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Sample records for differential autoradiographic localizations

  1. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptor downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tietz, E.I.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Chiu, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    Regional differences in downregulation of brain benzodiazepine receptors were studied using a quantitative autoradiographic method. Rats were given a 4-week flurazepam treatment known to cause tolerance and receptor downregulation. A second group of rats was given a similar treatment, but for only 1 week. A third group was given a single acute dose of diazepam to produce a brain benzodiazepine-like activity equivalent to that found after the chronic treatment. Areas studied included hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, superior colliculus, substantia nigra, dorsal geniculate nucleus, lateral amygdala and lateral hypothalamus. There was a regional variation in the degree of downregulation after 1 week of flurazepam treatment, ranging from 12% to 25%. Extending the flurazepam treatment to 4 weeks caused little further downregulation in those areas studied, except for the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, which showed a 13% reduction in (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding after 1 week and a 40% reduction after 4 weeks of treatment. In a few areas, such as the lateral hypothalamus, no significant change in binding was found after 4 weeks. Acute diazepam treatment caused no change in binding. This latter finding as well as results obtained during the development of the methodology show that downregulation was not an artifact due to residual drug content of brain slices. The regional variations in degree and rate of downregulation suggest areas that may be most important for benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence and may be related to the varying time courses for tolerance to different benzodiazepine actions.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.D.; Springall, D.R.; Wharton, J.; Polak, J.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques and {sup 125}I-labeled endothelin-1 were used to study the distribution of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin. Specific endothelin-1 binding sites were localized to blood vessels (capillaries, deep cutaneous vascular plexus, arteries, and arterioles), the deep dermal and connective tissue sheath of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, and arrector pili muscle. Specific binding was inhibited by endothelin-2 and endothelin-3 as well as endothelin-1. Non-specific binding was found in the epidermis and the medulla of hair follicles. No binding was found in connective tissue or fat. These vascular binding sites may represent endothelin receptors, in keeping with the known cutaneous vasoconstrictor actions of the peptide. If all binding sites are receptors, the results suggest that endothelin could also regulate the function of sweat glands and may have trophic effects in the skin.

  3. ( 3 H)lysergic acid diethylamide: cellular autoradiographic localization in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Diab, I M; Freedman, D X; Roth, L J

    1971-09-10

    Intravenous administration of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide(LSD) to rats resulted in accumulation of the drug in the brain within 15 minutes. Autoradiographic methods were used to differentiate free and bound [(3)H]LSD in brain tissue. Free [(3)H]LSD was generally distributed in the pituitary and pineal glands, cerebellum, hippocampus,and choroid plexus. Bound [(3)H]LSD was localized in neurons of the cortex, caudate nucleus, midbrain, and medulla,as well as in choroid plexus epithelium.

  4. Autoradiographic localization of tritiated dihydrotestosterone in the flank organ of the albino hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Lucky, A.W.; Eisenfeld, A.J.; Visintin, I.

    1985-02-01

    In the hamster flank organ, the growth of hair and growth of sebaceous glands are androgen-dependent functions. Although dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is known to be a potent stimulator of flank organ growth, there is no information about localization of DHT receptor sites in this organ. The purpose of this study was to use steroid autoradiography to localize DHT receptors in the hamster flank organ. Because steroid hormones are functional when translocated to nuclear receptors, nuclear localization by autoradiography defines receptor sites. In order to be able to visualize autoradiographic grains from radiolabeled androgens around hair follicles, albino hamsters were studied to avoid confusion between the grains and pigment granules which are abundant in the more common Golden Syrian hamster. Mature male hamsters castrated 24 hours earlier were given tritium-labeled dihydrotestosterone ( (/sup 3/H)DHT). Using the technique of thaw-mount steroid autoradiography, 4-micron unfixed frozen sections were mounted in the dark onto emulsion-coated glass slides and allowed to develop for 4-6 months. (/sup 3/H)DHT was found to be concentrated over sebocyte nuclei. The label was present peripherally as well as in differentiating sebocytes. There was no nuclear localization of (/sup 3/H)DHT in animals pretreated with excessive quantities of unlabeled DHT. Steroid metabolites of (/sup 3/H) DHT were assessed by thin-layer chromatography in paired tissue samples. Most of the label remained with DHT. Uptake was inhibited in the flank organ of hamsters pretreated with unlabeled DHT.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of specific [3H]dexamethasone binding in fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Beer, D G; Butley, M S; Cunha, G R; Malkinson, A M

    1984-10-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of specific [3H]dexamethasone binding was examined in fetal mouse lung at various stages of development and in human fetal lung at 8 weeks of gestation using a rapid in vitro steroid incubation technique followed by thaw-mount autoradiography. Competition studies with unlabeled steroids demonstrate the specificity of [3H]dexamethasone labeling, and indicate that fetal lung mesenchyme is a primary glucocorticoid target during lung development. Quantitative binding studies, involving incubation of intact tissue with competing ligand and subsequent subcellular fractionation, show this to be specific, nuclear binding characteristic of glucocorticoid receptors. Autoradiographs of [3H]dexamethasone binding in lung tissue at early stages of development demonstrate that the mesenchyme directly adjacent to the more proximal portions of the bronchiolar network is heavily labeled. In contrast, the epithelium which will later differentiate into bronchi and bronchioles, is relatively unlabeled. Distal portions of the growing epithelium, destined to become alveolar ducts and alveoli, do show nuclear localization of [3H]dexamethasone. Because of the known importance of the mesenchyme in controlling lung development and the ability of glucocorticoids to stimulate lung development, these results suggest that many of the growth-promoting effects of glucocorticoids may be mediated through the mesenchyme. In addition, by utilizing a technique which allows the simultaneous examination of extracellular matrix components and [3H]dexamethasone binding, a relationship is observed between extensive mesenchymal [3H]dexamethasone binding and extensive extracellular matrix accumulation. Since glucocorticoids stimulate the synthesis of many extracellular matrix components, these results suggest a role for these hormones in affecting mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during lung morphogenesis.

  6. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptors in the rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, K.; Healy, D.P.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1984-11-01

    The localization of benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in the rat kidney was studied by autoradiography after in vitro labeling of kidney slices with flunitrazepam. The affinity, density, and rank order of displacement of (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam by several BZDs (RO 5-4864 > diazepam > clonazepam) demonstrated that binding was to BZD receptors of the peripheral type. In autoradiograms obtained with tritium-sensitive film, a high density of silver grains was obtained in the outer medulla, with lower densities in the cortex. Binding was absent from the inner medulla (papilla). In higher resolution autoradiograms obtained with an emulsion-coated cover slip procedure, silver grains were seen to be concentrated over a tubular element in both outer medulla and cortex, identifiable by morphology and distribution as the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule. The identity of the labeled tubules was confirmed by immunofluorescent localization in adjacent slices of Tamm-Horsfall protein, a specific marker for these segments of tubules. Investigation of the effects of peripherally specific BZDs such as RO 5-4864 on distal tubule function is indicated.

  7. Autoradiographic detection of (/sup 125/I)-secondary antiserum: a sensitive light and electron microscopic labeling method compatible with peroxidase immunocytochemistry for dual localization of neuronal antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Pickel, V.M.; Chan, J.; Milner, T.A.

    1986-06-01

    We examined whether autoradiographic localization of (/sup 125/I)-antirabbit immunoglobulin (IgG) was suitable for light and electron microscopic detection of a rabbit antiserum to the catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and whether autoradiographic and peroxidase labeling could be combined for simultaneous immunocytochemical identification of TH and neuropeptides in brain. Adult rat brains were fixed by aortic arch perfusion with acrolein and paraformaldehyde. Vibratome sections of the fixed tissues were incubated with various dilutions of TH antiserum followed by (/sup 125/I)-secondary IgG. These sections were then directly processed for autoradiography or were incubated with rabbit antiserum to substance P (SP) or methionine (Met5)-enkephalin (ME). These latter sections were then processed by the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) or conjugated peroxidase methods followed by autoradiography. Exposure periods of 12-20 days for light microscopy or 90 days for electron microscopy yielded substantial accumulations of silver grains even at the highest (1:30,000) dilution of TH antiserum. At this dilution, immunoreactivity for TH was virtually nondetectable by PAP and conjugated peroxidase methods. The differential sensitivities of the autoradiographic versus peroxidase methods provided a means for separable identification of rabbit antiserum to TH and to SP or ME. Ultrastructural analysis of the catecholaminergic neurons in the medial nuclei of the solitary tract (NTS) showed selective cytoplasmic localization of silver grains for (/sup 125/I)-labeling of TH in perikarya, dendrites, and terminals. Within single thin sections prepared for dual labeling, the peroxidase marker for SP and for ME was differentially localized with respect to autoradiographic labeling of TH.

  8. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  9. In vitro autoradiographic localization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in sarcoid lymph nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.K.; Chai, S.Y.; Dunbar, M.S.; Mendelsohn, F.A.

    1986-09-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was localized in sarcoid lymph nodes by an in vitro autoradiographic technique using a synthetic ACE inhibitor of high affinity, /sup 125/I-labelled 351A. The lymph nodes were from seven patients with active sarcoidosis who underwent mediastinoscopy and from six control subjects who had nodes resected at either mediastinoscopy or laparotomy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme was localized in the epithelioid cells of sarcoid granulomata in markedly increased amounts compared with control nodes, where it was restricted to vessels and some histiocytes. In sarcoid lymph nodes, there was little ACE present in lymphocytes or fibrous tissue. Sarcoid nodes with considerable fibrosis had much less intense ACE activity than the nonfibrotic nodes. The specific activity of ACE measured by an enzymatic assay in both the control and sarcoid lymph nodes closely reflected the ACE activity demonstrated by autoradiography. Sarcoid lymph nodes with fibrosis had an ACE specific activity of half that of nonfibrotic nodes (p less than 0.05). There was a 15-fold increase in specific ACE activity in sarcoid nodes (p less than 0.05) compared to normal. Serum ACE was significantly higher in those sarcoid patients whose lymph nodes were not fibrosed compared with those with fibrosis (p less than 0.01). This technique offers many advantages over the use of polyclonal antibodies. The 351A is a highly specific ACE inhibitor, chemically defined and in limitless supply. This method enables the quantitation of results, and autoradiographs may be stored indefinitely for later comparison.

  10. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine receptors in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)cyclohexyladenosine

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, R.R.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    Adenosine (A1) receptor binding sites have been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method. The binding of (/sup 3/H)N6-cyclohexyladenosine to slide-mounted rat brain tissue sections has the characteristics of A1 receptors. It is saturable with high affinity and has appropriate pharmacology and stereospecificity. The highest densities of adenosine receptors occur in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, the molecular and polymorphic layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the medial geniculate body, certain thalamic nuclei, and the lateral septum. High densities also are observed in certain layers of the cerebral cortex, the piriform cortex, the caudate-putamen, the nucleus accumbens, and the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. Most white matter areas, as well as certain gray matter areas, such as the hypothalamus, have negligible receptor concentrations. These localizations suggest possible central nervous system sites of action of adenosine.

  11. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine uptake sites in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine

    SciTech Connect

    Bisserbe, J.C.; Patel, J.; Marangos, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The adenosine uptake site has been localized in rat brain by an in vitro light microscopic autoradiographic method, using (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H)NBI) as the probe. The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)NBI on slide-mounted sections are comparable to those seen in studies performed on brain homogenates. A very high density of uptake sites occurs in the nucleus tractus solitarius, in the superficial layer of the superior colliculus, in several thalamic nuclei, and also in geniculate body nuclei. A high density of sites are also observed in the nucleus accumbens, the caudate putamen, the dorsal tegmentum area, the substantia nigra, and the central gray. The localization of the adenosine uptake site in brain may provide information on the functional activity of the site and suggests the involvement of the adenosine system in the central regulation of cardiovascular function.

  12. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin.

  14. Pharmacological characterization and autoradiographic localization of substance P receptors in guinea pig brain

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, T.V.; Quirion, R.

    1986-09-01

    (/sup 3/H)Substance P ((/sup 3/H)SP) was used to characterize substance P (SP) receptor binding sites in guinea pig brain using membrane preparations and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Curvilinear Scatchard analysis shows that (/sup 3/H)SP binds to a high affinity site (Kd = 0.5 nM) with a Bmax of 16.4 fmol/mg protein and a low affinity site (Kd = 29.6 nM) with a Bmax of 189.1 fmol/mg protein. Monovalent cations generally inhibit (/sup 3/H)SP binding while divalent cations substantially increased it. The ligand selectivity pattern is generally similar to the one observed in rat brain membrane preparation with SP being more potent than SP fragments and other tachykinins. However, the potency of various nucleotides is different with GMP-PNP greater than GDP greater than GTP. The autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)SP binding sites shows that high amounts of sites are present in the hippocampus, striatum, olfactory bulb, central nucleus of the amygdala, certain thalamic nuclei and superior colliculus. The cortex is moderately enriched in (/sup 3/H)SP binding sites while the substantia nigra contains only very low amounts of sites. Thus, the autoradiographic distribution of SP binding sites is fairly similar in both rat and guinea pig brain.

  15. Autoradiographic localization of (/sup 125/I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Zarbin, M.A.; Kuhar, M.J.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-02-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sub 4/)bombesin to rat brain slices was investigated. Radiolabeled (Tyr/sub 4/)bombesin bound with high affinity (K/sub d/ . 4 nM) to a single class of sites (B/sub max/ . 130 fmol/mg of protein); the ratio of specific to nonspecific binding was 6/1. Also, pharmacology studies indicated that the C-terminal of bombesin was important for the high affinity binding activity. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the (/sup 125/I-Tyr4)bombesin-binding sites were discretely distributed in certain gray but not white matter regions of rat brain. Highest grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, suprachiasmatic and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, central medial thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, subiculum, nucleus of the solitary tract, and substantia gelatinosa. Moderate grain densities were present in the parietal cortex, deep layers of the neocortex, rhinal cortex, caudate putamen, stria terminalis, locus ceruleus, parabrachial nucleus, and facial nucleus. Low grain densities were present in the globus pallidus, lateral thalamus, and midbrain. Negligible grain densities were present in the cerebellum, corpus callosum, and all regions treated with 1 microM unlabeled bombesin. The discrete regional distribution of binding suggests that endogenous bombesin-like peptides may function as important regulatory agents in certain brain loci.

  16. Autoradiographic localization of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) binding sites in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J.

    1988-09-01

    /sup 125/I-Human calcitonin gene-related peptide (hCGRP) binding sites were localized in human and guinea pig lungs by an autoradiographic method. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments from slide-mounted sections of guinea pig lung displayed specific /sup 125/I-hCGRP binding sites with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.72 +/- 0.05 nM (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3) and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 133.4 +/- 5.6 fmol/mg protein. In both human and guinea pig lung, autoradiography revealed that CGRP binding sites were widely distributed, with particularly dense labeling over bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels of all sizes and alveolar walls. Airway smooth muscle and epithelium of large airways was sparsely labeled but no labeling was found over submucosal glands. This localization corresponds well to the reported pattern of CGRP-like immunoreactive innervation. The findings of localization of CGRP binding sites on bronchial and pulmonary blood vessels indicate that CGRP may be important in the regulation of airway and pulmonary blood flow.

  17. Characterization and autoradiographic localization of multiple tachykinin binding sites in gastrointestinal tract and bladder

    SciTech Connect

    Burcher, E.; Buck, S.H.; Lovenberg, W.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Binding sites for the (125I)Bolton-Hunter-labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE) and substance P (BHSP) were investigated using crude membrane suspensions and autoradiography. In smooth muscle membranes from guinea-pig small intestine and rat duodenum, specific binding of BHSK was saturable and reversible, showing a single class of sites with a KD of 1 to 3 nM and maximum number of specific binding sites of 1 to 2 fmol/mg of wet weight tissue. Pharmacological characterization of this binding revealed a novel receptor site (K) with affinity for substance K greater than kassinin greater than or equal to eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin. Inhibition of the binding of BHSK in membranes from mouse urinary bladder exhibited a similar K-type pattern. In rat duodenum and mouse bladder membranes, the binding of BHE was inhibited by substance K greater than kassinin greater than eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin indicating the same receptor site as for BHSK. In rat cerebral cortex membranes BHE binding was inhibited by neuromedin K = kassinin = eledoisin greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than substance P indicating a definitive tachykinin E receptor site. The same displacement pattern of BHE binding was also detected in longitudinal muscle membranes from the guinea-pig small intestine. In mouse bladder membranes and in rat and guinea-pig intestine, the binding of BHSP was inhibited by substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than or equal to eledoisin = kassinin greater than neuromedin K indicating a definitive tachykinin P receptor site. Autoradiographic binding sites for both BHSK and BHSP were seen in circular muscle of the rat stomach, small intestine and colon and in circular and longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig small intestine and colon.

  18. Characteristics and autoradiographic localization of 2-( sup 125 I)iodomelatonin binding sites in Djungarian hamster brain

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, M.J.; Takahashi, J.S.; Dubocovich, M.L. )

    1989-08-01

    These studies investigated the characteristics and regional distribution of 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding in Djungarian hamster brain. The results showed that 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin labels two types of binding sites, which resemble the ML-1 and ML-2 melatonin subtypes previously described in other tissues. The 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin binding site identified in whole brain membranes has a nanomolar affinity (Kd = 1.48 +/- 0.26 nM) and biochemical and pharmacological characteristics identical to those of the ML-2 site of Syrian hamster whole brain. The 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin site in the hypothalamus has a picomolar affinity (Kd = 43.4 +/- 5.1 pM) and resembles the ML-1 site of chicken retina. The localization of 2-({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin labeling in autoradiographic studies of the Djungarian hamster brain includes the suprachiasmatic nuclei, the median eminence, the reuniens nucleus, and the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus.

  19. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in intermediate lobe of the pituitary: Biochemical characterization and autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; De Souza, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    CRF receptors were characterized using radioligand binding and chemical affinity cross-linking techniques and localized using autoradiographic techniques in porcine, bovine and rat pituitaries. The binding of 125I-(Tyr0)-ovine CRF (125I-oCRF) to porcine anterior and neurointermediate lobe membranes was saturable and of high affinity with comparable KD values (200-600 pM) and receptor densities (100-200 fmoles/mg protein). The pharmacological rank order of potencies for various analogs and fragments of CRF in inhibiting 125I-oCRF binding in neurointermediate lobe was characteristic of the well-established CRF receptor in anterior pituitary. Furthermore, the binding of 125I-oCRF to both anterior and neurointermediate lobes of the pituitary was guanine nucleotide-sensitive. Affinity cross-linking studies revealed that the molecular weight of the CRF binding protein in rat intermediate lobe was identical to that in rat anterior lobe (Mr = 75,000). While the CRF binding protein in the anterior lobes of porcine and bovine pituitaries had identical molecular weights to CRF receptors in rat pituitary (Mr = 75,000), the molecular weight of the CRF binding protein in porcine and bovine intermediate lobe was slightly higher (Mr = 78,000). Pituitary autoradiograms from the three species showed specific binding sites for 125I-oCRF in anterior and intermediate lobes, with none being apparent in the posterior pituitary. The identification of CRF receptors in the intermediate lobe with comparable characteristics to those previously identified in the anterior pituitary substantiate further the physiological role of CRF in regulating intermediate lobe hormone secretion.

  20. A quantitative autoradiographic method for the measurement of local rates of brain protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.E.; Donatoni, P.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1982-05-01

    We have developed a new method for measuring local rates of brain protein synthesis in vivo. It combines the intraperitoneal injection of a large dose of low specific activity amino acid with quantitative autoradiography. This method has several advantages: 1) It is ideally suited for young or small animals or where immobilizing an animal is undesirable. 2 The amino acid injection ''floods'' amino acid pools so that errors in estimating precursor specific activity, which is especially important in pathological conditions, are minimized. 3) The method provides for the use of a radioautographic internal standard in which valine incorporation is measured directly. Internal standards from experimental animals correct for tissue protein content and self-absorption of radiation in tissue sections which could vary under experimental conditions.

  1. Autoradiographic localization of peptide YY and neuropeptide Y binding sites in the medulla oblongata

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie, R.A.; McDonald, T.J.; Robertson, H.A.

    1988-09-01

    Peptide YY is a highly potent emetic when given intravenously in dogs. We hypothesized that the area postrema, a small brain stem nucleus that acts as a chemoreceptive trigger zone for vomiting and lies outside the blood-brain barrier, might have receptors that PYY would bind to, in order to mediate the emetic response. We prepared (/sup 125/I)PYY and used autoradiography to show that high affinity binding sites for this ligand were highly localized in the area postrema and related nuclei of the dog medulla oblongata. Furthermore, the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites in the rat medulla oblongata was very similar to that in the dog; the distribution of (/sup 125/I)PYY binding sites throughout the rat brain was seen to be similar to the distribution of (/sup 125/I)NPY binding sites.

  2. Initial characterization and autoradiographic localization of a novel sigma/opioid binding site in immune tissues.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B B; Liu, Y; Chang, S; Saini, P; Ha, B K; Barrett, T W; Wolfe, S A

    1996-07-01

    High concentrations of novel, haloperidol- and DTG-inaccessible (+)-[3H]-3-PPP binding sites were found in human peripheral blood leukocytes rat spleen and splenocytes, but not in rat brain. Splenic sites were localized in a course punctate pattern in the marginal zones and red pulp. The pharmacology of the splenic sites was: (-)-SKF 10,047 > or = naltrexone = (-)-pentazocine > (+)-pentazocine = (-)-3-PPP = (+)-SKF 10,047 > or = (+)-3-PPP > or = dextrorphan > dextromethorphan > PCP > clorgyline. DTG, haloperidol, TCP, (-)-deprenyl and SKF 525-A did not complete. Binding activity was destroyed by heating and phospholipase C, but not by proteases or glycosidases. These sites may be involved in immunomodulation by opiate and sigma receptor agonists.

  3. Autoradiographic localization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of the zebra finch (Poephila guttata)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.T.; Adkins-Regan, E.; Whiting, P.; Lindstrom, J.M.; Podleski, T.R.

    1988-08-08

    We have localized nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the zebra finch brain by using three 125I-labelled ligands: alpha bungarotoxin and two monoclonal antibodies to neuronal nicotinic receptors. Unfixed brains from intact adult male and female zebra finches were prepared for in vitro autoradiography. Low-resolution film autoradiograms and high-resolution emulsion autoradiograms were prepared for each of the three ligands. The major brain structures that bind all three of the ligands are hippocampus; hyperstriatum dorsalis; hyperstriatum ventralis; nucleus lentiformis mesencephali; nucleus pretectalis, some layers of the optic tectum; nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis; pars dorsalis; locus ceruleus; and all cranial motor nuclei except nucleus nervi hypoglossi. The major structures labelled only by (125I)-alpha bungarotoxin binding included hyperstriatum accessorium and the nuclei: preopticus medialis, medialis hypothalami posterioris, semilunaris, olivarius inferior, and the periventricular organ. Of the song control nuclei, nucleus magnocellularis of the anterior neostriatum; hyperstriatum ventralis, pars caudalis; nucleus intercollicularis; and nucleus hypoglossus were labelled. The binding patterns of the two antibodies were similar to one another but not identical. Both labelled nucleus spiriformis lateralis and nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis especially heavily and also labelled the nucleus habenula medialis; nucleus subpretectalis; nucleus isthmi, pars magnocellularis; nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis; nucleus reticularis lateralis; nucleus tractus solitarii; nucleus vestibularis dorsolateralis; nucleus vestibularis lateralis; nucleus descendens nervi trigemini; and the deep cerebellar nuclei.

  4. Autoradiographic localization of epidermal growth factor receptors to all major uterine cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.H.; Mukku, V.R.; Verner, G.; Kirkland, J.L.; Stancel, G.M.

    1988-03-01

    We have recently studied the structure and function of the uterine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, its hormonal regulation, and its possible role in estrogen-induced uterine DNA synthesis. Since the uterus is composed of multiple cell types, we sought, in the work reported here, to localize EGF binding in this organ by autoradiography. Prior to the actual autoradiography, we performed a companion series of experiments to insure that EGF binding to uterine tissue in situ represented a true receptor interaction. Uteri from immature female rats were incubated in vitro with 125I-EGF at 25 degrees C. Tissue binding was maximal within 120 min and remained constant for at least an additional 120 min. This binding of labeled EGF was largely abolished by excess unlabeled EGF but not by other growth factors, indicating that binding was to specific receptors. The binding of 125I-EGF was saturable and reached a plateau at 4-8 nM; specific binding was half-maximal at 1-2 nM EGF. In situ cross-linking studies revealed that 125I-EGF was bound predominantly to a 170,000 MW EGF receptor similar to that seen in isolated uterine membranes. Incubation of uteri with 125I-EGF followed by autoradiography revealed binding to epithelial cells, stroma, and myometrium. These results provide evidence for the presence of specific EGF receptors in all major uterine cell types of the immature rat.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of a gluten peptide during organ culture of human duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Fluge, G.; Aksnes, L.

    1983-01-01

    An 125I-labeled subfraction of Frazer's fraction III (molecular weight, 8,000) was added to the culture medium during organ culture of duodenal biopsies from two patients with celiac disease in exacerbation. The isotope-labeled gluten peptide was localized by autoradiography after 6, 12, and 24 h of culture. At 6 h, labeling was located mainly in the basal layers of the biopsies. The tissue was well preserved. After 12 h in culture, the labeling had spread to the lamina propria and the crypts. A few grains were located over enterocytes and desquamated cells. Moderate histological signs of toxicity were observed. After 24 h, there was marked toxic deterioration, comparable to that seen after culture with alpha-gliadin. Labeling had spread throughout the entire section. There seemed to be no specificity of the binding, for the entire section was affected. Culture with the identical gluten fraction, in the radionegative state, produced histological deterioration comparable to that seen after exposure to the isotope-labeled peptide. Gluten peptides are presented to the target cells in a unique way during organ culture, different from in vivo conditions. This may influence the results when the organ culture method is used to investigate the pathogenesis of celiac disease.

  6. Autoradiographic localization of (/sup 125/I)-angiotensin II binding sites in the rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, D.P.; Maciejewski, A.R.; Printz, M.P.

    1985-03-01

    To gain greater insight into sites of action of circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) within the adrenal, we have localized the (/sup 125/I)-Ang II binding site using in vitro autoradiography. Autoradiograms were generated either by apposition of isotope-sensitive film or with emulsion-coated coverslips to slide-mounted adrenal sections labeled in vitro with 1.0 nM (/sup 125/I)-Ang II. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that Ang II binding sites were concentrated in a thin band in the outer cortex (over the cells of the zona glomerulosa) and in the adrenal medulla, which at higher power was seen as dense patches. Few sites were evident in the inner cortex. The existence of Ang II binding sites in the adrenal medulla was confirmed by conventional homogenate binding techniques which revealed a single class of high affinity Ang II binding site (K/sub d/ . 0.7nM, B/sub max/ . 168.7 fmol/mg). These results suggest that the adrenal medulla may be a target for direct receptor-mediated actions of Ang II.

  7. Methods in laboratory investigation. Autoradiographic demonstration of the specific binding and nuclear localization of 3H-dexamethasone in adult mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Beer, D G; Cunha, G R; Malkinson, A M

    1983-12-01

    This report describes the first autoradiographic demonstration of specific nuclear localization of 3H-dexamethasone in different cell types of the lung. Adult mouse lung tissue was incubated in vitro for 90 minutes with 17 nM 3H-dexamethasone in the presence or absence of various nonradioactive steroids. After extensive washing to remove any nonspecifically bound ligand, the specimens were processed for autoradiography using the thaw-mount method. In the absence of competing steroids, silver grains were localized in the nuclei of alveolar type II cells, bronchiolar and arteriolar smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells of the pulmonary vasculature. No significant nuclear concentration of label was observed in the bronchiolar epithelium, however. The specificity of 3H-dexamethasone labeling was demonstrated by incubating 17 nM 3H-dexamethasone with a 600-fold excess of either unlabeled dexamethasone, estrogen, dihydrotestosterone, or progesterone. These autoradiographic binding and steroid competition studies were confirmed by quantifying with liquid scintillation counting the specific 3H-dexamethasone binding in nuclear and cytosolic fractions prepared from lung tissues that had undergone identical incubation and washing procedures as those for autoradiography. These results demonstrate that many cell types in adult lung are targets for glucocorticoids and may respond to physiologic concentrations of this hormone.

  8. Autoradiographic location of multiple serotonin receptors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.L.G.

    1983-02-01

    Autoradiographic localization of receptors in an attempt to determine the locations of different populations of serotonin (5HT) receptors in the CNS was examined. Data confirmed that the auto radiographic technique for visualizing ligand-binding sites can be used to localize 5HT-1 receptors within very small regions of the brain. The hypothesis that it should be possible to use this technique to localize different populations of the 5HT-1 sites based on their differential sensitivities to drugs was also confirmed.

  9. Quantitative autoradiographic localization of cholecystokinin receptors in rat and guinea pig brain using sup 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8

    SciTech Connect

    Niehoff, D.L. )

    1989-03-01

    The autoradiographic localization of receptors for the brain-gut peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) has shown differences in receptor distribution between rat and guinea pig brain. However the full anatomical extent of the differences has not been determined quantitatively. In the present study, {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-CCK8 ({sup 125}I-BH-CCK8) was employed in a comparative quantitative autoradiographic analysis of the distribution of CCK receptors in these two species. The pharmacological profile of {sup 125}I-BH-CCK8 binding in guinea pig forebrain sections was comparable to those previously reported for rat and human. Statistically significant differences in receptor binding between rat and guinea pig occurred in olfactory bulb, caudate-putamen, amygdala, several cortical areas, ventromedial hypothalamus, cerebellum, and a number of midbrain and brainstem nuclei. The results of this study confirm the presence of extensive species-specific variation in the distribution of CCK receptors, suggesting possible differences in the physiological roles of this peptide in different mammalian species.

  10. Preparation of (125)I-ricin suitable as a probe for the autoradiographic localization of toxin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Doebler, J.A.; Mayer, T.W.; Traub, R.K.; Broomfield, C.A.; Calamaio, C.A.

    1993-05-13

    The long term objectives of this research are to identify cellular binding sites for ricin and examine its organ distribution in mice following aerosol inhalation exposure. Preliminary studies relating to the synthesis and evaluation of (125 I)-ricin as an autoradiographic probe have been conducted. Non-radioactive (I)-ricin prepared using the Iodogen method was found to be non-toxic both in vivo and in vitro. Lactose was then added to the Iodogen reaction medium to block galactose-binding site associated tyrosines in an attempt to retain toxicity. However, this did not prevent iodination-induced loss of biological potency. We then switched to the lactoperoxidase method of iodination, which yielded an (I)-ricin preparation with toxicity comparable to that of native toxin.

  11. Postnatal changes in local cerebral blood flow measured by the quantitative autoradiographic ( sup 14 C)iodoantipyrine technique in freely moving rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nehlig, A.; Pereira de Vasconcelos, A.; Boyet, S. )

    1989-10-01

    The postnatal changes in local cerebral blood flow in freely moving rats were measured by means of the quantitative autoradiographic ({sup 14}C)iodoantipyrine method. The animals were studied at 10, 14, 17, 21 and 35 days and at the adult stage. At 10 days after birth, rates of blood flow were very low and quite homogeneous in most cerebral structures except in a few posterior areas. From these relatively uniform levels, values of local cerebral blood flow rose notably to reach a peak at 17 days in all brain regions studied. Rates of blood flow decreased between 17 and 21 days after birth and then increased from weaning time to reach the known characteristic distribution of the adult rat. The postnatal evolution of local cerebral blood in the rat is in good agreement with previous studies in other species such as dog and humans that also show higher rates of cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization at immature stages. However, in the rat, local cerebral blood flow and local cerebral glucose utilization are not coupled over the whole postnatal period studied, since blood flow rates reach peak values at 17 days whereas glucose utilization remains still quite low at that stage. The high rate of cerebral blood flow in the 17-day-old rat may reflect the energetic and biosynthetic needs of the actively developing brain that are completed by the summation of glucose and ketone body utilization.

  12. Elasmobranch rectal gland cell: autoradiographic localization of [3H]ouabain-sensitive Na, K-ATPase in rectal gland of dogfish, Squalus acanthias

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Specific binding of radiolabeled inhibitor was employed to localize the Na-pump sites (Na,K-ATPase) in rectal gland epithelium, a NaCl- secreting osmoregulatory tissue which is particularly rich in pump sites. Slices of gland tissue from spiny dogfish were incubated in suitable [3H]ouabain-containing media and then prepared for Na,K-ATPase assay, measurement of radiolabel binding, or quantitative freeze-dry autoradiography at the light microscope level. Gross freezing or drying artifacts were excluded by comparison with additional aldehyde-fixed slices. Characterization experiments demonstrated high-affinity binding which correlated with Na,K-ATPase inhibition and half-saturated at approximately 5 microM [3H]ouabain. At this concentration, the normal half-loading time was approximately 1 h and low-affinity binding to nonspecific sites was negligible. Autoradiographs from both 1- and 4-h incubated slices showed approximately 85% of the bound [3H]ouabain to be localized within a 1-micrometer wide boundary region where the highly infolded basal-lateral cell membrane are closest to the mitochondria. These results establish that most of the enormous Na,K- ATPase activity associated with rectal gland epithelium is in the basal- lateral cell membrane facing interstitial fluid and not in the luminal membrane facing secreted fluid. Moreover, distribution along the basal- lateral membrane appears to be nonuniform with a higher density of enzyme sites close to mitochondria. PMID:229110

  13. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-05-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and (3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5)enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids.

  14. Local Algebras of Differential Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, P. T.; Timourian, J. G.

    2002-05-01

    There is an increasing literature devoted to the study of boundary value problems using singularity theory. The resulting differential operators are typically Fredholm with index 0, defined on infinite-dimensional spaces, and they have often led to folds, cusps, and even higher-order Morin singularities. In this paper we develop some of the local algebras of germs of such differential Fredholm operators, extending the theory of the finite-dimensional case. We apply this work to nonlinear elliptic boundary value problems: in particular, we make further progress on a question proposed and initially studied by Ruf [1999, J. Differential Equations 151, 111-133]. We also make comments on several problems raised by others.

  15. The ventral surface of the medulla in the rat: pharmacologic and autoradiographic localization of GABA-induced cardiovascular effects.

    PubMed

    Keeler, J R; Shults, C W; Chase, T N; Helke, C J

    1984-04-16

    Experiments were done to evaluate a rat model for studying the cardiovascular effects of pharmacological manipulations of the ventral surface of the medulla. GABAergic drugs were used because of their well-characterized actions at the ventral surface of the medulla in the cat. GABA and muscimol, applied to the exposed ventral surface with filter paper pledgets, produced dose-dependent decreases in heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) which were reversed with bicuculline but not with strychnine. Bicuculline alone raised HR and MAP. The GABA- or bicuculline-induced cardiovascular effects were mediated primarily by inhibition of sympathetic outflow. The most sensitive site was localized to an intermediate area on the ventral surface of the medulla, between the trapezoid body and exits of the hypoglossal nerves and just lateral to the pyramids. Topical application of [3H]GABA to the intermediate area resulted in labeling that was concentrated at the site of application, and which penetrated the parenchyma 1 mm dorsally. The heaviest labeling was found primarily in the ventral halves of the lateral paragigantocellular nuclei. No tritium was detected in peripheral blood. These data provide evidence for a neuronal system at the ventral medullary surface of the rat which influences sympathetic outflow and is modulated by GABA. PMID:6326937

  16. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-dihydrotestosterone in the preoptic area, hypothalamus, and amygdala of a male rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, R.P.; Rees, H.D.

    1982-06-14

    In a preliminary study, autoradiography was used to localize target cells for /sup 3/H-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a non-aromatizable androgen, in the brain of the rhesus monkey. One castrated male was injected intravenously with 2 mCi of /sup 3/H-DHT (0.42 ..mu..g/kg), and was killed one hour later. Neurons that concentrated radioactivity in their nuclei were located in widespread areas of the brain, which included the medial and suprachiasmatic preoptic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, lateral septal nucleus, anterior hypothalamic area, ventromedial, arcuate, dorsomedial, and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, ventral premammillary nucleus, and medial, cortical, basal accessory, and lateral amygdaloid nuclei. These results indicate that the topographic distribution of androgen target neurons is considerably wider than that observed in a study using /sup 3/H-testosterone (T) in the male rhesus monkey. However, further work is needed to elucidate these differences before attempting correlations between behavioral activity and androgen receptors in the brain.

  17. Autoradiographic localization of supraspinal kappa-opioid receptors with (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11)

    SciTech Connect

    Jomary, C.; Gairin, J.E.; Cros, J.; Meunier, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    (/sup 125/I-Tyr1, D-Pro10)dynorphin A-(1-11) (/sup 125/I-DP-DYN), an opioid peptide analogue that has previously been shown to be kappa selective, displays specific, saturable, and high-affinity (Kd = 0.3 nM) binding in slide-mounted sections from nerve tissue. We have used /sup 125/I-DPDYN to autoradiographically visualize supraspinal kappa-opioid receptor sites in rats, guinea pigs, and rabbits. The autoradiographic dispositions of /sup 125/I-DPDYN in sections from cerebellum are clearly different in guinea pig and rabbit, suggesting that kappa receptors have different functions in this organ of the two species. Autoradiograms from /sup 125/I-DPDYN-labeled brain sections also reveal major species differences, in particular in thalamus, which is densely labeled in rabbit and considerably less so in rat and guinea pig. The data show that /sup 125/I-DPDYN is a useful probe to visualize kappa-opioid receptor sites in nerve tissue sections directly and rapidly.

  18. Autoradiographic visualization of angiotensin-converting enzyme in rat brain with (/sup 3/H)captopril: localization to a striatonigral pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Strittmatter, S.M.; Lo, M.M.S.; Javitch, J.A.; Snyder, S.H.

    1984-03-01

    The authors have visualized angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase, peptidylpeptide hydrolase, EC 3.4.15.1) in rat brain by in vitro (/sup 3/H)captopril autoradiography. (/sup 3/H)Captopril binding to brain slices displays a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 1.8 x 10/sup -9/ M) and a pharmacological profile similar to that of ACE activity. Very high densities of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding were found in the choroid plexus and the subfornical organ. High densities were present in the caudate putamen and substantia nigra, zona reticulata. Moderate levels were found in the entopeduncular nucleus, globus pallidus, and median eminence of the hypothalamus. Lower levels were detectable in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, the media habenula, the median preoptic area, and the locus coeruleus. Injection of ibotenic acid or colchicine into the caudate putamen decreased (/sup 3/H)captopril-associated autoradiographic grains by 85% in the ipsilateral caudate putamen and by > 50% in the ipsilateral substantia nigra. Thus, ACE in the substantia nigra is located on presynaptic terminals of axons originating from the caudate putamen, and ACE in the caudate putamen is situated in neuronal perikarya or at the terminals of striatal interneurons. The lack of effect of similar injections into the substantia nigra confirmed that the caudate putamen injections did not cause trans-synaptic changes. The presence of (/sup 3/H)captopril binding is consistent with an ACE-mediated production of angiotensin II in some brain regions. Although (/sup 3/H)captopril autoradiography reveals ACE in a striatonigral pathway, there is no evidence for angiotensin II involvement in such a neuronal pathway. 26 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  19. Development of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I in head and brain of chick embryos: Autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Bassas, L.; Girbau, M.; Lesniak, M.A.; Roth, J.; de Pablo, F. )

    1989-11-01

    In whole brain of chick embryos insulin receptors are highest at the end of embryonic development, while insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) receptors dominate in the early stages. These studies provided evidence for developmental regulation of both types of receptors, but they did not provide information on possible differences between brain regions at each developmental stage or within one region at different embryonic ages. We have now localized the specific binding of (125I)insulin and (125I)IGF-I in sections of head and brain using autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometric analysis. Embryos have been studied from the latter part of organogenesis (days 6 and 12) through late development (day 18, i.e. 3 days before hatching), and the binding patterns have been compared with those in the adult brain. At all ages the binding of both ligands was to discrete anatomical regions. Interestingly, while in late embryos and adult brain the patterns of (125I)insulin and (125I) IGF-I binding were quite distinct, in young embryos both ligands showed very similar localization of binding. In young embryos the retina and lateral wall of the growing encephalic vesicles had the highest binding of both (125I)insulin and (125I)IGF-I. In older embryos, as in the adult brain, insulin binding was high in the paleostriatum augmentatum and molecular layer of the cerebellum, while IGF-I binding was prominent in the hippocampus and neostriatum. The mapping of receptors in a vertebrate embryo model from early prenatal development until adulthood predicts great overlap in any possible function of insulin and IGF-I in brain development, while it anticipates differential localized actions of the peptides in the mature brain.

  20. Earth fissures and localized differential subsidence.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Pampeyan, Earl H.

    1981-01-01

    Long linear tension cracks associated with declining groundwater levels at four sites in subsiding areas in south-central Arizona, Fremont Valley, California, and Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, occur near points of maximum convex-upward curvature in subsidence profiles oriented perpendicular to the cracks. Profiles are based on repeated precise vertical control surveys of lines of closely spaced bench marks. Association of these fissures with zones of localized differential subsidence indicates that linear earth fissures are caused by horizontal tensile strains probably resulting from localized differential compaction. Horizontal tensile strains across the fissures at the point of maximum convex-upward curvature, ranging from approximately 100 to 700 microstrains (0.01 to 0.07% per year), were indicated based on measurements with a tape or electronic distance meter.

  1. Pharmacological and autoradiographic characterization of sigma receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of three types of opioid receptors - ..mu.., kappa, and sigma - was postulated to explain the effects of different opioids in the chronic spinal dog. Sigma receptors, named for the prototypic agonist SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine), were suggested to mediate the psychotomimetic-like effects of SKF 10,047 in the dog. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (3-PPP) has been proposed as a selective dopamine autoreceptor agonist. However, the drug specificity of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP binding in brain is identical to that of sigma receptor binding sites which may mediate psychotomimetic effects of some opioids. Pharmacological and autoradiographic analyses reveal that (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047, the prototypic sigma agonist, labels two sites in brain. The drug specificity of the high affinity site for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 resembles that of putative sigma receptors labeled with (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP, being potently inhibited by (+)3-PPP, haloperidol, and (+/-)pentazocine, and demonstrating stereoselectivity for the (+) isomer of SKF 10,047. Autoradiographic localizations of high affinity (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10,047 binding sites closely resemble those of (+)(/sup 3/H)3-PPP labeled sites with high levels of binding in the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, hypothalamus, and pontine and cranial nerve nuclei. Thus, putative sigma receptors and PCP receptors represent distinct receptor populations in brain. This proposal is supported by the presence of sigma binding sites - and absence of PCP receptors - on NCB-20 cell membranes, a hybrid neurotumor cell line that provides a model system for the physiological and biochemical study of sigma receptors.

  2. Autoradiographic localization of binding sites for 2-[125I]iodomelatonin in the pars tuberalis of the western spotted skunk (Spilogale putorius latifrons).

    PubMed

    Duncan, M J; Mead, R A

    1992-01-01

    Pineal melatonin secretion mediates photoperiodic regulation of implantation of blastocysts in the female western spotted skunk. Autoradiography studies demonstrated that high affinity 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding sites are present in the pars tuberalis but not in any other hypophyseal region or in the hypothalamus or thalamus of this species. This restricted localization of 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding, which was characteristic of spotted skunks sacrificed at various times during their annual reproductive cycles, suggests that the pars tuberalis mediates photoperiodic responses in this species.

  3. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine and (/sup 3/H)(/sup -/)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding in human stellate ganglia

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, H.I.; Watson, M.; Wamsley, J.K.; Johnson, P.C.; Roeske, W.R.

    1984-08-13

    The LKB Ultrofilm method of autoradiography has been utilized to anatomically localize putative M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptor subtypes in human stellate ganglia. Ten micron sections were labeled in vitro with either 1 nM of the classical antagonist (/sup 3/H)(/sup -/)quinuclidinyl benzilate ((/sup 3/H)(/sup -/)QNB) or 20 nM of the non-classical antagonist (/sup 3/H)pirenzepine ((/sup 3/H)PZ), using 1 ..mu..M atropine sulfate to define non-specific binding for both ligands. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)(/sup -/)QNB and (/sup 3/H)PZ binding sites are distributed within the principal ganglion cells and nerve bundles.

  4. Earth fissures and localized differential subsidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Pampeyan, Earl Haig

    1979-01-01

    Long tension cracks caused by declines of ground-water level at four sites in Arizona, California, and Nevada occur at points of maximum, convex-upward curvature in subsidence profiles based on relevelings of closely-spaced bench marks aligned perpendicular to the cracks. We conclude the cracks are caused by horizontal strains associated with the differential subsidence.

  5. The fibrous growth plate of the rat tibia: tritiated thymidine autoradiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Badi, M H

    1978-01-01

    Tritiated thymidine autoradiographic studies have demonstrated that the intermediate fibrogenic zone of the fibrous growth plate at the upper end of the rat tibia is a site of intense cellular proliferation, the resulting cells differentiating into osteoblasts which manufacture the bundle bone at the distal end of the growth plate. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 PMID:689992

  6. Differentiated Response of Snowpack to Climate Change at Local Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, M.; López Moreno, J. I.; Rosas-Casals, M.; Jover, E.

    2014-12-01

    Local factors such as topography, aspect, elevation or local wind can significantly affect the spatial distribution of snow. This study intends to understand the effect of these factors and model a differentiated response of snowpack to climate change at small scale. In order to accomplish this objective, a network of wind, temperature and humidity sensors has been deployed in two different ski areas of the Pyrenees to monitor and analyze the effect of local factors on these variables. Moreover, snow depth and density, snowmaking working and time-lapse imagery of slopes will be analyzed during a winter season in order to better understand the snowpack changes and distribution due to local factors and the technical work on the ski resorts. The main aim of this study is to better understand the differentiated response of the snowpack at small scale considering local factors in order to improve and enhance the efficiency of the present daily management for example in ski resort areas and the planning of future adaptation strategies to climate change.

  7. Local random potentials of high differentiability to model the Landscape

    SciTech Connect

    Battefeld, T.; Modi, C.

    2015-03-09

    We generate random functions locally via a novel generalization of Dyson Brownian motion, such that the functions are in a desired differentiability class C{sup k}, while ensuring that the Hessian is a member of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (other ensembles might be chosen if desired). Potentials in such higher differentiability classes (k≥2) are required/desirable to model string theoretical landscapes, for instance to compute cosmological perturbations (e.g., k=2 for the power-spectrum) or to search for minima (e.g., suitable de Sitter vacua for our universe). Since potentials are created locally, numerical studies become feasible even if the dimension of field space is large (D∼100). In addition to the theoretical prescription, we provide some numerical examples to highlight properties of such potentials; concrete cosmological applications will be discussed in companion publications.

  8. Comparisons of three dry application autoradiographic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Parson, M.J.; Parker, B.C. )

    1987-06-01

    We compared three common dry application techniques applied for the first time to phytoplankton taking up water-soluble radioisotopically labeled substrates. Following incubation of live phytoplankton communities in oligotrophic, nitrogen-limited Mountain Lake, Virginia, with Carbon-14 labeled methylamine-hydrochloride, an ammomium analog, we concentrated cells on 0.8 um pore size Millipore filters, then preserved filters in liquid nitrogen, and freeze-dried. Differences in the techniques are application of stripping film, preparation of freshly prepared film by dipping loops into liquid emulsion, and dipping cover slips in liquid emulsion. Following dark-incubation and development, autoradiographs were evaluated microscopically for reproducibility, fine resolution of silver grains, background scatter, and eaes of technique.

  9. An Enhanced Differential Evolution with Elite Chaotic Local Search

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaolu; Huang, Haixia; Deng, Changshou; Yue, Xuezhi; Wu, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a simple yet efficient evolutionary algorithm for real-world engineering problems. However, its search ability should be further enhanced to obtain better solutions when DE is applied to solve complex optimization problems. This paper presents an enhanced differential evolution with elite chaotic local search (DEECL). In DEECL, it utilizes a chaotic search strategy based on the heuristic information from the elite individuals to promote the exploitation power. Moreover, DEECL employs a simple and effective parameter adaptation mechanism to enhance the robustness. Experiments are conducted on a set of classical test functions. The experimental results show that DEECL is very competitive on the majority of the test functions. PMID:26379703

  10. An Enhanced Differential Evolution with Elite Chaotic Local Search.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaolu; Huang, Haixia; Deng, Changshou; Yue, Xuezhi; Wu, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a simple yet efficient evolutionary algorithm for real-world engineering problems. However, its search ability should be further enhanced to obtain better solutions when DE is applied to solve complex optimization problems. This paper presents an enhanced differential evolution with elite chaotic local search (DEECL). In DEECL, it utilizes a chaotic search strategy based on the heuristic information from the elite individuals to promote the exploitation power. Moreover, DEECL employs a simple and effective parameter adaptation mechanism to enhance the robustness. Experiments are conducted on a set of classical test functions. The experimental results show that DEECL is very competitive on the majority of the test functions. PMID:26379703

  11. Local pattern classification differentiates processes of economic valuation.

    PubMed

    Clithero, John A; Carter, R McKell; Huettel, Scott A

    2009-05-01

    For effective decision making, individuals must be able to form subjective values from many types of information. Yet, the neural mechanisms that underlie potential differences in value computation across different decision scenarios are incompletely understood. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in conjunction with the machine learning technique of support vector machines (SVM), to identify brain regions that contain unique local information associated with different types of valuation. We used a combinatoric approach that evaluated the unique contributions of different brain regions to model generalization strength. Local voxel patterns in left posterior parietal cortex contained unique information differentiating probabilistic and intertemporal valuation, a result that was not accessible using standard fMRI analyses. We conclude that the early valuation phases for these reward types differ on a fine spatial scale, suggesting the existence of computational topographies along the value construction pathway.

