of water and oleic acid in composite films of phase separated polypropylene and cellulose stearate blends.

    PubMed

    Krasnou, Illia; Gårdebjer, Sofie; Tarasova, Elvira; Larsson, Anette; Westman, Gunnar; Krumme, Andres

    2016-11-05

    Cellulose esters with long carbon side chains (e.g. stearate) were produced via a homogenous reaction in ionic liquids. The degree of substitution was calculated to approximately 2. The melt rheology was studied for the pure cellulose esters but also combinations of the esters and polypropylene to study the processability of a blended composite material. It was shown that the compatibility between the two components was weak, which resulted in a phase-separated composite material. The morphology and permeability of water and oleic acid of the composite films were studied and it was shown that the water permeability decreased upon addition of the cellulose ester to the polymer. The permeability of oleic acid was however unchanged, which is most probable a result of high solubility in the cellulose ester rich domains of the composites. Also, the following hypothesis is stated: cellulose stearate influence the polypropylene crystallization process by decreasing the size of spherulites.

  1. Characterization of acyl-ACP thioesterases of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) seed and high levels of stearate production in transgenic canola.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, D J; Kridl, J C

    1998-03-01

    Acyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases are, at least in part, responsible for the fatty acyl chain length composition of seed storage oils. Acyl-ACP thioesterases with specificity for each of the saturated acyl-ACP substrates from 8:0 through 16:0 have been cloned, with the exception of 18:0, and are members of the FatB class of thioesterases. The authors have determined that the tropical tree species mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) stores 18:0 (stearate) in its seed oil in amounts of up to 56% by weight. Acyl-ACP thioesterase activity as measured in crude mangosteen seed extracts showed a preference for 18:1-ACP substrates, but had significant activity with 18:0 relative to that with 16:0-ACP, suggesting a thioesterase might be involved in the production of stearate. Three distinct acyl-ACP thioesterases were cloned from mangosteen seed cDNA; two representative of the FatA class and one representative of the FatB class. When expressed in vitro, the enzyme encoded by one of the FatAs (Garm FatA1) while preferring 18:1-ACP showed relatively low activity with 16:0-ACP as compared to 18:0-ACP, similar to the substrate preferences shown by the crude seed extract. Expression of Garm FatA1 in Brassica seeds led to the accumulation of stearate up to 22% in seed oil. These results suggest that Garm FatA1 is at least partially responsible for determining the high stearate composition of mangosteen seed oil and that FatA as well FatB thioesterases have evolved for specialized roles.

  2. Associations between dietary habits and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in a Hong Kong Chinese working population--the "Better Health for Better Hong Kong" (BHBHK) health promotion campaign.

    PubMed

    Ko, Gary T C; Chan, Juliana C N; Tong, Spencer D Y; Chan, Amy W Y; Wong, Patrick T S; Hui, Stanley S C; Kwok, Ruby; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2007-01-01

    Diet and nutritional status have been shown to play pivotal roles in the occurrence of many chronic diseases. In this study, we examined the patterns of dietary habits and their relationships with risk factors for cardiovascular and chronic diseases in Hong Kong working populations. In April 2000, a 5-year territory-wide health promotion campaign supported by the Li Ka Shing Foundation was launched in Hong Kong by the Health InfoWorld of Hospital Authority. Between July 2000 and March 2002, 4841 Chinese subjects [2375 (49.1%) men and 2466 (50.9%) women, mean age: 42.4 +/- 8.9 years (median: 43.0 years, range: 17-83 years)] from the general working class were recruited. Subjects were randomly selected using computer generated codes according to the distribution of occupational groups. A dietary questionnaire was used to assess 6 core dietary habits: daily fruit intake, vegetable intake, fluid intake, sugary drinks, regularity of daily meals and number of dining out each day. Overall, men had a worse cardiovascular risk profile and less desirable dietary habits than women. Those who had more unhealthy dietary habits were more likely to be obese and current smokers. Using logistic regression analysis with the dietary habits as independent variables, we found that obesity, smoking and constipation were independently associated with various unhealthy dietary patterns. In conclusion, there were close associations between dietary habits and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in Hong Kong. More effective community education about healthy lifestyle is required in Hong Kong.

  3. Analysis of magnesium from magnesium stearate in pharmaceutical tablet formulations using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with nano quantity analyte detection.

    PubMed

    Risley, Donald S; Magnusson, Lars-Erik; Morow, Paul R; Aburub, Aktham

    2013-05-05

    This study demonstrates the use of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with a nano quantity analyte detector for the retention, separation and detection of magnesium from magnesium stearate in tablet formulations for a drug product formulation blend containing a hydrochloride salt of a weakly basic compound as the active ingredient. The nano quantity analyte detector can provide direct detection of inactive excipients and inorganic salts lacking ultraviolet chromophores, as well as, all non-volatile compounds. The separation was accomplished using a SeQuant ZIC-HILIC column and mobile phase consisting of 32.5:32.5:35 of acetone/methanol/ammonium formate buffer (150 mM, pH 4.5). Common validation parameters were evaluated to assess the method's quantitative potential for magnesium (from magnesium stearate) including: linearity, accuracy, specificity, solution stability, repeatability, and intermediate precision. Overall, the method described in this report proved to be very robust and represents a novel technique to conveniently separate and detect magnesium from magnesium stearate in pharmaceutical preparations both quickly and accurately.

  4. Separating Octadecyltrimethoxysilane Hydrolysis and Condensation at the Air/Water Interface through Addition of Methyl Stearate

    PubMed Central

    Britt, David W.; Hlady, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis and condensation of octadecyltrimethoxysilane (OTMS) at the air/water interface were monitored through molecular area changes at a constant surface pressure of 10 mN/m. The onset of condensation was delayed through the addition of methyl stearate (SME) acting as an inert filler molecule. In the absence of SME, complete gelation of OTMS required 30 h, during which time OTMS condensation occurred concomitantly with hydrolysis. In the presence of SME, the OTMS monolayer gelation rate increased in proportion to the amount of SME present. A 1:6 OTMS:SME molar ratio resulted in monolayer gelation within 30 min, suggesting completion of monomer hydrolysis prior to condensation. These findings indicate that lability of OTMS to hydrolysis at the air/water interface is governed by steric and conformational constraints at the silicon atom site, with monomeric OTMS being much more reactive than oligomeric OTMS. Fluorescence microscope images demonstrated that the OTMS condensed domain size also decreased with increasing SME concentrations, further implicating SME’s role as an inert filler. PMID:25132807

  5. [Determination of magnesium stearate in pharmaceutical preparations using derivatization with 2-nitrophenylhydrazine and HPLC].

    PubMed

    Arai, Takashi; Hosoi, Yasue

    2005-03-01

    In general, spectrophotometric methods (inductively coupled plasma or atomic absorption spectrophotometry) are used for the assay of magnesium stearate (Mg-St). In this study, a new rapid, selective assay method was developed for Mg-St in pharmaceutical formulations. The method was based on isocratic reverse-phase liquid chromatography using a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (80:20, v/v) after precolumn derivatization with 2-nitrophenyl hydrazine for sensitive UV detection. Margaric acid was used as an internal standard and the substances were detectable at 230 nm or 400 nm. Using a short (2 cm) HPLC column reduced the analytical time to 5 min. Validation of the newly developed method was performed in accordance with the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The linearity range for Mg-St was 0.00-0.04 mg/ml (as the concentration of injected sample solution) and their correlation factor was 0.9998. The determination and detection limits for Mg-St were 6 microg and 2 microg, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of Mg-St in commercially available tablets with a high recovery percentage, good accuracy, and precision.

  6. Mucoadhesive effect of thiolated PEG stearate and its modified NLC for ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Wang, Yu; Ping, Qineng; Xiao, Yanyu; Huang, Xin

    2009-08-04

    This study was to develop a thiolated non-ionic surfactant, cysteine-polyethylene glycol stearate (Cys-PEG-SA), for the assembling of nanoparticulate ocular drug delivery system with mucoadhesive property. Cys-PEG-SA was synthesized in two steps reaction involving a new derivative intermediate formation of p-nitrophenylcarbonyl-PEG-SA (pNP-PEG-SA). Up to 369.43+/-25.54 mumol free thiol groups per gram of the conjugates was reached. The nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) loaded cyclosporine A (CyA) was prepared by melt-emulsification method. The mucoadhesive NLC (Cys-NLC) was obtained by incubating NLC emulsion with Cys-PEG-SA. The mucoadhesive properties of these nanocarriers were examined by using mucin particles method. The particle size or zeta potential of the porcine mucin particles were changed with the added concentration of Cys-PEG-SA, and the disulphide bond breaker cysteine significantly reduced the adhesion of Cys-NLC to mucin particles (P<0.05), whereas PEG-SA and NLC did not alternate the properties of the mucin particles. When Cys-NLC was administered topically to the rabbit eye, the encapsulated cyclosporine was found to remain on the ocular surface in the cul-de-sac for up to 6 h, both precorneal retention time and concentration were dramatically increased (P<0.05), compared with the NLC without thiomer modification.

  7. Application and mechanism of inhalation profile improvement of DPI formulations by mechanofusion with magnesium stearate.

    PubMed

    Kumon, Michiko; Machida, Satoshi; Suzuki, Masahiko; Kusai, Akira; Yonemochi, Etsuo; Terada, Katsuhide

    2008-05-01

    In our previous paper, we reported the inhalation properties of dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations containing Compound A and mechanofusion-processed lactose carriers. The mechanofusion process with magnesium stearate (Mg-St) on the lactose carrier enhanced the fine particle fraction (FPF) value of the Andersen cascade impactor (ACI) study. The increase of FPF seemed to be associated with the increase of the dispersibility of drug particles. The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate the applicability of lactose carrier mechanofusion-processed with Mg-St and (2) to examine the mechanism of FPF alteration by the mechanofusion process applied on the lactose carrier with or without additive. The inhalation profiles of DPI formulations containing four different pharmaceutical compounds were evaluated with an ACI. The dispersibility of the formulations was observed by particle size distribution measurement in the air stream and the adhesive force was measured bydirect separation method. It was found that higher FPF was obtained with lactose mechanofusion-processed with Mg-St as compared to control lactose carriers for all four compounds. This suggested that mechanofusion process with Mg-St is widely applicable in DPI formulations. The homogenization of surface adhesiveness was attributed to the increased FPF of the DPI including lactose mechanofusion-processed with Mg-St, as suggested by the combination of several physicochemical characteristics. Combination of different characterization methods would be of help to clarify the whole mechanism which defines the inhalation properties of DPI formulations.

  8. Microstructure of calcium stearate matrix pellets: a function of the drying process.

    PubMed

    Schrank, Simone; Kann, Birthe; Windbergs, Maike; Glasser, Benjamin J; Zimmer, Andreas; Khinast, Johannes; Roblegg, Eva

    2013-11-01

    Drying is a common pharmaceutical process, whose potential to modify the final drug and/or dosage form properties is often underestimated. In the present study, pellets consisting of the matrix former calcium stearate (CaSt) incorporating the active pharmaceutical ingredient ibuprofen were prepared via wet extrusion and spheronization. Subsequent drying was performed by either desiccation, fluid-bed drying, or lyophilization, and the final pellets were compared with respect to their microstructure. To minimize the effect of solute ibuprofen molecules on the shrinking behavior of the CaSt, low ibuprofen loadings were used, as ibuprofen is soluble in the granulation liquid. Pellet porosity and specific surface area increased during desiccation, fluid-bed drying, and lyophilization. The inlet-air temperature during fluid-bed drying affected the specific surface area, which increased at lower inlet-air temperatures rather than the pellet porosity. The in vitro dissolution profiles were found to be a nonlinear function of the specific surface area. Overall, the microstructure, including porosity, pore size, and specific surface area, of CaSt pellets was a strong function of the drying conditions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Action of Humicola lanuginosa lipase on mixed monomolecular films of tricaprylin and polyethylene glycol stearate.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Tz; Mircheva, K; Dobreva, G; Panaiotov, I; Proust, J E; Verger, R

    2008-05-01

    The hydrolysis catalyzed by Humicola lanuginosa lipase (HLL) of pure tricaprylin (TC) or stearate of polyethylene glycol 1500 (PEG-St) as well as their mixtures spread as monomolecular films were studied. The catalytic transformation of the two substrates TC or PEG-St into their respective reaction products was detected by measuring simultaneously the decrease in the film area and the surface potential using the "zero order" trough at constant surface pressure. A kinetic model describing the enzymatic hydrolysis was developed. The surface concentrations of the two substrates and their respective reaction products as well as the values of the global kinetic constants of hydrolysis were determined. The experimentally obtained global kinetic constants of the catalytic action of HLL against TC and PEG-St present in mixed monolayers of TC/PEG-St are approximately the same as in the case of pure monolayers. These obtained results give some indications that the activity of enzyme is not significantly affected by the different molecular environments in the mixed monolayers.

  10. Early life exposure to a high fat diet promotes long-term changes in dietary preferences and central reward signaling.

    PubMed

    Teegarden, S L; Scott, A N; Bale, T L

    2009-09-15

    Overweight and obesity in the United States continues to grow at epidemic rates in large part due to the overconsumption of calorically-dense palatable foods. Identification of factors influencing long-term macronutrient preferences may elucidate points of prevention and behavioral modification. In our current study, we examined the adult macronutrient preferences of mice acutely exposed to a high fat diet during the third postnatal week. We hypothesized that the consumption of a high fat diet during early life would alter the programming of central pathways important in adult dietary preferences. As adults, the early-exposed mice displayed a significant preference for a diet high in fat compared to controls. This effect was not due to diet familiarity as mice exposed to a novel high carbohydrate diet during this same early period failed to show differences in macronutrient preferences as adults. The increased intake of high fat diet in early exposed mice was specific to dietary preferences as no changes were detected for total caloric intake or caloric efficiency. Mechanistically, mice exposed to a high fat diet during early life exhibited significant alterations in biochemical markers of dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens, including changes in levels of phospho-dopamine and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein, molecular weight 32 kDa (DARPP-32) threonine-75, DeltaFosB, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These results support our hypothesis that even brief early life exposure to calorically-dense palatable diets alters long-term programming of central mechanisms important in dietary preferences and reward. These changes may underlie the passive overconsumption of high fat foods contributing to the increasing body mass in the western world.

  11. Cancer-promoting and Inhibiting Effects of Dietary Compounds: Role of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AhR)

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Joann B.; Ghotbaddini, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic aromatic amines and dioxin-like compounds are environmental carcinogens shown to initiate cancer in a number of tissue types including prostate and breast. These environmental carcinogens elicit their effects through interacting with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand activated transcription factor. Naturally occurring compounds found in fruits and vegetables shown to have anti-carcinogenic effects also interact with the AhR. This review explores dietary and environmental exposure to chemical carcinogens and beneficial natural compounds whose effects are elicited by the AhR. PMID:25258701

  12. Tumor-protective and tumor-promoting actions of dietary whey proteins in an N-methyl-N-nitrosourea model of rat mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Eason, Renea R; Till, S Reneé; Frank, Julie A; Badger, Thomas M; Korourian, Sohelia; Simmen, Frank A; Simmen, Rosalia C M

    2006-01-01

    The mammary tumor-protective effects of dietary factors are considered to be mediated by multiple signaling pathways, consistent with the heterogeneous nature of the disease and the distinct genetic profiles of tumors arising from diverse mammary cell populations. In a 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced model of carcinogenesis, we showed previously that female Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to AIN-93G diet containing whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) beginning at gestation Day 4 had reduced tumor incidence than those exposed to diet containing casein (CAS), due partly to increased mammary differentiation and reduced activity of phase I metabolic enzymes. Here, we evaluated the tumor-protective effects of these same dietary proteins to the direct-acting carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (NMU). We found that lifetime exposure to WPH, relative to CAS, decreased mammary tumor incidence and prolonged the appearance of tumors in NMU-treated female rats, with no corresponding effects on tumor multiplicity. At 115 days post-NMU, histologically normal mammary glands from WPH-fed tumor-bearing rats had increased gene expression for the tumor suppressor BRCA1 and the differentiation marker kappa-casein than those of CAS-fed tumor-bearing rats. Tumor-bearing rats from the WPH group had more advanced tumors, with a greater incidence of invasive ductal carcinoma than ductal carcinoma in situ and higher serum C-peptide levels than corresponding rats fed CAS. WPH-fed tumor-bearing rats were also heavier after NMU administration than CAS tumor-bearing rats, although no correlation was noted between body weight and C-peptide levels for either diet group. Results demonstrate the context-dependent tumor-protective and tumor-promoting effects of WPH; provide support for distinct signaling pathways underlying dietary effects on development of mammary carcinoma; and raise provocative questions on the role of diet in altering the prognosis of existing breast tumors.

  13. Beyond Food Promotion: A Systematic Review on the Influence of the Food Industry on Obesity-Related Dietary Behaviour among Children.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Diana; Schneider, Sarah; Mdege, Noreen; Ali, Shehzad; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2015-10-16

    An increased consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor food and beverages as a result of a changing obesogenic environment contributes substantially to the increasing prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity. This paper reviews the nature and extent of food industry influences which expose children to commercial influences and thus might affect unhealthy dietary behaviour and finally contributes to obesity. A systematic search of nine electronic databases (including PubMed, PsycINFO, EconLit) and reference lists of original studies and reviews using key search terms identified 1900 articles. Of these only thirty-six articles met the inclusion and quality criteria. A narrative synthesis of the reviewed studies revealed six key obesogenic environments by which the food industry possibly influences obesity-related dietary behaviours in young children. These were schools, retailers, mass media "television", mass media "internet", home and promotional campaigns. Identifying these obesogenic environments is critical for monitoring and controlling the food industry, the development of effective environmental-level interventions to prevent childhood overweight and obesity and to identify knowledge gaps to be addressed in future research to support informed decisions of policy makers.

  14. Beyond Food Promotion: A Systematic Review on the Influence of the Food Industry on Obesity-Related Dietary Behaviour among Children

    PubMed Central

    Sonntag, Diana; Schneider, Sarah; Mdege, Noreen; Ali, Shehzad; Schmidt, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    An increased consumption of energy-dense, nutrient-poor food and beverages as a result of a changing obesogenic environment contributes substantially to the increasing prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity. This paper reviews the nature and extent of food industry influences which expose children to commercial influences and thus might affect unhealthy dietary behaviour and finally contributes to obesity. A systematic search of nine electronic databases (including PubMed, PsycINFO, EconLit) and reference lists of original studies and reviews using key search terms identified 1900 articles. Of these only thirty-six articles met the inclusion and quality criteria. A narrative synthesis of the reviewed studies revealed six key obesogenic environments by which the food industry possibly influences obesity-related dietary behaviours in young children. These were schools, retailers, mass media “television”, mass media “internet”, home and promotional campaigns. Identifying these obesogenic environments is critical for monitoring and controlling the food industry, the development of effective environmental-level interventions to prevent childhood overweight and obesity and to identify knowledge gaps to be addressed in future research to support informed decisions of policy makers. PMID:26501319

  15. The Role of Supplemental Complex Dietary Carbohydrates and Gut Microbiota in Promoting Cardiometabolic and Immunological Health in Obesity: Lessons from Healthy Non-Obese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Vinke, Petra C.; El Aidy, Sahar; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2017-01-01

    Dietary supplementation with complex carbohydrates is known to alter the composition of gut microbiota, and optimal implementation of the use of these so called “prebiotics” could be of great potential in prevention and possibly treatment of obesity and associated cardiometabolic and inflammatory diseases via changes in the gut microbiota. An alternative to this “microbiocentric view” is the idea that health-promoting effects of certain complex carbohydrates reside in the host, and could secondarily affect the diversity and abundance of gut microbiota. To circumvent this potential interpretational problem, we aimed at providing an overview about whether and how dietary supplementation of different complex carbohydrates changes the gut microbiome in healthy non-obese individuals. We then reviewed whether the reported changes in gut bacterial members found to be established by complex carbohydrates would benefit or harm the cardiometabolic and immunological health of the host taking into account the alterations in the microbiome composition and abundance known to be associated with obesity and its associated disorders. By combining these research areas, we aimed to give a better insight into the potential of (foods containing) complex carbohydrates in the treatment and prevention of above-mentioned diseases. We conclude that supplemental complex carbohydrates that increase Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, without increasing the deleterious Bacteroides, are most likely promoting cardiometabolic and immunological health in obese subjects. Because certain complex carbohydrates also affect the host’s immunity directly, it is likely that host–microbiome interactions in determination of health and disease characteristics are indeed bidirectional. Overall, this review article shows that whereas it is relatively clear in which direction supplemental fermentable carbohydrates can alter the gut microbiome, the relevance of these changes regarding health remains

  16. The Role of Supplemental Complex Dietary Carbohydrates and Gut Microbiota in Promoting Cardiometabolic and Immunological Health in Obesity: Lessons from Healthy Non-Obese Individuals.

    PubMed

    Vinke, Petra C; El Aidy, Sahar; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2017-01-01

    Dietary supplementation with complex carbohydrates is known to alter the composition of gut microbiota, and optimal implementation of the use of these so called "prebiotics" could be of great potential in prevention and possibly treatment of obesity and associated cardiometabolic and inflammatory diseases via changes in the gut microbiota. An alternative to this "microbiocentric view" is the idea that health-promoting effects of certain complex carbohydrates reside in the host, and could secondarily affect the diversity and abundance of gut microbiota. To circumvent this potential interpretational problem, we aimed at providing an overview about whether and how dietary supplementation of different complex carbohydrates changes the gut microbiome in healthy non-obese individuals. We then reviewed whether the reported changes in gut bacterial members found to be established by complex carbohydrates would benefit or harm the cardiometabolic and immunological health of the host taking into account the alterations in the microbiome composition and abundance known to be associated with obesity and its associated disorders. By combining these research areas, we aimed to give a better insight into the potential of (foods containing) complex carbohydrates in the treatment and prevention of above-mentioned diseases. We conclude that supplemental complex carbohydrates that increase Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli, without increasing the deleterious Bacteroides, are most likely promoting cardiometabolic and immunological health in obese subjects. Because certain complex carbohydrates also affect the host's immunity directly, it is likely that host-microbiome interactions in determination of health and disease characteristics are indeed bidirectional. Overall, this review article shows that whereas it is relatively clear in which direction supplemental fermentable carbohydrates can alter the gut microbiome, the relevance of these changes regarding health remains controversial

  17. Dietary antibiotic growth promoters enhance the bioavailability of alpha-tocopheryl acetate in broilers by altering lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Knarreborg, Ane; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Engberg, Ricarda M; Jensen, Søren K

    2004-06-01

    The influence of intestinal microbial bile salt deconjugation on absorption of fatty acids and alpha- and gamma-tocopherol was investigated in a trial with Ross 208 broilers. Birds (n = 1600) were assigned to 4 dietary treatments: no supplementation or supplementation of antibiotics (salinomycin, 40 mg/kg feed and avilamycin, 10 mg/kg feed), and inclusion of either animal fat (10 g/100 g feed) or soybean oil (10 g/100 g feed) in the diet. At d 7, 14, 21, and 35 of age, the intestinal number of the bile salt hydrolase-active bacteria Clostridium perfringens, the concentration of conjugated and unconjugated bile salts, the ileal absorption of fatty acids and tocopherols, and the blood plasma concentrations of tocopherols were measured. All variables were significantly influenced by bird age. C. perfringens counts were lower and bile salt concentrations were greater in birds fed soybean oil. The supplementation of antibiotics reduced the numbers of C. perfringens in the small intestine and reduced the concentration of unconjugated bile salts. The ileal absorption of fatty acids and alpha-tocopherol, as well as the plasma concentration of alpha-tocopherol, was greater in birds fed antibiotics. The absorption and plasma concentration of gamma-tocopherol were not influenced by antibiotics. Unlike gamma-tocopherol, which is present solely as the free alcohol, the major proportion of dietary alpha-tocopherol is present as alpha-tocopheryl acetate, which requires a bile salt-dependent enzymatic hydrolysis before absorption. In conclusion, proper digestion of lipid-soluble compounds is highly dependent on an adequate concentration of bile salts in the small intestine to provide proper lipid emulsification and activation of lipolytic enzymes.

  18. Dietary, lifestyle and clinicopathological factors associated with APC mutations and promoter methylation in colorectal cancers from the EPIC-Norfolk study.

    PubMed

    Gay, Laura J; Mitrou, Panagiota N; Keen, Jennifer; Bowman, Richard; Naguib, Adam; Cooke, James; Kuhnle, Gunter G; Burns, Philip A; Luben, Robert; Lentjes, Marleen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Ball, Richard Y; Ibrahim, Ashraf Ek; Arends, Mark J

    2012-11-01

    The tumour suppressor APC is the most commonly altered gene in colorectal cancer (CRC). Genetic and epigenetic alterations of APC may therefore be associated with dietary and lifestyle risk factors for CRC. Analysis of APC mutations in the extended mutation cluster region (codons 1276-1556) and APC promoter 1A methylation was performed on 185 archival CRC samples collected from participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk study, with the aim of relating these to high-quality seven-day dietary and lifestyle data collected prospectively. Truncating APC mutations (APC(+) ) and promoter 1A methylation (PM(+) ) were identified in 43% and 23% of CRCs analysed, respectively. Distal CRCs were more likely than proximal CRCs to be APC(+) or PM(+) (p = 0.04). APC(+) CRCs were more likely to be moderately/well differentiated and microsatellite stable than APC(-) CRCs (p = 0.05 and 0.03). APC(+) CRC cases consumed more alcohol than their counterparts (p = 0.01) and PM(+) CRC cases consumed lower levels of folate and fibre (p = 0.01 and 0.004). APC(+) or PM(+) CRC cases consumed higher levels of processed meat and iron from red meat and red meat products (p = 0.007 and 0.006). Specifically, CRC cases harbouring GC-to-AT transition mutations consumed higher levels of processed meat (35 versus 24 g/day, p = 0.04) and iron from red meat and red meat products (0.8 versus 0.6 mg/day, p = 0.05). In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex and cigarette-smoking status, each 19 g/day (1SD) increment increase in processed meat consumption was associated with cases with GC-to-AT mutations (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.03-2.75). In conclusion, APC(+) and PM(+) CRCs may be influenced by diet and GC-to-AT mutations in APC are associated with processed meat consumption, suggesting a mechanistic link with dietary alkylating agents, such as N-nitroso compounds.

  19. Lubrication potential of magnesium stearate studied on instrumented rotary tablet press.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2007-10-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lubrication potential of 2 grades of magnesium stearate (MS) blended with a mix of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and microcrystalline cellulose. Force-displacement, force-time, and ejection profiles were generated using an instrumented rotary tablet press, and the effect of MS mixing time (10, 20, and 30 minutes) and tableting speed (10.7, 13.8, and 17.5 rpm) was investigated. The packing index (PI), frictional index (FI), and packing energy (PE) derived from the force-displacement profiles showed that MS sample I performed better than sample II. At higher lubricant mixing times, the values of PI were observed to increase, and values of FI and PE were observed to decrease for both MS samples. Lower values of area under the curve (AUC) calculated from force-time compression profiles also showed sample I to be superior to sample II in lubrication potential. For both the samples, the values of AUC were observed to decrease with higher lubricant mixing times. Tapping volumetry that simulates the initial particle rearrangement gave values of parameter a and C(max) that were higher for sample I than sample II and also increased with lubricant mixing time. The superior lubrication potential of sample I was also established by the lower values of peak ejection force encountered in the ejection profile. Lower ejection forces were also found to result from higher tableting speeds and longer lubricant mixing times. The difference in lubrication efficacy of the 2 samples could be attributed to differences in their solid-state properties, such as particle size, specific surface area, and d-spacing.

  20. PEG-stearate coated solid lipid nanoparticles as levothyroxine carriers for oral administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Rostami, Elham

    2014-03-01

    In this study, poly ethylene glycol 100 stearate (PEG 100-S) was used to prepare coated solid lipid nanoparticles with loading levothyroxine sodium (levo-loaded PEG 100-S-coated SLNs) by microemulsification technique. Evaluation of the release kinetic of prepared colloidal carriers was conducted. The particle size and zeta potential of levo-loaded PEG 100-S-coated SLNs have been measured to be 187.5 nm and -23.0 mV, respectively, using photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS). Drug entrapment efficiency (EE) was calculated to be 99 %. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the majority of drug loaded in PEG 100-S-coated SLNs were in amorphous state which could be considered desirable for drug delivery. The purpose of this study was to develop a new nanoparticle system, consisting lipid nanoparticles coated with PEG 100-S. The modification procedure led to a reduction in the zeta potential values, varying from -40.0 to -23.0 mV for the uncoated and PEG-coated SLNs, respectively. Stability results of the nanoparticles in gastric and intestinal media show that the low pH of the gastric medium is responsible for the critical aggregation and degradation of the uncoated lipid nanoparticles. PEG 100-S-coated SLNs were more stable due to their polymer coating layer which prevented aggregation of SLNs. Consequently, it is possible that the PEG surrounds the particles reducing the attachment of enzymes and further degradation of the triglyceride cores. Shape and surface morphology of particles were determined by transition electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy that revealed spherical shape of nanoparticles. In vitro drug release of PEG 100-S-coated SLNs was characterized using diffusion cell which showed a controlled release for drug.

  1. Development of sustained-release lipophilic calcium stearate pellets via hot melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Roblegg, Eva; Jäger, Evelyn; Hodzic, Aden; Koscher, Gerold; Mohr, Stefan; Zimmer, Andreas; Khinast, Johannes

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study was the development of retarded release pellets using vegetable calcium stearate (CaSt) as a thermoplastic excipient. The matrix carrier was hot melt extruded and pelletized with a hot-strand cutter in a one step continuous process. Vegetable CaSt was extruded at temperatures between 100 and 130°C, since at these temperatures cutable extrudates with a suitable melt viscosity may be obtained. Pellets with a drug loading of 20% paracetamol released 11.54% of the drug after 8h due to the great densification of the pellets. As expected, the drug release was influenced by the pellet size and the drug loading. To increase the release rate, functional additives were necessary. Therefore, two plasticizers including glyceryl monostearate (GMS) and tributyl citrate (TBC) were investigated for plasticization efficiency and impact on the in vitro drug release. GMS increased the release rate due to the formation of pores at the surface (after dissolution) and showed no influence on the process parameters. The addition of TBC increased the drug release to a higher extent. After dissolving, the pellets exhibited pores at the surface and in the inner layer. Small- and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering (SWAXS) revealed no major change in crystalline peaks. The results demonstrated that (nearly) spherical CaSt pellets could be successfully prepared by hot melt extrusion using a hot-strand cutter as downstreaming system. Paracetamol did not melt during the process indicating a solid suspension. Due to the addition of plasticizers, the in vitro release rate could be tailored as desired.

  2. Semi-solid Sucrose Stearate-Based Emulsions as Dermal Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Victoria; Schwarz, Julia C.; Matsko, Nadejda; Rezvani, Elham; El-Hagin, Nivine; Wirth, Michael; Valenta, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Mild non-ionic sucrose ester surfactants can be employed to produce lipid-based drug delivery systems for dermal application. Moreover, sucrose esters of intermediate lipophilicity such as sucrose stearate S-970 possess a peculiar rheological behavior which can be employed to create highly viscous semi-solid formulations without any further additives. Interestingly, it was possible to develop both viscous macroemulsions and fluid nanoemulsions with the same chemical composition merely by slight alteration of the production process. Optical light microscopy and cryo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the sucrose ester led to the formation of an astonishing hydrophilic network at a concentration of only 5% w/w in the macroemulsion system. A small number of more finely structured aggregates composed of surplus surfactant were likewise detected in the nanoemulsions. These discoveries offer interesting possibilities to adapt the low viscosity of fluid O/W nanoemulsions for a more convenient application. Moreover, a simple and rapid production method for skin-friendly creamy O/W emulsions with excellent visual long-term stability is presented. It could be shown by franz-cell diffusion studies and in vitro tape stripping that the microviscosity within the semi-solid formulations was apparently not influenced by their increased macroviscosity: the release of three model drugs was not impaired by the complex network-like internal structure of the macroemulsions. These results indicate that the developed semi-solid emulsions with advantageous application properties are highly suitable for the unhindered delivery of lipophilic drugs despite their comparatively large particle size and high viscosity. PMID:24310496

  3. Role of dietary phytochemicals in modulating local innate immunity and as alternatives to growth promoting antibiotics to reduce inflammation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The global animal industry needs to address the increasing regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production. Many AGPs have already been restricted by animal farms in the EU and soon other countries are expected to be under increasing scrutiny as consumer...

  4. Metal stearate distributions in modern artists' oil paints: surface and cross-sectional investigation of reference paint films using conventional and synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Gillian; Boon, Jaap J; Puskar, Ljiljana; Drennan, John

    2012-10-01

    Zinc oxide is a prevalent industrial-age pigment that readily reacts with fatty acids in oil-based paints to form zinc carboxylates. Zinc stearate aggregates are associated with deterioration in late nineteenth and twentieth century paintings. The current study uses both conventional and synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) to investigate metal carboxylate composition in a range of naturally aged artists' oil paints and reference paint film draw-downs. The paints contain zinc oxide alone or in combination with lead white, titanium white, and aluminum stearate and are prepared with linseed and safflower oils. Attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FT-IR using the conventional source identifies marked differences in carboxylate profiles between exposed and protected surfaces in a large number of samples. Synchrotron FT-IR microspectroscopy of thin paint cross-sections maps metal carboxylate distributions at high spatial resolution and resolves broad concentration gradients and micrometer-scale phase separation of carboxylate species. Aluminum stearate, a common paint additive, is found to influence the distribution of zinc carboxylates more strongly than pigment composition or oil type. The presence of aluminum stearate results in higher concentrations and more pronounced separation of saturated C16 and C18 chain zinc carboxylates in the margin of paint nearest the polyester substrate. The presence of aluminum stearate in association with zinc oxide has a clear influence on zinc carboxylate formation and distribution, with potential implications for long term stability of vulnerable paintings.

  5. Preparation, characterization and in vitro activities evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticles based on PEG-40 stearate for antifungal drugs vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Roberta; Ferrarelli, Teresa; Mauro, Maria Vittoria; Cavalcanti, Paolina; Picci, Nevio; Trombino, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    The present article reports the preparation, characterization and performance evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) based on polyoxyethylene-40 stearate (PEG-40 stearate) for the administration of antifungal agents such as ketoconazole and clotrimazole. These nanoparticles could be useful in the treatment of vaginal infections sustained by Candida albicans. In particular, PEG-40 stearate was made to react with acryloyl chloride in order to introduce an easily polymerizable moiety for the creation of a second shell and to ensure a slow drug release. In addition, the differences on the release profiles between PEG-40 stearate-based nanoparticles, PEG-40 stearate acrylate based and polymerized ones, were analyzed under conditions, simulating the typical environment of Candida albicans infection. Then, the antifungal activity of nanoparticles was also evaluated in terms of minimal inhibitory concentration. Moreover, the nanoparticles were submitted to in vitro studies for evaluating the drug permeability at the site of action. Results indicated that the obtained particles are potentially useful for the treatment of vaginal infections sustained by Candida albicans.

  6. Oncological outcomes in rats given nephrocarcinogenic exposure to dietary ochratoxin a, followed by the tumour promoter sodium barbital for life: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mantle, Peter G; Dobrota, Miloslav; Gillett, Cheryl E; Odell, Edward W; Pinder, Sarah E

    2010-04-01

    The potent experimental renal carcinogenesis of ochratoxin A (OTA) in male rats makes the dietary contaminant a potential factor in human oncology. We explored whether the tumour promoter sodium barbitate could shorten the otherwise long latency between exposure to toxin and tumourigenesis. Young rats, of a hybrid in which mononuclear leukaemia was rare, were given feed contaminated (5 ppm) with OTA for 36 weeks to initiate renal tumourigenesis. Some individuals were thereafter given sodium barbitate (500 ppm in drinking water) for life. Pathological outcomes were studied at or near the end of natural life. Renal tumours in males given barbitate became evident after latency of one year, but only slightly before those without barbitate. In contrast, female mammary tumourigenesis was advanced by at least 6 months synchronously in all rats given the OTA-barbitate regimen compared to tumourigenesis in controls. Diagnosis of malignant mammary angiosarcoma in a female given the OTA-barbitate regimen is a new finding in the rat. The long latency of OTA-induced renal tumourigenesis was not notably susceptible to accelerated promotion by barbitate, contrasting with an apparently marked effect of barbitate on development of mammary tumours.

  7. Performance and carcass characteristics of guinea fowl fed on dietary Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf powder as a growth promoter

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. K.; Singh, S. K.; Sharma, R. K.; Singh, B.; Kumar, Sh.; Joshi, S. K.; Kumar, S.; Sathapathy, S.

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed at studying growth pattern and carcass traits in pearl grey guinea fowl fed on dietary Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf powder (NLP) over a period of 12 weeks. Day old guinea fowl keets (n=120) were randomly assigned to four treatment groups, each with 3 replicates. The first treatment was designated as control (T0) in which no supplement was added to the feed, while in treatments T1, T2 and T3, NLP was provided as 1, 2 and 3 g per kg of feed, respectively. The results revealed a significant increase in body weight at 12 weeks; 1229.7 for T1, 1249.8 for T2, and 1266.2 g T3 compared to 1220.0 g for the control group (P<0.05). The results also showed that the supplementation of NLP significantly increased feed intake (P≤0.05) which might be due to the hypoglycaemic activity of Neem. A significant increase was also found in the feed conversion ratio (FCR) of the treated groups over the control, showing that feeding NLP to the treated groups has lowered their residual feed efficiency. The results of the study demonstrate the beneficial effects of supplementing NLP on body weight gain and dressed yield in the treated groups in guinea fowl. NLP is, therefore, suggested to be used as a feed supplement in guinea fowl for higher profitability. PMID:27175156

  8. Dietary α-mangostin, a xanthone from mangosteen fruit, exacerbates experimental colitis and promotes dysbiosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M.; Berman-Booty, Lisa D.; Galley, Jeffrey D.; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Mace, Thomas; Suksamrarn, Sunit; Bailey, Michael T.; Clinton, Steven K.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Failla, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Scope Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon. α-Mangostin (α-MG), the most abundant xanthone in mangosteen fruit, exerts anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities in vitro. We evaluated the impact of dietary α-MG on murine experimental colitis and on the gut microbiota of healthy mice. Methods and results Colitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Mice were fed control diet or diet with α-MG (0.1%). α-MG exacerbated the pathology of DSS-induced colitis. Mice fed diet with α-MG had greater colonic inflammation and injury, as well as greater infiltration of CD3+ and F4/80+ cells, and colonic myeloperoxidase, than controls. Serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, IL-6, and serum amyloid A were also greater in α-MG-fed animals than in controls. The colonic and cecal microbiota of healthy mice fed α-MG but no DSS shifted to an increased abundance of Proteobacteria and decreased abundance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, a profile similar to that found in human UC. Conclusion α-MG exacerbated colonic pathology during DSS-induced colitis. These effects may be associated with an induction of intestinal dysbiosis by α-MG. Our results suggest that the use of α-MG-containing supplements by patients with UC may have unintentional risk. PMID:24668769

  9. Performance and carcass characteristics of guinea fowl fed on dietary Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf powder as a growth promoter.

    PubMed

    Singh, M K; Singh, S K; Sharma, R K; Singh, B; Kumar, Sh; Joshi, S K; Kumar, S; Sathapathy, S

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed at studying growth pattern and carcass traits in pearl grey guinea fowl fed on dietary Neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf powder (NLP) over a period of 12 weeks. Day old guinea fowl keets (n=120) were randomly assigned to four treatment groups, each with 3 replicates. The first treatment was designated as control (T0) in which no supplement was added to the feed, while in treatments T1, T2 and T3, NLP was provided as 1, 2 and 3 g per kg of feed, respectively. The results revealed a significant increase in body weight at 12 weeks; 1229.7 for T1, 1249.8 for T2, and 1266.2 g T3 compared to 1220.0 g for the control group (P<0.05). The results also showed that the supplementation of NLP significantly increased feed intake (P≤0.05) which might be due to the hypoglycaemic activity of Neem. A significant increase was also found in the feed conversion ratio (FCR) of the treated groups over the control, showing that feeding NLP to the treated groups has lowered their residual feed efficiency. The results of the study demonstrate the beneficial effects of supplementing NLP on body weight gain and dressed yield in the treated groups in guinea fowl. NLP is, therefore, suggested to be used as a feed supplement in guinea fowl for higher profitability.

  10. Dietary isoflavone daidzein promotes Tfam expression that increases mitochondrial biogenesis in C2C12 muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Makiko; Naka, Ayano; Sakamoto, Yuri; Shibasaki, Ayako; Toh, Mariko; Tsukamoto, Sakuka; Kondo, Kazuo; Iida, Kaoruko

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in muscles leads to a wide range of metabolic and age-related disorders. Recently, it has been reported that a natural polyphenol, resveratrol, affects mitochondrial biogenesis. This study aimed to identify other natural polyphenolic compounds that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis in muscles. For this purpose, we used the C2C12 murine muscle cell line. Screening involved a reporter assay based on the promoter of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). We found that several polyphenols exhibited the ability to increase Tfam promoter activity and that the soy isoflavone daidzein was a most potent candidate that regulated mitochondrial biogenesis. When C2C12 myotubes were treated with 25-50 μM daidzein for 24h, there were significant increases in the expression of Tfam and mitochondrial genes such as COX1 and Cytb as well as the mitochondrial content. Using several mutant Tfam promoter fragments, we found that the transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor (NRF) and its coactivator, PGC1α, were necessary for the effect of daidzein on Tfam expression. Finally, silencing of sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) by shRNA resulted in inhibition of the daidzein effects on mitochondrial gene expression. In conclusion, daidzein regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in muscle cells by regulating transcriptional networks through a SIRT1-associated pathway. These results suggest that daidzein would be beneficial to protect against a wide range of diseases caused by muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary silymarin supplementation promotes growth performance and improves lipid metabolism and health status in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) fed diets with elevated lipid levels.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Peizhen; Ji, Hong; Ye, Yuantu; Zhang, Baotong; Chen, Yongsheng; Tian, Jingjing; Liu, Pin; Chen, Liqiao; Du, Zhenyu

    2017-02-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate whether silymarin supplementation influences growth, lipid metabolism, and health status in grass carp fed elevated dietary lipid levels. The juvenile fish (27.43 ± 0.17 g/tail) were fed six isonitrogenous and isocaloric diets in a factorial design containing 0, 100, or 200 mg kg(-1) silymarin (SM0, SM100, SM200) associated with either 4 or 8 % lipid level (low lipid, LL, and high lipid, HL, respectively) for 82 days. The results showed that both dietary silymarin supplementation and high lipid level significantly enhanced growth performance (WG, SGR), protein efficiency ratio, and feed utilization. Silymarin supplementation significantly reduced the VSI, hepatic lipid content, and the total bilirubin concentration in the serum. The gallbladdersomatic index displayed higher in the SM100 groups than SM200 groups. Serum total cholesterol content exhibited lower in the SM100 groups than SM0 groups. Meanwhile, significant interactions were shown for hepatic gene expression of HSL and CPT1 by two factors, and SM100 group had higher hepatic gene expression of HSL and CPT1 in fish fed with the HL diets. The SM100 groups up-regulated hepatic gene expressions of HMGCR and CYP7A1 compared with the SM0 groups. Silymarin supplementation notably reduced the elevated serum MDA content induced by HL treatments. Thus, silymarin supplementation markedly promoted growth and protein efficiency, suppressed lipid accumulation, and improved health status in grass carp fed with high-lipid diets, which might be associated with its enhancement of lipolysis and β-oxidation, antioxidant capacity.