  12. Autoradiographic localization of voltage-dependent sodium channels on the mouse neuromuscular junction using /sup 125/I-alpha scorpion toxin. I. Preferential labeling of glial cells on the presynaptic side

    SciTech Connect

    Boudier, J.L.; Jover, E.; Cau, P.

    1988-05-01

    Alpha-scorpion toxins bind specifically to the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in excitable membranes, and binding is potential-dependent. The radioiodinated toxin II from the scorpion Androctonus australis Hector (alpha ScTx) was used to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels on the presynaptic side of mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJ) by autoradiography using both light and electron microscopy. Silver grain localization was analyzed by the cross-fire method. At the light-microscopic level, grain density over NMJ appeared 6-8x higher than over nonjunctional muscle membrane. The specificity of labeling was verified by competition/displacement with an excess of native alpha ScTx. Labeling was also inhibited by incubation in depolarizing conditions, showing its potential-dependence. At the electron-microscopic level, analysis showed that voltage-sensitive sodium channels labeled with alpha ScTx were almost exclusively localized on membranes, as expected. Due to washout after incubation, appreciable numbers of binding sites were not found on the postsynaptic membranes. However, on the presynaptic side, alpha ScTx-labeled voltage-sensitive sodium channels were localized on the membrane of non-myelin-forming Schwann cells covering NMJ. The axonal presynaptic membrane was not labeled. These results show that voltage-sensitive sodium channels are present on glial cells in vivo, as already demonstrated in vitro. It is proposed that these glial channels could be indirectly involved in the ionic homeostasis of the axonal environment.

  13. Differential localization of decidual stathmin during pregnancy in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshie, M; Tamura, K; Kogo, H

    2004-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the precise localization of stathmin, a protein associated with microtubule dynamics, during decidualization in rat uterus and to compare it with that of cyclin D3. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that stathmin is exclusively localized in decidual cells, especially in the primary decidual zone surrounding the embryo, on days 7 and 9 of pregnancy. The intensity of staining was much higher on day 9 than day 7. On day 14, when the endometrial stromal cells had completely differentiated into decidual cells, the staining of decidual cells was faint. Cyclin D3 was expressed in decidual cells of the secondary but not the primary decidual zone on days 7 and 9. On day 14, cyclin D3 levels were low in decidua. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was broadly detected in the uterus on days 7 and 9, and in the placenta and fetus on day 14. In an artificial decidualization model, cyclin D3 expression was stimulated as deciduoma was formed after an artificial stimulus. Stathmin mRNA levels also increased within 24 h and peaked at 48 h. The specific spatio-temporal uterine expression of stathmin and cyclin D3 suggest that they have a specific role in decidualization in rats.

  14. Graphical construction of a local perspective on differentiation and integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ye Yoon; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies of the transition from school to university mathematics have identified a number of epistemological gaps, including the need to change from an emphasis on equality to that of inequality. Another crucial epistemological change during this transition involves the movement from the pointwise and global perspectives of functions usually established through the school curriculum to a view of function that includes a local, or interval, perspective. This is necessary for study of concepts such as continuity and limit that underpin calculus and analysis at university. In this study, a first-year university calculus course in Korea was constructed that integrated use of digital technology and considered the epistemic value of the associated techniques. The aim was to encourage versatile thinking about functions, especially in relation to properties arising from a graphical investigation of differentiation and integration. In this paper, the results of this approach for the learning of derivative and antiderivative, based on integrated technology use, are presented. They show the persistence of what Tall ( Mathematics Education Research Journal, 20(2), 5-24, 2008) describes as symbolic world algebraic thinking on the part of a significant minority of students, who feel the need to introduce algebraic methods, in spite of its disadvantages, even when no explicit algebra is provided. However, the results also demonstrate the ability of many of the students to use technology mediation to build local or interval conceptual thinking about derivative and antiderivative functions.

  15. Rhizoid Differentiation in Spirogyra: III. Intracellular Localization of Phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Y

    1979-07-01

    Localization of phytochrome which mediates rhizoid differentiation in Spirogyra was investigated. The red-absorbing form of phytochrome (Pr) seems to be distributed all over the cell periphery which remained in the centripetal end part after the centrifugation, as rhizoids formed equally well with red spotlight irradiation of three different parts of an end cell, i.e. distal end, middle, and proximal end, and with irradiation of centrifugal and centripetal end parts of a centrifuged end cell. The Pr distribution was confirmed with an experiment using far red irradiation over the entire cell, centrifugation, and red spotlight irradiation. The Pr-phytochrome molecules appeared to be mobile because no dichroic orientation was shown with polarized red spotlight irradiation. On the contrary, it is suggested that far red-absorbing form of phytochrome molecules are evacuated from the centripetal end part by the centrifugation in an experiment involving red irradiation over the entire cell-centrifugation-far red spot irradiation. Rhizoid formation was repressed markedly by far red irradiation of the centrifugal end part but not of the centripetal end part.

  16. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations.

  17. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    SciTech Connect

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective {sup 125}I-labeled OT antagonist ({sup 125}I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of {sup 125}I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that {sup 125}I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration.

  18. Ecological Values amid Local Interests: Natural Resource Conservation, Social Differentiation, and Human Survival in Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareau, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Local peoples living in protected areas often have a different understanding about their natural space than do non-local groups that promote and declare such areas "protected." By designing protected areas without local involvement, or understandings of local social differentiation and power, natural resources management schemes will likely be…

  19. Autoradiographic localization of beta-adrenoreceptors in rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Tolszczuk, M.; Pelletier, G.

    1988-12-01

    The inhibitory effects of catecholamines on uterine smooth muscle are known to be mediated through beta-adrenergic receptors. To investigate further the distribution of these receptors in the rat uterus, we utilized in vitro autoradiography using ( SVI)-cyanopindolol (CYP), a specific beta-receptor ligand that has equal activity for both beta 1- and beta 2-receptor subtypes. The specificity of the labeling and the characterization of receptor subtypes in different cell types were achieved by displacement of radioligand with increasing concentrations of zinterol, a beta-adrenergic agonist with preferential affinity for the beta 2-adrenoreceptor subtype, and practolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist that binds preferentially to the beta 1-subtype. Quantitative estimation of ligand binding was performed by densitometry. It was shown that the vast majority of beta-adrenoreceptors were of the beta 2-subtype and were found in high concentration not only in the myometrium but also in the endometrial and serosal epithelia. Specific labeling was also observed in glandular elements. These results suggest that beta-adrenoreceptors might be involved in different functions in the uterus.

  20. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  1. Autoradiographic localization of (3H) gepirone in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.E.; Matheson, G.K. )

    1990-02-26

    Gepirone is an anxiolytic compound active at the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor site. The purpose of this study was to locate the ({sup 3}H)gepirone in the rat brain and to determine the quantity of gepirone in these locations. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with (3H)gepirone (200 {mu}Ci/kg, i.v.) and decapitated 10 minutes later. To determine specific binding some animals were pretreated with cold gepirone (1 mg/kg) 15 minutes before the (3H)gepirone treatment. The brains were removed, frozen, sectioned, and fixed in formaldehyde vapors. Tritium sensitive film was exposed to the sections for 106 days. Using computerized imaging technology data were obtained from 104 brain sites. Overall, the quantity of (3H)gepirone in each site correlated proportionally with known 5-HT{sub 1A} (in vitro) receptor binding.

  2. 5 CFR 591.234 - Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential? 591.234 Section 591.234 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Post Differentials § 591.234 Under what circumstances may...

  3. 5 CFR 591.234 - Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Under what circumstances may people recruited locally receive a post differential? 591.234 Section 591.234 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF... Post Differential-Nonforeign Areas Post Differentials § 591.234 Under what circumstances may...

  4. Local behavior of autonomous neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    Basic problems for a special class of neutral functional differential equations (NFDE) are formulated, and some contributions to a general qualitative theory in the neighborhood of an equilibrium point are indicated. The properties of a NFDE (G,f) are examined to determine in what sense these properties are insensitive to small changes in (G,f) in the topology G x F. The special class of equations that is introduced includes retarded functional differential equations and difference equations.

  5. Quantitative autoradiographic microimaging in the development and evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.

    1994-04-01

    Autoradiographic (ARG) microimaging is the method for depicting biodistribution of radiocompounds with highest spatial resolution. ARG is applicable to gamma, positron and negatron emitting radiotracers. Dual or multiple-isotope studies can be performed using half-lives and energies for discrimination of isotopes. Quantitation can be performed by digital videodensitometry and by newer filmless technologies. ARG`s obtained at different time intervals provide the time dimension for determination of kinetics.

  6. Autoradiographic Studies of Intracellular Calcium in Frog Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Winegrad, Saul

    1965-01-01

    Autoradiographs consisting of a 1000 A thick tissue section and a 1400 A thick emulsion film have been prepared from frog toe muscles labeled with Ca45. The muscles had been fixed with an oxalate-containing osmium solution at rest at room temperature, at rest at 4°C, during relaxation following K+ depolarization or after prolonged depolarization. From 6 to 39 per cent of K+ contracture tension was produced during fixation. The grains in the autoradiographs were always concentrated in the center 0.2 to 0.3 µ of the I band and the region of the overlapping of the thick and thin filaments. The greater the tension produced during fixation, the greater was the concentration in the A band and the smaller the concentration in the I band. Autoradiographs of two muscles fixed by freeze-substitution resembled those of muscles which produced little tension during osmium fixation. Muscles which shortened during fixation produced fewer grains. In the narrow (<2.0 µ) sarcomeres of the shortened muscles, grain density decreased with decreasing sarcomere width. A theoretical analysis of the significance of these grain distributions is proposed and discussed. PMID:14284779

  7. Unsupervised eye pupil localization through differential geometry and local self-similarity matching.

    PubMed

    Leo, Marco; Cazzato, Dario; De Marco, Tommaso; Distante, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    's shape that is obtained through a differential analysis of image intensities and the subsequent combination with the local variability of the appearance represented by self-similarity coefficients. The experimental evidence of the effectiveness of the method was demonstrated on challenging databases containing facial images. Moreover, its capabilities to accurately detect the centers of the eyes were also favourably compared with those of the leading state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25122452

  8. Unsupervised eye pupil localization through differential geometry and local self-similarity matching.

    PubMed

    Leo, Marco; Cazzato, Dario; De Marco, Tommaso; Distante, Cosimo

    2014-01-01

    's shape that is obtained through a differential analysis of image intensities and the subsequent combination with the local variability of the appearance represented by self-similarity coefficients. The experimental evidence of the effectiveness of the method was demonstrated on challenging databases containing facial images. Moreover, its capabilities to accurately detect the centers of the eyes were also favourably compared with those of the leading state-of-the-art methods.

  9. Does local adaptation to resources explain genetic differentiation among Daphnia populations?

    PubMed

    Allen, Michael R; Thum, Ryan A; Cáceres, Carla E

    2010-08-01

    Substantial genetic differentiation is frequently observed among populations of cyclically parthenogenetic zooplankton despite their high dispersal capabilities and potential for gene flow. Local adaptation has been invoked to explain population genetic differentiation despite high dispersal, but several neutral models that account for basic life history features also predict high genetic differentiation. Here, we study genetic differentiation among four populations of Daphnia pulex in east central Illinois. As with other studies of Daphnia, we demonstrate substantial population genetic differentiation despite close geographic proximity (<50 km; mean theta = 0.22). However, we explicitly tested and failed to find evidence for, the hypothesis that local adaptation to food resources occurs in these populations. Recognizing that local adaptation can occur in traits unrelated to resources, we estimated contemporary migration rates (m) and tested for admixture to evaluate the hypothesis that observed genetic differentiation is consistent with local adaptation to other untested ecological factors. Using Bayesian assignment methods, we detected migrants in three of the four study populations including substantial evidence for successful reproduction by immigrants in one pond, allowing us to reject the hypothesis that local adaptation limits gene flow for at least this population. Thus, we suggest that local adaptation does not explain genetic differentiation among these Daphnia populations and that other factors related to extinction/colonization dynamics, a long approach to equilibrium F(ST) or substantial genetic drift due to a low number of individuals hatching from the egg bank each season may explain genetic differentiation.

  10. Neural networks for improved target differentiation and localization with sonar.

    PubMed

    Ayrulu, B; Barshan, B

    2001-04-01

    This study investigates the processing of sonar signals using neural networks for robust differentiation of commonly encountered features in indoor robot environments. Differentiation of such features is of interest for intelligent systems in a variety of applications. Different representations of amplitude and time-of-flight measurement patterns acquired from a real sonar system are processed. In most cases, best results are obtained with the low-frequency component of the discrete wavelet transform of these patterns. Modular and non-modular neural network structures trained with the back-propagation and generating-shrinking algorithms are used to incorporate learning in the identification of parameter relations for target primitives. Networks trained with the generating-shrinking algorithm demonstrate better generalization and interpolation capability and faster convergence rate. Neural networks can differentiate more targets employing only a single sensor node, with a higher correct differentiation percentage (99%) than achieved with previously reported methods (61-90%) employing multiple sensor nodes. A sensor node is a pair of transducers with fixed separation, that can rotate and scan the target to collect data. Had the number of sensing nodes been reduced in the other methods, their performance would have been even worse. The success of the neural network approach shows that the sonar signals do contain sufficient information to differentiate all target types, but the previously reported methods are unable to resolve this identifying information. This work can find application in areas where recognition of patterns hidden in sonar signals is required. Some examples are system control based on acoustic signal detection and identification, map building, navigation, obstacle avoidance, and target-tracking applications for mobile robots and other intelligent systems.

  11. Differential membrane effects of general and local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Diamond, B I; Havdala, H S; Sabelli, H C

    1975-12-01

    The authors studied the effects of varying Na+ and Ca++ concentrations and of replacing H2O with D2O in Ringer's solution upon the actions of general and local anesthetics on isolated frog sciatic nerves. This experimental model was used to study whether general anesthetics affect excitable membranes in a manner similar to that of typical membrane stabilizers (local anesthetics). Procaine (2.5-7.5 mM), halothane (9, 18, and 36 mM), enflurane (8 mM), and ketamine (0.15 and 0.73 mM) raised threshold and lowered spike amplitude, and their effects were facilitated by reducing Na+ concentration in the Ringer's solution. The local anesthetic effects of procaine (2.5-7.5 mM) and ketamine (0.73 mM) were antagonized by Ca++, while the axonal depressant effect of halothane was facilitated by increasing Ca++ concentration in the Ringer's solution, indicating a different mode of action. General anesthetics also differed from local anesthetics in their interaction with water: replacement by D2O of H2O in the Ringer's solution selectively increased the axonal depressant effects of halothane and enflurane but not those of ketamine or procaine. Since D2O differs from H2O in its greater ice-likeness, these results are consistent with the view that general anesthetics stabilize excitable membranes via stabilization of the water-biopolymer lattice, as predicted by the hydrate-microcrystal theory of anesthesia. In contrast, local anesthetics may stabilize excitable tissues by binding to the same fixed negative charges of the membrane to which Ca++ is normally bound. (Key words: Theories of anesthesia, hydrate-microcrystal; Nerve, mode of action of anesthetics; Anesthetics, volatile, halothane; Anesthetics, volatile, enflurane; Anesthetics, local, procaine; Anesthetics, intravenous, ketamine.)

  12. Nonstationary patterns of isolation-by-distance: inferring measures of local genetic differentiation with Bayesian kriging.

    PubMed

    Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Blum, Michael G B

    2014-04-01

    Patterns of isolation-by-distance (IBD) arise when population differentiation increases with increasing geographic distances. Patterns of IBD are usually caused by local spatial dispersal, which explains why differences of allele frequencies between populations accumulate with distance. However, spatial variations of demographic parameters such as migration rate or population density can generate nonstationary patterns of IBD where the rate at which genetic differentiation accumulates varies across space. To characterize nonstationary patterns of IBD, we infer local genetic differentiation based on Bayesian kriging. Local genetic differentiation for a sampled population is defined as the average genetic differentiation between the sampled population and fictive neighboring populations. To avoid defining populations in advance, the method can also be applied at the scale of individuals making it relevant for landscape genetics. Inference of local genetic differentiation relies on a matrix of pairwise similarity or dissimilarity between populations or individuals such as matrices of FST between pairs of populations. Simulation studies show that maps of local genetic differentiation can reveal barriers to gene flow but also other patterns such as continuous variations of gene flow across habitat. The potential of the method is illustrated with two datasets: single nucleotide polymorphisms from human Swedish populations and dominant markers for alpine plant species.

  13. Particle localization with total internal reflection illumination and differential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ye; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Ge, Baoliang; Mao, Xinmin; Shen, Shuhao; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    A theoretical framework of an alternative to TIRFM for high-speed reconstruction of the axial information from a fluorescent sample is presented. Two detectors are applied to capture the sample intensity, and the differential signal from the two detectors is used to determine the axial location with decreased detected noise. The axial response is analyzed theoretically; for greater accuracy, the distance dependence of the radiation patterns of samples near the interface is considered. Depth measurements with improved axial resolution and robustness to noise were obtained. The method may provide a reliable tool for 3-D reconstruction and tracking of fluorescent particles for studies of the mechanisms of cellular and subcellular processes near the cell surface.

  14. Quantitative receptor autoradiography: tissue defatting eliminates differential self-absorption of tritium radiation in gray and white matter of brain.

    PubMed

    Herkenham, M; Sokoloff, L

    1984-11-12

    A four-fold greater absorption (quenching) of tritium emissions by white matter relative to gray matter produces a false 'contrast' effect in autoradiographs of 3H-ligand binding to brain sections. The differential absorption is eliminated by tissue defatting prior to autoradiographic exposure.

  15. Population differentiation in Pacific salmon: local adaptation, genetic drift, or the environment?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkison, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    Morphological, behavioral, and life-history differences between Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) populations are commonly thought to reflect local adaptation, and it is likewise common to assume that salmon populations separated by small distances are locally adapted. Two alternatives to local adaptation exist: random genetic differentiation owing to genetic drift and founder events, and genetic homogeneity among populations, in which differences reflect differential trait expression in differing environments. Population genetics theory and simulations suggest that both alternatives are possible. With selectively neutral alleles, genetic drift can result in random differentiation despite many strays per generation. Even weak selection can prevent genetic drift in stable populations; however, founder effects can result in random differentiation despite selective pressures. Overlapping generations reduce the potential for random differentiation. Genetic homogeneity can occur despite differences in selective regimes when straying rates are high. In sum, localized differences in selection should not always result in local adaptation. Local adaptation is favored when population sizes are large and stable, selection is consistent over large areas, selective diffeentials are large, and straying rates are neither too high nor too low. Consideration of alternatives to local adaptation would improve both biological research and salmon conservation efforts.

  16. On the local stability of vortices in differentially rotating discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Railton, A. D.; Papaloizou, J. C. B.

    2014-12-01

    In order to circumvent the loss of solid material through radial drift towards the central star, the trapping of dust inside persistent vortices in protoplanetary discs has often been suggested as a process that can eventually lead to planetesimal formation. Although a few special cases have been discussed, exhaustive studies of possible quasi-steady configurations available for dust-laden vortices and their stability are yet to be undertaken, thus their viability or otherwise as locations for the gravitational instability to take hold and seed planet formation is unclear. In this paper we generalize and extend the well-known Kida solution to obtain a series of steady-state solutions with varying vorticity and dust density distributions in their cores, in the limit of perfectly coupled dust and gas. We then present a local stability analysis of these configurations, considering perturbations localized on streamlines. Typical parametric instabilities found have growth rates of 0.05ΩP, where ΩP is the angular velocity at the centre of the vortex. Models with density excess can exhibit many narrow parametric instability bands while those with a concentrated vorticity source display internal shear which significantly affects their stability. However, the existence of these parametric instabilities may not necessarily prevent the possibility of dust accumulation in vortices.

  17. Differential temperature stress measurement employing array sensor with local offset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesniak, Jon R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The instrument has a focal plane array of infrared sensors of the integrating type such as a multiplexed device in which a charge is built up on a capacitor which is proportional to the total number of photons which that sensor is exposed to between read-out cycles. The infrared sensors of the array are manufactured as part of an overall array which is part of a micro-electronic device. The sensor achieves greater sensitivity by applying a local offset to the output of each sensor before it is converted into a digital word. The offset which is applied to each sensor will typically be the sensor's average value so that the digital signal which is periodically read from each sensor of the array corresponds to the portion of the signal which is varying in time. With proper synchronization between the cyclical loading of the test object and the frame rate of the infrared array the output of the A/D converted signal will correspond to the stress field induced temperature variations. A digital lock-in operation may be performed on the output of each sensor in the array. This results in a test instrument which can rapidly form a precise image of the thermoelastic stresses in an object.

  18. Differential localization of glioblastoma subtype: implications on glioblastoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Steed, Tyler C.; Treiber, Jeffrey M.; Patel, Kunal; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Merk, Alexander; Smith, Amanda R.; Carter, Bob S.; Dale, Anders M.; Chow, Lionel M. L.; Chen, Clark C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The subventricular zone (SVZ) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma. Whether molecular subtypes of glioblastoma arise from unique niches of the brain relative to the SVZ remains largely unknown. Here, we tested whether these subtypes of glioblastoma occupy distinct regions of the cerebrum and examined glioblastoma localization in relation to the SVZ. Methods Pre-operative MR images from 217 glioblastoma patients from The Cancer Imaging Archive were segmented automatically into contrast enhancing (CE) tumor volumes using Iterative Probabilistic Voxel Labeling (IPVL). Probabilistic maps of tumor location were generated for each subtype and distances were calculated from the centroid of CE tumor volumes to the SVZ. Glioblastomas that arose in a Genetically Modified Murine Model (GEMM) model were also analyzed with regard to SVZ distance and molecular subtype. Results Classical and mesenchymal glioblastomas were more diffusely distributed and located farther from the SVZ. In contrast, proneural and neural glioblastomas were more likely to be located in closer proximity to the SVZ. Moreover, in a GFAP-CreER; PtenloxP/loxP; Trp53loxP/loxP; Rb1loxP/loxP; Rbl1−/− GEMM model of glioblastoma where tumor can spontaneously arise in different regions of the cerebrum, tumors that arose near the SVZ were more likely to be of proneural subtype (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Glioblastoma subtypes occupy different regions of the brain and vary in proximity to the SVZ. These findings harbor implications pertaining to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma subtypes. PMID:27056901

  19. Localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Hayley; Patel, Shyam; Wong, Janelle; Chu, Julia; Li, Adrian; Li, Song

    2008-08-08

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) are pluripotent, and can be directed to differentiate into different cell types for therapeutic applications. To expand hESCs, it is desirable to maintain hESC growth without differentiation. As hESC colonies grow, differentiated cells are often found at the periphery of the colonies, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we utilized micropatterning techniques to pattern circular islands or strips of matrix proteins, and examined the spatial pattern of hESC renewal and differentiation. We found that micropatterned matrix restricted hESC differentiation at colony periphery but allowed hESC growth into multiple layers in the central region, which decreased hESC proliferation and induced hESC differentiation. In undifferentiated hESCs, {beta}-catenin primarily localized at cell-cell junctions but not in the nucleus. The amount of {beta}-catenin in differentiating hESCs at the periphery of colonies or in multiple layers decreased significantly at cell-cell junctions. Consistently, knocking down {beta}-catenin decreased Oct-4 expression in hESCs. These results indicate that localized decrease of {beta}-catenin contributes to the spatial pattern of differentiation in hESC colonies.

  20. Cultivation and Differentiation Change Nuclear Localization of Chromosome Centromeres in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voldgorn, Yana I.; Adilgereeva, Elmira P.; Nekrasov, Evgeny D.; Lavrov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes. PMID:25775427

  1. Topical spironolactone inhibits dihydrotestosterone receptors in human sebaceous glands: an autoradiographic study in subjects with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Berardesca, E; Gabba, P; Ucci, G; Borroni, G; Rabbiosi, G

    1988-01-01

    The interaction between spironolactone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) receptors was evaluated with an autoradiographic technique. The inhibition of DHT receptors by spironolactone was found to be related to the decrease of tritiated DHT granules in the sebaceous glands of the treated site. 6 male patients affected by acne vulgaris entered the study. The acute study was performed by applying to 25 cm2 of the back a cream containing 5% spironolactone under occlusive dressing. The dosage of spironolactone applied was 4 mg/cm2 for 48 h. The long-term study was performed by applying the same amount to the entire back, without occlusion, twice daily for 1 month. Skin biopsies were taken at the end of the treatment, incubated with tritiated DHT and processed for autoradiography. Both the acute and the long-term study revealed a decrease of the autoradiographic granules in the treated site. This effect is related to the binding of spironolactone with dihydrotestosterone receptors in the sebaceous glands. Our study demonstrates that 5% topical spironolactone cream acts as an antiandrogen in human sebaceous glands, competing with DHT receptors and producing a decrease of labelled DHT. At the concentrations used the effect has been only local. No side-effects were recorded during both studies. PMID:2972662

  2. Autoradiographic visualization of CNS receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, M.M.; Moody, T.W.

    1986-03-01

    Receptors for VIP were characterized in the rat CNS. /sup 125/I-VIP bound with high affinity to rat brain slices. Binding was time dependent and specific. Pharmacology studies indicated that specific /sup 125/I-VIP binding was inhibited with high affinity by VIP and low affinity by secretin and PHI. Using in vitro autoradiographic techniques high grain densities were present in the dentate gyrus, pineal gland, supraoptic and suprachiasmatic nuclei, superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and the area postrema. Moderate grain densities were present in the olfactory bulb and tubercle, cerebral cortex, nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, interstitial nucleus of the stria terminalis, paraventricular thalamic nucleus, medial amygdaloid nucleus, subiculum and the medial geniculate nucleus. Grains were absent in the corpus callosum and controls treated with 1 microM unlabeled VIP. The discrete regional distribution of VIP receptors suggest that it may function as an important modulator of neural activity in the CNS.

  3. Estimation of Ordinary Differential Equation Parameters Using Constrained Local Polynomial Regression

    PubMed Central

    Ding, A. Adam; Wu, Hulin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new method to use a constrained local polynomial regression to estimate the unknown parameters in ordinary differential equation models with a goal of improving the smoothing-based two-stage pseudo-least squares estimate. The equation constraints are derived from the differential equation model and are incorporated into the local polynomial regression in order to estimate the unknown parameters in the differential equation model. We also derive the asymptotic bias and variance of the proposed estimator. Our simulation studies show that our new estimator is clearly better than the pseudo-least squares estimator in estimation accuracy with a small price of computational cost. An application example on immune cell kinetics and trafficking for influenza infection further illustrates the benefits of the proposed new method. PMID:26401093

  4. Data analysis software for the autoradiographic enhancement process. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, and appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, S. P.

    1979-01-01

    The computer software developed to set up a method for Wiener spectrum analysis of photographic films is presented. This method is used for the quantitative analysis of the autoradiographic enhancement process. The software requirements and design for the autoradiographic enhancement process are given along with the program listings and the users manual. A software description and program listings modification of the data analysis software are included.

  5. Application of autoradiographic techniques for contaminant distribution studies in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povetko, Oleg G.

    In order to determine the physical location of contaminants in soil, two solidified soil "thin" sections, which preserve the undisturbed structural characteristics of the original soil, containing weapons-grade plutonium from the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site were prepared. Two autoradiographic methods were used in radionuclide mapping: contact autoradiography using CR-39RTMplastic alpha track detectors and neutron-induced autoradiography that produced fission fragment tracks in LexanRTM plastic detectors. The combination of the two autoradiographic methods distinguished alpha-emitting particles of natural U, from 239+240Pu and non-fissile alpha-emitters. The locations of 990 alpha "stars" caused by plutonium "hot particles" in two soil sections were recorded, particles were sized, their size-frequency and depth distributions were analyzed. Several large colloidal conglomerates of "hot particles" were found in soil profiles. One such conglomerate with a geometric size of about 500 mum contained over 94% of the total recorded contaminant alpha activity in the sample. It was found that the upper 6.5 cm of soil contained 20% of all recorded particles (mean equivalent size 0.35 mum). The deeper portion of the surface 6.5 cm soil layer contained 80% of the particles (with mean equivalent size 0.25 mum). The average specific activity (SA) for 989 hot particles (with the conglomerate of the particles excluded) with equivalent diameters over 80 nm was found to be greater than 23.9 Bq g-1 (about 90% of the overall average SA). For dissolved and defragmented (below 80 nm of equivalent diameter) actinide particles, SA was found smaller than 2.9 Bq g-1. Over 99% of the total actinide contaminant activity in the analyzed soil sample (with the conglomerate of the particles included) was found in particles with equivalent diameters over 0.08 mum. It suggests that larger particles of plutonium oxide moved down more slowly than smaller ones and no significant breakup of

  6. Registration and three-dimensional reconstruction of autoradiographic images by the disparity analysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Weizhao; Ginsberg, M. . Cerebral Vascular Disease Research Center); Young, T.Y. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative autoradiography is a powerful radio-isotopic-imaging method for neuroscientists to study local cerebral blood flow and glucose-metabolic rate at rest, in response to physiologic activation of the visual, auditory, somatosensory, and motor systems, and in pathologic conditions. Most autoradiographic studies analyze glucose utilization and blood flow in two-dimensional (2-D) coronal sections. With modern digital computer and image-processing techniques, a large number of closely spaced coronal sections can be stacked appropriately to form a three-dimensional (3-d) image. 3-D autoradiography allows investigators to observe cerebral sections and surfaces from any viewing angle. A fundamental problem in 3-D reconstruction is the alignment (registration) of the coronal sections. A new alignment method based on disparity analysis is presented which can overcome many of the difficulties encountered by previous methods. The disparity analysis method can deal with asymmetric, damaged, or tilted coronal sections under the same general framework, and it can be used to match coronal sections of different sizes and shapes. Experimental results on alignment and 3-D reconstruction are presented.

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of polygalacturonase during tracheary element differentiation in Zinnia elegans.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Jin; Endo, Satoshi; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2004-03-01

    Polygalacturonase (PG) is a cell wall-associated protein that degrades pectin. A ZePG1 cDNA encoding a putative PG was isolated from Zinnia elegens L. and a rabbit antibody specific to the ZePG1 protein was generated. The level of the ZePG1 protein was up-regulated when tracheary element differentiation was initiated. Using gold-labeled secondary antibodies for light and electron microscopy, ZePG1 protein was localized in cultured Zinnia cells. This protein was preferentially distributed on tracheary elements (TEs). At the subcellular level, the protein was localized on secondary wall thickenings, primary walls, Golgi bodies and vesicles. Thus, the putative role of the ZePG1 protein might be the degradation of pectic substances before lignification. Some non-TE cells also accumulated ZePG1 protein on primary walls, Golgi bodies and vesicles. The accumulation of ZePG1 protein on primary walls seems to be at the elongating tips of non-TE cells. In plants, ZePG1 protein was localized on the secondary wall thickenings of differentiating TEs and phloem regions. These results suggest that the expression of the ZePG1 protein is highly regulated both spatially and temporally during in vitro and in situ TE differentiation.

  8. Life history trait differentiation and local adaptation in invasive populations of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Meng; She, Deng-Ying; Zhang, Da-Yong; Liao, Wan-Jin

    2015-03-01

    Local adaptation has been suggested to play an important role in range expansion, particularly among invasive species. However, the extent to which local adaptation affects the success of an invasive species and the factors that contribute to local adaptation are still unclear. This study aimed to investigate a case of population divergence that may have contributed to the local adaptation of invasive populations of Ambrosia artemisiifolia in China. Common garden experiments in seven populations indicated clinal variations along latitudinal gradients, with plants from higher latitudes exhibiting earlier flowering and smaller sizes at flowering. In reciprocal transplant experiments, plants of a northern Beijing origin produced more seeds at their home site than plants of a southern Wuhan origin, and the Wuhan-origin plants had grown taller at flowering than the Beijing-origin plants in Wuhan, which is believed to facilitate pollen dispersal. These results suggest that plants of Beijing origin may be locally adapted through female fitness and plants from Wuhan possibly locally adapted through male fitness. Selection and path analysis suggested that the phenological and growth traits of both populations have been influenced by natural selection and that flowering time has played an important role through its direct and indirect effects on the relative fitness of each individual. This study evidences the life history trait differentiation and local adaptation during range expansion of invasive A. artemisiifolia in China.

  9. Intracellular localization of differentially regulated RNA-specific adenosine deaminase isoforms in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Hua; Nie, Yongzhan; Zhao, Qingchuan; Su, Yingjun; Pypaert, Marc; Su, Haili; Rabinovici, Reuven

    2003-11-14

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process that amplifies the repertoire of protein production. Recently, the induction of this process through up-regulation of the editing enzyme RNA-specific adenosine deaminase 1 (ADAR1) was documented during acute inflammation. Here we report that the inflammation-induced up-regulation of ADAR1 involves differential production and intracellular localization of several isoforms with distinct RNA-binding domains and localization signals. These include the full-length ADAR1 (p150) and two functionally active short isoforms (p80 and p110). ADAR1 p80 starts at a methionine 519 (M519) due to alternative splicing in exon 2, which deletes the putative nuclear localization signal, the Z-DNA binding domain, and the entire RNA binding domain I. ADAR1 p110 is the mouse homologue of the human ADAR1 110-kDa variant (M246), which retains the second half of the Z-DNA binding domain, all RNA binding domains, and the deaminase domain. Additional variations are found in the third RNA binding domain of ADAR1; they are differentially regulated during inflammation, generating isoforms with different levels of activities. Studies in several cell types transfected with ADAR1-EGFP chimeras demonstrated that the p150 and p80 variants are localized in the cytoplasm and nucleolus, respectively. In agreement with this observation, endogenous ADAR1 was identified in the cytoplasm and nucleolus of mouse splenocytes and HeLa cells. Since the ADAR1 variants are differentially regulated during acute inflammation, it suggests that the localization of these variants and of A-to-I RNA editing in the cytoplasm, nucleus, and nucleolus is intracellularly reorganized in response to inflammatory stimulation. PMID:12954622

  10. Fine-scale genetic differentiation of a temperate herb: relevance of local environments and demographic change

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yasuhiro; Kudoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The genetic structure of a plant species is shaped by environmental adaptation and demographic factors, but their relative contributions are still unknown. To examine the environment- or geography-related differentiation, we quantified genetic variation among 41 populations of a temperate herb, Arabidopsis halleri subsp. gemmifera (Brassicaceae). We analysed 19 microsatellite loci, which showed a significant population differentiation and a moderate within-population genetic diversity (global Gst = 0.42 and Hs = 0.19). Our structure analysis and phylogenetic network did not detect more than two genetic groups across the Japanese mainland but found fine-scale genetic differentiations and admixed patterns around the central area. Across the Japanese mainland, we found significant evidence for isolation-by-distance but not for isolation-by-environments. However, at least within the central area, the magnitude of genetic differentiation tended to increase with microhabitat dissimilarity under light conditions and water availability. Furthermore, most populations have been estimated to experience a recent decline in the effective population size, indicating a possibility of bottleneck effects on the pattern of genetic variation. These findings highlight a potential influence of the microhabitat conditions and demographic changes on the local-scale genetic differentiation among natural plant populations. PMID:25387749

  11. Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fedy, Bradley C

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of spatial genetic variation across a region can shape evolutionary dynamics and impact population persistence. Local population dynamics and among-population dispersal rates are strong drivers of this spatial genetic variation, yet for many species we lack a clear understanding of how these population processes interact in space to shape within-species genetic variation. Here, we used extensive genetic and demographic data from 10 subpopulations of greater sage-grouse to parameterize a simulated approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) model and (i) test for regional differences in population density and dispersal rates for greater sage-grouse subpopulations in Wyoming, and (ii) quantify how these differences impact subpopulation regional influence on genetic variation. We found a close match between observed and simulated data under our parameterized model and strong variation in density and dispersal rates across Wyoming. Sensitivity analyses suggested that changes in dispersal (via landscape resistance) had a greater influence on regional differentiation, whereas changes in density had a greater influence on mean diversity across all subpopulations. Local subpopulations, however, varied in their regional influence on genetic variation. Decreases in the size and dispersal rates of central populations with low overall and net immigration (i.e. population sources) had the greatest negative impact on genetic variation. Overall, our results provide insight into the interactions among demography, dispersal and genetic variation and highlight the potential of ABC to disentangle the complexity of regional population dynamics and project the genetic impact of changing conditions.

  12. Differential influences of local subpopulations on regional diversity and differentiation for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus).

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fedy, Bradley C

    2016-09-01

    The distribution of spatial genetic variation across a region can shape evolutionary dynamics and impact population persistence. Local population dynamics and among-population dispersal rates are strong drivers of this spatial genetic variation, yet for many species we lack a clear understanding of how these population processes interact in space to shape within-species genetic variation. Here, we used extensive genetic and demographic data from 10 subpopulations of greater sage-grouse to parameterize a simulated approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) model and (i) test for regional differences in population density and dispersal rates for greater sage-grouse subpopulations in Wyoming, and (ii) quantify how these differences impact subpopulation regional influence on genetic variation. We found a close match between observed and simulated data under our parameterized model and strong variation in density and dispersal rates across Wyoming. Sensitivity analyses suggested that changes in dispersal (via landscape resistance) had a greater influence on regional differentiation, whereas changes in density had a greater influence on mean diversity across all subpopulations. Local subpopulations, however, varied in their regional influence on genetic variation. Decreases in the size and dispersal rates of central populations with low overall and net immigration (i.e. population sources) had the greatest negative impact on genetic variation. Overall, our results provide insight into the interactions among demography, dispersal and genetic variation and highlight the potential of ABC to disentangle the complexity of regional population dynamics and project the genetic impact of changing conditions. PMID:27483196

  13. In situ autoradiographic detection of folylpolyglutamate synthetase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, D.J.; Milman, G.; Osborne, C.; Shane, B.

    1986-11-01

    The enzyme folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) catalyzes the conversion of folate (pteroylmonoglutamate) to the polyglutamate forms (pteroylpolyglutamates) that are required for folate retention by mammalian cells. A rapid in situ autoradiographic assay for FPGS was developed which is based on the folate cofactor requirement of thymidylate synthase. Chinese hamster AUX B1 mutant cells lack FPGS activity and are unable to accumulate folate. As a result, the conversion of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine to thymidine via the thymidylate synthase reaction is impaired in AUX B1 cells and no detectable label is incorporated into DNA. In contrast, FPGS in wild-type Chinese hamster CHO cells causes folate retention and enables the incorporation of (6-/sup 3/H)deoxyuridine into DNA. Incorporation may be detected by autoradiography of monolayer cultures or of colonies replica plated onto polyester discs. Introduction of Escherichia coli FPGS into AUX B1 cells restores the activity of the thymidylate synthase pathway and demonstrates that the E. coli FPGS enzyme can provide pteroylpolyglutamates which functions in mammalian cells.

  14. An autoradiographic study of neurotensin receptors in the human hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Najimi, Mohamed; Sarrieau, Alain; Kopp, Nicolas; Chigr, Fatiha

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to determine a detailed mapping of neurotensin (NT) in the human hypothalamus, the brain region involved in neuroendocrine control. For this, we investigated the presence and the distribution of neurotensin binding sites in the human hypothalamus, using an in vitro quantitative autoradiography technique and the selective radioligand monoiodo-Tyr3-neurotensin (2000Ci/mM). This study was performed on nine adult human postmortem hypothalami. We first determined the biochemical kinetics of the binding and found that binding affinity constants were of high affinity and do not differ significantly between all cases investigated. Our analysis of the autoradiographic distribution shows that NT binding sites are widely distributed throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the hypothalamus. However, the distribution of NT binding sites is not homogenous and regional variations exist. In general, the highest densities are mainly present in the anterior hypothalamic level, particularly in the preoptic region and the anterior boarding limit (i.e. the diagonal band of Broca). Important NT binding site densities are also present at the mediobasal hypothalamic level, particularly in the paraventricular, parafornical and dorsomedial nuclei. At the posterior level, relatively moderate densities could be observed in the mammillary complex subdivisions, apart from the supramammillary nucleus and the posterior hypothalamic area. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the occurrence of high concentrations of NT binding sites in various structures in many regions in the human adult hypothalamus, involved in the control of neuroendocrine and/or neurovegetative functions.

  15. Autoradiographic study of actinide sorption on climax stock granite

    SciTech Connect

    Beall, G.W.; O'Kelley, G.D.; Allard, B.

    1980-06-01

    An autoradiographic technique that employed an arrangement for placing in firm contact Polaroid sheet film, a scintillator screen, and the radioactive face of a specimen was applied to a study of the sorption of americium, neptunium, plutonium, and uranium on Climax Stock granite under varying conditions of pH and Eh. Qualitative agreement was found between the sorption of americium on crushed, pure minerals and on the minerals comprising the specimen of Climax Stock granite. The observations also supported a mechanism for reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV) and Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) by Fe(II)-containing minerals. There was no evidence for reduction of U(VI) by the Fe(II)-containing minerals, although the uranium, assumed to be present as UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, appeared to be the only actinide species to exhibit sorption by a simple, cation-exchange mechanism at particular mineral sites. Some implications of these results for nuclear waste isolation are discussed briefly.

  16. Autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptors in rat nasal glands.

    PubMed

    Van Megen, Y J; Teunissen, M J; Klaassen, A B; Rodrigues de Miranda, J F

    1988-01-01

    An in vitro method was developed for the biochemical and autoradiographic demonstration of low muscarinic receptor densities in peripheral tissue. Histological criteria point clearly to the necessity for fixation to preserve tissue quality. [3H]l-Quinuclidinylbenzilate bound specifically to a homogeneous class of binding sites in 0.5% glutardialdehyde-fixed cryostat sections (10 microns) of rat nasal glands with high affinity (Kd = 0.47 +/- 0.06 nM) and with a receptor density (Bmax) of 41 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein. This binding was linearly dependent on the thickness of the sections. Kinetic experiments resulted in a Kd value of 0.19 nM. Binding was stereoselectively inhibited by benzetimide enantiomers. Autoradiograms, generated after incubation with 0.6 nM [3H]l-quinuclidinylbenzilate and dipping in nuclear K2 emulsion, showed specific labelling of the glandular acini and excretory ducts. These in vitro observations provide conclusive evidence for the presence of acetylcholine receptors in the nasal glands of the rat. PMID:2450760

  17. Foxg1 localizes to mitochondria and coordinates cell differentiation and bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Pancrazi, Laura; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Colombaioni, Laura; Della Sala, Grazia; Testa, Giovanna; Olimpico, Francesco; Reyes, Aurelio; Zeviani, Massimo; Pozzan, Tullio; Costa, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box g1 (Foxg1) is a nuclear-cytosolic transcription factor essential for the forebrain development and involved in neurodevelopmental and cancer pathologies. Despite the importance of this protein, little is known about the modalities by which it exerts such a large number of cellular functions. Here we show that a fraction of Foxg1 is localized within the mitochondria in cell lines, primary neuronal or glial cell cultures, and in the mouse cortex. Import of Foxg1 in isolated mitochondria appears to be membrane potential-dependent. Amino acids (aa) 277–302 were identified as critical for mitochondrial localization. Overexpression of full-length Foxg1 enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and promoted mitochondrial fission and mitosis. Conversely, overexpression of the C-term Foxg1 (aa 272–481), which is selectively localized in the mitochondrial matrix, enhanced organelle fusion and promoted the early phase of neuronal differentiation. These findings suggest that the different subcellular localizations of Foxg1 control the machinery that brings about cell differentiation, replication, and bioenergetics, possibly linking mitochondrial functions to embryonic development and pathological conditions. PMID:26508630

  18. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Nordemar, D.; Öberg, J.; Brosjö, O.; Skorpil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal) pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS. PMID:26819567

  19. Local Discontinuous Galerkin Methods for Partial Differential Equations with Higher Order Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jue; Shu, Chi-Wang; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we review the existing and develop new continuous Galerkin methods for solving time dependent partial differential equations with higher order derivatives in one and multiple space dimensions. We review local discontinuous Galerkin methods for convection diffusion equations involving second derivatives and for KdV type equations involving third derivatives. We then develop new local discontinuous Galerkin methods for the time dependent bi-harmonic type equations involving fourth derivatives, and partial differential equations involving fifth derivatives. For these new methods we present correct interface numerical fluxes and prove L(exp 2) stability for general nonlinear problems. Preliminary numerical examples are shown to illustrate these methods. Finally, we present new results on a post-processing technique, originally designed for methods with good negative-order error estimates, on the local discontinuous Galerkin methods applied to equations with higher derivatives. Numerical experiments show that this technique works as well for the new higher derivative cases, in effectively doubling the rate of convergence with negligible additional computational cost, for linear as well as some nonlinear problems, with a local uniform mesh.

  20. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  1. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  2. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development.

    PubMed

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  3. Differential Spatial Expression and Subcellular Localization of CtBP Family Members in Rodent Brain

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Lazarevic, Vesna; Altrock, Wilko D.; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Gundelfinger, Eckart D.; Fejtova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are well-characterized nuclear transcriptional co-regulators. In addition, cytoplasmic functions were discovered for these ubiquitously expressed proteins. These include the involvement of the isoform CtBP1-S/BARS50 in cellular membrane-trafficking processes and a role of the isoform RIBEYE as molecular scaffolds in ribbons, the presynaptic specializations of sensory synapses. CtBPs were suggested to regulate neuronal differentiation and they were implied in the control of gene expression during epileptogenesis. However, the expression patterns of CtBP family members in specific brain areas and their subcellular localizations in neurons in situ are largely unknown. Here, we performed comprehensive assessment of the expression of CtBP1 and CtBP2 in mouse brain at the microscopic and the ultra-structural levels using specific antibodies. We quantified and compared expression levels of both CtBPs in biochemically isolated brain fractions containing cellular nuclei or synaptic compartment. Our study demonstrates differential regional and subcellular expression patterns for the two CtBP family members in brain and reveals a previously unknown synaptic localization for CtBP2 in particular brain regions. Finally, we propose a mechanism of differential synapto-nuclear targeting of its splice variants CtBP2-S and CtBP2-L in neurons. PMID:22745816

  4. Differential spatial expression and subcellular localization of CtBP family members in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Hübler, Diana; Rankovic, Marija; Richter, Karin; Lazarevic, Vesna; Altrock, Wilko D; Fischer, Klaus-Dieter; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Fejtova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    C-terminal binding proteins (CtBPs) are well-characterized nuclear transcriptional co-regulators. In addition, cytoplasmic functions were discovered for these ubiquitously expressed proteins. These include the involvement of the isoform CtBP1-S/BARS50 in cellular membrane-trafficking processes and a role of the isoform RIBEYE as molecular scaffolds in ribbons, the presynaptic specializations of sensory synapses. CtBPs were suggested to regulate neuronal differentiation and they were implied in the control of gene expression during epileptogenesis. However, the expression patterns of CtBP family members in specific brain areas and their subcellular localizations in neurons in situ are largely unknown. Here, we performed comprehensive assessment of the expression of CtBP1 and CtBP2 in mouse brain at the microscopic and the ultra-structural levels using specific antibodies. We quantified and compared expression levels of both CtBPs in biochemically isolated brain fractions containing cellular nuclei or synaptic compartment. Our study demonstrates differential regional and subcellular expression patterns for the two CtBP family members in brain and reveals a previously unknown synaptic localization for CtBP2 in particular brain regions. Finally, we propose a mechanism of differential synapto-nuclear targeting of its splice variants CtBP2-S and CtBP2-L in neurons.

  5. Co-localization of growth QTL with differentially expressed candidate genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Kocmarek, Andrea L; Ferguson, Moira M; Danzmann, Roy G

    2015-09-01

    We tested whether genes differentially expressed between large and small rainbow trout co-localized with familial QTL regions for body size. Eleven chromosomes, known from previous work to house QTL for weight and length in rainbow trout, were examined for QTL in half-sibling families produced in September (1 XY male and 1 XX neomale) and December (1 XY male). In previous studies, we identified 108 candidate genes for growth expressed in the liver and white muscle in a subset of the fish used in this study. These gene sequences were BLASTN aligned against the rainbow trout and stickleback genomes to determine their location (rainbow trout) and inferred location based on synteny with the stickleback genome. Across the progeny of all three males used in the study, 63.9% of the genes with differential expression appear to co-localize with the QTL regions on 6 of the 11 chromosomes tested in these males. Genes that co-localized with QTL in the mixed-sex offspring of the two XY males primarily showed up-regulation in the muscle of large fish and were related to muscle growth, metabolism, and the stress response.

  6. Local polynomial chaos expansion for linear differential equations with high dimensional random inputs

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yi; Jakeman, John; Gittelson, Claude; Xiu, Dongbin

    2015-01-08

    In this paper we present a localized polynomial chaos expansion for partial differential equations (PDE) with random inputs. In particular, we focus on time independent linear stochastic problems with high dimensional random inputs, where the traditional polynomial chaos methods, and most of the existing methods, incur prohibitively high simulation cost. Furthermore, the local polynomial chaos method employs a domain decomposition technique to approximate the stochastic solution locally. In each subdomain, a subdomain problem is solved independently and, more importantly, in a much lower dimensional random space. In a postprocesing stage, accurate samples of the original stochastic problems are obtained from the samples of the local solutions by enforcing the correct stochastic structure of the random inputs and the coupling conditions at the interfaces of the subdomains. Overall, the method is able to solve stochastic PDEs in very large dimensions by solving a collection of low dimensional local problems and can be highly efficient. In our paper we present the general mathematical framework of the methodology and use numerical examples to demonstrate the properties of the method.