  12. Higher compared with lower dietary protein during an energy deficit combined with intense exercise promotes greater lean mass gain and fat mass loss: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Longland, Thomas M; Oikawa, Sara Y; Mitchell, Cameron J; Devries, Michaela C; Phillips, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    A dietary protein intake higher than the Recommended Dietary Allowance during an energy deficit helps to preserve lean body mass (LBM), particularly when combined with exercise. The purpose of this study was to conduct a proof-of-principle trial to test whether manipulation of dietary protein intake during a marked energy deficit in addition to intense exercise training would affect changes in body composition. We used a single-blind, randomized, parallel-group prospective trial. During a 4-wk period, we provided hypoenergetic (~40% reduction compared with requirements) diets providing 33 ± 1 kcal/kg LBM to young men who were randomly assigned (n = 20/group) to consume either a lower-protein (1.2 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)) control diet (CON) or a higher-protein (2.4 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)) diet (PRO). All subjects performed resistance exercise training combined with high-intensity interval training for 6 d/wk. A 4-compartment model assessment of body composition was made pre- and postintervention. As a result of the intervention, LBM increased (P < 0.05) in the PRO group (1.2 ± 1.0 kg) and to a greater extent (P < 0.05) compared with the CON group (0.1 ± 1.0 kg). The PRO group had a greater loss of fat mass than did the CON group (PRO: -4.8 ± 1.6 kg; CON: -3.5 ± 1.4kg; P < 0.05). All measures of exercise performance improved similarly in the PRO and CON groups as a result of the intervention with no effect of protein supplementation. Changes in serum cortisol during the intervention were associated with changes in body fat (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) and LBM (r = -0.34, P = 0.03). Our results showed that, during a marked energy deficit, consumption of a diet containing 2.4 g protein · kg(-1) · d(-1) was more effective than consumption of a diet containing 1.2 g protein · kg(-1) · d(-1) in promoting increases in LBM and losses of fat mass when combined with a high volume of resistance and anaerobic exercise. Changes in serum cortisol were associated with changes in body

  13. Effect of dietary antibiotic, probiotic and prebiotic as growth promoters, on growth performance, carcass characteristics and hematological indices of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ashayerizadeh, A; Dabiri, N; Ashayerizadeh, O; Mirzadeh, K H; Roshanfekr, H; Mamooee, M

    2009-01-01

    This experiment was conducted for comparison the effects of antibiotic (flavomycin), probiotic (primalac), prebiotic (Biolex-MB) and mixture ofprobiotic and prebiotic (primalac plus Biolex-MB) as dietary growth promoter on growth performance, carcass characteristics and hematological indices of broiler chickens. Three hundred day old Ross 308 broilers were equally distributed into 30 floor pens and reared for 42 day. A basal diet was formulated covering the recommendations of NRC (1994) for starter (0-21 days) and grower (22-42 days) periods and considered as control diet. Four tested diets were formulated by supplemented the basal control diet with antibiotic (flavomycin), probiotic (primalac), prebiotic (Biolex-MB) and mixture ofprimalac plus Biolex-MB, respectively. Six replicates were used for each treatment. The results of present study showed that all growth promoters used was improved growth indices of Ross 308 broilers. The highest significant (p<0.05) values of carcass and thigh were recorded for broilers fed diet supplemented with flavomycin. The highest (p>0.05) value of breast was recorded for broilers fed the diet supplemented with primalac, meanwhile the lower value were showed for birds fed either diet or diet supplemented with Biolex-MB. The percent of carcass and cuts followed the same trend. Hematological parameter including cholesterol was recorded the highest (p>0.05) values groups fed the diets either control or supplemented with flavomycin, meanwhile the lower value was showed for bird fed diet supplemented primalac plus Biolex-MB. Triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL) were recorded the highest concentration for bird fed both control and diet supplemented with flavomycin groups while least concentration was found for bird fed diet supplemented with primalac. The results of present study revealed that probiotic and prebiotic as growth promoters can use as alternatives non-antibiotic feed additives to their free

  14. Dietary Assessment

    Cancer.gov

    EGRP's goals in Dietary Assessment are to increase the precision of dietary intake estimates by improving self-report of dietary intake and the analytic procedures for processing reported information.

  15. Dietary administration of sodium alginate ameliorated stress and promoted immune resistance of grouper Epinephelus coioides under cold stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pai-Po; Lin, Yu-Hung; Chen, Min-Chieh; Cheng, Winton

    2017-06-01

    Grouper, Epinephelus coioides, fed a diet containing sodium alginate at 0 (control, named C) and 1.0 g kg(-1) (named S) at a temperature of 28 °C for 12 days, were then further individually transferred to 28 (two groups named C-28 and S-28) or 20 °C (two groups named C-20 and S-20), and immune parameters and stress indexes were measured at the beginning and after 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of exposure. Examination of immune parameters revealed that the alternative complement activity (ACH50), lysozyme activity, phagocytic activity, superoxide dismutase, and respiratory bursts significantly increased in groupers fed the sodium alginate-containing diet for 12 days, and were higher in the S-28 than those of the C-28 and S-20 groups, which were higher than those of the C-20 group from 6 to 48 h except for ACH50 at 48 h, respiratory bursts at 48 h, and lysozymes at 6 h. For the assessment of stress indicators, cortisol, glucose, and lactate levels of serum significantly decreased in grouper fed the sodium alginate-containing diet for 12 days, and were higher in the C-20 group than those of the C-28 and S-20 groups, which were higher than those of the S-20 group at 6-48 h. In another experiment, grouper fed the test diet for 12 days at a temperature of 28 °C were challenged with Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida at a dose of 5 × 10(3) colony-forming units (cfu) (g fish)(-1), and then individually transferred to 28 or 20 °C. The survival rate of challenged fish of the C-28 group was significantly lower than those of challenged fish of the C-20 and S-28 groups, which were significantly lower than that of challenged fish of the S-20 group. All challenged fish of the S-20 group survived. Survival rates over 144 h were 30.0%, 70.0%, and 56.7% for the C-28, C-20, and S-28 groups, respectively. Our results indicated that dietary sodium alginate administration downregulated stress response indicators, enhanced immune responses, and prevented impacts of

  16. Child health promotion program in South Korea in collaboration with US National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Improvement in dietary and nutrition knowledge of young children

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunjung; Kim, JiEun; Min, Jungwon; Carvajal, Nubia A.; Lloyd, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Childhood obesity has become a global epidemic. Development of effective and sustainable programs to promote healthy behaviors from a young age is important. This study developed and tested an intervention program designed to promote healthy eating and physical activity among young children in South Korea by adaptation of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission X (MX) Program. SUBJECTS/METHODS The intervention program consisted of 4 weeks of fitness and 2 weeks of nutrition education. A sample of 104 subjects completed pre- and post-surveys on the Children's Nutrition Acknowledgement Test (NAT). Parents were asked for their children's characteristics and two 24-hour dietary records, the Nutrition Quotient (NQ) at baseline and a 6-week follow-up. Child weight status was assessed using Korean body mass index (BMI) percentiles. RESULTS At baseline, 16.4% (boy: 15.4%; girl: 19.2%) of subjects were overweight or obese (based on BMI≥85%tile). Fat consumption significantly decreased in normal BMI children (48.6 ± 16.8 g at baseline to 41.9 ± 18.1 g after intervention, P < 0.05); total NQ score significantly increased from 66.4 to 67.9 (P < 0.05); total NAT score significantly improved in normal BMI children (74.3 at baseline to 81.9 after the program), children being underweight (from 71.0 to 77.0), and overweight children (77.1 at baseline vs. 88.2 after intervention, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The 6-week South Korean NASA MX project is feasible and shows favorable changes in eating behaviors and nutritional knowledge among young children. PMID:27698964

  17. Child health promotion program in South Korea in collaboration with US National Aeronautics and Space Administration: Improvement in dietary and nutrition knowledge of young children.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyunjung; Kim, JiEun; Wang, Youfa; Min, Jungwon; Carvajal, Nubia A; Lloyd, Charles W

    2016-10-01

    Childhood obesity has become a global epidemic. Development of effective and sustainable programs to promote healthy behaviors from a young age is important. This study developed and tested an intervention program designed to promote healthy eating and physical activity among young children in South Korea by adaptation of the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Mission X (MX) Program. The intervention program consisted of 4 weeks of fitness and 2 weeks of nutrition education. A sample of 104 subjects completed pre- and post-surveys on the Children's Nutrition Acknowledgement Test (NAT). Parents were asked for their children's characteristics and two 24-hour dietary records, the Nutrition Quotient (NQ) at baseline and a 6-week follow-up. Child weight status was assessed using Korean body mass index (BMI) percentiles. At baseline, 16.4% (boy: 15.4%; girl: 19.2%) of subjects were overweight or obese (based on BMI≥85%tile). Fat consumption significantly decreased in normal BMI children (48.6 ± 16.8 g at baseline to 41.9 ± 18.1 g after intervention, P < 0.05); total NQ score significantly increased from 66.4 to 67.9 (P < 0.05); total NAT score significantly improved in normal BMI children (74.3 at baseline to 81.9 after the program), children being underweight (from 71.0 to 77.0), and overweight children (77.1 at baseline vs. 88.2 after intervention, P < 0.001). The 6-week South Korean NASA MX project is feasible and shows favorable changes in eating behaviors and nutritional knowledge among young children.

  18. Improvement of dietary oil consumption following a community trial in a developing country: The role of translational research in health promotion.

    PubMed

    Mohammadifard, Noushin; Toghianifar, Nafiseh; Sajjadi, Firoozeh; Alikhasi, Hassan; Kelishadi, Roya; Maghroun, Maryam; Esmaeili, Mostafa; Ehteshami, Shahram; Tabaie, Hamzeh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of the interventions of Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) on the type of oil consumed at the population level. It also tried to assess how this strategy has been effective as a health policy. The IHHP, a six-year community intervention program (2001-07), aimed at health promotion through the modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors. It was performed in Isfahan and Najafabad counties (intervention area) and Arak county (reference area), all in central Iran. This study targeted the whole population of over 2,000,000 in the intervention area. The findings of annual independent sample surveys were compared with the reference area. Dietary interventions were performed as educational, environmental, and/or legislative strategies. From 2001 to 2007, the mean of changes for hydrogenated oil consumption was -3.2 and -3.6, and for liquid oil it was 3.6 and 2.8 times per week in the intervention and reference areas, respectively (P < 0.001). According to Commerce office record, the increase in liquid oil distribution during 2000-2007 was significantly higher in Isfahan than Arak (34% vs. 25%). The effects of the simple, comprehensive, and integrated action-oriented interventions of our program could influence policy making and its results at the community level. It can be adopted by other developing countries.

  19. Mobile MyPlate: a pilot study using text messaging to provide nutrition education and promote better dietary choices in college students.

    PubMed

    Brown, Onikia N; O'Connor, Lauren E; Savaiano, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of repetitive nutrition-related text messages on college students' nutrition knowledge and fruit and vegetable consumption. One hundred fifty undergraduate (18-24 years old) non-health major students with a texting mobile phone. The intervention group received biweekly text messages of the MyPlate icon and the United States Department of Agriculture's Dietary Guidelines (DGs) for 7 weeks. The control group received the same information in a mailed brochure. A pre and post online survey assessed the students' knowledge and behavior. The intervention resulted in greater MyPlate food group recognition (p <.05) compared with control and a trend toward improved knowledge of the DGs. In the intervention group, fruit consumption was elevated (p <.05) and a trend toward elevated vegetable consumption was determined. No gender differences in intervention effectiveness exist. Texting repeated messages appears to be an acceptable and effective way to increase nutrition knowledge and promote positive diet-related behaviors in college students.

  20. Improvement of dietary oil consumption following a community trial in a developing country: The role of translational research in health promotion

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadifard, Noushin; Toghianifar, Nafiseh; Sajjadi, Firoozeh; Alikhasi, Hassan; Kelishadi, Roya; Maghroun, Maryam; Esmaeili, Mostafa; Ehteshami, Shahram; Tabaie, Hamzeh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to determine the effects of the interventions of Isfahan Healthy Heart Program (IHHP) on the type of oil consumed at the population level. It also tried to assess how this strategy has been effective as a health policy. METHODS The IHHP, a six-year community intervention program (2001-07), aimed at health promotion through the modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors. It was performed in Isfahan and Najafabad counties (intervention area) and Arak county (reference area), all in central Iran. This study targeted the whole population of over 2,000,000 in the intervention area. The findings of annual independent sample surveys were compared with the reference area. Dietary interventions were performed as educational, environmental, and/or legislative strategies. RESULTS From 2001 to 2007, the mean of changes for hydrogenated oil consumption was -3.2 and -3.6, and for liquid oil it was 3.6 and 2.8 times per week in the intervention and reference areas, respectively (P < 0.001). According to Commerce office record, the increase in liquid oil distribution during 2000-2007 was significantly higher in Isfahan than Arak (34% vs. 25%). CONCLUSION The effects of the simple, comprehensive, and integrated action-oriented interventions of our program could influence policy making and its results at the community level. It can be adopted by other developing countries. PMID:23696757

  1. The effects of dietary supplementation of methionine on genomic stability and p53 gene promoter methylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cátia Lira Do; Bueno, Rafaela de Barros E Lima; Burim, Regislaine Valéria; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2011-05-18

    Methionine is a component of one-carbon metabolism and a precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor for DNA methylation. When methionine intake is high, an increase of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is expected. DNA methyltransferases convert SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). A high intracellular SAH concentration could inhibit the activity of DNA methyltransferases. Therefore, high methionine ingestion could induce DNA damage and change the methylation pattern of tumor suppressor genes. This study investigated the genotoxicity of a methionine-supplemented diet. It also investigated the diet's effects on glutathione levels, SAM and SAH concentrations and the gene methylation pattern of p53. Wistar rats received either a methionine-supplemented diet (2% methionine) or a control diet (0.3% methionine) for six weeks. The methionine-supplemented diet was neither genotoxic nor antigenotoxic to kidney cells, as assessed by the comet assay. However, the methionine-supplemented diet restored the renal glutathione depletion induced by doxorubicin. This fact may be explained by the transsulfuration pathway, which converts methionine to glutathione in the kidney. Methionine supplementation increased the renal concentration of SAH without changing the SAM/SAH ratio. This unchanged profile was also observed for DNA methylation at the promoter region of the p53 gene. Further studies are necessary to elucidate this diet's effects on genomic stability and DNA methylation.

  2. Dietary probiotic supplementation (Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11) modulates gut microbiota and promotes growth and condition in Senegalese sole larviculture.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Carmen; Moreno-Ventas, Xabier; Tapia-Paniagua, Silvana; Rodríguez, Covadonga; Moriñigo, Miguel A; de La Banda, Inés García

    2014-02-01

    Probiotic supplementation in fish aquaculture has significantly increased in the last decade due to its beneficial effect on fish performance. Probiotic use at early stages of fish development may contribute to better face metamorphosis and weaning stress. In the present work, we studied the influence of Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 supplementation on growth, body composition and gut microbiota in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) during larval and weaning development. S. putrefaciens Pdp11 was incorporated using Artemia as live vector (2.5 × 10⁷ cfu mL⁻¹) and supplied to sole specimens in a co-feeding regime (10-86 DAH) by triplicate. Probiotic addition promoted early metamorphosis and a significantly higher growth in length at 24 DAH larvae. S. putrefaciens Pdp11 also modulated gut microbiota and significantly increased protein content and DHA/EPA ratios in sole fry (90 DAH). This nutritional enhancement is considered especially important after weaning, where significantly higher growth in length and weight was observed in probiotic fish. Moreover, a less heterogeneous fish size in length was detected since metamorphosis till the end of weaning, being of interest for sole aquaculture production. After weaning, fish showed significantly higher growth (length and weight) and less variable lengths in fish when supplemented with probiotics. Both the enhancement of nutritional condition and the decrease in size variability associated with probiotic addition are highly interesting for sole aquaculture production.

  3. High Dietary Fat Intake during Lactation Promotes the Development of Social Stress-Induced Obesity in the Offspring of Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Kazushi; E, Shuang; Hatakeyama, Yu; Sakamoto, Yu

    2015-07-17

    This study examined how a maternal high-fat diet (HD) during lactation and exposure of offspring to isolation stress influence the susceptibility of offspring to the development of obesity. C57BL/6J mice were fed a commercial diet (CD) during pregnancy and a CD or HD during lactation. Male offspring were weaned at three weeks of age, fed a CD until seven weeks of age, and fed a CD or HD until 11 weeks of age. Offspring were housed alone (isolation stress) or at six per cage (ordinary circumstances). Thus, offspring were assigned to one of eight groups: dams fed a CD or HD during lactation and offspring fed a CD or HD and housed under ordinary circumstances or isolation stress. Serum corticosterone level was significantly elevated by isolation stress. High-fat feeding of offspring reduced their serum corticosterone level, which was significantly elevated by a maternal HD. A maternal HD and isolation stress had combined effects in elevating the serum corticosterone level. These findings suggest that a maternal HD during lactation enhances the stress sensitivity of offspring. White adipose tissue weights were significantly increased by a maternal HD and isolation stress and by their combination. In addition, significant adipocyte hypertrophy was induced by a maternal HD and isolation stress and exacerbated by their combination. Thus, a maternal HD and isolation stress promote visceral fat accumulation and adipocyte hypertrophy, accelerating the progression of obesity through their combined effects. The mechanism may involve enhanced fatty acid synthesis and lipid influx from blood into adipose tissue. These findings demonstrate that a maternal HD during lactation may increase the susceptibility of offspring to the development of stress-induced obesity.

  4. Dietary peppermint (Mentha piperita) extracts promote growth performance and increase the main humoral immune parameters (both at mucosal and systemic level) of Caspian brown trout (Salmo trutta caspius Kessler, 1877).

    PubMed

    Adel, Milad; Safari, Reza; Pourgholam, Reza; Zorriehzahra, Jalil; Esteban, Maria Ángeles

    2015-11-01

    The effects of dietary administration of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) on Caspian brown trout fish (Salmo trutta caspius) were studied. Fish were divided into 4 groups before being fed diets supplemented with 0% (control), 1%, 2% and 3% of peppermint extracts for 8 weeks. Dose-dependent increases in growth, immune (both in skin mucus and blood serum) and hematological parameters (number of white cells, hematocrit and hemoglobin content), as well as in amylase activity and in the number of lactic acid bacteria on intestine were recorded in fish fed supplemented diets compared to control fish. However, the dietary peppermint supplements have different effects on the number of blood leucocytes depending on the leukocyte cell type. While no significant differences were observed in the number of blood monocytes and eosinophils, the number of lymphocytes was decreased, respectively, on fish fed peppermint enriched diets, respect to the values found in control fish. Furthermore, dietary peppermint supplements have no significant effect on blood biochemical parameters, enzymatic activities of liver determined in serum and total viable aerobic bacterial count on intestine of Caspian brown trout. Present results support that dietary administration of peppermint promotes growth performance and increases the main humoral immune parameters (both at mucosal and systemic level) and the number of the endogenous lactic acid bacteria of Caspian brown trout. This study underlying several positive effects of dietary administration of peppermint to farmed fish. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Growth-Promoting Effect of Dietary Nucleotides in Fish Is Associated with an Intestinal Microbiota-Mediated Reduction in Energy Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoze; Ran, Chao; Zhang, Zhen; He, Suxu; Jin, Min; Zhou, Zhigang

    2017-03-29

    were not fed nucleotides. Furthermore, germ-free zebrafish colonized with nucleotide microbiota exhibited downregulated inflammatory tone and 33% lower fiaf expression compared with their control microbiota-colonized counterparts.Conclusions: The growth-promoting effect of dietary nucleotides in zebrafish involves 2 intestinal microbiota-mediated mechanisms that result in reduced standard metabolic rate: 1) lower inflammatory tone and 2) reduced FA oxidation associated with increased microbial suppression of intestinal fiaf.

  6. Deposition of stearate-oleate rich seed fat in Mangifera indica is mediated by a FatA type acyl-ACP thioesterase.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Ashish; Ghosh, Santosh K; Neogi, Krishnakali; Aich, Aniruddha; Willard, Belinda; Kinter, Michael; Sen, Soumitra K; Ghosh, Dolly; Ghosh, Sudhamoy

    2011-02-01

    Although the mechanism of accumulation of C8-C16 saturated fatty acids in seed oils has been well-studied, the control of stearic (C18:0) acid deposition in high stearate seed fat is still unclear. We investigated the mechanism that regulates high level of stearate and oleate (C18:1) accumulation in mango (Mangifera indica) seeds during its development, and examined the seed plastid extracts for induction of any specialized fatty acyl-ACP thioesterase (Fat) that may control this high level of deposition. Though the specificity of the Fat enzymes does not account directly for the fatty acid composition of mango seeds, our result suggested that an induced synthesis of a FatA type of thioesterase could be responsible for the high content of oleate and stearate in its seed fat. The major thioesterase from developing seed kernel was purified to near homogeneity, and characterized as a heat-labile, dimeric, neutral protein with relative substrate specificity of 100:35:1.8 towards oleoyl-, stearoyl- and palmitoyl-ACP, respectively. This enzyme was confirmed as Mi FatA by mass spectrometric analysis. Additionally, a heat-stable FatB type enzyme (Mi FatB) was also partially purified, with relative substrate specificity for the same substrates as 9:8.5:100, respectively. Mi FatA is an enzyme of great biotechnological interest because of its involvement in the regulation of stearate rich seed fat in mango.

  7. A proprietary topical preparation containing EGCG-stearate and glycerin with inhibitory effects on herpes simplex virus: case study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Man; Jiang, Jinyan; Zheng, Rongrong; Pearl, Henna; Dickinson, Douglas; Fu, Baiping; Hsu, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    The effects of a proprietary topical formulation containing EGCG-stearate in 100% glycerin USP were studied in two volunteer patients with recurrent herpes simplex (HSV) type 1. Application during early onset (prodromal stage) in a patient with herpes labialis prevented lesion progression. In a second patient with herpetic stomatitis, application of the formula during a later stage (inflammation stage) led to a remarkably shortened duration of symptoms. In contrast, a third patient provided 100% glycerin USP only as placebo failed to demonstrate any therapeutic or preventive effect against lesion occurrence or duration of lesion and healing time. These results suggest that this proprietary topical preparation could be used effectively to prevent and treat HSV-induced symptoms, and warrants further clinical investigation.

  8. Influence of two different alcohols in the esterification of fatty acids over layered zinc stearate/palmitate.

    PubMed

    de Paiva, Eduardo José Mendes; Corazza, Marcos Lúcio; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Wärnå, Johan; Murzin, Dmitry Yu; Wypych, Fernando; Salmi, Tapio

    2015-10-01

    In this work, esterification of fatty acids (oleic, linoleic and stearic acid) with a commercial zinc carboxylate (a layered compound formed by simultaneous intercalation of stearate and palmitate anions) was performed. Kinetic modeling using a quasi-homogeneous approach successfully fitted experimental data at different molar ratio of fatty acids/alcohols (1-butanol and 1-hexanol) and temperature. An apparent first-order reaction related to all reactants was found and activation energy of 66 kJ/mol was reported. The catalyst showed to be unique, as it can be easily recovered like a heterogeneous catalysts behaving like ionic liquids. In addition, this catalyst demonstrated a peculiar behavior, because higher reactivity was observed with the increase in the alcohols chain length compared to the authors' previous work using ethanol.

  9. Fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, induces apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting HSF1 activity through blocking its binding to the hsp70 promoter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Ae; Lee, Somyoung; Kim, Da-Eun; Kim, Moonil; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Han, Dong Cho

    2015-06-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is a transcription factor for heat shock proteins (HSPs) expression that enhances the survival of cancer cells exposed to various stresses. HSF1 knockout suppresses carcinogen-induced cancer induction in mice. Therefore, HSF1 is a promising therapeutic and chemopreventive target. We performed cell-based screening with a natural compound collection and identified fisetin, a dietary flavonoid, as a HSF1 inhibitor. Fisetin abolished heat shock-induced luciferase activity with an IC50 of 14 μM in HCT-116 cancer cells. The treatment of HCT-116 with fisetin inhibited proliferation with a GI50 of 23 μM. When the cells were exposed to heat shock in the presence of fisetin, the induction of HSF1 target proteins, such as HSP70, HSP27 and BAG3 (Bcl-2-associated athanogene domain 3), were inhibited. HSP70/BAG3 complexes protect cancer cells from apoptosis by stabilizing anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. The downregulation of HSP70/BAG3 by fisetin significantly reduced the amounts of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 proteins, subsequently inducing apoptotic cell death. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that fisetin inhibited HSF1 activity by blocking the binding of HSF1 to the hsp70 promoter. Intraperitoneal treatment of nude mice with fisetin at 30mg/kg resulted in a 35.7% (P < 0.001) inhibition of tumor growth. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Successful long-term weight loss among participants with diabetes receiving an intervention promoting an adapted Mediterranean-style dietary pattern: the Heart Healthy Lenoir Project

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Genevieve G R; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen D; Johnston, Larry F; Garcia, Beverly A; Gizlice, Ziya; Evenson, Kelly R; DeWalt, Darren A; Ammerman, Alice S; Keyserling, Thomas C

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine weight change by diabetes status among participants receiving a Mediterranean-style diet, physical activity, and weight loss intervention adapted for delivery in the southeastern USA, where rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) are disproportionately high. Research design and methods The intervention included: Phase I (months 1–6), an individually tailored intervention promoting a Mediterranean-style dietary pattern and increased walking; Phase II (months 7–12), option of a 16-week weight loss intervention for those with BMI≥25 kg/m2 offered as 16 weekly group sessions or 5 group sessions and 10 phone calls, or a lifestyle maintenance intervention; and Phase III (months 13–24), weight loss maintenance intervention for those losing ≥8 pounds with all others receiving a lifestyle maintenance intervention. Weight change was assessed at 6, 12, and 24-month follow-up. Results Baseline characteristics (n=339): mean age 56, 77% female, 65% African-American, 124 (37%) with diabetes; mean weight 103 kg for those with diabetes and 95 kg for those without. Among participants with diabetes, average weight change was −1.2 kg (95% CI −2.1 to −0.4) at 6 months (n=92), −1.5 kg (95% CI −2.9 to −0.2) at 12 months (n=96), and −3.7 kg (95% CI −5.2 to −2.1) at 24 months (n=93). Among those without diabetes, weight change was −0.4 kg (95% CI −1.4 to 0.6) at 24 months (n=154). Conclusions Participants with diabetes experienced sustained weight loss at 24-month follow-up. High-risk US populations with diabetes may experience clinically important weight loss from this type of lifestyle intervention. Trial registration number NCT01433484. PMID:28405344

  11. Synergistic effect of combination of Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate on thermal stabilization of electron beam irradiated HDPE/EVA both in hot water and oven

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanpour, S.; Khoylou, F.

    2007-11-01

    Thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE/EVA blends can be considerably increased by combination of a high-molecular weight phenolic antioxidant and zinc stearate. In this work, the post-irradiation thermal stability of HDPE/EVA blends has been studied. High-density polyethylene and its blends with ethylene-vinylacetate copolymer in both pure form and mixed with Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate were exposed to electron beam radiation at doses between 80 and 150 kGy, at room temperature, in air. In order to evaluate the thermal stability of the samples, post-irradiation heat treatments were done in both hot water bath at 95 °C and in an oven at 140 °C. The mechanical properties and changes in the chemical structure were determined during thermal aging in hot water and oven. The gel content was enhanced by increasing EVA concentration in all applied doses. The stabilized blends have lower gel content than the unstabilized samples. From the results of heat aging treatments it was observed that the thermal stability of the unstabilized blend samples was lower than HDPE. Thermal stability of the samples has been improved by incorporation of Irganox 1010 and zinc stearate. Formation of hydroxyl group was insignificant for stabilized samples during heat aging in both conditions. Also, the changes in the value of oxidation induction time (OIT) for the stabilized samples were negligible after prolonged immersion in hot water.

  12. Dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Massey, Patrick B

    2002-01-01

    The amount of published information on dietary supplements mushroomed in the 1990s. In fewer than 5 years, publications increased at least 100-fold in the medical literature alone. Dietary supplements are an uncharted territory that warrants complete and accurate exploration. One should not be surprised that disease and illness may respond to dietary supplements. Nutrition is the foundation to good health, and dietary supplements may prove to be some of the most powerful medicines ever discovered. An especially exciting discovery is that dietary supplements may enhance the effects of specific drugs. This discovery may lead to more effective and safer protocols for the treatment of cancer, heart and lung disease, and a host of chronic medical conditions. Information about dietary supplements is becoming more common in the popular medical literature and is creating increased curiosity and an increased awareness. The explosion of the dietary supplement market is compelling physicians to become aware of dietary supplements. Whether or not they are used in clinical practice is a decision for the individual physician. Given the increasing number of patients who are using dietary supplements, however, it is imperative that physicians have a good understanding of this topic. Considering the increasing complexity and magnitude of this topic, physician specialization may be essential. There are many good reference books, review articles, and internet sites on specific supplements that probably should be part of every physician's reference library. The accompanying box provides a brief list of such sources.

  13. Alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped alginate-tamarind gum-magnesium stearate buoyant beads of risperidone.

    PubMed

    Bera, Hriday; Boddupalli, Shashank; Nandikonda, Sridhar; Kumar, Sanoj; Nayak, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A novel alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped calcium-alginate-tamarind gum (TG)-magnesium stearate (MS) composite floating beads was developed for intragastric risperidone delivery with a view to improving its oral bioavailability. The TG-blended alginate core beads containing olive oil and MS as low-density materials were accomplished by ionotropic gelation technique. Effects of polymer-blend ratio (sodium alginate:TG) and crosslinker (CaCl2) concentration on drug entrapment efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release after 8 h (Q8h, %) were studied to optimize the core beads by a 3(2) factorial design. The optimized beads (F-O) exhibited DEE of 75.19±0.75% and Q8h of 78.04±0.38% with minimum errors in prediction. The alginate gel-coated optimized beads displayed superior buoyancy and sustained drug release property. The drug release profiles of the drug-loaded uncoated and coated beads were best fitted in Higuchi kinetic model with Fickian and anomalous diffusion driven mechanisms, respectively. The optimized beads yielded a notable sustained drug release profile as compared to marketed immediate release preparation. The uncoated and coated Ca-alginate-TG-MS beads were also characterized by SEM, FTIR and P-XRD analyses. Thus, the newly developed alginate-gel coated oil-entrapped alginate-TG-MS composite beads are suitable for intragastric delivery of risperidone over a prolonged period of time.

  14. Qualitative study among African American parents to inform an intervention to promote adoption of the dietary guidelines for Americans food and phyical activity recommendations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This qualitative study was conducted to enable the research team to culturally tailor an intervention to increase adherence to the dietary guidelines for Americans (DGA) in African American parents and their children living in Lower Mississippi Delta (LMD) Communities. Focus group results guided the...

  15. The Diet Quality Index-Revised: a tool to promote and evaluate dietary change among older cancer survivors enrolled in a home-based intervention trial.

    PubMed

    Clutter Snyder, Denise; Sloane, Richard; Haines, Pamela S; Miller, Paige; Clipp, Elizabeth C; Morey, Miriam C; Pieper, Carl; Cohen, Harvey; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2007-09-01

    To utilize the Diet Quality Index-Revised (DQI-R) as a framework for delivering and evaluating an intervention to improve overall diet quality among older cancer survivors. As part of a randomized controlled trial to improve lifestyle behaviors among older cancer survivors, we sought a dietary measure that could serve as both an intervention framework and a means to evaluate global dietary quality. The DQI-R measures overall diet quality by summing 10 subscales that relate to national guidelines. At baseline, DQI-R scores were generated from three multi-pass 24-hour dietary recalls. The 6-month intervention delivered tailored feedback on individual DQI-R subscales. Dietary recalls were repeated at 6 and 12 months. Elderly (aged >or=65 years) individuals within 18 months of diagnosis of breast or prostate cancer (n=182) were randomized postbaseline measures to intervention vs attention control arms. Significant differences in overall diet quality were observed between arms at 6 months, with the intervention arm improving (67.6+/-12.2 to 69.8+/-13.9), and controls declining (67.5+/-12.5 to 64.6+/-14.7) (P=0.003). Significant differences were observed between arms over time in dietary diversity subscale scores: baseline and 6-month follow-up means among intervention and control arms were 4.8+/-1.3 to 4.8+/-1.4, and 4.7+/-1.2 to 4.1+/-1.1, respectively (P=0.001). The DQI-R served as an effective guide and evaluation tool for this diet-related randomized controlled trial. Like many interventions, our effect diminished after the intervention was complete. Future research should consider testing interventions that use the DQI-R, or other global diet-related indexes, as guides and evaluation tools over longer study periods, as well as in other populations.

  16. Dietary linoleic acid elevates the endocannabinoids 2-AG and anandamide and promotes weight gain in mice fed a low fat diet.

    PubMed

    Alvheim, Anita Røyneberg; Torstensen, Bente E; Lin, Yu Hong; Lillefosse, Haldis Haukås; Lock, Erik-Jan; Madsen, Lise; Frøyland, Livar; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Malde, Marian Kjellevold

    2014-01-01

    Dietary intake of linoleic acid (LNA, 18:2n-6) has increased dramatically during the 20th century and is associated with greater prevalence of obesity. The endocannabinoid system is involved in regulation of energy balance and a sustained hyperactivity of the endocannabinoid system may contribute to obesity. Arachidonic acid (ARA, 20:4n-6) is the precursor for 2-AG and anandamide (AEA), and we sought to determine if low fat diets (LFD) could be made obesogenic by increasing the endocannabinoid precursor pool of ARA, causing excessive endocannabinoid signaling leading to weight gain and a metabolic profile associated with obesity. Mice (C57BL/6j, 6 weeks of age) were fed 1 en% LNA and 8 en% LNA in low fat (12.5 en%) and medium fat diets (MFD, 35 en%) for 16 weeks. We found that increasing dietary LNA from 1 to 8 en% in LFD and MFD significantly increased ARA in phospholipids (ARA-PL), elevated 2-AG and AEA in liver, elevated plasma leptin, and resulted in larger adipocytes and more macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue. In LFD, dietary LNA of 8 en% increased feed efficiency and caused greater weight gain than in an isocaloric reduction to 1 en% LNA. Increasing dietary LNA from 1 to 8 en% elevates liver endocannabinoid levels and increases the risk of developing obesity. Thus a high dietary content of LNA (8 en%) increases the adipogenic properties of a low fat diet.

  17. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  18. Injection of hTERT-Transduced Endothelial Progenitor Cells Promotes Beneficial Aortic Changes in a High-Fat Dietary Model of Early Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingsheng; Deng, Yanru; Zhao, Shunrong; Zhang, Dandan; Chen, Qingwei

    2017-01-01

    Cultured endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) display troubling issues that adversely affect their applicability to endothelial regeneration. We hypothesized that transduction of the human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) gene would enhance EPC function in treating dietary-induced early atherosclerosis (AS). A dietary-induced early AS model was successfully constructed in 90 healthy male rats, while 30 healthy control (HC) rats were normally fed. Four experimental groups were constructed: an untreated HC group; an untreated AS group injected with PBS; a null EPC AS group injected with null vector-transduced EPCs, and an hTERT EPC AS group injected with hTERT-transduced EPCs. Two months postinjection, abdominal aortas were extracted to validate EPC integration and comparatively assess mRNA and protein expression of the early atherosclerotic markers VCAM-1, ICAM-1, LFA-1, Mac-1, CD44, MCP-1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and apolipoprotein E. In vitro, hTERT transduction of EPCs resulted in a significantly superior proliferative capacity as well as significantly higher NO, iNOS, and LDH secretory capacity. In vivo injection of hTERT-transduced EPCs produced significant reductions in CD44 and MCP-1 expression as well as a significant increase in eNOS expression relative to injection with null vector-transduced EPCs (all p < 0.05). hTERT-transduced human EPCs may be useful in treating dietary-induced early AS. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Dietary microbial phytase exerts mixed effects on the gut health of tilapia: a possible reason for the null effect on growth promotion.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jun; Ran, Chao; He, Suxu; Cao, Yanan; Yao, Bin; Ye, Yuantu; Zhang, Xuezhen; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-06-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of dietary microbial phytase on the growth and gut health of hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus ♀×Oreochromis aureus ♂), focusing on the effect on intestinal histology, adhesive microbiota and expression of immune-related cytokine genes. Tilapia were fed either control diet or diet supplemented with microbial phytase (1000 U/kg). Each diet was randomly assigned to four groups of fish reared in cages (3×3×2 m). After 12 weeks of feeding, weight gain and feed conversion ratio of tilapia were not significantly improved by dietary microbial phytase supplementation. However, significantly higher level of P content in the scales, tighter and more regular intestinal mucosa folds were observed in the microbial phytase group and the microvilli density was significantly increased. The adhesive gut bacterial communities were strikingly altered by microbial phytase supplementation (0·41dietary microbial phytase may exert mixed effects on hybrid tilapia, and can guide our future selection of phytases as aquafeed additives - that is, eliminating those that can stimulate intestinal inflammation.

  20. Increased dietary iron and radiation in rats promote oxidative stress, induce localized and systemic immune system responses, and alter colon mucosal environment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Ritchie, Lauren E; Crucian, Brian E; Theriot, Corey; Wu, Honglu; Sams, Clarence; Smith, Scott M; Turner, Nancy D; Zwart, Sara R

    2014-03-01

    Astronauts are exposed to increased body iron stores and radiation, both of which can cause oxidative damage leading to negative health effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate combined effects of high dietary iron (650 mg/kg diet) and radiation exposure (0.375 Gy cesium-137 every other day for 16 d) on markers of oxidative stress, immune system function, and colon mucosal environment in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Control rats consumed adequate iron (45 mg/kg diet) and were not irradiated. Combined treatments increased liver glutathione peroxidase, serum catalase, and colon myeloperoxidase while decreasing total fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations. The high-iron diet alone increased leukocyte count. Radiation decreased the T-cell CD4:CD8 ratio. Plasma iron was negatively correlated with cytokine production in activated monocytes. Genes involved in colon microbial signaling, immune response, and injury repair were altered by radiation. Genes involved with injury repair and pathogen recognition changed with dietary iron. These data demonstrate that dietary iron and radiation, alone and combined, contribute to oxidative stress that is related to immune system alterations in circulation and the colon. The model presented may help us better understand the changes to these systems that have been identified among astronauts.

  1. Dietary Approaches to Prevent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bazzano, Lydia A.; Green, Torrance; Harrison, Teresa N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors. A substantial body of evidence from animal studies, epidemiologic studies, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials has demonstrated that certain dietary patterns and individual dietary elements play a prominent role in the development of hypertension. Changes in diet can lower blood pressure, prevent the development of hypertension, and reduce the risk of hypertension-related complications. Dietary strategies for the prevention of hypertension include reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing potassium intake, and adopting an overall dietary pattern such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet or a Mediterranean diet. In order to reduce the burden of blood pressure-related complications, efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted. PMID:24091874

  2. Stearate organogel-gelatin hydrogel based bigels: physicochemical, thermal, mechanical characterizations and in vitro drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Sagiri, Sai Sateesh; Singh, Vinay K; Kulanthaivel, Senthilguru; Banerjee, Indranil; Basak, Piyali; Battachrya, M K; Pal, Kunal

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, researchers have been trying to develop alternative gel based formulations in comparison to the traditional hydrogels and emulgels. In this perspective, bigels were synthesized by mixing gelatin hydrogel and stearic acid based organogel by hot emulsification method. Two types of bigels were synthesized using sesame oil and soy bean oil based stearate organogels. Gelatin based emulgels prepared using sesame oil and soy bean oil were used as the controls. Microscopic studies revealed that the bigels contained aggregates of droplets, whereas, emulgels showed dispersed droplets within the continuum phase. The emulgels showed higher amount of leaching of oils, whereas, the leaching of the internal phase was negligible from the bigels. Presence of organogel matrix within the bigels was confirmed by XRD, FTIR and DSC methods. Bigels showed higher mucoadhesive and mechanical properties compared to emulgels. Cyclic creep-recovery and stress relaxation studies confirmed the viscoelastic nature of the formulations. Four elemental Burger's model was employed to analyze the cyclic creep-recovery data. Cyclic creep-recovery studies suggested that the deformation of the bigels were lower due to the presence of the organogels within its structure. The formulations showed almost 100% recovery after the creep stage and can be explained by the higher elastic nature of the formulations. Stress relaxation study showed that the relaxation time was higher in the emulgels as compared to the bigels. Also, the % relaxation was higher in emulgels suggesting its fluid dominant nature. The in vitro biocompatibility of the bigels was checked using human epidermal keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). Both emulgels and bigels were biocompatible in nature. The in vitro drug (ciprofloxacin) release behavior indicated non-Fickian diffusion of the drug from the matrices. The drug release showed good antimicrobial effect against Escherichia coli. Based on the results, it was concluded

  3. Sucrose stearate-enriched lipid matrix tablets of etodolac: modulation of drug release, diffusional modeling and structure elucidation studies.