  7. Excitatory Projection Neuron Subtypes Differentially Control the Distribution of Local Inhibitory Interneurons in the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lodato, Simona; Rouaux, Caroline; Quast, Kathleen B.; Jantrachotechatchawan, Chanati; Studer, Michèle; Hensch, Takao K.; Arlotta, Paola

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian cerebral cortex, the developmental events governing the integration of excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons into balanced local circuitry are poorly understood. We report that different subtypes of projection neurons uniquely and differentially determine the laminar distribution of cortical interneurons. We find that in Fezf2−/− cortex, the exclusive absence of subcerebral projection neurons and their replacement by callosal projection neurons cause distinctly abnormal lamination of interneurons and altered GABAergic inhibition. In addition, experimental generation of either corticofugal neurons or callosal neurons below the cortex is sufficient to recruit cortical interneurons to these ectopic locations. Strikingly, the identity of the projection neurons generated, rather than strictly their birthdate, determines the specific types of interneurons recruited. These data demonstrate that in the neocortex individual populations of projection neurons cell-extrinsically control the laminar fate of interneurons and the assembly of local inhibitory circuitry. PMID:21338885

  8. AUTORADIOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS ON AGAR PLATES OF ANTIGENS FROM SUB CELLULAR FRACTIONS OF RAT LIVER SLICES

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, W. S.; Perlmann, P.; Hultin, T.

    1961-01-01

    Slices of rat livers were incubated with 14C amino acids, homogenized, and subjected to differential centrifugation. The microsomes were further extracted with the non-ionic detergent Lubrol W and with EDTA. These extracts and the microsome free "cell sap," freed from the pH 5 precipitable fraction, were subsequently reacted with antisera using agar diffusion techniques. The antisera employed were obtained from rabbits injected with different subcellular fractions of rat liver or with rat serum proteins. When the agar diffusion plates were autoradiographed it was found that some of the precipitates were radioactive while others were not. Control experiments indicated that this labeling was due to the specific incorporation of 14C amino acids into various rat liver antigens during incubation of the slices rather than to a non-specific adsorption of radioactive material to the immunological precipitates. When the slices were incubated with the isotope for up to 30 minutes, the serum proteins which could be extracted from the microsomes with the detergent were strongly labeled, as were a number of additional microsomal antigens of unknown significance. In contrast, the serum proteins present in the cell sap were only weakly labeled. Most of the typical cell sap proteins, both those precipitable and those soluble at pH 5, seemed to remain unlabeled. No consistently reproducible results were obtained with the EDTA extracts of the ribosomal residues remaining after extraction of the microsomes with the detergent. Incubation of the liver slices for longer periods (up to 120 minutes) led to a strong labeling of the serum proteins in the cell sap as well as to the appearance of labeling in additional cell sap proteins. The results are discussed with regard to the subcellular site of synthesis and the metabolism of the different antigens. PMID:13772607

  9. The consequences of dominance and gene flow for local adaptation and differentiation at two linked loci

    PubMed Central

    Akerman, Ada; Bürger, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    For a subdivided population the consequences of dominance and gene flow for the maintenance of multilocus polymorphism, local adaptation, and differentiation are investigated. The dispersing population inhabits two demes in which selection acts in opposite direction. Fitness is determined additively by two linked diallelic loci with arbitrary intermediate dominance (no over- or underdominance). For weak as well as strong migration, the equilibrium structure is derived. As a special case, a continuous-time continent–island model (CI model) is analyzed, with one-way migration from the continent to the island. For this CI model, the equilibrium and stability configuration is obtained explicitly for weak migration, for strong migration, for independent loci, and for complete linkage. For independent loci, the possible bifurcation patterns are derived as functions of the migration rate. These patterns depend strongly on the degree of dominance. The effects of dominance, linkage, and migration on the amount of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and the degree of local adaptation are explored. Explicit formulas are obtained for D   (=x1x4−x2x3) and r2 (the squared correlation in allelic state). They demonstrate that dominant island alleles increase D and decrease r2. Local adaptation is elevated by dominance of the locally adaptive alleles. The effective migration rate at a linked neutral locus is calculated. If advantageous alleles are dominant, it is decreased only slightly below the actual migration rate. For a quantitative trait that is determined by two additive loci, the influence of dominance on measures of differentiation is studied. Explicit expressions for QST and two types of FST at equilibrium are deduced and their relation is discussed. PMID:24793653

  10. Local environment but not genetic differentiation influences biparental care in ten plover populations.

    PubMed

    Vincze, Orsolya; Székely, Tamás; Küpper, Clemens; Alrashidi, Monif; Amat, Juan A; Ticó, Araceli Argüelles; Burgas, Daniel; Burke, Terry; Cavitt, John; Figuerola, Jordi; Shobrak, Mohammed; Montalvo, Tomas; Kosztolányi, András

    2013-01-01

    Social behaviours are highly variable between species, populations and individuals. However, it is contentious whether behavioural variations are primarily moulded by the environment, caused by genetic differences, or a combination of both. Here we establish that biparental care, a complex social behaviour that involves rearing of young by both parents, differs between closely related populations, and then test two potential sources of variation in parental behaviour between populations: ambient environment and genetic differentiation. We use 2904 hours behavioural data from 10 geographically distinct Kentish (Charadrius alexandrinus) and snowy plover (C. nivosus) populations in America, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa to test these two sources of behavioural variation. We show that local ambient temperature has a significant influence on parental care: with extreme heat (above 40 °C) total incubation (i.e. % of time the male or female incubated the nest) increased, and female share (% female share of incubation) decreased. By contrast, neither genetic differences between populations, nor geographic distances predicted total incubation or female's share of incubation. These results suggest that the local environment has a stronger influence on a social behaviour than genetic differentiation, at least between populations of closely related species.

  11. Charcoal tattoo localization for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence in the central compartment of the neck.

    PubMed

    Soprani, F; Bondi, F; Puccetti, M; Armaroli, V

    2012-04-01

    Recurrence of differentiated thyroid cancer can often require further surgical options. Reoperations may carry significant risk of surgical complications; additionally, as the anatomy is subverted, there is the possibility of leaving residual neoplasm. In order to avoid such problems during reoperation for differentiated thyroid cancer recurrence, we have introduced the technique of preoperative ultrasound-guided tattooing localization of the lymphatic structure to be removed with a 4% solution of active charcoal. Using ultrasound guidance, the lesion is identified and 0.5-2 ml of colloidal charcoal is injected near the lesion. The extraction of the needle is accompanied by injection at constant pressure of other charcoal as to leave a trace of colouring along the path of the needle up to the skin. The preoperative injection was well tolerated in all cases. In the last 5 years, we have used this technique in 13 patients with suspected recurrence in the central compartment (all from papillary carcinomas). Postoperative ultrasound and histological examination confirmed the removal of the lesion in all patients; in one case, the lesion was a parathyroid cyst. Complications were observed in two of 13 (15.4%) cases (one transitory hypoparathyroidism, and one transitory vocal cord paresis). Considering our experience, charcoal tattoo localization can be considered a safe, low-cost technique that is extremely useful for facilitating surgical procedures, and reduces the risk of iatrogenic damage.

  12. Nucleosomal occupancy changes locally over key regulatory regions during cell differentiation and reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    West, Jason A.; Cook, April; Alver, Burak H.; Stadtfeld, Matthias; Deaton, Aimee M.; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Park, Peter J.; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Kingston, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin structure determines DNA accessibility. We compare nucleosome occupancy in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and differentiated cell types using MNase-seq. To address variability inherent in this technique, we developed a bioinformatic approach to identify regions of difference (RoD) in nucleosome occupancy between pluripotent and somatic cells. Surprisingly, most chromatin remains unchanged; a majority of rearrangements appear to affect a single nucleosome. RoDs are enriched at genes and regulatory elements, including enhancers associated with pluripotency and differentiation. RoDs co-localize with binding sites of key developmental regulators, including the reprogramming factors Klf4, Oct4/Sox2 and c-Myc. Nucleosomal landscapes in ESC enhancers are extensively altered, exhibiting lower nucleosome occupancy in pluripotent cells than in somatic cells. Most changes are reset during reprogramming. We conclude that changes in nucleosome occupancy are a hallmark of cell differentiation and reprogramming and likely identify regulatory regions essential for these processes. PMID:25158628

  13. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  14. Complementary effect of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintains differentiation between locally adapted fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plath, Martin; Riesch, Rüdiger; Oranth, Alexandra; Dzienko, Justina; Karau, Nora; Schießl, Angela; Stadler, Stefan; Wigh, Adriana; Zimmer, Claudia; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Schlupp, Ingo; Tobler, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Adaptation to ecologically heterogeneous environments can drive speciation. But what mechanisms maintain reproductive isolation among locally adapted populations? Using poeciliid fishes in a system with naturally occurring toxic hydrogen sulfide, we show that (a) fish from non-sulfidic sites ( Poecilia mexicana) show high mortality (95 %) after 24 h when exposed to the toxicant, while locally adapted fish from sulfidic sites ( Poecilia sulphuraria) experience low mortality (13 %) when transferred to non-sulfidic water. (b) Mate choice tests revealed that P. mexicana females exhibit a preference for conspecific males in non-sulfidic water, but not in sulfidic water, whereas P. sulphuraria females never showed a preference. Increased costs of mate choice in sulfidic, hypoxic water, and the lack of selection for reinforcement due to the low survival of P. mexicana may explain the absence of a preference in P. sulphuraria females. Taken together, our study may be the first to demonstrate independent—but complementary—effects of natural and sexual selection against immigrants maintaining differentiation between locally adapted fish populations.

  15. Differential expression and localization of TIMP-1 and TIMP-4 in human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Groft, L L; Muzik, H; Rewcastle, N B; Johnston, R N; Knäuper, V; Lafleur, M A; Forsyth, P A; Edwards, D R

    2001-01-01

    Studies have suggested that an imbalance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) may contribute to the malignant phenotype of gliomas. In this study, we have undertaken a detailed analysis of expression of the TIMP family in normal human brain and malignant gliomas at both the mRNA and protein level. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analyses of total RNA from surgical tumour specimens revealed unique expression patterns for the 4 members of the TIMP family, with TIMP-1 and -4 showing positive and negative correlations, respectively, with glioma malignancy. By RT-PCR, TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 expression did not change with tumour grade. In situ hybridization localized TIMP-1 to glial tumour cells and also to the surrounding tumour vasculature. TIMP-4 transcripts were predominantly localized to tumour cells, though minor expression was found in vessels. Recombinant TIMP-4 reduced invasion of U251 glioma cells through Matrigel, and U87 clones overexpressing TIMP-4 showed reduced invasive capacity in vitro. TIMP-4, but not TIMP-1, blocked Membrane Type-1-MMP-mediated progelatinase-A (MMP-2) activation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The differential expression and localization of individual TIMPs may contribute to the pathophysiology of human malignant gliomas, particularly with regard to tumour vascularization. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437402

  16. Magnetic Exchange Couplings in Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on Differential Local Spin Rotations.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajendra P; Phillips, Jordan J; Peralta, Juan E

    2016-04-12

    We analyze the performance of a new method for the calculation of magnetic exchange coupling parameters for the particular case of heterodinuclear transition metals complexes of Cu, Ni, and V. This method is based on a generalized perturbative approach which uses differential local spin rotations via formal Lagrange multipiers (Phillips, J. J.; Peralta, J. E. J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 174115). The reliability of the calculated couplings has been assessed by comparing with results from traditional energy differences with different density functional approximations and with experimental values. Our results show that this method to calculate magnetic exchange couplings can be reliably used for heteronuclear transition metal complexes, and at the same time, that it is independent from the different mapping schemes used in energy difference methods. PMID:26953521

  17. Expression and localization of epithelial stem cell and differentiation markers in equine skin, eye and hoof

    PubMed Central

    Linardi, Renata L.; Megee, Susan O.; Mainardi, Sarah R.; Senoo, Makoto; Galantino-Homer, Hannah L.

    2015-01-01

    Background The limited characterization of equine skin, eye and hoof epithelial stem cell (ESC) and differentiation markers impedes the investigation of the physiology and pathophysiology of these tissues. Hypothesis/Objectives To characterize ESC and differentiation marker expression in epithelial tissues of the equine eye, haired skin and hoof capsule. Methods Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting were utilized to detect expression and tissue localization of keratin (K) isoforms K3, K10, K14, and K124, the transcription factor p63 (a marker of ESCs) and phosphorylated p63 (pp63, a marker of ESC to transit-amplifying (TA) cell transition) in epithelial tissues of the foot (haired skin, hoof coronet and hoof lamellae) and the eye (limbus and cornea). Results K14 expression was restricted to the basal layer of epidermal lamellae, and to basal and adjacent suprabasal layers of the haired skin, coronet and corneal limbus. Coronary and lamellar epidermis was negative for both K3 and K10, which were expressed in the cornea/limbus epithelium and haired skin epidermis, respectively. Variable expression of p63 with relatively low to high levels of phosphorylation was detected in individual basal and suprabasal cells of all epithelial tissues examined. Conclusions This is the first report of the characterization of tissue-specific keratin marker expression and the localization of putative epithelial progenitor cell populations, including ESCs (high p63 expression with low pp63 levels) and TA cells (high expression of both p63 and pp63), in the horse. These results will aid further investigation of epidermal and corneal epithelial biology and regenerative therapies in horses. PMID:25963063

  18. Local differentiation amidst extensive allele sharing in Oryza nivara and O. rufipogon

    PubMed Central

    Banaticla-Hilario, Maria Celeste N; van den Berg, Ronald G; Hamilton, Nigel Ruaraidh Sackville; McNally, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation patterns within and between species may change along geographic gradients and at different spatial scales. This was revealed by microsatellite data at 29 loci obtained from 119 accessions of three Oryza series Sativae species in Asia Pacific: Oryza nivara Sharma and Shastry, O. rufipogon Griff., and O. meridionalis Ng. Genetic similarities between O. nivara and O. rufipogon across their distribution are evident in the clustering and ordination results and in the large proportion of shared alleles between these taxa. However, local-level species separation is recognized by Bayesian clustering and neighbor-joining analyses. At the regional scale, the two species seem more differentiated in South Asia than in Southeast Asia as revealed by FST analysis. The presence of strong gene flow barriers in smaller spatial units is also suggested in the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) results where 64% of the genetic variation is contained among populations (as compared to 26% within populations and 10% among species). Oryza nivara (HE = 0.67) exhibits slightly lower diversity and greater population differentiation than O. rufipogon (HE = 0.70). Bayesian inference identified four, and at a finer structural level eight, genetically distinct population groups that correspond to geographic populations within the three taxa. Oryza meridionalis and the Nepalese O. nivara seemed diverged from all the population groups of the series, whereas the Australasian O. rufipogon appeared distinct from the rest of the species. PMID:24101993

  19. Local Differentiation of Sugar Donor Specificity of Flavonoid Glycosyltransferase in Lamiales[W

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Akio; Horikawa, Manabu; Fukui, Yuko; Fukuchi-Mizutani, Masako; Iuchi-Okada, Asako; Ishiguro, Masaji; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Toru; Ono, Eiichiro

    2009-01-01

    Flavonoids are most commonly conjugated with various sugar moieties by UDP-sugar:glycosyltransferases (UGTs) in a lineage-specific manner. Generally, the phylogenetics and regiospecificity of flavonoid UGTs are correlated, indicating that the regiospecificity of UGT differentiated prior to speciation. By contrast, it is unclear how the sugar donor specificity of UGTs evolved. Here, we report the biochemical, homology-modeled, and phylogenetic characterization of flavonoid 7-O-glucuronosyltransferases (F7GAT), which is responsible for producing specialized metabolites in Lamiales plants. All of the Lamiales F7GATs were found to be members of the UGT88-related cluster and specifically used UDP-glucuronic acid (UDPGA). We identified an Arg residue that is specifically conserved in the PSPG box in the Lamiales F7GATs. Substitution of this Arg with Trp was sufficient to convert the sugar donor specificity of the Lamiales F7GATs from UDPGA to UDP-glucose. Homology modeling of the Lamiales F7GAT suggested that the Arg residue plays a critical role in the specific recognition of anionic carboxylate of the glucuronic acid moiety of UDPGA with its cationic guanidinium moiety. These results support the hypothesis that differentiation of sugar donor specificity of UGTs occurred locally, in specific plant lineages, after establishment of general regiospecificity for the sugar acceptor. Thus, the plasticity of sugar donor specificity explains, in part, the extraordinary structural diversification of phytochemicals. PMID:19454730

  20. Genomic Analysis of Differentiation between Soil Types Reveals Candidate Genes for Local Adaptation in Arabidopsis lyrata

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Thomas L.; von Wettberg, Eric J.; Nuzhdin, Sergey V.

    2008-01-01

    Serpentine soil, which is naturally high in heavy metal content and has low calcium to magnesium ratios, comprises a difficult environment for most plants. An impressive number of species are endemic to serpentine, and a wide range of non-endemic plant taxa have been shown to be locally adapted to these soils. Locating genomic polymorphisms which are differentiated between serpentine and non-serpentine populations would provide candidate loci for serpentine adaptation. We have used the Arabidopsis thaliana tiling array, which has 2.85 million probes throughout the genome, to measure genetic differentiation between populations of Arabidopsis lyrata growing on granitic soils and those growing on serpentinic soils. The significant overrepresentation of genes involved in ion transport and other functions provides a starting point for investigating the molecular basis of adaptation to soil ion content, water retention, and other ecologically and economically important variables. One gene in particular, calcium-exchanger 7, appears to be an excellent candidate gene for adaptation to low Ca∶Mg ratio in A. lyrata. PMID:18784841

  1. Autoradiographic disposition of (1-methyl-/sup 14/C)- and (2-/sup 14/C)caffeine in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lachance, M.P.; Marlowe, C.; Waddell, W.J.

    1983-11-01

    Male, C57B1/6J mice received either (1-methyl-14C)caffeine or (2-14C)caffeine via the tail vein at a dose of 0.7 or 11 mg/kg, respectively. At 0.1, 0.33, 1, 3, 9, and 24 hr after treatment, the mice were anesthetized with ether and frozen by immersion in dry ice/hexane. The mice were processed for whole-body autoradiography by the Ullberg technique; this procedure does not allow thawing or contact with solvents. All autoradiographs revealed some retention of radioactivity at early time intervals in the lacrimal glands, seminal vesicle fluid, nasal and olfactory epithelium, and retinal melanocytes. The remaining portion of the animal was densitometrically uniform except for the lower levels noted in the CNS and adipose tissues. Excretion of radioactivity by the liver and kidneys seems to be the major routes of elimination. Localization in the liver at late time intervals was confined principally to the centrilobular region. Late sites of retention, observed only after (1-methyl-14C)caffeine administration, included the pancreas, minor and major salivary glands, splenic red pulp, thymal cortex, bone marrow, and gastrointestinal epithelium. Sites of localization present in both studies included the olfactory epithelium, lacrimal glands, hair follicles, and retinal melanocytes. Further studies are needed to determine whether the localization at these various sites is due to metabolic degradation, active transport, or possibly a specific receptor interaction.

  2. Differential localization of 5- and 15-lipoxygenases to the nuclear envelope in RAW macrophages.

    PubMed

    Christmas, P; Fox, J W; Ursino, S R; Soberman, R J

    1999-09-01

    Leukotriene formation is initiated in myeloid cells by an increase in intracellular calcium and translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytoplasm to the nuclear envelope where it can utilize arachidonic acid. Monocyte- macrophages and eosinophils also express 15-lipoxygenase, which converts arachidonic acid to 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Enhanced green fluorescent 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and 15-lipoxygenase (15-LO) fusion proteins were expressed in the cytoplasm of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Only 5-lipoxygenase translocated to the nuclear envelope after cell stimulation, suggesting that differential subcellular compartmentalization can regulate the generation of leukotrienes versus 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in cells that possess both lipoxygenases. A series of truncation mutants of 5-LO were created to identify putative targeting domains; none of these mutants localized to the nuclear envelope. The lack of targeting of 15-LO was then exploited to search for specific targeting motifs in 5-LO, by creating 5-LO/15-LO chimeric molecules. The only chimera that could sustain nuclear envelope translocation was one which involved replacement of the N-terminal 237 amino acids with the corresponding segment of 15-LO. Significantly, no discrete targeting domain could be identified in 5-LO, suggesting that sequences throughout the molecule are required for nuclear envelope localization.

  3. [Autoradiographic investigations on postnatal proliferative activity of the telencephalic and diencephalic matrix-zones in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), with special references to the olfactory organ (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Kranz, D

    1981-01-01

    The localization and proliferative activity of the matrix-zones has been investigated in the telencephalon and in the diencephalon of 21 axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) by means of autoradiographs, after injection of tritiated thymidine at different stages of the postnatal life. There are no previous detailed autoradiographical reports on postnatal brain development in the axolotl. Matrix-zones (i.e. ventricular and subventricular zone) exist in the dorsal part and in the ventral part of the telencephalon, we have found these also in the diencephalon in the wall of the preoptic recessus and ventrally of the habenula. The quantitative part of this study indicates high values of the labeling-index in the early postnatal stages. Then, the labeling-index decreases, but also in 3 years old specimens labeled cells were observed in the matrix-zones of the telencephalon; therefore a few of proliferative capacity remains in the central nervous system of adult axolotls. Labeled cells were also found in the olfactory organ of early postnatal and adult axolotls; these are neuroblasts which have relevance for the regeneration of the forebrain.

  4. Localized committed differentiation of neural stem cells based on the topographical regulation effects of TiO2 nanostructured ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xiaoning; Wang, Shu; Guo, Weibo; Ji, Shaozheng; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Deshuai; Zhang, Xiaodi; Zhou, Jin; Tang, Wei; Wang, Changyong; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a porous-flat TiO2 micropattern was fabricated with flat and nanoporous TiO2 ceramics for investigating the effect of topography on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. This finding demonstrates that localized committed differentiation could be achieved in one system by integrating materials with different topographies.In this study, a porous-flat TiO2 micropattern was fabricated with flat and nanoporous TiO2 ceramics for investigating the effect of topography on neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation. This finding demonstrates that localized committed differentiation could be achieved in one system by integrating materials with different topographies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01874b

  5. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease. PMID:27695453

  6. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease.

  7. Differential expression, distinct localization and opposite effect on Golgi structure and cell differentiation by a novel splice variant of human PRMT5.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Muhammad; Zhang, Manli; Litchfield, David; Wang, Lisheng; Kung, Sam; Xie, Jiuyong

    2015-10-01

    Alternative splicing contributes greatly to the proteomic diversity of metazoans. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) methylates arginines of Golgi components and other factors exerting diverse effects on cell growth/differentiation, but the underlying molecular basis for its subcellular distribution and diverse roles has not been fully understood. Here we show the detailed properties of an evolutionarily emerged splice variant of human PRMT5 (PRMT5S) that is distinct from the original isoform (PRMT5L). The isoforms are differentially expressed among mammalian cells and tissues. The PRMT5S is distributed all over the cell but PRMT5L mainly colocalizes with Giantin, a Golgi marker. PRMT5 knockdown led to an enlarged Giantin pattern, which was prevented by the expression of either isoform. Rescuing PRMT5S also increased the percentage of cells with an interphase Giantin pattern compacted at one end of the nucleus, consistent with its cell cycle-arresting effect, while rescuing PRMT5L increased that of the mitotic Giantin patterns of dynamically fragmented structures. Moreover, the isoforms are differentially expressed during neuronal or dendritic cell differentiation, and their ectopic expression showed an opposite effect on dendritic cell differentiation. Furthermore, besides their differential regulation of gene expression, both isoforms also similarly regulate over a thousand genes particularly those involved in apoptosis and differentiation. Taking these properties together, we propose that their differential expression and subcellular localization contribute to spatial and temporal regulation of arginine methylation and gene expression to exert different effects. The novel PRMT5S likely contributes to the observed diverse effects of PRMT5 in cells. PMID:26151339

  8. Differential expression, distinct localization and opposite effect on Golgi structure and cell differentiation by a novel splice variant of human PRMT5.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Muhammad; Zhang, Manli; Litchfield, David; Wang, Lisheng; Kung, Sam; Xie, Jiuyong

    2015-10-01

    Alternative splicing contributes greatly to the proteomic diversity of metazoans. Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) methylates arginines of Golgi components and other factors exerting diverse effects on cell growth/differentiation, but the underlying molecular basis for its subcellular distribution and diverse roles has not been fully understood. Here we show the detailed properties of an evolutionarily emerged splice variant of human PRMT5 (PRMT5S) that is distinct from the original isoform (PRMT5L). The isoforms are differentially expressed among mammalian cells and tissues. The PRMT5S is distributed all over the cell but PRMT5L mainly colocalizes with Giantin, a Golgi marker. PRMT5 knockdown led to an enlarged Giantin pattern, which was prevented by the expression of either isoform. Rescuing PRMT5S also increased the percentage of cells with an interphase Giantin pattern compacted at one end of the nucleus, consistent with its cell cycle-arresting effect, while rescuing PRMT5L increased that of the mitotic Giantin patterns of dynamically fragmented structures. Moreover, the isoforms are differentially expressed during neuronal or dendritic cell differentiation, and their ectopic expression showed an opposite effect on dendritic cell differentiation. Furthermore, besides their differential regulation of gene expression, both isoforms also similarly regulate over a thousand genes particularly those involved in apoptosis and differentiation. Taking these properties together, we propose that their differential expression and subcellular localization contribute to spatial and temporal regulation of arginine methylation and gene expression to exert different effects. The novel PRMT5S likely contributes to the observed diverse effects of PRMT5 in cells.

  9. Monocytes become macrophages; they do not become microglia: a light and electron microscopic autoradiographic study using 125-iododeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Schelper, R.L.; Adrian, E.K. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This light and electron microscopic autoradiographic study of stab injuries in the spinal cord of mice evaluated the ultrastructural characteristics of cells labeled by incorporation of the thymidine analogue /sup 125/I-5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine (I-UdR), injected one day prior to injury. I-UdR was used instead of tritiated thymidine (H-TdR) because H-TdR can be reutilized and is therefore not a suitable pulse label for long-term studies of cell migration. Using serial thick and thin sections for autoradiography 614 labeled cells were identified. Labeled cells included 545 monocytes/macrophages, 50 lymphocytes, 17 pericytes, one endothelial cell, and one arachnoid cell. No labeled cell had the morphology of microglia. We concluded that macrophages in stab injuries of the spinal cord of mice are derived from blood monocytes. Blood-derived lymphocytes are also involved in the reaction to spinal cord stab injury. Microglia are not blood-derived and are not seen as a transitional form in the differentiation of monocytes to macrophages.

  10. Acoustic flight tests of rotorcraft noise-abatement approaches using local differential GPS guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Robert T. N.; Hindson, William S.; Mueller, Arnold W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the test design, instrumentation set-up, data acquisition, and the results of an acoustic flight experiment to study how noise due to blade-vortex interaction (BVI) may be alleviated. The flight experiment was conducted using the NASA/Army Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) research helicopter. A Local Differential Global Positioning System (LDGPS) was used for precision navigation and cockpit display guidance. A laser-based rotor state measurement system on board the aircraft was used to measure the main rotor tip-path-plane angle-of-attack. Tests were performed at Crows Landing Airfield in northern California with an array of microphones similar to that used in the standard ICAO/FAA noise certification test. The methodology used in the design of a RASCAL-specific, multi-segment, decelerating approach profile for BVI noise abatement is described, and the flight data pertaining to the flight technical errors and the acoustic data for assessing the noise reduction effectiveness are reported.

  11. Autoradiographic measurement of relative changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.R.

    1986-05-01

    An autoradiographic method is described for detecting changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons of rats using (3H)difluoromethylornithine. An increase in binding to neurons was seen at 12 h and 1 day after crushing the postganglionic nerves. Binding returned to control values between 3 and 5 days postoperation. The patterns found using this method were in general agreement with prior reports of enzymatic changes in whole ganglia.

  12. Early differential sensitivity of evoked-potentials to local and global shape during the perception of three-dimensional objects.

    PubMed

    Leek, E Charles; Roberts, Mark; Oliver, Zoe J; Cristino, Filipe; Pegna, Alan J

    2016-08-01

    Here we investigated the time course underlying differential processing of local and global shape information during the perception of complex three-dimensional (3D) objects. Observers made shape matching judgments about pairs of sequentially presented multi-part novel objects. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to measure perceptual sensitivity to 3D shape differences in terms of local part structure and global shape configuration - based on predictions derived from hierarchical structural description models of object recognition. There were three types of different object trials in which stimulus pairs (1) shared local parts but differed in global shape configuration; (2) contained different local parts but shared global configuration or (3) shared neither local parts nor global configuration. Analyses of the ERP data showed differential amplitude modulation as a function of shape similarity as early as the N1 component between 146-215ms post-stimulus onset. These negative amplitude deflections were more similar between objects sharing global shape configuration than local part structure. Differentiation among all stimulus types was reflected in N2 amplitude modulations between 276-330ms. sLORETA inverse solutions showed stronger involvement of left occipitotemporal areas during the N1 for object discrimination weighted towards local part structure. The results suggest that the perception of 3D object shape involves parallel processing of information at local and global scales. This processing is characterised by relatively slow derivation of 'fine-grained' local shape structure, and fast derivation of 'coarse-grained' global shape configuration. We propose that the rapid early derivation of global shape attributes underlies the observed patterns of N1 amplitude modulations.

  13. Early differential sensitivity of evoked-potentials to local and global shape during the perception of three-dimensional objects.

    PubMed

    Leek, E Charles; Roberts, Mark; Oliver, Zoe J; Cristino, Filipe; Pegna, Alan J

    2016-08-01

    Here we investigated the time course underlying differential processing of local and global shape information during the perception of complex three-dimensional (3D) objects. Observers made shape matching judgments about pairs of sequentially presented multi-part novel objects. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were used to measure perceptual sensitivity to 3D shape differences in terms of local part structure and global shape configuration - based on predictions derived from hierarchical structural description models of object recognition. There were three types of different object trials in which stimulus pairs (1) shared local parts but differed in global shape configuration; (2) contained different local parts but shared global configuration or (3) shared neither local parts nor global configuration. Analyses of the ERP data showed differential amplitude modulation as a function of shape similarity as early as the N1 component between 146-215ms post-stimulus onset. These negative amplitude deflections were more similar between objects sharing global shape configuration than local part structure. Differentiation among all stimulus types was reflected in N2 amplitude modulations between 276-330ms. sLORETA inverse solutions showed stronger involvement of left occipitotemporal areas during the N1 for object discrimination weighted towards local part structure. The results suggest that the perception of 3D object shape involves parallel processing of information at local and global scales. This processing is characterised by relatively slow derivation of 'fine-grained' local shape structure, and fast derivation of 'coarse-grained' global shape configuration. We propose that the rapid early derivation of global shape attributes underlies the observed patterns of N1 amplitude modulations. PMID:27396674

  14. Ultra-high performance, solid-state, autoradiographic image digitization and analysis system.

    PubMed

    Lear, J L; Pratt, J P; Ackermann, R F; Plotnick, J; Rumley, S

    1990-06-01

    We developed a Macintosh II-based, charge-coupled device (CCD), image digitization and analysis system for high-speed, high-resolution quantification of autoradiographic image data. A linear CCD array with 3,500 elements was attached to a precision drive assembly and mounted behind a high-uniformity lens. The drive assembly was used to sweep the array perpendicularly to its axis so that an entire 20 x 25-cm autoradiographic image-containing film could be digitized into 256 gray levels at 50-microns resolution in less than 30 sec. The scanner was interfaced to a Macintosh II computer through a specially constructed NuBus circuit board and software was developed for autoradiographic data analysis. The system was evaluated by scanning individual films multiple times, then measuring the variability of the digital data between the different scans. Image data were found to be virtually noise free. The coefficient of variation averaged less than 1%, a value significantly exceeding the accuracy of both high-speed, low-resolution, video camera (VC) systems and low-speed, high-resolution, rotating drum densitometers (RDD). Thus, the CCD scanner-Macintosh computer analysis system offers the advantage over VC systems of the ability to digitize entire films containing many autoradiograms, but with much greater speed and accuracy than achievable with RDD scanners. PMID:2385214

  15. Local lymph node assay: differentiating allergic and irritant responses using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Gerberick, G F; Cruse, L W; Ryan, C A

    1999-09-01

    The murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) is a method for assessing the contact sensitization potential of chemicals. Based on events that occur during the induction phase of a contact sensitization response, the LLNA measures the in vivo proliferation of cells in the draining lymph nodes (DLNs) of mice following topical exposure to chemicals. In terms of predictive identification of important skin sensitizers, the LLNA has been shown to be at least as sensitive as, and much more reliable than, current guinea pig tests. However, proliferation has also been observed following treatment with some irritants. In an attempt to distinguish allergic from irritant-induced proliferation, flow cytometric techniques have been used to examine the phenotype of lymphocyte subsets in the DLNs as well as markers of T-lymphocyte activation and memory. Mice were treated on the ears for 3 consecutive days with allergens or irritants. The DLNs were harvested 72 h after the final treatment. Single-cell suspensions were prepared, counted, and stained for analysis of the percentages of T cells and B cells and T-cell expression of two adhesion molecules that have been associated with differentiating naïve and activated/memory T cells, CD62L (L-selectin) and CD44 (H-cam). Increases in lymph node cellularity were observed in both allergen- and irritant-treated mice relative to naïve and vehicle-treated animals. Mice treated with allergens showed a preferential increase in the percentage of B220(+) B cells compared with irritant-treated mice. Treatment with allergens, but not irritants, resulted in a selective increase in the percentages of CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells expressing the T-cell activation/memory phenotype CD62L(lo)CD44(hi). Taken together, flow cytometric analysis of cell phenotype and expression of T-cell activation/memory markers may provide important information for differentiating allergen- and irritant-induced proliferative responses in the DLNs of chemically treated mice.

  16. Local adaptation along a continuous coastline: prey recruitment drives differentiation in a predatory snail.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Eric; Worth, David J

    2010-03-01

    Recent work demonstrates that nearshore oceanography can generate strong variation in the delivery of resources (nutrients and larvae) to benthic marine communities over spatial scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers. Moreover, variation in the strength of these bottom-up inputs is often spatially consistent, linked to regional centers of upwelling, coastal topography, and other stable features of the coastline. Whereas the ecological effects of these oceanographic links are increasingly clear, the possibility that these same bottom-up forces might impose spatially varying selection on consumers has not been addressed. Here, we test the hypothesis that a carnivorous snail (Nucella canaliculata) with direct development is locally adapted to persistent differences in prey recruitment within two adjacent oceanographic regions (northern California and Oregon, USA). Previous laboratory studies demonstrated that snails from Oregon rarely drilled the thick-shelled mussel Mytilus californianus, whereas snails from California readily drilled this prey. To test whether these differences reflect local adaptation, snails from two populations in each region were raised through two laboratory generations to minimize the potential influence of nongenetic effects. We then reciprocally outplanted these F2 generation snails to field enclosures at each of the four sites and monitored their growth for 11 months. Recruitment and availability of preferred prey (the acorn barnacle Balanus glandula and blue mussel Mytilus trossulus) at the experimental sites were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower in California than in Oregon. At the California sites, snails that originated from Oregon sources failed to drill larger M. californianus, encountered few alternative prey, and showed almost no growth. In contrast, snails from California drilled M. californianus and showed substantial growth. These results strongly suggest that the capacity of California snails to drill M. californianus allows

  17. Come rain or shine? Public expectation on local weather change and differential effects on climate change attitude.

    PubMed

    Lo, Alex Y; Jim, C Y

    2015-11-01

    Tailored messages are instrumental to climate change communication. Information about the global threat can be 'localised' by demonstrating its linkage with local events. This research ascertains the relationship between climate change attitude and perception of local weather, based on a survey involving 800 Hong Kong citizens. Results indicate that concerns about climate change increase with expectations about the likelihood and impacts of local weather change. Climate change believers attend to all three types of adverse weather events, namely, temperature rises, tropical cyclones and prolonged rains. Climate scepticism, however, is not associated with expectation about prolonged rains. Differential spatial orientations are a possible reason. Global climate change is an unprecedented and distant threat, whereas local rain is a more familiar and localised weather event. Global climate change should be articulated in terms that respect local concerns. Localised framing may be particularly effective for engaging individuals holding positive views about climate change science.

  18. Subnuclear localization and differentiation-dependent increased expression of DGK-zeta in C2C12 mouse myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Evangelisti, Camilla; Riccio, Massimo; Faenza, Irene; Zini, Nicoletta; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Goto, Kaoru; Cocco, L; Martelli, Alberto M

    2006-11-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) catalyze phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG) to yield phosphatidic acid (PA). Previous evidence has shown that the nucleus contains several DGK isoforms. In this study, we have analyzed the expression and subnuclear localization of DGK-zeta employing C2C12 mouse myoblasts. Immunocytochemistry coupled to confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that both endogenous and green fluorescent protein-tagged overexpressed DGK-zeta localized mostly to the nucleus. In contrast, overexpressed DGK-alpha, -beta, -delta, and -iota did not migrate to the nucleus. DGK-zeta was present in the nuclear speckle domains, as also revealed by immuno-electron microscopy analysis. Moreover, DGK-zeta co-localized and interacted with phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase Cbeta1 (PLCbeta1), that is involved in inositide-dependent signaling pathways important for the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, we report that DGK-zeta associated with nuclear matrix, the fundamental organizing principle of the nucleus where many cell functions take place, including DNA replication, gene expression, and protein phosphorylation. Nuclear DGK-zeta increased during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells, while DGK-zeta down-regulation by siRNA markedly impaired differentiation. Overall, our findings further support the importance of speckles and nuclear matrix in lipid-dependent signaling and suggest that nuclear DGK-zeta might play some fundamental role during myogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells. PMID:16897754

  19. Modular poly(ethylene glycol) matrices for the controlled 3D-localized osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Stéphanie; Lienemann, Philipp S; Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Wilfried; Martin, Ivan; Weber, Franz E; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-03-11

    The in vitro formation of physiologically relevant engineered tissues is still limited by the availability of adequate growth-factor-presenting cell-instructive biomaterials, allowing simultaneous and three-dimensionally localized differentiation of multiple tissue progenitor cells. Together with ever improving technologies such as microfluidics, printing, or lithography, these biomaterials could provide the basis for generating provisional cellular constructs, which can differentiate to form tissue mimetics. Although state-of-the-art biomaterials are endowed with sophisticated modules for time- and space-controlled positioning and release of bioactive molecules, reports on 3D arrangements of differentiation-inducing growth factors are scarce. This paper describes the stable and localized immobilization of biotinylated bioactive molecules to a modular, Factor XIII-cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel platform using a genetically engineered streptavidin linker. Linker incorporation is demonstrated by Western blot, and streptavidin functionality is confirmed by capturing biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (ALP). After optimizing bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) biotinylation, streptavidin-modified hydrogels are able to bind and present bioactive BMP-2-biotin. Finally, with this immobilization scheme for BMP-2, the specific osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is demonstrated by inducing ALP expression in confined 3D areas. In future, this platform together with other affinity-based strategies will be useful for the local incorporation of various growth factors for engineering cell-responsive constructs.

  20. A preconditioned fast finite volume scheme for a fractional differential equation discretized on a locally refined composite mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Jinhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Numerical methods for fractional differential equations generate full stiffness matrices, which were traditionally solved via Gaussian type direct solvers that require O (N3) of computational work and O (N2) of memory to store where N is the number of spatial grid points in the discretization. We develop a preconditioned fast Krylov subspace iterative method for the efficient and faithful solution of finite volume schemes defined on a locally refined composite mesh for fractional differential equations to resolve boundary layers of the solutions. Numerical results are presented to show the utility of the method.

  1. The Local Brewery: A Project for Use in Differential Equations Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starling, James K.; Povich, Timothy J.; Findlay, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe a modeling project designed for an ordinary differential equations (ODEs) course using first-order and systems of first-order differential equations to model the fermentation process in beer. The project aims to expose the students to the modeling process by creating and solving a mathematical model and effectively communicating their…

  2. The Differential Outcomes Effect (DOE) in Spatial Localization: An Investigation with Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legge, Eric L. G.; Spetch, Marciar L.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether search accuracy of adult humans could be enhanced using differential reward contingencies in landmark-based spatial tasks conducted on a computer screen. We found that search accuracy was significantly enhanced by differential outcomes in a conditional spatial search task, in which the landmark-to-goal relationship depended…

  3. Autoradiographic imaging of phosphoinositide turnover in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, P.M.; Bredt, D.S.; Snyder, S.H. )

    1990-08-17

    With ({sup 3}H)cytidine as a precursor, phosphoinositide turnover can be localized in brain slices by selective autoradiography of the product ({sup 3}H)cytidine diphosphate diacylglycerol, which is membrane-bound. In the cerebellum, glutamatergic stimulation elicits an increase of phosphoinositide turnover only in Purkinje cells and the molecular layer. In the hippocampus, both glutamatergic and muscarinic cholinergic stimulation increase phosphoinositide turnover, but with distinct localizations. Cholinergic stimulation affects CA1, CA3, CA4, and subiculum, whereas glutamatergic effects are restricted to the subiculum and CA3. Imaging phosphoinositide turnover in brain slices, which are amenable to electrophysiologic studies, will permit a dynamic localized analysis of regulation of this second messenger in response to synaptic stimulation of specific neuronal pathways.

  4. Specific deletion of CMF1 nuclear localization domain causes incomplete cell cycle withdrawal and impaired differentiation in avian skeletal myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.dees@vanderbilt.edu; Robertson, J. Brian; Zhu, Tianli; Bader, David

    2006-10-01

    CMF1 is a protein expressed in embryonic striated muscle with onset of expression preceding that of contractile proteins. Disruption of CMF1 in myoblasts disrupts muscle-specific protein expression. Preliminary studies indicate both nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of CMF1 protein, suggesting functional roles in both cellular compartments. Here we examine the nuclear function of CMF1, using a newly characterized antibody generated against the CMF1 nuclear localization domain and a CMF1 nuclear localization domain-deleted stable myocyte line. The antibody demonstrates nuclear distribution of the CMF1 protein both in vivo and in cell lines, with clustering of CMF1 protein around chromatin during mitosis. In more differentiated myocytes, the protein shifts to the cytoplasm. The CMF1 NLS-deleted cell lines have markedly impaired capacity to differentiate. Specifically, these cells express less contractile protein than wild-type or full-length CMF1 stably transfected cells, and do not fuse properly into multinucleate syncytia with linear nuclear alignment. In response to low serum medium, a signal to differentiate, CMF1 NLS-deleted cells enter G0, but continue to express proliferation markers and will reenter the cell cycle when stimulated by restoring growth medium. These data suggest that CMF1 is involved in regulation the transition from proliferation to differentiation in embryonic muscle.

  5. Interleukin-13 interferes with CFTR and AQP5 expression and localization during human airway epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Skowron-zwarg, Marie; Boland, Sonja; Caruso, Nathalie; Coraux, Christelle; Marano, Francelyne; Tournier, Frederic . E-mail: f-tournier@paris7.jussieu.fr

    2007-07-15

    Interleukin-13 (IL-13) is a central regulator of Th2-dominated respiratory disorders such as asthma. Lesions of the airway epithelial barrier frequently observed in chronic respiratory inflammatory diseases are repaired through proliferation, migration and differentiation of epithelial cells. Our work is focused on the effects of IL-13 in human cellular models of airway epithelial cell regeneration. We have previously shown that IL-13 altered epithelial cell polarity during mucociliary differentiation of human nasal epithelial cells. In particular, the cytokine inhibited ezrin expression and interfered with its apical localization during epithelial cell differentiation in vitro. Here we show that CFTR expression is enhanced in the presence of the cytokine, that two additional CFTR protein isoforms are expressed in IL-13-treated cells and that part of the protein is retained within the endoplasmic reticulum. We further show that aquaporin 5 expression, a water channel localized within the apical membrane of epithelial cells, is completely abolished in the presence of the cytokine. These results show that IL-13 interferes with ion and water channel expression and localization during epithelial regeneration and may thereby influence mucus composition and hydration.

  6. The Differential Palmitoylation States of N-Ras and H-Ras Determine Their Distinct Golgi Sub-compartment Localizations

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Stephen J.; Snitkin, Harriet; Gumper, Iwona; Philips, Mark R.; Sabatini, David; Pellicer, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high degree of structural homology and shared exchange factors, effectors and GTPase activating proteins, a large body of evidence suggests functional heterogeneity among Ras isoforms. One aspect of Ras biology that may explain this heterogeneity is the differential subcellular localizations driven by the C-terminal hypervariable regions of Ras proteins. Spatial heterogeneity has been documented at the level of organelles: palmitoylated Ras isoforms (H-Ras and N-Ras) localize on the Golgi apparatus whereas K-Ras4B does not. We tested the hypothesis that spatial heterogeneity also exists at the sub-organelle level by studying the localization of differentially palmitoylated Ras isoforms within the Golgi apparatus. Using confocal, live cell fluorescent imaging and immunogold electron microscopy we found that, whereas the doubly palmitoylated H-Ras is distributed throughout the Golgi stacks, the singly palmitoylated N-Ras is polarized with a relative paucity of expression on the trans Golgi. Using palmitoylation mutants we show that the different sub-Golgi distributions of the Ras proteins are a consequence of their differential degree of palmitoylation. Thus, the acylation state of Ras proteins controls not only their distribution between the Golgi apparatus and the plasma membrane but also their distribution within the Golgi stacks. PMID:25158650

  7. Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

  8. Whole-body autoradiographic microimaging: Applications in radiopharmaceutical and drug research

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Sacker, D.F.

    1991-12-31

    The whole-body autoradiographic (WBARG) microimaging technique is used for evaluation of the temporo-spatial distribution of radiolabeled molecules in intact animals as well as to determine the sites of accumulation of parent compounds and their metabolites. This technique is also very useful to determine the metabolism of a compound, toxicity, and effects of therapeutic interventions on the distribution of a compound in the whole body, by studying animals at different time intervals after injection of the radiolabeled compound. This report discusses various aspects of WBARG.

  9. JULIDE: a software tool for 3D reconstruction and statistical analysis of autoradiographic mouse brain sections.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Delphine; Parafita, Julia; Charrier, Rémi; Magara, Fulvio; Magistretti, Pierre J; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2010-11-23

    In this article we introduce JULIDE, a software toolkit developed to perform the 3D reconstruction, intensity normalization, volume standardization by 3D image registration and voxel-wise statistical analysis of autoradiographs of mouse brain sections. This software tool has been developed in the open-source ITK software framework and is freely available under a GPL license. The article presents the complete image processing chain from raw data acquisition to 3D statistical group analysis. Results of the group comparison in the context of a study on spatial learning are shown as an illustration of the data that can be obtained with this tool.

  10. Autoradiographic study of tritium-labeled misonidazole in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, L.M.; Nolan, J.

    1989-04-01

    The localization of tritiated misonidazole metabolites in a number of normal tissues in the mouse is reported from autoradiography. The labeled misonidazole was injected at 750 or 75 mg/kg body weight (Rel. Sp. Act. 74 and 740 MBq/mg respectively). The grain count ratio, parenchyma:stroma, for selected tissues was: liver (centrilobular zone) 13; meibomian gland (acini) 68, (duct) 116; esophagus (keratinized layer) 61; enamel organ 17. It is concluded that there are a number of tissues which will accumulate MISO metabolites although they may not all be hypoxic.

  11. Localization of DNA methyltransferase-1 during oocyte differentiation, in vitro maturation and early embryonic development in cow

    PubMed Central

    Lodde, V.; Modina, S.C.; Franciosi, F.; Zuccari, E.; Tessaro, I.; Luciano, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase-1 (Dnmt1) is involved in the maintenance of DNA methylation patterns and is crucial for normal mammalian development. The aim of the present study was to assess the localization of Dnmt1 in cow, during the latest phases of oocyte differentiation and during the early stages of segmentation. Dnmt1 expression and localization were assessed in oocytes according to the chromatin configuration, which in turn provides an important epigenetic mechanism for the control of global gene expression and represents a morphological marker of oocyte differentiation. We found that the initial chromatin condensation was accompanied by a slight increase in the level of global DNA methylation, as assessed by 5-methyl-cytosine immunostaining followed by laser scanning confocal microscopy analysis (LSCM). RT-PCR confirmed the presence of Dnmt1 transcripts throughout this phase of oocyte differentiation. Analogously, Dnmt1 immunodetection and LSCM indicated that the protein was always present and localized in the cytoplasm, regardless the chromatin configuration and the level of global DNA methylation. Moreover, our data indicate that while Dnmt1 is retained in the cytoplasm in metaphase II stage oocytes and zygotes, it enters the nuclei of 8–16 cell stage embryos. As suggested in mouse, the functional meaning of the presence of Dnmt1 in the bovine embryo nuclei could be the maintainement of the methylation pattern of imprinted genes. In conclusion, the present work provides useful elements for the study of Dnmt1 function during the late stage of oocyte differentiation, maturation and early embryonic development in mammals. PMID:22073356

  12. Autoradiographic localization of gonadotrophin receptors in ovaries of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio L

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniarz, K.; Kime, D.E.