    PubMed

    Abd-Elbary, Ahmed; Tadros, Mina Ibrahim; Alaa-Eldin, Ahmed Adel

    2013-06-01

    Etodolac is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug having an elimination half-life of 7 h; oral doses are given every 6-8 h. The aim of current work was the development of controlled-release etodolac lipid matrix tablets. The variables influencing design of these tablets (L1-L28) by the hot fusion method were investigated including; (1) lipid type (stearic acid, cetyl alcohol, cetostearyl alcohol, Imwitor® 900K, Precirol® ATO 5 and Compritol® ATO 888), (2) drug/lipid ratio (1:0.25 and 1:0.50, respectively), (3) filler type (lactose, Avicel® PH101 and their physical mixtures; 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2, respectively), (4) surfactant's HLB (5 and 11), and (5) drug/surfactant ratio (20:1 and 10:1, respectively). Statistical analysis and kinetic modeling of drug release data were evaluated. The inner matrix of the tablet was visualized via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An inverse correlation was observed between the drug/lipid ratio and the drug release rate. Precirol®- and Compritol®-containing formulae showed more retarded drug release rates. Lactose/Avicel® physical mixture (1:1) was considered as a filler of choice where it minimized the burst effect observed with Avicel®-free formulae. The higher surfactant's HLB, the higher drug release rate. The similarity factor (f(2)) between the drug release profiles revealed similarity within the investigated drug/surfactant ratios. Sucrose stearate D1805®-based matrix (L21) succeeded in delivering more than 90% of etodolac over 12 h, following anomalous (non-Fickian) controlled-release kinetics. SEM micrographs confirmed pore formation, within the latter matrix, upon contact with dissolution medium.

  4. Investigation of the potential for direct compaction of a fine ibuprofen powder dry-coated with magnesium stearate.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li; Zhou, Qi Tony; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A; Stewart, Peter J; Hapgood, Karen P; Gamlen, Michael; Morton, David A V

    2015-05-01

    Intensive dry powder coating (mechanofusion) with tablet lubricants has previously been shown to give substantial powder flow improvement. This study explores whether the mechanofusion of magnesium stearate (MgSt), on a fine drug powder can substantially improve flow, without preventing the powder from being directly compacted into tablets. A fine ibuprofen powder, which is both cohesive and possesses a low-melting point, was dry coated via mechanofusion with between 0.1% and 5% (w/w) MgSt. Traditional low-shear blending was also employed as a comparison. No significant difference in particle size or shape was measured following mechanofusion. For the low-shear blended powders, only marginal improvement in flowability was obtained. However, after mechanofusion, substantial improvements in the flow properties were demonstrated. Both XPS and ToF-SIMS demonstrated high degrees of a nano-scale coating coverage of MgSt on the particle surfaces from optimized mechanofusion. The study showed that robust tablets were produced from the selected mechanofused powders, at high-dose concentration and tablet tensile strength was further optimized via addition of a Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) binder (10% w/w). The tablets with the mechanofused powder (with or without PVP) also exhibited significantly lower ejection stress than those made of the raw powder, demonstrating good lubrication. Surprisingly, the release rate of drug from the tablets made with the mechanofused powder was not retarded. This is the first study to demonstrate such a single-step dry coating of model drug with MgSt, with promising flow improvement, flow-aid and lubrication effects, tabletability and also non-inhibited dissolution rate.

  5. Novel ultrasound contrast agent based on microbubbles generated from surfactant mixtures of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhanwen; Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-09-01

    In this study, novel perfluorocarbon-filled microbubbles as ultrasound contrast agent were fabricated using ultrasonication of a surfactant mixture of sorbitan monostearate (Span 60) and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) in aqueous media. The microbubbles generated from a 1:9 mixture of PEG40S/Span 60 exhibited an average diameter of 2.08+/-1.27 microm. More than 99% of the microbubbles had a mean particle diameter less than 8 microm, indicating that they were appropriately sized for intravenous administration as ultrasound contrast agent. The stabilization mechanism of the microbubbles was investigated by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique including the measurements of surface pressure-area (pi-A) isotherms and compression-decompression cycles with a two-dimensional monolayer of Span 60 and PEG40S. The dependence on molar fraction of PEG40S in pi-A isotherms of mixed monolayers provided a strong evidence of interactions between the two microbubble-forming materials. It is suggested that the monolayer shell imparts good stability to the microbubbles by three means: (1) a low surface tension monolayer hinders dissolution through the reduction of surface tension, which introduces a mechanical surface pressure that counters the Laplace pressure; (2) the presence of a monolayer shell imparts a significant barrier to gas escaping from the core into the aqueous medium; and (3) encapsulation elasticity stabilizes microbubbles against diffusion-driven dissolution and explains the long shelf-life of microbubble contrast agent. The preliminary in vivo ultrasound imaging study showed that such stabilized microbubbles demonstrated excellent enhancement under grey-scale pulse inversion harmonic imaging and power Doppler imaging. 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gas adsorption on commercial magnesium stearate: Effects of degassing conditions on nitrogen BET surface area and isotherm characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lapham, Darren P; Lapham, Julie L

    2017-09-15

    Commercial grades of magnesium stearate have been analysed by nitrogen adsorption having been pre-treated at temperatures between 30°C and 110°C and in the as-received state. Characteristics of nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms are assessed through the linearity of low relative pressure isotherm data and the BET transform plot together with the extent of isotherm hysteresis. Comparison is made between thermal gravimetric analysis and mass loss on drying. Features of gas adsorption isotherms considered atypical are identified and possible causes presented. It is shown that atypical isotherm features and issues of applying BET theory to the calculation of SBET are linked to the presence of hydrated water and that these depend on the hydration state: being more pronounced for the di-hydrate than the mono-hydrate. Dehydration reduces the extent of atypical features. SBET of a mono-hydrate sample is 5.6m(2)g(-1) and 3.2m(2)g(-1) at 40°C and 100°C degassing respectively but 23.9m(2)g(1) and 5.9m(2)g(-1) for di-hydrate containing samples under comparable degassing. Di-hydrated samples also show SBET >15m(2)g(1), BET C-values <7 and BET correlation coefficients <0.98 before dehydration. Possible mechanisms for atypical isotherms are critically discussed together with the suitability of applying BET theory to nitrogen adsorption data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of moisture content on solid-state interaction at the interface between magnesium stearate and captopril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wen-Ting; Wang, Shun-Li; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2008-12-01

    A grinding process was used to accelerate the solid-state interaction at the interface between magnesium stearate (MgSt) and captopril (CAP) in the presence or absence of water. The 110 °C-preheated MgSt/CAP or MgSt/CAP ground mixture showed a 5.06% (w/w) or 6.07% (w/w) water content, respectively, which was >4.29% (w/w) for the original MgSt alone. The increased water content in each ground mixture was due to the atmospheric absorption of water caused by grinding. A small infrared (IR) peak at 1562 cm -1 appeared in the IR spectrum of the 110 °C-preheated MgSt/CAP ground mixture, whereas a stronger IR peak at 1541 cm -1 with a shoulder at 1556 cm -1 was observed for the MgSt/CAP ground mixture. These IR peaks were possibly related to the solid-state interaction at the interface between MgSt and CAP via hydrogen bonding of adsorbed water. However, an excess of water added in the MgSt/CAP ground mixture could exacerbate the solid-state interaction of MgSt and CAP to form a stearic acid as evidenced by the IR peak at 1705 cm -1. This may be due to the neutralization between basic MgSt and acidic CAP. In addition, thermal Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy also confirmed that the thermal-dependent dehydration process might alter the IR peak intensity of MgSt/CAP ground mixtures.

  8. Effects of dietary antibiotic growth promoter and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on production, intestinal bacterial community, and nonspecific immunity of hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus female x Oreochromis aureus male).

    PubMed

    He, S; Zhou, Z; Meng, K; Zhao, H; Yao, B; Ringø, E; Yoon, I

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of a dietary antibiotic growth promoter (florfenicol) and a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (DVAQUA) on growth, G:F, daily feed intake, intestinal bacterial community, and nonspecific immunity of hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus ♀ × Oreochromis aureus ♂), a 16-wk feeding trial was conducted in a recirculating aquaculture system. Four feeding regimens were evaluated: control, dietary florenicol (0.02 g/kg; 16 wk), dietary DVAQUA (0.5 g/kg; 16 wk), and sequential use of florenicol (0.02 g/kg; 8 wk), and DVAQUA (0.5 g/kg; 8 wk). Each regimen had 4 replicate tanks (0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 m) and each tank contained 12 fish (initial BW: 46.88 ± 0.38 g). Dietary florfenicol improved growth (P = 0.089), G:F (P = 0.036), and serum complement component concentrations (P < 0.001) of hybrid tilapia. However, the compound decreased the estimated intestinal bacterial count estimated by rpoB quantitative PCR (P < 0.001) and bacterial diversity (visual band numbers, Shannon diversity index, and Shannon equitability index based on 16S rDNA V3 denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprints) compared with the control. Although sequential use of florfenicol and DVAQUA improved growth and G:F numerically to a similar extent as dietary florfenicol, and increased intestinal bacterial count to normal quantities, the sequential use of florenicol and DVAQUA decreased intestinal bacterial diversity (visual band numbers, Shannon diversity index, and Shannon equitability index) as well as serum complement component concentrations (P < 0.001) compared with their respective use and the control. These findings might be negatively related to disease control and host defense, and the sequential use of florenicol and DVAQUA should be practiced with caution. Feeding DAVQUA to the fish improved nonspecific immunity and increased intestinal bacterial count and bacterial diversity, but further research, including challenge studies, should be conducted

  9. Comparison with ancestral diets suggests dense acellular carbohydrates promote an inflammatory microbiota, and may be the primary dietary cause of leptin resistance and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Spreadbury, Ian

    2012-01-01

    A novel hypothesis of obesity is suggested by consideration of diet-related inflammation and evolutionary medicine. The obese homeostatically guard their elevated weight. In rodent models of high-fat diet-induced obesity, leptin resistance is seen initially at vagal afferents, blunting the actions of satiety mediators, then centrally, with gastrointestinal bacterial-triggered SOCS3 signaling implicated. In humans, dietary fat and fructose elevate systemic lipopolysaccharide, while dietary glucose also strongly activates SOCS3 signaling. Crucially however, in humans, low-carbohydrate diets spontaneously decrease weight in a way that low-fat diets do not. Furthermore, nutrition transition patterns and the health of those still eating diverse ancestral diets with abundant food suggest that neither glycemic index, altered fat, nor carbohydrate intake can be intrinsic causes of obesity, and that human energy homeostasis functions well without Westernized foods containing flours, sugar, and refined fats. Due to being made up of cells, virtually all “ancestral foods” have markedly lower carbohydrate densities than flour- and sugar-containing foods, a property quite independent of glycemic index. Thus the “forgotten organ” of the gastrointestinal microbiota is a prime candidate to be influenced by evolutionarily unprecedented postprandial luminal carbohydrate concentrations. The present hypothesis suggests that in parallel with the bacterial effects of sugars on dental and periodontal health, acellular flours, sugars, and processed foods produce an inflammatory microbiota via the upper gastrointestinal tract, with fat able to effect a “double hit” by increasing systemic absorption of lipopolysaccharide. This model is consistent with a broad spectrum of reported dietary phenomena. A diet of grain-free whole foods with carbohydrate from cellular tubers, leaves, and fruits may produce a gastrointestinal microbiota consistent with our evolutionary condition

  10. Influence of trehalose on the interaction of curcumin with surface active ionic liquid micelle and its vesicular aggregate composed of a non-ionic surfactant sorbitan stearate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Dutta, Rupam; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-11-01

    The present investigation unravels the effect of trehalose on 1-hexadecyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C16mim]Cl), a cationic surface active ionic liquid (SAIL) micelle and SAIL ([C16mim]Cl)-nonionic surfactant (Sorbitan Stearate, Span 60) based vesicles. The influence of trehalose on size and morphology of the aggregates has been investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements. Besides, we have studied the dynamic properties of curcumin inside these aggregates using fluorescence spectroscopic based techniques. The results revealed that trehalose molecules play crucial role in modulation of the photophysical properties of curcumin in these organized assemblies.

  11. Dietary fibre-rich resistant starches promote ammonia detoxification in the human colon as measured by lactose-[¹⁵N₂]ureide.

    PubMed

    Wutzke, Klaus D; Tisztl, Michael; Salewski, Birgit; Glass, Änne

    2015-01-01

    Three resistant starches (RSs), namely fibre of potatoes (FP), wrinkle pea starch (WPS), and high amylose maize starch (HAMS) with different dietary fibre contents, were supplemented in adults to evaluate their effects on urinary nitrogen and ammonia excretion as well as on faecal nitrogen excretion by means of lactose-[(15)N2]ureide ((15)N-LU) degradation. Twenty subjects received a regular diet either without or with the supplementation of FP, WPS, and HAMS in a randomized order. After administration of (15)N-LU, urine and faeces were collected over 48 and 72 h, respectively, whereas blood was collected after 6 h. The (15)N-abundances were measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. In comparison to the dry run, supplementation with RS significantly lowered renal (15)N-excretion (dry run: 43.2%, FP: 34.6%, WPS: 37.9%, HAMS: 36.4%) as well as the corresponding (15)NH3-excretion (dry run: 0.08%, FP: 0.06%, HAMS: 0.05%), clearly indicating a reduced colonic nitrogen generation at high dietary fibre intake.

  12. Delivery of Dietary and Lifestyle Interventions in Pregnancy: is it Time to Promote the Use of Electronic and Mobile Health Technologies?

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Cecelia M; Cramp, Courtney; Dodd, Jodie M

    2016-03-01

    Fifty percent of women who enter pregnancy are overweight or obese, increasing complications for both the mother and the infant, along with significant burden on individuals and the health care system. Pregnancy represents a "teachable moment" in a woman's life, however, antenatal interventions focusing on improving dietary and physical activity patterns have been associated with modest behavior change. There are many barriers that need to be overcome, including lack of knowledge, access and time pressures. Advancing mobile and electronic health technologies may represent an adjunct tool to support traditional face-to-face consultations and facilitate behavior change, but further rigorous evaluation of the technologies and their impact on health outcomes is required. Well-designed antenatal intervention trials with particular attention to the structure and method of information provision are required to further assess the feasibility of such technology.

  13. Dietary zinc deficiency induces oxidative stress and promotes tumor necrosis factor-α- and interleukin-1β-induced RANKL expression in rat bone.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takako; Katsumata, Shin-Ichi; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuharu

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary zinc deficiency on oxidative stress and bone metabolism. Four-week-old male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups for 4 weeks: a zinc-adequate group (30 ppm); a zinc-deficient group (1 ppm); and a pair-fed group (30 ppm) that was pair-fed to the zinc-deficient group. The iron content and the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance level in bone were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. The mRNA expression level of osteoblastogenesis-related genes such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 and runt-related transcription factor 2 was lower in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. In contrast, the mRNA expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and osteoclastogenesis-related genes such as receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand and nuclear factor of activated T cells cytoplasmic 1 were higher in the zinc-deficient group than in the zinc-adequate and pair-fed groups. These findings suggested that dietary zinc deficiency reduced osteoblastogenesis via a decrease in the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 and increased osteoclastogenesis via enhancement of the expression of receptor for activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand induced by oxidative stress-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β.

  14. Dietary pattern analysis for the evaluation of dietary guidelines.

    PubMed

    Willett, Walter C; McCullough, Marjorie L

    2008-01-01

    Dietary Guidelines for the promotion of overall good health and the prevention of disease often play an important role in setting nutritional policy and in the education of the public about healthy food choices. Although much has been written about adherence to such guidelines, until recently there was no evidence on whether adherence to specific dietary guidelines is associated with better health. As an outcome variable for such analyses, we have used the incidence of major chronic disease, which includes incidence of any major cardiovascular disease, cancer, or death from any cause excluding violence. We have evaluated the Dietary Guidelines for Americans using a scoring system called the Healthy Eating Index developed by the Department of Agriculture to quantify adherence to these guidelines. We found that adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid was associated with only a small reduction in major chronic disease risk in a population of over 100,000 US adult men and women. We also assessed whether an alternate index, which took into account the type of fat and quality of carbohydrate, would better predict risk. In contrast with the original Healthy Eating Index, adherence to the alternative index predicted lower rates of major chronic disease, and particularly cardiovascular disease, suggesting that the Dietary Guidelines were not offering optimal dietary guidance. These analyses suggest that dietary guidelines should be evaluated for their ability to predict the occurrence of major illness, and that such analyses can help refine these guidelines.

  15. Importance of dietary fiber in childhood.

    PubMed

    Williams, C L

    1995-10-01

    Dietary fiber has important health benefits in childhood, especially in promoting normal laxation. Currently, children consume amounts of dietary fiber that appear to be inadequate for optimal health promotion and disease prevention. It is prudent to recommend that children older than 2 years of age increase dietary fiber intake to an amount equal to or greater than their age + 5 g/day. According to the "age + 5" rule dietary fiber intake would increase from 8 g/day at age 3 years to 25 g/day by age 20 years. After age 20, dietary fiber levels of 25 to 35 g/day are recommended. Dietary fiber intake should be increased gradually in childhood by increasing consumption of a variety of fruits, vegetables, legumes, cereals, and other whole-grain products. Although very high fiber intake in childhood could have adverse effects, the potential health benefits of a moderate increase in dietary fiber substantially outweigh the possible risks, especially in highly industrialized countries such as the United States. A safe range of dietary fiber intake for children may be between age + 5 and age + 10 g/day. This range is considered safe even for children and adolescents with marginal intakes of some vitamins and minerals; should provide enough dietary fiber for normal laxation; and may provide enough added dietary fiber to help prevent chronic diseases.

  16. Outcome Evaluation of "Family Eats": An Eight-Session Web-Based Program Promoting Healthy Home Food Environments and Dietary Behaviors for African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Thompson, Debbe; Chen, Tzu-An

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the eight-session "Family Eats" web-based intervention promoting healthy home food environments for African American families. African American families (n = 126) with 8- to 12-year-old children completed online baseline questionnaires and were randomized into…

  17. Outcome evaluation of Family Eats: An eight-session web-based program promoting healthy home food environments and dietary behaviors for African American families

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This article presents the results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the eight-session Family Eats web-based intervention promoting healthy home food environments for African American families. African American families (n=126) with 8- to 12-year-old children completed online baseline questio...

  18. Outcome Evaluation of "Family Eats": An Eight-Session Web-Based Program Promoting Healthy Home Food Environments and Dietary Behaviors for African American Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Thompson, Debbe; Chen, Tzu-An

    2017-01-01

    This article presents the results of a randomized clinical trial evaluating the eight-session "Family Eats" web-based intervention promoting healthy home food environments for African American families. African American families (n = 126) with 8- to 12-year-old children completed online baseline questionnaires and were randomized into…

  19. Aluminum exposure at human dietary levels promotes vascular dysfunction and increases blood pressure in rats: A concerted action of NAD(P)H oxidase and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Caroline Silveira; Piagette, Janaina Trindade; Escobar, Alyne Gourlart; Martín, Ángela; Palacios, Roberto; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Exley, Christopher; Alonso, María Jesús; Miguel, Marta; Salaices, Mercedes; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2017-08-19

    Aluminum (Al) is a non-essential metal and a significant environmental contaminant and is associated with a number of human diseases including cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of Al exposure at doses similar to human dietary levels on the cardiovascular system over a 60day period. Wistar male rats were divided into two major groups and received orally: 1) Low aluminum level - rats were subdivided and treated for 60days as follows: a) Untreated - ultrapure water; b) AlCl3 at a dose of 8.3mg/kg bw for 60days, representing human Al exposure by diet; and 2) High aluminum level - rats were subdivided and treated for 42days as follows: C) Untreated - ultrapure water; d) AlCl3 at 100mg/kg bw for 42days, representing a high level of human exposure to Al. Effects on systolic blood pressure (SBP) and vascular function of aortic and mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA) were studied. Endothelium and smooth muscle integrity were evaluated by concentration-response curves to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside. Vasoconstrictor responses to phenylephrine (Phe) in the presence and absence of endothelium and in the presence of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME, the potassium channels blocker TEA, the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor apocynin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), the non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin and the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398 were analyzed. Vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation and total antioxidant capacity, were measured. The mRNA expressions of eNOS, NAD(P)H oxidase 1 and 2, SOD1, COX-2 and thromboxane A2 receptor (TXA-2 R) were also investigated. Al exposure at human dietary levels impaired the cardiovascular system and these effects were almost the same as Al exposure at much higher levels. Al increased SBP, decreased ACh-induced relaxation, increased response to Phe, decreased endothelial modulation of vasoconstrictor responses, the bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO), the involvement of potassium channels on

  20. Regulation of tissue LC-PUFA contents, Δ6 fatty acyl desaturase (FADS2) gene expression and the methylation of the putative FADS2 gene promoter by different dietary fatty acid profiles in Japanese seabass (Lateolabrax japonicus).

    PubMed

    Xu, Houguo; Dong, Xiaojing; Ai, Qinghui; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yanjiao; Zuo, Rantao

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the influences of different dietary fatty acid profiles on the tissue content and biosynthesis of LC-PUFA in a euryhaline species Japanese seabass reared in seawater. Six diets were prepared, each with a characteristic fatty acid: Diet PA: Palmitic acid (C16:0); Diet SA: Stearic acid (C18:0); Diet OA: Oleic acid (C18:1n-9); Diet LNA: α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3); Diet N-3 LC-PUFA: n-3 LC-PUFA (DHA+EPA); Diet FO: the fish oil control. A 10-week feeding trial was conducted using juvenile fish (29.53 ± 0.86 g). The results showed that Japanese seabass had limited capacity to synthesize LC-PUFA and fish fed PA, SA, OA and LNA showed significantly lower tissue n-3 LC-PUFA contents compared to fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO. The putative gene promoter and full-length cDNA of FADS2 was cloned and characterized. The protein sequence was confirmed to be homologous to FADS2s of marine teleosts and possessed all the characteristic features of microsomal fatty acid desaturases. The FADS2 transcript levels in liver of fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO were significantly lower than those in fish fed other diets except LNA while Diet PA significantly up-regulated the FADS2 gene expression compared to Diet LNA, N-3 LC-PUFA and FO. Inversely, fish fed N-3 LC-PUFA and FO showed significantly higher promoter methylation rates of FADS2 gene compared to fish fed the LC-PUFA deficient diets. These results suggested that Japanese seabass had low LC-PUFA synthesis capacity and LC-PUFA deficient diets caused significantly reduced tissue n-3 LC-PUFA contents. The liver gene expression of FADS2 was up-regulated in groups enriched in C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n-9 respectively but not in the group enriched in C18:3n-3 compared to groups with high n-3 LC-PUFA contents. The FADS2 gene expression regulated by dietary fatty acids was significantly negatively correlated with the methylation rate of putative FADS2 gene promoter.

  1. Teaching subjects with type 2 diabetes how to incorporate sugar choices into their daily meal plan promotes dietary compliance and does not deteriorate metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, J; Koski, K G; Strychar, I; Yale, J F

    2001-02-01

    To determine whether teaching free-living subjects with type 2 diabetes how to incorporate added sugars or sweets into their daily meal plan results in a greater consumption of calories (fat or sugar) and deteriorates their glycemic or lipid profiles but improves their perceived quality of life. In an 8-month randomized controlled trial, 48 free-living subjects with type 2 diabetes were taught either a conventional (C) meal plan (no concentrated sweets) or one permitting as much as 10% of total energy as added sugars or sweets (S). Mean individual nutrient intake was determined using the average of six 24-h telephone recalls per 4 months. Metabolic control and quality of life were evaluated every 2 months. Quality of life was assessed using the Medical Outcome Survey and the Diabetes Quality of Life questionnaire. The S group did not consume more calories (fat or sugar) and in fact ate significantly less carbohydrate (-15 vs. 10 g) and less starch (-7 vs. 8 g) and had a tendency to eat fewer calories (-77 vs. 81 kcal) than the C group. Weight remained stable, and there was no evidence that consuming more sugar worsened metabolic profile or improved their perceived quality of life. Giving individuals with type 2 diabetes the freedom to include sugar in their daily meal plan had no negative impact on dietary habits or metabolic control. Health professionals can be reassured and encouraged to teach the new "sugar guidelines," because doing so may result in a more conscientious carbohydrate consumption.

  2. Dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Madar, Z; Thorne, R

    1987-01-01

    Studies done on dietary fiber (DF) over the past five years are presented in this Review. The involvement of dietary fiber in the control of plasma glucose and lipid levels is now established. Two dietary fiber sources (soybean and fenugreek) were studied in our laboratory and are discussed herein. These sources were found to be potentially beneficial in the reduction of plasma glucose in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus subjects. They are shown to be acceptable by human subjects and are easy to use either in a mixture of milk products and in cooking. The mechanism by which dietary fiber alters the nutrient absorption is also discussed. The effect of DF on gastric emptying, transit time, adsorption and glucose transport may contribute to reducing plasma glucose and lipid levels. DF was found to be effective in controlling blood glucose and lipid levels of pregnant diabetic women. Dietary fiber may also be potentially beneficial in the reduction of exogenous insulin requirements in these subjects. However, increased consumption of DF may cause adverse side effects; the binding capabilities of fiber may affect nutrient availability, particularly that of minerals and prolonged and high DF dosage supplementation must be regarded cautiously. This is particularly true when recommending such a diet for pregnant or lactating women, children or subjects with nutritional disorders. Physiological effects of DF appear to depend heavily on the source and composition of fiber. Using a combination of DF from a variety of sources may reduce the actual mass of fiber required to obtain the desired metabolic effects and will result in a more palatable diet. Previously observed problems, such as excess flatus, diarrhea and mineral malabsorption would also be minimized.

  3. Dietary supplements in sport.

    PubMed

    Burke, L M; Read, R S

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the dietary practices of athletes report that nutritional supplements are commonly used. Supplementation practices vary between sports and individual athletes; however, there is evidence that at least some athletes use a large number of supplements concurrently, often in doses that are very high in comparison with normal dietary intakes. In exploring supplementation practices we propose a classification system separating the supplements into dietary supplements and nutritional erogogenic aids. The dietary supplement is characterised as a product which can be used to address physiological or nutritional issues arising in sport. It may provide a convenient or practical means of consuming special nutrient requirements for exercise, or it may be used to prevent/reverse nutritional deficiencies that commonly occur among athletes. The basis of the dietary supplement is an understanding of nutritional requirements and physiological effects of exercise. When the supplement is used to successfully meet a physiological/nutritional goal arising in sport it may be demonstrated to improve sports performance. While there is some interest in refining the composition or formulation of some dietary supplements, the real interest belongs to the use or application of the supplement; i.e. educating athletes to understand and achieve their nutritional needs in a specific sports situation. The sports drink (carbohydrate-electrolyte replacement drink) is a well known example of a dietary supplement. Scientific attitudes towards the sports drink have changed over the past 20 years. Initial caution that carbohydrate-electrolyte fluids compromise gastric emptying during exercise has now been shown to be unjustified. Numerous studies have shown that 5 to 10% solutions of glucose, glucose polymers (maltodextrins) and other simple sugars all have suitable gastric emptying characteristics for the delivery of fluid and moderate amounts of carbohydrate substrate. The optimal

  4. Modification of the health-promoting value of potato tubers field grown under drought stress: emphasis on dietary antioxidant and glycoalkaloid contents in five native andean cultivars (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Andre, Christelle M; Schafleitner, Roland; Guignard, Cédric; Oufir, Mouhssin; Aliaga, Carlos Alberto Alvarado; Nomberto, Giannina; Hoffmann, Lucien; Hausman, Jean-François; Evers, Danièle; Larondelle, Yvan

    2009-01-28

    The effects of drought stress on dietary antioxidant and glycoalkaloid contents in potato tubers were investigated using a selection of five native Andean cultivars. Both freshly harvested and 4 month-stored tubers were analyzed. Responses to drought stress were highly cultivar-specific. The antioxidant contents of the yellow tuber-bearing cultivars (Sipancachi and SS-2613) were weakly affected by the drought treatment, whereas the pigmented cultivars demonstrated highly cultivar-dependent variations. A drastic reduction of anthocyanins and other polyphenols was revealed in the red- (Sullu) and purple-fleshed (Guincho Negra) cultivars, whereas an increase was shown in the purple-skinned and yellow-fleshed cultivar (Huata Colorada). The hydrophilic antioxidant capacity (evaluated by Folin-Ciocalteu and H-oxygen radical absorbance capacity assays) was highly correlated with the polyphenol content and followed, therefore, the same behavior upon drought. Carotenoid contents, including beta-carotene, as well as vitamin E, tended to increase or remain stable following drought exposure, except for the cultivar Sullu, in which the level of these lipophilic antioxidants was decreased. Vitamin C contents were not affected by drought with the exception of Guincho Negra, in which the level was increased. These variations of health-promoting compounds were associated with increased or stable levels of the toxic glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine. Storage at 10 degrees C for 4 months tended to decrease the concentrations of all dietary antioxidants, except those of vitamin E. This storage also reduced the drought-induced variations observed in freshly harvested tubers. These results were discussed in terms of their implications for human diet and health as well as in plant stress defense mechanisms.

  5. Final report of the amended safety assessment of Glyceryl Laurate, Glyceryl Laurate SE, Glyceryl Laurate/Oleate, Glyceryl Adipate, Glyceryl Alginate, Glyceryl Arachidate, Glyceryl Arachidonate, Glyceryl Behenate, Glyceryl Caprate, Glyceryl Caprylate, Glyceryl Caprylate/Caprate, Glyceryl Citrate/Lactate/Linoleate/Oleate, Glyceryl Cocoate, Glyceryl Collagenate, Glyceryl Erucate, Glyceryl Hydrogenated Rosinate, Glyceryl Hydrogenated Soyate, Glyceryl Hydroxystearate, Glyceryl Isopalmitate, Glyceryl Isostearate, Glyceryl Isostearate/Myristate, Glyceryl Isostearates, Glyceryl Lanolate, Glyceryl Linoleate, Glyceryl Linolenate, Glyceryl Montanate, Glyceryl Myristate, Glyceryl Isotridecanoate/Stearate/Adipate, Glyceryl Oleate SE, Glyceryl Oleate/Elaidate, Glyceryl Palmitate, Glyceryl Palmitate/Stearate, Glyceryl Palmitoleate, Glyceryl Pentadecanoate, Glyceryl Polyacrylate, Glyceryl Rosinate, Glyceryl Sesquioleate, Glyceryl/Sorbitol Oleate/Hydroxystearate, Glyceryl Stearate/Acetate, Glyceryl Stearate/Maleate, Glyceryl Tallowate, Glyceryl Thiopropionate, and Glyceryl Undecylenate.

    PubMed

    2004-01-01

    activity in an in vitro assay using sheep erythrocytes. Glyceryl Laurate, Glyceryl Isostearate, or Glyceryl Citrate/Lactate/Linoleate/Oleate were not classified as ocular irritants in rabbits. Undiluted glyceryl monoesters may produce minor skin irritation, especially in abraded skin, but in general these ingredients are not irritating at concentrations used in cosmetics. Glyceryl monoesters are not sensitizers, except that Glyceryl Rosinate and Hydrogenated Glyceryl Rosinate may contain residual rosin, which can cause allergic reactions. These ingredients are not photosensitizers. Glyceryl Citrate/Lactate/Linoleate/Oleate was not mutagenic in the Ames test system. Glyceryl Laurate exhibited antitumor activity and Glyceryl Stearate was negative in a tumor promotion assay. At concentrations higher than used in cosmetics, Glyceryl Laurate did cause moderate erythema in human repeat-insult patch test (RIPT) studies, but the other glyceryl monoesters tested failed to produce any significant positive reactions. Glyceryl Rosinate was irritating to animal skin at 50%, but did not produce sensitization in clinical tests at concentrations up to 10% and covered with semioccluded patches. There is reported use of Glyceryl Rosinate at 12%in mascara, which is somewhat higher than the concentration in the clinical testing. It was reasoned that the available data do support the safety of this use because there would be minimal contact with the skin and no occlusion. The safety of Arachidonic Acid was not documented and substantiated for cosmetic product use in an earlier safety assessment and those same safety questions apply to Glyceryl Arachidonate. Based on these data, the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel found that these glyceryl monoesters are safe as cosmetic ingredients in the present practices of use and concentration: except that the available data are insufficient to support the safety of Glyceryl Arachidonate. Additional data needed to support the safety of

  6. High doses of riboflavin and the elimination of dietary red meat promote the recovery of some motor functions in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, C G; Junqueira, V B C

    2003-10-01

    Abnormal riboflavin status in the absence of a dietary deficiency was detected in 31 consecutive outpatients with Parkinson's disease (PD), while the classical determinants of homocysteine levels (B6, folic acid, and B12) were usually within normal limits. In contrast, only 3 of 10 consecutive outpatients with dementia without previous stroke had abnormal riboflavin status. The data for 12 patients who did not complete 6 months of therapy or did not comply with the proposed treatment paradigm were excluded from analysis. Nineteen PD patients (8 males and 11 females, mean age +/- SD = 66.2+/-8.6 years; 3, 3, 2, 5, and 6 patients in Hoehn and Yahr stages I to V) received riboflavin orally (30 mg every 8 h) plus their usual symptomatic medications and all red meat was eliminated from their diet. After 1 month the riboflavin status of the patients was normalized from 106.4+/-34.9 to 179.2+/-23 ng/ml (N = 9). Motor capacity was measured by a modification of the scoring system of Hoehn and Yahr, which reports motor capacity as percent. All 19 patients who completed 6 months of treatment showed improved motor capacity during the first three months and most reached a plateau while 5/19 continued to improve in the 3- to 6-month interval. Their average motor capacity increased from 44 to 71% after 6 months, increasing significantly every month compared with their own pretreatment status (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Discontinuation of riboflavin for several days did not impair motor capacity and yellowish urine was the only side effect observed. The data show that the proposed treatment improves the clinical condition of PD patients. Riboflavin-sensitive mechanisms involved in PD may include glutathione depletion, cumulative mitochondrial DNA mutations, disturbed mitochondrial protein complexes, and abnormal iron metabolism. More studies are required to identify the mechanisms involved.

  7. Dietary green-plant thylakoids decrease gastric emptying and gut transit, promote changes in the gut microbial flora, but does not cause steatorrhea.

    PubMed

    Stenblom, Eva-Lena; Weström, Björn; Linninge, Caroline; Bonn, Peter; Farrell, Mary; Rehfeld, Jens F; Montelius, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Green-plant thylakoids increase satiety by affecting appetite hormones such as ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). The objective of this study was to investigate if thylakoids also affect gastrointestinal (GI) passage and microbial composition. To analyse the effects on GI passage, 16 rats were gavage-fed a control or thylakoid-supplemented high-fat diet (HFD) 30 min before receiving Evans blue. Another 16 rats were fed a control HFD or thylakoid HFD for two weeks prior to the intragastric challenge with Evans blue. The amount of Evans blue in the stomach and the distance of migration in the intestines after 30 min were used as a measurement of gastric emptying and intestinal transit. These were reduced by thylakoid supplementation in the acute study, and however not significantly also after the two-week diet study. The second aim of the study was to investigate if thylakoid-supplementation affects the gut microbiota and amount of faecal fat in healthy human volunteers (n = 34) receiving thylakoid or placebo treatments for three months. Microbiota was analysed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and qPCR, and faecal fat was extracted by dichloromethane. The total bacteria, and specifically the Bacteriodes fragilis group, were increased by thylakoid treatment versus placebo, while thylakoids did not cause steatorrhea. Dietary supplementation with thylakoids thus affects satiety both via appetite hormones and GI fullness, and affects the microbial composition without causing GI adverse effects such as steatorrhea. This suggests thylakoids as a novel agent in prevention and treatment of obesity.

  8. Dietary methyl donors, methyl metabolizing enzymes, and epigenetic regulators: diet-gene interactions and promoter CpG island hypermethylation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    de Vogel, Stefan; Wouters, Kim A D; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; van Schooten, Frederik J; de Goeij, Anton F P M; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; van Engeland, Manon; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2011-01-01

    Dietary methyl donors might influence DNA methylation during carcinogenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Among 609 CRC cases and 1,663 subcohort members of the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (n = 120,852), we estimated CRC risk according to methyl donor intake across genotypes of folate metabolizing enzymes and methyltransferases.Although diet-gene interactions were not statistically significant, methionine intake was inversely associated with CRC among subjects having both common rs2424913 and rs406193 DNMT3B C > T genotypes (highest versus lowest tertile: RR = 0.44; p (trend) = 0.05). Likewise, vitamin B2 was modestly inversely associated among individuals with the MTHFR c.665CC (rs1801133) genotype (RR = 0.66; p (trend) = 0.08), but with a significant reduced risk when ≤ 1 rare allele occurred in the combination of folate metabolizing enzymes MTHFR, MTRR and MTR (RR = 0.30; p (trend) = 0.005). Folate or vitamin B6 were neither inversely associated with CRC nor was methyl donor intake associated with the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP).Despite the absence of heterogeneity across genotypes, might an effect of methyl donors on CRC be more pronounced among individuals carrying common variants of folate metabolizing enzymes or DNA methyltransferases. Combining genotypes may assist to reveal diet associations with CRC, possibly because rare variants of related genes may collectively affect specific metabolic pathways or enzymatic functions.

  9. Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Improve the Neurolipidome and Restore the DHA Status while Promoting Functional Recovery after Experimental Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Johnny D.; Cordero, Kathia; llán, Miguel S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) confer multiple health benefits and decrease the risk of neurological disorders. Studies are needed, however, to identify promising cellular targets and to assess their prophylactic value against neurodegeneration. The present study (1) examined the efficacy of a preventive diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs to reduce dysfunction in a well-established spinal cord injury (SCI) animal model and (2) used a novel metabolomics data analysis to identify potential neurolipidomic targets. Rats were fed with either control chow or chow enriched with ω-3 PUFAs (750 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks before being subjected to a sham or a contusion SCI operation. We report new evidence showing that rats subjected to SCI after being pre-treated with a diet enriched with ω-3 PUFAs exhibit significantly better functional outcomes. Pre-treated animals exhibited lower sensory deficits, autonomic bladder recovery, and early improvements in locomotion that persisted for at least 8 weeks after trauma. We found that SCI triggers a robust alteration in the cord PUFA neurolipidome, which was characterized by a marked docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) deficiency. This DHA deficiency was associated with dysfunction and corrected with the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet. Multivariate data analyses revealed that the spinal cord of animals consuming the ω-3 PUFA-enriched diet had a fundamentally distinct neurolipidome, particularly increasing the levels of essential and long chain ω-3 fatty acids and lysolipids at the expense of ω-6 fatty acids and its metabolites. Altogether, dietary ω-3 PUFAs prophylaxis confers resiliency to SCI mediated, at least in part, by generating a neuroprotective and restorative neurolipidome. PMID:23294084

  10. Dietary assessment methods: dietary records.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Rosa M; Pérez-Rodrigo, Carmen; López-Sobaler, Ana M

    2015-02-26

    Dietary records or food diaries can be highlighted among dietary assessment methods of the current diet for their interest and validity. It is a prospective, open-ended survey method collecting data about the foods and beverages consumed over a previously specified period of time. Dietary records can be used to estimate current diet of individuals and population groups, as well as to identify groups at risk of inadequacy. It is a dietary assessment method interesting for its use in epidemiological or in clinical studies. High validity and precision has been reported for the method when used following adequate procedures and considering the sufficient number of days. Thus, dietary records are often considered as a reference method in validation studies. Nevertheless, the method is affected by error and has limitations due mainly to the tendency of subjects to report food consumption close to those socially desirable. Additional problems are related to the high burden posed on respondents. The method can also influence food behavior in respondents in order to simplify the registration of food intake and some subjects can experience difficulties in writing down the foods and beverages consumed or in describing the portion sizes. Increasing the number of days observed reduces the quality of completed diet records. It should also be considered the high cost of coding and processing information collected in diet records. One of the main advantages of the method is the registration of the foods and beverages as consumed, thus reducing the problem of food omissions due to memory failure. Weighted food records provide more precise estimates of consumed portions. New Technologies can be helpful to improve and ease collaboration of respondents, as well as precision of the estimates, although it would be desirable to evaluate the advantages and limitations in order to optimize the implementation.

  11. Dietary fibre.

    PubMed

    Escudero Alvarez, E; González Sánchez, P

    2006-05-01

    Currently and after 30 years of research, dietary fibre is part of what is considered a healthy diet. There is no single definition yet comprising the different components of dietary fibre and its functions. The main factors of fibre are complex carbohydrates and lignin, although new products may be included in the future within the concept of fibre. Dietary fibres reach the large bowel and are attacked by colonic microflora, yielding short chain fatty acids, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane as fermentation products. Short chain fatty acids represent a way of recovering energy and they are also implicated in other beneficial functions for the human organism. Although there are no yet conclusive data on recommendations of different types of fibre, it is still appropriate to indicate a diet providing 20-35 g/day of fibre from different sources. There is a consensus to recommend a mixture of fibres or fibre like soybean polysaccharide for constipation. There are few conclusive data, still, on the benefit of fibre on prevention of colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease. However, a fibre-rich diet is recommended from early years of life since it is often associated to a lifestyle that in the long term helps controlling other risk factors.

  12. Comparison of near-infrared and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for determination of magnesium stearate in pharmaceutical powders and solid dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Green, Robert L; Mowery, Mark D; Good, Julie A; Higgins, John P; Arrivo, Steven M; McColough, Kristen; Mateos, Arthur; Reed, Robert A

    2005-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has become well established in both the pharmaceutical arena and other areas as a useful technique for rapid quantitative analysis of solid materials. Though laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has not been widely applied in the pharmaceutical industry, the technique has been used for rapid quantitative analysis of solids in many other applications. One analysis amenable to each technique is the determination of magnesium stearate in solids during the lubrication blending unit operation of pharmaceutical processing. A comparative study of the utility of these two techniques for this application will be presented. Necessary sample preparations and the extent and type of matrix effects will be discussed. Additionally, it will be shown that NIR provides better accuracy and precision than LIBS with the experimental parameters used; however, LIBS showed superior selectivity as it was demonstrated to be more robust to sample matrix perturbations. Examples of blending applications will also be presented.

  13. Scale effects in tribological properties of solid-lubricating composites made of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene filled with calcium stearate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, S. A.; Volkov-Bogorodskiy, D. B.; Knyzeva, A. G.; Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.

    2016-04-01

    Friction properties being influenced by scale effects are simulated in the paper by the example of polymer composite material made from Ultra High-Molecular Weight Polyethylenes (UHMWPE) filled by calcium stearate (C36H70CaO4). Of interest are the composites whose mechanical properties and tribotechnical characteristics do not depend monotonically on filler (inclusions) weight fraction. In order to describe the influence of scale effects onto frictional properties the model based on Reiss averaging (model of "weak phase") is employed. It is also suggested that when gradient elasticity theory is applicable the formal analogy between effective friction coefficient for surface heterogeneous structures and effective mechanical properties (compliances) for heterogeneous material can take place. Theoretical dependence to describe nonmonotonic change of effective friction coefficient versus filler concentration was obtained for the polymer composites under study. The suggested expressions might be useful for the sake of properties prognosis of antifriction polymeric materilas.

  14. Application of the quantitative detection of a change in concentration of magnesium stearate in a feeder tube of tableting manufacture by real-time near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sasakura, D; Nakayama, K; Chikuma, T

    2015-10-01

    Process analytical technology is important for the analysis and control of manufacturing processes. Near-infrared spectroscopy is widely used in various process analytical technologies for the analysis of the chemical componentsof solid dosage forms. Lubrication is an important process carried out before a tablet is produced. In this process, the concentration of lubricant, such as magnesium stearate (StMg), might change for one of many reasons during powder transport, which would be a critical problem such as variation in tablet compressibility and dissolution failure of compressed tablets. Our group investigated the feasibility of the quantitative monitoring of a change in the concentration of StMg in the feeder tube of tableting equipment employing real-time near-infrared spectroscopy.

  15. Association of apolipoprotein E promoter polymorphisms with bone structural traits is modified by dietary saturated fat intake - the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Sanna; Mikkilä, Vera; Laaksonen, Marika; Sievänen, Harri; Mononen, Nina; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Vehkalahti, Kimmo; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2011-05-01

    Association of apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) bone traits at the distal and shaft sites of the radius and tibia was evaluated in the Young Finns Cohort (n=1777). We also analyzed the interactions of the APOE promoter polymorphisms (-219G/T rs405509 and +113G/C rs440446) and bone traits within the APOE ε3/ε3 genotype (n=1025 and n=1013, respectively), and investigated the gene-environment interactions on bone traits with longitudinal saturated fatty acids (SAFA) intake. Differences between the ε4 allele carriers and noncarriers were modest and mostly nonsignificant. Within the APOE promoter -219G/T polymorphism, cortical strength index (CSI) and compressive bone strength index (BSI) at the distal radius (linear, P=0.003 and P=0.05, respectively) and tibia (linear, P=0.01 and P=0.03, respectively), and CSI at the tibial shaft (linear, P=0.04) decreased towards the -219T/T genotype in women. In men, total cross-sectional areas at the radial site and stress-strain index (SSI) at the radial shaft (linear, P=0.03 and P=0.04 and P=0.05, respectively) increased, and conversely cortical bone density and CSI at the radial shaft (linear, P=0.005 and P=0.05, respectively) and CSI at the tibial shaft (linear, P=0.03) decreased towards the -219T/T genotype. In the highest SAFA tertile, women with the -219T/T genotype had the smallest total area and SSI at the radial shaft (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively). Subjects with the APOE +113C/C genotype shared similar bone traits as subjects with the APOE -219T/T genotype. In conclusion, APOE genotypes -219T/T and +113C/C could be genetic markers for cortical bone strength. Furthermore, high longitudinal SAFA intake seems to be more detrimental to bone in women with the -219T/T and +133C/C genotypes than others. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Computer access to research on dietary supplements: a database of federally funded dietary supplement research.

    PubMed

    Haggans, Carol J; Regan, Karen S; Brown, Lynda M; Wang, Chunling; Krebs-Smith, Jim; Coates, Paul M; Swanson, Christine A

    2005-07-01

    Dietary supplement use is prevalent in the United States, but support for supplement research has been relatively modest and only recently emphasized at the NIH. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994 led to the creation of the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the NIH to promote research on dietary supplements. In order to track federally funded dietary supplement research, the ODS developed a database known as Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements (CARDS). This article provides an overview of the development and potential uses of the CARDS database. In addition, we report that NIH-funded dietary supplement research steadily increased from fiscal year (FY) 1999 through 2002. The majority of NIH institutes or centers (ICs) funded research relevant to dietary supplements during this time, led by the National Cancer Institute and one of the newest NIH ICs, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. CARDS data indicate that NIH-funded dietary supplement research from FY 1999 through 2002 involved primarily vitamins, minerals, botanicals and phytochemicals. Cancer and cardiovascular disease, two of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States, collectively accounted for almost 45% of the research related to dietary supplements. A variety of types of research studies were funded, with the majority consisting of human intervention studies. This information is useful to evaluate trends in federally funded dietary supplement research, identify research gaps, and help research scientists identify potential sources of NIH funding.

  17. Dietary Intake among American Indians with Metabolic Syndrome – Comparison to Dietary Recommendations: the Balance Study

    PubMed Central

    ALI, Rohaid; LEE, Elisa T.; KNEHANS, Allen W.; ZHANG, Ying; YEH, Jeunliang; RHOADES, Everett R.; JOBE, Jared B.; ALI, Tauqeer; JOHNSON, Melanie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background American Indians have a very high prevalence of metabolic syndrome that increases their risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Dietary habits are of central importance in the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome. Objective The main objective of this article was to describe dietary intake among American Indians with metabolic syndrome and compare it to several dietary recommendations. A secondary objective was to identify certain barriers to dietary adherence experienced by this population. Methods A total of 213 participants with metabolic syndrome were enrolled in the Balance Study, a randomized controlled trial with two intervention groups: Guided Group and Self-Managed Group. Dietary intake was assessed using the Block Food Frequency questionnaire. Dietary intakes were evaluated against the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Results Intakes of saturated fats, cholesterol, and sodium were higher and intakes of dietary fiber, calcium, magnesium, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin D, and vitamin E were lower than recommended. Additionally, intake of many food groups was noticeably low. Economic factors seem to be related to low adherence to dietary recommendations. Conclusion Results showed low adherence by the participants to dietary recommendations for key nutrients and food groups related to risk factors for metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Economic factors are related to this low adherence. These findings illustrate a need to develop innovative, focused, and perhaps individualized health promotion strategies that can improve dietary habits of American Indians with metabolic syndrome. PMID:26594109

  18. Dietary Intake among American Indians with Metabolic Syndrome - Comparison to Dietary Recommendations: the Balance Study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rohaid; Lee, Elisa T; Knehans, Allen W; Zhang, Ying; Yeh, Jeunliang; Rhoades, Everett R; Jobe, Jared B; Ali, Tauqeer; Johnson, Melanie R

    American Indians have a very high prevalence of metabolic syndrome that increases their risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Dietary habits are of central importance in the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome. The main objective of this article was to describe dietary intake among American Indians with metabolic syndrome and compare it to several dietary recommendations. A secondary objective was to identify certain barriers to dietary adherence experienced by this population. A total of 213 participants with metabolic syndrome were enrolled in the Balance Study, a randomized controlled trial with two intervention groups: Guided Group and Self-Managed Group. Dietary intake was assessed using the Block Food Frequency questionnaire. Dietary intakes were evaluated against the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Intakes of saturated fats, cholesterol, and sodium were higher and intakes of dietary fiber, calcium, magnesium, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin D, and vitamin E were lower than recommended. Additionally, intake of many food groups was noticeably low. Economic factors seem to be related to low adherence to dietary recommendations. Results showed low adherence by the participants to dietary recommendations for key nutrients and food groups related to risk factors for metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Economic factors are related to this low adherence. These findings illustrate a need to develop innovative, focused, and perhaps individualized health promotion strategies that can improve dietary habits of American Indians with metabolic syndrome.

  19. Protocol for a qualitative study on promoting dietary change and positive food choices for poor people with low income who experience cardiovascular disease in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Barolia, Rubina Iqbal; Clark, Alexander M; Higginbottom, Gina M A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction There is a misconception that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the burden of wealthy nations, but, in fact, it is the leading cause of death and disability-adjusted life worldwide. Healthy diets are an essential factor in the prevention of CVD. However, promoting healthy diet is challenging, particularly for people with low-socioeconomic status (SES), because poverty is linked with many risk behaviours such as smoking, unhealthy eating and obesity. Multiple factors, cultural values and beliefs interact and make healthy eating very challenging. The effects of these factors in the context of low-SES populations with CVD are largely unknown. To address this gap, this study will examine the factors that affect decisions about consuming healthy diet in Pakistanis with low SES who suffer from CVD. Methods and analysis A qualitative method of interpretive description will be used. 25 participants will be selected from two cardiac rehabilitation (CR) centres in Karachi, Pakistan. Face-to-face interviews using a critical realist framework will be used to understand individual and contextual factors in the food choices of people with low SES and CVD. ATLAS.ti qualitative data analysis software will be used to identify themes and patterns in the interview data. Ethics and discussion Ethical approvals were received from the Ethics Review board of University of Alberta, Canada and Aga Khan University, Karachi Pakistan. The findings will generate new knowledge about which and how factors influence the food choices of Pakistanis with CVD and low SES to provide an insight into the development of an operational framework for designing interventions for prevention of CVD. For knowledge-translation purposes, we will publish the findings in highly accessed, peer-reviewed scientific and health policy journals at the national and international level. This research protocol received IRDC (International Development Research Centre) doctoral award from International Development

  20. Dietary rice bran protects against rotavirus diarrhea and promotes Th1-type immune responses to human rotavirus vaccine in gnotobiotic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingdong; Wen, Ke; Tin, Christine; Li, Guohua; Wang, Haifeng; Kocher, Jacob; Pelzer, Kevin; Ryan, Elizabeth; Yuan, Lijuan

    2014-10-01

    Rice bran (RB) contains a distinct stoichiometry of phytochemicals that can promote gut mucosal immune responses against enteric pathogens. The effects of RB on rotavirus diarrhea and immunogenicity of an attenuated human rotavirus (HRV) vaccine were evaluated in gnotobiotic pigs. The four treatment groups studied were RB plus vaccine, vaccine only, RB only, and mock control. Pigs in the RB groups were fed the amount of RB that replaced 10% of the pigs' total daily calorie intake from milk starting from 5 days of age until they were euthanized. Pigs in the vaccine groups were orally inoculated with two doses of the attenuated HRV vaccine. A subset of pigs from each group was orally challenged with the homologous virulent HRV on postinoculation day 28. Diarrhea and virus shedding were monitored daily from postchallenge day 0 to day 7. RB feeding significantly protected against diarrhea upon virulent HRV challenge and enhanced the protective rate of the vaccine against rotavirus diarrhea. Consistent with protection, RB significantly increased gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in intestinal and systemic lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, RB also increased the number of total IgM- and IgA-secreting cells, total serum IgM, IgG, and IgA titers, and HRV-specific IgA titers in intestinal contents. RB reduced the numbers of intestinal and systemic HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody-secreting cells and reduced serum HRV-specific IgA and IgG antibody titers before the challenge. These results demonstrate clear beneficial effects of RB in protection against rotavirus diarrhea and stimulation of nonspecific and HRV-specific immune responses, as well as its biased Th1-type adjuvant effect for the vaccine.

  1. Maternal dietary loads of α-tocopherol depress protein kinase C signaling and synaptic plasticity in rat postnatal developing hippocampus and promote permanent deficits in adult offspring.

    PubMed

    Betti, Michele; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Minelli, Andrea; Floridi, Alessandro; Lattanzi, Davide; Ciuffoli, Stefano; Bucherelli, Corrado; Prospero, Emilia; Frontini, Andrea; Santarelli, Lory; Baldi, Elisabetta; Benetti, Fernando; Galli, Francesco; Cuppini, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin E (α-tocopherol) supplementation has been tested as prophylaxis against gestational disorders associated with oxidative damage. However, recent evidence showing that high maternal α-tocopherol intake can adversely affect offspring development raises concerns on the safety of vitamin E extradosages during pregnancy. Besides acting as an antioxidant, α-tocopherol depresses cell proliferation and modulates cell signaling through inhibiting protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that is deeply involved in neural maturation and plasticity. Possible effects of α-tocopherol loads in the maturing brain, where PKC dysregulation is associated to developmental dysfunctions, are poorly known. Here, supranutritional doses of α-tocopherol were fed to pregnant and lactating dams to evaluate the effects on PKC signaling and morphofunctional maturation in offspring hippocampus. Results showed that maternal supplementation potentiates hippocampal α-tocopherol incorporation in offspring and leads to marked decrease of PKC phosphorylation throughout postnatal maturation, accompanied by reduced phosphorylation of growth-associated protein-43 and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate, two PKC substrates involved in neural development and plasticity. Although processes of neuronal maturation, synapse formation and targeting appeared unaffected, offspring of supplemented mothers displayed a marked reduction of long-term synaptic plasticity in juvenile hippocampus. Interestingly, this impairment persisted in adulthood, when a deficit in hippocampus-dependent, long-lasting spatial memory was also revealed. In conclusion, maternal supplementation with elevated doses of α-tocopherol can influence cell signaling and synaptic plasticity in developing hippocampus and promotes permanent adverse effects in adult offspring. The present results emphasize the need to evaluate the safety of supranutritional maternal intake of α-tocopherol in humans.

  2. Effectiveness of a universal parental support programme to promote healthy dietary habits and physical activity and to prevent overweight and obesity in 6-year-old children: the Healthy School Start Study, a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Gisela; Sundblom, Elinor; Norman, Åsa; Bohman, Benjamin; Hagberg, Jan; Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer

    2015-01-01

    To develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a parental support programme to promote healthy dietary and physical activity habits and to prevent overweight and obesity in Swedish children. A cluster-randomised controlled trial was carried out in areas with low to medium socio-economic status. Participants were six-year-old children (n = 243) and their parents. Fourteen pre-school classes were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 7) and control groups (n = 7). The intervention lasted for 6 months and included: 1) Health information for parents, 2) Motivational Interviewing with parents and 3) Teacher-led classroom activities with children. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry, dietary and physical activity habits and parental self-efficacy through a questionnaire. Body weight and height were measured and BMI standard deviation score was calculated. Measurements were conducted at baseline, post-intervention and at 6-months follow-up. Group differences were examined using analysis of covariance and Poisson regression, adjusted for gender and baseline values. There was no significant intervention effect in the primary outcome physical activity. Sub-group analyses showed a significant gender-group interaction in total physical activity (TPA), with girls in the intervention group demonstrating higher TPA during weekends (p = 0.04), as well as in sedentary time, with boys showing more sedentary time in the intervention group (p = 0.03). There was a significantly higher vegetable intake (0.26 servings) in the intervention group compared to the control group (p = 0.003). At follow-up, sub-group analyses showed a sustained effect for boys. The intervention did not affect the prevalence of overweight or obesity. It is possible to influence vegetable intake in children and girls' physical activity through a parental support programme. The programme needs to be intensified in order to increase effectiveness and sustain the effects long-term. These findings are an

  3. Dietary treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Moloney, M

    2000-11-01

    Numerous dietary treatments that purport to promote something unique for stimulating weight loss have been published. These treatments include fad diets, diets formulated by various commercial slimming clubs, very-low-energy diets (VLCD) and conventional diets. Fad diets may possibly reduce some weight short-term; however, there is no scientific basis to their long-term use. Commercial slimming clubs may be suitable for some individuals but they need to be properly assessed professionally. There are specific guidelines for the use of VLCD, which are only appropriate for short-term use. There is scientific evidence to suggest that conventional diets can produce both short- and long-term weight loss. A successful weight-loss programme depends on a multidisciplinary team approach. Management strategies should be devised for addressing issues such as goals, monitoring, follow-up, relapse and evaluation. Initial assessments should include medical, laboratory and anthropometric data, fitness level and dietary and behavioural attitudes. These results will form the basis of the treatment plan. Frequent visits to the clinic are fundamental in promoting continuing weight loss during the long-term maintenance stage of treatment. The visits should be made worthwhile for the patient. Realistic and attainable goals for diet, exercise and behaviour modification should be made. The diet should have a novel approach and be tailored to the needs of the patient. It should be adequate nutritionally, low in energy and fat. The overall aim should be to promote lifelong changes in lifestyle, improvement in quality of life and health risks.

  4. Vascular Effects of Dietary Advanced Glycation End Products

    PubMed Central

    Stirban, Alin; Tschöpe, Diethelm

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated lately demonstrating that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in the development of diabetic and cardiovascular complications as well as the development of other chronic diseases. AGEs originating from diet have a significant contribution to the AGEs body pool and therefore dietary interventions aiming at reducing AGEs load are believed to exert health promoting effects. This review summarizes the evidence from clinical studies regarding effects of dietary AGEs on the vascular system, highlighting also the different aspects of vascular tests. It also advocates an extension of dietary recommendations towards the promotion of cooking methods that reduce dietary AGEs in consumed foods. PMID:26089897

  5. A Dietary Medium-Chain Fatty Acid, Decanoic Acid, Inhibits Recruitment of Nur77 to the HSD3B2 Promoter In Vitro and Reverses Endocrine and Metabolic Abnormalities in a Rat Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao Hui; Indran, Inthrani Raja; Tan, Huey Min; Li, Yu; Zhang, Zhiwei; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong

    2016-01-01

    Hyperandrogenism is the central feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Due to the intricate relationship between hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance in PCOS, 50%-70% of these patients also present with hyperinsulinemia. Metformin, an insulin sensitizer, has been used to reduce insulin resistance and improve fertility in women with PCOS. In previous work, we have noted that a dietary medium-chain fatty acid, decanoic acid (DA), improves glucose tolerance and lipid profile in a mouse model of diabetes. Here, we report for the first time that DA, like metformin, inhibits androgen biosynthesis in NCI-H295R steroidogenic cells by regulating the enzyme 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ5-Δ4-isomerase type 2 (HSD3B2). The inhibitory effect on HSD3B2 and androgen production required cAMP stimulation, suggesting a mechanistic action via the cAMP-stimulated pathway. Specifically, both DA and metformin reduced cAMP-enhanced recruitment of the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 to the HSD3B2 promoter, coupled with decreased transcription and protein expression of HSD3B2. In a letrozole-induced PCOS rat model, treatment with DA or metformin reduced serum-free testosterone, lowered fasting insulin, and restored estrous cyclicity. In addition, DA treatment lowered serum total testosterone and decreased HSD3B2 protein expression in the adrenals and ovaries. We conclude that DA inhibits androgen biosynthesis via mechanisms resulting in the suppression of HSD3B2 expression, an effect consistently observed both in vitro and in vivo. The efficacy of DA in reversing the endocrine and metabolic abnormalities of the letrozole-induced PCOS rat model are promising, raising the possibility that diets including DA could be beneficial for the management of both hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance in PCOS.

  6. [Dietary changes in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mayans, J A; García Campos, M; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Mata Rivera, N; Zárate Mondragón, F; Mason Cordero, T; Villarreal Espinosa, A

    2003-06-01

    Although the Mexican population has traditionally been malnourished, the prevalence of obesity in children and adults has increased by almost 50 % in the last 10 years. Recent studies show substantial changes in the nutritional status of Mexicans, especially in the pediatric population. Among the factors associated with the development of obesity are overeating, sedentariness, and genetics. The apparent economic development in Mexico, as well as the influence of dietary patterns from other countries, have contributed to modifying lifestyle. Despite measures taken by the health system, iron- and zinc-deficiency anemia continue to be prevalent. The present review aims to describe the changes that have taken place in Mexico in the last few decades leading to a generation of short and obese children, as well as to determine the associated factors in order to promote healthier eating patterns among the Mexican population.

  7. The effect of Zn-Al-hydrotalcites composited with calcium stearate and β-diketone on the thermal stability of PVC.

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengliang; Chen, Hongyan; Yang, Zhanhong; Wen, Runjuan

    2011-01-01

    A clean-route synthesis of Zn-Al-hydrotalcites (Zn-Al-LDHs) using zinc oxide and sodium aluminate solution has been developed. The as-obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of metal ions at different molar ratios on the performance of hydrotalcites were discussed. The results showed that the Zn-Al-hydrotalcites can be successfully synthesized at three different Zn/Al ratios of 3:1, 2:1 and 1:1. Thermal aging tests of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) mixed with Zn-Al-LDHs, calcium stearate (CaSt(2)) and β-diketone were carried out in a thermal aging test box by observing the color change. The results showed that Zn-Al-LDHs can not only enhance the stability of PVC significantly due to the improved capacity of HCl-adsorption but also increase the initial stability and ensure good-initial coloring due to the presence of the Zn element. The effects of various amounts of Zn-Al-LDHs, CaSt(2) and β-diketone on the thermal stability of PVC were discussed. The optimum composition was determined to be 0.1 g Zn-Al-LDHs, 0.15 g CaSt(2) and 0.25 g β-diketone in 5 g PVC.

  8. Use of surface energy distributions by inverse gas chromatography to understand mechanofusion processing and functionality of lactose coated with magnesium stearate.

    PubMed

    Das, Shyamal C; Zhou, Qi; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J

    2011-07-17

    The purpose was to employ a new finite dilution approach to determine total surface energy distributions of mechanofused powders by inverse gas chromatography (IGC) to contribute to the understanding of their improved flow properties and to help optimise the magnesium stearate (MgSt) coating. Pharmatose 450M was mechanofused with between 0.1 and 8% (w/w) of MgSt. The non-polar, polar and total surface energies and work of cohesion at infinite dilution and the energy distributions at finite dilution were constructed using IGC. Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area and particle morphology were determined by IGC and scanning electron microscope, respectively. Surface energies determined at finite dilution appeared more consistent with the observed flow behaviour of mechanofused powders than comparative surface energy determination at infinite dilution. Polar and total surface energy distributions together with BET surface area measurements were the lowest when lactose was mechanofused with 1-2% MgSt (w/w). In conclusion, the surface energy distribution profiles measured at finite dilution were argued to be more informative and useful in reporting the surface energy changes during mechanofusion, optimising MgSt concentration in the mechanofusion process, and the flow behaviour of mechanofused powders.

  9. The Effect of Zn-Al-Hydrotalcites Composited with Calcium Stearate and β-Diketone on the Thermal Stability of PVC

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Mengliang; Chen, Hongyan; Yang, Zhanhong; Wen, Runjuan

    2011-01-01

    A clean-route synthesis of Zn-Al-hydrotalcites (Zn-Al-LDHs) using zinc oxide and sodium aluminate solution has been developed. The as-obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of metal ions at different molar ratios on the performance of hydrotalcites were discussed. The results showed that the Zn-Al-hydrotalcites can be successfully synthesized at three different Zn/Al ratios of 3:1, 2:1 and 1:1. Thermal aging tests of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) mixed with Zn-Al-LDHs, calcium stearate (CaSt2) and β-diketone were carried out in a thermal aging test box by observing the color change. The results showed that Zn-Al-LDHs can not only enhance the stability of PVC significantly due to the improved capacity of HCl-adsorption but also increase the initial stability and ensure good-initial coloring due to the presence of the Zn element. The effects of various amounts of Zn-Al-LDHs, CaSt2 and β-diketone on the thermal stability of PVC were discussed. The optimum composition was determined to be 0.1 g Zn-Al-LDHs, 0.15 g CaSt2 and 0.25 g β-diketone in 5 g PVC. PMID:21673921

  10. Formulation and evaluation of carvedilol melt-in-mouth tablet using mucoadhesive polymer and PEG-6-stearate as hydrophilic waxy binder

    PubMed Central

    Dangi, Amish Ashvinkumar; Zalodiya, Prakash Bhikhabhai

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The demand for melt-in-mouth tablets (MMTs) has been rapidly growing during the last decade, especially for the elderly and children who have swallowing difficulties, to avoid first-pass metabolism and quick drug entry into the systemic circulation. Materials and Methods: In this work, a new approach has been tried to prepare MMTs using a hydrophilic waxy binder [polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6-stearate]. Carvedilol MMTs were prepared by direct compression method using different mucoadhesive polymers such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), chitosan, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (Na-CMC) at various concentrations (range: 0.5–5%) to reduce the flushing action of saliva and to increase mucosal absorption. All the formulations were evaluated for various physiochemical parameters, and the formulations containing the maximum amount of polymer (F4, F7, and F10) were selected for further stability study. Results: The deaggregation time of the tablets was found to be rapid, and the dissolution test revealed that carvedilol was dissolved from the formulation within the compendia limits. This data confirmed that the polymer concentration (0.5–5%) was within acceptable limits. It was also concluded that avicel PH101, pearlitol SD 200, and croscarmellose sodium (CCS) were the appropriate excipients and formulated in the right proportion. Conclusion: As a result, mouth dissolving administration of carvedilol formulated with appropriate excipients and especially with chitosan seems a promising alternative to traditional routes. PMID:23580934

  11. Dietary cholesterol, heart disease risk and cognitive dissonance.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Donald J

    2014-05-01

    In the 1960s, the thesis that dietary cholesterol contributes to blood cholesterol and heart disease risk was a rational conclusion based on the available science at that time. Fifty years later the research evidence no longer supports this hypothesis yet changing the dietary recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol has been a slow and at times contentious process. The preponderance of the clinical and epidemiological data accumulated since the original dietary cholesterol restrictions were formulated indicate that: (1) dietary cholesterol has a small effect on the plasma cholesterol levels with an increase in the cholesterol content of the LDL particle and an increase in HDL cholesterol, with little effect on the LDL:HDL ratio, a significant indicator of heart disease risk, and (2) the lack of a significant relationship between cholesterol intake and heart disease incidence reported from numerous epidemiological surveys. Over the last decade, many countries and health promotion groups have modified their dietary recommendations to reflect the current evidence and to address a now recognised negative consequence of ineffective dietary cholesterol restrictions (such as inadequate choline intake). In contrast, health promotion groups in some countries appear to suffer from cognitive dissonance and continue to promote an outdated and potentially hazardous dietary recommendation based on an invalidated hypothesis. This review evaluates the evidence for and against dietary cholesterol restrictions and the potential consequences of such restrictions.

  12. The Dietary Guidelines For Americans 2005: Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Educator, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans [Dietary Guidelines] provides science-based advice to promote health and to reduce risk for major chronic diseases through diet and physical activity. Major causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States are related to poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle. Some specific diseases linked to poor diet and…

  13. Comparison of children's dietary intake patterns with US dietary guidelines.

    PubMed

    Brady, L M; Lindquist, C H; Herd, S L; Goran, M I

    2000-09-01

    Monitoring dietary intake patterns among children is important in order to explore and prevent the onset of adult health problems. The aim of the present study was to compare children's dietary intakes with national recommendations and to determine whether sex or ethnic differences were evident. This was done using a methodology that allows assessment of intake from the major components of the Food Guide Pyramid developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA: US Department of Agriculture and US Department of Health and Human Services (1992)). The sample studied included 110 African-American and Caucasian males and females (mean age 9.9 years, BMI 20.1 kg/m2) from Birmingham, AL, USA, who were participating in a study investigating the development of obesity. Dietary data were based on three 24 h recalls and food group intake was determined using the USDA Pyramid Servicing Database. The results indicated that a high percentage of subjects failed to meet the recommended number of servings from each of the food groups. For example, only 5 % and 9 % met fruit and dietary group recommendations respectively. Consumption of foods from the Pyramid 'tip' (including discretionary fat and added sugar) contributed almost 50 % of the diet. African-Americans were more likely to meet requirements for the meat group, with a higher proportion of Caucasians meeting dietary recommendations. Males were more likely to meet the vegetable group guidelines although females consumed more energy per day from discretionary fat. In conclusion, these results suggest that implementation of nutrition education programmes may be important for promoting healthy nutrition among American children.

  14. Proposed rule: current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, packing, or holding dietary ingredients and dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Melethil, Srikumaran

    2006-03-27

    The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) was enacted in October 1994 to promote the health of Americans by ensuring easier access to safe dietary supplements. Many supplements such as vitamins, minerals, herbs and amino acids have been reported to be helpful in chronic conditions (i.e., heart disease, cancer and osteoporosis). Under DSHEA, dietary supplements can be marketed without prior FDA approval; the burden is on this agency to show that a marketed dietary supplement is unsafe. However, DSHEA retained the FDA's authority to issue regulations that require the manufacture of dietary supplements be in compliance with current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) standards, which are needed to ensure their quality. Several quality-related concerns of marketed dietary supplements that came to light since the passage of DSHEA prompted the FDA in 2003 to propose rules for cGMP for the manufacture, packaging and holding (storage) of dietary supplements. This review will present the highlights of these proposed rules, focusing on the legislative history of DSHEA, rationale for proposing cGMPs along with a general discussion of the specific requirements. Given the voluminous nature of the specific details, the reader is directed to the pertinent FDA publications for details. In this analysis, selected scientific and legal issues are also discussed to promote a better understanding and implications of these rules.

  15. A comparative study of glycerin fatty acid ester and magnesium stearate on the dissolution of acetaminophen tablets using the analysis of available surface area.

    PubMed

    Uchimoto, Takeaki; Iwao, Yasunori; Takahashi, Kana; Tanaka, Shoko; Agata, Yasuyoshi; Iwamura, Takeru; Miyagishima, Atsuo; Itai, Shigeru

    2011-08-01

    To study the effect of glycerin fatty acid ester (Poem TR-FB) concentrations on the dissolution rate of acetaminophen (APAP), the dissolution and disintegration behaviors of APAP tablets formulated using various lubricants were examined. The change over time in the available surface area of APAP (S(t)), which is in direct contact with solvent, was also analyzed using these dissolution data. In the dissolution tests, a retarded dissolution of APAP was not observed with TR-FB, whereas magnesium stearate (Mg-St), which is widely used as a lubricant, retarded the dissolution. However, no significant difference in the disintegration time between the two lubricants was observed. With regard to the time course of the S(t), Mg-St at 0.1% gave a maximum surface area value at 9.19 min (peak time); however, the profiles for APAP with Mg-St at greater than 0.5% showed downward curvature indicating a gradual decrease in surface area over time. Conversely, with TR-FB, even when its concentration was increased, the S(t) profile for APAP had a maximum value that was more than twice that of APAP with that of 0.5-3.0% of Mg-St. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations showed that the differences in the dissolution rate and S(t) patterns between Mg-St and TR-FB could be explained by differences in extensibility deriving from their morphology. Therefore, it was concluded that TR-FB does not cause retardation of drug dissolution and may prove to be a superior alternative lubricant to Mg-St. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Progress in developing analytical and label-based dietary supplement databases at the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Johanna T.; Picciano, Mary Frances; Betz, Joseph M.; Fisher, Kenneth D.; Saldanha, Leila G.; Yetley, Elizabeth A.; Coates, Paul M.; Milner, John A.; Whitted, Jackie; Burt, Vicki; Radimer, Kathy; Wilger, Jaimie; Sharpless, Katherine E.; Holden, Joanne M.; Andrews, Karen; Roseland, Janet; Zhao, Cuiwei; Schweitzer, Amy; Harnly, James; Wolf, Wayne R.; Perry, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Although an estimated 50% of adults in the United States consume dietary supplements, analytically substantiated data on their bioactive constituents are sparse. Several programs funded by the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health enhance dietary supplement database development and help to better describe the quantitative and qualitative contributions of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes. ODS, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture, is developing a Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) verified by chemical analysis. The products chosen initially for analytical verification are adult multivitamin-mineral supplements (MVMs). These products are widely used, analytical methods are available for determining key constituents, and a certified reference material is in development. Also MVMs have no standard scientific, regulatory, or marketplace definitions and have widely varying compositions, characteristics, and bioavailability. Furthermore, the extent to which actual amounts of vitamins and minerals in a product deviate from label values is not known. Ultimately, DSID will prove useful to professionals in permitting more accurate estimation of the contribution of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes of nutrients and better evaluation of the role of dietary supplements in promoting health and well-being. ODS is also collaborating with the National Center for Health Statistics to enhance the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey dietary supplement label database. The newest ODS effort explores the feasibility and practicality of developing a database of all dietary supplement labels marketed in the US. This article describes these and supporting projects. PMID:25346570

  17. Progress in developing analytical and label-based dietary supplement databases at the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Johanna T; Picciano, Mary Frances; Betz, Joseph M; Fisher, Kenneth D; Saldanha, Leila G; Yetley, Elizabeth A; Coates, Paul M; Milner, John A; Whitted, Jackie; Burt, Vicki; Radimer, Kathy; Wilger, Jaimie; Sharpless, Katherine E; Holden, Joanne M; Andrews, Karen; Roseland, Janet; Zhao, Cuiwei; Schweitzer, Amy; Harnly, James; Wolf, Wayne R; Perry, Charles R

    2008-02-01

    Although an estimated 50% of adults in the United States consume dietary supplements, analytically substantiated data on their bioactive constituents are sparse. Several programs funded by the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health enhance dietary supplement database development and help to better describe the quantitative and qualitative contributions of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes. ODS, in collaboration with the United States Department of Agriculture, is developing a Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) verified by chemical analysis. The products chosen initially for analytical verification are adult multivitamin-mineral supplements (MVMs). These products are widely used, analytical methods are available for determining key constituents, and a certified reference material is in development. Also MVMs have no standard scientific, regulatory, or marketplace definitions and have widely varying compositions, characteristics, and bioavailability. Furthermore, the extent to which actual amounts of vitamins and minerals in a product deviate from label values is not known. Ultimately, DSID will prove useful to professionals in permitting more accurate estimation of the contribution of dietary supplements to total dietary intakes of nutrients and better evaluation of the role of dietary supplements in promoting health and well-being. ODS is also collaborating with the National Center for Health Statistics to enhance the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey dietary supplement label database. The newest ODS effort explores the feasibility and practicality of developing a database of all dietary supplement labels marketed in the US. This article describes these and supporting projects.

  18. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-02-15

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host's metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer.

  19. Current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, packaging, labeling, or holding operations for dietary supplements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-06-25

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule regarding current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) for dietary supplements. The final rule establishes the minimum CGMPs necessary for activities related to manufacturing, packaging, labeling, or holding dietary supplements to ensure the quality of the dietary supplement. The final rule is one of many actions related to dietary supplements that we are taking to promote and protect the public health.

  20. Nutritional policies and dietary guidelines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Teiji

    2011-01-01

    The national government settled on "Healthy Japan 21" as the premier preventive policy of lifestyle related diseases in 2000. In 2005, the effectiveness of the campaign was conducted, but the results did not turn out as expected. The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare made the "Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top (JFG-ST)" as a practical and easy way to improve eating habits for all of the people. The JFG-ST falls down when the balance of the diets worsens and expresses a stable thing in what a turn (exercise) does. Eyes down quantity to take out of each group per day is shown in the basic form by the 5 distinction from grain dishes, vegetable dishes, fish and meat dishes, milk, and fruits. In 2005, the Basic Law on Dietary Education was enacted to promote the dietary education about the importance of eating proper meals in order to solve problems such as inappropriate eating habits and nutrition intake, disturbances in diets, increases in lifestyle-related diseases, a fall in the rate of food self-sufficiency and so forth. The Ministry of Education and Science started a program to train people to become "diet and nutrition teacher" in primary school. JFG- ST is developed in a dietary education campaign as a standard method of the dietary education. In May, 2011, the government has announced the second dietary education promotional basic plan to assume five years.

  1. Sales promotions and food consumption.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Corinna

    2009-06-01

    Sales promotions are widely used to market food to adults, children, and youth. Yet, in contrast to advertising, practically no attention has been paid to their impacts on dietary behaviors, or to how they may be used more effectively to promote healthy eating. This review explores the available literature on the subject. The objective is to identify if and what literature exists, examine the nature of this literature, and analyze what can be learned from it about the effects of sales promotions on food consumption. The review finds that while sales promotions lead to significant sales increases over the short-term, this does not necessarily lead to changes in food-consumption patterns. Nevertheless, there is evidence from econometric modeling studies indicating that sales promotions can influence consumption patterns by influencing the purchasing choices of consumers and encouraging them to eat more. These effects depend on the characteristics of the food product, sales promotion, and consumer. The complexity of the effects means that sales promotions aiming to encourage consumption of nutritious foods need to be carefully designed. These conclusions are based on studies that use mainly sales data as a proxy for dietary intake. The nutrition (and economics) research communities should add to this existing body of research to provide evidence on the impact of sales promotions on dietary intake and related behaviors. This would help support the development of a sales promotion environment conducive to healthy eating.

  2. Using the Global Burden of Disease study to assist development of nation-specific fact sheets to promote prevention and control of hypertension and reduction in dietary salt: a resource from the World Hypertension League.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Norm R C; Lackland, Daniel T; Lisheng, Liu; Niebylski, Mark L; Nilsson, Peter M; Zhang, Xin-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Increased blood pressure and high dietary salt are leading risks for death and disability globally. Reducing the burden of both health risks are United Nations' targets for reducing noncommunicable disease. Nongovernmental organizations and individuals can assist by ensuring widespread dissemination of the best available facts and recommended interventions for both health risks. Simple but impactful fact sheets can be useful for informing the public, healthcare professionals, and policy makers. The World Hypertension League has developed fact sheets on dietary salt and hypertension but in many circumstances the greatest impact would be obtained from national-level fact sheets. This manuscript provides instructions and a template for developing fact sheets based on the Global Burden of Disease study and national survey data.

  3. Dietary shifts and implications for US agriculture.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P

    1995-06-01

    Changes to healthier dietary patterns similar to those of traditional Mediterranean diets or those of the US government's dietary guidelines and food guide pyramid would require significant changes in American agricultural practices. The volume, mix, production, and marketing of agricultural commodities would need to be modified. Because differences between actual and recommended intakes for major food groups are quite large and affect a broad range of products, adjustments in supply and demand could overshadow past experience in dealing with such changes. New food and agriculture policies may well be needed to ease and accelerate agricultural adjustments, to improve nutritional characteristics of popular foods, and to promote desirable changes in consumers' food choices.

  4. Dietary sources of fiber intake in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sardinha, Aline Nascimento; Canella, Daniela Silva; Martins, Ana Paula Bortoletto; Claro, Rafael Moreira; Levy, Renata Bertazzi

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the household availability of fibers in Brazil and to identify the dietary sources of this nutrient. Data from the 2008-2009 Household Budget Survey were used to estimate national household availability and density of fibers and also according to stratifications defined by income level, five regions and area (rural or urban). The contribution of the different food groups, classified by the nature, extent and purpose of processing, to total fibers available in Brazilian households was also determined. The mean density of per capita fibers was 7.6 g/1000 kcal. Higher availability and density of fibers was observed in households situated in rural areas and among low-income families. The main dietary sources of fiber were beans, bread, rice, fruit, vegetables and manioc flour. Fiber intake was found to be insufficient. Therefore, actions promoting a healthy diet are needed to improve the dietary quality of the Brazilian population.

  5. Protection of Dietary Polyphenols against Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yijian; Yao, Hua; Yao, Yanan; Yenwong Fai, Leonard; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer represents a health burden worldwide with approximate 275,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Its poor prognosis is due to local tumor invasion and frequent lymph node metastasis. Better understanding and development of novel treatments and chemo-preventive approaches for the preventive and therapeutic intervention of this type of cancer are necessary. Recent development of dietary polyphenols as cancer preventives and therapeutic agents is of great interest due to their antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic activities. Polyphenols may inhibit carcinogenesis in the stage of initiation, promotion, or progression. In particular, dietary polyphenols decrease incidence of carcinomas and exert protection against oral cancer by induction of cell death and inhibition of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this review, we discuss current progress of dietary polyphenols against oral cancers in vitro, in vivo, and at population levels. PMID:23771133

  6. Using Dietary Supplements Wisely

    MedlinePlus

    ... you to take. If you experience any side effects that concern you, stop taking the dietary supplement, and contact your health care provider. You can report serious problems suspected with dietary supplements to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of ...

  7. Dietary fat interacts with the -514C>T polymorphism in the hepatic lipase gene promoter on plasma lipid profiles in a multiethnic Asian population: the 1998 Singapore National Health Survey.

    PubMed

    Tai, E Shyong; Corella, Dolores; Deurenberg-Yap, Mabel; Cutter, Jeffery; Chew, Suok Kai; Tan, Chee Eng; Ordovas, Jose M

    2003-11-01

    We have previously reported an interaction between -514C>T polymorphism at the hepatic lipase (HL) gene and dietary fat on high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) metabolism in a representative sample of white subjects participating in the Framingham Heart Study. Replication of these findings in other populations will provide proof for the relevance and consistency of this marker as a tool for risk assessment and more personalized cardiovascular disease prevention. Therefore, we examined this gene-nutrient interaction in a representative sample of Singaporeans (1324 Chinese, 471 Malays and 375 Asian Indians) whose dietary fat intake was recorded by a validated questionnaire. When no stratification by fat intake was considered, the T allele was associated with higher plasma HDL-C concentrations (P = 0.001), higher triglyceride (TG) concentrations (P = 0.001) and higher HDL-C/TG ratios (P = 0.041). We found a highly significant interaction (P = 0.001) between polymorphism and fat intake in determining TG concentration and the HDL-C/TG ratio (P = 0.001) in the overall sample even after adjustment for potential confounders. Thus, TT subjects showed higher TG concentrations only when fat intake supplied >30% of total energy. This interaction was also found when fat intake was considered as continuous (P = 0.035). Moreover, in the upper tertile of fat intake, TT subjects had 45% more TG than CC individuals (P < 0.01). For HDL-C concentration, the gene-diet interaction was significant (P = 0.015) only in subjects of Indian origin. In conclusion, our results indicate that there are differences in the association of -514C>T polymorphism with plasma lipids according to dietary intake and ethnic background. Specifically, the TT genotype is associated with a more atherogenic lipid profile when subjects consume diets with a fat content > 30%.