    1986-10-01

    Binding sites for carp gonadotrophin have been located in carp ovaries using (/sup 125/I)labeled gonadotrophin and autoradiography. The radioactive gonadotrophin was displaced from tissue by unlabeled gonadotrophin or carp hypophysial homogenate in a dose-dependent fashion. No binding of gonadotrophin was found in previtellogenic oocytes but binding appeared with the first indications of vitellogenesis. In the smaller vitellogenic oocytes binding was uniformly distributed in the follicular envelope, but in the largest oocytes binding was restricted to the interstitial tissue. In these more mature oocytes gonadotrophin was also found within the oocyte and appeared to migrate toward the nucleus. The relationship between binding location, steroidogenesis, and oocyte maturation is discussed. We found no evidence for specific binding of (/sup 125/I)thyroxine under comparable conditions.

  13. Autoradiographic localization of opioid receptor types in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.R.; Sykes, R.M.; Thompson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The selective mu and delta ligands (/sup 3/H)DAGO and (/sup 3/H)DPDPE have been used to investigate the distribution of specific opioid subtypes in the rat small intestine by in vitro autoradiography. There was a greater density of (/sup 3/H)DPDPE binding at regions of the villi and crypts than (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding. These results suggest that the opioid receptors located in these regions are predominantly of the delta subtype.

  14. Autoradiographic localization of aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in rhesus monkey ovary.

    PubMed

    Baldridge, Monika G; Hutz, Reinhold J

    2007-06-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is the most toxic congener of a large class of manmade pollutants that persist in the environment. TCDD exerts its toxic effects, in part, by binding to its receptor known as the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). TCDD is estrogen modulatory and in some systems its receptor associates directly with estrogen receptors via co-activator molecules. TCDD inhibits steroid synthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells and AHR is found in these cells. We have previously shown that AHR is found in whole rhesus monkey ovary, but have yet to establish its location. In the present study, we set out to show that radiolabeled TCDD binds to monkey ovarian follicles and that this binding is receptor mediated. Ovaries from Macaca mulatta were sectioned on a cryostat at 10 micro m; and sections were incubated with either control vehicle, (3)H-TCDD, or (3)H-TCDD plus alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), a known receptor-blocking agent. Here, we show for the first time specific binding of TCDD to the granulosa cells of antral follicles and other regions of the rhesus monkey ovary. Our data indicate a 60-fold increase in binding with (3)H-TCDD over that of control, and that this binding is reduced to the levels seen in controls with the addition of the competitive antagonist ANF. These findings support the hypothesis that TCDD directly affects primate ovarian function via the AHR.

  15. Whole-body autoradiographic localization of (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine and its metabolites in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fand, I.; McNally, W.P.; Koul, O.; Yonekura, Y.; Som, P.; Brill, A.B.; Deutsch, D.G.

    1988-05-01

    When evaluated by whole-body autoradiography (WBAR) and quantitative densitometry, (3H)phencyclidine (PCP) equivalents were found to be removed rapidly from blood, after a single iv dose in mice, and avidly taken up as early as 1 min after dosage by glandular tissues including thyroid, salivary glands, pancreas, pituitary and, most prominently, by stomach mucosa. Stomach:blood (3H)PCP concentration ratios showed that rapid secretion of (3H)PCP from mucosa to the stomach contents occurred within 2 min after dosing. During early intervals, chromatographic analysis of tissue sections demonstrated that PCP was present in brain, liver, and gut primarily in its unaltered chemical form. Mice killed at 60 and 120 min showed persistently high levels of (3H)PCP equivalents within the stomach and intestines, these levels being the highest of all other tissues densitometrically measured. The early time course and magnitude of (3H)PCP uptake by stomach glandular mucosa strongly suggests that cycling of PCP occurs principally through gastroenteric recirculation. Very striking was the high concentration of (3H)PCP radioactivity observed within the adrenal as early as 5 min. The concentration of (3H)PCP equivalents in pituitary, choroid plexus, cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus was highest at 1-20 min following injection. Application of high-resolution quantitative WBAR was found to be a useful tool in the study of the biodistribution of labeled PCP, especially during very early post-treatment time points where alternative tissue counting techniques would not be feasible.

  16. Autoradiographic localization of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Manaker, S.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the rat and human central nervous system (CNS). The binding of (/sup 3/H)-3-methyl-histidine/sup 2/-TRH ((/sup 3/H)-MeTRH) to TRH receptors was saturable, of a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5 nM), and specific for TRH analogs. Studies with neurotoxins ibotenic acid and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) suggest that TRH receptors within the amygdala are predominantly located on cell bodies, and not nerve terminals. Finally, an examination was made of the concentrations of TRH receptors in spinal cords of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease of the motor neurons located in Lamina IX. Large decreases in TRH receptors were noted in ALS spinal cords, when compared to non-neurological controls, probably reflecting the loss of motor neurons. In addition, decreases in the TRH receptor concentration of Lamina II were observed. This finding may reflect the sensitivity of neurons throughout the CNS to the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal degeneration which cause ALS.

  17. Local Probing of Electrochemically Induced Negative Differential Resistance in TiO2 Memristive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yunseok; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    Early stage of electroforming in TiO2 was observed by deliberately combining conductive atomic force microscopy and electrochemical strain microscopy. The negative differential resistance and the corresponding surface deformation were observed below electroforming voltages. The surface deformations induced by surface oxidation are thermodynamically stable, reversibly controlled by applying voltage bias of different polarities, and electrochemically less active.

  18. Performance and scaling of locally-structured grid methods forpartial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Bell, John; Keen, Noel; Ligocki, Terry; Lijewski, Michael; Van Straalen, Brian

    2007-07-19

    In this paper, we discuss some of the issues in obtaining high performance for block-structured adaptive mesh refinement software for partial differential equations. We show examples in which AMR scales to thousands of processors. We also discuss a number of metrics for performance and scalability that can provide a basis for understanding the advantages and disadvantages of this approach.

  19. Differential localization of LGR5 and Nanog in clusters of colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Freyhan, Ora; Fabrikant, Yakov; Melzer, Ehud; Givol, David

    2013-05-01

    One paradigm of cancer development claims that cancer emerges at the niche of tissue stem cells and these cells continue to proliferate in the tumor as cancer stem cells. LGR5, a membrane receptor, was recently found to be a marker of normal colon stem cells in colon polyps and is also expressed in colon cancer stem cells. Nanog, an embryonic stem cell nuclear factor, is expressed in several embryonic tissues, but Nanog expression is not well documented in cancerous stem cells. Our aim was to examine whether both LGR5 and Nanog are expressed in the same clusters of colon stem cells or cancer stem cells, using immunocytochemistry with specific antibodies to each antigen. We analyzed this aspect using paraffin embedded tumor tissue sections obtained from 18 polyps and 36 colon cancer specimens at stages I-IV. Antibodies to LGR5 revealed membrane and cytoplasm immunostaining of scattered labeled cells in normal crypts, with no labeling of Nanog. However, in close proximity to the tumors, staining to LGR5 was much more intensive in the crypts, including that of the epithelial cells. In cancer tissue, positive LGR5 clusters of stem cells were observed mainly in poorly differentiated tumors and in only a few scattered cells in the highly differentiated tumors. In contrast, antibodies to Nanog mainly stained the growing edges of carcinoma cells, leaving the poorly differentiated tumor cells unlabeled, including the clustered stem cells that could be detected even by direct morphological examination. In polyp tissues, scattered labeled cells were immunostained with antibodies to Nanog and to a much lesser extent with antibodies to LGR5. We conclude that expression of LGR5 is probably specific to stem cells of poorly differentiated tumors, whereas Nanog is mainly expressed at the edges of highly differentiated tumors. However, some of the cell layers adjacent to the carcinoma cell layers that still remained undifferentiated, expressed mainly Nanog with only a few cells

  20. An autoradiographic analysis of cholinergic receptors in mouse brain after chronic nicotine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pauly, J.R.; Marks, M.J.; Gross, S.D.; Collins, A.C. )

    1991-09-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic procedures were used to examine the effects of chronic nicotine infusion on the number of central nervous system nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Female DBA mice were implanted with jugular cannulas and infused with saline or various doses of nicotine (0.25, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg/kg/hr) for 10 days. The animals were then sacrificed and the brains were removed and frozen in isopentane. Cryostat sections were collected and prepared for autoradiographic procedures as previously described. Nicotinic cholinergic receptors were labeled with L-(3H)nicotine or alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin; (3H)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to measure muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding. Chronic nicotine infusion increased the number of sites labeled by (3H)nicotine in most brain areas. However, the extent of the increase in binding as well as the dose-response curves for the increase were widely different among brain regions. After the highest treatment dose, binding was increased in 67 of 86 regions measured. Septal and thalamic regions were most resistant to change. Nicotinic binding measured by alpha-(125I)bungarotoxin also increased after chronic treatment, but in a less robust fashion. At the highest treatment dose, only 26 of 80 regions were significantly changes. Muscarinic binding was not altered after chronic nicotine treatment. These data suggest that brain regions are not equivalent in the mechanisms that regulate alterations in nicotinic cholinergic receptor binding after chronic nicotine treatment.

  1. Autoradiographic determination of marginal leakage of a pressed glass ceramic inlay.

    PubMed

    Canay, R S; Hersek, N E; Uzun, G; Ercan, M T

    1997-09-01

    The marginal integrity and microleakage of pressed glass ceramic inlays were evaluated using autoradiography. IPS/Empress ceramic inlays were fabricated for 10 human molar mandibular teeth. After adjusting the inlays, they were etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel for 30 s and silanized with Monobond S for 30 s. Before cementation with dual cure resin cement the inlays and cavity walls were gently covered with a thin layer of bonding agent. When the cementation process was completed the samples were cycled 300 times between a 55 degrees C hot bath and a 5 degrees C cold bath. The samples were placed in each bath for 60 s, with 5 s intervals between immersions, then the specimens were immersed in an aqueous solution of Ca-45. After 24 h the inlay and tooth assemblies were removed, rinsed with water and placed in cold-cured acrylic resin, then sectioned through the long axis for autoradiographic analysis. According to the penetration of Ca-45, the microleakage level was scored for each section. The results indicated slight penetration of Ca-45 on autoradiographic films.

  2. Postsynaptic and differential localization to neuronal subtypes of protocadherin beta16 in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Junghans, Dirk; Heidenreich, Matthias; Hack, Iris; Taylor, Verdon; Frotscher, Michael; Kemler, Rolf

    2008-02-01

    The formation of synapses is dependent on the expression of surface adhesion molecules that facilitate correct recognition, stabilization and function. The more than 60 clustered protocadherins (Pcdhalpha, Pcdhbeta and Pcdhgamma) identified in human and mouse have attracted considerable attention because of their clustered genomic organization and the potential role of alpha- and gamma-Pcdhs in allocating a neuronal surface code specifying synaptic connectivity. Here, we investigated whether beta-Pcdhs also contribute to these processes. By performing RT-PCR, we found a striking parallel onset of expression of many beta-Pcdhs around the onset of neurogenesis and wide expression in the central nervous system. We generated antibodies specific to Pcdhb16 and showed localization of Pcdhb16 protein in the adult mouse cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Analysing the mouse retina in detail revealed localization of Pcdhb16 to specific cell types and, importantly, subsets of synapses. We show that Pcdhb16 localizes predominantly to postsynaptic compartments and the comparison with Pcdhb22 implies differential localization and functions of individual beta-Pcdhs in the mammalian central nervous system. Moreover, we provide evidence for a role of beta-Pcdhs in the outer segments and connecting cilia of photoreceptors. Our data show for the first time that beta-Pcdhs also localize to specific neuronal subpopulations and synapses, providing support for the hypothesis that clustered Pcdhs are candidate genes for the specification of synaptic connectivity and neuronal networks.

  3. Contemporary evolution during invasion: evidence for differentiation, natural selection, and local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Colautti, Robert I; Lau, Jennifer A

    2015-05-01

    Biological invasions are 'natural' experiments that can improve our understanding of contemporary evolution. We evaluate evidence for population differentiation, natural selection and adaptive evolution of invading plants and animals at two nested spatial scales: (i) among introduced populations (ii) between native and introduced genotypes. Evolution during invasion is frequently inferred, but rarely confirmed as adaptive. In common garden studies, quantitative trait differentiation is only marginally lower (~3.5%) among introduced relative to native populations, despite genetic bottlenecks and shorter timescales (i.e. millennia vs. decades). However, differentiation between genotypes from the native vs. introduced range is less clear and confounded by nonrandom geographic sampling; simulations suggest this causes a high false-positive discovery rate (>50%) in geographically structured populations. Selection differentials (¦s¦) are stronger in introduced than in native species, although selection gradients (¦β¦) are not, consistent with introduced species experiencing weaker genetic constraints. This could facilitate rapid adaptation, but evidence is limited. For example, rapid phenotypic evolution often manifests as geographical clines, but simulations demonstrate that nonadaptive trait clines can evolve frequently during colonization (~two-thirds of simulations). Additionally, QST-FST studies may often misrepresent the strength and form of natural selection acting during invasion. Instead, classic approaches in evolutionary ecology (e.g. selection analysis, reciprocal transplant, artificial selection) are necessary to determine the frequency of adaptive evolution during invasion and its influence on establishment, spread and impact of invasive species. These studies are rare but crucial for managing biological invasions in the context of global change. PMID:25891044

  4. Contemporary evolution during invasion: evidence for differentiation, natural selection, and local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Colautti, Robert I; Lau, Jennifer A

    2015-05-01

    Biological invasions are 'natural' experiments that can improve our understanding of contemporary evolution. We evaluate evidence for population differentiation, natural selection and adaptive evolution of invading plants and animals at two nested spatial scales: (i) among introduced populations (ii) between native and introduced genotypes. Evolution during invasion is frequently inferred, but rarely confirmed as adaptive. In common garden studies, quantitative trait differentiation is only marginally lower (~3.5%) among introduced relative to native populations, despite genetic bottlenecks and shorter timescales (i.e. millennia vs. decades). However, differentiation between genotypes from the native vs. introduced range is less clear and confounded by nonrandom geographic sampling; simulations suggest this causes a high false-positive discovery rate (>50%) in geographically structured populations. Selection differentials (¦s¦) are stronger in introduced than in native species, although selection gradients (¦β¦) are not, consistent with introduced species experiencing weaker genetic constraints. This could facilitate rapid adaptation, but evidence is limited. For example, rapid phenotypic evolution often manifests as geographical clines, but simulations demonstrate that nonadaptive trait clines can evolve frequently during colonization (~two-thirds of simulations). Additionally, QST-FST studies may often misrepresent the strength and form of natural selection acting during invasion. Instead, classic approaches in evolutionary ecology (e.g. selection analysis, reciprocal transplant, artificial selection) are necessary to determine the frequency of adaptive evolution during invasion and its influence on establishment, spread and impact of invasive species. These studies are rare but crucial for managing biological invasions in the context of global change.

  5. Differentiability in density-functional theory: Further study of the locality theorem

    SciTech Connect

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Salomonson, Sten

    2004-09-01

    The locality theorem in density-functional theory (DFT) states that the functional derivative of the Hohenberg-Kohn universal functional can be expressed as a local multiplicative potential function, and this is the basis of DFT and of the successful Kohn-Sham model. Nesbet has in several papers [Phys. Rev. A 58, R12 (1998); ibid.65, 010502 (2001); Adv. Quant. Chem, 43, 1 (2003)] claimed that this theorem is in conflict with fundamental quantum physics, and as a consequence that the Hohenberg-Kohn theory cannot be generally valid. We have commented upon these works [Comment, Phys. Rev. A 67, 056501 (2003)] and recently extended the arguments [Adv. Quantum Chem. 43, 95 (2003)]. We have shown that there is no such conflict and that the locality theorem is inherently exact. In the present work we have furthermore verified this numerically by constructing a local Kohn-Sham potential for the 1s2s{sup 3}S state of helium that generates the many-body electron density and shown that the corresponding 2s Kohn-Sham orbital eigenvalue agrees with the ionization energy to nine digits. Similar result is obtained with the Hartree-Fock density. Therefore, in addition to verifying the locality theorem, this result also confirms the so-called ionization-potential theorem.

  6. Autoradiographic evidence of sup 125 I-. beta. -endorphin binding sites in the articular cartilage of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Castano, M.T.; Freire-Garabal, M.; Giraldez, M.; Nunez, M.J.; Belmonte, A.; Couceiro, J.; Jorge, J. )

    1991-01-01

    After {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin was intravenously injected to rats, an autoradiographic study of distal femur articular cartilage was performed. Results show a specific binding of {sup 125}I-{beta}-endorphin to chondrocytes, suggesting the possible existence of an opiate modulation of articular cartilage.

  7. Thaumatin-like proteins are differentially expressed and localized in phloem tissue of hybrid poplar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were previously identified in phloem exudate of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) using proteomics methods, and their sieve element localization confirmed by immunofluorescence. In the current study, we analyzed different tissues to further underst...

  8. Size differentiation in Finnish house sparrows follows Bergmann's rule with evidence of local adaptation.

    PubMed

    Brommer, J E; Hanski, I K; Kekkonen, J; Väisänen, R A

    2014-04-01

    Bergmann's rule predicts that individuals are larger in more poleward populations and that this size gradient has an adaptive basis. Hence, phenotypic divergence in size traits between populations (PST ) is expected to exceed the level of divergence by drift alone (FST ). We measured 16 skeletal traits, body mass and wing length in 409 male and 296 female house sparrows Passer domesticus sampled in 12 populations throughout Finland, where the species has its northernmost European distributional margin. Morphometric differentiation across populations (PST ) was compared with differentiation in 13 microsatellites (FST ). We find that twelve traits phenotypically diverged more than FST in both sexes, and an additional two traits diverged in males. The phenotypic divergence exceeded FST in several traits to such a degree that findings were robust also to strong between-population environmental effects. Divergence was particularly strong in dimensions of the bill, making it a strong candidate for the study of adaptive molecular genetic divergence. Divergent traits increased in size in more northern populations. We conclude that house sparrows show evidence of an adaptive latitudinal size gradient consistent with Bergmann's rule on the modest spatial scale of ca. 600 km.

  9. Negative differential resistance in GeSi core-shell transport junctions: the role of local sp(2) hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nuo; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaobin; Kong, Xianghua; Zheng, Xiaohong; Guo, Hong

    2016-09-21

    We report a theoretical investigation of nonlinear quantum transport properties of Au/GeSi/Au junctions. For GeSi semiconducting core-shell structures brought into contact with Au electrodes, a very unusual behavior is that the tunneling transport is on-resonance right at equilibrium. This resonance is not due to the alignment of a quantum level in GeSi to the electrochemical potential of Au, but due to the alignment of very sharp DOS features - hot spots, localized at the two Au/GeSi interfaces of the device. An applied bias voltage shifts the hot spots relative to each other which gives rise to substantial negative differential resistance (NDR). The hot spots localized at the two interfaces were found to be due to the unbonded pz orbital of a sp(2) hybridized interface Si atom which is surrounded by three non-sp(2) hybridized neighbors. The mechanism of inducing hot spots and NDR by a local structure unit is not limited to the GeSi. The results suggest an interesting scheme for constructing NDR devices by orbital manipulation, to be more explicit, for example, by designing local structural units having unbonded orbitals at the interfaces between electrodes and the central region of the transport junction.

  10. Negative differential resistance in GeSi core-shell transport junctions: the role of local sp(2) hybridization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nuo; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiaobin; Kong, Xianghua; Zheng, Xiaohong; Guo, Hong

    2016-09-21

    We report a theoretical investigation of nonlinear quantum transport properties of Au/GeSi/Au junctions. For GeSi semiconducting core-shell structures brought into contact with Au electrodes, a very unusual behavior is that the tunneling transport is on-resonance right at equilibrium. This resonance is not due to the alignment of a quantum level in GeSi to the electrochemical potential of Au, but due to the alignment of very sharp DOS features - hot spots, localized at the two Au/GeSi interfaces of the device. An applied bias voltage shifts the hot spots relative to each other which gives rise to substantial negative differential resistance (NDR). The hot spots localized at the two interfaces were found to be due to the unbonded pz orbital of a sp(2) hybridized interface Si atom which is surrounded by three non-sp(2) hybridized neighbors. The mechanism of inducing hot spots and NDR by a local structure unit is not limited to the GeSi. The results suggest an interesting scheme for constructing NDR devices by orbital manipulation, to be more explicit, for example, by designing local structural units having unbonded orbitals at the interfaces between electrodes and the central region of the transport junction. PMID:27546305

  11. Differential localization of the streptococcal accessory sec components and implications for substrate export.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yihfen T; Cameron, Todd A; Bensing, Barbara A; Seepersaud, Ravin; Zambryski, Patricia C; Sullam, Paul M

    2013-02-01

    The accessory Sec system of Streptococcus gordonii is comprised of SecY2, SecA2, and five proteins (Asp1 through -5) that are required for the export of a serine-rich glycoprotein, GspB. We have previously shown that a number of the Asps interact with GspB, SecA2, or each other. To further define the roles of these Asps in export, we examined their subcellular localization in S. gordonii and in Escherichia coli expressing the streptococcal accessory Sec system. In particular, we assessed how the locations of these accessory Sec proteins were altered by the presence of other components. Using fluorescence microscopy, we found in E. coli that SecA2 localized within multiple foci at the cell membrane, regardless of whether other accessory Sec proteins were expressed. Asp2 alone localized to the cell poles but formed a similar punctate pattern at the membrane when SecA2 was present. Asp1 and Asp3 localized diffusely in the cytosol when expressed alone or with SecA2. However, these proteins redistributed to the membrane in a punctate arrangement when all of the accessory Sec components were present. Cell fractionation studies with S. gordonii further corroborated these microscopy results. Collectively, these findings indicate that Asp1 to -3 are not integral membrane proteins that form structural parts of the translocation channel. Instead, SecA2 serves as a docking site for Asp2, which in turn attracts a complex of Asp1 and Asp3 to the membrane. These protein interactions may be important for the trafficking of GspB to the cell membrane and its subsequent translocation. PMID:23204472

  12. Locally adapted fish populations maintain small-scale genetic differentiation despite perturbation by a catastrophic flood event

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Local adaptation to divergent environmental conditions can promote population genetic differentiation even in the absence of geographic barriers and hence, lead to speciation. Perturbations by catastrophic events, however, can distort such parapatric ecological speciation processes. Here, we asked whether an exceptionally strong flood led to homogenization of gene pools among locally adapted populations of the Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana, Poeciliidae) in the Cueva del Azufre system in southern Mexico, where two strong environmental selection factors (darkness within caves and/or presence of toxic H2S in sulfidic springs) drive the diversification of P. mexicana. Nine nuclear microsatellites as well as heritable female life history traits (both as a proxy for quantitative genetics and for trait divergence) were used as markers to compare genetic differentiation, genetic diversity, and especially population mixing (immigration and emigration) before and after the flood. Results Habitat type (i.e., non-sulfidic surface, sulfidic surface, or sulfidic cave), but not geographic distance was the major predictor of genetic differentiation. Before and after the flood, each habitat type harbored a genetically distinct population. Only a weak signal of individual dislocation among ecologically divergent habitat types was uncovered (with the exception of slightly increased dislocation from the Cueva del Azufre into the sulfidic creek, El Azufre). By contrast, several lines of evidence are indicative of increased flood-induced dislocation within the same habitat type, e.g., between different cave chambers of the Cueva del Azufre. Conclusions The virtual absence of individual dislocation among ecologically different habitat types indicates strong natural selection against migrants. Thus, our current study exemplifies that ecological speciation in this and other systems, in which extreme environmental factors drive speciation, may be little affected by temporary

  13. Population-scale sequencing reveals genetic differentiation due to local adaptation in Atlantic herring

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhaney, Sangeet; Barrio, Alvaro Martinez; Rafati, Nima; Sundström, Görel; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Gilbert, Elizabeth R.; Berglund, Jonas; Wetterbom, Anna; Laikre, Linda; Webster, Matthew T.; Grabherr, Manfred; Ryman, Nils; Andersson, Leif

    2012-01-01

    The Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus), one of the most abundant marine fishes in the world, has historically been a critical food source in Northern Europe. It is one of the few marine species that can reproduce throughout the brackish salinity gradient of the Baltic Sea. Previous studies based on few genetic markers have revealed a conspicuous lack of genetic differentiation between geographic regions, consistent with huge population sizes and minute genetic drift. Here, we present a cost-effective genome-wide study in a species that lacks a genome sequence. We first assembled a muscle transcriptome and then aligned genomic reads to the transcripts, creating an “exome assembly,” capturing both exons and flanking sequences. We then resequenced pools of fish from a wide geographic range, including the Northeast Atlantic, as well as different regions in the Baltic Sea, aligned the reads to the exome assembly, and identified 440,817 SNPs. The great majority of SNPs showed no appreciable differences in allele frequency among populations; however, several thousand SNPs showed striking differences, some approaching fixation for different alleles. The contrast between low genetic differentiation at most loci and striking differences at others implies that the latter category primarily reflects natural selection. A simulation study confirmed that the distribution of the fixation index FST deviated significantly from expectation for selectively neutral loci. This study provides insights concerning the population structure of an important marine fish and establishes the Atlantic herring as a model for population genetic studies of adaptation and natural selection. PMID:23134729

  14. Local sequence targeting in the AID/APOBEC family differentially impacts retroviral restriction and antibody diversification.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Rahul M; Maul, Robert W; Guminski, Amy F; McClure, Rhonda L; Gajula, Kiran S; Saribasak, Huseyin; McMahon, Moira A; Siliciano, Robert F; Gearhart, Patricia J; Stivers, James T

    2010-12-24

    Nucleic acid cytidine deaminases of the activation-induced deaminase (AID)/APOBEC family are critical players in active and innate immune responses, playing roles as target-directed, purposeful mutators. AID specifically deaminates the host immunoglobulin (Ig) locus to evolve antibody specificity, whereas its close relative, APOBEC3G (A3G), lethally mutates the genomes of retroviral pathogens such as HIV. Understanding the basis for the target-specific action of these enzymes is essential, as mistargeting poses significant risks, potentially promoting oncogenesis (AID) or fostering drug resistance (A3G). AID prefers to deaminate cytosine in WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) motifs, whereas A3G favors deamination of CCC motifs. This specificity is largely dictated by a single, divergent protein loop in the enzyme family that recognizes the DNA sequence. Through grafting of this substrate-recognition loop, we have created enzyme variants of A3G and AID with altered local targeting to directly evaluate the role of sequence specificity on immune function. We find that grafted loops placed in the A3G scaffold all produced efficient restriction of HIV but that foreign loops in the AID scaffold compromised hypermutation and class switch recombination. Local targeting, therefore, appears alterable for innate defense against retroviruses by A3G but important for adaptive antibody maturation catalyzed by AID. Notably, AID targeting within the Ig locus is proportionally correlated to its in vitro ability to target WRC sequences rather than non-WRC sequences. Although other mechanisms may also contribute, our results suggest that local sequence targeting by AID/APOBEC3 enzymes represents an elegant example of co-evolution of enzyme specificity with its target DNA sequence.

  15. Differential Expression of the Eicosanoid Pathway in Patients With Localized or Mucosal Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    França-Costa, Jaqueline; Andrade, Bruno B; Khouri, Ricardo; Van Weyenbergh, Johan; Malta-Santos, Hayna; da Silva Santos, Claire; Brodyskn, Cláudia I; Costa, Jackson M; Barral, Aldina; Bozza, Patrícia T; Boaventura, Viviane; Borges, Valeria M

    2016-04-01

    Unfettered inflammation is thought to play critical role in the development of different clinical forms of tegumentary leishmaniasis. Eicosanoids are potent mediators of inflammation and tightly associated with modulation of immune responses. In this cross-sectional exploratory study, we addressed whether targets from the eicosanoid biosynthetic pathway, assessed by multiplexed expression assays in lesion biopsy and plasma specimens, could highlight a distinct biosignature in patients with mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL) or localized cutaneous leishmaniasis (LCL). Differences in immunopathogenesis between MCL and LCL may result from an imbalance between prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which may serve as targets for future host-directed therapies.

  16. [Flora Differentiation among Local Ecotopes in the Transzonal Study of Forest-Steppe and Steppe Mounds].

    PubMed

    Lisetskii, F N; Sudnik-Wojcikowska, B; Moysiyenko, I I

    2016-01-01

    Flora similarity was assessed using complete floristic lists of five ecotopes in each of four mounds along the transect from meadow steppes to desert steppes. It was found that the circumapical similitude of floras is more significant than the expositional similitude. Soil analysis in separate ecotopes showed that regular changes in the biogeochemical features are manifested along the topographic gradient and under the effect of the insolation exposure of slopes in local (mound) ecosystems. It was noted that the slopes are characterized by the most abundant steppe vegetation classes in the phytosociological spectrum of mound ecotopes.

  17. [Flora Differentiation among Local Ecotopes in the Transzonal Study of Forest-Steppe and Steppe Mounds].

    PubMed

    Lisetskii, F N; Sudnik-Wojcikowska, B; Moysiyenko, I I

    2016-01-01

    Flora similarity was assessed using complete floristic lists of five ecotopes in each of four mounds along the transect from meadow steppes to desert steppes. It was found that the circumapical similitude of floras is more significant than the expositional similitude. Soil analysis in separate ecotopes showed that regular changes in the biogeochemical features are manifested along the topographic gradient and under the effect of the insolation exposure of slopes in local (mound) ecosystems. It was noted that the slopes are characterized by the most abundant steppe vegetation classes in the phytosociological spectrum of mound ecotopes. PMID:27396182

  18. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  19. Differential Chromosomal Localization of Centromeric Histone CENP-A Contributes to Nematode Programmed DNA Elimination.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jianbin; Neff, Ashley; Kratzer, Stella; Kimura, Hiroshi; Davis, Richard E

    2016-08-30

    The stability of the genome is paramount to organisms. However, diverse eukaryotes carry out programmed DNA elimination in which portions or entire chromsomes are lost in early development or during sex determination. During early development of the parasitic nematode, Ascaris suum, 13% of the genome is eliminated. How different genomic segments are reproducibly retained or discarded is unknown. Here, we show that centromeric histone CENP-A localization plays a key role in this process. We show that Ascaris chromosomes are holocentric during germline mitoses, with CENP-A distributed along their length. Prior to DNA elimination in the four-cell embryo, CENP-A is significantly diminished in chromosome regions that will be lost. This leads to the absence of kinetochores and microtubule attachment sites necessary for chromosome segregation, resulting in loss of these regions upon mitosis. Our data suggest that changes in CENP-A localization specify which portions of chromosomes will be lost during programmed DNA elimination. PMID:27545882

  20. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  1. Phosphorylation of nucleoporin Tpr governs its differential localization and is required for its mitotic function.

    PubMed

    Rajanala, Kalpana; Sarkar, Anshuk; Jhingan, Gagan Deep; Priyadarshini, Raina; Jalan, Manisha; Sengupta, Sagar; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2014-08-15

    A major constituent of the nuclear basket region of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), nucleoporin Tpr, plays roles in regulating multiple important processes. We have previously established that Tpr is phosphorylated in both a MAP-kinase-dependent and MAP-kinase-independent manner, and that Tpr acts as both a substrate and as a scaffold for ERK2 (also known as MAPK1). Here, we report the identification of S2059 and S2094 as the major novel ERK-independent phosphorylation sites and T1677, S2020, S2023 and S2034 as additional ERK-independent phosphorylation sites found in the Tpr protein in vivo. Our results suggest that protein kinase A phosphorylates the S2094 residue and that the site is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis. Furthermore, we find that Tpr is phosphorylated at the S2059 residue by CDK1 and the phosphorylated form distinctly localizes with chromatin during telophase. Abrogation of S2059 phosphorylation abolishes the interaction of Tpr with Mad1, thus compromising the localization of both Mad1 and Mad2 proteins, resulting in cell cycle defects. The identification of novel phosphorylation sites on Tpr and the observations presented in this study allow better understanding of Tpr functions.

  2. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts.

  3. Differential transition metal uptake and fluorescent probe localization in hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Kay, Alan R; Rumschik, Sean M

    2011-08-01

    Metals are taken up by the combined action of metal transporters and ion channels. In this communication we have measured the uptake of the biologically important transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd by rat and mouse hippocampal slices using the fluorescent probes FluoZin-3 (FZ3) and Newport Green (NPG), introduced by acetoxymethyl ester (AM) loading. The combination of metals and probes is also used to attempt to localize cellular sites into which metals translocate. We show that FZ3 and NPG partition into different cellular compartments; FZ3 into neuropil, whereas NPG localizes in neuropil and compartments within the cell bodies of neurons. Ni, Zn and Cd pass across the plasma membrane and then accumulate in intracellular vesicles and within intracellular membranes of cell bodies. The latter accumulate Cd, while synaptic vesicles take up Co. The passage of Mn, Cu and Fe into cells can be detected but there is some uncertainty about their disposition within the cell. All of our experiments are consistent with metals accumulating in intracellular compartments rather than the cytoplasm. Whether and to what extent there are transient elevations of free zinc levels in the cytoplasm remains unclear.

  4. Postnatal neurogenesis in the olfactory bulbs of a lizard. A tritiated thymidine autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Verdugo, J M; Llahi, S; Ferrer, I; Lopez-Garcia, C

    1989-04-10

    Autoradiographically labelled cells were observed in the olfactory bulbs of perinatal, young and adult specimens of the lizard Podarcis hispanica following intraperitoneal injection of tritiated thymidine (5 muCi/g b.wt). After survival times of 7, 18 and 28 days labelled cells were found in the granular layer of both main and accessory bulbs. A few labelled cells were observed in the ependyma, mitral and glomerular layer. In the main olfactory bulb, one week of survival time resulted in labelling of cells in the innermost part of the granular layer. Longer survival times (up to 4 weeks), resulted in labelling of cells mainly in the outermost part of the granular layer. This spatio-temporal gradient was not observed in the accessory bulb. Nevertheless, longer survival times resulted in greater number of labelled cells located in the dorsal and ventral parts of the granular layer of the accessory bulb.

  5. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  6. Regulation and localization of TOB and IFR1 in differentiating red cells.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Simone K; Baumann, Rosemarie; Dragon, Stefanie

    2007-08-10

    In differentiating red blood cells (RBCs) of the chick embryo, the synthesis of carbonic anhydrase (CAII) and pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase (P5N-I) is triggered by the hypoxic mediators norepinephrine and adenosine via receptor-mediated cAMP formation. The process is accompanied by the induction of IFR1 and TOB which are putative regulators of transcription or translation in different cell types. The present investigation studied the erythroid TOB and IFR1 expression: mRNA and protein are up-regulated in post-mitotic RBCs from D11-19 treated with cAMP-elevating agonists. In contrast, immature RBCs of early embryos (D5-7) fail to synthesize a significant amount of IFR1/TOB. In D11 RBCs, TOB and IFR1 are cytosolic proteins with different half-lives (TOB<4h, IFR1>12h). Cytosolic fractionation characterized TOB as a free soluble protein while the abundant IFR1 (c(max) approximately 3microM) is completely associated with the ribosomal fraction. A putative function of both proteins as translational regulators is discussed.

  7. Kullback-Leibler Divergence-Based Differential Evolution Markov Chain Filter for Global Localization of Mobile Robots.

    PubMed

    Martín, Fernando; Moreno, Luis; Garrido, Santiago; Blanco, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important skills desired for a mobile robot is the ability to obtain its own location even in challenging environments. The information provided by the sensing system is used here to solve the global localization problem. In our previous work, we designed different algorithms founded on evolutionary strategies in order to solve the aforementioned task. The latest developments are presented in this paper. The engine of the localization module is a combination of the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling technique and the Differential Evolution method, which results in a particle filter based on the minimization of a fitness function. The robot's pose is estimated from a set of possible locations weighted by a cost value. The measurements of the perceptive sensors are used together with the predicted ones in a known map to define a cost function to optimize. Although most localization methods rely on quadratic fitness functions, the sensed information is processed asymmetrically in this filter. The Kullback-Leibler divergence is the basis of a cost function that makes it possible to deal with different types of occlusions. The algorithm performance has been checked in a real map. The results are excellent in environments with dynamic and unmodeled obstacles, a fact that causes occlusions in the sensing area. PMID:26389914

  8. Kullback-Leibler Divergence-Based Differential Evolution Markov Chain Filter for Global Localization of Mobile Robots

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Fernando; Moreno, Luis; Garrido, Santiago; Blanco, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important skills desired for a mobile robot is the ability to obtain its own location even in challenging environments. The information provided by the sensing system is used here to solve the global localization problem. In our previous work, we designed different algorithms founded on evolutionary strategies in order to solve the aforementioned task. The latest developments are presented in this paper. The engine of the localization module is a combination of the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling technique and the Differential Evolution method, which results in a particle filter based on the minimization of a fitness function. The robot’s pose is estimated from a set of possible locations weighted by a cost value. The measurements of the perceptive sensors are used together with the predicted ones in a known map to define a cost function to optimize. Although most localization methods rely on quadratic fitness functions, the sensed information is processed asymmetrically in this filter. The Kullback-Leibler divergence is the basis of a cost function that makes it possible to deal with different types of occlusions. The algorithm performance has been checked in a real map. The results are excellent in environments with dynamic and unmodeled obstacles, a fact that causes occlusions in the sensing area. PMID:26389914

  9. Differential subcellular localization of cholesterol, gangliosides, and glycosaminoglycans in murine models of mucopolysaccharide storage disorders.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Robert; Dobrenis, Kostantin; Walkley, Steven U

    2004-12-20

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs) are a complex family of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by failure to degrade heparan sulfate (HS) and/or other types of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) secondary to the absence of specific lysosomal enzymes. An accompanying storage of glycosphingolipids (GSLs), most notably GM2 and GM3 gangliosides, has also been documented to occur in many types of MPS disease and is believed to be caused by secondary inhibition of GSL-degradative enzymes by intracellular GAG accumulation. We have documented the presence of secondary ganglioside accumulation in mouse models of several MPS disorders (types I, IIIA, IIIB, and VII) and report that this storage is accompanied by sequestration of free cholesterol in a manner similar to that observed in primary gangliosidoses. Using confocal microscopy, we evaluated the cellular distribution of cholesterol, GM2 and GM3 gangliosides, and HS in brains of mice with MPS IIIA disease. Unexpectedly, we found that although both gangliosides often accumulated in the same neurons, they were consistently located in separate populations of cytoplasmic vesicles. Additionally, GM3 ganglioside only partially co-localized with the primary storage material (HS), and cholesterol likewise only partially co-localized with the GM2 and GM3 gangliosides. These findings raise significant questions about the mechanism(s) responsible for secondary accumulation of storage materials in MPS disease. Furthermore, given that GSLs and cholesterol are constituents of membrane rafts believed critical in signal transduction events in neurons, their co-sequestration in individual neurons suggests the presence of defects in the composition, trafficking, and/or recycling of raft components and thus possible new mechanisms to explain neuronal dysfunction in MPS disorders.

  10. Differential localization and functional specialization of centrin analogs in the parasitic ciliate Trichodina pediculus.

    PubMed

    Viguès, Bernard; Colombet, Jonathan; Damaj, Raghida

    2016-09-01

    Trichodinids are ciliated protozoans that reversibly attach to the tegument of marine and freshwater host-organisms via an adhesive disc. In this study, we have used permeabilized cell models of Trichodina pediculus to examine the distribution of centrins, a Ca(2+)-binding protein associated with centrioles and/or contractile filamentous structures in a large number of protists. The previous finding that filamentous material of the adhesive disc comprised a 23-kDa centrin analog suggested that this protein might be a disc-specific isoform. This possibility was explored through immunolabeling methods using two distinct antibodies, anti-ecto-endoplasmic boundary (EEB) and anti-Hscen2 previously shown to react respectively with centrin-based filament networks and with centrioles. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that anti-EEB reacts with filamentous material of the disc but not with basal bodies. Conversely, anti-Hscen2 cross-reacted with basal bodies but failed to label any type of structure occurring in the disc area. More detailed data on localization of this protein was obtained by immunoelectron microscopy showing gold particles deposits in the lumen of basal bodies. The different patterns revealed by this immunochemical approach suggest that the two protein antigens concerned by this study are distinct centrin isoforms that presumably perform organelle-specific function in the ciliate T. pediculus.

  11. The instantaneous local transition of a stable equilibrium to a chaotic attractor in piecewise-smooth systems of differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, D. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    An attractor of a piecewise-smooth continuous system of differential equations can bifurcate from a stable equilibrium to a more complicated invariant set when it collides with a switching manifold under parameter variation. Here numerical evidence is provided to show that this invariant set can be chaotic. The transition occurs locally (in a neighbourhood of a point) and instantaneously (for a single critical parameter value). This phenomenon is illustrated for the normal form of a boundary equilibrium bifurcation in three dimensions using parameter values adapted from of a piecewise-linear model of a chaotic electrical circuit. The variation of a secondary parameter reveals a period-doubling cascade to chaos with windows of periodicity. The dynamics is well approximated by a one-dimensional unimodal map which explains the bifurcation structure. The robustness of the attractor is also investigated by studying the influence of nonlinear terms.

  12. Effect of Local Heating and Cooling on Cambial Activity and Cell Differentiation in the Stem of Norway Spruce (Picea abies)

    PubMed Central

    GRIČAR, JOŽICA; ZUPANČIČ, MARTIN; ČUFAR, KATARINA; KOCH, GERALD; SCHMITT, UWE; OVEN, PRIMOŽ

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims The effect of heating and cooling on cambial activity and cell differentiation in part of the stem of Norway spruce (Picea abies) was investigated. • Methods A heating experiment (23–25 °C) was carried out in spring, before normal reactivation of the cambium, and cooling (9–11 °C) at the height of cambial activity in summer. The cambium, xylem and phloem were investigated by means of light- and transmission electron microscopy and UV-microspectrophotometry in tissues sampled from living trees. • Key Results Localized heating for 10 d initiated cambial divisions on the phloem side and after 20 d also on the xylem side. In a control tree, regular cambial activity started after 30 d. In the heat-treated sample, up to 15 earlywood cells undergoing differentiation were found to be present. The response of the cambium to stem cooling was less pronounced, and no anatomical differences were detected between the control and cool-treated samples after 10 or 20 d. After 30 d, latewood started to form in the sample exposed to cooling. In addition, almost no radially expanding tracheids were observed and the cambium consisted of only five layers of cells. Low temperatures reduced cambial activity, as indicated by the decreased proportion of latewood. On the phloem side, no alterations were observed among cool-treated and non-treated samples. • Conclusions Heating and cooling can influence cambial activity and cell differentiation in Norway spruce. However, at the ultrastructural and topochemical levels, no changes were observed in the pattern of secondary cell-wall formation and lignification or in lignin structure, respectively. PMID:16613904

  13. Separate localization of light signal perception for sun or shade type chloroplast and palisade tissue differentiation in Chenopodium album.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Terashima, I

    2001-12-01

    Physiological and ecological characteristics of sun and shade leaves have been compared in detail, but their developmental processes, in particular their light sensory mechanisms, are still unknown. This study compares the development of sun and shade leaves of Chenopodium album L., paying special attention to the light sensory site. We hypothesized that mature leaves sense the light environment, and that this information determines anatomy of new leaves. To examine this hypothesis, we shaded plants partially. In the low-light apex treatment (LA), the shoot apex with developing leaves was covered by a cap made of a shading screen and received photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD) of 60 micromol m(-2 )s(-1), while the remaining mature leaves were exposed to 360 micromol m(-2 )s(-1). In the high-light apex treatment (HA), the apex was exposed while the mature leaves were covered by a shade screen. After these treatments for 6 d, we analyzed leaf anatomy and chloroplast ultrastructure. The anatomy of LA leaves with a two-layered palisade tissue was similar to that of sun leaves, while their chloroplasts were shade-type with thick grana. The anatomy of HA leaves and shade leaves was similar and both had one-layered palisade tissue, while chloroplasts of HA leaves were sun-type having thin grana. These results clearly demonstrate that new leaves differentiate depending on the light environment of mature leaves, while chloroplasts differentiate depending on the local light environment.

  14. Differential expression of embryonic epicardial progenitor markers and localization of cardiac fibrosis in adult ischemic injury and hypertensive heart disease.

    PubMed

    Braitsch, Caitlin M; Kanisicak, Onur; van Berlo, Jop H; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Yutzey, Katherine E

    2013-12-01

    During embryonic heart development, the transcription factors Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 regulate activation and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells, including fibroblast lineages. Expression of these epicardial progenitor factors and localization of cardiac fibrosis were examined in mouse models of cardiovascular disease and in human diseased hearts. Following ischemic injury in mice, epicardial fibrosis is apparent in the thickened layer of subepicardial cells that express Wt1, Tbx18, and Tcf21. Perivascular fibrosis with predominant expression of Tcf21, but not Wt1 or Tbx18, occurs in mouse models of pressure overload or hypertensive heart disease, but not following ischemic injury. Areas of interstitial fibrosis in ischemic and hypertensive hearts actively express Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18. In all areas of fibrosis, cells that express epicardial progenitor factors are distinct from CD45-positive immune cells. In human diseased hearts, differential expression of Tcf21, Wt1, and Tbx18 also is detected with epicardial, perivascular, and interstitial fibrosis, indicating conservation of reactivated developmental mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis in mice and humans. Together, these data provide evidence for distinct fibrogenic mechanisms that include Tcf21, separate from Wt1 and Tbx18, in different fibroblast populations in response to specific types of cardiac injury.

  15. New 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic modeling and nonlinear inversion using global magnetic integral and local differential equation

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, G.; Li, J.; Majer, E.; Zuo, D.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes a new 3D parallel GILD electromagnetic (EM) modeling and nonlinear inversion algorithm. The algorithm consists of: (a) a new magnetic integral equation instead of the electric integral equation to solve the electromagnetic forward modeling and inverse problem; (b) a collocation finite element method for solving the magnetic integral and a Galerkin finite element method for the magnetic differential equations; (c) a nonlinear regularizing optimization method to make the inversion stable and of high resolution; and (d) a new parallel 3D modeling and inversion using a global integral and local differential domain decomposition technique (GILD). The new 3D nonlinear electromagnetic inversion has been tested with synthetic data and field data. The authors obtained very good imaging for the synthetic data and reasonable subsurface EM imaging for the field data. The parallel algorithm has high parallel efficiency over 90% and can be a parallel solver for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic modeling and inversion. The parallel GILD algorithm can be extended to develop a high resolution and large scale seismic and hydrology modeling and inversion in the massively parallel computer.

  16. The pathways mediating affective defense and quiet biting attack behavior from the midbrain central gray of the cat: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M B; Barrett, J A; Siegel, A

    1987-12-22

    The purpose of this study was to describe the pathways which mediate feline affective defense and quiet biting attack behavior elicited from the midbrain central gray. In these experiments, methods of [3H]leucine and 2-deoxy-[14C]glucose (2-DG) radioautography were utilized in concert with the technique of electrical and chemical brain stimulation. Affective defense behavior elicited from the midbrain central gray is characterized by marked vocalization such as hissing and growling, pupillary dilatation, urination and piloerection. In contrast, quiet biting attack elicited from the midbrain central gray lacks overt autonomic signs observed with affective defense response as well as the stalking component which is typically associated with stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. Nevertheless, central gray-elicited attack resulted in a directed bite of the neck of an anesthetized rat in a manner similar to that observed from the hypothalamus. Affective defense was elicited from the dorsal half of the midbrain central gray, while quiet biting attack was obtained following stimulation of the ventral half of the midbrain central gray, thus indicating a functional differentiation of the central gray with respect to these two forms of aggression. In a separate series of experiments, affective defense or quiet biting attack response was identified by electrical stimulation through a cannula electrode situated in the midbrain central gray. The affective defense responses were subsequently elicited following microinjections of D,L-homocysteic acid through the same cannula electrode in order to demonstrate that these responses were the result of direct stimulation of cell bodies within the central gray. Then, one of the following autoradiographic tracing procedures was utilized: (1) [3H]leucine was injected through a cannula electrode and the animal was sacrificed after a 4- to 14-day survival period; or (2) a 2-DG solution was systemically injected and electrical

  17. Autoradiographic analysis of 3H-glutamate, 3H-dopamine, and 3H-GABA accumulation in rabbit retina after kainic acid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, C.K.; Redburn, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    We have previously reported that exposure of isolated rabbit retina to 10(-3) M kainic acid produces profound morphological changes in specific retinal neurons (Hampton et al, 1981). We noted specific swelling of horizontal cell bodies and neurites, necrosis of cell bodies in the amacrine and ganglion cell layers, and swelling of elements in the inner plexiform layer. We now report a differential sensitivity to kainic acid of specific subclasses of amacrine cells autoradiographically labeled with 3H-glutamate, 3H-GABA, or 3H-dopamine. Three different effects were observed: (1) Labeling of neurons after incubation in 3H-glutamate was uniformly reduced while labeling of glia was much less affected. (2) The accumulation of 3H-dopamine was also decreased by kainic acid in two of the three labeled bands of the inner plexiform layer. The outermost labeled band was insensitive to kainic acid at the highest concentration tested (10(-2) M). These findings provide a basis for the subclassification of dopaminergic amacrine cells into at least two subclasses based on their sensitivity to kainic acid. (3) Kainic acid caused a dramatic increase in the labeling of GABAergic amacrine cell bodies and their terminals. This increased intensity may reflect a compensatory increase in uptake activity in response to kainic acid-induced depletion of endogenous GABA stores. These results confirm the highly toxic nature of kainic acid and demonstrate a high degree of specificity and complexity in its action in the retina.