  8. Psychological predictors of dietary intentions in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gardner, B; Croker, H; Barr, S; Briley, A; Poston, L; Wardle, J

    2012-08-01

    Consuming a healthy diet in pregnancy has the potential to improve obstetric outcome, including minimising the risk of macrosomia. Effective promotion of dietary change depends on identifying and targeting determinants of gestational diet. The present study aimed to model psychological predictors of intentions to reduce intake of high-fat and high-sugar foods, and increase fruit and vegetable consumption, among pregnant women. One hundred and three pregnant women completed questionnaire measures of intentions to modify the consumption of the target foods, current intake, perceived vulnerability to and severity of adverse outcomes of unhealthful consumption of these foods (i.e. 'threat'), benefits of dietary change to mother and baby, barriers to dietary changes, and social approval for dietary change ('subjective norms'). A cross-sectional design was used. Logistic regression analyses were undertaken to model dietary change intentions. Participants who reported excessive current intake of high-fat and high-sugar foods were more likely to intend to reduce the intake of these foods. Perceived benefits for mother and baby enhanced intentions to eat more fruit and vegetables and eat less high-fat, and marginally significantly increased high-sugar reduction intentions. There were no effects of threat, barriers or subjective norms. Lack of effects for barriers, threat and subjective norms may indicate that pregnant women discount barriers to health-promoting behaviour, understand the threat posed by unhealthy eating and perceive social approval from others. Dietary change interventions for pregnant women should emphasise likely positive outcomes for both mother and child. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  9. [Diet counseling through "Shoku-dietary Coaching"].

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Naoko

    2005-11-01

    "Shoku-dietary Coaching" is a skill under development by Kageyama, who applies "coaching," widely used in the business field, to diet counseling. This counseling aims at improving conventional "nutritional guidance-type diet counseling" and promoting self-motivation so that healthy clients eagerly improve their own health, and clients with obesity or lifestyle-related diseases can learn self-control. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, the basis for the differentiation between healthy and unhealthy conditions is not only the parameters measured by medical devices. In Shoku-dietary Coaching, attention is directed to clients' assessment of their own lifestyle, dietary goals they have, and actions they will take to achieve them. To increase the health level of clients, we are developing techniques to enhance their motivation by showing sympathy with and support for their dietary behavior and health awareness. In addition, we give guidance through both theory and the practice of such things as having three meals a day at regular hours, knowing the kinds and daily amounts of foods appropriate for each client, and clarifying the percentages of seasonings necessary for cooking. The habit of having meals at regular hours alleviates stress, promotes communication with people sitting at the same table, and increases the health level of both the client and the others. These are important elements in the theory of Shoku-dietary Coaching. Putting the above into practice should not be limited to clients, but should include the clinic staff so as to deepen their own understanding and communication. Enhanced communication reinforces team medical care in the clinic. Communication skills which involve respect for others, continuous motivation of individuals, and achievement of purposes that may even require a long time may be useful for all people.

  10. Ramadan Major Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. Results: We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). Conclusions: This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest. PMID:25593728

  11. Ramadan major dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-09-01

    There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest.

  12. Dietary fibres in the regulation of appetite and food intake. Importance of viscosity.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mette; Jensen, Morten Georg

    2011-02-01

    Dietary fibres have many functions in the diet, one of which may be to promote control of energy intake and reduce the risk of developing obesity. This is linked to the unique physico-chemical properties of dietary fibres which aid early signalling of satiation and prolonged or enhanced sensation of satiety. Particularly the ability of some dietary fibres to increase viscosity of intestinal contents offers numerous opportunities to affect appetite regulation. Few papers on the satiating effect of dietary fibres include information on the physico-chemical characteristics of the dietary fibres being tested, including molecular weight and viscosity. For viscosity to serve as a proxy for soluble dietary fibres it is essential to have an understanding of individual dietary fibre viscosity characteristics. The goal of this paper is to provide a brief overview on the role of dietary fibres in appetite regulation highlighting the importance of viscosity.

  13. Barriers and facilitators to following the Dietary Guidelines for Americans reported by rural, Northern Plains American-Indian children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans promote healthy dietary choices for all Americans aged 2 years and older; however, the majority of Americans do not meet recommendations. The goal of the present study was to identify both barriers and facilitators to adherence to Dietary Guidelines for Americans...

  14. A review of methods to measure dietary sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Brooke

    2006-01-01

    With the rising prevalence of heart failure, it is imperative to investigate reasons for dietary sodium nonadherence and to develop evidence-based interventions to promote adherence. However, one of the biggest obstacles in studying adherence to a low sodium diet is the imprecision in measurement of dietary sodium intake. The purpose of this article is to critically review current methods used to measure dietary sodium intake. Specifically, 24-hour urine, single- and multiple-day food records, and 24-hour dietary recalls are compared and contrasted. The reliability and validity of these methods are discussed. When choosing a method to measure dietary sodium, it is important also to consider other strengths and weaknesses of each method. The "best" method to be used in research may depend not only on the above information, but also on the research question as well as characteristics of the population under study.

  15. An energy-reduced dietary pattern, including moderate protein and increased nonfat dairy intake combined with walking promotes beneficial body composition and metabolic changes in women with excess adiposity: a randomized comparative trial

    PubMed Central

    Shlisky, Julie D; Durward, Carrie M; Zack, Melissa K; Gugger, Carolyn K; Campbell, Jessica K; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M

    2015-01-01

    Moderate protein and nonfat dairy intake within an energy-reduced diet (ERD) may contribute to health benefits achieved with body weight (BW) loss. The current study examined the effectiveness of a weight-loss/weight-loss maintenance intervention using an ERD with moderate dietary protein (30% of kcals) and increased nonfat dairy intake (4–5 svg/d), including yogurt (INT group) and daily walking compared to an ERD with standard protein (16–17% of kcals) and standard nonfat dairy intake (3 svg/d) (COM group) with daily walking. A randomized comparative trial with 104 healthy premenopausal women with overweight/obesity was conducted in a university setting. Women were randomized to INT group or COM group. Anthropometric measurements, as well as dietary intake, selected vital signs, resting energy expenditure, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, and selected adipose-derived hormones were measured at baseline, and weeks 2, 12, and 24. Targets for dietary protein and nonfat dairy intake, while initially achieved, were not sustained in the INT group. There were no significant effects of diet group on anthropometric measurements. Women in the INT group and COM group, respectively, reduced BW (−4.9 ± 3.2 and −4.3 ± 3.3 kg, P < 0.001) and fat mass (−3.0 ± 2.2 and −2.3 ± 2.3 kg, P < 0.001) during the 12-week weight-loss phase and maintained these losses at 24 weeks. Both groups experienced significant decreases in body mass index, fat-free soft tissue mass, body fat percentage, waist and hip circumferences and serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and leptin (all P < 0.001). Healthy premenopausal women with excess adiposity effectively lost BW and fat mass and improved some metabolic risk factors following an ERD with approximately 20% protein and 3 svg/d of nonfat dairy intake. PMID:26405524

  16. An energy-reduced dietary pattern, including moderate protein and increased nonfat dairy intake combined with walking promotes beneficial body composition and metabolic changes in women with excess adiposity: a randomized comparative trial.

    PubMed

    Shlisky, Julie D; Durward, Carrie M; Zack, Melissa K; Gugger, Carolyn K; Campbell, Jessica K; Nickols-Richardson, Sharon M

    2015-09-01

    Moderate protein and nonfat dairy intake within an energy-reduced diet (ERD) may contribute to health benefits achieved with body weight (BW) loss. The current study examined the effectiveness of a weight-loss/weight-loss maintenance intervention using an ERD with moderate dietary protein (30% of kcals) and increased nonfat dairy intake (4-5 svg/d), including yogurt (INT group) and daily walking compared to an ERD with standard protein (16-17% of kcals) and standard nonfat dairy intake (3 svg/d) (COM group) with daily walking. A randomized comparative trial with 104 healthy premenopausal women with overweight/obesity was conducted in a university setting. Women were randomized to INT group or COM group. Anthropometric measurements, as well as dietary intake, selected vital signs, resting energy expenditure, blood lipids, glucose, insulin, and selected adipose-derived hormones were measured at baseline, and weeks 2, 12, and 24. Targets for dietary protein and nonfat dairy intake, while initially achieved, were not sustained in the INT group. There were no significant effects of diet group on anthropometric measurements. Women in the INT group and COM group, respectively, reduced BW (-4.9 ± 3.2 and -4.3 ± 3.3 kg, P < 0.001) and fat mass (-3.0 ± 2.2 and -2.3 ± 2.3 kg, P < 0.001) during the 12-week weight-loss phase and maintained these losses at 24 weeks. Both groups experienced significant decreases in body mass index, fat-free soft tissue mass, body fat percentage, waist and hip circumferences and serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and leptin (all P < 0.001). Healthy premenopausal women with excess adiposity effectively lost BW and fat mass and improved some metabolic risk factors following an ERD with approximately 20% protein and 3 svg/d of nonfat dairy intake.

  17. The importance of dietary carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castillo, Claudia P; Hudson, Geoffrey J; Englyst, Hans N; Dewey, Peter; James, W Philip T

    2002-12-01

    Forty years ago carbohydrates (CHO) were regarded as a simple energy source whereas they are now recognized as important food components. The human diet contains a wide range of CHO, the vast majority of which are of plant origin. Modern techniques based on chemical classification of dietary CHO replaced the traditional "by difference" measurement. They provide a logical basis for grouping into categories of specific nutritional importance. The physiological effects of dietary CHO are highly dependent on the rate and extent of digestion and absorption in the small intestine and fermentation in the large intestine, interactions which promote human health. Current knowledge of the fate of dietary CHO means that the potentially undesirable properties of many modern foods could be altered by using processing techniques that yield foods with more intact plant cell wall structures. Such products would more closely resemble the foods in the pre-agriculture diet with respect to the rate of digestion and absorption of CHO in the small intestine. The potentially detrimental physiological consequences of eating sugars and starch that are rapidly digested and absorbed in the small intestine suggest that, as fibre, the form, as well as the amount of starch should be considered. Increasing consumer awareness of the relationship between diet and health has led to demands for more widespread nutrition labelling. The entry "carbohydrate" is required in most countries, and the value is usually obtained "by difference" and used in the calculation of energy content. However, the value provides no nutritional information per se. Food labels should provide values that aid consumers in selecting a healthy diet.

  18. Preschoolers’ Dietary Behaviours: Parents’ Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    TUCKER, PATRICIA; IRWIN, JENNIFER D.; HE, MEIZI; BOUCK, L. MICHELLE SANGSTER; POLLETT, GRAHAM

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Preschoolers’ dietary intake behaviours are described from the perspective of their parents. Methods A maximum variation sample of 71 parents of preschoolers participated in this qualitative study. Ten semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted. Two experienced moderators facilitated all focus groups, which were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of the data were employed throughout the study. Two team members independently performed inductive content analysis. NVivo software was used to code the emerging themes. Results Parents identified food and food issues as key health-related behaviours among preschoolers. Parents discussed challenges to healthy eating, including time limitations and societal pressures, as well as methods for facilitating healthy food choices, including bribery, education, and being creative with food. Conclusions Dietary intake is on the minds of preschoolers’ parents. Unfortunately, some methods that parents currently use to promote healthy food choices may be more detrimental than beneficial for children in the long term. Parents’ keen interest in their preschoolers’ eating habits may make them particularly receptive to learning about and facilitating healthy choices in more behaviourally appropriate ways. Widespread educational messages about the benefits and detriments of various strategies to facilitate healthy eating among preschoolers therefore seem warranted. PMID:16759432

  19. Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database

    MedlinePlus

    ... and US Department of Agriculture Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database Toggle navigation Menu Home About DSID Mission Current ... values can be saved to build a small database or add to an existing database for national, ...

  20. Alternate dietary lifestyles.

    PubMed

    Krey, S H

    1982-09-01

    Various forms of vegetarian diets are discussed and evaluated for their nutritional adequacy. Health, philosophical, religious, ecological, and economic concerns are suggested as possible reasons for these alternate dietary lifestyles. Nutrients of specific concern ot the vegetarian are highlighted and suggestions given to help incorporate these in the diet, thereby avoiding marginal intakes. With judicious menu planning and careful thought to food selections, most vegetarian diets can supply excellent nutrition. Very restricted vegetarian diets or higher level macrobiotic diets may not be nutritionally complete, and individuals following these diets may benefit from special dietary counseling and dietary supplementation. Otherwise, these diets may place the adult as well as pregnant and lactating women, infants, and children at a nutritional risk. As vegetarian food habits are becoming more widespread, physicians and nutritionists must be knowledgeable about these alternate dietary lifestyles in order to counsel their patients appropriately, to understand the reasons for these eating habits, and to be supportive of the choice of diet.

  1. FDA 101: Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... has certain safety monitoring responsibilities. These include monitoring mandatory reporting of serious adverse events by dietary supplement ... Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Alimentos y Bebidas ...

  2. Effects of disintegration-promoting agent, lubricants and moisture treatment on optimized fast disintegrating tablets.

    PubMed

    Late, Sameer G; Yu, Yi-Ying; Banga, Ajay K

    2009-01-05

    Effects of calcium silicate (disintegration-promoting agent) and various lubricants on an optimized beta-cyclodextrin-based fast-disintegrating tablet formulation were investigated. Effects of moisture treatment were also evaluated at 75, 85 and 95% relative humidities. A two factor, three levels (3(2)) full factorial design was used to optimize concentrations of calcium silicate and lubricant. Magnesium stearate, being commonly used lubricant, was used to optimize lubricant concentration in optimization study. Other lubricants were evaluated at an obtained optimum concentration. Desiccator with saturated salt solutions was used to analyze effects of moisture treatments. Results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that concentration of calcium silicate had no effect; however concentration of lubricant was found to be important for tablet disintegration and hardness. An optimized value of 1.5% of magnesium stearate gave disintegration time of 23.4 s and hardness of 1.42 kg. At an optimized concentration, glycerol dibehenate and L-leucine significantly affected disintegration time, while talc and stearic acid had no significant effect. Tablet hardness was significantly affected with L-leucine, while other lubricants had no significant effect. Hardness was not affected at 75% moisture treatment. Moisture treatment at 85 and 95% increased hardness of the tablets; however at the same time it negatively affected the disintegration time.

  3. Dietary modifiers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, L; Simonsen, N; Mottus, K

    1995-01-01

    Dietary components express a wide range of activities that can affect carcinogenesis. Naturally occurring substances in foods have been shown in laboratory experiments to serve as dietary antimutagens, either as bioantimutagens or as desmutagens. Dietary desmutagens may function as chemical inactivaters, enzymatic inducers, scavengers, or antioxidants. Dietary components may also act later in the carcinogenic process as tumor growth suppressors. Examples of dietary factors acting in each of these stages of carcinogenesis are presented, and potential anticarcinogens such as the carotenoids, tocopherols, phenolic compounds, glucosinolates, metal-binding proteins, phytoestrogens, and conjugated linoleic acid are discussed. Individual foods typically contain multiple potential anticarcinogens. Many of these substances can influence carcinogenesis through more than one mechanism. Some substances exhibit both anticarcinogenic and carcinogenic activity in vitro, depending on conditions. Epidemiologic research indicates that high fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with lower cancer risk. Little research has focused on the effects of single substances or single foods in man. Realization of the potential of foodborne substances to reduce the human burden of cancer will only be achieved with better measurement of dietary exposures and funding of multidisciplinary research in this area commensurate with its importance. PMID:8741780

  4. Dietary supplements for football.

    PubMed

    Hespel, P; Maughan, R J; Greenhaff, P L

    2006-07-01

    Physical training and competition in football markedly increase the need for macro- and micronutrient intake. This requirement can generally be met by dietary management without the need for dietary supplements. In fact, the efficacy of most supplements available on the market is unproven. In addition, players must be cautious of inadequate product labelling and supplement impurities that may cause a positive drug test. Nonetheless, a number of dietary supplements may beneficially affect football performance. A high endurance capacity is a prerequisite for optimal match performance, particularly if extra time is played. In this context, the potential of low-dose caffeine ingestion (2 - 5 mg . kg body mass(-1)) to enhance endurance performance is well established. However, in the case of football, care must be taken not to overdose because visual information processing might be impaired. Scoring and preventing goals as a rule requires production of high power output. Dietary creatine supplementation (loading dose: 15 - 20 g . day(-1), 4 - 5 days; maintenance dose: 2 - 5 g g . day(-1)) has been found to increase muscle power output, especially during intermittent sprint exercises. Furthermore, creatine intake can augment muscle adaptations to resistance training. Team success and performance also depend on player availability, and thus injury prevention and health maintenance. Glucosamine or chondroitin may be useful in the treatment of joint pain and osteoarthritis, but there is no evidence to support the view that the administration of these supplements will be preventative. Ephedra-containing weight-loss cocktails should certainly be avoided due to reported adverse health effects and positive doping outcomes. Finally, the efficacy of antioxidant or vitamin C intake in excess of the normal recommended dietary dose is equivocal. Responses to dietary supplements can vary substantially between individuals, and therefore the ingestion of any supplement must be assessed

  5. Final report on the safety assessment of trilaurin, triarachidin, tribehenin, tricaprin, tricaprylin, trierucin, triheptanoin, triheptylundecanoin, triisononanoin, triisopalmitin, triisostearin, trilinolein, trimyristin, trioctanoin, triolein, tripalmitin, tripalmitolein, triricinolein, tristearin, triundecanoin, glyceryl triacetyl hydroxystearate, glyceryl triacetyl ricinoleate, and glyceryl stearate diacetate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W

    2001-01-01

    an increase in mammary tumors in the offspring compared to that seen in offspring of untreated animals, but similar studies in pregnant hamsters and rabbits showed no tumors in the offspring. One study of Triolein injected subcutaneously in rats showed no tumors at the injection site. As part of an effort to evaluate vehicles used in carcinogenicity studies, the National Toxicology Program conducted a 2-year carcinogenicity study in rats given Tricaprylin by gavage. This treatment was associated with a statistically significant dose-related increase in pancreatic acinar cell hyperplasia and adenoma, but there were no acinar carcinomas, the incidence of mononuclear leukemia was less, and nephropathy findings were reduced, all compared to corn oil controls. Overall, the study concluded that Tricaprylin did not offer significant advantages over corn oil as vehicles in carcinogenicity studies. Trilaurin was found to inhibit the formation of neoplasms initiated by dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and promoted by croton oil. Tricaprylin was not teratogenic in mice or rats, but some reproductive effects were seen in rabbits. A low level of fetal eye abnormalities and a small percentage of abnormal sperm were reported in mice injected with Trioctanoin as a vehicle control. Clinical tests of Trilaurin at 36.3% in a commercial product applied to the skin produced no irritation reactions. Trilaurin, Tristearin, and Tribehenin at 40%, 1.68%, and 0.38%, respectively, in commercial products were also negative in repeated-insult patch tests. Tristearin at 0.32% in a commercial product induced transient, mild to moderate, ocular irritation after instillation into the eyes of human subjects. Based on the enhancement of penetration of other chemicals by skin treatment with glyceryl triesters, it is recommended that care be exercised in using them in cosmetic products. On the basis of the available data, the following 23 glyceryl triesters are considered safe as used in cosmetics

  6. Correlation between Intake of Dietary Fiber and Adherence to the Korean National Dietary Guidelines in Adolescents from Jeonju

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunmi; Na, Woori; Kim, Misung; Kim, Eunsoo; Sohn, Cheongmin

    2012-01-01

    This study surveyed dietary intake and adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines in Korean adolescents. To elucidate basic data for use in nutrition education, which aims to improve adolescent compliance with the national dietary guidelines and to increase the intake of dietary fiber, we evaluated the sources of fiber in adolescent diets. This study included 182 male and 212 female students from 2 middle schools in the Jeonju province. From November 15~20, 2011, we surveyed the students for general characteristics, adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, and dietary intake. Dietary fiber intake was 16.57 ± 6.95 g/day for male students and 16.14 ± 7.11 g/day for female students. The food groups that contributed most to dietary fiber intake were (in descending order) cereals, vegetables, seasoning, and fruits. The fiber-containing food items consumed most were cabbage- kimchi, cooked rice, instant noodles, and cabbage. Based on adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, the vegetable-based intake of dietary fiber in groups 1 (score 15~45), 2 (score 46~52), and 3 (score 53~75) were 4.41 ± 2.595 g/day, 4.12 ± 2.692 g/day, and 5.49 ± 3.157 g/day, respectively (p<0.001). In addition, the total intake of dietary fiber varied significantly among the three groups (p<0.001) as follows: Group 1, 14.99 ± 6.374 g/day; Group 2, 15.32 ± 6.772 g/day; and Group 3, 18.79 ± 7.361 g/day. In this study, we discovered that adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines correlates with improved intake of dietary fiber. Therefore, marketing and educational development is needed to promote adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines. In addition, nutritional education is needed to improve dietary fiber consumption through the intake of vegetables and fruits other than kimchi. PMID:24471093

  7. Correlation between Intake of Dietary Fiber and Adherence to the Korean National Dietary Guidelines in Adolescents from Jeonju.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmi; Na, Woori; Kim, Misung; Kim, Eunsoo; Sohn, Cheongmin

    2012-12-01

    This study surveyed dietary intake and adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines in Korean adolescents. To elucidate basic data for use in nutrition education, which aims to improve adolescent compliance with the national dietary guidelines and to increase the intake of dietary fiber, we evaluated the sources of fiber in adolescent diets. This study included 182 male and 212 female students from 2 middle schools in the Jeonju province. From November 15~20, 2011, we surveyed the students for general characteristics, adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, and dietary intake. Dietary fiber intake was 16.57 ± 6.95 g/day for male students and 16.14 ± 7.11 g/day for female students. The food groups that contributed most to dietary fiber intake were (in descending order) cereals, vegetables, seasoning, and fruits. The fiber-containing food items consumed most were cabbage- kimchi, cooked rice, instant noodles, and cabbage. Based on adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines, the vegetable-based intake of dietary fiber in groups 1 (score 15~45), 2 (score 46~52), and 3 (score 53~75) were 4.41 ± 2.595 g/day, 4.12 ± 2.692 g/day, and 5.49 ± 3.157 g/day, respectively (p<0.001). In addition, the total intake of dietary fiber varied significantly among the three groups (p<0.001) as follows: Group 1, 14.99 ± 6.374 g/day; Group 2, 15.32 ± 6.772 g/day; and Group 3, 18.79 ± 7.361 g/day. In this study, we discovered that adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines correlates with improved intake of dietary fiber. Therefore, marketing and educational development is needed to promote adherence to the Korean national dietary guidelines. In addition, nutritional education is needed to improve dietary fiber consumption through the intake of vegetables and fruits other than kimchi.

  8. Why US children use dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Regan L; Gahche, Jaime J; Thomas, Paul R; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2013-12-01

    Dietary supplements are used by one-third of children. We examined motivations for supplement use in children, the types of products used by motivations, and the role of physicians and health care practitioners in guiding choices about supplements. We examined motivations for dietary supplement use reported for children (from birth to 19 y of age; n = 8,245) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2010. Dietary supplements were used by 31% of children; many different reasons were given as follows: to "improve overall health" (41%), to "maintain health" (37%), for "supplementing the diet" (23%), to "prevent health problems" (20%), and to "boost immunity" (14%). Most children (~90%) who use dietary supplements use a multivitamin-mineral or multivitamin product. Supplement users tend to be non-Hispanic white, have higher family incomes, report more physical activity, and have health insurance. Only a small group of supplements used by children (15%) were based on the recommendation of a physician or other health care provider. Most supplements used by children are not under the recommendation of a health care provider. The most common reasons for use of supplements in children are for health promotion, yet little scientific data support this notion in nutrient-replete children.

  9. Why US children use dietary supplements

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Regan L.; Gahche, Jaime J.; Thomas, Paul R.; Dwyer, Johanna T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dietary supplements are used by one-third of children. We examined motivations for supplement use in children, the types of products used by motivations, and the role of physicians and health care practitioners in guiding choices about supplements. Methods: We examined motivations for dietary supplement use reported for children (from birth to 19 y of age; n = 8,245) using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007–2010. Results: Dietary supplements were used by 31% of children; many different reasons were given as follows: to “improve overall health” (41%), to “maintain health” (37%), for “supplementing the diet” (23%), to “prevent health problems” (20%), and to “boost immunity” (14%). Most children (~90%) who use dietary supplements use a multivitamin–mineral or multivitamin product. Supplement users tend to be non-Hispanic white, have higher family incomes, report more physical activity, and have health insurance. Only a small group of supplements used by children (15%) were based on the recommendation of a physician or other health care provider. Conclusion: Most supplements used by children are not under the recommendation of a health care provider. The most common reasons for use of supplements in children are for health promotion, yet little scientific data support this notion in nutrient-replete children. PMID:24002333

  10. Chemoprevention of photocarcinogenesis by selected dietary botanicals.

    PubMed

    Baliga, Manjeshwar S; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2006-02-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory studies have implicated solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a tumor initiator, tumor promoter and complete carcinogen, and their excessive exposure can lead to the development of various skin disorders including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Sunscreens are useful, but their protection is not adequate to prevent the risk of UV-induced skin cancer. It may be because of inadequate use, incomplete spectral protection and toxicity. Therefore new chemopreventive methods are necessary to protect the skin from photodamaging effects of solar UV radiation. Chemoprevention refers to the use of agents that can inhibit, reverse or retard the process of skin carcinogenesis. In recent years, considerable interest has been focused on identifying naturally occurring botanicals, specifically dietary, for the prevention of photocarcinogenesis. A wide variety of botanicals, mostly dietary flavonoids or phenolic substances, have been reported to possess substantial anticarcinogenic and antimutagenic activities because of their antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. This review summarizes chemopreventive effects of some selected botanicals, such as apigenin, curcumin, grape seed proanthocyanidins, resveratrol, silymarin, and green tea polyphenols, against photocarcinogenesis in in vitro and in vivo systems. Attention has also been focused on highlighting the mechanism of chemopreventive action of these dietary botanicals. We suggest that in addition to the use of these botanicals as dietary supplements for the protection of photocarcinogenesis, these botanicals may favorably supplement sunscreens protection and may provide additional antiphotocarcinogenic protection including the protection against other skin disorders caused by solar UV radiation.

  11. Acyl chain length, saturation, and hydrophobicity modulate the efficiency of dietary fatty acid absorption in adult humans

    PubMed Central

    McKimmie, Ryan L.; Easter, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal fat absorption is known to be, overall, a highly efficient process, but much less is known about the efficiency with which individual dietary fatty acids (FA) are absorbed by the adult small intestine. We therefore measured the absorption efficiency of the major dietary FA using sucrose polybehenate (SPB) as a nonabsorbable marker and analyzed how it is modulated by acyl chain physicochemical properties and polymorphisms of proteins involved in chylomicron assembly. Dietary FA absorption efficiency was measured in 44 healthy subjects fed a standard diet containing 35% fat and 5% SPB. FA and behenic acid (BA) were measured in homogenized diets and stool samples by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy, and coefficients of absorption for each FA were calculated as 1 − [(FA/BA)feces/(FA/BA)diet]. Absorption coefficients for saturated FA decreased with increasing chain length and hydrophobicity (mean ± SE) and ranged from 0.95 ± 0.02 for myristate (14:0), 0.80 ± 0.03 for stearate (18:0), to 0.26 ± 0.02 for arachidate (20:0). Absorption coefficients for unsaturated FA increased with increasing desaturation from 0.79 ± 0.03 for elaidic acid (18:1t), 0.96 ± 0.01 for linoleate (18:2), to near complete absorption for eicosapentaenoic (20:5) and docosahexaenoic (22:6) acids. Of several common genetic polymorphisms in key proteins involved in the chylomicron assembly pathway, only the intestinal fatty acid-binding protein-2 A54T allele (rs1799883) had any impact on FA absorption. We conclude that acyl chain length, saturation, and hydrophobicity are the major determinants of the efficiency with which dietary FA are absorbed by the adult small intestine. PMID:24008359

  12. Dietary Fats and Health: Dietary Recommendations in the Context of Scientific Evidence1

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Glen D.

    2013-01-01

    Although early studies showed that saturated fat diets with very low levels of PUFAs increase serum cholesterol, whereas other studies showed high serum cholesterol increased the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), the evidence of dietary saturated fats increasing CAD or causing premature death was weak. Over the years, data revealed that dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) are not associated with CAD and other adverse health effects or at worst are weakly associated in some analyses when other contributing factors may be overlooked. Several recent analyses indicate that SFAs, particularly in dairy products and coconut oil, can improve health. The evidence of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) promoting inflammation and augmenting many diseases continues to grow, whereas ω3 PUFAs seem to counter these adverse effects. The replacement of saturated fats in the diet with carbohydrates, especially sugars, has resulted in increased obesity and its associated health complications. Well-established mechanisms have been proposed for the adverse health effects of some alternative or replacement nutrients, such as simple carbohydrates and PUFAs. The focus on dietary manipulation of serum cholesterol may be moot in view of numerous other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. The adverse health effects that have been associated with saturated fats in the past are most likely due to factors other than SFAs, which are discussed here. This review calls for a rational reevaluation of existing dietary recommendations that focus on minimizing dietary SFAs, for which mechanisms for adverse health effects are lacking. PMID:23674795

  13. A review of dietary influences on cardiovascular health: part 1: the role of dietary nutrients.

    PubMed

    Stradling, Clare; Hamid, Mash; Fisher, Katherine; Taheri, Shahrad; Thomas, G Neil

    2013-12-01

    Lifestyle modification, including diet, is a key strategy for prevention and regression of cardiovascular disease (CVD), a leading cause of death worldwide. Traditionally, the study of the relationship between diet and CVD has focused on the analysis of single nutrients, or foods, in relation to CVD risk. In part one of this review, we present current epidemiologic and clinical evidence on nutrition and cardiovascular health with regards to specific foods and nutrients aimed at preventing CVD. The Cochrane Library database between 2006 and 2012 was searched for studies on effects of dietary factors on cardiovascular health. Evidence is presented on soy protein, fats, fish, nuts, fruit, vegetables, electrolytes, vitamins, and carbohydrate including fibre, glycaemic index, and wholegrains. Evidence from specific foods underpins current dietary CVD prevention guidelines, that advise on replacing saturated with unsaturated fat, consuming carbohydrate foods that are wholegrain or of low glycaemic index, increased consumption of fruit, vegetables (particularly cruciferous), nuts, and oily fish. Other nutrients (such as soya protein, or reducing sodium intake) reduce CVD risk via favourable effects on disease contributors (such as LDL-cholesterol or blood pressure), but also infer/promote dietary change that impacts other nutrients (using less animal or processed foods, resulting in saturated fat reduction). The complexity and limitations of interpreting dietary epidemiologic studies is reviewed. With the general ineffectiveness of nutrient-based intervention, recently the shift has been towards the examination of associations between dietary patterns and cardiovascular health, which will be examined in the second part of this review.

  14. Dietary fats and health: dietary recommendations in the context of scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Glen D

    2013-05-01

    Although early studies showed that saturated fat diets with very low levels of PUFAs increase serum cholesterol, whereas other studies showed high serum cholesterol increased the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), the evidence of dietary saturated fats increasing CAD or causing premature death was weak. Over the years, data revealed that dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs) are not associated with CAD and other adverse health effects or at worst are weakly associated in some analyses when other contributing factors may be overlooked. Several recent analyses indicate that SFAs, particularly in dairy products and coconut oil, can improve health. The evidence of ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) promoting inflammation and augmenting many diseases continues to grow, whereas ω3 PUFAs seem to counter these adverse effects. The replacement of saturated fats in the diet with carbohydrates, especially sugars, has resulted in increased obesity and its associated health complications. Well-established mechanisms have been proposed for the adverse health effects of some alternative or replacement nutrients, such as simple carbohydrates and PUFAs. The focus on dietary manipulation of serum cholesterol may be moot in view of numerous other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. The adverse health effects that have been associated with saturated fats in the past are most likely due to factors other than SFAs, which are discussed here. This review calls for a rational reevaluation of existing dietary recommendations that focus on minimizing dietary SFAs, for which mechanisms for adverse health effects are lacking.

  15. Gut microbial status induced by antibiotic growth promoter alters the prebiotic effects of dietary DVAQUA® on Aeromonas hydrophila-infected tilapia: production, intestinal bacterial community and non-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhigang; He, Suxu; Liu, Yuchun; Cao, Yanan; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin; Ringø, Einar; Yoon, Ilkyu

    2011-05-05

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether dietary antibiotic-induced changes in the fish intestinal microbiota altered host physiological responses to the infection with Aeromonas hydrophila in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus ♀ × O. aureus ♂). After an 8-week induction period with an antibiotic-supplemented or antibiotic-non-supplemented diet, 160 hybrid tilapias in 16 tanks were each injected with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) or A. hydrophila at a dose of one-half of the LD(50). Then, all of the diets were changed to a prebiotic-supplemented one for the sequential 8-week response period. Parameters including production, gut microbial diversity and count, and non-specific immunity were determined at the end of the response period. Our results showed that A. hydrophila infection had no effects on the growth and diet conversion of tilapia, but it caused the decrease of the gut bacterial count, the number of visual bands, and the Shannon diversity and equitability indexes of gut bacteria in antibiotic-non-supplemented fish based on PCR-DGGE fingerprints. Infection with A. hydrophila reduced the gut bacterial evenness (lower Shannon equitability index), and slightly improved the gut bacterial richness (more visual bands) in antibiotic-supplemented tilapia. In addition, A. hydrophila infection affected non-specific immunity such as serum lysozyme activity and serum alternative complement pathway (C3 and C4) activities regardless of hybrid tilapia fed antibiotic-supplemented diets. These changes varied based on the intestinal microbial status of the fish before infection with A. hydrophila. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dietitians use and recommend dietary supplements: report of a survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    (72%). Nearly all respondents (95%) expressed an interest in continuing education about dietary supplements on a variety of topics. Conclusions Many dietitians, like other health professionals, use dietary supplements regularly as part of their own approach to a healthy diet and lifestyle. They also recommend dietary supplements to their clients or patients, to promote health. PMID:22416673

  17. Dietitians use and recommend dietary supplements: report of a survey.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Annette; Bonci, Leslie; Boyon, Nicolas; Franco, Julio C

    2012-03-14

    (95%) expressed an interest in continuing education about dietary supplements on a variety of topics. Many dietitians, like other health professionals, use dietary supplements regularly as part of their own approach to a healthy diet and lifestyle. They also recommend dietary supplements to their clients or patients, to promote health. © 2012 Dickinson et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  18. A Practical Guide for Estimating Dietary Fat and Fiber Using Limited Food Frequency Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is presented for estimating daily intake of dietary fat and fiber based on limited food frequency data. The procedure, which relies on National Food Consumption Survey data and daily consumption rates, can provide baseline estimates of dietary patterns for health promotion policymakers. (SLD)

  19. A Practical Guide for Estimating Dietary Fat and Fiber Using Limited Food Frequency Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Anne Victoria; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A methodology is presented for estimating daily intake of dietary fat and fiber based on limited food frequency data. The procedure, which relies on National Food Consumption Survey data and daily consumption rates, can provide baseline estimates of dietary patterns for health promotion policymakers. (SLD)

  20. Dietary factors during early life program bone formation in female rats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutritional status during intrauterine and early postnatal life impacts the risk of chronic diseases; however, evidence for an association between early life dietary factors and bone health in adults is limited. Soy protein isolate (SPI) may be one such dietary factor that promotes bone accretion du...

  1. Hyperkalemia from Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Villgran, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte problem in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is typically caused by medications in patients with poor kidney function. Patients with comorbodities such as heart failure and diabetes are predisposed to electrolyte problems. Salt substitutes and dietary supplements are uncommon causes of hyperkalemia, but we propose that they are under-recognized and underdiagnosed causes in patients with chronic kidney disease. Our case report and literature review illustrates that a careful dietary history is essential in patients presenting with electrolyte disorders, especially hyperkalemia. PMID:27924248

  2. Dietary proteins and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2014-01-17

    Both defective and persistent angiogenesis are linked to pathological situations in the adult. Compounds able to modulate angiogenesis have a potential value for the treatment of such pathologies. Several small molecules present in the diet have been shown to have modulatory effects on angiogenesis. This review presents the current state of knowledge on the potential modulatory roles of dietary proteins on angiogenesis. There is currently limited available information on the topic. Milk contains at least three proteins for which modulatory effects on angiogenesis have been previously demonstrated. On the other hand, there is some scarce information on the potential of dietary lectins, edible plant proteins and high protein diets to modulate angiogenesis.

  3. Dietary composition and nutrient content of the New Nordic Diet.

    PubMed

    Mithril, Charlotte; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Meyer, Claus; Tetens, Inge; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja; Astrup, Arne

    2013-05-01

    To describe the dietary composition of the New Nordic Diet (NND) and to compare it with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR)/Danish Food-based Dietary Guidelines (DFDG) and with the average Danish diet. Dietary components with clear health-promoting properties included in the DFDG were included in the NND in amounts at least equivalent to those prescribed by the DFDG. The quantities of the other dietary components in the NND were based on scientific arguments for their potential health-promoting properties together with considerations of acceptability, toxicological concerns, availability and the environment. Calculations were conducted for quantifying the dietary and nutrient composition of the NND. Denmark. None. The NND is characterized by a high content of fruits and vegetables (especially berries, cabbages, root vegetables and legumes), fresh herbs, potatoes, plants and mushrooms from the wild countryside, whole grains, nuts, fish and shellfish, seaweed, free-range livestock (including pigs and poultry) and game. Overall, the average daily intakes of macro- and micronutrients in the NND meet the NNR with small adjustments based on evidence of their health-promoting properties. The NND is a prototype regional diet that takes palatability, health, food culture and the environment into consideration. Regionally appropriate healthy diets could be created on similar principles anywhere in the world.

  4. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huawei; Lazarova, Darina L; Bordonaro, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which modifies the host’s metabolism in various ways. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which dietary fiber-dependent changes in gut microbiota enhance bile acid deconjugation, produce short chain fatty acids, and modulate inflammatory bioactive substances can lead to a better understanding of the beneficial role of dietary fiber. This article reviews the current knowledge concerning the mechanisms via which dietary fiber protects against colon cancer. PMID:24567795

  5. Therapeutic role of dietary fibre.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R.; Fedorak, R.; Frohlich, J.; McLennan, C.; Pavilanis, A.

    1993-01-01

    The current status of dietary fibre and fibre supplements in health and disease is reported, and the components of dietary fibre and its respective mechanical and metabolic effects with emphasis on its therapeutic potential are reviewed. Practical management guidelines are provided to help physicians encourage patients identified as having fibre deficiency to increase dietary fibre intake to the recommended level. PMID:8388284

  6. Household dietary diversity and child stunting in East Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mahmudiono, Trias; Sumarmi, Sri; Rosenkranz, Richard R

    2017-03-01

    More than one-quarter of under-five children in the developing world are stunted, and those with poor nutrient intake are at risk of irreversible cognitive impairment. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between dietary diversity and child stunting in an Indonesian context. Dietary diversity was assessed using a maternal-reported checklist of 12 food groups, summed as a Household Dietary Diversity Score. Stunting was defined as <=-2.0 height-for-age z-score by WHO-Anthro 2005. Trained interviewers administered the household dietary diversity questionnaire to 768 households with children aged <5 years in East Java, Indonesia. Logistic regression models were constructed to test the association between dietary diversity and child stunting. The prevalence of child stunting was 39.4%, and the percentage of households consuming food groups high in protein and calcium, like dairy products (41%), and meat/poultry, (65%) was lower compared with other food groups. The unadjusted model revealed that higher dietary diversity scores were associated with lower likelihood of child stunting (OR=0.89; 95% CI=0.80-0.98). This relationship remained significant after adjustment for family size, maternal literacy, food expenditure, breastfeeding, energy, and protein intake (OR=0.89; 95% CI=0.80-0.99). The dietary diversity score was moderate, with consumption of dairy products and meat/poultry lowest among 12 food groups. Hence, population interventions should focus on promoting food groups currently lacking in maternal and child diet, including those rich in growth-promoting nutrients like dairy, meat/poultry. These results, from an Indonesian context, confirm the widely observed protective relationship between dietary diversity and child stunting.

  7. Developing and implementing dietary guidelines in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, Kamala

    2008-01-01

    Single nutrients are no solution to the problem of malnutrition. It is essential that food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) are developed and implemented to overcome the diet related diseases and promote health in the population. A multidisciplinary group was constituted to develop FBDGs in India. A manual with scientific details and an abridged version were prepared with 6 goals and 14 dietary guidelines covering all age groups to overcome the public health nutritional problems. The guidelines are based on dietary patterns and specific outcomes of health and disease. Dietary diversification has been suggested as the practical approach. Diets from locally available and culturally accepted foods in household measures have been suggested to ensure optimal health. For successful implementation of FBDGs, political/bureaucratic commitment are essential. It must become a tool in the developmental plans for food, nutrition, agriculture, rural, educational and biotechnology policies. Workshops and meetings were organized to sensitise the administrative set-up. The intersectoral nature of FBDG for implementation was highlighted. The department of women and child development, which is responsible for implementing the National Nutritional Policy, was recognized as nodal agency. Meetings were organised for secondary target audiences. The press was invited to participate in popularization of the FBDGs. Social marketing strategies were used to match the local dietary and cultural aspects. Interpersonal communication and professional societies were used for better dissemination. Industry and legislative bodies were requested to take active action in this regard. The FBDGs have to be implemented to achieve food and nutrition security and the Millennium Development Goals.

  8. Dietary patterns, approaches, and multicultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Katherine L

    2010-04-01

    Nutrition research has traditionally focused on single nutrients in relation to health. However, recent appreciation of the complex synergistic interactions among nutrients and other food constituents has led to a growing interest in total dietary patterns. Methods of measurement include summation of food or nutrient recommendations met, such as the United States Department of Agriculture Healthy Eating Index; data-driven approaches--principal components (PCA) and cluster analyses--which describe actual intake patterns in the population; and, most recently, reduced rank regression, which defines linear combinations of food intakes that maximally explain intermediate markers of disease. PCA, a form of factor analysis, derives linear combinations of foods based on their intercorrelations. Cluster analysis groups individuals into maximally differing eating patterns. These approaches have now been used in diverse populations with good reproducibility. In contrast, because it is based on associations with outcomes rather than on coherent behavioral patterns, reduced rank regression may be less reproducible, but more research is needed. However, it is likely to yield useful information for hypothesis generation. Together, the focus on dietary patterns has been fruitful in demonstrating the powerful protective associations of healthy or prudent dietary patterns, and the higher risk associations of Western or meat and refined grains patterns. The field, however, has not fully addressed the effects of diet in subpopulations, including ethnic minorities. Depending on food group coding, subdietary patterns may be obscured or artificially separated, leading to potentially misleading results. Further attention to the definition of the dietary patterns of different populations is critical to providing meaningful results. Still, dietary pattern research has great potential for use in nutrition policy, particularly as it demonstrates the importance of total diet in health

  9. Children and Dietary Supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... and dietary supplements. This issue provides information about scope of use of complementary health practices by children , ... Systematic Reviews/Reviews/Meta-analyses (PubMed®) Randomized Controlled Trials (PubMed®) Research Spotlights National Survey Reports on CAM ...

  10. Online Dietary Supplement Resources

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Internet is becoming an increasingly popular tool for finding nutrition-related information; therefore, nutrition professionals must know how to use it effectively. This article describes websites that dietitians and other health professionals can use to obtain reliable information on dietary s...

  11. Evolution of dietary antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Benzie, Iris F F

    2003-09-01

    Oxygen is vital for most organisms but, paradoxically, damages key biological sites. Oxygenic threat is met by antioxidants that evolved in parallel with our oxygenic atmosphere. Plants employ antioxidants to defend their structures against reactive oxygen species (ROS; oxidants) produced during photosynthesis. The human body is exposed to these same oxidants, and we have also evolved an effective antioxidant system. However, this is not infallible. ROS breach defences, oxidative damage ensues, accumulates with age, and causes a variety of pathological changes. Plant-based, antioxidant-rich foods traditionally formed the major part of the human diet, and plant-based dietary antioxidants are hypothesized to have an important role in maintaining human health. This hypothesis is logical in evolutionary terms, especially when we consider the relatively hypoxic environment in which humans may have evolved. In this paper, the human diet is discussed briefly in terms of its evolutionary development, different strategies of antioxidant defence are outlined, and evolution of dietary antioxidants is discussed from the perspectives of plant need and our current dietary requirements. Finally, possibilities in regard to dietary antioxidants, evolution, and human health are presented, and an evolutionary cost-benefit analysis is presented in relation to why we lost the ability to make ascorbic acid (vitamin C) although we retained an absolute requirement for it.

  12. Carbohydrate and dietary fiber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Carbohydrate provides 50 to 60% of the calories consumed by the average American. Although relatively little carbohydrate is needed in the diet, carbohydrate spares protein and fat being metabolized for calories. The principal dietary carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Sugars (simple carbohydrat...

  13. Development of a Dietary Index to Assess Overall Diet Quality for Chinese School-Aged Children: The Chinese Children Dietary Index.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guo; Duan, Ruonan; Kranz, Sibylle; Libuda, Lars; Zhang, Lishi

    2016-04-01

    A composite measure of diet quality is preferable to an index of nutrients, food groups, or health-promoting behaviors in dietary assessment. However, to date, such a tool for Chinese children is lacking. Based on the current Chinese Dietary Guidelines and Dietary Reference Intakes, a dietary index for Chinese school-aged children, the Chinese Children Dietary Index was developed to assess overall diet quality among children in South China. Dietary data were recorded using 24-hour recalls among 1,719 children aged 7 to 15 years between March and June 2013. Inactivity data and sociodemographic information were also collected. The Chinese Children Dietary Index included 16 components, which incorporated nutrients, foods/food groups, and health-promoting behaviors. The range of possible Chinese Children Dietary Index scores was 0 to 160, with a higher score indicating better diet quality. Pearson/Spearman correlation was used to assess relative validity using correlations between total Chinese Children Dietary Index score and age, body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)), inactivity, whole-grain intake, frequency of fried-foods intake, nutrient adequacy ratios for energy intake and 12 nutrients not included in the Chinese Children Dietary Index, and the mean adequacy ratio. Finally, a stepwise multiple regression analysis was performed to indicate the factors correlated with Chinese Children Dietary Index. Mean Chinese Children Dietary Index score of this sample was 88.1 points (range=34.2 to 137.8), the Chinese Children Dietary Index score of girls was higher than that of boys and decreased with higher age. Children with higher Chinese Children Dietary Index had lower body mass index and spent less time being inactive. Positive associations were observed between Chinese Children Dietary Index and the majority of nutrient adequacy ratios and the mean adequacy ratio. Age, paternal educational level, and family size were correlated with Chinese Children Dietary

  14. Dietary supplements and team-sport performance.

    PubMed

    Bishop, David

    2010-12-01

    highlighted in this review needs to be conducted using team-sport athletes and using team-sport-relevant testing (e.g. single- and multiple-sprint performance). It should also be considered that there is no guarantee that dietary supplements that improve isolated performance (i.e. single-sprint or jump performance) will remain effective in the context of a team-sport match. Thus, more research is also required to investigate the effects of dietary supplements on simulated or actual team-sport performance. A second aim of this review was to investigate any health issues associated with the ingestion of the more commonly promoted dietary supplements. While most of the supplements described in the review appear safe when using the recommended dose, the effects of higher doses (as often taken by athletes) on indices of health remain unknown, and further research is warranted. Finally, anecdotal reports suggest that team-sport athletes often ingest more than one dietary supplement and very little is known about the potential adverse effects of ingesting multiple supplements. Supplements that have been demonstrated to be safe and efficacious when ingested on their own may have adverse effects when combined with other supplements. More research is required to investigate the effects of ingesting multiple supplements (both on performance and health).

  15. A community-based health promotion intervention using brief negotiation techniques and a pledge on dietary intake, physical activity levels and weight outcomes: lessons learnt from an exploratory trial.

    PubMed

    Hillier, Frances C; Batterham, Alan M; Nixon, Catherine A; Crayton, Alisha M; Pedley, Claire L; Summerbell, Carolyn D

    2012-08-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a brief face-to-face health promotion intervention which included a 'pledge' using brief negotiation techniques, compared with standard advice-giving techniques, delivered in a community setting. A parallel group pre-post design using randomised matched groups. Lifestyle helpers delivered the intervention (one consultation per participant). Diet, physical activity and anthropometric measurements were collected at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Qualitative data were also collected. Middlesbrough (UK). Adults living in low socio-economic areas. Recruitment and engagement of lifestyle helpers was difficult, and initial expectations that local health authority staff working in the community and community champions would act as lifestyle helpers were not realised. As a consequence, recruitment of participants was lower than anticipated. One hundred and twenty-eight adults were recruited and the retention rate was 48 % at 12 months. Barriers to participation included poor health and competing commitments. No significant differences in change in diet or physical activity behaviours, or BMI, between the intervention and control groups were observed. The control group had a significantly greater decrease in waist circumference at 12 months compared with the intervention group. This exploratory trial provides important insights in terms of recruiting lifestyle helpers for community-based health promotion interventions, specifically (i) the priorities and limitations in terms of time (regardless of their general enthusiasm) for staff employed by the local health authority, and (ii) the willingness of potential community champions to serve their local community in areas where community identity and 'spirit' are seen as lacking.

  16. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which mod...

  17. Effect of dietary antimicrobials on immune status in broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary antimicrobials (anticoccidials plus antibiotic growth promoters) on the development of post-hatch immune systems in commercial broiler chickens. One hundred and five day-old broiler chicks were raised on the used litter and provi...

  18. A Dietary Feedback System for the Delivery of Consistent Personalized Dietary Advice in the Web-Based Multicenter Food4Me Study.

    PubMed

    Forster, Hannah; Walsh, Marianne C; O'Donovan, Clare B; Woolhead, Clara; McGirr, Caroline; Daly, E J; O'Riordan, Richard; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Fallaize, Rosalind; Macready, Anna L; Marsaux, Cyril F M; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; San-Cristobal, Rodrigo; Kolossa, Silvia; Hartwig, Kai; Mavrogianni, Christina; Tsirigoti, Lydia; Lambrinou, Christina P; Godlewska, Magdalena; Surwiłło, Agnieszka; Gjelstad, Ingrid Merethe Fange; Drevon, Christian A; Manios, Yannis; Traczyk, Iwona; Martinez, J Alfredo; Saris, Wim H M; Daniel, Hannelore; Lovegrove, Julie A; Mathers, John C; Gibney, Michael J; Gibney, Eileen R; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-06-30

    Despite numerous healthy eating campaigns, the prevalence of diets high in saturated fatty acids, sugar, and salt and low in fiber, fruit, and vegetables remains high. With more people than ever accessing the Internet, Web-based dietary assessment instruments have the potential to promote healthier dietary behaviors via personalized dietary advice. The objectives of this study were to develop a dietary feedback system for the delivery of consistent personalized dietary advice in a multicenter study and to examine the impact of automating the advice system. The development of the dietary feedback system included 4 components: (1) designing a system for categorizing nutritional intakes; (2) creating a method for prioritizing 3 nutrient-related goals for subsequent targeted dietary advice; (3) constructing decision tree algorithms linking data on nutritional intake to feedback messages; and (4) developing personal feedback reports. The system was used manually by researchers to provide personalized nutrition advice based on dietary assessment to 369 participants during the Food4Me randomized controlled trial, with an automated version developed on completion of the study. Saturated fatty acid, salt, and dietary fiber were most frequently selected as nutrient-related goals across the 7 centers. Average agreement between the manual and automated systems, in selecting 3 nutrient-related goals for personalized dietary advice across the centers, was highest for nutrient-related goals 1 and 2 and lower for goal 3, averaging at 92%, 87%, and 63%, respectively. Complete agreement between the 2 systems for feedback advice message selection averaged at 87% across the centers. The dietary feedback system was used to deliver personalized dietary advice within a multi-country study. Overall, there was good agreement between the manual and automated feedback systems, giving promise to the use of automated systems for personalizing dietary advice. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01530139

  19. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Persephone; Jurado, Leo-Felix

    2015-12-22

    Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ). Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA). Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA) and dietary intake was determined using the Block's Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208) = 0.193, p < 0.01), percentage fat intake (r(208) = 0.154, p < 0.05), percentage carbohydrate intake (r(208) = -0.172, p < 0.05), Body Mass Index (BMI) (r(208) = 0.216, p < 0.01) and waist circumference (r(208) = 0.161, p < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between Filipino dietary acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status.

  20. Dietary Acculturation among Filipino Americans

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Persephone; Jurado, Leo-Felix

    2015-01-01

    Acculturation, the subsequent changes that occur in one culture after continuous first hand contact with another culture, impacts the dietary habits and health risks of individuals. This study examines the acculturation, dietary habits and anthropometric measurements in a sample of 210 first generation Filipino American immigrants in New Jersey (NJ). Acculturation was measured using the Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA). Dietary acculturation was measured using the Dietary Acculturation Questionnaire for Filipino Americans (DAQFA) and dietary intake was determined using the Block’s Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire (BFFQ). Anthropometric measurements were obtained including weight, height and waist circumference. Acculturation had a significant negative relationship with Filipino Dietary acculturation. Western dietary acculturation was significantly correlated with caloric intake (r(208) = 0.193, p < 0.01), percentage fat intake (r(208) = 0.154, p < 0.05), percentage carbohydrate intake (r(208) = −0.172, p < 0.05), Body Mass Index (BMI) (r(208) = 0.216, p < 0.01) and waist circumference (r(208) = 0.161, p < 0.01). There was no significant correlation between Filipino dietary acculturation, dietary intake and anthropometric measurements. The results showed that Filipino American immigrants have increased risks including increased BMI, waist circumference and increased fat intake. Over all, this research highlighted some dietary changes and their effects on dietary intake and health status. PMID:26703646

  1. Dietary transition and obesity in selected Arabicspeaking countries: a review of the current evidence.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Enein, B H; Bernstein, J; Neary, A C

    2017-01-23

    Escalating obesity rates have become a significant public health problem in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and have been associated with shifts towards a westernized diet. This integrative review aimed to examine the current dietary trends and transitions and their association with obesity in Arabic-speaking countries of the MENA region. Relevant databases were searched for studies in MENA countries between 1998 and 2014 that investigated obesity trends and changes in dietary patterns at the regional level in all age groups. A total of 39 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the articles noted that obesity was increasingly prevalent and that there was a significant dietary shift away from traditional dietary patterns; 51% reported a shift towards a westernized diet and half found that the western diet was correlated with increased obesity. Culturally relevant dietary health education and health promotion strategies are warranted to address both the dietary shifts towards the westernized diet and the increasing obesity.

  2. Strategies to Improve Adherence to Dietary Weight Loss Interventions in Research and Real-World Settings.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Alice A; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2017-07-11

    Dietary interventions are the cornerstone of obesity treatment. The optimal dietary approach to weight loss is a hotly debated topic among health professionals and the lay public alike. An emerging body of evidence suggests that a higher level of adherence to a diet, regardless of the type of diet, is an important factor in weight loss success over the short and long term. Key strategies to improve adherence include designing dietary weight loss interventions (such as ketogenic diets) that help to control the increased drive to eat that accompanies weight loss, tailoring dietary interventions to a person's dietary preferences (and nutritional requirements), and promoting self-monitoring of food intake. The aim of this paper is to examine these strategies, which can be used to improve adherence and thereby increase the success of dietary weight loss interventions.

  3. [Dietary modification in hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Berg, A; Kloock, B; König, D

    2006-11-23

    Successful treatment of hypertension requires a holistic approach. In this connection, focusing on a healthy lifestyle, eating, drinking and consumption behavior and, finally, the quality of foodstuffs and the exercise habits of the patient represents an essential supplement to the classical forms of pharmaceutical treatment. The major dietary-physiological factors have been shown to be weight reduction, the monitoring of salt consumption, appropriate intake of fiber, a preference for vegetables, and a reduction of immoderate alcohol consumption.

  4. Dietary treatment of nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Nouvenne, Antonio; Meschi, Tiziana; Guerra, Angela; Allegri, Franca; Prati, Beatrice; Borghi, Loris

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of idiopathic nephrolithiasis is increasing in rich countries. Dietary manipulation could contribute to the prevention of both its first appearance and the recurrence of the disease. The target of dietary treatment is to decrease the “urinary lithogenic risk factors” such as low urine volume, hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria, hyperphosphaturia, hypocitraturia, hypomagnesuria and excessively alkaline or acid urinary pH. Due to the lack of randomized controlled trials focused on this problem, there is not ample evidence to confidently recommend dietary changes. Despite this, numerous recent and past experiences support modification of diet as having a primary role in the prevention of nephrolithiasis. In particular, it is recommended to limit animal protein and salt intake, to consume milk and derivatives in amounts corresponding to calcium intake of about 1200 mg/day and to assume fiber (40 g/day), vegetables and fruit daily avoiding foods with high oxalate content. Furthermore, vitamin C intake not exceeding 1500 mg/day plays a protective role as well as avoiding vitamin B6 deficiency and abstaining, if possible, from vitamin D supplements. Lastly, it is recommended to drink enough water to bring the urinary volume up to at least 2 L/day and, as much as possible, to use fresh or frozen products rather than prepacked or precooked foods which are often too rich in sodium chloride. PMID:22460996

  5. Natural Dietary Phytosterols.

    PubMed

    Racette, Susan B; Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Most clinical phytosterol studies are performed by adding purified supplements to smaller phytosterol amounts present in the natural diet. However, natural dietary phytosterols themselves may also have important effects on cholesterol metabolism. Epidemiological work using food frequency questionnaires to estimate dietary intake suggest that extremes of normal consumption may be associated with 3-14% changes in LDL cholesterol. Standardized food databases do not have enough phytosterol values to allow calculation of phytosterol intake for individuals outside of specialized studies. Natural diets contain phytosterol amounts ranging from less than 60 mg/2000 kcal to over 500 mg/2000 kcal. Physiological studies in which whole body cholesterol metabolism is investigated show large effects of natural dietary phytosterols on cholesterol absorption efficiency, cholesterol biosynthesis and cholesterol excretion which exceed the magnitude of changes in LDL cholesterol. The dual effects of natural phytosterols on both LDL-C and whole body cholesterol metabolism need to be considered in relating them to potential protection from coronary heart disease risk.

  6. Dietary hyperthyroidism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Köhler, B; Stengel, C; Neiger, R

    2012-03-01

    Evaluation of dogs with elevated plasma thyroxine concentration fed raw food before and after changing the diet. Between 2006 and 2011 all dogs presented with an elevated plasma thyroxine concentration and a dietary history of feeding raw food were included. Thyroxine (reference interval: 19·3 to 51·5 nmol/L) and in many cases also thyroid-stimulating hormone concentrations (reference interval: <0·30 ng/mL) were measured initially and after changing the diet. Twelve dogs were presented with a median age of five years. The median plasma thyroxine concentration was 156·1 (range of 79·7 to 391·9) nmol/L; in six dogs, thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration was measured and was <0·03 ng/mL in five dogs and 0·05 ng/mL in one dog. Six dogs showed clinical signs such as weight loss, aggressiveness, tachycardia, panting and restlessness while six dogs had no clinical signs. After changing the diet eight dogs were examined: thyroxine concentration normalised in all dogs and clinical signs resolved. Dietary hyperthyroidism can be seen in dogs on a raw meat diet or fed fresh or dried gullets. Increased plasma thyroxine concentration in a dog, either with or without signs of hyperthyroidism, should prompt the veterinarian to obtain a thorough dietary history. © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  8. The interaction between dietary protein and bone health.

    PubMed

    Jesudason, David; Clifton, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The role of dietary protein in bone health has been controversial. On the one hand, a plentiful supply of dietary amino acids has been considered important to support bone remodeling while on the other hand there have been concerns that the dietary acid load associated with protein consumption promotes hypercalciuria and loss of bone calcium stores. This article reviews the effect of dietary protein on bone mass and bone density, and the effect on markers of bone resorption and formation and also on fracture risk, looking at both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies and examining both meat and vegetable protein including soy and milk basic protein. The results are not entirely consistent and suggest that the interaction between dietary protein and other components in a mixed diet, such as calcium intake and vegetables and fruit to neutralize acid, are important and may determine whether high-protein diets are beneficial to bone health. Overall the results suggest that dietary protein has a modest beneficial effect on bone markers and bone density. This effect has yet to be consistently linked to reduced fracture risk, probably because of the role of other etiological factors such as the risk of falls. There is not enough evidence currently to suggest that animal protein is superior or inferior to vegetable protein, or that milk or soy protein, respectively, is more favorable than other protein sources.

  9. Which sources of flavonoids: complex diets or dietary supplements?

    PubMed

    Egert, Sarah; Rimbach, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential health benefits of dietary flavonoids. Fruits and vegetables, tea, and cocoa are rich natural sources of flavonoids. Epidemiological studies have indicated that consumption of these foods is likely to be associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, but the etiology of this benefit is not yet clearly defined. Furthermore, in some acute interventions, a positive effect of tea and cocoa on vascular function has been reported. An alternative source of flavonoids is dietary supplements, which have become increasingly popular in the recent past. In this context, it needs to be critically evaluated whether vascular health-promoting and other positive properties of flavonoid-rich diets can be replaced by purified flavonoids as dietary supplements. Plant sources of flavonoids contain a complex mixture of secondary plant metabolites and not only flavonoids per se. This complex mixture of secondary plant metabolites cannot be simply exchanged by single purified compounds as dietary supplements. If flavonoids are given as dietary supplements, toxicity issues as well as nutrient drug interactions need to be taken into account. Purified flavonoids given in high doses as dietary supplements may affect trace element, folate, and vitamin C status. Furthermore, they may exhibit antithyroid and goitrogenic activities. In this review article, the available literature on the safety issues surrounding high dose supplemental flavonoid consumption has been summarized.

  10. Dietary Fatty Acids: Is it Time to Change the Recommendations?

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Joyce A; Lovegrove, Julie A; Mensink, Ronald P; Schwab, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Limiting the saturated fatty acid (SAFA) consumption forms the basis of dietary fat recommendations for heart health, despite several meta-analyses demonstrating no link between dietary SAFA and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Three experts on dietary fat and health discussed the evidence of reducing SAFA intake at a symposium of the Federation of European Nutrition Societies in Berlin, Germany, October 23, 2015. Ronald P. Mensink, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, discussed the evidence linking dietary fatty acids and CVD risk. He emphasized the importance of the replacement nutrient(s) when SAFA intake is reduced. Julie Lovegrove, University of Reading, UK, addressed the question of whether higher intakes of unsaturated fatty acids are beneficial. She discussed the replacement of SAFA by polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), noting the reduction in CVD risk with PUFA replacement and in CVD risk markers with MUFA replacement of SAFA. Ursula Schwab, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland, discussed the importance of dietary patterns in achieving reduced risk of CVD, observing that several dietary patterns following the principles of a health-promoting diet and adapted to local customs, food preferences and seasonality are effective in reducing the risk of CVD, type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases. This paper summarizes the symposium presentations.

  11. Dietary monounsaturated fatty acids are protective against metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, Leah G; Harris-Janz, Sydney; Jones, Peter J H

    2011-03-01

    Over 50 years of research has sought to define the role dietary fat plays in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Although optimal dietary fat quantity has been keenly pursued over past decades, attention has recently centered on the value of dietary fat quality. The purpose of the present review is to provide a critical assessment of the current body of evidence surrounding efficacy of dietary monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) for reduction of traditional risk factors defining metabolic syndrome (MetS) and CVD. Due to existing and emerging research on health attributes of MUFA rich diets, and to the low prevalence of chronic disease in populations consuming MUFA rich Mediterranean diets, national dietary guidelines are increasingly recommending dietary MUFA, primarily at the expense of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Consumption of dietary MUFA promotes healthy blood lipid profiles, mediates blood pressure, improves insulin sensitivity and regulates glucose levels. Moreover, provocative newer data suggest a role for preferential oxidation and metabolism of dietary MUFA, influencing body composition and ameliorating the risk of obesity. Mounting epidemiological and human clinical trial data continue to demonstrate the cardioprotective activity of the MUFA content of dietary fat. As the debate on the optimal fatty acid composition of the diet continues, the benefit of increasing MUFA intakes, particularly as a substitute for dietary SFA, deserves considerable attention.

  12. Alignment of Healthy Dietary Patterns and Environmental Sustainability: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Miriam E; Hamm, Michael W; Hu, Frank B; Abrams, Steven A; Griffin, Timothy S

    2016-11-01

    To support food security for current and future generations, there is a need to understand the relation between sustainable diets and the health of a population. In recent years, a number of studies have investigated and compared different dietary patterns to better understand which foods and eating patterns have less of an environmental impact while meeting nutritional needs and promoting health. This systematic review (SR) of population-level dietary patterns and food sustainability extends and updates the SR that was conducted by the 2015 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, an expert committee commissioned by the federal government to inform dietary guidance as it relates to the committee's original conclusions. In the original SR, 15 studies met the criteria for inclusion; since then, an additional 8 studies have been identified and included. The relations between dietary intake patterns and both health and environmental outcomes were compared across studies, with methodologies that included modeling, life cycle assessment, and land use analysis. Across studies, consistent evidence indicated that a dietary pattern higher in plant-based foods (e.g., vegetables, fruits, legumes, seeds, nuts, whole grains) and lower in animal-based foods (especially red meat), as well as lower in total energy, is both healthier and associated with a lesser impact on the environment. This dietary pattern differs from current average consumption patterns in the United States. Our updated SR confirms and strengthens the conclusions of the original US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee SR, which found that adherence to several well-characterized dietary patterns, including vegetarian (with variations) diets, dietary guidelines-related diets, Mediterranean-style diets, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and other sustainable diet scenarios, promotes greater health and has a less negative impact on the environment than current average dietary intakes.

  13. Self-Reported Dietary Intake Following Endurance, Resistance and Concurrent Endurance and Resistance Training

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Brandon S.; Shaw, Ina; Brown, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    With regards to obesity-related disease the impact of exercise training on health depends on the ability of exercise to promote a negative energy balance. Exercise's effect on promoting a negative energy balance is more likely to occur if exercise can induce a favourable dietary intake such as a reduced relative fat content in the diet. As such, the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of aerobic training, weight training and concurrent aerobic and weight training on self-reported dietary intake. The effects of 16 weeks of aerobic (n = 12), weight (n = 13) and concurrent aerobic and weight training (n = 13) on self-reported dietary intakes were compared in previously sedentary males using the computer-based Dietary Manager® software programme. Only the concurrent aerobic and weight training group showed significant (p ≤ 0.05) reductions in total kilocalories, carbohydrates, proteins and fats consumed while the aerobic training group showed significant reductions in fat intake at the completion of the experimental period (before: 91.0 ± 42.1g versus after: 77.1 ± 62.1g). However, no changes were observed in self-reported dietary intake in the weight training or non-exercising control groups. It is concluded that concurrent aerobic and weight training is the most effective mode of exercise at promoting a favourable improvement in self-reported dietary intake in the short term. This finding provides support for efforts to promote increases in overall physical activity in an attempt to modify the patterns of dietary intake. Key pointsConcurrent aerobic and weight training can significantly reduce the amount of total kilocalories, carbohydrates, proteins and fats consumed.Aerobic training can significantly reduce fat intake.Weight training resulted in no changes in dietary intake.Concurrent aerobic and weight training is the most effective mode of exercise at promoting a favourable improvement in self-reported dietary intake. PMID

  14. Dietary patterns are associated with dietary recommendations but have limited relationship to BMI in the Communities Advancing the Studies of Tribal Nations Across the Lifespan (CoASTAL) cohort.

    PubMed

    Fialkowski, Marie K; McCrory, Megan A; Roberts, Sparkle M; Tracy, J Kathleen; Grattan, Lynn M; Boushey, Carol J

    2012-10-01

    Traditional food systems in indigenous groups have historically had health-promoting benefits. The objectives of the present study were to determine if a traditional dietary pattern of Pacific Northwest Tribal Nations (PNwT) could be derived using reduced rank regression and if the pattern would be associated with lower BMI and current Dietary Reference Intakes. The baseline data from the Communities Advancing the Studies of Tribal Nations Across the Lifespan (CoASTAL) cohort were used to derive dietary patterns for the total sample and those with plausibly reported energy intakes. Pacific Northwest Coast of Washington State, USA. Adult PNwT members of the CoASTAL cohort with laboratory-measured weight and height and up to 4 d of dietary records (n 418). A traditional dietary pattern did not evolve from the analysis. Moderate consumption of a sweet drinks dietary pattern was associated with lower BMI while higher consumption of a vegetarian-based dietary pattern was associated with higher BMI. The highest consumers of the vegetarian-based dietary pattern were almost six times more likely to meet the recommendations for dietary fibre. Distinct dietary patterns were found. Further exploration is needed to confirm whether the lack of finding a traditional pattern is due to methodology or the loss of a traditional dietary pattern among this population. Longitudinal assessment of the CoASTAL cohort's dietary patterns needs to continue.

  15. Dietary patterns are associated with dietary recommendations but have limited relationship to body mass index in the Communities Advancing the Studies of Tribal Nations Across the Lifespan (CoASTAL) cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fialkowski, Marie K.; McCrory, Megan A.; Roberts, Sparkle M.; Tracy, J. Kathleen; Grattan, Lynn M.; Boushey, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Traditional food systems in indigenous groups have historically had health promoting benefits. The objectives of this study were to determine if a traditional dietary pattern of Pacific Northwest Tribal Nations (PNwT) could be derived using reduced rank regression (RRR) and if the pattern would be associated with lower body mass index (BMI) and current Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). Design The baseline data from the Communities Advancing the Studies of Tribal Nations Across the Lifespan (CoASTAL) cohort were used to derive dietary patterns for the total sample and those with plausibly reported energy intakes. Setting Pacific Northwest Coast of Washington State, United States. Subjects Adult PNwT members of the CoASTAL cohort with lab-measured weight and height and up to 4 days of dietary records (n=418). Results A traditional dietary pattern did not evolve from the analysis. Moderate consumption of a sweet drinks dietary pattern was associated with a lower BMI while higher consumption of a vegetarian based dietary pattern was associated with higher BMI. The highest consumers of the vegetarian based dietary pattern were almost 6 times more likely to meet the recommendations for dietary fiber. Conclusions Distinct dietary patterns were found. Further exploration is needed to confirm whether the lack of finding a traditional pattern is due to methodology or the loss of a traditional dietary pattern among this population. Longitudinal assessment of the CoASTAL cohort’s dietary patterns needs to continue. PMID:22348238

  16. Knowledge of current dietary guidelines and food choice by college students: better eaters have higher knowledge of dietary guidance.

    PubMed

    Kolodinsky, Jane; Harvey-Berino, Jean Ruth; Berlin, Linda; Johnson, Rachel K; Reynolds, Travis William

    2007-08-01

    College students enrolled in university dining plans are exposed daily to a food environment characterized by foods high in energy, fats, and added sugars, and low in nutrient density. Their decisions about what to eat are currently made in an environment where no nutrition labeling is required. To fill the gap in current literature regarding whether or not increased nutrition knowledge of dietary guidance actually translates into positive behavior, this cross-sectional study investigated self-reported eating patterns of 200 college students. An Internet-based survey was used to identify how closely respondents followed the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, and whether their eating patterns were related to their knowledge of dietary guidance. It was observed that, for fruit, dairy, protein, and whole grains, increased knowledge is related to increased likelihood of meeting dietary guidelines. Moreover, when asked about individual food choices, nutrition knowledge was related to making more healthful choices in every case. Ultimately, increased knowledge of dietary guidance appears to be positively related to more healthful eating patterns. This suggests that guidelines such as the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, in conjunction with effective public-awareness campaigns, may be a useful mechanism for promoting change in what foods consumers choose to eat.

  17. Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents (2016): comments and comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-shan; Lay, Sovichea; Yu, Hai-ning; Shen, Sheng-rong

    2016-01-01

    A high quality diet is believed to play a functional role in promoting the healthy growth of mankind and preventing many kinds of chronic degenerative diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Adherence to a high quality diet has been strongly associated with a lower risk of mortality. To help promote healthy lifestyles and physical strength, the Chinese government has produced a new revised version of the Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents (2016) and the Chinese Food Pagoda, as guidance for dietary intake among its population. Similarly, the Japanese government has produced the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top Model, and the US government has recently published revised dietary recommendations in its 2015–2020 eighth edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The evidence from all respective cohort studies involved in producing these guidelines shows a reduced risk of many chronic diseases and mortality if the guidelines are followed. All scientific findings support encouraging the general population to consume a broad variety of food on the basis of nutrient and food intakes in order to prevent deficiency diseases and a surplus of energy and nutrients, and recommend daily physical activity for health promotion. PMID:27604857

  18. Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents (2016): comments and comparisons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan-Shan; Lay, Sovichea; Yu, Hai-Ning; Shen, Sheng-Rong

    2016-09-01

    A high quality diet is believed to play a functional role in promoting the healthy growth of mankind and preventing many kinds of chronic degenerative diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and obesity. Adherence to a high quality diet has been strongly associated with a lower risk of mortality. To help promote healthy lifestyles and physical strength, the Chinese government has produced a new revised version of the Dietary Guidelines for Chinese Residents (2016) and the Chinese Food Pagoda, as guidance for dietary intake among its population. Similarly, the Japanese government has produced the Japanese Food Guide Spinning Top Model, and the US government has recently published revised dietary recommendations in its 2015-2020 eighth edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The evidence from all respective cohort studies involved in producing these guidelines shows a reduced risk of many chronic diseases and mortality if the guidelines are followed. All scientific findings support encouraging the general population to consume a broad variety of food on the basis of nutrient and food intakes in order to prevent deficiency diseases and a surplus of energy and nutrients, and recommend daily physical activity for health promotion.

  19. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Following the comprehensive systematic review of domestic and overseas scientific evidence, the "Dietary Reference Intakes for Japanese, 2005 (DRI-J)" was published in April, 2005. The DRIs-J were prepared for health individuals and groups and designed to present a reference for intake values of energy and 34 nutrients to maintain and promote health and to prevent lifestyle-related diseases and illness due to excessive consumption of either energy or nutrients. The DRI-J also includes a special chapter for basic knowledge of DRIs. The energy recommendation is provided as an estimated energy requirement (EER), while five indices were used for nutrients: Estimated average requirement (EAR), recommended dietary allowance (RDA), adequate intake (AI), tolerable upper intake level (UL), and tentative dietary goal for preventing lifestyle-related [chronic non-communicable] diseases (DG). Whilst the first four indices are same as the ones used in other countries, DG is unique index in Japan, which was set as a reference value for preventing non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular (including hypertension), major types of cancer and osteoporosis. This report (DRI-J) is the first dietary guidance in Japan, which applied evidence-based approach utilizing a systematic review process. Only a few articles from within Japan and other Asian countries could be used for its establishment. The project to establish the DRI-J revealed a severe lack of researchers and publications focused upon establishing DRIs for Japanese. Further review is therefore required in preparation for the next revision scheduled in 2010.

  20. Beware of Fraudulent 'Dietary Supplements'

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products Marketed as Dietary Supplements Hidden Risks of Erectile Dysfunction 'Treatments' Sold Online 'All Natural' Alternatives for Erectile Dysfunction: A Risky Proposition For More Information Questions and ...

  1. Dietary Patterns and CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Liu, Yang; Crews, Deidra C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and their clinicians seek ways to mitigate the risk of CKD progression and its associated complications. Emerging data suggest that dietary modifications may be beneficial adjuvant approaches to reducing the risk of adverse CKD outcomes. This review focuses on several different dietary patterns, including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension and Mediterranean diets, and their kidney health benefits. We discuss how healthful dietary patterns are lower in dietary acid load and how improving diet quality may slow the progression of CKD. We also discuss some barriers that may impede socially disadvantaged individuals from following healthful diets. Dietary patterns low in dietary acid load might slow the progression of CKD. Current evidence suggests that a reduction in dietary acid load could be beneficial in patients with CKD, but the supremacy of any particular diet is yet to be established. Additional randomized controlled dietary interventions among CKD patients are needed to inform evidence-based recommendations, which can be tailored to an individual's preferences and ability to access healthful foods. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. The regulation of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Larissa L; Berry, Judith A

    2003-09-01

    To discuss the regulatory history of dietary supplements, define the term dietary supplement, clarify ingredient and nutrition information labeling, and discuss safety issues and implications for practice. Review of primary and secondary sources, including both Internet sites and journal articles. In the United States, 6 out of every 10 people use dietary supplements. For decades, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) protected the public from mislabeled and unsafe products by regulating as foods those dietary supplements that included only essential nutrients. The Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 included herbs as dietary supplements. When the Dietary Supplement and Health and Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994 was passed, the FDA lost its regulatory power. The DSHEA expanded the definition of dietary supplements beyond essential nutrients. Dietary supplements are no longer considered food additives, which makes them exempt from prescreening or any safety and efficacy studies before they are released to the public. Under the DSHEA, the FDA may take action if a product poses a direct health threat and only after adverse health effects have already occurred. A good understanding of the regulatory procedures for dietary supplements will aid nurse practitioners (NPs) in patient education regarding these products. Patients should be advised to choose supplements that are made by nationally known food and drug manufacturers that belong to trade groups. NPs and patients can contact the manufacturer directly and can access government Internet sites for more product information.

  3. The effect of complex workplace dietary interventions on employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status: a cluster controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Geaney, Fiona; Kelly, Clare; Di Marrazzo, Jessica Scotto; Harrington, Janas M; Fitzgerald, Anthony P; Greiner, Birgit A; Perry, Ivan J

    2016-08-01

    Evidence on effective workplace dietary interventions is limited. The comparative effectiveness of a workplace environmental dietary modification and an educational intervention both alone and in combination was assessed versus a control workplace on employees' dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status. In the Food Choice at Work cluster controlled trial, four large, purposively selected manufacturing workplaces in Ireland were allocated to control (N=111), nutrition education (Education) (N=226), environmental dietary modification (Environment) (N=113) and nutrition education and environmental dietary modification (Combined) (N=400) in 2013. Nutrition education included group presentations, individual consultations and detailed nutrition information. Environmental dietary modification included menu modification, fruit price discounts, strategic positioning of healthier alternatives and portion size control. Data on dietary intakes, nutrition knowledge and health status were obtained at baseline and follow-up at 7-9months. Multivariate analysis of covariance compared changes across the four groups with adjustment for age, gender, educational status and other baseline characteristics. Follow-up data at 7-9months were obtained for 541 employees (64% of 850 recruited) aged 18-64years: control: 70 (63%), Education: 113 (50%), 74 (65%) and Combined: 284 (71%). There were significant positive changes in intakes of saturated fat (p=0.013), salt (p=0.010) and nutrition knowledge (p=0.034) between baseline and follow-up in the combined intervention versus the control. Small but significant changes in BMI (-1.2kg/m(2) (95% CI -2.385, -0.018, p=0.047) were observed in the combined intervention. Effects in the education and environment alone workplaces were smaller and generally non-significant. Combining nutrition education and environmental dietary modification may be an effective approach for promoting a healthy diet and weight loss at work. Copyright © 2016

  4. Hormetic Dietary Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Son, Tae Gen; Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P.

    2008-01-01

    Compelling evidence from epidemiological studies suggest beneficial roles of dietary phytochemicals in protecting against chronic disorders such as cancer, and inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. Emerging findings suggest that several dietary phytochemicals also benefit the nervous system and, when consumed regularly, may reduce the risk of disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The evidence supporting health benefits of vegetables and fruits provide a rationale for identification of the specific phytochemicals responsible, and for investigation of their molecular and cellular mechanisms of action. One general mechanism of action of phytochemicals that is emerging from recent studies is that they activate adaptive cellular stress response pathways. From an evolutionary perspective, the noxious properties of such phytochemicals play an important role in dissuading insects and other pests from eating the plants. However at the relatively small doses ingested by humans that consume the plants, the phytochemicals are not toxic and instead induce mild cellular stress responses. This phenomenon has been widely observed in biology and medicine, and has been described as ‘preconditioning’ or ‘hormesis’. Hormetic pathways activated by phytochemicals may involve kinases and transcription factors that induce the expression of genes that encode antioxidant enzymes, protein chaperones, phase-2 enzymes, neurotrophic factors and other cytoprotective proteins. Specific examples of such pathways include the sirtuin – FOXO pathway, the NF-κB pathway and the Nrf-2 –ARE pathway. In this article we describe the hormesis hypothesis of phytochemical actions with a focus on the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway as a prototypical example of a neuroprotective mechanism of action of specific dietary phytochemicals. PMID:18543123

  5. Dietary control of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhiguang; Cai, Ling; Tu, Benjamin P

    2015-01-01

    Organisms must be able to rapidly alter gene expression in response to changes in their nutrient environment. This review summarizes evidence that epigenetic modifications of chromatin depend on particular metabolites of intermediary metabolism, enabling the facile regulation of gene expression in tune with metabolic state. Nutritional or dietary control of chromatin is an often-overlooked, yet fundamental regulatory mechanism directly linked to human physiology. Nutrient-sensitive epigenetic marks are dynamic, suggesting rapid turnover, and may have functions beyond the regulation of gene transcription, including pH regulation and as carbon sources in cancer cells. PMID:26094239

  6. Modulation of hepatic apolipoprotein B, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor mRNA and plasma lipoprotein concentrations by defined dietary fats. Comparison of trimyristin, tripalmitin, tristearin and triolein.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, A J; Billett, M A; Salter, A M; Mangiapane, E H; Bruce, J S; Anderton, K L; Marenah, C B; Lawson, N; White, D A

    1995-01-01

    Different dietary fatty acids exert specific effects on plasma lipids but the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. Hamsters were fed on low-cholesterol diets containing triacylglycerols enriched in specific saturated fatty acids, and effects on plasma lipids and the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipoprotein metabolism were measured. Trimyristin and tripalmitin caused significant rises in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol which were accompanied by significant reductions in hepatic LDL receptor mRNA levels. Tripalmitin also increased hepatic expression of the apolipoprotein B gene, implying an increased production of LDL via very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and decreased removal of LDL in animals fed this fat. Hepatic levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase mRNA did not vary significantly between the groups. Compared with triolein, tristearin had little effect on hepatic gene expression or total plasma cholesterol. However, it caused a marked decrease in VLDL cholesterol and a rise in LDL cholesterol such that overall it appeared to be neutral. Lipid analysis suggested a rapid desaturation of much of the dietary stearate. The differential changes in plasma lipids and hepatic mRNA levels induced by specific dietary fats suggests a role for fatty acids or a metabolite thereof in the regulation of the expression of genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism. PMID:7575449

  7. Dietary Patterns: Challenges and Opportunities in Dietary Patterns Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, increasing numbers of researchers have used dietary patterns to characterize the population’s diet and to examine associations between diet and disease outcomes. Many methods, primarily data-driven and index-based approaches, are available for characterizing dietary patterns in a p...

  8. National Children's Study Dietary Assessment Workshop

    Cancer.gov

    The National Children's Study dietary assessment workshop was an opportunity for experts in dietary assessment methodology to gather and discuss the current state of knowledge about methodologies used to assess dietary intake during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence.

  9. Dose-dependent effects of R-sulforaphane isothiocyanate on the biology of human mesenchymal stem cells, at dietary amounts, it promotes cell proliferation and reduces senescence and apoptosis, while at anti-cancer drug doses, it has a cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Zanichelli, Fulvia; Capasso, Stefania; Cipollaro, Marilena; Pagnotta, Eleonora; Cartenì, Maria; Casale, Fiorina; Iori, Renato; Galderisi, Umberto

    2012-04-01

    Brassica vegetables are attracting a great deal of attention as healthy foods because of the fact that they contain substantial amounts of secondary metabolite glucosinolates that are converted into isothiocyanates, such as sulforaphane [(-)1-isothiocyanato-4R-(methylsulfinyl)-butane] (R-SFN), through the actions of chopping or chewing the vegetables. Several studies have analyzed the biological and molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of synthetic R,S-sulforaphane, which is thought to be a result of its antioxidant properties and its ability to inhibit histone deacetylase enzymes (HDAC). Few studies have addressed the possible antioxidant effects of R-SFN, which could protect cells from the free radical damage that strongly contribute to aging. Moreover, little is known about the effect of R-SFN on stem cells whose longevity is implicated in human aging. We evaluated the effects of R-SFN on the biology on human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which, in addition to their ability to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues, support hematopoiesis, and contribute to the homeostatic maintenance of many organs and tissues. Our investigation found evidence that low doses of R-SFN promote MSCs proliferation and protect them from apoptosis and senescence, while higher doses have a cytotoxic effect, leading to the induction of cell cycle arrest, programmed cell death and senescence. The beneficial effects of R-SFN may be ascribed to its antioxidant properties, which were observed when MSC cultures were incubated with low doses of R-SFN. Its cytotoxic effects, which were observed after treating MSCs with high doses of R-SFN, could be attributed to its HDAC inhibitory activity. In summary, we found that R-SFN, like many other dietary supplements, exhibits a hormetic behavior; it is able to induce biologically opposite effects at different doses.