  18. Possibility between earthquake and explosion seismogram differentiation by discrete stochastic non-Markov processes and local Hurst exponent analysis.

    PubMed

    Yulmetyev, R; Gafarov, F; Hänggi, P; Nigmatullin, R; Kayumov, S

    2001-12-01

    The basic scientific point of this paper is to draw the attention of researchers to new possibilities of differentiation of similar signals having different nature. One example of such kinds of signals is presented by seismograms containing recordings of earthquakes (EQ's) and technogenic explosions (TE's). EQ's are among the most dramatic phenomena in nature. We propose here a discrete stochastic model for possible solution of a problem of strong EQ forecasting and differentiation of TE's from the weak EQ's. Theoretical analysis is performed by two independent methods: by using statistical theory of discrete non-Markov stochastic processes [Phys. Rev. E 62, 6178 (2000)] and the local Hurst exponent. The following Earth states have been considered among them: before (Ib) and during (I) strong EQ, during weak EQ (II) and during TE (III), and in a calm state of Earth's core (IV). The estimation of states I, II, and III has been made on the particular examples of Turkey (1999) EQ's, state IV has been taken as an example of Earth's state before underground TE. Time recordings of seismic signals of the first four dynamic orthogonal collective variables, six various planes of phase portrait of four-dimensional phase space of orthogonal variables and the local Hurst exponent have been calculated for the dynamic analysis of states of systems I-IV. The analysis of statistical properties of seismic time series I-IV has been realized with the help of a set of discrete time-dependent functions (time correlation function and first three memory functions), their power spectra, and the first three points in the statistical spectrum of non-Markovity parameters. In all systems studied we have found a bizarre combination of the following spectral characteristics: the fractal frequency spectra adjustable by phenomena of usual and restricted self-organized criticality, spectra of white and color noises and unusual alternation of Markov and non-Markov effects of long-range memory

  19. Trpm4 differentially regulates Th1 and Th2 function by altering calcium signaling and NFAT localization

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Hildner, Kai; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Allen, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    T helper cell subsets have unique calcium (Ca2+) signals when activated with identical stimuli. The regulation of these Ca2+ signals and their correlation to the biological function of each T cell subset remains unclear. Trpm4 is a Ca2+-activated cation channel that we found is expressed at higher levels in Th2 cells compared to Th1 cells. Inhibition of Trpm4 expression increased Ca2+ influx and oscillatory levels in Th2 cells and decreased influx and oscillations in Th1 cells. This inhibition of Trpm4 expression also significantly altered T cell cytokine production and motility. Our experiments revealed that decreasing Trpm4 levels divergently regulates nuclear localization of NFATc1. Consistent with this, gene profiling did not show Trpm4 dependent transcriptional regulation and T-bet and GATA-3 levels remain identical. Thus, Trpm4 is expressed at different levels on T helper cells and plays a distinctive role in T cell function by differentially regulating Ca2+ signaling and NFATc1 localization. PMID:20656926

  20. Differential expression of HLA-G and ILT-2 receptor in human tuberculosis: Localized versus disseminated disease.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Abhinav; Thakral, Deepshi; Mourya, Manish K; Singh, Amar; Mohan, Anant; Bhatnagar, Anuj K; Mitra, Dipendra K; Kanga, Uma

    2016-09-01

    Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) is an anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive molecule that can modulate immune cell activation. The role of HLA-G in tuberculosis, an immune-mediated and chronic bacterial disease remains to be elucidated. We investigated the expression profile of soluble and membrane bound HLA-G in pulmonary TB (PTB), TB pleural effusion (TB-PE, localized disease) and Miliary TB (disseminated form). The expression of HLA-G receptor, ILT-2 was also determined on the immune cells. We observed that the plasma sHLA-G levels were significantly increased in Miliary TB than in TB-PE patients. In contrast, immunophenotyping revealed that the percent frequency of CD3(+) T cells expressing HLA-G was significantly reduced in Miliary TB as compared to TB-PE, whereas frequency of CD14(+) monocytes expressing HLA-G was significantly higher in TB-PE patients. Strikingly in the TB-PE cases, comparison of disease site, i.e. pleural effusion with peripheral blood showed increased expression of both soluble and surface HLA-G, whereas ILT-2 expressing cells were reduced at the local disease site. Furthermore, we demonstrated that in TB-PE cases, HLA-G expression on CD3(+) T cells was influenced by broad spectrum MMP inhibitor. Thus, differential expression of HLA-G could potentially be a useful biomarker to distinguish different states of TB disease.

  1. Light- and electron-microscopic autoradiographic analysis of proliferating cells during the early stages of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat induced by feeding N-2-fluorenylacetamide in a choline-deficient diet.

    PubMed

    Sell, S; Salman, J

    1984-02-01

    Proliferating cells that appear after feeding the hepatocarcinogen N-2-fluorenylacetamide in a choline-deficient diet were identified by autoradiographic electron and light microscopy. Labeled cells are first seen as nondescript periductular cells 1 day after feeding carcinogen. Proliferation of duct lining cells begins at 2-3 days. For the next three weeks there is proliferation and extension of a mixture of nondescript cells and cells with a duct like appearance from the portal zone into the adjacent liver. By 3-4 weeks the entire liver lobule contains this new cell population. At 3 weeks more differentiated duct like structures are seen at the edge of the advancing new cell population. Newly appearing duct like cells differ from normal duct cells in that they contain AFP and albumin. It is concluded that the new cell population may arise from duct cells or periportal "stem" cells, or both.

  2. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 14/C-labeled 3H-imidazo(4,5-f)quinoline-2-amines in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, K.

    1985-03-01

    The highly mutagenic heterocyclic amines, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (IQ) and 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), are formed during heating of protein-rich foods. In order to gain information about the distribution and fate of IQ and MeIQ in vivo, a whole-body autoradiographic study of i.v.-injected /sup 14/C-labeled IQ and MeIQ has been performed in male NMRI, pregnant NMRI, and female C3H mice. IQ and MeIQ showed similar distribution patterns. At short survival times, the autoradiograms were characterized by an accumulation of radioactivity in metabolic and excretory organs (liver, kidney, bile, urine, gastric and intestinal contents, salivary glands, nasal mucosa, and Harder's gland), as well as in lymphomyeloid tissues (bone marrow, thymus, spleen and lymph nodes) and in endocrine and reproductive tissues (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets, thyroid, hypophysis, testis, epididymis, seminal vesicles, ampulla, and prostate). The liver and kidney cortex were identified as sites of retention of nonextractable radioactivity. IQ and MeIQ showed a strong affinity for melanin. IQ and MeIQ passed the placenta, but no radioactivity was retained in fetal tissues. The results pinpoint the liver as a site of IQ- and MeIQ-mediated toxicity. Future studies of IQ and MeIQ may be guided by and clarify the role of other tissue localizations in the toxicity of IQ and MeIQ.

  3. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of /sup 125/I-pindolol binding in Fischer 344 rat brain: changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density with aging

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.A.; Zahniser, N.R.

    1988-05-01

    Age-related changes in beta-adrenergic receptor density in Fischer 344 rat brain were examined using in vitro /sup 125/I-pindolol (IPIN) binding and quantitative autoradiographic analysis. Localized protein concentrations were determined using a new quantitative histological technique, and these were used to normalize the densities of receptors. Saturation binding studies in brain sections revealed 40-50% decreases in beta-adrenergic receptor density in the thalamus of 23-25-month-old and the cerebellum and brainstem of both 18-19-month-old and 23-25-month-old compared to 4-6-month-old rats. The loss of cerebellar beta-adrenergic receptors may be correlated with reports of deficits in sensitivity to beta-adrenergic-mediated transmission in the cerebellum of aged rats. No changes in specific IPIN binding with age were observed in rat cortex or hippocampus. In all areas examined no age-related differences were observed in receptor affinity. No changes in protein concentration were found in any of the areas examined in the different aged animals. These results demonstrate a region-specific loss of beta-adrenergic receptors with age in the brain of Fischer 344 rats.

  4. Differential localization of SNARE complex proteins SNAP-25, syntaxin, and VAMP during development of the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, M H; Roosevelt, C B; Sakaguchi, D S

    2001-02-12

    SNARE complex proteins have critical functions during regulated vesicular release of neurotransmitter. In addition, they play critical roles during neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis. Although it is clear that the function of any one SNARE complex protein during release of neurotransmitter is dependent on its association with other members of the complex, it is less certain whether their function during development and differentiation is dependent on interaction with one another. Previously, we have observed transient high levels of SNARE complex protein SNAP-25 in developing cholinergic amacrine cells (West Greenlee et al. [1998] J Comp Neurol 394:374-385). In addition, we detected, high levels of SNAP-25 in developing and mature photoreceptors. To better understand the functional significance of these high levels of SNAP-25 expression, we used immunocytochemistry to examine the developmental expression of the three members of the SNARE complex, SNAP-25, Syntaxin, and vesicle associated membrane protein (VAMP/also Synaptobrevin). Our results demonstrate that the high levels of SNAP-25 in cholinergic amacrine cells and photoreceptors are not accompanied by the same relatively high levels of other SNARE complex proteins. These results suggest that high levels of SNAP-25 in specific cell types may function independently of association with Syntaxin and VAMP. In this analysis, we characterized the changing patterns of immunoreactivity for the three SNARE complex proteins during the development and differentiation of the mammalian retina. We have compared the pattern of expression of the core SNARE complex proteins in the Brazilian opossum, Monodelphis domestica, and in the rat and found common patterns of expression between these diverse mammalian species. We observed temporal differences in the onset of immunoreactivity between these three proteins, and differences in their localization within synaptic layers in the developing and mature mammalian retina. This

  5. Unilateral once daily milking locally induces differential gene expression in both mammary tissue and milk epithelial cells revealing mammary remodeling.

    PubMed

    Boutinaud, Marion; Galio, Laurent; Lollivier, Vanessa; Finot, Laurence; Wiart, Sandra; Esquerré, Diane; Devinoy, Eve

    2013-10-16

    Once daily milking reduces milk yield, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet fully understood. Local regulation due to milk stasis in the tissue may contribute to this effect, but such mechanisms have not yet been fully described. To challenge this hypothesis, one udder half of six Holstein dairy cows was milked once a day (ODM), and the other twice a day (TDM). On the 8th day of unilateral ODM, mammary epithelial cells (MEC) were purified from the milk using immunomagnetic separation. Mammary biopsies were harvested from both udder halves. The differences in transcript profiles between biopsies from ODM and TDM udder halves were analyzed by a 22k bovine oligonucleotide array, revealing 490 transcripts that were differentially expressed. The principal category of upregulated transcripts concerned mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and death. We further confirmed remodeling of the mammary tissue by immunohistochemistry, which showed less cell proliferation and more apoptosis in ODM udder halves. Gene expression analyzed by RT-qPCR in MEC purified from milk and mammary biopsies showed a common downregulation of six transcripts (ABCG2, FABP3, NUCB2, RNASE1 and 5, and SLC34A2) but also some discrepancies. First, none of the upregulated transcripts in biopsies varied in milk-purified MEC. Second, only milk-purified MEC showed significant LALBA downregulation, which suggests therefore that they correspond to a mammary epithelial cell subpopulation. Our results, obtained after unilateral milking, suggest that cell remodeling during ODM is due to a local effect, which may be triggered by milk accumulation.

  6. Changes in localization of human discs large (hDlg) during keratinocyte differentiation is associated with expression of alternatively spliced hDlg variants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S. . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk; Calautti, E.; Vanderweil, S.; Nguyen, H.O.; Foley, A.; Baden, H.P.; Viel, A.

    2007-07-15

    Alternative spliced variants of the human discs large (hDlg) tumour suppressor are characterized by combinations of insertions. Here, using insertions I2- and I3-specific antibodies, we show that I2 and I3 variants have distinct distributions in epidermal and cervical epithelia. In skin and cervix, I3 variants are found in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic localization of I3 variants decreases as cervical keratinocytes differentiate, concomitant with relocalization to the cell periphery. I2 variants are found at the cell periphery of differentiated epidermal and cervical keratinocytes. Nuclear localization of I2 variants was evident in both tissues, with concentration of nuclear I2 variants in basal and parabasal cervical keratinocytes. A prominent nuclear localization of hDlg in cells of hyperproliferative layers of psoriatic lesions, but not in mature differentiated keratinocytes, together with I2 redistribution in differentiating keratinocytes, suggests that nuclear hDlg functions may be pertinent to growth of undifferentiated cells. Supporting our findings in squamous tissues, a decrease of nuclear hDlg and an increase of membrane-bound and cytoplasmic hDlg upon calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation were not concomitant processes. Furthermore, we confirm that the exit of I2 variants from the nucleus is linked to stimulation of epithelial differentiation. The dynamic redistribution of hDlg also correlated with a marked increase in the expression of I3 variants while the level of I2 variants showed only a moderate decrease. Because changes in the intracellular distribution of hDlg splice variants, and in their expression levels, correlate with changes in differentiation state we hypothesize that the different hDlg isoforms play distinct roles at various stages of epithelial differentiation.

  7. Ground and building extraction from LiDAR data based on differential morphological profiles and locally fitted surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongus, Domen; Lukač, Niko; Žalik, Borut

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposes a new framework for ground extraction and building detection in LiDAR data. The proposed approach constructs the connectivity of a grid over the LiDAR point-cloud in order to perform multi-scale data decomposition. This is realised by forming a top-hat scale-space using differential morphological profiles (DMPs) on points' residuals from the approximated surface. The geometric attributes of the contained features are estimated by mapping characteristic values from DMPs. Ground definition is achieved by using features' geometry, whilst their surface and regional attributes are additionally considered for building detection. A new algorithm for local fitting surfaces (LoFS) is proposed for extracting planar points. Finally, transitions between planar ground and non-ground regions are observed in order to separate regions of similar geometrical and surface properties but different contexts (i.e. bridges and buildings). The methods were evaluated using ISPRS benchmark datasets and show superior results in comparison to the current state-of-the-art.

  8. Autoradiographic studies of chromosome replication during the cell cycle of Streptococcus faecium

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.L.; Koch, A.L.; Dicker, D.T.; Daneo-Moore, L.

    1986-11-01

    Analysis of the distribution of autoradiographic grains around cells of Streptococcus faecium which had been either continuously or pulse-labeled with tritiated thymidine (mass doubling time, 90 min) showed a non-Poisson distribution even when the distribution of cell sizes in the populations studied was taken into account. These non-Poisson distributions of grains were assumed to reflect the discontinuous nature of chromosome replication. To study this discontinuous process further, an equation was fitted to the grain distribution observed for the pulse-labeled cells that assumed that in any population of cells there were subpopulations in which there were zero, one, or two replicating chromosomes. This analysis predicted an average time for chromosome replication and for the period between completion of rounds of chromosome replication and division of 55 and 43 min, respectively, which were in excellent agreement with estimates made by other techniques. The present investigation extended past studies in indicating that the initiation and completion of rounds of chromosome replication are poorly phased with increases in cell volume and that the amount of chromosome replication may be different in different cell halves.

  9. Decreased benzodiazepine receptor binding in epileptic El mice: A quantitative autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasaka, Y.; Ito, M.; Tsuda, H.; Shiraishi, H.; Oguro, K.; Mutoh, K.; Mikawa, H. )

    1990-09-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors and subtypes were examined in El mice and normal ddY mice with a quantitative autoradiographic technique. Specific (3H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice, which had experienced repeated convulsions, was significantly lower in the cortex and hippocampus than in ddY mice and unstimulated El mice. In the amygdala, specific ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice was lower than in ddY mice. There was a tendency for the ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in these regions in unstimulated El mice to be intermediate between that in stimulated El mice and that in ddY mice, but there was no significant difference between unstimulated El mice and ddY mice. ({sup 3}H)Flunitrazepam binding displaced by CL218,872 was significantly lower in the cortex of stimulated El mice than in that of the other two groups, and in the hippocampus of stimulated than of unstimulated El mice. These data suggest that the decrease in ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam binding in stimulated El mice may be due mainly to that of type 1 receptor and may be the result of repeated convulsions.

  10. Dual tracer autoradiographic study with thallium-201 and radioiodinated fatty acid in cardiomyopathic hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, C.; Kobayashi, A.; Yamazaki, N.

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the usefulness of myocardial scintigraphy with radioiodinated 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-R,S-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) in cardiomyopathy, quantitative dual tracer autoradiographic study with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed in 27 cardiomyopathic Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters and eight normal hamsters. Furthermore, 16 Bio 14.6 Syrian hamsters aged 21 days were divided into verapamil-treated (during 70 days) and control groups (respectively, n = 8), and autoradiography with /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP was performed. Quantitative autoradiography demonstrated an uncoupling of /sup 201/Tl and (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions and a regional heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution in cardiomyopathic hamsters aged more than 2 mo, while normal hamsters showed only mild heterogeneity of (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distribution without an uncoupling of tracers. Age-matched comparison between normal and cardiomyopathic hamsters (5-8 mo old) demonstrated that a difference between their (/sup 125/I)BMIPP distributions are more marked than that between their /sup 201/Tl distributions. Furthermore, (/sup 125/I)BMIPP visualized effects of verapamil on cardiomyopathy more distinctly than did /sup 201/Tl. In conclusion, myocardial imaging with (/sup 123/I)BMIPP could be useful for investigating cardiomyopathy and evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in patients with cardiomyopathy.

  11. Correlation of 125I-LSD autoradiographic labeling with serotonin voltage clamp responses in Aplysia neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.; Kadan, M.J.; Hartig, P.R.; Carpenter, D.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Autoradiographic receptor binding studies using 125I-LSD (2-(125I)lysergic acid diethyamide) revealed intense labelling on the soma of a symmetrically located pair of cells in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia californica. This binding was blocked by micromolar concentrations of serotonin and lower concentrations of the serotonergic antagonists, cyproheptadine and mianserin. Electrophysiological investigation of responses to serotonin of neurons in the left upper quadrant, where one of the labeled neurons is located, revealed a range of serotonin responses. Cells L3 and L6 have a K+ conductance increase in response to serotonin that is not blocked by cyproheptadine or mianserin. Cells L2 and L4 have a biphasic response to serotonin: a Na+ conductance increase, which can be blocked by cyproheptadine and mianserin, followed by a voltage dependent Ca2+ conductance which is blocked by Co2+ but not the serotonergic antagonists. Cell L1, and its symmetrical pair, R1, have in addition to the Na+ and Ca2+ responses observed in L2 and L4, a Cl- conductance increase blocked by LSD, cyproheptadine and mianserin. LSD had little effect on the other responses. The authors conclude that the symmetrically located cells L1 and R1 have a Cl- channel linked to a cyproheptadine- and mianserin-sensitive serotonin receptor that is selectively labelled by 125I-LSD. This receptor has many properties in common with the mammalian serotonin 1C receptor.

  12. The site of action of intrahypothalamic estrogen implants in feminine sexual behavior: an autoradiographic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, P.G.; Krieger, M.S.; Barfield, R.J.; McEwen, B.S.; Pfaff, D.W.

    1982-11-01

    Estrogenic stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamus is sufficient to prime progesterone-facilitated estrous behavior in ovariectomized rats. To determine precisely the site(s) of estrogenic stimulation and the locus of its priming action on estrous behavior, we used steroid autoradiographic methods to assess the diffusion of (/sup 3/H)estradiol ((/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/) from behaviorally effective implants diluted 1:300 with cholesterol. Ovariectomized rats received (/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/-cholesterol implants aimed at the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN). Females were tested twice for feminine sexual behavior after stereotaxic surgery. They received progesterone on the day of behavioral testing. Animals were killed on the day after the second behavior test, cannulae were removed, and the brains were frozen rapidly and processed for autoradiography. Five of eight females with bilateral implants aimed at the VMN exhibited female sexual behavior in at least one of the two tests. Of these, four also showed proceptive behavior. Histological examination of brain sections indicated that behaviorally effective implants were located in, or adjacent to, the central portions of VMN. Implants from nonreceptive animals were located at the extreme anterior or posterior aspects of the VMN. The data collected are consistent with the view that estrogen acts within a sharply defined region of the VMN to prime estrons behavior.

  13. Chromosomal and Autoradiographic Studies of Cells Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus

    PubMed Central

    Waubke, Rainer; zur Hausen, Harald; Henle, Werner

    1968-01-01

    The induction of chromosomal aberrations by herpes simplex virus (HSV) and the interaction between viral deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and chromosomes have been studied (i) by infection of the BHK-21 line of hamster kidney cells at multiplicities ranging from 0.5 to 100 followed by 1-hr pulses of 3H-thymidine preceding preparation at varying intervals of metaphases and autoradiography, and (ii) by use of 3H-thymidine-labeled HSV for infection, chromosomal, and autoradiographic analyses at intervals thereafter. The results revealed that (i) chromosomal lesions develop prior to, and thus are independent of, viral DNA synthesis; (ii) HSV is capable of replicating in cells during the late G-2 period or in metaphase; (iii) most of the viral DNA remains unassociated with chromosomes and is not detectable at sites of chromosomal lesions; (iv) the capacity of the virus to cause chromosomal aberrations is four times less sensitive to inactivation by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation than its infectious property; and (v) after large doses of UV, invasion of the nuclei by the irradiated virus is reduced. These observations indicate that the chromosomal lesions induced by HSV result most likely from action of an early enzyme under control of the viral genome. This explanation is proposed also for the effects of adenovirus type 12 on chromosomes. Images PMID:4302015

  14. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 125/I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Skofitsch, G.; Sills, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-11-01

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. /sup 125/I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions.

  15. Population genetics of the understory fishtail palm Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti in Belize: high genetic connectivity with local differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cibrián-Jaramillo, Angélica; Bacon, Christine D; Garwood, Nancy C; Bateman, Richard M; Thomas, Meredith M; Russell, Steve; Bailey, C Donovan; Hahn, William J; Bridgewater, Samuel GM; DeSalle, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Developing a greater understanding of population genetic structure in lowland tropical plant species is highly relevant to our knowledge of increasingly fragmented forests and to the conservation of threatened species. Specific studies are particularly needed for taxa whose population dynamics are further impacted by human harvesting practices. One such case is the fishtail or xaté palm (Chamaedorea ernesti-augusti) of Central America, whose wild-collected leaves are becoming progressively more important to the global ornamental industry. We use microsatellite markers to describe the population genetics of this species in Belize and test the effects of climate change and deforestation on its recent and historical effective population size. Results We found high levels of inbreeding coupled with moderate or high allelic diversity within populations. Overall high gene flow was observed, with a north and south gradient and ongoing differentiation at smaller spatial scales. Immigration rates among populations were more difficult to discern, with minimal evidence for isolation by distance. We infer a tenfold reduction in effective population size ca. 10,000 years ago, but fail to detect changes attributable to Mayan or contemporary deforestation. Conclusion Populations of C. ernesti-augusti are genetically heterogeneous demes at a local spatial scale, but are widely connected at a regional level in Belize. We suggest that the inferred patterns in population genetic structure are the result of the colonization of this species into Belize following expansion of humid forests in combination with demographic and mating patterns. Within populations, we hypothesize that low aggregated population density over large areas, short distance pollen dispersal via thrips, low adult survival, and low fruiting combined with early flowering may contribute towards local inbreeding via genetic drift. Relatively high levels of regional connectivity are likely the result of

  16. High level expression of differentially localized BAG-1 isoforms in some oestrogen receptor-positive human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brimmell, M; Burns, J S; Munson, P; McDonald, L; O’Hare, M J; Lakhani, S R; Packham, G

    1999-01-01

    Sensitivity to oestrogens and apoptosis are critical determinants of the development and progression of breast cancer and reflect closely linked pathways in breast epithelial cells. For example, induction of BCL-2 oncoprotein expression by oestrogen contributes to suppression of apoptosis and BCL-2 and oestrogen receptor (ER) are frequently co-expressed in tumours. BAG-1/HAP is a multifunctional protein which complexes with BCL-2 and steroid hormone receptors (including the ER), and can suppress apoptosis and influence steroid hormone-dependent transcription. Therefore, analysis of expression of BAG-1 in human breast cancer is of considerable interest. BAG-1 was readily detected by immunostaining in normal breast epithelial cells and most ER-positive tumours, but was undetectable or weakly expressed in ER-negative tumours. BAG-1 positive cells showed a predominantly cytoplasmic or cytoplasmic plus nuclear distribution of staining. A correlation between ER and BAG-1 was also evident in breast cancer derived cell lines, as all lines examined with functional ER expression also expressed high levels of BAG-1. In addition to the prototypical 36 kDa BAG-1 isoform, breast cancer cells expressed higher molecular weight isoforms and, in contrast to BCL-2, BAG-1 expression was independent of oestrogens. BAG-1 isoforms were differentially localized to the nucleus or cytoplasm and this was also independent of oestrogens. These results demonstrate a close association between BAG-1 and functional ER expression and suggest BAG-1 may be useful as a therapeutic target or prognostic marker in breast cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10576663

  17. Perichondrial and endochondral components of mandibular condylar growth: morphometric and autoradiographic quantitation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Luder, H U

    1994-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the contribution of the perichondrial and endochondral components to rapid and slow overall condylar growth, mandibular condyles from rats aged 21 and 45 d as well as 3 and 6 months were examined by light microscopy. A morphometric analysis served to estimate the size of cells and the amount of extracellular matrix per cell in the various tissue layers beneath the articular surface. Quantitative evaluation of autoradiographic labelling due to the presence of [3H]-thymidine, [3H]-proline, and [35S]-sulphate 1.5 or 2 h and 5 d after injection of the tracer was used to determine the velocity of overall condylar growth. A combination of the two types of results allowed the calculation of daily rates in (1) the generation of new chondrocytes, constituting the perichondrial growth component, and the endochondral components comprising (2) net accumulation of extracellular matrix in the cartilage and (3) enlargement of the chondrocytes. It was observed that the 3 factors contributed, respectively, by about 10-25, 30 and 45-60% to rapid growth and by about 75, 15 and 10% to slow growth. Thus when growth slowed, the contribution of chondrocyte enlargement declined markedly and that of matrix accumulation slightly, while the contribution of new cell generation increased correspondingly. Declines in chondrocyte enlargement and in accumulation of cartilage matrix that was related mainly to decreasing proteoglycan formation were in good agreement with age-associated variation in weight gain, while peak rates in generation of new chondrocytes appeared to be delayed against peak somatic growth. It is concluded that (1) endochondral components contribute most to particularly rapid condylar growth, exceeding the perichondrial component, and (2) endochondral components of condylar growth are regulated by systemic factors that also control somatic growth. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7649794

  18. Some relatively simple steps toward a computer system for the analysis of two-dimensional gel-electrophoresis autoradiographs.

    PubMed

    Fox, S H

    1982-04-01

    A computerized system for the quantitative comparison of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel autoradiographs is being developed that requires relatively limited hardware resources. Two fast, simple, and stable programs--one for background and streak subtraction and one for peak detection--have been developed and tested. Two methods developed by others--one for image smoothing and one for peak matching--also have been tested. A very simple spot-density integration program that works on isolated spots has been written and is being developed further.

  19. Localization of Post-Translational Modifications in Peptide Mixtures via High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Followed by Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Matthew A.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-09-01

    Precise localization of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on proteins and peptides is an outstanding challenge in proteomics. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has dramatically advanced PTM analyses, mixtures of localization variants that commonly coexist in cells often require prior separation. Although differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) achieves broad variant resolution, the need for standards to identify the features has limited the utility of approach. Here we demonstrate full a priori characterization of variant mixtures by high-resolution FAIMS coupled to ETD and the procedures to systematically extract the FAIMS spectra for all variants from such data.

  20. A Model of the Differential Representation of Signal Novelty in the Local Field Potentials and Spiking Activity of the Ventrolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Tsunada, Joji; Cohen, Yale E.

    2014-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) and spiking activity reflect different types of information procssing. For example, neurophysiological studies indicate that signal novelty in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex is differentially represented by LFPs and spiking activity: LFPs habituate to repeated stimulus presentations, whereas spiking activity does not. The neural mechanisms that allow for this differential representation between LFPs and spiking activity are not clear. Here, we model and simulate LFPs and spiking activity of neurons in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex in order to elucidate potential mechanisms underlying this differential representation. We demonstrate that dynamic negative-feedback loops cause LFPs to habituate in response to repeated presentations of the same stimulus while spiking activity is maintained. This disassociation between LFPs and spiking activity may be a mechanism by which LFPs code stimulus novelty, whereas spiking activity carries abstract information, such as category membership and decision-related activity. PMID:23020111

  1. Autoradiographic evidence for two classes of mu opioid binding sites in rat brain using (/sup 125/I)FK33824

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.B.; Jacobson, A.E.; Rice, K.C.; Herkenham, M.

    1987-11-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that pretreatment of brain membranes with the irreversible mu antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), partially eliminated mu binding sites (25,35), consistent with the existence of two mu binding sites distinguished by beta-FNA. This paper tests the hypothesis that the FNA-sensitive and FNA-insensitive mu binding sites have different anatomical distributions in rat brain. Prior to autoradiographic visualization of mu binding sites, (/sup 3/H)oxymorphone, (/sup 3/H)D-ala2-MePhe4, Gly-ol5-enkephalin (DAGO), and (/sup 125/I)D-ala2-Me-Phe4-met(o)-ol)enkephalin (FK33824) were shown to selectively label mu binding sites using slide mounted sections of molded minced rat brain. As found using membranes, beta-FNA eliminated only a portion of mu binding sites. Autoradiographic visualization of mu binding sites using the mu-selective ligand (/sup 125/I)FK33824 in control and FNA-treated sections of rat brain demonstrated that the proportion of mu binding sites sensitive to beta-FNA varied across regions of the brain, particularly the dorsal thalamus, ventrobasal complex and the hypothalamus, providing anatomical data supporting the existence of two classes of mu binding sites in rat brain.

  2. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  3. Characterization of composition traits related to organoleptic and functional quality for the differentiation, selection and enhancement of local varieties of tomato from different cultivar groups.

    PubMed

    Figàs, Maria R; Prohens, Jaime; Raigón, María D; Fita, Ana; García-Martínez, María D; Casanova, Cristina; Borràs, Dionís; Plazas, Mariola; Andújar, Isabel; Soler, Salvador

    2015-11-15

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) local varieties are having an increasing demand. We characterized 69 local tomato accessions from eight cultivar groups for proximate composition traits, major sugars, acids and antioxidants. A large diversity was found, with differences among accessions of almost tenfold for lycopene. Significant differences were found among cultivar group means for most traits. The Cherry and Penjar groups generally presented higher dry matter, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, taste index, β-carotene, ascorbic acid, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity that the other groups. Wide ranges of variation were found within each cultivar group. Positive correlations were found between proximate traits related to taste and antioxidants. The multivariate principal components analysis confirms the distinct profile of the Cherry and Penjar groups and the large variation within groups. The results will be useful for the differentiation, enhancement and selection of local tomato varieties with improved organoleptic properties and functional quality. PMID:25977058

  4. Fine-scale population genetic structure of Zhikong scallop (Chlamys farreri): do local marine currents drive geographical differentiation?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Aibin; Hu, Jingjie; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Zunchun; Hui, Min; Wang, Shi; Peng, Wei; Wang, Mingling; Bao, Zhenmin

    2009-01-01

    Marine scallops, with extended planktonic larval stages which can potentially disperse over large distances when advected by marine currents, are expected to possess low geographical differentiation. However, the sessile lifestyle as adult tends to form discrete "sea beds" with unique population dynamics and structure. The narrow distribution of Zhikong scallop (Chlamys farreri), its long planktonic larval stage, and the extremely hydrographic complexity in its distribution range provide an interesting case to elucidate the impact of marine currents on geographical differentiation for marine bivalves at a fine geographical scale. In this study, we analyzed genetic variation at nine microsatellite DNA loci in six locations throughout the distribution of Zhikong scallop in the Northern China. Very high genetic diversity was present in all six populations. Two populations sampled from the same marine gyre had no detectable genetic differentiation (F (ST) = 0.0013); however, the remaining four populations collected from different marine gyres or separated by strong marine currents showed low but significant genetic differentiation (F (ST) range 0.0184-0.0602). Genetic differentiation was further analyzed using the Monmonier algorithm to identify genetic barriers and using the assignment test conducted by software GeneClass2 to ascertain population membership of individuals. The genetic barriers fitting the orientation of marine gyres/currents were clearly identified, and the individual assignment analysis indicated that 95.6% of specimens were correctly allocated to one of the six populations sampled. The results support the hypothesis that significant population structure is present in Zhikong scallop at a fine geographical scale, and marine currents can be responsible for the genetic differentiation.

  5. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  6. Localization and osteoblastic differentiation potential of neural crest-derived cells in oral tissues of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ono, Miki; Suzawa, Tetsuo; Takami, Masamichi; Yamamoto, Gou; Hosono, Tomohiko; Yamada, Atsushi; Suzuki, Dai; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Watahiki, Junichi; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Arata, Satoru; Mishima, Kenji; Nishida, Kohji; Osumi, Noriko; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-09-01

    In embryos, neural crest cells emerge from the dorsal region of the fusing neural tube and migrate throughout tissues to differentiate into various types of cells including osteoblasts. In adults, subsets of neural crest-derived cells (NCDCs) reside as stem cells and are considered to be useful cell sources for regenerative medicine strategies. Numerous studies have suggested that stem cells with a neural crest origin persist into adulthood, especially those within the mammalian craniofacial compartment. However, their distribution as well as capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts in adults is not fully understood. To analyze the precise distribution and characteristics of NCDCs in adult oral tissues, we utilized an established line of double transgenic (P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP) mice in which NCDCs express green fluorescent protein (GFP) throughout their life. GFP-positive cells were scattered like islands throughout tissues of the palate, gingiva, tongue, and buccal mucosa in adult mice, with those isolated from the latter shown to form spheres, typical cell clusters composed of stem cells, under low-adherent conditions. Furthermore, GFP-positive cells had markedly increased alkaline phosphatase (a marker enzyme of osteoblast differentiation) activity and mineralization as shown by alizarin red staining, in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. These results suggest that NCDCs reside in various adult oral tissues and possess potential to differentiate into osteoblastic cells. NCDCs in adults may be a useful cell source for bone regeneration strategies.

  7. Flow towards diagonalization for many-body-localization models: adaptation of the Toda matrix differential flow to random quantum spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    The iterative methods to diagonalize matrices and many-body Hamiltonians can be reformulated as flows of Hamiltonians towards diagonalization driven by unitary transformations that preserve the spectrum. After a comparative overview of the various types of discrete flows (Jacobi, QR-algorithm) and differential flows (Toda, Wegner, White) that have been introduced in the past, we focus on the random XXZ chain with random fields in order to determine the best closed flow within a given subspace of running Hamiltonians. For the special case of the free-fermion random XX chain with random fields, the flow coincides with the Toda differential flow for tridiagonal matrices which is related to the classical integrable Toda chain and which can be seen as the continuous analog of the discrete QR-algorithm. For the random XXZ chain with random fields that displays a many-body-localization transition, the present differential flow should be an interesting alternative to compare with the discrete flow that has been proposed recently to study the many-body-localization properties in a model of interacting fermions (Rademaker and Ortuno 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 010404).

  8. Autoradiographic localization and characterization of [125I]lysergic acid diethylamide binding to serotonin receptors in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Kadan, M J; Hartig, P R

    1988-03-01

    The sensitive serotonergic radioligand 2-[125I]lysergic acid diethylamide was used to study the distribution and pharmacological binding properties of serotonin receptors in Aplysia californica. The high specific activity of this radioligand allowed us to develop a methodology for the investigation of receptor binding properties and receptor distribution in a single ganglion. [125I]Lysergic acid diethylamide labels a population of high-affinity serotonergic sites (Kd = 0.41 nM) in Aplysia ganglia whose regional distribution matches that expected from previous electrophysiological and immunohistochemical studies. The properties of [125I]lysergic acid diethylamide binding sites in Aplysia are in general agreement with previous studies on [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide binding in this system but these sites differ from the serotonergic receptor subtypes described in the mammalian brain. Guanine nucleotides were shown to modulate agonist but not antagonist affinity for the [125I]lysergic acid diethylamide binding site in Aplysia, suggesting that this site is coupled to a G-protein. Images of serotonin receptor distribution in the Aplysia nervous system were obtained from autoradiograms of [125I]lysergic acid diethylamide binding. Serotonin receptors in ganglia tissue sections are located primarily within the neuropil. In addition, a subset of neuronal soma are specifically labeled by [125I]lysergic acid diethylamide. These studies indicate that [125I]lysergic acid diethylamide binds to sites in the Aplysia nervous system which display a regional distribution, pharmacological binding properties and evidence of coupling to a G-protein consistent with labeling of a subset of functional serotonin receptors. In addition, the techniques used in this investigation provide a general approach for rapidly characterizing the pharmacological properties and anatomical distribution of receptor binding sites in single invertebrate ganglia. Individual neurons containing these receptor subtypes can be identified by these methods and correlated with physiological responses in the same cell.

  9. Autoradiographic localization of putative nicotinic receptors in the rat brain using sup 125 I-neuronal bungarotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, D.W.; Loring, R.H.; Aizenman, E.; Zigmond, R.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Neuronal bungarotoxin (NBT), a snake venom neurotoxin, selectively blocks nicotinic receptors in many peripheral and central neuronal preparations. alpha-Bungarotoxin (alpha BT), on the other hand, a second toxin isolated from the venom of the same snake, is an ineffective nicotinic antagonist in most vertebrate neuronal preparations studied thus far. To examine central nicotinic receptors recognized by NBT, we have characterized the binding of 125I-labeled NBT (125I-NBT) to rat brain membranes and have mapped the distribution of 125I-NBT binding in brain sections using quantitative light microscopic autoradiography. The binding of 125I-NBT was found to be saturable, of high affinity, and heterogeneously distributed in the brain. Pharmacological studies suggested that more than one population of sites is labeled by 125I-NBT. For example, one component of 125I-NBT binding was also recognized by alpha BT, while a second component, not recognized by alpha BT, was recognized by the nicotinic agonist nicotine. The highest densities of these alpha BT-insensitive, nicotine-sensitive sites were found in the fasciculus retroflexus, the lateral geniculate nucleus, the medial terminal nucleus of the accessory optic tract, and the olivary pretectal nucleus. alpha BT-sensitive NBT binding sites were found in highest density in the lateral geniculate nucleus, the subthalamic nucleus, the dorsal tegmental nucleus, and the medial mammillary nucleus (lateral part). The number of brain regions with a high density of 125I-NBT binding sites, blocked either by alpha BT or by nicotine, is low when compared with results obtained using other approaches to studying the central distribution of nicotinic receptors, such as labeling with 3H-nicotine or labeling with cDNA probes to mRNAs coding for putative receptor subunits.

  10. Autoradiographic localization of nicotinic receptor binding in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)methylcarbamylcholine, a novel radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, S.; Gehlert, D.R.; Hawkins, K.N.; Nakayama, K.; Roeske, W.R.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-12-28

    Light microscopic autoradiography was used to visualize the neuroanatomical distribution of nicotinic receptors in rat brain using a novel radioligand, (/sup 3/H)methylcarbamylcholine (MCC). Specific (/sup 3/H)MCC binding to slide-mounted tissue sections of rat brain was saturable, reversible and of high affinity. Data analysis revealed a single population of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding sites with a K/sub d/ value or 1.8 nM and B/sub max/ of 20.1 fmol/mg protein. Nicotinic agonists and antagonists competed for (/sup 3/H)MCC binding sites in slide-mounted brain sections with much greater potency than muscarinic drugs. The rat brain areas containing the highest densities of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding were in thalamic regions, the medial habenular nucleus and the superior colliculus. Moderate densities of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding were seen over the anterior cingulate cortex, the nucleus accumbens, the zona compacta of substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Low densities of (/sup 3/H)MCC binding were found in most other brain regions. These data suggest that (/sup 3/H)MCC selectively labels central nicotinic receptors and that these receptors are concentrated in the thalamus, the medial habenular nucleus and the superior colliculus of the rat brain. 29 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  11. EPHA7 and EPHA10 Physically Interact and Differentially Co-localize in Normal Breast and Breast Carcinoma Cell Lines, and the Co-localization Pattern Is Altered in EPHB6-expressing MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Candace; Segovia, Briana; Kandpal, Raj P

    Erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma cell (EPH) receptors comprise the most abundant receptor tyrosine kinase family characterized to date in mammals including humans. These proteins are involved in axon guidance, tissue organization, vascular development and the intricate process of various diseases including cancer. These diverse functions of EPH receptors are attributed, in part, to their abilities for heterodimerization. While the interacting partners of kinase-deficient EPHB6 receptor have been characterized, the interaction of the kinase-dead EPHA10 with any other receptor has not been identified. By using co-immunoprecipitation, we demonstrated physical interaction between kinase-deficient EPHA10 with kinase-sufficient EPHA7 receptor. Immunocytochemical analyses have revealed that these two receptors co-localize on the cell surface, and soluble portions of the receptors exist as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nuclei. While EPHA7 and EPHA10 co-localize similarly on the membrane in MCF10A and MCF7 cells, they were differentially co-localized in MDA-MB-231 cells stably transfected with empty pcDNA vector (MDA-MB-231-PC) or an expression construct of EPHB6 (MDA-MB-231-B6). The full-length isoforms of these receptors were co-localized on the cell surface, and the soluble forms were present as a complex in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus in MDA-MB-231-PC cells. MDA-MB-231-B6 cells, on the other hand, were distinguished by the absence of any signal in the nuclei. Our results represent the first demonstration of physical interaction between EPHA10 and EPHA7 and their cellular co-localization. Furthermore, these observations also suggest gene-regulatory functions of the complex of the soluble forms of these receptors in breast carcinoma cells of differential invasiveness. PMID:27566654

  12. Differential Regulation of Disheveled in a Novel Vegetal Cortical Domain in Sea Urchin Eggs and Embryos: Implications for the Localized Activation of Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, ChiehFu Jeff; Wikramanayake, Athula H.

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation along the animal-vegetal (AV) axis in sea urchin embryos is initiated when canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling is activated in vegetal blastomeres. The mechanisms that restrict cWnt signaling to vegetal blastomeres are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that the egg’s vegetal cortex plays a critical role in this process by mediating localized “activation” of Disheveled (Dsh). To investigate how Dsh activity is regulated along the AV axis, sea urchin-specific Dsh antibodies were used to examine expression, subcellular localization, and post-translational modification of Dsh during development. Dsh is broadly expressed during early sea urchin development, but immunolocalization studies revealed that this protein is enriched in a punctate pattern in a novel vegetal cortical domain (VCD) in the egg. Vegetal blastomeres inherit this VCD during embryogenesis, and at the 60-cell stage Dsh puncta are seen in all cells that display nuclear β-catenin. Analysis of Dsh post-translational modification using two-dimensional Western blot analysis revealed that compared to Dsh pools in the bulk cytoplasm, this protein is differentially modified in the VCD and in the 16-cell stage micromeres that partially inherit this domain. Dsh localization to the VCD is not directly affected by disruption of microfilaments and microtubules, but unexpectedly, microfilament disruption led to degradation of all the Dsh pools in unfertilized eggs over a period of incubation suggesting that microfilament integrity is required for maintaining Dsh stability. These results demonstrate that a pool of differentially modified Dsh in the VCD is selectively inherited by the vegetal blastomeres that activate cWnt signaling in early embryos, and suggests that this domain functions as a scaffold for localized Dsh activation. Localized cWnt activation regulates AV axis patterning in many metazoan embryos. Hence, it is possible that the VCD is an evolutionarily conserved

  13. Localization of heat shock protein HSPA6 (HSP70B') to sites of transcription in cultured differentiated human neuronal cells following thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Khalouei, Sam; Chow, Ari M; Brown, Ian R

    2014-12-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are a set of highly conserved proteins that are involved in cellular repair and protective mechanisms. In order to identify potential stress-sensitive sites in differentiated SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells, localization of two inducible members of the HSPA (HSP70) family was investigated, namely HSPA6 (HSP70B') and HSPA1A (HSP70-1). Following heat shock, yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged HSPA6 and HSPA1A proteins localized to nuclear speckles that are enriched in RNA splicing factors (identified by SC35 and SON marker proteins) and then to the granular component of the nucleolus (identified by nucleophosmin). Subsequently, YFP-HSPA6 protein, but not YFP-HSPA1A, localized to the periphery of nuclear speckles that are sites of RNA transcription. The HSPA6 gene is present in the human genome but not in genomes of rat and mouse. Hence, current animal models of neurodegenerative diseases are lacking a potentially protective member of the HSPA family. Potential stress-sensitive sites were identified in differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells by the localization of HSPA6 (HSP70B') and HSPA1A (HSP70-1) to nuclear components following heat shock. HSPA6 and HSPA1A rapidly moved to nuclear speckles, enriched in RNA splicing factors, then to the granular layer of the nucleolus. Subsequently, HSPA6 exhibited a novel localization not observed for the more widely studied HSPA1A, namely association with the periphery of nuclear speckles that are sites of transcription. HS = heat shock; HSPA6 = HSP70B' protein; HSPA1A = HSP70-1 protein.

  14. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 2: Two-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    A two-step semidirect procedure is developed to accelerate the one-step procedure described in NASA TP-2529. For a set of constant coefficient model problems, the acceleration factor increases from 1 to 2 as the one-step procedure convergence rate decreases from + infinity to 0. It is also shown numerically that the two-step procedure can substantially accelerate the convergence of the numerical solution of many partial differential equations (PDE's) with variable coefficients.

  15. Cellular localization of NRF2 determines the self-renewal and osteogenic differentiation potential of human MSCs via the P53–SIRT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, D S; Choi, Y; Lee, J W

    2016-01-01

    NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2) plays an important role in defense against oxidative stress at the cellular level. Recently, the roles of NRF2 in embryonic and adult stem cells have been reported, but its role in maintaining self-renewal and differentiation potential remains unknown. We studied the mechanisms of NRF2 action in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow. We found that the cellular localization of NRF2 changed during prolonged cell passage and osteogenic differentiation. Blocking the nuclear import of NRF2 using ochratoxin A (OTA) induced the loss of the self-renewal and osteogenic potential of early-passage (EP) MSCs. Conversely, reinforcing the nuclear import of NRF2 using tert-butylhydroquinone (t-BHQ) improved the self-renewal capacity and maintained the differentiation potential in the osteogenic lineage of EP MSCs. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analysis showed that NRF2 positively regulates sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) at the mRNA and protein levels via the negative regulation of p53. The self-renewal and osteogenic potential suppressed in OTA-treated or NRF2-targeting small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-infected EP MSCs were rescued by introducing small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting p53. t-BHQ treatment in late-passage (LP) MSCs, which lost their self-renewal and osteogenic potential, reversed these effects. In LP MSCs treated with t-BHQ for ∼7 days, the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of NRF2 improved and SIRT1 protein level increased, whereas p53 protein levels decreased. Therefore, our results suggest that NRF2 plays an important role in regulating p53 and SIRT1 to maintain MSC stemness. This study is the first to establish a functional link between NRF2 and SIRT1 expression in the maintenance of MSC self-renewal and differentiation potential. PMID:26866273

  16. [Genetic Differentiation of Local Populations of the Dark European Bee Apis mellifera mellifera L. in the Urals].

    PubMed

    Il'yasov, R A; Poskryakov, A V; Petukhov, A V; Nikolenko, A G

    2015-07-01

    For the last two centuries, beekeepers in Russia and Europe have been introducing bees from the southern regions to the northern ones, subjecting the genetic pool of the dark European bee Apis mellifera mellifera L. subspecies to extensive hybridization. In order to reconfirm on the genetic level the previously published morphological data on the native bee population in the Urals, the Bashkortostan Republic, and the Perm Krai, we analyzed the polymorphism of the mitochondrial (mtDNA COI-COII intergenic locus) and nuclear (two microsatellite loci, ap243 and 4a110) DNA markers. Four local populations of the dark European bee A. m. mellifera surviving in the Urals have been identified, and their principal genetic characteristics have been determined. Data on the genetic structure and geographical localization of the areals of the dark European bee local populations in the Urals may be of use in restoring the damaged genetic pool of A. m. mellifera in Russia and other northern countries.

  17. A novel imaging method for quantitative Golgi localization reveals differential intra-Golgi trafficking of secretory cargoes

    PubMed Central

    Tie, Hieng Chiong; Mahajan, Divyanshu; Chen, Bing; Cheng, Li; VanDongen, Antonius M. J.; Lu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular functions of the Golgi are determined by the unique distribution of its resident proteins. Currently, electron microscopy is required for the localization of a Golgi protein at the sub-Golgi level. We developed a quantitative sub-Golgi localization method based on centers of fluorescence masses of nocodazole-induced Golgi ministacks under conventional optical microscopy. Our method is rapid, convenient, and quantitative, and it yields a practical localization resolution of ∼30 nm. The method was validated by the previous electron microscopy data. We quantitatively studied the intra-Golgi trafficking of synchronized secretory membrane cargoes and directly demonstrated the cisternal progression of cargoes from the cis- to the trans-Golgi. Our data suggest that the constitutive efflux of secretory cargoes could be restricted at the Golgi stack, and the entry of the trans-Golgi network in secretory pathway could be signal dependent. PMID:26764092

  18. Effects of chronic food restriction on mu and kappa opioid binding in rat forebrain: a quantitative autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Wolinsky, T D; Carr, K D; Hiller, J M; Simon, E J

    1994-09-12

    It was previously observed that chronic food restriction lowers the threshold for lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation in a manner that is reversible by mu- and kappa-selective opioid antagonists. The present quantitative autoradiographic study was designed to investigate whether chronic food restriction alters regional mu and kappa opioid binding in brain. [3H]DAGO (mu) and mu/delta blocked [3H]BMZ (kappa) binding were analyzed in 34 brain regions from the medial prefrontal cortex to posterior hypothalamus. Significant reductions in mu binding were observed in caudal portions of the medial and lateral habenula, and the basolateral and basomedial nuclei of the amygdala. kappa binding was similarly reduced in medial habenula. Large increases in kappa binding were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, ventral pallidum, and medial preoptic area. The possible involvement of these changes in the sensitization of reward by food restriction is discussed.