  10. Healthy School Meals: Promotion Ideas That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Children, Families, and Learning, Roseville. Food and Nutrition Service.

    "Healthy School Meals: Promotion Ideas That Work" is a Minnesota program based on the USDA's Team Nutrition program. The program's goal is to improve the health of children through school meals and nutrition education. This is accomplished by empowering schools to serve meals meeting the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and motivating…

  11. Barriers and facilitators to following the Dietary Guidelines for Americans reported by rural, Northern Plains American-Indian children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: The Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) promotes healthy dietary choices for all Americans ages two years and older; however, the majority of Americans do not meet recommendations. The goal of this study was to identify both barriers and facilitators (BAFs) to adherence to DGA recomme...

  12. Cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy: dietary polyphenols and signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Sonia

    2008-05-01

    Prevention of cancer through dietary intervention recently has received an increasing interest, and dietary polyphenols have become not only important potential chemopreventive, but also therapeutic, natural agents. Polyphenols have been reported to interfere at the initiation, promotion and progression of cancer. They might lead to the modulation of proteins in diverse pathways and require the integration of different signals for the final chemopreventive or therapeutic effect. Polyphenols have been demonstrated to act on multiple key elements in signal transduction pathways related to cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and metastasis; however, these molecular mechanisms of action are not completely characterized and many features remain to be elucidated. The aim of this review is to provide insights into the molecular basis of potential chemopreventive and therapeutic activities of dietary polyphenols with emphasis in their ability to control intracellular signalling cascades considered as relevant targets in a cancer preventive approach.

  13. Use of nonvitamin, nonmineral dietary supplements among college students.

    PubMed

    Newberry, H; Beerman, K; Duncan, S; McGuire, M; Hillers, V

    2001-11-01

    The authors assessed the use of nonvitamin, nonmineral (NVNM) dietary supplements in a college population. They found that the use of NVNM dietary supplements among college students might be higher than that of other population groups and that the types of NVNM products they use differ from those used by an older population. Of the 272 students who completed the questionnaire, 48.5% reported they took an NVNM supplement during the past 12 months. The most frequently used NVNM products were echinacea, ginseng, and St John's wort. Of the 27 students who took NVNM products to promote weight loss, 81.5% had body mass index (BMI) values in the acceptable range. Eleven of the 19 participants who reported an adverse reaction to an NVNM supplement continued to take the products despite negative effects. Users and nonusers of NVNM supplements did not differ significantly by age, ethnicity, gender, perceived dietary adequacy, or by exercise patterns.

  14. Dietary therapies for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kossoff, Eric H; Wang, Huei-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Since their introduction in 1921, high-fat, low-carbohydrate "ketogenic" diets have been used worldwide for refractory childhood epilepsy. Approximately half of the children have at least half their seizures reduced, including 15% who are seizure free. The mechanisms of action of dietary therapies are under active investigation and appear to involve mitochondria. Once perceived as a last resort, modifications to initiation and maintenance, as well as the widespread use of pre-made ketogenic formulas have allowed dietary treatment to be used earlier in the course of epilepsy. For infantile spasms (West syndrome) specifically, the ketogenic diet is successful about 50% of the time as a first-line treatment. New "alternative" diets such as the modified Atkins diet were created in 2003 and can be started more easily and are less restrictive. They may have particular value for countries in Asia. Side effects include constipation, dyslipidemia, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones. Additionally, neurologists are studying ketogenic diets for conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer's disease, autism, and brain tumors.

  15. Chapter 11: Dietary reference intakes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI) are a set of recommendations intended to provide guidance in evaluating nutrient intakes and planning meals on the basis of nutrient adequacy. In contrast to their predecessor, Recommended Dietary Allowances last published in 1989, the DRIs differ in two ways: th...

  16. Dietary intake and nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jiyoung; Abnet, Christian C; Cross, Amanda J; Sinha, Rashmi

    2011-01-01

    Though dietary factors are implicated in chronic disease risk, assessment of dietary intake has limitations, including problems with recall of complex food intake patterns over a long period of time. Diet and nutrient biomarkers may provide objective measures of dietary intake and nutritional status, as well as an integrated measure of intake, absorption and metabolism. Thus, the search for an unbiased biomarker of dietary intake and nutritional status is an important aspect of nutritional epidemiology. This chapter reviews types of biomarkers related to dietary intake and nutritional status, such as exposure biomarkers of diet and nutritional status, intermediate endpoints, and susceptibility. Novel biomarkers, such as biomarkers of physical fitness, oxidative DNA damage and tissue concentrations are also discussed.

  17. Does the importance of dietary costs for fruit and vegetable intake vary by socioeconomic position?

    PubMed

    Mackenbach, Joreintje D; Brage, Soren; Forouhi, Nita G; Griffin, Simon J; Wareham, Nicholas J; Monsivais, Pablo

    2015-11-14

    Evidence suggests that diets meeting recommendations for fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake are more costly. Dietary costs may be a greater constraint on the diet quality of people of lower socioeconomic position (SEP). The aim of this study was to examine whether dietary costs are more strongly associated with F&V intake in lower-SEP groups than in higher-SEP groups. Data on individual participants' education and income were available from a population-based, cross-sectional study of 10 020 British adults. F&V intake and dietary costs (GBP/d) were derived from a semi-quantitative FFQ. Dietary cost estimates were based on UK food prices. General linear models were used to assess associations between SEP, quartiles of dietary costs and F&V intake. Effect modification of SEP gradients by dietary costs was examined with interaction terms. Analysis demonstrated that individuals with lowest quartile dietary costs, low income and low education consumed less F&V than individuals with higher dietary costs, high income and high education. Significant interaction between SEP and dietary costs indicated that the association between dietary costs and F&V intake was stronger for less-educated and lower-income groups. That is, socioeconomic differences in F&V intake were magnified among individuals who consumed lowest-cost diets. Such amplification of socioeconomic inequalities in diet among those consuming low-cost diets indicates the need to address food costs in strategies to promote healthy diets. In addition, the absence of socioeconomic inequalities for individuals with high dietary costs suggests that high dietary costs can compensate for lack of other material, or psychosocial resources.

  18. Strong dietary restrictions protect Drosophila against anoxia/reoxygenation injuries.

    PubMed

    Vigne, Paul; Tauc, Michel; Frelin, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Reoxygenation of ischemic tissues is a major factor that determines the severity of cardiovascular diseases. This paper describes the consequences of anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) stresses on Drosophila, a useful, anoxia tolerant, model organism. Newly emerged adult male flies were exposed to anoxic conditions (<1% O2) for 1 to 6 hours, reoxygenated and their survival was monitored. A/R stresses induced a transient increase in mortality which peaked at the time of reoxygenation. Then flies recovered low mortality rates similar to those of control flies. A/R induced mortality was strongly dependent on dietary conditions during the 48 h that preceded anoxia. Well fed flies were anoxia sensitive. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protected flies against A/R injuries. The tolerance to anoxia was associated to large decreases in glycogen, protein, and ATP contents. During anoxia, anoxia tolerant flies produced more lactate, less phosphate and they maintained more stable ATP levels than anoxia sensitive flies. Moderate dietary restrictions, which increased the longevity of normoxic flies, did not promote resistance to A/R stresses. Diet dependent A/R injuries were still observed in sigma loss of function mutants and they were insensitive to dietary rapamycin or resveratrol. AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribose-furanoside), an activator AMP kinase decreased A/R injuries. Mutants in the insulin signalling pathway were more anoxia tolerant in a fed state. Long A/R stresses induce a transient increase in mortality in Drosophila. This mortality is highly dependent on dietary conditions prior to the stress. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protect flies against A/R injuries, probably by inducing a major remodelling of energy metabolism. The results also indicate that mechanistically different responses develop in response to dietary restrictions of different strengths. AMP kinase and the insulin signalling pathway are

  19. Strong Dietary Restrictions Protect Drosophila against Anoxia/Reoxygenation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Vigne, Paul; Tauc, Michel; Frelin, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background Reoxygenation of ischemic tissues is a major factor that determines the severity of cardiovascular diseases. This paper describes the consequences of anoxia/reoxygenation (A/R) stresses on Drosophila, a useful, anoxia tolerant, model organism. Methodology/Principal Findings Newly emerged adult male flies were exposed to anoxic conditions (<1% O2) for 1 to 6 hours, reoxygenated and their survival was monitored. Results A/R stresses induced a transient increase in mortality which peaked at the time of reoxygenation. Then flies recovered low mortality rates similar to those of control flies. A/R induced mortality was strongly dependent on dietary conditions during the 48 h that preceded anoxia. Well fed flies were anoxia sensitive. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protected flies against A/R injuries. The tolerance to anoxia was associated to large decreases in glycogen, protein, and ATP contents. During anoxia, anoxia tolerant flies produced more lactate, less phosphate and they maintained more stable ATP levels than anoxia sensitive flies. Moderate dietary restrictions, which increased the longevity of normoxic flies, did not promote resistance to A/R stresses. Diet dependent A/R injuries were still observed in sima loss of function mutants and they were insensitive to dietary rapamycin or resveratrol. AICAR (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribosefuranoside), an activator AMP kinase decreased A/R injuries. Mutants in the insulin signalling pathway were more anoxia tolerant in a fed state. Conclusion/Significance Long A/R stresses induce a transient increase in mortality in Drosophila. This mortality is highly dependent on dietary conditions prior to the stress. Strong dietary restrictions and starvation conditions protect flies against A/R injuries, probably by inducing a major remodelling of energy metabolism. The results also indicate that mechanistically different responses develop in response to dietary restrictions of

  20. Eating out of home and dietary adequacy in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Teresa; Severo, Milton; Oliveira, Andreia; Ramos, Elisabete; Rodrigues, Sara; Lopes, Carla

    2015-07-01

    The present study aims to describe dietary intake and dietary adequacy according to eating location in preschool children. A sub-sample of 2414 children from the Generation XXI birth cohort (Porto, Portugal), evaluated during the follow-up between 2009 and 2011, was included. Dietary intake was assessed by 3 d food diaries and four groups of children were defined according to the eating location: 'Home' ( ≥ 80% of meals at home), 'Other homes', 'Preschool' and 'Restaurants'. A dietary adequacy index was developed based on general recommendations for children; a higher score represents a better dietary adequacy. The comparison of nutrients and foods daily intake according to the eating location groups was performed by ANOVA and ANCOVA to adjust for potential confounders. Children classified in 'Preschool' group ate significantly more vegetables, fruit, bread and fish, and less meat, compared to children classified into the 'Home' group. Children classified in the 'Restaurants' group ate more cakes, salty snacks and fruit juices than children in 'Home' group; and less vegetables, dairy products and pasta/rice/potatoes. In 'Restaurants' children obtained the lowest mean score of the dietary adequacy index (15.5, 95% CI 14.8, 16.3) and in 'Preschool' children had the highest mean score (18.3, 95% CI 18.1, 18.4), corresponding to a better dietary adequacy. Preschools seem to have a relevant role in promoting the intake of healthy foods in preschool children. The consumption in restaurants/coffee shops seems to contribute to energy-dense food intake and reduced consumption of nutrient-dense foods.

  1. Dietary intervention in acne

    PubMed Central

    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  2. Dietary patterns with special reference to calcium intake in 2-16-year-old Urban Western Indian children.

    PubMed

    Ekbote, Veena H; Khadilkar, Anuradha V; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Chiplonkar, Shashi A; Mughal, Zulf

    2017-01-01

    It is important to establish good dietary practices in childhood that promote adequate calcium intake throughout life and reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures in later life. To assess dietary patterns of 2-16-year-old children with special reference to calcium and suggest strategies and develop recipes suitable to identified patterns to increase dietary calcium intake. We studied 220 schoolchildren (2-16 years) around Pune city, India. The study duration was June 2013-July 2014. Height and weight were measured using standard protocols. Dietary intake was assessed by 24-h diet recall on 3 nonconsecutive days. Dietary patterns were derived by cluster analysis in two age groups; children (2-9 years) and adolescents (10-16 years). As per the dietary patterns, calcium-rich recipes were developed. Among children, "rice-pulse" (RP) and "wheat, milk, and milk products" (WM) patterns were observed. Among adolescents, RP, "wheat, milk, and bakery" (WMB), and "mixed food" patterns were observed. Children who consumed "WM" and "WMB" patterns had greater intake of calcium (P < 0.05) than children consuming other dietary patterns. The daily calcium intake of whole group was 53% of the recommended dietary allowance. From this, 30% calcium came from milk. Each serve of the developed recipe provided an average of 254 mg of calcium. Majority of children had cereal-pulse-based dietary patterns. By replacing foods from existing dietary patterns with calcium-rich foods, the dietary calcium content may be increased in a sustainable manner.

  3. Using School Lunch Programs To Promote Positive Dietary Habits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    The variety of school lunch foods available has dramatically expanded as school food managers strive to increase sales and generate revenue. Though lunchtime offerings are often based on student preferences versus nutritional value, with a small investment of effort and commitment to student well-being, schools can create lunch programs that…

  4. Using School Lunch Programs To Promote Positive Dietary Habits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    The variety of school lunch foods available has dramatically expanded as school food managers strive to increase sales and generate revenue. Though lunchtime offerings are often based on student preferences versus nutritional value, with a small investment of effort and commitment to student well-being, schools can create lunch programs that…

  5. A Critical Look at Prebiotics Within the Dietary Fiber Concept.

    PubMed

    Verspreet, Joran; Damen, Bram; Broekaert, Willem F; Verbeke, Kristin; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the current knowledge of the health effects of dietary fiber and prebiotics and establishes the position of prebiotics within the broader context of dietary fiber. Although the positive health effects of specific fibers on defecation, reduction of postprandial glycemic response, and maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels are generally accepted, other presumed health benefits of dietary fibers are still debated. There is evidence that specific dietary fibers improve the integrity of the epithelial layer of the intestines, increase the resistance against pathogenic colonization, reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer, increase mineral absorption, and have a positive impact on the immune system, but these effects are neither generally acknowledged nor completely understood. Many of the latter effects are thought to be particularly elicited by prebiotics. Although the prebiotic concept evolved significantly during the past two decades, the line between prebiotics and nonprebiotic dietary fiber remains vague. Nevertheless, scientific evidence demonstrating the health-promoting potential of prebiotics continues to accumulate and suggests that prebiotic fibers have their rightful place in a healthy diet.

  6. Dietary goals, sensible eating and nutrition in the future.

    PubMed

    Walker, A R

    1980-01-26

    Compared with our ancestor's diet, that consumed by present-day Western populations is higher in intake of energy, of protein (especially animal protein) and of fat (especially animal fat), but lower in intake of fibre-containing cereal foods; this diet is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality from degenerative diseases. In the USA, the Dietary Goals report has recommended partial reversion to our ancestors' diet, including decreased intake of animal fat and protein, cholesterol, salt, sugar and alcohol--hopefully to reduce mortality from the six leading causes of death. 'Dietary goals', 'sensible eating' and the extreme 'longevity diet' are discussed. It is concluded that the general public will not voluntarily accept dietary changes of the magnitude required to promote a meaningful decrease in the burden of ill-health from degenerative diseases, because of: (i) conservativeness of dietary habits; and (ii) uncertainties about the extent of benefits likely to accrue. It is speculated, however, that in the distant future dietary changes of the type recommended will gradually but compulsorily be introduced, because of: (i) increases in population numbers; and (ii) the far greater economy of land usage linked with production of a near-vegetarian diet.

  7. Examining school-day dietary intakes among Canadian children.

    PubMed

    Tugault-Lafleur, Claire N; Black, Jennifer L; Barr, Susan I

    2017-10-01

    Understanding how dietary intakes vary over the course of the school day can help inform targeted school-based interventions, but little is known about the distribution or determinants of school-day dietary intakes in Canada. This study examined differences between school-hour and non-school-hour dietary intakes and assessed demographic and socioeconomic correlates of school-hour diet quality among Canadian children. Nationally representative data from the Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed using 24-h dietary recalls falling on school days in 2004 (n = 4827). Differences in nutrient and food-group densities during and outside of school hours and differences in School Heathy Eating Index (School-HEI) scores across sociodemographic characteristics were examined using survey-weighted, linear regression models. Children reported consuming, on average, 746 kcal during school hours (one-third of their daily energy intakes). Vitamins A, D, B12, calcium, and dairy products densities were at least 20% lower during school hours compared with non-school hours. Differences in School-HEI scores were poorly explained by sociodemographic factors, although age and province of residence emerged as significant correlates. The school context provides an important opportunity to promote healthy eating, particularly among adolescents who have the poorest school-hour dietary practices. The nutritional profile of foods consumed at school could be potentially improved with increased intake of dairy products, thereby increasing intakes of protein, vitamin A, vitamin D, calcium, and magnesium.

  8. Inclusion of red meat in healthful dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Shalene H

    2014-11-01

    Dietary patterns are an important concept in dietary recommendations. The Western pattern is most commonly defined as a diet characterized by high intakes of refined grains, sugar and red meat, and has been shown to be associated with increased risks for certain types of cancer, coronary heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. However, isolating the independent effects of individual foods on health outcomes is central to helping individuals choose foods to build healthier dietary patterns to which they can adhere. Red meat is a popular source of high quality protein and provides a variety of essential nutrients that improve overall diet quality. It is also a source of saturated fatty acids, which observational evidence suggests are associated with heart disease, although recent data challenge this. Several studies have shown that lean red meat can be successfully included in recommended heart-healthy dietary patterns without detriment to blood lipids. Furthermore, increased dietary protein has been shown to promote healthy body weight and composition, in part by increasing satiety, and to improve vitality and stamina.

  9. Dietary potassium regulates vascular calcification and arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yong; Byon, Chang Hyun; Yang, Youfeng; Bradley, Wayne E; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Sanders, Paul W; Agarwal, Anupam; Wu, Hui; Chen, Yabing

    2017-10-05

    Vascular calcification is a risk factor that predicts adverse cardiovascular complications of several diseases including atherosclerosis. Reduced dietary potassium intake has been linked to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and incidental stroke, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using the ApoE-deficient mouse model, we demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge that reduced dietary potassium (0.3%) promoted atherosclerotic vascular calcification and increased aortic stiffness, compared with normal (0.7%) potassium-fed mice. In contrast, increased dietary potassium (2.1%) attenuated vascular calcification and aortic stiffness. Mechanistically, reduction in the potassium concentration to the lower limit of the physiological range increased intracellular calcium, which activated a cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) signal that subsequently enhanced autophagy and promoted vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Inhibition of calcium signals and knockdown of either CREB or ATG7, an autophagy regulator, attenuated VSMC calcification induced by low potassium. Consistently, elevated autophagy and CREB signaling were demonstrated in the calcified arteries from low potassium diet-fed mice as well as aortic arteries exposed to low potassium ex vivo. These studies established a potentially novel causative role of dietary potassium intake in regulating atherosclerotic vascular calcification and stiffness, and uncovered mechanisms that offer opportunities to develop therapeutic strategies to control vascular disease.

  10. A Dietary Fiber-Deprived Gut Microbiota Degrades the Colonic Mucus Barrier and Enhances Pathogen Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mahesh S; Seekatz, Anna M; Koropatkin, Nicole M; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Hickey, Christina A; Wolter, Mathis; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Kitamoto, Sho; Terrapon, Nicolas; Muller, Arnaud; Young, Vincent B; Henrissat, Bernard; Wilmes, Paul; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Núñez, Gabriel; Martens, Eric C

    2016-11-17

    Despite the accepted health benefits of consuming dietary fiber, little is known about the mechanisms by which fiber deprivation impacts the gut microbiota and alters disease risk. Using a gnotobiotic mouse model, in which animals were colonized with a synthetic human gut microbiota composed of fully sequenced commensal bacteria, we elucidated the functional interactions between dietary fiber, the gut microbiota, and the colonic mucus barrier, which serves as a primary defense against enteric pathogens. We show that during chronic or intermittent dietary fiber deficiency, the gut microbiota resorts to host-secreted mucus glycoproteins as a nutrient source, leading to erosion of the colonic mucus barrier. Dietary fiber deprivation, together with a fiber-deprived, mucus-eroding microbiota, promotes greater epithelial access and lethal colitis by the mucosal pathogen, Citrobacter rodentium. Our work reveals intricate pathways linking diet, the gut microbiome, and intestinal barrier dysfunction, which could be exploited to improve health using dietary therapeutics.

  11. Dietary restriction suppresses proteotoxicity and enhances longevity by an hsf-1-dependent mechanism in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Steinkraus, Katherine A; Smith, Erica D; Davis, Christina; Carr, Daniel; Pendergrass, William R; Sutphin, George L; Kennedy, Brian K; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2008-06-01

    Dietary restriction increases lifespan and slows the onset of age-associated disease in organisms from yeast to mammals. In humans, several age-related diseases are associated with aberrant protein folding or aggregation, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases. We report here that dietary restriction dramatically suppresses age-associated paralysis in three nematode models of proteotoxicity. Similar to its longevity-enhancing properties, dietary restriction protects against proteotoxicity by a mechanism distinct from reduced insulin/IGF-1-like signaling. Instead, the heat shock transcription factor, hsf-1, is required for enhanced thermotolerance, suppression of proteotoxicity, and lifespan extension by dietary restriction. These findings demonstrate that dietary restriction confers a general protective effect against proteotoxicity and promotes longevity by a mechanism involving hsf-1.

  12. Effects of commercially available dietary supplements on resting energy expenditure: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roger A; Conn, Carole A; Mermier, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available dietary products advertised to promote weight loss are an underresearched but heavily purchased commodity in the United States. Despite only limited evidence, interest in dietary supplements continues to increase. This work uniquely summarizes the current evidence evaluating the efficacy of several over-the-counter thermogenic products for their effects on resting energy expenditure. Currently, there is some evidence suggesting dietary products containing select ingredients can increase energy expenditure in healthy young people immediately following consumption (within 6 hours). It is unclear if supplement-induced increases in metabolic rate provide additional benefit beyond that provided by dietary constituents that contain similar ingredients. It is also unclear if dietary supplements are effective for weight loss in humans.

  13. Effects of Commercially Available Dietary Supplements on Resting Energy Expenditure: A Brief Report

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Roger A.; Conn, Carole A.; Mermier, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available dietary products advertised to promote weight loss are an underresearched but heavily purchased commodity in the United States. Despite only limited evidence, interest in dietary supplements continues to increase. This work uniquely summarizes the current evidence evaluating the efficacy of several over-the-counter thermogenic products for their effects on resting energy expenditure. Currently, there is some evidence suggesting dietary products containing select ingredients can increase energy expenditure in healthy young people immediately following consumption (within 6 hours). It is unclear if supplement-induced increases in metabolic rate provide additional benefit beyond that provided by dietary constituents that contain similar ingredients. It is also unclear if dietary supplements are effective for weight loss in humans. PMID:24967272

  14. Absorption of dietary cholesterol oxidation products and their downstream metabolic effects are reduced by dietary apple polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Yamato; Osada, Kyoichi; Nakamura, Shingo; Ohta, Yutaka; Kanda, Tomomasa; Sugano, Michihiro

    2007-03-01

    Exogenous and endogenous cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) perturb various metabolic processes, and thereby they may induce various homeostasis-related disorders. Here, we observed that procyanidin-rich dietary apple polyphenol (APP) from unripe apples alleviates the perturbation of lipid metabolism by decreasing the exogenous COP levels in rats. Dietary COPs may be the greatest source of COPs found in the human body. Rats (4 weeks of age) were fed AIN-purified diets containing 0.3% COPs supplemented with 0.5 or 2.5% APP for 3 weeks. Dietary APP alleviated the growth inhibition action of the exogenous COPs. The modulations of the liver lipid profile by COPs remained unchanged. However, serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels increased following the intake of dietary APP. Further, dietary APP inhibited the increase in lipid peroxide levels in the liver and serum by COPs. The activity of hepatic Delta6 desaturase was lowered by dietary APP in a dose-dependent manner, although exogenous COPs generally increased the activity of this enzyme. In keeping with this observation, Delta6 desaturation indices in the phospholipids and cholesteryl esters of the liver and serum lipids were lower in the APP-fed groups than those in the control group. Dietary APP also promoted the excretion of exogenous COPs, cholesterol, and acidic steroids in feces. Therefore, the inhibition of intestinal absorption of COPs may partly contribute to the alleviation of the perturbation of lipid metabolism and lipid peroxidation levels. Thus, APP may be an important removal agent of exogenous toxic material such as COPs contained in processed or fast foods.

  15. Effect of dietary fiber on morphine-induced constipation in rats.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Takashi; Nakao, Makoto; Hoshi, Seiko; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Inagaki, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Mikio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2002-06-01

    Morphine is used to alleviate chronic cancer pain. However, constipation is a major adverse effect that often detracts from the patient's quality of life. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of dietary fiber on morphine-induced constipation. Rats were fed on a normal diet or one containing either 10% or 20% apple fiber for two weeks before morphine was administered. In the control diet group, the fecal number and dry weight were decreased by treating with morphine in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the motility of the small and large intestines was reduced. The fecal number and weight were increased and the colon motility was promoted by dietary fiber, regardless of whether morphine was being administered. The dietary fiber increased the concentration of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in the cecum. These results suggest that dietary fiber has a preventative effect on morphine-induced constipation by increasing SCFAs in the cecum, and thereby promoting colon motility in rats.

  16. Factors influencing Australian construction industry apprentices' dietary behaviors.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Karin

    2012-01-01

    To date there has been a theoretical and empirical gap in workplace-centered health promotion research-particularly as it applies to blue-collar men's diets. To begin addressing the paucity of research, five qualitative focus groups (N = 53) were conducted in Australian training colleges to explore the dietary behaviors of apprentices. Thematic analysis was used by the researcher who concludes that although some apprentices were health conscious and attempted to eat healthy foods, many had diets high in saturated fats and sugar. These types of diets are associated with increased risks for developing chronic disease and are associated with decreased life expectancy. As such it poses a serious challenge for health promoters. Apprentices' dietary practices were also found to be moderated by convenience, availability, and cost of foods in their environment. Their nutritional beliefs, significant others, colleagues in the workplace, and their body image also influence their food choices.

  17. Factors influencing consumer dietary health preventative behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Petrovici, Dan A; Ritson, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Background The deterioration of the health status of the Romanian population during the economic transition from a centrally planned to a free market economy has been linked to lifestyles factors (e.g. diet) regarded as a main determinants of the disparity in life expectancy between Eastern and Western Europe. Reforms in the health care system in this transition economy aim to focus on preventive action. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that impact on the individual decision to engage in Dietary Health Preventive Behaviour (DHPB) and investigate their influence in the context of an adapted health cognition model. Methods A population-based study recruited 485 adult respondents using random route sampling and face-to-face administered questionnaires. Results and discussion Respondents' health motivation, beliefs that diet can prevent disease, knowledge about nutrition, level of education attainment and age have a positive influence on DHPB. Perceived barriers to healthy eating have a negative impact on alcohol moderation. The information acquisition behaviour (frequency of reading food labels) is negatively predicted by age and positively predicted by health motivation, education, self-reported knowledge about nutrition and household financial status. A significant segment of respondents believe they are not susceptible to the elicited diseases. Health promotion strategies should aim to change the judgments of health risk. Conclusion The adaptation of the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Health Preventive Behaviour represents a valid framework of predicting DHPB. The negative sign of perceived threat of disease on DHPB may suggest that, under an income constraint, consumers tend to trade off long-term health benefits for short-term benefits. This cautions against the use of negative messages in public health campaigns. Raising the awareness of diet-disease relationships, knowledge about nutrition (particularly sources and risks associated

  18. Factors influencing consumer dietary health preventative behaviours.

    PubMed

    Petrovici, Dan A; Ritson, Christopher

    2006-09-01

    The deterioration of the health status of the Romanian population during the economic transition from a centrally planned to a free market economy has been linked to lifestyles factors (e.g. diet) regarded as a main determinants of the disparity in life expectancy between Eastern and Western Europe. Reforms in the health care system in this transition economy aim to focus on preventive action. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that impact on the individual decision to engage in Dietary Health Preventive Behaviour (DHPB) and investigate their influence in the context of an adapted health cognition model. A population-based study recruited 485 adult respondents using random route sampling and face-to-face administered questionnaires. Respondents' health motivation, beliefs that diet can prevent disease, knowledge about nutrition, level of education attainment and age have a positive influence on DHPB. Perceived barriers to healthy eating have a negative impact on alcohol moderation. The information acquisition behaviour (frequency of reading food labels) is negatively predicted by age and positively predicted by health motivation, education, self-reported knowledge about nutrition and household financial status. A significant segment of respondents believe they are not susceptible to the elicited diseases. Health promotion strategies should aim to change the judgments of health risk. The adaptation of the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Health Preventive Behaviour represents a valid framework of predicting DHPB. The negative sign of perceived threat of disease on DHPB may suggest that, under an income constraint, consumers tend to trade off long-term health benefits for short-term benefits. This cautions against the use of negative messages in public health campaigns. Raising the awareness of diet-disease relationships, knowledge about nutrition (particularly sources and risks associated with dietary fat and cholesterol) may induce people to

  19. A qualitative study of dietary discussions as an emerging task for cancer clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Katherine C; Coa, Kisha I; Klassen, Ann C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Improvements in cancer detection and treatment create a need for care that prioritizes acute treatment and ongoing needs. There have been calls to include health promotion in cancer care, but little empirical consideration of the work involved in such an expansion of services. In this article, we adopt a constructionist position to explore clinicians’ perspectives on capacity for health promotion, specifically dietary counseling. Methods: Our data result from 33 semi-structured qualitative interviews with members of cancer care teams. All interviewees were affiliated with one of two contrasting medical systems located in Baltimore, MD, USA. Interviews focused on professional roles and responsibilities around health promotion for cancer survivors. We employed both purposive and snowball sampling. We conducted a thematic analysis informed by the sociology of professions literature of discussions of dietary change by provider type. Results: We discuss four emergent themes that relate to the work of providing dietary counseling: (1) prioritization of behavior change in survivorship care, (2) evidence base for dietary messaging, (3) available time and clinical priorities and (4) clinical expertise. Interviewees generally expressed support for the importance of diet for healthy cancer survivorship. However, while there was broad support for dietary change and health promotion, we found little evidence of an emerging consensus on how this work should be accomplished, nor an indication of any occupational group expanding their professional remit to prioritize health promotion tasks. Conclusions: Health promotion is the key to any efficient and effective model of cancer care. Careful attention to the impact of the task on key patient outcomes as well as system capacity for the provision of dietary counseling and its fit with a specific professional remit will be critical for successful integration of health promotion into routine cancer care. PMID:27635247

  20. Dietary Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Bruce N.

    1983-01-01

    Describes 16 mutagens/carcinogens found in plant food and coffee as well as several anticarcinogens also found in such food. Speculates on relevant biochemical mechanisms, particularly the role of oxygen radicals and their inhibitors in the fat/cancer relationship, promotion, anticarcinogenesis, and aging. (JN)

  1. Dietary Carcinogens and Anticarcinogens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Bruce N.

    1983-01-01

    Describes 16 mutagens/carcinogens found in plant food and coffee as well as several anticarcinogens also found in such food. Speculates on relevant biochemical mechanisms, particularly the role of oxygen radicals and their inhibitors in the fat/cancer relationship, promotion, anticarcinogenesis, and aging. (JN)

  2. Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ron

    1992-01-01

    How physicians address issues of disease prevention and health promotion is discussed and current standards of screening for disease and counseling practices are reviewed. Collaboration among all health professionals is necessary if preventive medicine is to be effective. PMID:21221259

  3. Dietary supplements for dysmenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Pattanittum, Porjai; Kunyanone, Naowarat; Brown, Julie; Sangkomkamhang, Ussanee S; Barnes, Joanne; Seyfoddin, Vahid; Marjoribanks, Jane

    2016-03-22

    Dysmenorrhoea refers to painful menstrual cramps and is a common gynaecological complaint. Conventional treatments include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), which both reduce myometrial activity (contractions of the uterus). A suggested alternative approach is dietary supplements. We used the term 'dietary supplement' to include herbs or other botanical, vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and amino acids. We excluded traditional Chinese medicines. To determine the efficacy and safety of dietary supplements for treating dysmenorrhoea. We searched sources including the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, PsycINFO (all from inception to 23 March 2015), trial registries, and the reference lists of relevant articles. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of dietary supplements for moderate or severe primary or secondary dysmenorrhoea. We excluded studies of women with an intrauterine device. Eligible comparators were other dietary supplements, placebo, no treatment, or conventional analgesia. Two review authors independently performed study selection, performed data extraction and assessed the risk of bias in the included trials. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and adverse effects. We used a fixed-effect model to calculate odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data, and mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMDs) for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We presented data that were unsuitable for analysis either descriptively or in additional tables. We assessed the quality of the evidence using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methods. We included 27 RCTs (3101 women). Most included studies were conducted amongst cohorts of students with primary dysmenorrhoea in their late teens or early twenties. Twenty-two studies were

  4. Dietary phosphorus acutely impairs endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-07-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  5. Dietary Phosphorus Acutely Impairs Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Shuto, Emi; Taketani, Yutaka; Tanaka, Rieko; Harada, Nagakatsu; Isshiki, Masashi; Sato, Minako; Nashiki, Kunitaka; Amo, Kikuko; Yamamoto, Hironori; Higashi, Yukihito; Nakaya, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji

    2009-01-01

    Excessive dietary phosphorus may increase cardiovascular risk in healthy individuals as well as in patients with chronic kidney disease, but the mechanisms underlying this risk are not completely understood. To determine whether postprandial hyperphosphatemia may promote endothelial dysfunction, we investigated the acute effect of phosphorus loading on endothelial function in vitro and in vivo. Exposing bovine aortic endothelial cells to a phosphorus load increased production of reactive oxygen species, which depended on phosphorus influx via sodium-dependent phosphate transporters, and decreased nitric oxide production via inhibitory phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Phosphorus loading inhibited endothelium-dependent vasodilation of rat aortic rings. In 11 healthy men, we alternately served meals containing 400 mg or 1200 mg of phosphorus in a double-blind crossover study and measured flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery before and 2 h after the meals. The high dietary phosphorus load increased serum phosphorus at 2 h and significantly decreased flow-mediated dilation. Flow-mediated dilation correlated inversely with serum phosphorus. Taken together, these findings suggest that endothelial dysfunction mediated by acute postprandial hyperphosphatemia may contribute to the relationship between serum phosphorus level and the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:19406976

  6. Japanese dietary lifestyle and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tada, Norio; Maruyama, Chizuko; Koba, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Birou, Sadatoshi; Teramoto, Tamio; Sasaki, Jun

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate the reasons for low morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD) and reconfirm the effectiveness of the Japanese dietary lifestyle for preventing CAD, we herein review the CAD risk transition, and post-war changes in Japanese food and nutrient intake. Large-scale cohort studies in Japan were selectively reviewed. Low serum total cholesterol contributed to preventing CAD, and decreased blood pressure was the major factor favoring stroke reduction. Japanese consumed more plant and marine origin foods, but fewer animal foods with saturated fatty acids (SFA) during the 1960-70s than in recent decades. Adequate control of total energy with restriction of saturated fatty acids from animal foods, increased intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including fish, soybean products, fruits and vegetables together with low salt intake are responsible for promoting CAD and stroke prevention. A diet with adequate total calories and increased intake of fish and plant foods, but decreased intake of refined carbohydrates and animal fat, a so-called Japan diet, appears to be quite effective for prevention of CAD risk factors and is recommended as dietary therapy for preventing CAD.

  7. Evolutionary Adaptations to Dietary Changes

    PubMed Central

    Luca, F.; Perry, G.H.; Di Rienzo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Through cultural innovation and changes in habitat and ecology, there have been a number of major dietary shifts in human evolution, including meat eating, cooking, and those associated with plant and animal domestication. The identification of signatures of adaptations to such dietary changes in the genome of extant primates (including humans) may shed light not only on the evolutionary history of our species, but also on the mechanisms that underlie common metabolic diseases in modern human populations. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the major dietary shifts that occurred during hominin evolution, and we discuss the methods and approaches used to identify signals of natural selection in patterns of sequence variation. We then review the results of studies aimed at detecting the genetic loci that played a major role in dietary adaptations and conclude by outlining the potential of future studies in this area. PMID:20420525

  8. Evolutionary adaptations to dietary changes.

    PubMed

    Luca, F; Perry, G H; Di Rienzo, A

    2010-08-21

    Through cultural innovation and changes in habitat and ecology, there have been a number of major dietary shifts in human evolution, including meat eating, cooking, and those associated with plant and animal domestication. The identification of signatures of adaptations to such dietary changes in the genome of extant primates (including humans) may shed light not only on the evolutionary history of our species, but also on the mechanisms that underlie common metabolic diseases in modern human populations. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the major dietary shifts that occurred during hominin evolution, and we discuss the methods and approaches used to identify signals of natural selection in patterns of sequence variation. We then review the results of studies aimed at detecting the genetic loci that played a major role in dietary adaptations and conclude by outlining the potential of future studies in this area.

  9. Dietary polyphenols: Antioxidants or not?

    PubMed

    Croft, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Population studies have shown a strong association between dietary intake of polyphenols and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. These associations have been confirmed to some extent by intervention studies which have shown improvements in vascular function and blood pressure with certain polyphenols or food extracts rich in polyphenols. The mechanisms involved in the bioactivity of dietary polyphenols is still under active investigation. It is unlikely that polyphenols act as antioxidants in vivo. Evidence suggests that dietary polyphenols or their metabolites act as signalling molecules and can increase nitric oxide bioavailability and induce protective enzymes. This review will outline some of the key issues in dietary polyphenol research that suggest mechanistic insights into the action of these bioactive compounds. There are a number of issues that remain to be resolved in bridging the gap between observational studies and intervention trials using food extracts or pure polyphenol compounds.

  10. Dietary manipulation of mouse metabolism.

    PubMed

    Feige, Jérôme N; Lagouge, Marie; Auwerx, Johan

    2008-10-01

    The maintenance of metabolic homeostasis relies on the balanced intake of nutrients from food. Consequently, diet composition strongly impacts whole-body physiology. Dietary formulations with strong nutrient imbalances can lead to metabolic disorders, with lipids and simple sugars playing a prominent role. This unit describes how diet formulation can be modified to generate mouse models of human metabolic pathologies, and it details methodological procedures linked to dietary manipulations, including caloric restriction and introduction of a test compound.

  11. Dietary change: what are the responses and roles of significant others?

    PubMed

    Paisley, Judy; Beanlands, Heather; Goldman, Joanne; Evers, Susan; Chappell, Janet

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of one person's dietary change on the experiences of a significant other with whom they regularly shared meals. Qualitative constant comparison approach using semistructured interviews. Community-based. Forty-two participants were recruited using a stratified purposive sampling strategy. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed using NUD*IST, version 4.0 software (Qualitative Solutions and Research, Melbourne, Australia, 1997) and manual coding. Most dietary changers had modified their diets in response to a disease diagnosis (eg, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, hypoglycemia, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), ulcer, allergies). Others had changed their diets for personal reasons (eg, weight loss, vegetarian diets). The dietary changes included dietary fat reduction, conversion to vegetarian or vegan diets, restriction of total kilocalorie intake, and elimination or reduction of specific food items. Significant others described a range of emotional responses to the dietary change, including cooperation, encouragement, skepticism, and anger. Significant others' descriptions of the roles that they played in the dietary change were positive (enabling), neutral (neither enabling nor inhibiting), or negative (inhibiting). Most significant others played positive roles; few played neutral or negative roles. Understanding dietary change from the perspective of significant others can enable nutrition professionals to develop strategies to promote dietary modifications as a shared activity.

  12. Dietary patterns and prostatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sebastiano, Cimino; Vincenzo, Favilla; Tommaso, Castelli; Giuseppe, Sortino; Marco, Russo; Ivana, Caldarella; Giorgio, Russo; Massimo, Madonia; Giuseppe, Morgia

    2012-01-01

    Dietary patterns play a role on prostatic diseases in association with genetic, behavioral, occupational and environmental ones. Data from reviewed literature provide evidences of a possible relationship between dietary habits and the incidence of prostate disorders, even if it is not enough to justify a widespread adoption of new dietary habits. In this review the role of dietary patterns, including the use of supplements, in the prevention and treatment of the most frequent and known prostatic diseases, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) was analyzed. A limited number of well designed trials were identified in which diet and dietary supplement intervention appeared to slow disease progression. Although conclusive evidences are limited, the current data suggest that a diet low in total calories and fat, high in vegetables and fruits and that body weight control could be possibly effective in preventing prostatic diseases. On the other hand care must be taken to ensure that over-consumption of dietary supplements does not occur because it may be harmful.

  13. Dietary lipids and cancer.

    PubMed

    Granados, S; Quiles, J L; Gil, A; Ramírez-Tortosa, M C

    2006-05-01

    Cancer is one of the main causes of death in Western countries. Among the factors that contribute to the appearance of this disease, diet has a fundamental role, and specifically fats are the main component related to the increase in the incidence of cancerous diseases, particularly breast, colon-rectal, and prostate cancer. From dietary lipids, much attention has been given to the beneficial effects of fish oil, rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids n-3 serie, as well as of olive oil, rich in monounsaturated fatty acids--primarily oleic acid. On the contrary, a negative effect has been reported for polyunsaturated fatty acids n-6 serie and for saturated fatty acids. Nutrition constitutes an important aspect of the life of cancer patients. Currently, nutritional formulas are being designed with supplements of polyunsaturated n-3 fatty acids and other components such as arginine, RNA, lysine, etc., with the aim of ameliorating the effects of this pathology. The results demonstrate the lower morbility and therefore improved quality of life, a decline in mortality, and a reduction in related costs.