  19. Spin fluctuation and local magnetism of isolated Fe impurities in Pd1-xVx alloys studied by time differential perturbed angular distribution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Srivastava, S. K.; Mishra, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic moment and spin fluctuation temperature of isolated Fe impurity atoms in Pd1-xVx (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) alloys have been studied by time differential perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) technique. With increasing V content in Pd matrix, a large non-linear reduction of the local magnetic moment accompanied with an exponential increase of the spin fluctuation temperature TSF has been observed. At and beyond x = 0.12, the Fe atoms are found to be nonmagnetic. As an important new feature, TSF is observed to vary quadratically with composition dependent changes in host spin polarization.

  20. Differential Localization of VE- and N-Cadherins in Human Endothelial Cells: VE-Cadherin Competes with N-Cadherin for Junctional Localization

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Pilar; Ruco, Luigi; Dejana, Elisabetta

    1998-01-01

    The two major cadherins of endothelial cells are neural (N)-cadherin and vascular endothelial (VE)- cadherin. Despite similar level of protein expression only VE-cadherin is located at cell–cell contacts, whereas N-cadherin is distributed over the whole cell membrane. Cotransfection of VE-cadherin and N-cadherin in CHO cells resulted in the same distribution as that observed in endothelial cells indicating that the behavior of the two cadherins was not cell specific but related to their structural characteristics. Similar amounts of α- and β-catenins and plakoglobin were associated to VE- and N-cadherins, whereas p120 was higher in the VE-cadherin complex. The presence of VE-cadherin did not affect N-cadherin homotypic adhesive properties or its capacity to localize at junctions when cotransfectants were cocultured with cells transfected with N-cadherin only. To define the molecular domain responsible for the VE-cadherin–dominant activity we prepared a chimeric construct formed by VE-cadherin extracellular region linked to N-cadherin intracellular domain. The chimera lost the capacity to exclude N-cadherin from junctions indicating that the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin alone is not sufficient for the preferential localization of the molecule at the junctions. A truncated mutant of VE-cadherin retaining the full extracellular domain and a short cytoplasmic tail (Arg621–Pro702) lacking the catenin-binding region was able to exclude N-cadherin from junctions. This indicates that the Arg621–Pro702 sequence in the VE-cadherin cytoplasmic tail is required for N-cadherin exclusion from junctions. Competition between cadherins for their clustering at intercellular junctions in the same cell has never been described before. We speculate that, in the endothelium, VE- and N-cadherin play different roles; whereas VE-cadherin mostly promotes the homotypic interaction between endothelial cells, N-cadherin may be responsible for the anchorage of the endothelium

  1. [3H]SCH 58261, a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, is a useful ligand in autoradiographic studies.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, B B; Lindström, K; Dionisotti, S; Ongini, E

    1998-03-01

    We have characterized the new potent and selective nonxanthine adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58261 as a new radioligand for receptor autoradiography. In autoradiographic studies using agonist radioligands for A2A receptors ([3H]CGS 21680) or A1 receptors (N6-[3H]cyclohexyladenosine), it was found that SCH 58261 is close to 800-fold selective for rat brain A2A versus A1 receptors (Ki values of 1.2 nM versus 0.8 microM). Moreover, receptor autoradiography showed that [3H]SCH 58261, in concentrations below 2 nM, binds only to the dopamine-rich regions of the rat brain, with a K(D) value of 1.4 (0.8-1.8) nM. The maximal number of binding sites was 310 fmol/mg of protein in the striatum. Below concentrations of 3 nM, the nonspecific binding was <15%. Three adenosine analogues displaced all specific binding of [3H] SCH 58261 with the following estimated Ki values (nM): 2-hex-1-ynyl-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, 3.9 (1.8-8.4); CGS 21680, 130 (42-405); N6-cyclohexyladenosine, 9,985 (3,169-31,462). The binding of low concentrations of SCH 58261 was not influenced by either GTP (100 microM) or Mg2+ (10 mM). The present results show that in its tritium-labeled form, SCH 58261 appears to be a good radioligand for autoradiographic studies, because it does not suffer from some of the problems encountered with the currently used agonist radioligand [3H]CGS 21680.

  2. [Genetic Differentiation of Local Populations of the Dark European Bee Apis mellifera mellifera L. in the Urals].

    PubMed

    Il'yasov, R A; Poskryakov, A V; Petukhov, A V; Nikolenko, A G

    2015-07-01

    For the last two centuries, beekeepers in Russia and Europe have been introducing bees from the southern regions to the northern ones, subjecting the genetic pool of the dark European bee Apis mellifera mellifera L. subspecies to extensive hybridization. In order to reconfirm on the genetic level the previously published morphological data on the native bee population in the Urals, the Bashkortostan Republic, and the Perm Krai, we analyzed the polymorphism of the mitochondrial (mtDNA COI-COII intergenic locus) and nuclear (two microsatellite loci, ap243 and 4a110) DNA markers. Four local populations of the dark European bee A. m. mellifera surviving in the Urals have been identified, and their principal genetic characteristics have been determined. Data on the genetic structure and geographical localization of the areals of the dark European bee local populations in the Urals may be of use in restoring the damaged genetic pool of A. m. mellifera in Russia and other northern countries. PMID:26410933

  3. Local adaptation and oceanographic connectivity patterns explain genetic differentiation of a marine diatom across the North Sea–Baltic Sea salinity gradient

    PubMed Central

    Sjöqvist, C; Godhe, A; Jonsson, P R; Sundqvist, L; Kremp, A

    2015-01-01

    Drivers of population genetic structure are still poorly understood in marine micro-organisms. We exploited the North Sea–Baltic Sea transition for investigating the seascape genetics of a marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were analysed in 354 individuals from ten locations to analyse population structure of the species along a 1500-km-long salinity gradient ranging from 3 to 30 psu. To test for salinity adaptation, salinity reaction norms were determined for sets of strains originating from three different salinity regimes of the gradient. Modelled oceanographic connectivity was compared to directional relative migration by correlation analyses to examine oceanographic drivers. Population genetic analyses showed distinct genetic divergence of a low-salinity Baltic Sea population and a high-salinity North Sea population, coinciding with the most evident physical dispersal barrier in the area, the Danish Straits. Baltic Sea populations displayed reduced genetic diversity compared to North Sea populations. Growth optima of low salinity isolates were significantly lower than those of strains from higher native salinities, indicating local salinity adaptation. Although the North Sea–Baltic Sea transition was identified as a barrier to gene flow, migration between Baltic Sea and North Sea populations occurred. However, the presence of differentiated neutral markers on each side of the transition zone suggests that migrants are maladapted. It is concluded that local salinity adaptation, supported by oceanographic connectivity patterns creating an asymmetric migration pattern between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, determines genetic differentiation patterns in the transition zone. PMID:25892181

  4. Local adaptation and oceanographic connectivity patterns explain genetic differentiation of a marine diatom across the North Sea-Baltic Sea salinity gradient.

    PubMed

    Sjöqvist, C; Godhe, A; Jonsson, P R; Sundqvist, L; Kremp, A

    2015-06-01

    Drivers of population genetic structure are still poorly understood in marine micro-organisms. We exploited the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition for investigating the seascape genetics of a marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were analysed in 354 individuals from ten locations to analyse population structure of the species along a 1500-km-long salinity gradient ranging from 3 to 30 psu. To test for salinity adaptation, salinity reaction norms were determined for sets of strains originating from three different salinity regimes of the gradient. Modelled oceanographic connectivity was compared to directional relative migration by correlation analyses to examine oceanographic drivers. Population genetic analyses showed distinct genetic divergence of a low-salinity Baltic Sea population and a high-salinity North Sea population, coinciding with the most evident physical dispersal barrier in the area, the Danish Straits. Baltic Sea populations displayed reduced genetic diversity compared to North Sea populations. Growth optima of low salinity isolates were significantly lower than those of strains from higher native salinities, indicating local salinity adaptation. Although the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition was identified as a barrier to gene flow, migration between Baltic Sea and North Sea populations occurred. However, the presence of differentiated neutral markers on each side of the transition zone suggests that migrants are maladapted. It is concluded that local salinity adaptation, supported by oceanographic connectivity patterns creating an asymmetric migration pattern between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, determines genetic differentiation patterns in the transition zone.

  5. Solution of elliptic partial differential equations by fast Poisson solvers using a local relaxation factor. 1: One-step method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, S. C.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for solving a large class of two- and three-dimensional nonseparable elliptic partial differential equations (PDE's) is developed and tested. It uses a modified D'Yakanov-Gunn iterative procedure in which the relaxation factor is grid-point dependent. It is easy to implement and applicable to a variety of boundary conditions. It is also computationally efficient, as indicated by the results of numerical comparisons with other established methods. Furthermore, the current algorithm has the advantage of possessing two important properties which the traditional iterative methods lack; that is: (1) the convergence rate is relatively insensitive to grid-cell size and aspect ratio, and (2) the convergence rate can be easily estimated by using the coefficient of the PDE being solved.

  6. Differential Utilization and Localization of ErbB Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Skin Compared to Normal and Malignant Keratinocytes1

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Stefan W; Kansra, Sanjay; Peshick, Scott; Fry, David W; Leopold, Wilbur R; Wiesen, Jane F; Sibilia, Maria; Zhang, Tong; Werb, Zena; Derynck, Rik; Wagner, Erwin F; Elder, James T

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Induction of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) mRNA in mouse skin organ culture was blocked by two pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors but not by genetic ablation of ErbB1, suggesting involvement of multiple ErbB species in skin physiology. Human skin, cultured normal keratinocytes, and A431 skin carcinoma cells expressed ErbB1, ErbB2, and ErbB3, but not ErbB4. Skin and A431 cells expressed more ErbB3 than did keratinocytes. Despite strong expression of ErbB2 and ErbB3, heregulin was inactive in stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation in A431 cells. In contrast, it was highly active in MDA-MB-453 breast carcinoma cells. ErbB2 displayed punctate cytoplasmic staining in A431 and keratinocytes, compared to strong cell surface staining in MDA-MB-453. In skin, ErbB2 was cytoplasmic in basal keratinocytes, assuming a cell surface pattern in the upper suprabasal layers. In contrast, ErbB1 retained a cell surface distribution in all epidermal layers. Keratinocyte proliferation in culture was found to be ErbB1-RTK-dependent, using a selective inhibitor. These results suggest that in skin keratinocytes, ErbB2 transduces ligand-dependent differentiation signals, whereas ErbB1 transduces ligand-dependent proliferation/survival signals. Intracellular sequestration of ErbB2 may contribute to the malignant phenotype of A431 cells, by allowing them to respond to ErbB1-dependent growth/survival signals, while evading ErbB2-dependent differentiation signals. PMID:11571634

  7. Purification and characterization of the human epidermal fatty acid-binding protein: localization during epidermal cell differentiation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Siegenthaler, G; Hotz, R; Chatellard-Gruaz, D; Didierjean, L; Hellman, U; Saurat, J H

    1994-09-01

    Epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP) was isolated from human skin and purified to homogeneity. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 15 kDa and the pI of non-denaturing protein was 5.6. Scatchard-plot analysis revealed one class of binding site for oleic acid with a Kd of 0.46 microM. Structure-binding relation experiments revealed a high affinity of E-FABP for stearic acid which decreased on reduction of the number of carbon atoms or introduction of double bonds into the fatty acid chain. Squalene, cholesterol and retinoic acid isomers showed no affinity, suggesting that E-FABP displays high specificity for fatty acids. E-FABP is a scarce cytosolic protein (0.065% of total protein). Only trace amounts could be detected in normal human skin but up to 42.5 +/- 3.4 pmol/mg of protein was found in a non-malignant defect of keratinocyte differentiation (psoriatic lesions). E-FABP levels were low in cultured human keratinocytes grown under proliferation-stimulating conditions but increased about 2-fold on induction of differentiation by Ca2+. Immunohistochemical localization showed cytosolic staining in differentiated cells of normal and psoriatic skin, suggesting a link between E-FABP and keratinocyte differentiation. The presence of E-FABP in tissues other than skin (heart, intestine and adipose tissue) excludes its specific role in fatty acid metabolism in epithelial cells or its involvement in skin lipid-barrier function.

  8. Total and local X-radiation effects on 18F uptake of bones.

    PubMed

    Ubios, A M; de Aisenberg, E Y; Cabrini, R L

    1978-02-01

    Flourine uptake in rat bones under local and total-body X-irradiation was studied. Data were obtained by measurements with a scintillation crystal counter and in the case of limbs by means of macro and microautoradiographies. The autoradiographic studies showed a higher concentration of the isotope in the metaphyseal area of the endochondral plate. Irradiation produced a depression of 18F uptake in both cases. An alteration in the mineralization mechanism due to irradiation is presumed. PMID:628936

  9. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  10. Identification and differential subcellular localization of the neuronal class C and class D L-type calcium channel alpha 1 subunits

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    To identify and localize the protein products of genes encoding distinct L-type calcium channels in central neurons, anti-peptide antibodies specific for the class C and class D alpha 1 subunits were produced. Anti-CNC1 directed against class C immunoprecipitated 75% of the L-type channels solubilized from rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Anti-CND1 directed against class D immunoprecipitated only 20% of the L-type calcium channels. Immunoblotting revealed two size forms of the class C L-type alpha 1 subunit, LC1 and LC2, and two size forms of the class D L-type alpha 1 subunit, LD1 and LD2. The larger isoforms had apparent molecular masses of approximately 200-210 kD while the smaller isoforms were 180-190 kD, as estimated from electrophoresis in gels polymerized from 5% acrylamide. Immunocytochemical studies using CNC1 and CND1 antibodies revealed that the alpha 1 subunits of both L-type calcium channel subtypes are localized mainly in neuronal cell bodies and proximal dendrites. Relatively dense labeling was observed at the base of major dendrites in many neurons. Staining in more distal dendritic regions was faint or undetectable with CND1, while a more significant level of staining of distal dendrites was observed with CNC1, particularly in the dentate gyrus and the CA2 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus. Class C calcium channels were concentrated in clusters, while class D calcium channels were generally distributed in the cell surface membrane of cell bodies and proximal dendrites. Our results demonstrate multiple size forms and differential localization of two subtypes of L-type calcium channels in the cell bodies and proximal dendrites of central neurons. The differential localization and multiple size forms may allow these two channel subtypes to participate in distinct aspects of electrical signal integration and intracellular calcium signaling in neuronal cell bodies. The preferential localization of these calcium channels in cell bodies and proximal

  11. Differential expression of a novel protein kinase in human B lymphocytes. Preferential localization in the germinal center.

    PubMed

    Katz, P; Whalen, G; Kehrl, J H

    1994-06-17

    B lymphocytes which reside in the germinal center region of lymphoid follicles are functionally and phenotypically distinct from the surrounding mantle zone B cells. We have isolated cDNA clones for several genes that are differentially expressed between these two populations of B lymphocytes. One such gene, BL44, is preferentially expressed in germinal center B cells. The nucleotide sequence of a 2,874-base pair BL44 cDNA was determined and a 2,451-bp open reading frame found that encodes for a 97-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase referred to as GC kinase. It has an NH2-terminal catalytic domain most similar to that of the Drosophila NinaC protein and the yeast STE20 protein. GC kinase mRNA transcripts are not unique to germinal center B cells and are found in several other tissues, including brain, lung, and placenta. The GC kinase protein was immunoprecipitated from transfected COS cells and from the Burkitt cell line RAMOS. GC kinase immunoprecipitated from transfected COS cells phosphorylated the substrates casein and myelin basic protein. In addition, a 97-kDa phosphoprotein likely to be GC kinase itself was detected. GC kinase may participate in an important signal transduction pathway in germinal center B cells.

  12. Differential plague-transmission dynamics determine Yersinia pestis population genetic structure on local, regional, and global scales

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Jessica M.; Wagner, David M.; Vogler, Amy J.; Keys, Christine; Allender, Christopher J.; Drickamer, Lee C.; Keim, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Plague, the disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, has greatly impacted human civilization. Y. pestis is a successful global pathogen, with active foci on all continents except Australia and Antarctica. Because the Y. pestis genome is highly monomorphic, previous attempts to characterize the population genetic structure within a single focus have been largely unsuccessful. Here we report that highly mutable marker loci allow determination of Y. pestis population genetic structure and tracking of transmission patterns at two spatial scales within a single focus. In addition, we found that in vitro mutation rates for these loci are similar to those observed in vivo, which allowed us to develop a mutation-rate-based model to examine transmission mechanisms. Our model suggests there are two primary components of plague ecology: a rapid expansion phase for population growth and dispersal followed by a slower persistence phase. This pattern seems consistent across local, regional, and even global scales. PMID:15173603

  13. Barley metallothioneins: MT3 and MT4 are localized in the grain aleurone layer and show differential zinc binding.

    PubMed

    Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Schiller, Michaela; Kichey, Thomas; Hansen, Thomas Hesselhøj; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod

    2012-07-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role in cytosolic zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) homeostasis. However, evidence for the functional properties of MTs has been hampered by methodological problems in the isolation and characterization of the proteins. Here, we document that barley (Hordeum vulgare) MT3 and MT4 proteins exist in planta and that they differ in tissue localization as well as in metal coordination chemistry. Combined transcriptional and histological analyses showed temporal and spatial correlations between transcript levels and protein abundance during grain development. MT3 was present in tissues of both maternal and filial origin throughout grain filling. In contrast, MT4 was confined to the embryo and aleurone layer, where it appeared during tissue specialization and remained until maturity. Using state-of-the-art speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on recombinant MT3 and MT4, their specificity and capacity for metal ion binding were quantified, showing a strong preferential Zn binding relative to Cu and cadmium (Cd) in MT4, which was not the case for MT3. When complementary DNAs from barley MTs were expressed in Cu- or Cd-sensitive yeast mutants, MT3 provided a much stronger complementation than did MT4. We conclude that MT3 may play a housekeeping role in metal homeostasis, while MT4 may function in Zn storage in developing and mature grains. The localization of MT4 and its discrimination against Cd make it an ideal candidate for future biofortification strategies directed toward increasing food and feed Zn concentrations.

  14. Single-unit activity, threshold crossings, and local field potentials in motor cortex differentially encode reach kinematics

    PubMed Central

    Perel, Sagi; Sadtler, Patrick T.; Oby, Emily R.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C.; Batista, Aaron P.

    2015-01-01

    A diversity of signals can be recorded with extracellular electrodes. It remains unclear whether different signal types convey similar or different information and whether they capture the same or different underlying neural phenomena. Some researchers focus on spiking activity, while others examine local field potentials, and still others posit that these are fundamentally the same signals. We examined the similarities and differences in the information contained in four signal types recorded simultaneously from multielectrode arrays implanted in primary motor cortex: well-isolated action potentials from putative single units, multiunit threshold crossings, and local field potentials (LFPs) at two distinct frequency bands. We quantified the tuning of these signal types to kinematic parameters of reaching movements. We found 1) threshold crossing activity is not a proxy for single-unit activity; 2) when examined on individual electrodes, threshold crossing activity more closely resembles LFP activity at frequencies between 100 and 300 Hz than it does single-unit activity; 3) when examined across multiple electrodes, threshold crossing activity and LFP integrate neural activity at different spatial scales; and 4) LFP power in the “beta band” (between 10 and 40 Hz) is a reliable indicator of movement onset but does not encode kinematic features on an instant-by-instant basis. These results show that the diverse signals recorded from extracellular electrodes provide somewhat distinct and complementary information. It may be that these signal types arise from biological phenomena that are partially distinct. These results also have practical implications for harnessing richer signals to improve brain-machine interface control. PMID:26133797

  15. Differential Subcellular Localization Renders HAI-2 a Matriptase Inhibitor in Breast Cancer Cells but Not in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hsiang-Hua D.; Xu, Yuan; Lai, Hongyu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Tseng, Chun-Che; Lai, Ying-Jung J.; Pan, Yu; Zhou, Emily; Johnson, Michael D.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 transmembrane serine protease matriptase is under tight control primarily by the actions of the integral membrane Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor HAI-1. Growing evidence indicates that HAI-2 might also be involved in matriptase inhibition in some contexts. Here we showed that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 depends on the subcellular localizations of HAI-2, and is observed in breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. HAI-2 is co-expressed with matriptase in 21 out of 26 human epithelial and carcinoma cells examined. HAI-2 is also a potent matriptase inhibitor in solution, but in spite of this, HAI-2 inhibition of matriptase is not observed in all contexts where HAI-2 is expressed, unlike what is seen for HAI-1. Induction of matriptase zymogen activation in mammary epithelial cells results in the formation of matriptase-HAI-1 complexes, but matriptase-HAI-2 complexes are not observed. In breast cancer cells, however, in addition to the appearance of matriptase-HAI-1 complex, three different matriptase-HAI-2 complexes, are formed following the induction of matriptase activation. Immunofluorescent staining reveals that activated matriptase is focused at the cell-cell junctions upon the induction of matriptase zymogen activation in both mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. HAI-2, in contrast, remains localized in vesicle/granule-like structures during matriptase zymogen activation in human mammary epithelial cells. In breast cancer cells, however, a proportion of the HAI-2 reaches the cell surface where it can gain access to and inhibit active matriptase. Collectively, these data suggest that matriptase inhibition by HAI-2 requires the translocation of HAI-2 to the cell surface, a process which is observed in some breast cancer cells but not in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25786220

  16. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and

  17. Type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins from Phytolacca dioica L. leaves: differential seasonal and age expression, and cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Parente, Augusto; Conforto, Barbara; Di Maro, Antimo; Chambery, Angela; De Luca, Paolo; Bolognesi, Andrea; Iriti, Marcello; Faoro, Franco

    2008-11-01

    The expression of type 1 ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) in Phytolacca dioica L. leaves was investigated. Fully expanded leaves of young P. dioica plants (up to 3 years old) expressed two novel RIPs, dioicin 1 and dioicin 2. The former was also found in developing leaves from adult P. dioica within about two and a half weeks after leaf development, and the latter continuously synthesized, with no seasonal or ontogenetic constraint. Fully expanded leaves from adult P. dioica expressed four RIPs (PD-Ls1-4) exhibiting seasonal variation. RIPs were localized in the extracellular space, in the vacuole and in the Golgi apparatus of mesophyll cells. Dioicin 1 and dioicin 2 showed rRNA N-beta-glycosidase activity and displayed the following properties, respectively: (1) Mr values of 30,047.00 and 29,910.00, (2) pIs of 8.74 and 9.37, and (3) IC(50) values of 19.74 (0.658 nM) and 6.85 ng/mL (0.229 nM). Furthermore, they showed adenine polynucleotide glycosylase activity and nicked pBR322 dsDNA. The amino acid sequence of dioicin 2 had 266 amino acid residues, and the highest percentage identity (81.6%) and similarity (84.6%) with PAP-II from Phytolacca americana, while its identity with other RIPs from Phytolaccaceae was around 40%.

  18. Motivated to walk but nowhere to walk to: Differential effect of a mass media campaign by mix of local destinations

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Rosanne; Bauman, Adrian E.; Giles-Corti, Billie; Knuiman, Matthew W.; Rosenberg, Michael; Leyden, Kevin M.; Abildso, Christiaan G.; Reger-Nash, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Objective Built environment attributes are associated with walking but little is known about how the impact of walking campaigns varies across different environments. The objective of this study was to compare the impact of a campaign on changes in walking between respondents with a high versus low mix of local destinations. Methods Pre- and post-campaign data from a quasi-experimental study were used to compare changes in walking for residents aged 40–65 with high and low destination mix in a West Virginia community campaign (March–May 2005). Results Overall samples consisted of 777 intervention community respondents and 388 comparison community respondents with pre- and post-campaign data. Among insufficiently active intervention respondents, those with high destination mix increased their walking by 0.64 days more than those with low mix (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed among the comparison community. Conclusion The walking response to campaigns in those insufficiently active may be influenced by neighborhood attributes. PMID:26844097

  19. Differential Localization of the Two T. brucei Poly(A) Binding Proteins to the Nucleus and RNP Granules Suggests Binding to Distinct mRNA Pools

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Susanne; Bannerman-Chukualim, Bridget; Ellis, Louise; Boulden, Elizabeth A.; Kelly, Steve; Field, Mark C.; Carrington, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The number of paralogs of proteins involved in translation initiation is larger in trypanosomes than in yeasts or many metazoan and includes two poly(A) binding proteins, PABP1 and PABP2, and four eIF4E variants. In many cases, the paralogs are individually essential and are thus unlikely to have redundant functions although, as yet, distinct functions of different isoforms have not been determined. Here, trypanosome PABP1 and PABP2 have been further characterised. PABP1 and PABP2 diverged subsequent to the differentiation of the Kinetoplastae lineage, supporting the existence of specific aspects of translation initiation regulation. PABP1 and PABP2 exhibit major differences in intracellular localization and distribution on polysome fractionation under various conditions that interfere with mRNA metabolism. Most striking are differences in localization to the four known types of inducible RNP granules. Moreover, only PABP2 but not PABP1 can accumulate in the nucleus. Taken together, these observations indicate that PABP1 and PABP2 likely associate with distinct populations of mRNAs. The differences in localization to inducible RNP granules also apply to paralogs of components of the eIF4F complex: eIF4E1 showed similar localization pattern to PABP2, whereas the localisation of eIF4E4 and eIF4G3 resembled that of PABP1. The grouping of translation initiation as either colocalizing with PABP1 or with PABP2 can be used to complement interaction studies to further define the translation initiation complexes in kinetoplastids. PMID:23382864

  20. Subcellular localization of Bcr, Abl, and Bcr-Abl proteins in normal and leukemic cells and correlation of expression with myeloid differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wetzler, M; Talpaz, M; Van Etten, R A; Hirsh-Ginsberg, C; Beran, M; Kurzrock, R

    1993-01-01

    We used specific antisera and immunohistochemical methods to investigate the subcellular localization and expression of Bcr, Abl, and Bcr-Abl proteins in leukemic cell lines and in fresh human leukemic and normal samples at various stages of myeloid differentiation. Earlier studies of the subcellular localization of transfected murine type IV c-Abl protein in fibroblasts have shown that this molecule resides largely in the nucleus, whereas transforming deletion variants are localized exclusively in the cytoplasm. Here, we demonstrate that the murine type IV c-Abl protein is also found in the nucleus when overexpressed in a mouse hematopoietic cell line. However, in both normal and leukemic human hematopoietic cells, c-Abl is discerned predominantly in the cytoplasm, with nuclear staining present, albeit at a lower level. In contrast, normal endogenous Bcr protein, as well as the aberrant p210BCR-ABL and p190BCR-ABL proteins consistently localize to the cytoplasm in both cell lines and fresh cells. The results with p210BCR-ABL were confirmed in a unique Ph1-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell line, KBM5, which lacks the normal chromosome 9 and hence the normal c-Abl product. Because the p210BCR-ABL protein appears cytoplasmic in both chronic phase and blast crisis CML cells, as does the p190BCR-ABL in Ph1-positive acute leukemia, a change in subcellular location of Bcr-Abl proteins between cytoplasm and nucleus cannot explain the different spectrum of leukemias associated with p210 and p190, nor the transition from the chronic to the acute leukemia phenotype seen in CML. Further analysis of fresh CML and normal hematopoietic bone marrow cells reveals that p210BCR-ABL, as well as the normal Bcr and Abl proteins, are expressed primarily in the early stages of myeloid maturation, and that levels of expression are reduced significantly as the cells mature to polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Similarly, a decrease in Bcr and Abl levels occurs in HL-60 cells

  1. Mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 localization in CD4-negative thymocytes: differentiation from a CD4-positive precursor allows productive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kitchen, S G; Uittenbogaart, C H; Zack, J A

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the thymus could have profound effects on development of the immune response, particularly in children. We and others have established that in addition to infecting and depleting CD4-bearing thymocytes, functional HIV proviruses are found in thymocytes lacking surface CD4 expression. Using in vitro thymocyte cultures, we show that neither HIV-mediated down regulation of CD4 nor CD4-independent infection contributes to the localization of HIV in cells lacking the primary virus receptor. Rather, infection of a CD4-positive precursor cell (CD4 positive/CD8 positive) with subsequent differentiation into a mature CD4-negative phenotype results in productively infected CD4-negative cells. This novel mechanism may contribute to pathogenesis by distributing viral sequences into functional subsets of T cells typically refractory to HIV infection and could account for the presence of viral DNA in CD8-positive lymphocytes recently observed in patients. PMID:9223457

  2. Differential induction and localization of mPer1 and mPer2 during advancing and delaying phase shifts

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lily; Silver, Rae

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism whereby brief light exposure resets the mammalian circadian clock in a phase dependent manner is not known, but is thought to involve Per gene expression. At the behavioural level, a light pulse produces phase delays in early subjective night, phase advances in late subjective night, and no phase shifts in mid-subjective night or subjective day. To understand the relationship between Per gene activity and behavioural phase shifts, we examined light-induced mPer1 and mPer2 expression in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mouse, in the subjective night, with a view to understanding SCN heterogeneity. In the VIP-containing region of the SCN (termed `core'), light-induced mPer1 expression occurs at all times of the subjective night, while mPer2 induction is seen only in early subjective night. In the remaining regions of the SCN (termed `shell'), a phase delaying light pulse produces no mPer1 but significant mPer2 expression, while a phase advancing light pulse produces no mPer2 but substantial mPer1 induction. Moreover, following a light pulse during mid-subjective night, neither mPer1 nor mPer2 are induced in the shell. The results reveal that behavioural phase shifts occur only when light-induced Per gene expression spreads from the core to the shell SCN, with mPer1 expression in shell corresponding to phase advances, and mPer2 corresponding to phase delays. The results indicate that the time course and the localization of light-induced Per gene expression in SCN reveals important aspects of intra-SCN communication. PMID:12405967

  3. (/sup 35/S)autoradiographic study of sulfated GAG accumulation and turnover in embryonic mouse tooth germs

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E.C.; Boukari, A.; Arechaga, J.; Osman, M.; Ruch, J.V.

    1983-01-01

    The accumulation of sulfated glycosaminoglycans(GAG) in embryonic mouse molars before, during, and after terminal differentiation of odontoblasts was localized by (/sup 35/S)autoradiography combined with the use of chondroitin ABC lyase. Much more sulfated GAG were accumulated in the dental papilla than in the dental epithelium. High incorporation of (/sup 35/S)sulfate occurred at the epithelio-mesenchymal junction, which is the site of dental basement membrane and predentin. Before terminal differentiation of odontoblasts, the distribution of sulfated GAG was uniform at the basement membrane. After the onset of terminal differentiation of odontoblasts, much more sulfated GAG accumulated at the tip of principal cusps than at the apical (inferior) parts of cusps, and sulfated GAG were then found to be degraded more rapidly at the epithelio-mesenchymal junction than at other parts of the tooth germ. Thus regional variation in the rate of degradation of GAG exists in the tooth germs. Trypsin-isolated dental epithelia cultured in vitro synthesized a new basement membrane that could be labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine but not with /sup 35/SO4(-2). The epithelial-derived basal lamina contains little or no sulfatated GAG.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Fasciclin-Like Arabinogalactan Protein Gene Family Reveals Differential Expression Patterns, Localization, and Salt Stress Response in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Lina; Zheng, Tangchun; Chu, Yanguang; Ding, Changjun; Zhang, Weixi; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) are a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) involved in plant growth, development and response to abiotic stress. Although many studies have been performed to identify molecular functions of individual family members, little information is available on genome-wide identification and characterization of FLAs in the genus Populus. Based on genome-wide analysis, we have identified 35 Populus FLAs which were distributed on 16 chromosomes and phylogenetically clustered into four major groups. Gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved in each group. All the members contained N-terminal signal peptide, 23 of which included predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites and were anchored to plasma membranes. Subcellular localization analysis showed that PtrFLA2/20/26 were localized in cell membrane and cytoplasm of protoplasts from Populus stem-differentiating xylem. The Ka/Ks ratios showed that purifying selection has played a leading role in the long-term evolutionary period which greatly maintained the function of this family. The expression profiles showed that 32 PtrFLAs were differentially expressed in four tissues at four seasons based on publicly available microarray data. 18 FLAs were further verified with qRT-PCR in different tissues, which indicated that PtrFLA1/2/3/7/11/12/20/21/22/24/26/30 were significantly expressed in male and female flowers, suggesting close correlations with the reproductive development. In addition, PtrFLA1/9/10/11/17/21/23/24/26/28 were highly expressed in the stems and differentiating xylem, which may be involved in stem development. To determine salt response of FLAs, qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of 18 genes under salinity stress across two time points. Results demonstrated that all the 18 FLAs were expressed in root tissues; especially, PtrFLA2/12/20/21/24/30 were significantly induced at different time points. In summary

  5. Growth differentiation factor 9 (Gdf9) was localized in the female as well as male germ cells in a protogynous hermaphroditic teleost fish, ricefield eel Monopterus albus.

    PubMed

    He, Zhi; Wu, Yangsheng; Xie, Jun; Wang, Taixin; Zhang, Lihong; Zhang, Weimin

    2012-09-01

    Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) is a member of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFb) superfamily. As an oocyte-derived growth factor, GDF9 plays key roles in regulating follicle development. In the present study, we identified a gdf9 homologue from the ovary of ricefield eel, and analyzed its expression both at the mRNA and protein levels. Ricefield eel Gdf9 showed high homologies with those of other teleosts, especially perciformes fish. RT-PCR analysis revealed that ricefield eel gdf9 was expressed exclusively in the ovary and testis. The mRNA levels of gdf9 in the ovary were increased significantly at the pre-vitellogenic (PV) stage and then decreased significantly along with vitellogenesis. During the natural sex change, expression of ricefield eel gdf9 was peaked at the intersexual stages. The immunoreactivity for Gdf9 was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of the oocytes in the ovary, particularly the oocytes at early stages, but not in the oogonia. Interestingly, strong immunoreactive signals were also detected in the degenerating oocytes in the intersexual gonad. Furthermore, the Gdf9 immunoreactivity was demonstrated for the first time to be localized in the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes of ricefield eel, a teleost fish. Taken together, the results of present study suggested that Gdf9 may play important roles in the folliculogenesis as well as spermatogenesis in ricefield eels.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptors in human breast tumour: localisation and quantification by histo-autoradiographic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Jammes, H.; Peyrat, J. P.; Ban, E.; Vilain, M. O.; Haour, F.; Djiane, J.; Bonneterre, J.

    1992-01-01

    To assess the precise role of IGF1 in benign and malignant breast diseases, we analysed the tissular localisation, characterised, and quantified specific insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) binding sites in these heterogenous tissues, using histo-autoradiographic analysis (HAA). The 125I-IGF1 binding was performed on frozen tissue sections and analysed using 3H Ultrofilm autoradiography coupled to computerised image analysis. Competitive binding experiments using unlabelled IGF1, IGF2 and insulin showed that the tissues exhibited typical type I IGF binding sites. This specificity was confirmed by the use of alpha IR-3 monoclonal antibody, as inhibitor of 125I-IGF1 binding. IGF1 binding sites were detected in 18 human primary breast cancers, 12 benign breast tumours and two normal breast tissues. Using HAA we found that the human breast carcinomas studied exhibit a specific and high binding capacity for 125I-IGF1 exclusively localised on the proliferative epithelial component. The 125I-IGF1 binding activity of benign breast tumours or normal breast tissue was significantly lower than in cancerous tissues. There was a significant correlation between IGF1-R concentrations detected with HAA and those detected with a classical biochemical method. Moreover, HAA could be useful in further detailing whether a tumour is IGF1-R positive or negative HAA appears to be a useful method for the detection of growth factor receptors, specially in small biopsy specimens. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1323990

  7. Variation in the autoradiographic technique: I. Emulsion-developer combinations assessed by photometric measurement of single silver grains.

    PubMed

    Neely, J E; Combs, J W

    1976-10-01

    Five commonly used developers (Acufine, Rodinal, Dektol, D19 and Microdol X) and two popular nuclear gel emulsions (Kodak NTB-2 and Ilford L4) were tested in combinations for adequacy of development characteristics and the distribution of silver particle (grain) size measured by means of a reflectance microphotometer. All developer-emulsion combinations had some range of development time during which maximum development was accomplished with no occurrence of background grains, with the exceptions of the combinations of NTB2-Acufine and NTB2-D19. Ilford L4 emulsion obtained the narrowest grain size distribution with Rodinal and Acufine, followed by Dektol, and D19. The narrowest size distribution for Kodak NTB2 emulsion was achieved with D19 followed by Acufine, Dektol and Rodinal. Microdol-X had undesirable effects on the integrity of the individual grains of both emulsions. The criteria are discussed for selecting the most advantageous emulsion-developer system for the particular mode of evaluation (visual, photometric, television camera) to be applied to the finished autoradiographic specimens.

  8. In situ immune autoradiographic identification of cells in heart tissues of mice with coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Godeny, E. K.; Gauntt, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    In adolescent CD-1 male mice inoculated with a myocarditic coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3m) acute focal lesions containing necrotic myocytes, infiltrating mononuclear cells, and fibroblasts develop. With the use of an in situ immune autoradiographic method with rat monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and an 35S-labeled antibody, viral antigens were detected outside of lesions. Macrophages, T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells were identified within myocarditic lesions during the acute phase of the disease. Macrophages detected by anti-Mac-1 MAb were in focal areas within myocarditic lesions on Days 4-7 after inoculation. T lymphocytes were detected in myocarditic lesions on Days 4-10, with MAb to Thy-1 and Lyt-1 antigens showing diffuse reaction patterns, suggesting random distribution of these cells in lesions. Focal areas of reactivity were detected with MAbs to L3T4 and Lyt-2 antigens, suggesting clusters of helper and cytotoxic/suppressor T lymphocytes, respectively. NK cells were presumptively detected by asialo GM1 surface marker in lesions at all times. The presence of activated NK cells in lesions was confirmed by assay of mechanically dissociated heart tissues on Day 8. These data describe the temporal sequence and identity of leukocytes entering into CVB3-induced focal myocarditic lesions during the acute phase of disease in CD-1 mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2823612

  9. Specificity of indium-111 granulocyte scanning and fecal excretion measurement in inflammatory bowel disease--an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Price, Y.E.; Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Wright, N.A.; Hodgson, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    The validity of /sup 111/In granulocyte scanning and fecal excretion measurement, as a reflection of loss of cells into the gastrointestinal tract, was studied using an autoradiographic technique in 11 patients in whom /sup 111/In granulocyte scan and colonoscopy were carried out simultaneously. /sup 111/In granulocytes were injected 1.5-4 hr prior to colonoscopy, and intraluminal fluid, mucosal brushings, and colonic biopsies were collected during the colonoscopy. In two patients with no histological evidence of inflammatory bowel disease, and four patients with clinically and histologically inactive inflammatory bowel disease, no /sup 111/Indium was detected in fluid, brushing, or biopsies. In five patients with active disease, 85% of the /sup 111/In activity in colonic fluid was precipitated by low-speed centrifugation. Autoradiography confirmed that the label remained attached to whole granulocytes in colonic fluid and mucosal brushings. Studies on biopsies, at intervals up to 4 1/2 hr following labeled granulocyte injection, demonstrated labeled polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) on the inflamed epithelial surface, with occasional cells in crypt abscesses by 110 min. We conclude that the techniques of /sup 111/In granulocyte scanning and fecal counting in patients with IBD are specifically measuring cell loss; labeled PMNs are capable of migrating through the gastrointestinal mucosa, in active disease, within 2 hr of administration.

  10. Effect of morphine on /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation in the subependyma of the rat: an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.R.; O'Steen, W.K.; Deadwyler, S.A.

    1982-06-20

    Following morphine treatment, an autoradiographic study investigated the uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine by the subependymal cells in the rat brain. /sup 3/H-thymidine was administered subcutaneously to adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats 30 minutes after saline or morphine (19 mg/kg) injection. The animals were sacrified 1 hour after /sup 3/H-thymidine administration. In some experiments the opioid antagonist, naloxone, was given alone 45 minutes before /sup 3/H-thymidine or 125 minutes before morphine treatment. Three areas of the subependyma were evaluated in terms of the percentage labeled cells and number of grains per nucleus, and a dorsal-to-ventral gradiant was described. Morphine treatment significantly increased the number of /sup 3/H-thymidine labeled subependymal cells and number of grains/nucleus within labeled cells. Examination of the distribution of grains/nucleus showed that morphine-treated animals had significantly more cells labeled with 30 or more grains than did saline-injected controls. Prior administration of naloxone blocked the increased /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake in morphine-treated animals but had no significant influence on cell proliferation when administered alone. The data are discussed in terms of morphine's possible dual influence on mechanisms which enhance cell transition from G to S phase and/or which accelerate DNA synthesis once these cells have entered the S phase of cell replication.

  11. Neutron capture autoradiographic determination of 10B distributions and concentrations in biological samples for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagie, Hironobu; Ogura, Koichi; Matsumoto, Toshio; Eriguchi, Masazumi; Kobayashi, Hisao

    1999-11-01

    It is necessary for effective boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to accumulate 10B atoms in the tumor cells. We prepared a cationic liposome entrapped 10B compound for the delivery system and examined the delivery capacity of 10B atoms to pancreatic cancer cell, AsPC-1, in vivo. It is required to achieve an accurate measurement of 10B distributions and concentrations in biological samples with a sensitivity in the ppm range for BNCT. We applied CR-39 (polyallyldiglycol carbonate) plastic track detectors to α-autoradiographic measurements of the 10B biodistribution in sliced whole-body samples of mice. To selectively desensitize undesirable proton tracks, we applied PEW (KOH+C 2H 5OH+H 2O) solution to the etching of CR-39 detector. The subsequent use of an alpha-track radiographic image analysis system enabled a discrimination between alpha tracks and recoiled proton tracks by the track size selection method. This enabled us to estimate quantitatively the distributions of 10B concentrations within the tissue sections by comparing with suitable standards.

  12. An autoradiographic analysis of the cortical connections of the pallidal and cerebellar zones within the feline motor thalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Wensel, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The feline motor thalamus relays both basal ganglia and cerebellar inputs to the motor cortex. This complex is classically subdivided into three nuclei: the ventroanterior nucleus (VA), the ventrolateral nucleus (VL), and the ventromedial nucleus (VM). Poor correlation between recognized patterns of cortical and subcortical connectivity and traditional boundaries used to distinguish these nuclei complicate the elucidation of the role they play in the elaboration of motor behavior. The recent demonstration of complementarity for the pallidothalamic and dentatothalamic projections to the motor thalamus of the cat provided the foundation for a revision of these nuclear borders to reflect differences in subcortical connectivity. Using a revised topography, this study analyzed the afferent and efferent connections of the feline VA and VL through the application of both anterograde and retrograde tracing techniques. The extent of the cerebellothalamic projection, as revealed by the bidirectional transport of WGA-HRP, was used to demarcate the boundary between VA and VL. Injections of tritiated amino acids into VA and VL allowed for the autoradiographic tracing of their cortical projections. Autoradiography was also used to demonstrate the distributions of corticothalamic projections from selected pericruciate and posterior parietal subfields to the motor thalamus.

  13. New aspects of intranuclear structures following partial decondensation of chromatin: a cytochemical and high-resolution autoradiographical study.

    PubMed

    Puvion-Dutilleul, F; Puvion, E

    1980-04-01

    Exposure of cultured CVI monkey kidney cells to a hypotonic medium containing a nonionic detergent induces a partial decondensation of nuclear components which can be studied advantageously in ultrathin sections. In addition to previously described 20--25 nm, DNA-containing chromatin fibres arrayed perpendicularly to the nuclear lamina, a new nuclear configuration was found which consists of abundant clusters of 6--7 nm fibrils. These 'filamentous masses' are the most heavily labelled component of the nucleus in autoradiographs after brief (2 min) exposure to [5-3H]uridine, and they are greatly diminished in number after treatment of the cells with a low dose of actinomycin D. Therefore, we interpret the filamentous masses to be nascent RNP and to represent the fibrillar regions of the nucleolus which have become decondensed into partially spread 'Christmas-tree'-like figures detectable in situ in ultrathin sections. Similar structures occur in all cell types examined to date. This paper outlines the preparative procedure.

  14. Regulation of the Subcellular Localization of Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase in Response to Physiological Stresses and Sexual Differentiation in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yasuhiro; McInnis, Brittney; Marcus, Stevan

    2008-01-01

    We describe regulation of the subcellular localization of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory (Cgs1p) and catalytic (Pka1p) subunits in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe in response to physiological stresses and during sexual differentiation as determined by fluorescence microscopy of the Cgs1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Pka1-GFP fusion proteins, respectively. In wild-type S. pombe cells cultured to log phase under normal growth conditions, Cgs1p and Pka1p are concentrated in the nucleus and more diffusely present in the cytoplasm. Nuclear localization of both proteins is dependent on cAMP, since in cells lacking adenylate cyclase they are detectable only in the cytoplasm. In cells lacking Cgs1p or both Cgs1p and adenylate cyclase, Pka1p is concentrated in the nucleus, demonstrating a role for Cgs1p in the nuclear exclusion of Pka1p. Nuclear-cytoplasmic redistribution of Cgs1p and Pka1p is triggered by growth in glucose-limited or hyperosmotic media and in response to stationary-phase growth. In addition, both proteins are excluded from the nucleus in mating cells undergoing karyogamy and subsequently concentrated in postmeiotic spores. Cgs1p is required for subcellular redistribution of Pka1p induced by growth in glucose-limited and hyperosmotic media and during karyogamy but is not required for Pka1p redistribution triggered by stationary-phase growth or for the enrichment of Pka1p in spores. Our results demonstrate that PKA localization is regulated by cAMP and regulatory subunit-dependent and -independent mechanisms in S. pombe. PMID:18621924

  15. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of (125I)cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species.

  16. Expression analysis of the spi gene in the pock-forming plasmid pSA1.1 from Streptomyces azureus and localization of its product during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Doi, Katusmi; Ohyama, Yukiko; Yokoyama, Eiji; Nishiyama, Takashi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Nagayoshi, Yuko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Ogata, Seiya

    2012-08-01

    The sporulation inhibitory gene spi in the pock-forming conjugative plasmid pSA1.1 of Streptomyces azureus was introduced into cells via a high or low copy number vector to examine the effect of gene dosage on the growth of Streptomyces lividans TK24 as a host. In transformants carrying a high spi copy number, nutrient mycelial growth was inhibited, as was morphological differentiation from substrate mycelium to aerial mycelium on solid media. The degree of inhibition depended on the spi gene dosage, but the presence of pSA1.1 imp genes, which encode negative repressor proteins for spi, relieved the inhibition. Confocal images of Spi tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein in cells on solid media revealed that spi expression was initiated at the time of elongation of substrate mycelium, that its expression increased dramatically at septation in aerial hyphae, and that the expression was maximal during prespore formation. Expression of spi covered the whole of the hyphae, and the level of expression at the tip of the hyphae during prespore formation was about sixfold greater than during substrate mycelial growth and threefold greater than during aerial mycelial growth. Thus, localized expression of spi at particular times may inhibit sporulation until triggering imp expression to repress its inhibitory effects.

  17. Differential expression and selective localization of vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor in the rat uterus during the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Karuri, A R; Kumar, A M; Mukhopadhyay, D

    1998-12-01

    This study examines the expression of the multi-functional cytokine, vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) in the rat uterus during early proestrus, proestrus, estrus and diestrus. Groups of ovariectomized or hypophysectomized rats served as endocrine controls. Expression of VPF/VEGF mRNA was 2-fold greater in uteri during proestrus and estrus than in other phases of the estrous cycle. In situ hybridization techniques indicated that VPF/VEGF mRNA expression was confined to the luminal epithelium during proestrus, but shifted to the stromal compartment during estrus. Ovariectomized, hypophysectomized or diestrus rats exhibited scattered localization of VPF/VEGF mRNA among glandular epithelium and endometrial stromal compartments. Although VPF/VEGF mRNA was expressed throughout the estrous cycle, but in different compartments of the endometrium depending on the stage of the estrous cycle, VPF/VEGF protein expression appears to be restricted to the epithelial compartment during proestrus and estrus. Results indicate that circulating levels of gonadal steroids and LH may be associated with the differential expression of VPF/VEGF mRNA and its translation activity in the endometrium during different stages of the estrous cycle.

  18. Geographical/Ecological Differentials in Insecticide-Treated Net Use among Under-Five Children in Somolu Local Government Area, Lagos State.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Oreoluwa O; Ajayi, IkeOluwapo O; Awolola, Taiwo S

    2014-01-01

    Malaria control efforts currently lay emphasis on reducing transmission by limiting human-vector contact. More studies have been carried out on mosquito avoidance practices in the rural areas, leaving the urban areas understudied. This study was conducted to identify knowledge of malaria transmission and to investigate geographical/ecological differentials in the use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) among caregivers of under-fives in Somolu Local Government Area, Lagos State. A household survey was conducted by interviewing 394 female caregivers of under-fives selected using the WHO Lot Quality Technique from communities stratified based on level of planning and drainage. The mean age of the respondents was 33.6 ± 7.7 years. Malaria transmission was attributed mostly to mosquito bites in all strata: S1 (58.3%), S2 (56.1%) and S3 (61.4%). Mosquito net was mentioned as a preventive measure by: 59.3% (S1), 80.7% (S2) and 64.3% (S3). Ownership of long-lasting insecticidal nets was: 76.0% (S1), 75.4% (S2) and 68.6% (S3), and of these, 73.1% (S1), 70.7% (S2) and 72.4% (S3) reported that their child slept under the net the night before the survey. There is a need to reinforce education on transmission and ownership of ITNs especially among caregivers in unplanned, poorly drained communities.

  19. Relationships of the visual cortex in the marsupial brush-tailed possum, Trichosurus vulpecula, a horseradish peroxidase and autoradiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Haight, J R; Sanderson, K J; Neylon, L; Patten, G S

    1980-01-01

    The ascending and descending relationships of visual cortex in Trichosurus were determined using HRP and autoradiographic methods. The visual thalamus, LGNd and LP, was found to project to three cytoarchitecturally distinct areas of cortex with each of these regions displaying differing patterns of connectivity with other centres. The striate and peristriate cortices received homotypically organized projections from LGNd as well as projections from both divisions of LP. The posterior parietal cortex received projections from both LGNd and LP as well as from the latero-intermediate, posterior, ventroanterior and intralaminar thalamic nuclei. The cortical projection fields of LGNd and LP were co-extensive. Descending projections to thalamic centres were reciprocal with the exception of a descending only projection to the thalamic reticular nucleus. The striatogeniculate projection was homotypically organized as was the striatocollicular projection which extended only to the superficial layers of that nucleus. The posterior parietal projection to the superior colliculus involved the deeper layers of that nucleus. The entire visual cortex projected to the pretectum and to the pontine nuclei. The organization of visual cortex in Trichosurus differs from that reported in the American marsupial, Didelphis, in that the LGNd and LP complexes possess a very broad and co-extensive cortical projection, a finding substantially different to what has been reported in placental mammals as well. The organization of thalamic relationships with the posterior parietal cortex would also appear to be unusual with this region receiving convergent projections from at least seven separate thalamic nuclei. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 Fig. 11 PMID:7216909

  20. The GABAA receptor complex in hepatic encephalopathy. Autoradiographic evidence for the presence of elevated levels of a benzodiazepine receptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Gammal, S.H.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. )

    1990-02-01

    Autoradiographic analysis was used to examine radioligand binding to benzodiazepine (BZ) and GABAA receptors in the brains of rabbits with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Thin sections of whole brain from normal rabbits and rabbits with HE were mounted on slides and subdivided into two groups. One group was washed before incubation with radioligand, while the second group was not prewashed. (3H)Flunitrazepam binding to BZ receptors was decreased by 22% to 42% (p less than 0.05) in the cerebral cortex, superior and inferior colliculi, and cerebellum of unwashed sections from rabbits with HE compared to all other groups. The binding of (3H)Ro 15-1788 to unwashed sections from rabbits with HE was reduced by a similar degree (18% to 37%, p less than 0.05) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, superior colliculus, and cerebellar cortex. Incubation of sections with the GABA-mimetic muscimol and NaCl produced an additional decrease in (3H)flunitrazepam binding to the cortex and hippocampus (25% to 31%, p less than 0.05) in unwashed HE rabbit brain, but increased radioligand binding (27% to 71%, p less than 0.05) to several regions in control rabbits. No changes in radioligand binding to either GABAA or peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed between HE and control rabbit sections. These findings are consistent with previous electrophysiologic and neurochemical observations indicating no significant changes in either the function or density of GABAA or BZ receptors in this model of HE. Further, they indicate that a reversible BZ receptor ligand with agonist properties is present in the brain in HE. This substance may contribute to the enhancement of GABAergic tone observed in this syndrome.

  1. Effects of pentadecapeptide BPC157 on regional serotonin synthesis in the rat brain: alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan autoradiographic measurements.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Y; Sikirić, P; Diksic, M

    2004-12-01

    A novel pentadecapeptide, BPC157, was recently reported to have a large spectrum of in vivo activities, from anti-ulcer to central action on the brain dopaminergic system. The mechanisms of these actions are not well understood. In this study, the evaluation of the effects of acute and repeated administration of BPC157 on serotonin (5-HT) synthesis in the rat brain is reported. The alpha-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan (alpha-MTrp) autoradiographic method was used to measure regional 5-HT synthesis rates. In the first series of experiments, a single dose treatment of BPC157 (10 microg/kg) administered intraperitoneally 40 min before the alpha-MTrp tracer injection significantly reduced the regional rate of 5-HT synthesis in the dorsal thalamus, hippocampus, lateral geniculate body and hypothalamus. 5-HT synthesis rates in the substantia nigra reticulate and medial anterior olfactory nucleus in BPC157 treated rats were significantly higher than in the control rats. No significant change in the synthesis rate was observed in the raphe nuclei. In the second series of experiments, following a 7-day treatment with BPC157 (10 microg/kg; s.c.), a significant reduction in the 5-HT synthesis rate was observed in the dorsal raphe nucleus, and significant increases were observed in the substantia nigra, lateral caudate, accumbens nucleus and superior olive. This data suggests that BPC157, a gut peptide, influences brain 5-HT synthesis in rats, but we cannot determine, from this data, the mechanism of this action. PMID:15531385

  2. Autoradiographic analysis of GABAA receptor binding in the neural anxiety network of postpartum and non-postpartum laboratory rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephanie M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    Postpartum female rats exhibit a suppression of anxiety-related behaviors when compared to diestrous virgin females, pregnant females, and males. This blunted anxiety promotes optimal maternal care and involves elevated GABA neurotransmission, possibly including greater density of GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors in the postpartum brain. We here examined autoradiographic binding of [3H]muscimol to measure the total population of GABAA receptors and [3H]flunitrazepam to assess density of benzodiazepine sites in the medial prefrontal cortex, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdala, hippocampus, and periaqueductal gray of female rats sacrificed on day 7 postpartum, day 10 of pregnancy, or as diestrous virgins. A group of sexually naïve male rats was also included. We found that [3H]muscimol binding did not differ among groups in any site but that diestrous virgin females had greater [3H]flunitrazepam binding in the CA1 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus compared to mid-pregnant females and males. Notably, postpartum and diestrous virgin females did not significantly differ in binding of either ligand in any site examined. This is the first study to evaluate the densities of GABAA and benzodiazepine binding sites simultaneously across three female reproductive states and sex with a focus on brain sites influencing anxiety-related behaviors. The results suggest that changes other GABAA receptor characteristics, such as subunit composition or increased presynaptic GABA release during interactions with offspring, must instead play a greater role in the postpartum suppression of anxiety in laboratory rats. PMID:21664440

  3. Pharmacologic characterization and autoradiographic distribution of binding sites for iodinated tachykinins in the rat central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, S.H.; Helke, C.J.; Burcher, E.; Shults, C.W.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1986-11-01

    P-type, E-type, and K-type tachykinin binding sites have been identified in the mammalian CNS. These sites may be tachykinin receptors for which the mammalian neuropeptides substance P, neuromedin K, and substance K are the preferred natural agonists, respectively. In the present investigation, we have compared the pharmacology and the autoradiographic distribution of CNS binding sites for the iodinated (/sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent) tachykinins substance P, eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K. Iodinated eledoisin and neuromedin K exhibited an E-type binding pattern in cortical membranes. Iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K each labeled sites that had a similar distribution but one that was considerably different from that of sites labeled by iodinated substance P. CNS regions where there were detectable densities of binding sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K and few or no sites for iodinated substance P included cortical layers IV-VI, mediolateral septum, supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, interpeduncular nucleus, ventral tegmental area, and substantia nigra pars compacta. Binding sites for SP were generally more widespread in the CNS. CNS regions where there was a substantial density of binding sites for iodinated substance P and few or no sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K included cortical layers I and II, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, medial and lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, rostral thalamus, medial and lateral preoptic nuclei, arcuate nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, dorsal parabrachial nucleus, parabigeminal nucleus, cerebellum, inferior olive, nucleus ambiguus, retrofacial and reticular nuclei, and spinal cord autonomic and somatic motor nuclei.

  4. Temporal alignment of tissue and arterial data and selection of integration start times for the H[sub 2] [sup 15]O autoradiographic CBF model in PET

    SciTech Connect

    Muzic, R.F. Jr. . Dept. of Biomedical Engineering); Nelson, A.D.; Miraldi, F. . Div. of Nuclear Medicine)

    1993-09-01

    A technique has been developed and tested that provides an automated method of temporally aligning the PET tissue activity curve with the arterial activity curve for quantification of cerebral blood flow using the H[sub 2] [sup 15]O autoradiographic model. This technique not only determines the relative time delay between the two curves, but also provides the start time of integration. Variability in computing global cerebral blood flow using this technique is shown to be less than that obtained by trained observers manually selecting parameters and at least as good as that obtained by using another automated alignment technique.

  5. Autoradiographic studies of the intensity of morphogenetic processes in the bone skeleton under modeling microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N. V.; Zolotova-Haidamaka, N. V.; Nithevich, T. P.

    In ontogenesis the development of long skeleton bones and reconstruction of bone structures during adaptive remodeling are performed due to a combination of the bone apposition and bone resorption processes. With the use of radioactive markers of specific biosyntheses -3H-thymidine and 3H-glycine we studied the dynamics and peculiarities of these processes under hypokinesia by unloading the hind limbs of young white rats (tail suspension method) during 28 days. The radionuclides were administered in a single dose at the end of the experiment and the biomaterial was taken 1, 24, 48, 120 and 192 h. after injection. In histoautographs the counts were made of a nuclei labeling index (3H-thymidine), of the number of silver grains over the cells and in the forming bone matrix in growth and remodeling zones of the femoral bone (3H-glycine). The tendency for a reduction of a labeling index in the 3H-thymidine-labeled osteogenic cells in the periost and endost has been established. The dynamics of labeled cells following various intervals after 3H-thymidine injection testifies to a delay in the rates of osteoblasts' differentiation and their transformation to osteocytes in the experiment animals. 3H-glycine is assimilated by osteogenic cells 30 min after the radionuclide injection and following 24 h. it is already incorporated into the forming bone matrix. As a result an appositional bone addition by 192 h. the silver grains are registered in the bone matrix as "labeling lines". A lower 3H-glycine uptake by the osteogenic cells and bone matrix as compared with a control is indicative of a decrease of the osteoplastic process under hypokinesia, particulary in the periost. At the same time the resorption and remodeling bone zones reveal regions of an intensive 3H-glycine uptake after 1 and 24 h. We associate this latter fact with an activation of collagen proteins in the differentiating fibroblasts (instead of osteoblasts) in these locations. This is confirmed by our previous

  6. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  7. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca(2+) Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca(2+)) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  8. Ontogenic Changes and Differential Localization of T-type Ca2+ Channel Subunits Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 in Mouse Hippocampus and Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Carolina; García-Madrona, Sebastián; Gil-Minguez, Mercedes; Luján, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    T-type calcium (Ca2+) channels play a central role in regulating membrane excitability in the brain. Although the contributions of T-type current to neuron output is often proposed to reflect a differential distribution of T-type channel subtypes to somato-dendritic compartments, their precise subcellular distributions in central neurons are not fully determined. Using histoblot and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopic techniques, we have investigated the expression, regional distribution and subcellular localization of T-type Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channel subunits in the adult brain, as well as the ontogeny of expression during postnatal development. Histoblot analysis showed that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 proteins were widely expressed in the brain, with mostly non-overlapping patterns. Cav3.1 showed the highest expression level in the molecular layer (ml) of the cerebellum (Cb), and Cav3.2 in the hippocampus (Hp) and the ml of Cb. During development, levels of Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 increased with age, although there were marked region- and developmental stage-specific differences in their expression. At the cellular and subcellular level, immunoelectron microscopy showed that labeling for Cav3.1 was present in somato-dendritic domains of hippocampal interneurons and Purkinje cells (PCs), while Cav3.2 was present in somato-dendritic domains of CA1 pyramidal cells, hippocampal interneurons and PCs. Most of the immunoparticles for Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 were either associated with the plasma membrane or the intracellular membranes, with notable differences depending on the compartment. Thus, Cav3.1 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of interneurons, whereas Cav3.2 was mainly located in the plasma membrane of dendritic spines and had a major intracellular distribution in dendritic shafts. In PCs, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 showed similar distribution patterns. In addition to its main postsynaptic distribution, Cav3.2 but not Cav3.1 was also detected in axon terminals establishing

  9. Radionuclides in detecting active granuloma formation. Gallium-67 scintigraphy and histopathology with autoradiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    van Maarsseveen, A.; Alberts, C.; van der Schoot, J.; van Royen, E.; Hens, C.; Mullink, H.; de Groot, J.

    1986-01-01

    Granuloma formation studies were performed on lungs of guinea pigs sensitized with FCA over 2 to 17 months. Prolonged time of sensitization revealed more granulomatous pulmonary tissue. An intravenous booster of FCA in the animals that had been sensitized for 3 months yielded enhanced granuloma formation within 5 days. The histopathology of these lungs was comparable with that seen in lungs of animals after 17 months of sensitization without booster. Enhanced local proliferation of macrophages, measured by (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation and autoradiography, was seen in the lungs of the animals that had received boosters. Moreover, /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy was strongly positive in these animals. Scintigraphy of cell suspensions of pulmonary tissue from these animals showed that /sup 67/Ga was predominantly taken up (quantitatively as well as qualitatively) by the alveolar macrophages. Cell suspensions of sarcoidosis patients, prepared in the same way, showed only a low level of /sup 67/Ga uptake, one comparable to that of the pulmonary cell suspensions of the sensitized animals that had not received boosters. It is suggested that a negative scintigraphy in patients with chronic pulmonary granulomatous disorders could be (partly) explained by the absence of activated macrophages.

  10. Autoradiographic visualization of the mouse egg's sperm receptor bound to sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Bleil, J.D.; Wassarman, P.M.

    1986-04-01

    The extracellular coat, or zona pellucida, of mammalian eggs contains species-specific receptors to which sperm bind as a prelude to fertilization. In mice, ZP3, one of only three zona pellucida glycoproteins, serves as sperm receptor. Acrosome-intact, but not acrosome-reacted, mouse sperm recognize and interact with specific O-linked oligosaccharides of ZP3 resulting in sperm-egg binding. Binding, in turn, causes sperm to undergo the acrosome reaction; a membrane fusion event that results in loss of plasma membrane at the anterior region of the head and exposure of inner acrosomal membrane with its associated acrosomal contents. Bound, acrosome-reacted sperm are able to penetrate the zona pellucida and fuse with the egg's plasma membrane (fertilization). In the present report, we examined binding of radioiodinated, purified, egg ZP3 to both acrosome intact and acrosome reacted sperm by whole-mount autoradiography. Silver grains due to bound 125I-ZP3 were found localized to the acrosomal cap region of heads of acrosome-reacted sperm. Under the same conditions, 125I-fetuin bound at only background levels to heads of both acrosome-intact and -reacted sperm, and 125I-ZP2, another zona pellucida glycoprotein, bound preferentially to acrosome-reacted sperm. These results provide visual evidence that ZP3 binds preferentially and specifically to heads of acrosome intact sperm; properties expected of the mouse egg's sperm receptor.

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein 15 and growth differentiation factor 9 expression in the ovary of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): cellular localization, developmental profiles, and response to unilateral ovariectomy.

    PubMed

    García-López, Ángel; Sánchez-Amaya, María Isabel; Halm, Silke; Astola, Antonio; Prat, Francisco

    2011-12-01

    Vertebrate oocytes actively contribute to follicle development by secreting a variety of growth factors, among which bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15/Bmp15) and growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9/Gdf9) have been paid particular attention. In the present study, we describe the cellular localization, the developmental profiles, and the response to unilateral ovariectomy (a procedure implying the surgical removal of one of the ovaries) of protein and mRNA steady-state levels of Bmp15 and Gdf9 in the ovary of European sea bass, an important fish species for marine aquaculture industry. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the oocyte is the main production site of Bmp15 and Gdf9 in European sea bass ovary. During oocyte development, Bmp15 protein expression started to be detected only from the lipid vesicle stage onwards but not in primary pre-vitellogenic (i.e. perinucleolar) oocytes as the bmp15 mRNA already did. Gdf9 protein and gdf9 mRNA expression were both detected in primary perinucleolar oocytes and followed similar decreasing patterns thereafter. Unilateral ovariectomy induced a full compensatory growth of the remaining ovary in the 2-month period following surgery (Á. García-López, M.I. Sánchez-Amaya, C.R. Tyler, F. Prat 2011). The compensatory growth elicited different changes in the expression levels of mRNA and protein of both factors, although the involvement of Bmp15 and Gdf9 in the regulatory network orchestrating such process remains unclear at present. Altogether, our results establish a solid base for further studies focused on elucidating the specific functions of Bmp15 and Gdf9 during primary and secondary oocyte growth in European sea bass.

  12. Sclerostin is a locally acting regulator of late-osteoblast/preosteocyte differentiation and regulates mineralization through a MEPE-ASARM-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Gerald J; Rowe, Peter S; Lim, Hui P; Welldon, Katie J; Ormsby, Renee; Wijenayaka, Asiri R; Zelenchuk, Lesya; Evdokiou, Andreas; Findlay, David M

    2011-07-01

    The identity of the cell type responsive to sclerostin, a negative regulator of bone mass, is unknown. Since sclerostin is expressed in vivo by mineral-embedded osteocytes, we tested the hypothesis that sclerostin would regulate the behavior of cells actively involved in mineralization in adult bone, the preosteocyte. Differentiating cultures of human primary osteoblasts exposed to recombinant human sclerostin (rhSCL) for 35 days displayed dose- and time-dependent inhibition of in vitro mineralization, with late cultures being most responsive in terms of mineralization and gene expression. Treatment of advanced (day 35) cultures with rhSCL markedly increased the expression of the preosteocyte marker E11 and decreased the expression of mature markers DMP1 and SOST. Concomitantly, matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) expression was increased by rhSCL at both the mRNA and protein levels, whereas PHEX was decreased, implying regulation through the MEPE-ASARM axis. We confirmed that mineralization by human osteoblasts is exquisitely sensitive to the triphosphorylated ASARM-PO4 peptide. Immunostaining revealed that rhSCL increased the endogenous levels of MEPE-ASARM. Importantly, antibody-mediated neutralization of endogenous MEPE-ASARM antagonized the effect of rhSCL on mineralization, as did the PHEX synthetic peptide SPR4. Finally, we found elevated Sost mRNA expression in the long bones of HYP mice, suggesting that sclerostin may drive the increased MEPE-ASARM levels and mineralization defect in this genotype. Our results suggest that sclerostin acts through regulation of the PHEX/MEPE axis at the preosteocyte stage and serves as a master regulator of physiologic bone mineralization, consistent with its localization in vivo and its established role in the inhibition of bone formation.

  13. Autoradiographic distribution of 125I calcitonin gene-related peptide binding sites in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Skofitsch, G; Jacobowitz, D M

    1985-01-01

    Using autoradiographic method and 125I-Tyro rat CGRP as a ligand, receptor binding sites were demonstrated in the rat central nervous system. Saturation studies and Scatchard analysis of CGRP-binding to slide mounted tissue sections containing primarily cerebellum showed a single class of receptors with a dissociation constant of 0.96 nM and a Bmax of 76.4 fmol/mg protein. 125I-Tyro rat CGRP binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the telencephalon (medial prefrontal, insular and outer layers of the temporal cortex, nucleus accumbens, fundus striatum, central and inferior lateral amygdaloid nuclei, most caudal caudate putamen, organum vasculosum laminae terminalis, subfornical organ), the diencephalon (anterior hypothalamic, suprachiasmatic, arcuate, paraventricular, dorsomedial, periventricular, reuniens, rhomboid, lateral thalamic pretectalis and habenula nuclei, zona incerta), in the mesencephalon (superficial layers of the superior colliculus, central nucleus of the geniculate body, inferior colliculus, nucleus of the fifth nerve, locus coeruleus, nucleus of the mesencephalic tract, the dorsal tegmental nucleus, superior olive), in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, in the medulla oblongata (inferior olive, nucleus tractus solitarii, nucleus commissuralis, nuclei of the tenth and twelfth nerves, the prepositus hypoglossal and the gracilis nuclei, dorsomedial part of the spinal trigeminal tract), in the dorsal gray matter of the spinal cord (laminae I-VI) and the confines of the central canal. Moderate receptor densities were found in the septal area, the "head" of the anterior caudate nucleus, medial amygdaloid and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the pyramidal layers of the hippocampus and dentate gyri, medial preoptic area, ventromedial nucleus, lateral hypothalamic and ventrolateral thalamic area, central gray, reticular part of the substantia nigra, parvocellular reticular nucleus

  14. Effects of aging on signal transmission and transduction systems in the gerbil brain: morphological and autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Onodera, H; Kato, H; Kogure, K

    1992-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil was used as a model of aging because of its relatively short lifespan, genetic homogeneity and the fact that data had been collected previously. Furthermore, gerbils have been widely used in biomedical investigations of stroke and epilepsy. Age-related differences in signal transmission and transduction systems were investigated in brains of three-, 11- and 21-month-old gerbils by morphological and in vitro receptor autoradiographic studies. Morphometric analysis revealed a decreased number of neurons in layer III of the occipital cortex and also a decrease in cerebellar Purkinje cells in 21-month-old animals. However, no statistical differences were observed in the hippocampal formation, the dorsolateral striatum and layer III of the frontal cortex. Autoradiography was used to map muscarinic cholinergic (labeled with [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate), serotonin2 ([3H]spiperone), dopamine D2 ([3H]spiperone), adenosine A1 ([3H]cyclohexyladenosine), GABAA ([3H]muscimol), naloxone ([3H]naloxone), protein kinase C ([3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate), adenylate cyclase ([3H]forskolin), cyclic AMP ([3H]cyclic AMP) and L-type Ca2+ channels ([3H]PN200-110). Muscarinic cholinergic receptor and protein kinase C, cyclic AMP and L-type Ca2+ channels were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex and/or in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus in the 21-month-old group. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel binding sites were significantly reduced in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, protein kinase C was increased in this area in the 21-month-old group. Also, naloxone binding sites were increased in the CA3 subfield, hilus, dentate gyrus and molecular layer of the cerebellum in the 11- and 21-month-old groups. Muscarinic cholinergic, serotonin2 and dopamine D2 receptors and adenylate cyclase were significantly decreased in the striatum. On the other hand, adenosine A1 and GABAA receptors remained unchanged in the 21-month-old group. Although age

  15. Cellular sites of estrogen and antiestrogen uptake, retention and action: comparative autoradiographic studies in the immature rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism of action of antiestrogens: agents used for treating breast cancer and as probes for studying the mechanisms of action of estrogen. Nuclear uptake and retention of estrogen and antiestrogen were determined in the different cell types of the immature rat uterus, by quantitative autoradiography, after an injection of tritiated hydroxytamoxifen ((/sup 3/H)TAM(OH)) or tritiated estradiol ((/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/). The effect of TAM(OH) and E/sub 2/ on progesterone receptor content was assessed in the different cell types by determining nuclear uptake of the synthetic progestin (/sup 3/H)Org 2058. The results indicate that antiestrogen and estrogen localize to nuclei of the same uterine cell types, but that this nuclear uptake differs among the uterine tissue compartments, that antiestrogen is taken up considerably slower and retained longer than estrogen and that antiestrogen and estrogen differentially affect progesterone receptor content in the different cell types. The results further suggest that antiestrogen-specific binding sites exist in the cytoplasm of uterine luminal epithelium.

  16. Strain Partitioning and Localization within Dobe Graben Using Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-INSAR) and Shuttle Radar Terrain Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demissie, Z. S.; Abdelsalam, M. G.; Byrnes, J. M.; Bridges, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Dobe graben is a northwestern trending, Quaternary continental rift found within the east-central block of the Afar Depression (AD), Ethiopia. The AD is one of only few places where three active tectonic rift arms meet on land. Extensional rifting is ongoing in the Dobe graben as evident by the 1989 swarm of intermediate magnitude (5.7 < Ms < 6.3) earthquakes. Dobe graben extension occurs on steeply dipping faults, where the maximum displacement, fault length, heave and spacing spans in three orders of magnitude. Crustal deformation within the graben was measured through ascending and descending interferograms using the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR), C- Band (l = 5.6 cm) of the ENVISAT satellite. Results from the Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (D-INSAR) over a period of four years (05/20/2005 to 03/05/2010) suggests that the vertical component of deformation is distributed along a 50 km long NW trending zone in the Dobe graben. The vertical component of deformation is -0.5 to -0.3 cm along the graben axial rift floor likely representing subsidence due to riftingand +0.6 cm to 0.9 cm at the middle of the Dobe relay zone due to uplifting along the border escarpment faults. An estimate for the extension rate has been calculated from twelve traverses across the Dobe graben using Shuttle Rader Terrain Model (SRTM). Results show a deformation elongation (e) value ranging from 0.225 to 0.348. A fractal dimension of 0.03 from the graben floor was obtained for the measured population of fault throws (n= 162) in 12 traverses totaling 172 km. This value is interpreted to represent the dominant contribution to extension from faults with large throw. Moreover, frequency distribution of a natural fault population along the graben floor revealed a negative exponential law distribution indicating a strong strain partitioning within the active axial graben floor. A fractal dimension of 0.01 from the graben shoulder escarpment was obtained for

  17. Use of purified F1845 fimbrial adhesin to study localization and expression of receptors for diffusely adhering Escherichia coli during enterocytic differentiation of human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2 in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kerneis, S; Bilge, S S; Fourel, V; Chauviere, G; Coconnier, M H; Servin, A L

    1991-01-01

    Whole diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) C1845 cells bearing the F1845 adhesive factor bind diffusely to differentiated human colon carcinoma cell lines HT-29 and Caco-2. By using antibodies directed against the purified fimbrial adhesin F1845 factor, the expression of the DAEC F1845-specific brush border receptors in the polarized human intestinal HT-29 and Caco-2 epithelial cells was studied by indirect immunofluorescence. A low level of DAEC F1845 receptors in undifferentiated intestinal cells was detected; they were localized in a cluster of cells. DAEC F1845 receptors were expressed at a high level in differentiated HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. DAEC F1845 receptors were expressed at a strikingly high level in the apical domains of the cells and developed during enterocytic differentiation in culture, in parallel with the apical expression of the intestinal brush border hydrolase, sucrase-isomaltase. Images PMID:1682255

  18. The tryptophan hydroxylase activation inhibitor, AGN-2979, decreases regional 5-HT synthesis in the rat brain measured with alpha-[14C]methyl-L-tryptophan: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Shu; Kanemaru, Kazuya; Gittos, Maurice; Diksic, Mirko

    2005-10-15

    Many experimental conditions are stressful for animals. It is well known that stress induces tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activation, resulting in increased serotonin (5-HT) synthesis. In our experimental procedure to measure 5-HT synthesis using alpha-[(14)C]methyl-L-tryptophan (alpha-MTrp) autoradiographic method, the hind limbs of animals are restrained using a loose-fitted plaster cast such that the forelimbs of the animal remain free. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the changes, if any, in 5-HT synthesis, after injecting these restrained rats with the TPH activation inhibitor AGN-2979. The effect on regional 5-HT synthesis was studied using the alpha-MTrp autoradiographic method. The hypothesis was that the TPH activation inhibitor would reduce 5-HT synthesis, if TPH activation was induced by this restraint. The rats received injection of AGN-2979 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or distilled water vehicle (1 mL/kg, i.p.) 1 h prior to tracer administration. The free- and total tryptophan concentrations were not significantly different between the treatment and control groups. The results demonstrate that 5-HT synthesis in AGN-2979 treated rats is significantly decreased (-12 to -35%) in both the raphe nuclei and their terminal areas when compared to the control rats. These findings suggest that restrained conditions, such as those used in our experimental protocol, induce TPH activation resulting in an increased 5-HT synthesis throughout the brain. The reduction in 5-HT synthesis in the AGN-2979 group is not related to a change in the plasma tryptophan. Because there was no activation in the pineal body, the structure having a different isoform of TPH, we can propose that it is only the brain TPH that becomes activated with this specific restraint.

  19. A systematic analysis for localization of predominant growth factors and their receptors involved in murine tooth germ differentiation using in situ hybridization technique.

    PubMed

    Hisamoto, Meri; Goto, Marie; Muto, Mami; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2015-01-01

    Tooth development is regulated by various growth factors and their receptors. However, the overall mechanism of growth factor-mediated odontogenesis remains to be elucidated. The present study examined expression sites and intensities of major growth factors and receptors in the tooth germ of murine fetuses and neonates. Signals of TGF-β and CTGF in fetuses were released from the enamel epithelium, while their neonatal signals arose in odontoblasts. Moreover, BMP/Smad signaling may affect the differentiation of ameloblasts, in contrast to PDGFα whose signals may cause odontoblast differentiation. Growth factors associated with the formation of the periodontium were IGF1, IGF2, IGFBP3, CTGF, and PDGFα. Concerning cusp formation, the enamel knot selectively expressed FGF4, BMP2, and BMP4 with an expression of PDGFα in the enamel-free area. It is concluded that many molecules play critical roles in the epithelium-mesenchyme interaction of tooth germ differentiation, and their expressions are precisely controlled.

  20. Localization and abundance of early markers of fat cell differentiation in the skeletal muscle of cattle during growth--are DLK1-positive cells the origin of marbling flecks?

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Elke; Kuzinski, Judith; Komolka, Katrin; Gotoh, Takafumi; Maak, Steffen

    2015-02-01

    Localization and abundance of early markers of adipogenic differentiation were investigated in bovine muscle tissue to verify their association with marbling development. Bovine skeletal muscle samples were used for immunohistochemical localization and measurement of mRNA and protein abundance of delta-like homolog 1 (DLK1) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB). The localization of DLK1-positive cells confirmed the position of small clusters of adipocytes which can be considered as the origin of marbling flecks. The results indicated higher DLK1 expression in the less marbled muscle of Holstein (HS) steers (P < 0.05) and a trend to higher CEBPB expression in Japanese Black (JB) steers (P < 0.1) at slaughter. The number of DLK1-positive cells and fat content were negatively correlated. The lower expression of DLK1 together with higher CEBPB abundance during fattening in JB may have contributed to the development of more adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of JB.

  1. Differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts by analysis of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled polypeptide profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.D.; Choo, K.B.; Tsai, W.C.; Jen, T.M.; Yeh, J.Y.; Han, S.H.

    1988-12-01

    This paper describes a scheme for differential identification of Candida species and other yeasts based on autoradiographic analysis of protein profiles of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled cellular proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using ATCC strains as references, protein profile analysis showed that different Candida and other yeast species produced distinctively different patterns. Good agreement in results obtained with this approach and with other conventional systems was observed. Being accurate and reproducible, this approach provides a basis for the development of an alternative method for the identification of yeasts isolated from clinical specimens.

  2. Additively Manufactured 3D Porous Ti-6Al-4V Constructs Mimic Trabecular Bone Structure and Regulate Osteoblast Proliferation, Differentiation and Local Factor Production in a Porosity and Surface Roughness Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Alice; Humayun, Aiza; Cohen, David J.; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing by laser sintering is able to produce high resolution metal constructs for orthopaedic and dental implants. In this study, we used a human trabecular bone template to design and manufacture Ti-6Al-4V constructs with varying porosity via laser sintering. Characterization of constructs revealed interconnected porosities ranging from 15–70% with compressive moduli of 2063–2954 MPa. These constructs with macro porosity were further surface-treated to create a desirable multi-scale micro-/nano-roughness, which has been shown to enhance the osseointegration process. Osteoblasts (MG63 cells) exhibited high viability when grown on the constructs. Proliferation (DNA) and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALP), an early differentiation marker, decreased as porosity increased, while osteocalcin (OCN), a late differentiation marker, as well as osteoprotegerin (OPG), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic proteins 2 and 4 (BMP2, BMP4) increased with increasing porosity. 3D constructs with the highest porosity and surface modification supported the greatest osteoblast differentiation and local factor production. These results indicate that additively manufactured 3D porous constructs mimicking human trabecular bone and produced with additional surface treatment can be customized for increased osteoblast response. Increased factors for osteoblast maturation and differentiation on high porosity constructs suggest the enhanced performance of these surfaces for increasing osseointegration in vivo. PMID:25287305

  3. Differential effects of GABAB autoreceptor activation on ethanol potentiation of local and lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Weiner, Jeff L

    2009-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an integral role in the regulation of anxiety, an important behavioral component in the etiology of alcoholism. Although ethanol has recently been shown to enhance BLA GABAergic inhibition via two distinct populations of inhibitory cells, local and lateral paracapsular (lpcs) interneurons, little is known about the mechanisms underlying ethanol potentiation of these two inhibitory pathways. Ethanol is known to enhance GABAergic inhibition in many brain regions via a complex array of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In addition, ethanol's presynaptic effects are often subject to GABA(B) autoreceptor (GABA(B)-R) modulation. Therefore, in this study, we characterized GABA(B)-R function and modulation of ethanol actions at local and lpcs GABAergic synapses. At local synapses, we found significant paired-pulse depression (PPD, 250 ms inter-pulse interval) which was abated by SCH-50911 (GABA(B)-R antagonist). No significant PPD was detected at lpcs synapses, but SCH-50911 significantly potentiated lpcs-evoked IPSCs. Baclofen (GABA(B)-R agonist) had similar depressant effects on local- and lpcs-evoked IPSCs, however baclofen pretreatment only reduced ethanol potentiation at local synapses. Ethanol also significantly enhanced the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs, and these effects were also sensitive to GABA(B)-R modulators. Collectively, these data suggest that stimulus-independent inhibitory responses recorded from BLA principal neurons primarily reflect the activity of local GABAergic interneurons and provide additional evidence that ethanol potentiates local BLA inhibitory synapses primarily via a presynaptic enhancement of GABA release that is tightly regulated by GABA(B)-Rs. In contrast, ethanol potentiation of lpcs GABAergic synapses is not sensitive to GABA(B)-R activation and does not appear to involve increased presynaptic GABA release.

  4. Differential Effects of GABAB Autoreceptor Activation on Ethanol Potentiation of Local and Lateral Paracapsular GABAergic Synapses in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.; Weiner, Jeff L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Many studies have demonstrated that GABAergic inhibition within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays an integral role in the regulation of anxiety, an important behavioral component in the etiology of alcoholism. Although ethanol has recently been shown to enhance BLA GABAergic inhibition via two distinct populations of inhibitory cells, local and lateral paracapsular (lpcs) interneurons, little is known about the mechanisms underlying ethanol potentiation of these two inhibitory pathways. Ethanol is known to enhance GABAergic inhibition in many brain regions via a complex array of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. In addition, ethanol’s presynaptic effects are often subject to GABAB autoreceptor (GABAB-R) modulation. Therefore, in this study, we characterized GABAB-R function and modulation of ethanol actions at local and lpcs GABAergic synapses. At local synapses, we found significant paired-pulse depression (PPD, 250 msec interpulse interval) which was abated by SCH-50911 (GABAB-R antagonist). No significant PPD was detected at lpcs synapses, but SCH-50911 significantly potentiated lpcs-evoked IPSCs. Baclofen (GABAB-R agonist) had similar depressant effects on local- and lpcs-evoked IPSCs, however baclofen pretreatment only reduced ethanol potentiation at local synapses. Ethanol also significantly enhanced the frequency of spontaneous and miniature IPSCs, and these effects were also sensitive to GABAB-R modulators. Collectively, these data suggest that stimulus-independent inhibitory responses recorded from BLA principal neurons primarily reflect the activity of local GABAergic interneurons and provide additional evidence that ethanol potentiates local BLA inhibitory synapses primarily via a presynaptic enhancement of GABA release that is tightly regulated by GABAB-R. In contrast, ethanol potentiation of lpcs GABAergic synapses is not sensitive to GABAB-R activation and does not appear to involve increased presynaptic GABA release. PMID:19371578

  5. Calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity in Gudden’s tegmental nuclei and the hippocampal formation: differential co-localization in neurons projecting to the mammillary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Dillingham, Christopher M.; Holmes, Joshua D.; Wright, Nicholas F.; Erichsen, Jonathan T.; Aggleton, John P.; Vann, Seralynne D.

    2015-01-01

    The principal projections to the mammillary bodies arise from just two sites, Gudden’s tegmental nuclei (dorsal and ventral nuclei) and the hippocampal formation (subiculum and pre/postsubiculum). The present study sought to compare the neurochemical properties of these mammillary body inputs in the rat, with a focus on calcium-binding proteins. Neuronal calretinin (CR) immunoreactivity was sparse in Gudden’s tegmental nuclei and showed no co-localization with neurons projecting to the mammillary bodies. In contrast, many of the ventral tegmental nucleus of Gudden cell that project to the mammillary bodies were parvalbumin (PV)-positive whereas a smaller number of mammillary inputs stained for calbindin (CB). Only a few mammillary body projection cells in the dorsal tegmental nucleus of Gudden co-localized with PV and none co-localized with CB. A very different pattern was found in the hippocampal formation. Here, a large proportion of postsubiculum cells that project to the mammillary bodies co-localized with CR, but not CB or PV. While many neurons in the dorsal and ventral subiculum projected to the mammillary bodies, these cells did not co-localize with the immunofluorescence of any of the three tested proteins. These findings highlight marked differences between hippocampal and tegmental inputs to the rat mammillary bodies as well as differences between the medial and lateral mammillary systems. These findings also indicate some conserved neurochemical properties in Gudden’s tegmental nuclei across rodents and primates. PMID:26300741

  6. Autoradiographic localization of sigma receptor binding sites in guinea pig and rat central nervous system with (+)3H-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, A.L.; Largent, B.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1986-06-01

    (+)3H-3-PPP ((+)3H-3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)-piperidine) binds with high affinity to brain membranes with a pharmacological profile consistent with that of sigma receptors. The distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites in brain and spinal cord of both guinea pig and rat has been determined by in vitro autoradiography with binding densities quantitated by computer-assisted densitometry. (+)3H-3-PPP binding to slide-mounted brain sections is saturable and displays high affinity and a pharmacological specificity very similar to sites labeled in homogenates. (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites are heterogeneously distributed. Highest concentrations of binding sites occur in spinal cord, particularly the ventral horn and dorsal root ganglia; the pons-medulla, associated with the cranial nerve and pontine nuclei and throughout the brain stem reticular formation; the cerebellum, over the Purkinje cell layer; the midbrain, particularly the central gray and red nucleus; and hippocampus, over the pyramidal cell layer. Lowest levels are seen in the basal ganglia and parts of the thalamus, while all other areas, including hypothalamus and cerebral cortex, exhibit moderate grain densities. Quinolinic acid-induced lesions of the hippocampus indicate that (+)3H-3-PPP labels hippocampal pyramidal cells and granule cells in the dentate gyrus. Intrastriatal injection of ibotenic acid dramatically reduces (+)3H-3-PPP binding in this area, while injection of 6-hydroxydopamine produces a relatively slight decrease. The distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP binding sites does not correlate with the receptor distribution of any recognized neurotransmitter or neuropeptide, including dopamine. However, there is a notable similarity between the distribution of (+)3H-3-PPP sites and high-affinity binding sites for psychotomimetic opioids, such as the benzomorphan (+)SKF 10,047.

  7. LOCAL MAGNETIC BEHAVIOR OF 54Fe in EuFe2As2 AND Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2: MICROSCOPIC STUDY USING TIME DIFFERENTIAL PERTURBED ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION (TDPAD) SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Mishra, S. N.; Davane, S. M.; Layek, S.; Hossain, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the time differential perturbed angular distribution measurements of 54Fe on a polycrystalline EuFe2As2 and Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2. The hyperfine field and nuclear spin-relaxation rate are strongly temperature dependent in the paramagnetic state suggesting strong spin fluctuation in the parent compound. The local susceptibility show Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence and Korringa-like relaxation in the tetragonal phase indicating the presence of local moment. In the orthorhombic phase, the hyperfine field behavior suggesting quasi two-dimensional magnetic ordering. The experimental results are in a good agreement with first-principle calculations based on density functional theory.

  8. Differential localization of cytoplasmic myosin II isoforms A and B in avian interphase and dividing embryonic and immortalized cardiomyocytes and other cell types in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Jaffredo, T.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Two principal isoforms of cytoplasmic myosin II, A and B (CMIIA and CMIIB), are present in different proportions in different tissues. Isoform-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to avian CMIIA and CMIIB reveal the cellular distributions of these isoforms in interphase and dividing embryonic avian cardiac, intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia cells in primary cell culture. Embryonic cardiomyocytes react with antibodies to CMIIB but not to CMIIA, localize CMIIB in stress-fiber-like-structures during interphase, and markedly concentrate CMIIB in networks in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. In contrast, cardiac fibroblasts localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks during interphase, and demonstrate slight and independently regulated concentration of CMIIA and CMIIB in networks in their cleavage furrows. V-myc-immortalized cardiomyocytes, an established cell line, have regained the ability to express CMIIA, as well as CMIIB, and localize both CMIIA and CMIIB in stress fibers and networks in interphase cells and in cleavage furrows in dividing cells. Conversely, some intestinal epithelial, spleen, and dorsal root ganglia interphase cells express only CMIIA, organized primarily in networks. Of these, intestinal epithelial cells express both CMIIA and CMIIB when they divide, whereas some dividing cells from both spleen and dorsal root ganglia express only CMIIA and concentrate it in their cleavage furrows. These results suggest that within a given tissue, different cell types express different isoforms of CMII, and that cells expressing either CMIIA or CMIIB alone, or simultaneously, can form a cleavage furrow and divide.

  9. Identification of adaptive mutations in the influenza A virus non-structural 1 gene that increase cytoplasmic localization and differentially regulate host gene expression.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Nicole; Selman, Mohammed; Pelchat, Martin; Jia, Jian Jun; Stintzi, Alain; Brown, Earl G

    2013-01-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (IAV) is a multifunctional virulence factor. We have previously characterized gain-of-function mutations in the NS1 protein arising from the experimental adaptation of the human isolate A/Hong Kong/1/1968(H3N2) (HK) to the mouse. The majority of these mouse adapted NS1 mutations were demonstrated to increase virulence, viral fitness, and interferon antagonism, but differ in binding to the post-transcriptional processing factor cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30). Because nuclear trafficking is a major genetic determinant of influenza virus host adaptation, we assessed subcellular localization and host gene expression of NS1 adaptive mutations. Recombinant HK viruses with adaptive mutations in the NS1 gene were assessed for NS1 protein subcellular localization in mouse and human cells using confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation. In human cells the HK wild-type (HK-wt) virus NS1 protein partitioned equivalently between the cytoplasm and nucleus but was defective in cytoplasmic localization in mouse cells. Several adaptive mutations increased the proportion of NS1 in the cytoplasm of mouse cells with the greatest effects for mutations M106I and D125G. The host gene expression profile of the adaptive mutants was determined by microarray analysis of infected mouse cells to show either high or low extents of host-gene regulation (HGR or LGR) phenotypes. While host genes were predominantly down regulated for the HGR group of mutants (D2N, V23A, F103L, M106I+L98S, L98S, M106V, and M106V+M124I), the LGR phenotype mutants (D125G, M106I, V180A, V226I, and R227K) were characterized by a predominant up regulation of host genes. CPSF30 binding affinity of NS1 mutants did not predict effects on host gene expression. To our knowledge this is the first report of roles of adaptive NS1 mutations that impact intracellular localization and regulation of host gene expression.

  10. Molecular heterogeneity in the choroid plexus epithelium: the 22-member γ-protocadherin family is differentially expressed, apically localized, and implicated in CSF regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lobas, Mark A.; Helsper, Lindsey; Vernon, Claire G.; Schreiner, Dietmar; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Weiner, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) epithelium develops from the ependyma that lines the ventricular system, and plays a critical role in the development and function of the brain. In addition to being the primary site of CSF production, the CP maintains the blood-CSF barrier via apical tight junctions between epithelial cells. Here we show that the 22-member γ-Protocadherin (γ-Pcdh) family of cell adhesion molecules, which we have implicated previously in synaptogenesis and neuronal survival, is highly expressed by both CP epithelial and ependymal cells, in which γ-Pcdh protein localization is, surprisingly, tightly restricted to the apical membrane. Multi-label immunostaining demonstrates that γ-Pcdhs are excluded from tight junctions, basolateral adherens junctions, and apical cilia tufts. RT-PCR analysis indicates that, as a whole, the CP expresses most members of the Pcdh-γ gene family. Immunostaining using novel monoclonal antibodies specific for single γ-Pcdh proteins shows that individual epithelial cells differ in their apically-localized γ-Pcdh repertoire. Restricted mutation of the Pcdh-γ locus in the choroid plexus and ependyma leads to significant reductions in ventricular volume, without obvious disruptions of epithelial apical-basal polarity. Together, these results suggest an unsuspected role for the γ-Pcdhs in CSF production and demonstrate a surprising molecular heterogeneity in the CP epithelium. PMID:22092001

  11. Differentiability in Several Variables Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spindler, K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a concept of differentiability for functions in several variables which has a very natural definition and shares all the properties one expects of a notion of differentiability, but is shown to be weaker than the usual concept of differentiability defined as local linearizability. The exact connection between the two…

  12. Autoradiographic analysis of the in vivo distribution of 3H-imipramine and 3H-desipramine in brain: Comparison to in vitro binding patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, G.E.; Paul, I.A.; Fassberg, J.B.; Powell, K.R.; Stumpf, W.E.; Breese, G.R. )

    1991-03-01

    Using high resolution autoradiographic techniques, the distribution of radioactivity in forebrain and brainstem was assessed after 4 injection of 3H-impramine or 3H-desipramine. Results were compared with regional binding of the drugs to brain sections in vitro. Similar topographic binding of 3H-imipramine and 3H-desipramine was observed in vitro among brain regions, except in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and locus coeruleus, where binding was greater for 3H-desipramine. For both 3H-desipramine and 3H-imipramine, some brain regions that exhibited high binding in vitro also showed high accumulation after in vivo injection. However, certain regions that contained high densities of binding sites for the antidepressant drugs as measured by in vitro binding showed very low accumulation of radioactivity after in vivo treatment. Such regions included the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, layer 1 of piriform cortex, caudate-putamen, pontine and midbrain central gray, and cerebellar granular layer. Compared to in vitro binding of the drugs, the distribution of imipramine and desipramine in vivo appears more anatomically selective. For imipramine, primary sites of action in vivo, as indicated by the topographic distribution in brain, appear to be the locus coeruleus, hippocampus, lateral septal nucleus, and amygdala. For desipramine, the greatest accumulation in vivo was found in the locus coeruleus, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and anterior thalamic nuclei.

  13. Interaction of /sup 125/I-labeled botulinum neurotoxins with nerve terminals. II. Autoradiographic evidence for its uptake into motor nerves by acceptor-mediated endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.D.; Dolly, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    Using pharmacological and autoradiographic techniques it has been shown that botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is translocated across the motor nerve terminal membrane to reach a postulated intraterminal target. In the present study, the nature of this uptake process was investigated using electron microscopic autoradiography. It was found that internalization is acceptor-mediated and that binding to specific cell surface acceptors involves the heavier chain of the toxin. In addition, uptake was shown to be energy and temperature-dependent and to be accelerated by nerve stimulation, a treatment which also shortens the time course of the toxin-induced neuroparalysis. These results, together with the observation that silver grains were often associated with endocytic structures within the nerve terminal, suggested that acceptor-mediated endocytosis is responsible for toxin uptake. Possible recycling of BoNT acceptors (an important aspect of acceptor-mediated endocytosis of toxins) at motor nerve terminals was indicated by comparing the extent of labeling in the presence and absence of metabolic inhibitors. On the basis of these collective results, it is concluded that BoNT is internalized by acceptor-mediated endocytosis and, hence, the data support the proposal that this toxin inhibits release of acetylcholine by interaction with an intracellular target.

  14. Autoradiographic evidence that transport of newly synthesized neuropeptides is directed to release sites in the X-organ--sinus gland of Cardisoma carnifex.

    PubMed

    Stuenkel, E; Gillary, E; Cooke, I

    1991-05-01

    Sections of isolated X-organ--sinus gland neurosecretory systems of the crab, Cardisoma carnifex, were studied by light- and electron microscopy with conventional and autoradiographic procedures. The somata only were exposed to a pulse of 3H-leucine (5 min-5 h) and the entire system perfused with chase medium for various times (1-72 h) before fixation. Within 1 h, radiolabel is concentrated in Golgi complexes and nascent granules of both large and small somata. Label is undetectable in the terminal region following a 10 h chase. It is found in the nerve tract near terminals at 14 h, while after a 19 h chase, label is concentrated in terminal profiles abutting blood sinuses of the neurohemal organ (sinus gland). Following a 72 h chase, label is distributed throughout the terminal region. Each of the six morphologically distinguishable terminal types shows labelling. These observations show that the vast majority of newly formed granules are initially transported to release sites of the perisinus terminals. They thus provide an explanation for previous analyses indicating that newly synthesized peptides are preferentially secreted.