  14. Dietary habits and hearing.

    PubMed

    Rosenhall, Ulf; Idrizbegovic, Esma; Hederstierna, Christina; Rothenberg, Elisabet

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Objective: Study groups from three age cohorts of 70-75 year-olds were investigated to search for possible correlations between dietary habits and auditory function. A cross-sectional, epidemiological study. A total number of 524 people (275 women, 249 men) were recruited from three age cohorts. The study sample was representative of the general population. All participants answered a diet history and were tested with pure-tone audiometry. Eleven categories of food consumption were related to pure-tone averages of low-mid frequency hearing, and high frequency hearing. Two consistent correlations between diet and hearing were observed. One was a correlation between good hearing and a high consumption of fish in the male group. The other was a correlation between poor high frequency hearing and a high consumption of food rich in low molecular carbohydrates in both genders; a larger effect size was seen in females. The study indicates that diet is important for aural health in aging. According to this study fish is beneficial to hearing, whereas consumption of "junk food", rich in low molecular carbohydrates, is detrimental. Other correlations, e.g. between high consumption of antioxidants, were not demonstrated here, but cannot be excluded.

  15. 76 FR 55927 - Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New Dietary Ingredient Notifications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and... notice entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New Dietary Ingredient Notifications...

  16. Promoting Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Zhao, Yongxin; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Si

    There can be multitudinous models specifying aspects of the same system. Each model has a bias towards one aspect. These models often override in specific aspects though they have different expressions. A specification written in one model can be refined by introducing additional information from other models. The paper proposes a concept of promoting models which is a methodology to obtain refinements with support from cooperating models. It refines a primary model by integrating the information from a secondary model. The promotion principle is not merely an academic point, but also a reliable and robust engineering technique which can be used to develop software and hardware systems. It can also check the consistency between two specifications from different models. A case of modeling a simple online shopping system with the cooperation of the guarded design model and CSP model illustrates the practicability of the promotion principle.

  17. Dietary supplements in weight reduction.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Johanna T; Allison, David B; Coates, Paul M

    2005-05-01

    We summarize evidence on the role of dietary supplements in weight reduction, with particular attention to their safety and benefits. Dietary supplements are used for two purposes in weight reduction: (a) providing nutrients that may be inadequate in calorie-restricted diets and (b) for their potential benefits in stimulating weight loss. The goal in planning weight-reduction diets is that total intake from food and supplements should meet recommended dietary allowance/adequate intake levels without greatly exceeding them for all nutrients, except energy. If nutrient amounts from food sources in the reducing diet fall short, dietary supplements containing a single nutrient/element or a multivitamin-mineral combination may be helpful. On hypocaloric diets, the addition of dietary supplements providing nutrients at a level equal to or below recommended dietary allowance/adequate intake levels or 100% daily value, as stated in a supplement's facts box on the label, may help dieters to achieve nutrient adequacy and maintain electrolyte balance while avoiding the risk of excessive nutrient intakes. Many botanical and other types of dietary supplements are purported to be useful for stimulating or enhancing weight loss. Evidence of their efficacy in stimulating weight loss is inconclusive at present. Although there are few examples of safety concerns related to products that are legal and on the market for this purpose, there is also a paucity of evidence on safety for this intended use. Ephedra and ephedrine-containing supplements, with or without caffeine, have been singled out in recent alerts from the Food and Drug Administration because of safety concerns, and use of products containing these substances cannot be recommended. Dietitians should periodically check the Food and Drug Administration Web site ( www.cfsan.fda.gov ) for updates and warnings and alert patients/clients to safety concerns. Dietetics professionals should also consult authoritative sources for

  18. A community-based healthy living promotion program improved self-esteem among minority children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Improving self-esteem, dietary habits, and physical activity is essential for long-term success in childhood obesity prevention. The aim is to evaluate the effects of a healthy living promotion program, Healthy Kids-Houston, on BMI, dietary habits, self-esteem, and physical activity among minority c...

  19. Health Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Karmali-Rawji, Shameela; Kassim-Lakha, Shaheen; Taylor, Karmel

    1992-01-01

    Perceived lack or loss of control, stress, a rapidly again population and rising costs of health care necessitate effective health promotion and disease prevention in the elderly. In a collaborative health promotion effort, the private sector, public sector, and community partners have joined to increase the South Asian elders' sense of control over the decisions and circumstances that affect their everyday lives. The project was designed to help elders come to terms with the fragmentation of their extended families, cultural alienation, decreased autonomy, need for information, and greater risk of cardiovascular disease. Imagesp622-a

  20. A Dietary Feedback System for the Delivery of Consistent Personalized Dietary Advice in the Web-Based Multicenter Food4Me Study

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Hannah; Walsh, Marianne C; O'Donovan, Clare B; Woolhead, Clara; McGirr, Caroline; Daly, E.J; O'Riordan, Richard; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Fallaize, Rosalind; Macready, Anna L; Marsaux, Cyril F M; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; San-Cristobal, Rodrigo; Kolossa, Silvia; Hartwig, Kai; Mavrogianni, Christina; Tsirigoti, Lydia; Lambrinou, Christina P; Godlewska, Magdalena; Surwiłło, Agnieszka; Gjelstad, Ingrid Merethe Fange; Drevon, Christian A; Manios, Yannis; Traczyk, Iwona; Martinez, J Alfredo; Saris, Wim H M; Daniel, Hannelore; Lovegrove, Julie A; Mathers, John C; Gibney, Michael J; Gibney, Eileen R

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite numerous healthy eating campaigns, the prevalence of diets high in saturated fatty acids, sugar, and salt and low in fiber, fruit, and vegetables remains high. With more people than ever accessing the Internet, Web-based dietary assessment instruments have the potential to promote healthier dietary behaviors via personalized dietary advice. Objective The objectives of this study were to develop a dietary feedback system for the delivery of consistent personalized dietary advice in a multicenter study and to examine the impact of automating the advice system. Methods The development of the dietary feedback system included 4 components: (1) designing a system for categorizing nutritional intakes; (2) creating a method for prioritizing 3 nutrient-related goals for subsequent targeted dietary advice; (3) constructing decision tree algorithms linking data on nutritional intake to feedback messages; and (4) developing personal feedback reports. The system was used manually by researchers to provide personalized nutrition advice based on dietary assessment to 369 participants during the Food4Me randomized controlled trial, with an automated version developed on completion of the study. Results Saturated fatty acid, salt, and dietary fiber were most frequently selected as nutrient-related goals across the 7 centers. Average agreement between the manual and automated systems, in selecting 3 nutrient-related goals for personalized dietary advice across the centers, was highest for nutrient-related goals 1 and 2 and lower for goal 3, averaging at 92%, 87%, and 63%, respectively. Complete agreement between the 2 systems for feedback advice message selection averaged at 87% across the centers. Conclusions The dietary feedback system was used to deliver personalized dietary advice within a multi-country study. Overall, there was good agreement between the manual and automated feedback systems, giving promise to the use of automated systems for personalizing

  1. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 64, which is incorporated... Codex are available from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW., Washington, DC...

  2. Dietary patterns in the French adult population: a study from the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (INCA2) (2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Gazan, R; Béchaux, C; Crépet, A; Sirot, V; Drouillet-Pinard, P; Dubuisson, C; Havard, S

    2016-07-01

    Identification and characterisation of dietary patterns are needed to define public health policies to promote better food behaviours. The aim of this study was to identify the major dietary patterns in the French adult population and to determine their main demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental characteristics. Dietary patterns were defined from food consumption data collected in the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (2006-2007). Non-negative-matrix factorisation method, followed by a cluster analysis, was implemented to derive the dietary patterns. Logistic regressions were then used to determine their main demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Finally, nutritional profiles and contaminant exposure levels of dietary patterns were compared using ANOVA. Seven dietary patterns, with specific food consumption behaviours, were identified: 'Small eater', 'Health conscious', 'Mediterranean', 'Sweet and processed', 'Traditional', 'Snacker' and 'Basic consumer'. For instance, the Health-conscious pattern was characterised by a high consumption of low-fat and light products. Individuals belonging to this pattern were likely to be older and to have a better nutritional profile than the overall population, but were more exposed to many contaminants. Conversely, individuals of Snacker pattern were likely to be younger, consumed more highly processed foods, had a nutrient-poor profile but were exposed to a limited number of food contaminants. The study identified main dietary patterns in the French adult population with distinct food behaviours and specific demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental features. Paradoxically, for better dietary patterns, potential health risks cannot be ruled out. Therefore, this study demonstrated the need to conduct a risk-benefit analysis to define efficient public health policies regarding diet.

  3. Dietary determinants of dental caries and dietary recommendations for preschool children.

    PubMed

    Tinanoff, N; Palmer, C A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this review, commissioned by the Administration for Children and Families, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Health Care Financing Administration, and the Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service, was to update the evidence of the dietary factors that affect dental caries, and subsequently formulate dietary recommendations for preschool children based on principles of cariology. Literature on the dental caries process, dietary factors affecting dental caries initiation and progression, and nutrition education and counseling were reviewed and synthesized. Dietary guidelines for children at various ages were then constructed based on the review. Dental caries in preschool children is due to a combination of factors, including colonization of teeth with cariogenic bacteria, type of foods and frequency of exposure of these foods to the cariogenic bacteria, and susceptible teeth. Caries risk is greatest if sugars are consumed at high frequency and are in a form that is retained in the mouth for long periods. Sucrose is the most cariogenic sugar because it can form glucan that enables firm bacterial adhesion to teeth and limits diffusion of acid and buffers in the plaque. There is emerging interest in the effects of tooth development and its role in the future dental caries risk of the child. Nutrition education and counseling for the purposes of reducing caries in children is aimed at teaching parents the importance of reducing high frequency exposures to obvious and hidden sugars. Guidelines include: avoiding frequent consumption of juice or other sugar-containing drinks in the bottle or sippy cup, discouraging the behavior of a child sleeping with a bottle, promoting noncariogenic foods for snacks, fostering eating patterns consistent with the Food Guide Pyramid, limiting cariogenic foods to mealtimes, rapidly clearing cariogenic foods from the child's oral cavity either by toothbrushing or by consumption of protective

  4. Dietary determinants of dental caries and dietary recommendations for preschool children.

    PubMed

    Tinanoff, Norman; Palmer, Carol A

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this review, commissioned by the Administration for Children and Families, the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Health Care Financing Administration, and the Department of Agriculture's Food and Nutrition Service, was to update the evidence of the dietary factors that affect dental caries, and subsequently formulate dietary recommendations for preschool children based on principles of cariology. Literature on the dental caries process, dietary factors affecting dental caries initiation and progression, nutrition education and counseling were reviewed and synthesized. Dietary guidelines for children at various ages were then constructed based on the review. Dental caries in preschool children is due to a combination of factors, including colonization of teeth with cariogenic bacteria, type of foods and frequency of exposure of these foods to the cariogenic bacteria, and susceptible teeth. Caries risk is greatest if sugars are consumed at high frequency and are in a form that is retained in the mouth for long periods. Sucrose is the most cariogenic sugar because it can form glucan that enables firm bacterial adhesion to teeth and limits diffusion of acid and buffers in the plaque. There is emerging interest in the effects of tooth development and its role in the future dental caries risk of the child. Nutrition education and counseling for the purposes of reducing caries in children is aimed at teaching parents the importance of reducing high frequency exposures to obvious and hidden sugars. Guidelines include: avoiding frequent consumption of juice or other sugar containing drinks in bottle or sippy cup; discouraging the behavior of a child sleeping with a bottle; promoting non-cariogenic foods for snacks; fostering eating patterns consistent with Food Guide Pyramid; limiting cariogenic foods to mealtimes; rapidly clearing cariogenic foods from the child's oral cavity either by tooth brushing or by consumption of protective foods; and

  5. Prevention of colon carcinogenesis by components of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Reddy, B S

    1999-01-01

    Cancer of the colon is one of the leading causes of cancer death in Western countries and is increasing rapidly in Japan. Epidemiological and laboratory animal model studies have suggested an inverse relationship between colon cancer risk and intake of fiber-rich foods. The protective effect of dietary fiber which comprises a heterogeneous group of nonstarch polysaccharides such as cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin and noncarbohydrate substances such as phytic acid depends on the nature and source of fiber in the diet. Laboratory animal models have consistently shown that dietary administration of wheat bran reduced colon tumorigenesis. Human diet intervention studies have demonstrated that supplemental wheat bran in the diet decreased the formation of putative metabolites such as secondary bile acids and diacylglycerol in the colon that have been shown to act as tumor promoters in the colon. Among the components of dietary fiber, especially wheat bran, phytic acid (inositol hexaphosphate) has been studied extensively for its chemopreventive properties against colon carcinogenesis in the laboratory animal models. In studies carried out to date, dietary phytic acid reduced the incidence of colonic aberrant crypt foci, putative preneoplastic lesions in rats. Oral administration of phytic acid was shown to inhibit colon carcinogenesis in rodents during the initiation and postinitiation stages. These studies provide evidence for potential chemopreventive properties of phytic acid against colon cancer. With regard to mode of action, phytic acid acts as an antioxidant, to reduce the rate of cell proliferation and to augment the immune response by enhancing the activity of natural killer (NK) cells.

  6. Detection of antibiotic resistance in probiotics of dietary supplements.

    PubMed

    Wong, Aloysius; Ngu, Davey Yueh Saint; Dan, Lydia Annabel; Ooi, Amanda; Lim, Renee Lay Hong

    2015-09-14

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that confer nutrition- and health-promoting benefits if consumed in adequate amounts. Concomitant with the demand for natural approaches to maintaining health is an increase in inclusion of probiotics in food and health products. Since probiotic bacteria act as reservoir for antibiotic resistant determinants, the transfer of these genes to pathogens sharing the same intestinal habitat is thus conceivable considering the fact that dietary supplements contain high amounts of often heterogeneous populations of probiotics. Such events can confer pathogens protection against commonly-used drugs. Despite numerous reports of antibiotic resistant probiotics in food and biological sources, the antibiogram of probiotics from dietary supplements remained elusive. Here, we screened five commercially available dietary supplements for resistance towards antibiotics of different classes. Probiotics of all batches of products were resistant towards vancomycin while batch-dependent resistance towards streptomycin, aztreonam, gentamycin and/or ciprofloxacin antibiotics was detected for probiotics of brands Bi and Bn, Bg, and L. Isolates of brand Cn was also resistant towards gentamycin, streptomycin and ciprofloxacin antibiotics. Additionally, we also report a discrepancy between the enumerated viable bacteria amounts and the claims of the manufacturers. This short report has highlighted the present of antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria from dietary supplements and therefore serves as a platform for further screenings and for in-depth characterization of the resistant determinants and the molecular machinery that confers the resistance.

  7. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly.

  8. Promoting Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mechanic, David

    1990-01-01

    Argues that culture change or modification of the social structure is necessary for effective health promotion because health behavior is closely tied to basic group structures and processes. Examines the health attitudes of Mormons, low income and minority groups, and developing Islamic nations, emphasizing attitudes towards education and women.…

  9. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  10. Cardiovascular benefits of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Satija, Ambika; Hu, Frank B

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between dietary fiber and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been extensively studied. There is considerable epidemiological evidence indicating an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and CVD risk. The association has been found to be stronger for cereal fiber than for fruit or vegetable fiber, and several studies have also found increased whole grain consumption to be associated with CVD risk reduction. In light of this evidence, recent US dietary guidelines have endorsed increased consumption of fiber rich whole grains. Regular consumption of dietary fiber, particularly fiber from cereal sources, may improve CVD health through multiple mechanisms including lipid reduction, body weight regulation, improved glucose metabolism, blood pressure control, and reduction of chronic inflammation. Future research should focus on various food sources of fiber, including different types of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as well as resistant starch in relation to CVD risk and weight control; explore the biological mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of fiber-rich diets; and study different ethnic groups and populations with varying sources of dietary fiber.

  11. [Nutrigenomics--bioactive dietary components].

    PubMed

    Gętek, Monika; Czech, Natalia; Fizia, Katarzyna; Białek-Dratwa, Agnieszka; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata; Kokot, Teresa; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa

    2013-04-05

    Nutrigenomics analyzes relations between diet and genes, and identifies mechanisms in which food and nutrition affect health and lifestyles and noncommunicable diseases (R. Chadwick, 2004). Bioactive dietary components are signal molecules that carry information from the external environment and affect in terms of quantity and quality in the process of gene expression. The biological effect of bioactive dietary components depends on various of physiological processes that can occur within a few genes. Polymorphism of genes can change their function and physiological response of the body for nutrients. Bioactive dietary components work on at least two levels of the expression of genes as factors regulating chromatin structure and as factors directly regulate the activity of nuclear receptors. The processes of synthesis and DNA repair are regulated by some of vitamins, macro-and micro-elements. They provide, among others, cofactors of enzymes that catalyze the replication of DNA methylation and its repair. DNA methylation profile may change under the influence of diet, single nucleotide polymorphisms and environmental factors. Bioactive dietary components may directly affect the process of gene expression by acting as ligands for nuclear receptors. Sensitive to dietary group of nuclear receptors are sensory receptors. This group includes, among others receptor PPAR (peroxisome proliferator activated), responsible for energy metabolism and receptors LXR (liver X receptor), FXR (farnesoid X receptor) and RXR, which is responsible for the metabolism of cholesterol.

  12. Dietary Factors and Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Smith, P J; Blumenthal, J A

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive decline is an increasingly important public health problem, with more than 100 million adults worldwide projected to develop dementia by 2050. Accordingly, there has been an increased interest in preventive strategies that diminish this risk. It has been recognized that lifestyle factors including dietary patterns, may be important in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia in later life. Several dietary components have been examined, including antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins. In addition, whole dietary eating plans, including the Mediterranean diet (MeDi), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, with and without weight loss, have become areas of increasing interest. Although prospective epidemiological studies have observed that antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins are associated with better cognitive functioning, randomized clinical trials have generally failed to confirm the value of any specific dietary component in improving neurocognition. Several randomized trials have examined the impact of changing 'whole' diets on cognitive outcomes. The MeDi and DASH diets offer promising preliminary results, but data are limited and more research in this area is needed.

  13. Dietary sodium manipulation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Zara; McKeever, Tricia

    2011-03-16

    There is a wide geographical variation in the prevalence of asthma and observational studies have suggested that dietary sodium may play a role. To assess the effect of dietary sodium manipulation on asthma control. We carried out a search using the Cochrane Airways Group asthma register. We searched the bibliographies of included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for additional studies. We carried out the most recent search in November 2010. We considered only RCTs that involved dietary sodium reduction or increased sodium intake in patients with asthma. Both review authors assessed study and extracted data. We conducted data analyses in RevMan 5 using mean differences and random effects. We identified a total of nine studies in relation to sodium manipulation and asthma, of which five were in people with asthma (318 participants), and four in people with exercise-induced asthma (63 participants). There were no significant benefits of salt restriction on the control of asthma. There was some evidence from the exercise-induced asthma studies that a low sodium diet may improve lung function after exercise and possibly baseline lung function, but this is based on findings from a very small numbers of participants. This review did not find any evidence that dietary sodium reduction significantly improves asthma control. Although dietary sodium reduction may result in improvements in lung function in exercise-induced asthma, the clinical significance of this effect is unclear.

  14. Dietary Factors and Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Smith, P.J.; Blumenthal, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive decline is an increasingly important public health problem, with more than 100 million adults worldwide projected to develop dementia by 2050. Accordingly, there has been an increased interest in preventive strategies that diminish this risk. It has been recognized that lifestyle factors including dietary patterns, may be important in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia in later life. Several dietary components have been examined, including antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins. In addition, whole dietary eating plans, including the Mediterranean diet (MeDi), and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, with and without weight loss, have become areas of increasing interest. Although prospective epidemiological studies have observed that antioxidants, fatty acids, and B vitamins are associated with better cognitive functioning, randomized clinical trials have generally failed to confirm the value of any specific dietary component in improving neurocognition. Several randomized trials have examined the impact of changing ‘whole’ diets on cognitive outcomes. The MeDi and DASH diets offer promising preliminary results, but data are limited and more research in this area is needed. PMID:26900574

  15. The association of dietary vitamin C intake with periodontitis among Korean adults: Results from KNHANES Ⅳ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hoo; Shin, Myung-Seop; Kim, Eun-Jeong; Ahn, Yoo-Been; Kim, Hyun-Duck

    2017-01-01

    The association of dietary vitamin C (vit C) on periodontitis requires more valid evidence from large representative samples to enable sufficient adjustments. This study aimed to evaluate the association between dietary vit C intake and periodontitis after controlling for various confounders in the representative Korean adult population. A total of 10,930 Korean adults (≥19 years) from the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set were included in this cross-sectional study. Periodontitis was defined as community periodontal index score of 3 or 4. Dietary vit C intake was estimated from a 24-hour dietary record, and categorized into adequate and inadequate according to the Korean Estimated Average Requirement value. Potential confounders included age, sex, income, frequency of tooth brushing, use of floss, dental visit, drinking, smoking, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and obesity. A multivariable logistic regression analysis and stratified analysis were applied. Those with inadequate dietary vit C intake were more likely by 1.16 times to have periodontitis than those with adequate dietary vit C intake (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.16, 95% confidence interval = 1.04-1.29). Lowest and middle-low quartile of dietary vit C intake, compared to highest quartile of dietary vit C intake, showed significant association (aOR = 1.28 and 1.22 respectively), which was in a biological-gradient relationship (trend-p <0.05). Our data showed that inadequate dietary vit C intake was independently associated with periodontitis among Korean adults. Hence, adequate intake of dietary vitamin C could be substantially important on the promotion of periodontal health among Korean adults.

  16. Dietary intakes of urban, high body mass index, African American children: family and child dietary attributes predict child intakes.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Lorrene D; Raman, Aarthi; Sharma, Sushma; Fitch, Mark D; Fleming, Sharon E

    2011-01-01

    To identify family and child nutrition and dietary attributes related to children's dietary intakes. African American children (ages 8-11 years, n = 156), body mass index > 85th percentile, from urban, low-income neighborhoods. Baseline, cross-sectional data collected as part of an ongoing diabetes prevention intervention. Dietary intakes were collected by 3-day food diary to assess total energy, percent fat, discretionary fat, added sugar, whole grains, vegetables, fruit, meat, and dairy. Questionnaires on nutrition and dietary attributes administered to children and parents were used to develop 5 diet-related indices: child knowledge, child preferences, child snack habits, child beverage habits, and family food habits. A higher child nutrition knowledge score was significantly related to a lower starchy vegetable intake. Higher scores on the child snack habits index were significantly related to higher intakes of fruit, total fruits and vegetables, total fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, and to lower intakes of added sugars. A higher score on the family food habits index was significantly related to lower intakes of total energy and discretionary fat. Targeting both child and family food and nutrition attributes may be used to promote more healthful eating among urban, low-income, overweight African American children. Copyright © 2011 Society for Nutrition Education. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dietary phosphorus and kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Uribarri, Jaime

    2013-10-01

    High serum phosphate is linked to poor health outcome and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients before or after the initiation of dialysis. Therefore, maintenance of normal serum phosphate levels is a major concern in the clinical care of this population with dietary phosphorus restriction and/or use of oral phosphate binders considered to be the best corrective care. This review discusses (1) evidence for an association between serum phosphate levels and bone and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in CKD patients as well as progression of kidney disease itself; (2) the relationship between serum phosphate and dietary phosphorus intake; and (3) implications from these data for future research. Increasing our understanding of the relationship between altered phosphorus metabolism and disease in CKD patients may clarify the potential role of excess dietary phosphorus as a risk factor for disease in the general population.

  18. Dietary Intake of Competitive Bodybuilders.

    PubMed

    Spendlove, Jessica; Mitchell, Lachlan; Gifford, Janelle; Hackett, Daniel; Slater, Gary; Cobley, Stephen; O'Connor, Helen

    2015-07-01

    Competitive bodybuilders are well known for extreme physique traits and extremes in diet and training manipulation to optimize lean mass and achieve a low body fat. Although many of the dietary dogmas in bodybuilding lack scientific scrutiny, a number, including timing and dosing of high biological value proteins across the day, have more recently been confirmed as effective by empirical research studies. A more comprehensive understanding of the dietary intakes of bodybuilders has the potential to uncover other dietary approaches, deserving of scientific investigation, with application to the wider sporting, and potential health contexts, where manipulation of physique traits is desired. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review of dietary intake practices of competitive bodybuilders, evaluate the quality and currency of the existing literature, and identify research gaps to inform future studies. A systematic search of electronic databases was conducted from the earliest record until March 2014. The search combined permutations of the terms 'bodybuilding', 'dietary intake', and 'dietary supplement'. Included studies needed to report quantitative data (energy and macronutrients at a minimum) on habitual dietary intake of competitive bodybuilders. The 18 manuscripts meeting eligibility criteria reported on 385 participants (n = 62 women). Most studies were published in the 1980-1990s, with three published in the past 5 years. Study methodological quality was evaluated as poor. Energy intake ranged from 10 to 24 MJ/day for men and from 4 to 14 MJ/day for women. Protein intake ranged from 1.9 to 4.3 g/kg for men and from 0.8 to 2.8 g/kg for women. Intake of carbohydrate and fat was <6 g/kg/day and below 30% of energy, respectively. Carbohydrate intakes were below, and protein (in men) intakes were higher than, the current recommendations for strength athletes, with no consideration for exploration of macronutrient quality or distribution over the day. Energy

  19. Dietary Additive Probiotics Modulation of the Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shenglan; Wang, Li; Jiang, Zongyong

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the intestinal microbiota of animals is widely acknowledged because of its vital role in the health of animals. There are complex communities of microbiota, which colonize the gastrointestinal tract. Intestinal microbiota are conductive to animal health and the development of the host immune system. Probiotics are commonly used dietary additives where they provide the host with many beneficial functions, such as modulating intestinal homeostasis and promoting gut health. These beneficial effects of probiotics may accrue from the inhibiting the growth of pathogenic bacteria and promoting the growth of beneficial flora in the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics colonization and its impact on gut microbiota members are highly species specific. Different probiotics have been shown to have dramatically different capacities of modulation physiological function. This review summarizes existing studies of the influence of dietary additive probiotics on the gut microbiota in different animals, such as humans, mice, pigs and chickens, to clarify the contribution of different kinds of probiotics to the intestinal microbiota. Moreover, the probable mechanism for the benefits of dietary supplementation with probiotics will be discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Why do Dutch people use dietary supplements? Exploring the role of socio-cognitive and psychosocial determinants.

    PubMed

    Pajor, E M; Eggers, S M; Curfs, K C J; Oenema, A; de Vries, H

    2017-07-01

    In the Netherlands, the prevalence of dietary supplement use has doubled (from 17 to 40 per cent) since the 1980s. Yet, limited data is available on which socio-cognitive factors are associated with dietary supplement use. Therefore, the purpose of the study is to explain dietary supplement use with determinants deriving from the Integrated Change Model (ICM) and from formative research. Socio-cognitive and psychosocial factors were measured among users and non-users of dietary supplements in a longitudinal survey study, with measurements at baseline (N = 1448) and at one-month follow-up (N = 1161). Negative binomial regression analysis was applied to de data. Intention emerged as the main predictor of dietary supplement use (OR = 1.99). Further predictors of dietary supplement use with smaller effect-sizes were: health regulatory focus (promotion, OR = 1.46), social modelling (OR = 1.44), attitude (pros, OR = 1.37), attitude (cons, OR = 0.87), health locus of control (OR = 0.77), and risk perception (chance of getting ill, OR = 1.22). Individuals tend to use dietary supplements if they are promotion oriented, notice dietary supplement users in their social environment, estimate their chances of getting ill higher, and have positive attitudes towards dietary supplements. In contrast, non-users believe that external factors affect their health, and hold negative attitudes towards dietary supplements. Mapping out individuals' socio-cognitive profile may contribute to the development of online health communication. Based on socio-cognitive and demographical factors, personalised advice can be given about dietary supplement use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A mobile phone food record app to digitally capture dietary intake for adolescents in a free-living environment: Usability study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Mobile technologies are emerging as a valuable tool to collect and assess dietary intake. Adolescents readily accept and adopt new technologies; hence, a food record application (FRapp) may be used as a tool to promote a better understanding of adolescent’s dietary intake and eating patt...

  2. Dietary behavior and type 2 diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Albarran, Noemi B; Ballesteros, Martha N; Morales, Gloria G; Ortega, Maria I

    2006-05-01

    To explore risk factors modification, as well as barriers and facilitators for behavioral change in Mexican type 2 diabetics and their families. Risk assessment and impact evaluation included measurements on anthropometrics, diet, physical activity, nutrition knowledge, and HbA(1c.) The intervention included discussion groups and promoted behavioral change on dietary risk, physical exercise, and basic diabetic knowledge of 48 urban diabetic patients and 38 relatives. The educational method consisted of cognitive reframing and situational problem solving during five meetings over an 8-month period. Diabetics were older and less educated than their participating relatives (55.8+/-11 and 34.7+/-13.7 years old, and 4.5+/-3.4 and 7.8+/-3.7 years of schooling, respectively). Factors such as diet, degree of obesity, physical activity and HbA(1c), reflected that 92% of diabetic patients and 83% of their relatives were at high health risk. After the intervention, nutritional knowledge and diet-health awareness increased (p=.013 and .001 respectively); however, no significant health-risks reduction was observed. Focus group analysis suggested that lack of support from family and health services, low income, neighborhood insecurity and misleading "popular knowledge" and advice are key barriers to behavioral change. The study supports the understanding of constrains to health promotion campaigns and better health provider-patient interactions in Mexican population. Additionally, the study contributes to the general knowledge of ethnic socio-cultural environment influences over health care issues, primarily to diet modifications.

  3. SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual Appendices

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The appendices for the SHEDS-Dietary Technical Manual include a sample food diary, backgorund information on the water concentration data used in SHEDS-Dietary, a food list, food definitions and sample code.

  4. Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166625.html Healthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High Cholesterol Eating them can reduce ... and Human Services. More Health News on Cholesterol Dietary Fats Heart Diseases--Prevention Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus ...

  5. Dietary phosphorus overload aggravates the phenotype of the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Wada, Eiji; Yoshida, Mizuko; Kojima, Yoriko; Nonaka, Ikuya; Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Shiozuka, Masataka; Date, Munehiro; Higashi, Tetsuo; Nishino, Ichizo; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked disease with no effective treatment. Progressive muscle degeneration, increased macrophage infiltration, and ectopic calcification are characteristic features of the mdx mouse, a murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Because dietary phosphorus/phosphate consumption is increasing and adverse effects of phosphate overloading have been reported in several disease conditions, we examined the effects of dietary phosphorus intake in mdx mice phenotypes. On weaning, control and mdx mice were fed diets containing 0.7, 1.0, or 2.0 g phosphorus per 100 g until they were 90 days old. Dystrophic phenotypes were evaluated in cryosections of quadriceps and tibialis anterior muscles, and maximal forces and voluntary activity were measured. Ectopic calcification was analyzed by electron microscopy to determine the cells initially responsible for calcium deposition in skeletal muscle. Dietary phosphorus overload dramatically exacerbated the dystrophic phenotypes of mdx mice by increasing inflammation associated with infiltration of M1 macrophages. In contrast, minimal muscle necrosis and inflammation were observed in exercised mdx mice fed a low-phosphorus diet, suggesting potential beneficial therapeutic effects of lowering dietary phosphorus intake on disease progression. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that dietary phosphorus intake directly affects muscle pathological characteristics of mdx mice. Dietary phosphorus overloading promoted dystrophic disease progression in mdx mice, whereas restricting dietary phosphorus intake improved muscle pathological characteristics and function.

  6. Mathematical model of zinc absorption: effects of dietary calcium, protein and iron on zinc absorption.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leland V; Krebs, Nancy F; Hambidge, K Michael

    2013-02-28

    A previously described mathematical model of Zn absorption as a function of total daily dietary Zn and phytate was fitted to data from studies in which dietary Ca, Fe and protein were also measured. An analysis of regression residuals indicated statistically significant positive relationships between the residuals and Ca, Fe and protein, suggesting that the presence of any of these dietary components enhances Zn absorption. Based on the hypotheses that (1) Ca and Fe both promote Zn absorption by binding with phytate and thereby making it unavailable for binding Zn and (2) protein enhances the availability of Zn for transporter binding, the model was modified to incorporate these effects. The new model of Zn absorption as a function of dietary Zn, phytate, Ca, Fe and protein was then fitted to the data. The proportion of variation in absorbed Zn explained by the new model was 0·88, an increase from 0·82 with the original model. A reduced version of the model without Fe produced an equally good fit to the data and an improved value for the model selection criterion, demonstrating that when dietary Ca and protein are controlled for, there is no evidence that dietary Fe influences Zn absorption. Regression residuals and testing with additional data supported the validity of the new model. It was concluded that dietary Ca and protein modestly enhanced Zn absorption and Fe had no statistically discernable effect. Furthermore, the model provides a meaningful foundation for efforts to model nutrient interactions in mineral absorption.

  7. Associations between aspects of friendship networks and dietary behavior in youth: Findings from a systematized review.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Keri Jo; McCormack, Gavin R; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Swanson, Kenda

    2015-08-01

    To gather and synthesize current evidence on the associations between aspects of friendship networks (e.g., friends' dietary behavior, popularity) and an individual's dietary behavior among children and adolescents. A systematic search of six scientific online databases was conducted in August 2013. Eligible studies included child or adolescent participants (aged 6 to 18years), a measure of each participant's friendship network, and a measure of habitual dietary behavior for both the participant and the participant's nominated friend(s). Data on study design, participant characteristics, friendship networks, dietary behavior, and study outcomes were abstracted. From a total of 9041 articles retrieved, seven studies were included in this review. Overall, friends' unhealthy food consumption was associated with an individual's unhealthy food consumption, and this association appeared to be stronger for boys compared with girls. More popular adolescents also tended to consume more unhealthy foods. Best friends' total energy intake was correlated with an individual's total energy intake. Similarities among friends' healthy food consumption, as well as daily breakfast consumption, were inconclusive. Longitudinal evidence showed that an individual's unhealthy food consumption tended to become similar to friends' unhealthy food consumption over time. Social network analysis in the adolescent dietary behavior literature is beginning to emerge. Results highlight friends' particular influence on unhealthy food consumption among adolescents. Focus on modeling healthy dietary behaviors among adolescent friendship group may help reduce unhealthy dietary behaviors and promote healthy weight status among youth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduced Foodborne Toxin Exposure Is a Benefit of Improving Dietary Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia; Mitchell, Nicole J.; Male, Denis; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring foodborne toxins are common in subsistence diets of low-income human populations worldwide. Often, these populations rely on one or two staple foods for the bulk of their calories, making them more susceptible to chronic intake of certain toxins. Exposure to common foodborne toxins is associated with diverse conditions such as cancer, immunotoxicity, growth impairment, and neurological deficits. Interventions focused solely on reducing toxin levels have proven difficult to sustain. Using case studies of two foodborne toxins, aflatoxin and cassava cyanide, this article addresses the heightened risk of particular diseases from eating monotonous diets based in maize, groundnuts, and cassava: common in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of Asia. We also discuss the potential role of increased dietary diversity in counteracting these diseases. Increased dietary diversity can reduce consumption of toxins and increase intake of nutrients that could counteract the toxicity of such chemicals. In Qidong, China, a population that previously consumed a monotonous maize-based diet and increased dietary diversity since the 1980s has experienced a dramatic reduction in liver cancer mortalities. That liver cancer decreased as dietary diversity increased is the catalyst for the hypothesis that dietary diversity could have a direct impact on reducing health effects of foodborne toxins. Future research, agricultural development, and food policy reforms should take into consideration the multifaceted benefits associated with improved dietary diversity. Collaborations between toxicologists, nutritionists, and policymakers are important to development of sustainable interventions to reduce foodborne toxin exposure and promote health through increased dietary diversity. PMID:25015663

  9. Dietary changes and food intake in the first year after breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Vance, Vivienne; Campbell, Sharon; McCargar, Linda; Mourtzakis, Marina; Hanning, Rhona

    2014-06-01

    Understanding dietary habits of women after breast cancer is a critical first step in developing nutrition guidelines that will support weight management and optimal health in survivorship; however, limited data are available. The objective of this study was to describe changes in diet among breast cancer survivors in the first year after treatment, and to evaluate these changes in the context of current dietary intake. Changes in diet were assessed in 28 early stage breast cancer survivors, using a self-reported survey in which women identified changes in food intake since their diagnosis. Current dietary intake was estimated from 3-day food records and described relative to current recommendations. The majority of women reported changes in diet after diagnosis, most common being an increase in vegetables/fruit and fish, lower intake of red meat, and reduced alcohol. Many women reported that these changes were initiated during active treatment. Dietary changes were largely consistent with current recommendations for cancer prevention; however, some women were still above the guidelines for total and saturated fat, and many were below recommendations for vegetables/fruit, milk/alternatives, calcium, and vitamin D. Evidence that some women are willing and able to initiate positive changes in diet early in the treatment trajectory suggests that early intervention may be effective in promoting dietary habits that will assist with weight management and overall health. Data on current dietary intake highlights several possible targets for dietary intervention in this population.

  10. Health Promotion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-11

    Dependents Schools and Section 6 schools. (4) Information on the health consequences of smoking shall be incorporated with the information on alcohol...departments. 2. A Health Promotion Coordinating Committee shall be established to enhance communication among the Military Services, recommend joint policy...about the patient’s tobacco use, including use of smokeless tobacco products; to advise him or her of the risks associated with use, the health bcnefits

  11. Dietary Pattern Is Associated with Obesity in Older People in China: Data from China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Hall, John; Byles, Julie; Shi, Zumin

    2015-01-01

    Background: No studies have been conducted to explore the associations between dietary patterns and obesity among older Chinese people, by considering gender and urbanization level differences. Methods: We analyzed data from the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey (2745 individuals, aged ≥ 60 years). Dietary data were obtained using 24 h-recall over three consecutive days. Height, Body Weight, and Waist Circumference were measured. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Multinomial and Poisson regression models were used to examine the association between dietary patterns and Body Mass Index (BMI) status/central obesity. Results: The prevalence of general and central obesity was 9.5% and 53.4%. Traditional dietary pattern (high intake of rice, pork and vegetables) was inversely associated with general/central obesity; modern dietary pattern (high intake of fruit, fast food, and processed meat) was positively associated with general/central obesity. The highest quartile of traditional dietary pattern had a lower risk of general/central obesity compared with the lowest quartile, while an inverse picture was found for the modern dietary pattern. These associations were consistent by gender and urbanization levels. Conclusions: Dietary patterns are associated with general/central obesity in older Chinese. This study reinforces the importance of a healthy diet in promoting healthy ageing in China. PMID:26404368

  12. [Calcium pros and cons significance and risk of phosphorus supplementation. The risk of dietary phosphorus intake].

    PubMed

    Ohi, Akiko; Nomura, Kengo; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2011-12-01

    Dietary intake of phosphorus (Pi) is an important determinant of Pi balance in patients who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) and a reduced GFR. High dietary Pi burden may promote vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Recently, Ohnishi and Razzaque suggest that phosphate toxicity accelerates the mammalian aging process and that reducing the phosphate burden can delay the aging (FASEB J 24, 3562, 2010) . Dietary Pi is derived largely from foods with high protein content or food additives. Accurate information on the Pi content of foods is needed to achieve a low Pi intake and effectively manage CKD and the aging. In this review, we discuss the risk of dietary Pi intake in CKD and the aging.

  13. Carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and resistant starch in white vegetables: links to health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Slavin, Joanne L

    2013-05-01

    Vegetables are universally promoted as healthy. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 recommend that you make half of your plate fruits and vegetables. Vegetables are diverse plants that vary greatly in energy content and nutrients. Vegetables supply carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and resistant starch in the diet, all of which have been linked to positive health outcomes. Fiber lowers the incidence of cardiovascular disease and obesity. In this paper, the important role of white vegetables in the human diet is described, with a focus on the dietary fiber and resistant starch content of white vegetables. Misguided efforts to reduce consumption of white vegetables will lower intakes of dietary fiber and resistant starch, nutrients already in short supply in our diets.

  14. Carbohydrates, Dietary Fiber, and Resistant Starch in White Vegetables: Links to Health Outcomes12

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, Joanne L.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetables are universally promoted as healthy. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 recommend that you make half of your plate fruits and vegetables. Vegetables are diverse plants that vary greatly in energy content and nutrients. Vegetables supply carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and resistant starch in the diet, all of which have been linked to positive health outcomes. Fiber lowers the incidence of cardiovascular disease and obesity. In this paper, the important role of white vegetables in the human diet is described, with a focus on the dietary fiber and resistant starch content of white vegetables. Misguided efforts to reduce consumption of white vegetables will lower intakes of dietary fiber and resistant starch, nutrients already in short supply in our diets. PMID:23674804

  15. 76 FR 39111 - Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New Dietary Ingredient Notifications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry; Dietary Supplements: New... Dietary Supplements, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (HFS-850), Food and Drug Administration... NDI and any other dietary ingredients in the dietary supplement ``have been present in the food supply...

  16. Natural Dietary and Herbal Products in Anti-Obesity Treatment.

    PubMed

    Sun, Nan-Nong; Wu, Tsung-Yen; Chau, Chi-Fai

    2016-10-11

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is on the rise around the world. Common comorbidities associated with obesity, particularly diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease have an impact on social and financial systems. Appropriate lifestyle and behavior interventions are still the crucial cornerstone to weight loss success, but maintaining such a healthy lifestyle is extremely challenging. Abundant natural materials have been explored for their obesity treatment potential and widely used to promote the development of anti-obesity products. The weight loss segment is one of the major contributors to the overall revenue of the dietary supplements market. In this review, the anti-obesity effects of different dietary or herbal products, and their active ingredients and mechanisms of action against obesity will be discussed.

  17. Dietary factors, genetic and epigenetic influences in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    PELLEGRINI, M.L.; ARGIBAY, P.; GOMEZ, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic influences, together with epigenetic components and dietary factors, play a fundamental role in the initiation and progression of cancer by causing a number of deregulations. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a disease influenced by dietary factors, for which established genetic and epigenetic alterations have been identified. Within CRC, there are hereditary syndromes that present mutations in the germ-line hMLH1, and also alterations in the methylation of the promoters. Epigenetics has also been established as a pathway of carcinogenesis. In the present review, we analyzed studies conducted to discern the different pathways leading to established CRC, stressing the importance of identifying factors that may predict CRC at an early stage, since it is mostly a silent disease observed at the clinical level in advanced stages. PMID:22993535