  15. Topographical linkage of tecto-thalamo-anterior ectosylvian sulcal cortex in the cat: an /sup 125/I-WGA autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Higo, S.; Kawamura, S.

    1984-06-01

    Following injection of /sup 125/I-WGA into various parts of the caudal thalamus in the cat, the distribution of orthograde and retrograde labels in the cortex around the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AESS) and the superior colliculus (SC) was examined autoradiographically. When /sup 125/I-WGA injections involved the medial part of nucleus lateralis posterior (Lp) of the thalamus, both orthograde and retrograde labels consistently appeared in the cortex around AESS, and retrograde labels in the SC. The topographical organization of the cortical connections with the medial part of Lp can be well correlated with that of the tecto-thalamic projections, in such a way that the dorsal portion of the medial part of Lp which receives fibers from the rostromedial part of SC is connected reciprocally with the lateral lip of AESS and the crown of the anterior sylvian gyrus; whereas, the most ventral portion of the medial part of Lp which receives tectal afferents from the caudolateral part of SC is connected with the dorsal bank and fundus of AESS. These results suggest the existence of retinotopically ordered linkage between the tecto-Lp and the Lp-AESS connections in the cat.

  16. Comparative abundance and population structure of sympatric Afrotropical tortoises in six rainforest areas: the differential effects of ``traditional veneration'' and of ``subsistence hunting'' by local people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiselli, Luca

    2003-07-01

    Hinge-back tortoises are actively hunted by human populations in sub-Saharan Africa, and are currently threatened in wide areas of their ranges. The wide wetlands and moist rainforests of the Niger Delta (southeastern Nigeria, west Africa) house three sympatric species of hinge-back tortoises: Kinixys erosa, K. homeana, and K. belliana nogueyi. These tortoises are subjected to strong hunting pressure for several reasons (mainly domestic consumption), but in a few places in Bayelsa and Rivers States (eastern axis of the Niger Delta), they are traditionally venerated as "holy animals" bringing happiness. These few places may represent ideal laboratories for monitoring the effects of hundreds of years of "traditional conservation" on the wild populations of a tropical reptile. Here, I compare the apparent abundance, sex ratio, body sizes, microhabitats, and seasonal occurrence of free-ranging Kinixys populations inhabiting three of these "traditional sanctuaries" with the same ecological aspects of conspecifics from three neighbouring areas where the tortoises are actively hunted. K. homeana was the most common species at all sites, followed by K. erosa, whereas K. belliana was extremely rare. Adult sex ratio did not depart significantly from equality both in K. erosa and in K. homeana, and was not influenced by locality or by type of "management" (veneration or harvesting). The frequency of juveniles of K. homeana was significantly higher in areas with traditional veneration than in areas of harvesting, but the same pattern was not observed in K. erosa. There was a significant decrease in terms of the number of observed specimens between areas of traditional protection and areas of usual harvesting in all species, and this trend was more obvious in K. homeana than in K. erosa. The ratio "number of observed erosa/number of observed homeana" was not dependent on the presence of traditional veneration. Mean body sizes were not different in harvest areas and in

  17. Fine-scale population genetics analysis of Platynereis dumerilii (Polychaeta, Nereididae) in the Black Sea: how do local marine currents drive geographical differentiation?

    PubMed

    Popa, Luis Ovidiu; Popa, Oana Paula; Krapal, Ana-Maria; Iorgu, Elena Iulia; Surugiu, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed at a submeso-geographic scale (2 km) the genetic diversity of two sub-populations of Platynereis dumerilii and correlated this with the physical characteristics of the marine currents along the western Black Sea coast. For this purpose, we developed a set of 13 new polymorphic microsatellite markers and used them to assess the genetic differentiation, as well as the bi-directional migration rates between the studied sub-populations. We also computed the Peclet number (Pe) as an indicator of the relative effect of advection and eddy diffusion on larval dispersion for the specific conditions of the Black Sea study area. The results indicated no genetic structure in P. dumerilii sub-populations which indicates that the longitudinal alongshore currents dominate in the population structuring of this species. This finding is important, because with the average current speeds of 5 cm/sec on the Black Sea coast during May-August we might have expected a certain population structuring to occur. In accordance with the periodical change of direction of the longitudinal current (either form North to South, or form South to North) the gene flow was found to be bi-directional, with the same intensity.

  18. Rapid Identification of Candida dubliniensis by Indirect Immunofluorescence Based on Differential Localization of Antigens on C. dubliniensis Blastospores and Candida albicans Germ Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Bikandi, Joseba; Millán, Rosario San; Moragues, María D.; Cebas, Gontzal; Clarke, Mary; Coleman, David C.; Sullivan, Derek J.; Quindós, Guillermo; Pontón, José

    1998-01-01

    There is a clear need for the development of a rapid and reliable test for the identification of Candida dubliniensis and for the discrimination of this species from Candida albicans. In the present study we have investigated the potential use of C. dubliniensis-specific antigens as a basis for its identification. We produced an anti-C. dubliniensis serum which, after adsorption with C. albicans blastospores, was found to differentially label C. dubliniensis isolates in an indirect immunofluorescence test. In this test, the antiserum reacted with blastospores and germ tubes of C. dubliniensis and with blastospores of Candida krusei and Rhodotorula rubra but did not react with blastospores of several other Candida species including C. albicans. The antiserum also reacted with C. albicans germ tubes. The anti-C. dubliniensis adsorbed serum reacted with specific components of 25, 28, 37, 40, 52, and 62 kDa in the C. dubliniensis extract and with a variety of antigens from other yeast species. The antigens from non-C. dubliniensis yeasts showing reactivity with the anti-C. dubliniensis adsorbed serum are mostly expressed within the cell walls of these yeast species, and this reactivity does not interfere with the use of the anti-C. dubliniensis adsorbed serum in an indirect immunofluorescence test for the rapid identification of C. dubliniensis. PMID:9705368

  19. Sound identification in human auditory cortex: Differential contribution of local field potentials and high gamma power as revealed by direct intracranial recordings.

    PubMed

    Nourski, Kirill V; Steinschneider, Mitchell; Rhone, Ariane E; Oya, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Hiroto; Howard, Matthew A; McMurray, Bob

    2015-09-01

    High gamma power has become the principal means of assessing auditory cortical activation in human intracranial studies, albeit at the expense of low frequency local field potentials (LFPs). It is unclear whether limiting analyses to high gamma impedes ability of clarifying auditory cortical organization. We compared the two measures obtained from posterolateral superior temporal gyrus (PLST) and evaluated their relative utility in sound categorization. Subjects were neurosurgical patients undergoing invasive monitoring for medically refractory epilepsy. Stimuli (consonant-vowel syllables varying in voicing and place of articulation and control tones) elicited robust evoked potentials and high gamma activity on PLST. LFPs had greater across-subject variability, yet yielded higher classification accuracy, relative to high gamma power. Classification was enhanced by including temporal detail of LFPs and combining LFP and high gamma. We conclude that future studies should consider utilizing both LFP and high gamma when investigating the functional organization of human auditory cortex.

  20. Diagnostic imaging work-up for disease relapse after radical treatment for prostate cancer: how to differentiate local from systemic disease? The urologist point of view.

    PubMed

    Schiavina, R; Brunocilla, E; Borghesi, M; Vagnoni, V; Castellucci, P; Nanni, C; Ceci, F; Gacci, M; Martorana, G; Fanti, S

    2013-01-01

    About 40% of all patients undergoing radical treatment for localized prostate cancer (PCa) develop biochemical relapse (BCR) during lifetime but only 10-20% of them will show clinically detectable recurrences. Prostatic bed, pelvic or retroperitoneal lymph nodes (LN) and bones (especially the spine) are the sites where we must focus our attention in the early phase of PSA relapse. Time to PSA relapse, PSA kinetics, pathological Gleason score and pathological stage are the main factors related to the likelihood of local vs. distant relapse. Before an extensive diagnostic work-up in patients with BCR, is mandatory to understand if there is a therapeutic consequence or not for the patient. Current imaging techniques have some potential but many limits are yet encountered in the diagnosis of disease relapse. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have low accuracy in the detection of the recurrence. Today, Choline PET/CT may visualize the site of recurrence earlier, with better accuracy than conventional imaging, in a single step and even in the presence of low PSA level. In recent years, the new radiotracer (18)F-FACBC has been proposed as a possible alternative radiopharmaceutical to detect PCa relapse. From a clinical point of view, first clinical studies showed very promising and reproducible results with an improvement in sensitivity is about 20-25% with respect to Choline PET/CT, rendering the FACBC the possible radiotracer of the future for PCa. In conclusion, many improvements have been recently achieved in imaging techniques for PCa restaging, essentially in Nuclear Medicine and MRI, but negative results remain in many cases. Low sensitivity, costs, availability of technologies and confirmation of the results remain the major limitations in most cases.

  1. Barley Metallothioneins: MT3 and MT4 Are Localized in the Grain Aleurone Layer and Show Differential Zinc Binding1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hegelund, Josefine Nymark; Schiller, Michaela; Kichey, Thomas; Hansen, Thomas Hesselhøj; Pedas, Pai; Husted, Søren; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod

    2012-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight, cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role in cytosolic zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) homeostasis. However, evidence for the functional properties of MTs has been hampered by methodological problems in the isolation and characterization of the proteins. Here, we document that barley (Hordeum vulgare) MT3 and MT4 proteins exist in planta and that they differ in tissue localization as well as in metal coordination chemistry. Combined transcriptional and histological analyses showed temporal and spatial correlations between transcript levels and protein abundance during grain development. MT3 was present in tissues of both maternal and filial origin throughout grain filling. In contrast, MT4 was confined to the embryo and aleurone layer, where it appeared during tissue specialization and remained until maturity. Using state-of-the-art speciation analysis by size-exclusion chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry on recombinant MT3 and MT4, their specificity and capacity for metal ion binding were quantified, showing a strong preferential Zn binding relative to Cu and cadmium (Cd) in MT4, which was not the case for MT3. When complementary DNAs from barley MTs were expressed in Cu- or Cd-sensitive yeast mutants, MT3 provided a much stronger complementation than did MT4. We conclude that MT3 may play a housekeeping role in metal homeostasis, while MT4 may function in Zn storage in developing and mature grains. The localization of MT4 and its discrimination against Cd make it an ideal candidate for future biofortification strategies directed toward increasing food and feed Zn concentrations. PMID:22582132

  2. Differential effects of myelin basic protein-activated Th1 and Th2 cells on the local immune microenvironment of injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Guo; Shi, Ling-Ling; Chen, Yue-Juan; Xie, Xiu-Mei; Zhang, Nan; Zhu, An-You; Jiang, Zheng-Song; Feng, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Chen; Xi, Jin; Lü, He-Zuo

    2016-03-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) activated T cells (MBP-T) play an important role in the damage and repair process of the central nervous system (CNS). However, whether these cells play a beneficial or detrimental role is still a matter of debate. Although some studies showed that MBP-T cells are mainly helper T (Th) cells, their subtypes are still not very clear. One possible explanation for MBP-T immunization leading to conflicting results may be the different subtypes of T cells are responsible for distinct effects. In this study, the Th1 and Th2 type MBP-T cells (MBP-Th1 and -Th2) were polarized in vitro, and their effects on the local immune microenvironment and tissue repair of spinal cord injury (SCI) after adoptive immunization were investigated. In MBP-Th1 cell transferred rats, the high levels of pro-inflammatory cells (Th1 cells and M1 macrophages) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, -β, IL-1β) were detected in the injured spinal cord; however, the anti-inflammatory cells (Th2 cells, regulatory T cells, and M2 macrophages) and cytokines (IL-4, -10, and -13) were found in MBP-Th2 cell transferred animals. MBP-Th2 cell transfer resulted in decreased lesion volume, increased myelination of axons, and preservation of neurons. This was accompanied by significant locomotor improvement. These results indicate that MBP-Th2 adoptive transfer has beneficial effects on the injured spinal cord, in which the increased number of Th2 cells may alter the local microenvironment from one primarily populated by Th1 and M1 cells to another dominated by Th2, Treg, and M2 cells and is conducive for SCI repair.

  3. Texture analysis of clinical radiographs using radon transform on a local scale for differentiation between post-menopausal women with and without hip fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Holger F.; Körner, Markus; Baumert, Bernhard; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Reiser, Maximilian

    2011-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic condition characterized by demineralization and destruction of bone tissue. Fractures associated with the disease are becoming an increasingly relevant issue for public health institutions. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus research and, over the years, has been approched by various methods. Still, bone mineral density (BMD) obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) remains the clinical gold-standard for diagnosis and follow-up of osteoporosis. However, DXA is restricted to specialized diagnostic centers and there exists considerable overlap in BMD results between populations of individuals with and without fractures. Clinically far more available than DXA is conventional x-ray imaging depicting trabecular bone structure in great detail. In this paper, we demonstrate that bone structure depicted by clinical radiographs can be analysed quantitatively by parameters obtained from the Radon Transform (RT). RT is a global analysis-tool for detection of predefined, parameterized patterns, e.g. straight lines or struts, representing suitable approximations of trabecular bone texture. The proposed algorithm differentiates between patients with and without fractures of the hip by application of various texture-metrics based on the Radon-Transform to standard x-ray images of the proximal femur. We consider three different regions-of-interest in the proximal femur (femoral head, neck, and inter-trochanteric area), and conduct an analysis with respect to correct classification of the fracture status. Performance of the novel approach is compared to DXA. We draw the conclusion that performance of RT is comparable to DXA and may become a useful supplement to densitometry for the prediction of fracture risk.

  4. Differential expression and localization of insulin-like growth factors I and II in cutaneous wounds of diabetic and nondiabetic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. L.; Kane, C. D.; Chernausek, S. D.; Greenhalgh, D. G.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has profound effects on tissue repair. IGF-II is felt to exert its influence predominately during fetal development. The purpose of this study was to localize and quantify the expression of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA and protein during early wound healing in diabetic and nondiabetic mice. The hypothesis is that IGF-I and IGF-II are up-regulated in the healing wound, but their expression is inhibited in diabetics. Full-thickness cutaneous wounds were made on genetically diabetic (C57BL/ KsJ-db/db) mice and their nondiabetic littermates. At various times after wounding, one-half of each wound was fixed and paraffin embedded for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. The other half was flash-frozen for quantification of IGF mRNA by competitive reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and protein by radioimmunoassay. IGF-I mRNA rose sharply in nondiabetics at day 3. Expression in diabetic wounds was significantly delayed until 14 days after wounding. Even then, diabetic IGF-I mRNA levels were 50% less than those in the nondiabetics at their peak. Although not usually considered active in adult life, IGF-II mRNA expression was augmented after wounding, peaking at 3 days in nondiabetics. As with IGF-I, diabetic wounds exhibited a delay in IGF-II mRNA expression, with maximal levels at 10 days after wounding. Interestingly, peak concentrations of IGF-II mRNA were four times greater in diabetics versus nondiabetics. Trends in IGF-I protein expression followed the patterns of mRNA expression. IGF-I levels in nondiabetics were initially double those in diabetics and peaked at 5 days. Diabetic wound concentrations of IGF-I did not peak until 21 days after wounding, at which time they rose to nondiabetic levels. IGF-I and IGF-II proteins were localized to the advancing epithelial edge, to the epithelial cells of adjacent hair follicles, and to the granulation tissue of the wounds. IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA expression was noted in the

  5. Interleukin-1 receptors in mouse brain: Characterization and neuronal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, T.; Tracey, D.E.; Mitchell, W.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-12-01

    The cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) has a variety of effects in brain, including induction of fever, alteration of slow wave sleep, and alteration of neuroendocrine activity. To examine the potential sites of action of IL-1 in brain, we used iodine-125-labeled recombinant human interleukin-1 (( 125I)IL-1) to identify and characterize IL-1 receptors in crude membrane preparations of mouse (C57BL/6) hippocampus and to study the distribution of IL-1-binding sites in brain using autoradiography. In preliminary homogenate binding and autoradiographic studies, (125I)IL-1 alpha showed significantly higher specific binding than (125I)IL-1 beta. Thus, (125I)IL-1 alpha was used in all subsequent assays. The binding of (125I)IL-1 alpha was linear over a broad range of membrane protein concentrations, saturable, reversible, and of high affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant value of 114 +/- 35 pM and a maximum number of binding sites of 2.5 +/- 0.4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, recombinant human IL-1 alpha, recombinant human IL-1 beta, and a weak IL-1 beta analog. IL-1 beta +, inhibited (125I)IL-1 alpha binding to mouse hippocampus in parallel with their relative bioactivities in the T-cell comitogenesis assay, with inhibitory binding affinity constants of 55 +/- 18, 76 +/- 20, and 2940 +/- 742 pM, respectively; rat/human CRF and human tumor necrosis factor showed no effect on (125I)IL-1 alpha binding. Autoradiographic localization studies revealed very low densities of (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites throughout the brain, with highest densities present in the molecular and granular layers of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and in the choroid plexus. Quinolinic acid lesion studies demonstrated that the (125I)IL-1 alpha-binding sites in the hippocampus were localized to intrinsic neurons.

  6. Differential localization of prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 in two distinct types of secretory granules in rat pituitary gonadotrophs.

    PubMed

    Uehara, M; Yaoi, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, K; Tanaka, S

    2001-04-01

    Prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 are endoproteases involved in prohormone cleavage at pairs of basic amino acids. There is a report that prohormone convertase exists in the rat anterior pituitary gonadotrophs, where it had previously been considered that proprotein processing does not take place. In addition to luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, rat pituitary gonadotrophs contain chromogranin A (CgA) and secretogranin II (SgII), two members of the family of granin proteins, which have proteolytic sites in their molecules. In the present study we examined whether there is a close correlation between subcellular localization of prohormone convertases and granin proteins. Ultrathin sections of rat anterior pituitary were immunolabeled with anti-PC1 or -PC2 antisera and then stained with immunogold. Immunogold particles for PC1 were exclusively found in large, lucent secretory granules, whereas those for PC2 were seen in both large, lucent and small, dense granules. The double-immunolabeling also demonstrated colocalization of PC2 and SgII in small, dense granules and of PC1, PC2, and CgA in large, lucent granules. These immunocytochemical results suggest that PC2 may be involved in the proteolytic processing of SgII and that both PC1 and PC2 may be necessary to process CgA. PMID:11383885

  7. Association of novel polymorphisms of forkhead box L2 and growth differentiation factor-9 genes with egg production traits in local Chinese Dagu hens.

    PubMed

    Qin, N; Liu, Q; Zhang, Y Y; Fan, X C; Xu, X X; Lv, Z C; Wei, M L; Jing, Y; Mu, F; Xu, R F

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor forkhead box L2 (FOXL2) and growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF9) genes have critical roles in the regulation of hen ovarian development. In the present study, these genes were explored as possible molecular markers associated with BW, hen-housed egg production, and egg weight in Chinese Dagu hens. Samples were analyzed using the PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique followed by sequencing analysis, and two novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified within these candidate genes. Among them, an A/G transition at base position 238 in the coding region of the FOXL2 gene and a G/T transversion at base position 1609 in exon 2 of the GDF9 gene were found to be polymorphic and named SNPs A238G and G1609T, respectively. The SNP A238G (FOXL2) leads to a nonsynonymous substitution (isoleucine77-to-valine), and when the 360 Dagu hen samples were divided into genotypes AA and AB, allele A was found to be present at a higher frequency. Furthermore, the AA genotype correlated with significantly higher hen-housed egg production at 30, 43, 57, and 66 wk of age and with a higher egg weight at 43 wk (P<0.05). For the SNP G1609T (GDF9), the hens were typed into TT and TC genotypes, with the T allele shown to be dominant. The TC genotype was also markedly correlated with higher hen-housed egg production and a higher egg weight (P<0.05). Moreover, four haplotypes were reconstructed based on these two SNPs, with the AATC haplotype found to be correlated with the highest hen-housed egg production at 30 to 66 wk of age and with higher egg weights at 43 wk (P<0.05). Collectively, the two SNPs identified in this study might be used as possible genetic molecular markers to aid in the improvement of egg production traits in chicken breeding.

  8. Differential localization of type I and type III procollagen messenger ribonucleic acids in inflamed periodontal and periapical connective tissues by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Larjava, H; Sandberg, M; Happonen, R P; Vuorio, E

    1990-01-01

    Inflammatory lesions of periodontal and periapical connective tissue were studied by in situ hybridization to detect cells responsible for type I and type III collagen production. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from patients with oral lesions of various stages of inflammation were hybridized with cDNA probes specific for human pro alpha 1(I) and pro alpha 1(III) collagen mRNAs, and with bacteriophage lambda DNA as a control probe. This technique permitted us to localize fibroblasts active in type I collagen synthesis in the vicinity of inflammatory infiltrates in all the samples studied. Cells containing high levels of type III collagen mRNA were seen in early abscess formation and they were particularly abundant in pyogenic granuloma and irritation fibroma. Type I collagen mRNA was prominent in gingival fibrosis. In the infrabony lesions with active inflammatory infiltrations the production of collagen was confined mostly to the periphery of the lesions. These findings give indirect evidence that cytokines liberated during the early stages of the inflammatory process stimulate expression of the type III collagen gene by fibroblasts. In chronic lesions a gradual switch from type III to type I collagen gene expression occurs. The change in collagen types appears to underlie the observed isolation of the inflammation by a collagenous capsule. In all the samples studied fibroblasts exhibited marked variation in their levels of procollagen mRNAs, supporting previous views about their heterogeneity in connective tissues. The approach presented here offers new possibilities to study cellular interactions and metabolic activities in inflammatory lesions. PMID:2296161

  9. Antidepressant actions of lateral habenula deep brain stimulation differentially correlate with CaMKII/GSK3/AMPK signaling locally and in the infralimbic cortex.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yesul; Morath, Brooke; Hu, Chunling; Byrne, Linda K; Sutor, Shari L; Frye, Mark A; Tye, Susannah J

    2016-06-01

    High frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the lateral habenula (LHb) reduces symptoms of depression in severely treatment-resistant individuals. Despite the observed therapeutic effects, the molecular underpinnings of DBS are poorly understood. This study investigated the efficacy of high frequency LHb DBS (130Hz; 200μA; 90μs) in an animal model of tricyclic antidepressant resistance. Further, we reported DBS mediated changes in Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKIIα/β), glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3α/β) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) both locally and in the infralimbic cortex (IL). Protein expressions were then correlated to immobility time during the forced swim test (FST). Antidepressant actions were quantified via FST. Treatment groups comprised of animals treated with adrenocorticotropic hormone alone (ACTH; 100μg/day, 14days, n=7), ACTH with active DBS (n=7), sham DBS (n=8), surgery only (n=8) or control (n=8). Active DBS significantly reduced immobility in ACTH-treated animals (p<0.05). For this group, western blot results demonstrated phosphorylation status of LHb CaMKIIα/β and GSK3α/β significantly correlated to immobility time in the FST. Concurrently, we observed phosphorylation status of CaMKIIα/β, GSK3α/β, and AMPK in the IL to be negatively correlated with antidepressant actions of DBS. These findings suggest that activity dependent phosphorylation of CaMKIIα/β, and GSK3α/β in the LHb together with the downregulation of CaMKIIα/β, GSK3α/β, and AMPK in the IL, contribute to the antidepressant actions of DBS. PMID:26956153

  10. Differential cellular localization of Epstein-Barr virus and human cytomegalovirus in the colonic mucosa of patients with active or quiescent inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Racca, Francesca; Scudeller, Luigia; Piralla, Antonio; Formagnana, Pietro; Pozzi, Lodovica; Betti, Elena; Vanoli, Alessandro; Riboni, Roberta; Kruzliak, Peter; Baldanti, Fausto; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2016-02-01

    The role of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the exacerbation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still uncertain. We prospectively investigated the presence of EBV and HCMV infection in both epithelial and immune cells of colonic mucosa of IBD patients, both refractory and responders to standard therapies, in comparison with patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome who were considered as controls, by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, in an attempt to assess viral localization, DNA load, life cycle phase and possible correlation with disease activity indexes. We obtained clear evidence of the presence of high DNA loads of both viruses in either enterocytes or immune cells of refractory IBD patients, whereas we observed low levels in the responder group and an absence of detectable copies in all cell populations of controls. Remarkably, the values of EBV and HCMV DNA in inflamed mucosa were invariably higher than in non-inflamed areas in both IBD groups, and the EBV DNA loads in the cell populations of diseased mucosa of refractory IBD patients positively correlated with the severity of mucosal damage and clinical indexes of activity. Moreover, EBV infection resulted the most prevalent either alone or in combination with HCMV, while immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization did not allow us to distinguish between the different phases of viral life cycle. Finally, as regards treatment, these novel findings could pave the way for the use of new antiviral molecules in the treatment of this condition. PMID:26659090

  11. Differential Local Connectivity and Neuroinflammation Profiles in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus in the Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism.

    PubMed

    Codagnone, Martín Gabriel; Podestá, María Fernanda; Uccelli, Nonthué Alejandra; Reinés, Analía

    2015-01-01

    gliosis in the mPFC and hippocampus of VPA rats. While microgliosis is spread in these two limbic areas, astrogliosis, although extended in the mPFC, is circumscribed to the CA3 hippocampal subfield. Our work indicates that neuroinflammation and synaptic alterations do coexist in VPA rats, making this model suitable for studying novel aspects of neuron-glia interactions. Moreover, it suggests that the mPFC and hippocampus might behave differently in the context of the local hyperconnectivity and synaptic hypotheses of autism. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Differential Local Connectivity and Neuroinflammation Profiles in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus in the Valproic Acid Rat Model of Autism.

    PubMed

    Codagnone, Martín Gabriel; Podestá, María Fernanda; Uccelli, Nonthué Alejandra; Reinés, Analía

    2015-01-01

    gliosis in the mPFC and hippocampus of VPA rats. While microgliosis is spread in these two limbic areas, astrogliosis, although extended in the mPFC, is circumscribed to the CA3 hippocampal subfield. Our work indicates that neuroinflammation and synaptic alterations do coexist in VPA rats, making this model suitable for studying novel aspects of neuron-glia interactions. Moreover, it suggests that the mPFC and hippocampus might behave differently in the context of the local hyperconnectivity and synaptic hypotheses of autism. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:25895486

  13. Iodoamphetamine as a new tracer for local cerebral blood flow in the rat: comparison with isopropyliodoamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Rapin, J R; Le Poncin-Lafitte, M; Duterte, D; Rips, R; Morier, E; Lassen, N A

    1984-06-01

    Rats were injected with iodoamphetamine synthesized and labeled with 125I or with 125I- isopropyliodoamphetamine , a molecule of established value for the determination of local cerebral blood flow. The blood kinetics, tissue distribution, and brain uptake index for each tracer exhibited practically no differences. Autoradiographic quantification of the local cerebral blood flow, calculated according to the microsphere model, produced identical results for both molecules. However, compared with the values reported for other tracers, our values constituted an underestimation of white matter blood flow and a more real estimation of hippocampal flow. It is concluded from the brain uptake of the derivatives of both amphetamines during the first minutes following their injection that these tracers can be used as a chemical microembolus for the measurement of local cerebral blood flow. PMID:6725437

  14. Iodoamphetamine as a new tracer for local cerebral blood flow in the rat: comparison with isopropyliodoamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rapin, J.R.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, M.; Duterte, D.; Rips, R.; Morier, E.; Lassen, N.A.

    1984-06-01

    Rats were injected with iodoamphetamine synthesized and labeled with /sup 125/I or with /sup 125/I- isopropyliodoamphetamine, a molecule of established value for the determination of local cerebral blood flow. The blood kinetics, tissue distribution, and brain uptake index for each tracer exhibited practically no differences. Autoradiographic quantification of the local cerebral blood flow, calculated according to the microsphere model, produced identical results for both molecules. However, compared with the values reported for other tracers, our values constituted an underestimation of white matter blood flow and a more real estimation of hippocampal flow. It is concluded from the brain uptake of the derivatives of both amphetamines during the first minutes following their injection that these tracers can be used as a chemical microembolus for the measurement of local cerebral blood flow.

  15. Exercise training reinstates cortico-cortical sensorimotor functional connectivity following striatal lesioning: Development and application of a subregional-level analytic toolbox for perfusion autoradiographs of the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Hao; Heintz, Ryan; Wang, Zhuo; Guo, Yumei; Myers, Kalisa; Scremin, Oscar; Maarek, Jean-Michel; Holschneider, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Current rodent connectome projects are revealing brain structural connectivity with unprecedented resolution and completeness. How subregional structural connectivity relates to subregional functional interactions is an emerging research topic. We describe a method for standardized, mesoscopic-level data sampling from autoradiographic coronal sections of the rat brain, and for correlation-based analysis and intuitive display of cortico-cortical functional connectivity (FC) on a flattened cortical map. A graphic user interface “Cx-2D” allows for the display of significant correlations of individual regions-of-interest, as well as graph theoretical metrics across the cortex. Cx-2D was tested on an autoradiographic data set of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of rats that had undergone bilateral striatal lesions, followed by 4 weeks of aerobic exercise training or no exercise. Effects of lesioning and exercise on cortico-cortical FC were examined during a locomotor challenge in this rat model of Parkinsonism. Subregional FC analysis revealed a rich functional reorganization of the brain in response to lesioning and exercise that was not apparent in a standard analysis focused on CBF of isolated brain regions. Lesioned rats showed diminished degree centrality of lateral primary motor cortex, as well as neighboring somatosensory cortex--changes that were substantially reversed in lesioned rats following exercise training. Seed analysis revealed that exercise increased positive correlations in motor and somatosensory cortex, with little effect in non-sensorimotor regions such as visual, auditory, and piriform cortex. The current analysis revealed that exercise partially reinstated sensorimotor FC lost following dopaminergic deafferentation. Cx-2D allows for standardized data sampling from images of brain slices, as well as analysis and display of cortico-cortical FC in the rat cerebral cortex with potential applications in a variety of autoradiographic and histologic

  16. Circadian rhythm of mechanically mediated differentiation of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Roberts, W E; Klingler, E; Mozsary, P G

    1984-01-01

    Rats entrained to alternating 12 h light/dark periods were sacrificed at hourly intervals over one complete circadian cycle. Each animal was injected with 3H-Thymidine 1 h before death. Autoradiographs of serial sections of maxillary first molar periodontal ligament (PDL) were prepared. Nuclear volume was determined for labeled fibroblastlike PDL cells along a physiological bone forming surface. Preosteoblasts (large nuclei), the immediate proliferating precursors of osteoblasts, were found to synthesize DNA primarily during the environmental light period and divide during the subsequent dark cycle. Less differentiated precursor cells (small nuclei), the proliferating predecessors of preosteoblasts, were in S phase primarily during the dark period and divided in the following light cycle. Since previous studies have indicated, the stress/strain-mediated increase in nuclear size to form preosteoblasts also requires about 8-12 h, the least complex osteoblast differentiation model, which is consistent with the present data, is a 60 h sequence involving at least four cell types and five alternating dark/light cycles. The principal rate-limiting step in osteoblast differentiation is the mechanically related shift in nuclear size (change in genomic expression) associated with formation of preosteoblasts. PMID:6430524

  17. Mecamylamine-precipitated nicotine withdrawal syndrome and its prevention with baclofen: an autoradiographic study of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Varani, Andrés P; Antonelli, Marta C; Balerio, Graciela N

    2013-07-01

    A previous study from our laboratory showed that baclofen (BAC, GABAB receptor agonist) was able to prevent the behavioral expression of nicotine (NIC) withdrawal syndrome. To further investigate the mechanisms underlying this effect, we conducted this study, with the aims of analyzing α4β2 nicotinic receptor density during NIC withdrawal and, in case we found any changes, of determining whether they could be prevented by pretreatment with BAC. Swiss Webster albino mice received NIC (2.5 mg/kg, s.c.) 4 times daily, for 7 days. On the 8th day, NIC-treated mice received the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (MEC; 2 mg/kg, i.p.) 1 h after the last dose of NIC. A second group of NIC-treated mice received BAC (2 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to MEC administration. Thirty minutes after MEC, mice were sacrificed and brain autoradiography with [(3)H]epibatidine was carried out at five different anatomical levels. Autoradiographic mapping showed a significant increase of α4β2 nicotinic receptor labeling during NIC withdrawal in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), medial habenular nucleus (HbM), thalamic nuclei, dorsal lateral geniculate (DLG) nucleus, fasciculus retroflexus (fr), ventral tegmental area, interpeduncular nucleus and superior colliculus. BAC pretreatment prevented the increased α4β2 nicotinic receptor binding sites in the AcbSh, MHb, thalamic nuclei, DLG nucleus and fr. The present results suggest a relationship between BAC's preventive effect of the expression of NIC withdrawal signs, and its ability to restore the changes in α4β2 nicotinic receptor labeling, evidenced in specific brain areas in NIC withdrawn animals.

  18. Multiple conformations of 5-HT2A and 5-HT 2C receptors in rat brain: an autoradiographic study with [125I](±)DOI.

    PubMed

    López-Giménez, Juan F; Vilaró, M Teresa; Palacios, José M; Mengod, Guadalupe

    2013-10-01

    Earlier autoradiographic studies with the 5-HT2 receptor agonist [(125)I](±)DOI in human brain showed unexpected biphasic competition curves for various 5-HT2A antagonists. We have performed similar studies in rat brain regions with selective 5-HT2A (M100907) and 5-HT2C (SB242084) antagonists together with ketanserin and mesulergine. The effect of GTP analogues on antagonist competition was also studied. Increasing concentrations of Gpp(NH)p or GTPγS resulted in a maximal inhibition of [(125)I](±)DOI-specific binding of approximately 50 %. M100907 competed biphasically in all regions. In the presence of 100 μM Gpp(NH)p, M100907 still displaced biphasically the remaining [(125)I](±)DOI binding. Ketanserin showed biphasic curves in some regions and monophasic curves in others. In the latter, Gpp(NH)p evidenced an additional high-affinity site. SB242084 competed biphasically in brainstem nuclei and monophasically in the other regions. In most areas, SB242084 affinities were not notably altered by Gpp(NH)p. Mesulergine competed monophasically in all regions without alteration by Gpp(NH)p. These results conform with the extended ternary complex model of receptor action: receptor exists as an equilibrium of multiple conformations, i.e. ground (R), partly activated (R*) and activated G-protein-coupled (R*G) conformation/s. Thus, [(125)I](±)DOI would label multiple conformations of both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors in rat brain, and M100907 and ketanserin would recognise these conformations with different affinities.

  19. Omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) site distribution in the rat immune system: an autoradiographic study with the photoaffinity ligand (/sup 3/H)PK 14105

    SciTech Connect

    Benavides, J.; Dubois, A.; Dennis, T.; Hamel, E.; Scatton, B.

    1989-04-01

    The anatomical distribution of omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) sites in the immune system organs of the rat has been studied autoradiographically at both macroscopic and microscopic levels of resolution using either reversible or irreversible (UV irradiation) labeling with (/sup 3/H)PK 14105. In thymus sections, (/sup 3/H)PK 14105 labeled with high affinity (Kd, derived from saturation experiments = 10.8 nM) a single population of sites which possessed the pharmacological characteristics of omega 3 sites. In the thymus gland, higher omega 3 site densities were detected in the cortex than in the medulla; in these subregions, silver grains were associated to small (10-18 microns diameter) cells. In the spleen, omega 3 sites were more abundant in the white than in the red pulp. In the white pulp, silver grains were denser in the marginal zone than in the vicinity of the central artery and labeling was, as in the thymus, associated to small cytoplasm-poor cells. In the red pulp, omega 3 site associated silver grains were observed mainly in the Bilroth cords. In the lymph nodes, the medullary region showed a higher labeling than the surrounding follicles and paracortex. A significant accumulation of silver grains was observed in the lymph node medullary cords. In the intestine, Peyer patches were particularly enriched in omega 3 sites (especially in the periphery of the follicles). The distribution of omega 3 sites in the immune system organs suggests a preferential labeling of cells of T and monocytic lineages. This is consistent with the proposed immunoregulatory properties of some omega 3 site ligands.

  20. Myocardial uptake of indium-111-labeled antimyosin in acute subendocardial infarction: Clinical, histochemical, and autoradiographic correlation of myocardial necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendel, R.C.; McSherry, B.A.; Leppo, J.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Indium-111-labeled antimyosin has been utilized in the diagnosis and localization of acute transmural myocardial infarction. The present report describes a patient who presented with a massive subendocardial infarction. Two days after the injection of antimyosin, the patient's clinical status markedly deteriorated and he expired. Postmortem examination demonstrated severe three-vessel coronary artery disease with extensive myocyte death in the endocardium. Autoradiography and histochemical staining of the prosected heart demonstrated high correlation for myocardial necrosis and corresponded to clinical evidence for diffuse subendocardial infarction.

  1. Autoradiographic quantitation and anatomical mapping of 125I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Melander, T; Köhler, C; Nilsson, S; Hökfelt, T; Brodin, E; Theodorsson, E; Bartfai, T

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of 125I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system was studied by the use of autoradiography, and the amount of peptide bound was determined by the use of microdensitometry. The amount of 125I-galanin bound in various CNS regions ranged from non detectable to 0.40 pmol per gramme tissue at a concentration of 1.5 nM 125I-galanin. The anatomical mapping revealed high density of binding sites in the telencephalon, where labelling was seen in the entorhinal, perirhinal and piriform cortices, in most septal nuclei, in the amygdala and in the hippocampal formation. In the diencephalon binding sites were densely accumulated in the hypothalamus, including the median eminence and periventricular nucleus as well as in the dorsal and medial thalamic nuclei. In the mesencephalon binding sites were seen in many nuclei including the dorsal raphe nucleus, the periaqueductal central grey and pars compacta of the substantia nigra. The pons/medulla revealed high density of binding sites in the locus coeruleus, parabrachial nuclei and in the dorsal vagal complex, while binding in the spinal cord was seen in laminae I, II and X as well as in the intermediolateral horn. The distribution of 125I-galanin binding sites corresponded well to the localization of the peptide as revealed in several earlier immunohistochemical and radioimmunoassay studies, as well as to several previously reported effects of galanin on central autonomic functions.

  2. Plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain distribution of /sup 14/C-melatonin in rat: a biochemical and autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Vitte, P.A.; Harthe, C.; Lestage, P.; Claustrat, B.; Bobillier, P.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of 14C-Melatonin (14C-MT) after systemic injection was studied in the plasma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and brain of rats. Chromatographic analysis (thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography) indicated that the radioactivity from biological samples taken at various times following the injection of label was mainly associated with 14C-MT. Computer analysis of plasma 14C-MT kinetics showed a three-compartment system with half-lives of 0.21 +/- 0.05, 5.97 +/- 1.11, and 47.52 +/- 8.86 min. The volume of distribution and the clearance were 1,736 +/- 349 ml.kg-1 and 25.1 +/- 1.7 ml.min-1.kg-1 respectively. The entry of 14C-MT into the CSF was rapid and reached a maximum at 5 min. The decay followed a two-compartment system with half-lives of 16.5 +/- 2.9 and 47.3 +/- 8.6 min. The CSF/plasma concentration ratio was 0.38 at the steady state (30 min). At 2 min the level of 14C-MT in the brain was 3.8 higher than in the CSF. Representative autoradiograms revealed an heterogeneous localization of 14C-MT in the grey matter. The highest regional values, as evaluated by the permeability area product technique, were found in cortex, thalamic nuclei, medial geniculate nucleus, anterior pretectal area, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, choroid plexuses, and bulb-pons. Thirty minutes later 14C-MT was still detected in most of the brain regions analyzed. These results point to a low but rapid penetration of circulating MT into the brain and the CSF. The heterogeneous distribution and the partial retention of 14C-MT in the brain are compatible with the hypothesis of a central action of this hormone mediated via binding sites.

  3. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  4. Differentiated Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Robert W.; And Others

    This report describes school operation changes in scheduling, curriculum, decisionmaking powers, and individualization of instruction that are concurrent with the adoption of differentiated staffing. The author defines differentiated staffing, explains where and at what levels it has been utilized, provides descriptions of results achieved, gives…

  5. Differential games.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaiya, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    General discussion of the theory of differential games with two players and zero sum. Games starting at a fixed initial state and ending at a fixed final time are analyzed. Strategies for the games are defined. The existence of saddle values and saddle points is considered. A stochastic version of a differential game is used to examine the synthesis problem.

  6. Ultrastructural autoradiographic and immunocytochemical analysis of setae formation and keratinization in the digital pads of the gecko Hemidactylus turcicus (Gekkonidae, Reptilia).

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2003-08-01

    The modified subdigital scales of some lizards allow them to climb vertical surfaces. This is due to the action of millions of tiny setae present in the digital pads. Setae are mainly composed of beta-keratin which may have some modality of aggregation similar to that of barbs and barbules of feathers. Keratins and associated proteins are involved in the organization of setae. The formation of setae in the climbing pad lamellae of the gecko Hemidactylus turcicus has been analyzed under the electron microscope after injection of tritiated histidine and immunocytochemistry for a chick scale beta-keratin. Setae are made up of dense and pale filaments, both oriented along the longer axis of setae. Beta-keratin is present in the oberhautchen layer and in the growing setae which are highly modified oberhautchen cells. Most of the immunolabeling concentrated in the central part of setae. This cross-reactivity suggests that some epitopes in chick beta-keratin are also present in gecko setae. Four hours after injection of tritiated histidine, the labeling is localized over setae, in particular in the dense filaments and less in the pale filaments. Some labeling is also seen in the keratinaceous material present in the cytoplasm of clear cells, which are believed to mold setae. The present observations suggest that both beta-keratin and denser matrix proteins, possibly incorporating histidine, are packed into growing setae. These proteins may be mixed to form pale and dense filaments oriented along the longer axis of setae, a pattern resembling that of barb and barbule cells of feathers. The role of matrix material in the orientation of the deposited beta-keratin during setal outgrowth is discussed with the problem of barb and barbule differentiation in avian feathers.

  7. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  8. Sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sinisi, A A; Pasquali, D; Notaro, A; Bellastella, A

    2003-01-01

    In humans, like as in other mammals, the gonads, the internal genital ducts, and the external genital structures all develop from bipotential embryologic tissues. Male or female phenotype develops through a cascade of processes which initiate with sex determination and follow with sex differentiation. The karyotype (46, XY or 46, XX) of the embryo (genetic sex) determines whether primordial gonad differentiates into a testis or an ovary, respectively (gonadal differentiation). A Y-related gene, SRY, acts as a switch signal for testis differentiation. Testis development process involves several steps controlled by other non-OY-linked genes, such as Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1), EMX2, LIM1, steroidogenic factor 1(SF-1), SRY box-related gene 9 (SOX9). Since other genes, such as Wnt-4 and DAX-1, are necessary for the initiation of female pathway in sex determination, female development cannot be considered a default process. Hormonal production of differentiated gonads is relevant for differentiation of the internal and external genitalia during fetal life, and for the development of secondary sex characteristics at puberty. Antimullerian hormone (AMH) secreted by Sertoli cells inhibits the development of female internal genitalia (tube, uterus, upper part of vagina); testosterone secreted by Leydig cells induces stabilization of wolffian ducts and development of internal male genitalia. Differentiation of external male genitalia requires the transformation of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone by 5alpha reductase type 2 expressed in genital skin and urogenital sinus. The effects of androgens occur in presence of functional androgen receptor (AR) protein. Mutations of genes coding for steroidogenic enzymes, AMH, AMH receptor, AR and 5alpha reductase are all associated with impairment of sex differentiation and result in genital ambiguity. PMID:12834017

  9. Autoradiographic characterization of (+-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-( sup 125 I) iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (( sup 125 I)DOI) binding to 5-HT2 and 5-HT1c receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Garlick, R.K.; Glennon, R.A.; Teitler, M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-11-01

    The 5-HT2 (serotonin) receptor has traditionally been labeled with antagonist radioligands such as (3H)ketanserin and (3H)spiperone, which label both agonist high-affinity (guanyl nucleotide-sensitive) and agonist low-affinity (guanyl nucleotide-insensitive) states of this receptor. The hallucinogen 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) is an agonist which labels the high-affinity guanyl nucleotide-sensitive state of brain 5-HT2 receptors selectively. In the present study, conditions for autoradiographic visualization of (+/-)-(125I)DOI-labeled 5-HT2 receptors were optimized and binding to slide-mounted sections was characterized with respect to pharmacology, guanyl nucleotide sensitivity and anatomical distribution. In slide-mounted rat brain sections (+/-)-(125I)DOI binding was saturable, of high affinity (KD approximately 4 nM) and displayed a pharmacologic profile typical of 5-HT2 receptors. Consistent with coupling of 5-HT2 receptors in the high-affinity state to a guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein, (125I)DOI binding was inhibited by guanyl nucleotides but not by adenosine triphosphate. Patterns of autoradiographic distribution of (125I)DOI binding to 5-HT2 receptors were similar to those seen with (3H)ketanserin- and (125I)-lysergic acid diethylamide-labeled 5-HT2 receptors. However, the density of 5-HT2 receptors labeled by the agonist (125I)DOI was markedly lower (30-50%) than that labeled by the antagonist (3H)ketanserin. High densities of (125I)DOI labeling were present in olfactory bulb, anterior regions of cerebral cortex (layer IV), claustrum, caudate putamen, globus pallidus, ventral pallidum, islands of Calleja, mammillary nuclei and inferior olive. Binding in hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus was generally sparse.

  10. The norepinephrine transporter (NET) radioligand (S,S)-[18F]FMeNER-D2 shows significant decreases in NET density in the human brain in Alzheimer's disease: a post-mortem autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Brockschnieder, Damian; Nag, Sangram; Pavlova, Elena; Kása, Péter; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Légrádi, Adám; Gulya, Károly; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Halldin, Christer

    2010-01-01

    Earlier post-mortem histological and autoradiographic studies have indicated a reduction of cell numbers in the locus coeruleus (LC) and a corresponding decrease in norepinephrine transporter (NET) in brains obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients as compared to age-matched healthy controls. In order to test the hypothesis that the regional decrease of NET is a disease specific biomarker in AD and as such, it can be used in PET imaging studies for diagnostic considerations, regional differences in the density of NET in various anatomical structures were measured in whole hemisphere human brain slices obtained from AD patients and age-matched control subjects in a series of autoradiographic experiments using the novel selective PET radioligand for NET (S,S)-[(18)F]FMeNER-D(2). (S,S)-[(18)F]FMeNER-D(2) appears to be a useful imaging biomarker for quantifying the density of NET in various brain structures, including the LC and the thalamus wherein the highest densities are found in physiological conditions. In AD significant decreases of NET densities can be demonstrated with the radioligand in both structures as compared to age-matched controls. The decreases in AD correlate with the progress of the disease as indicated by Braak grades. As the size of the LC is below the spatial resolution of the PET scanners, but the size of the thalamus can be detected with appropriate spatial accuracy in advanced scanners, the present findings confirm our earlier observations with PET that the in vivo imaging of NET with (S,S)-[(18)F]FMeNER-D(2) in the thalamus is viable. Nevertheless, further studies are warranted to assess the usefulness of such an imaging approach for the early detection of changes in thalamic NET densities as a disease-specific biomarker and the possible use of (S,S)-[(18)F]FMeNER-D(2) as a molecular imaging biomarker in AD. PMID:20211213

  11. Challenge with 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) during early development persistently impairs growth, differentiation, and local expression of IGF-I and IGF-II in immune organs of tilapia.

    PubMed

    Shved, Natallia; Berishvili, Giorgi; Häusermann, Eliane; D'Cotta, Helena; Baroiller, Jean-François; Eppler, Elisabeth

    2009-03-01

    The enormous expansion of world-wide aquaculture has led to increasing interest in the regulation of fish immune system. Estrogen has recently been shown to inhibit the endocrine (liver-derived) and autocrine/paracrine local insulin-like growth factor-I system in fish. In order to address the potential actions of estrogen on the IGF system in immune organs, tilapia were fed with 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2)-enriched food from 10 to 40 days post fertilization (DPF) to induce functional feminization, an approach commonly used in aquaculture. EE2-treated and control fish were sampled at 75 and 165 DPF. The expression levels of ER-alpha, IGF-I, IGF-II and growth hormone receptor (GH-R) mRNA in spleen and head kidney were determined by real-time PCR and the expressing sites of IGF-I mRNA identified by in situ hybridisation. Ratios of spleen length and weight to body length and weight were determined. At 165 DPF, the length (4.9% vs. 7.6%) and weight (0.084% vs. 0.132%) ratios were significantly lowered in EE2-treated fish and number and size of the melanomacrophage centres were considerably reduced. At 75 DPF, both in spleen and head kidney of EE2-treated fish the expression levels of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA were markedly diminished. The suppression was more pronounced for IGF-I (spleen: -12.071-fold; head kidney: -8.413-fold) than for IGF-II (spleen: -4.102-fold; head kidney: -1.342-fold). In agreement, clearly fewer leucocytes and macrophages in head kidney and spleen of EE2-treated fish contained IGF-I mRNA as shown by in situ hybridisation. ER-alpha mRNA expression in spleen was increased at 75 DPF but unchanged in head kidney. GH-R gene expression showed a mild upregulation at 165 DPF in both tissues. Thus, exposure to EE2 during early development affected distinctly the IGF system in tilapia immune organs. It led to lasting impairment of spleen growth and differentiation that can be attributed to an interaction of EE2 with IGF-I and, less pronouncedly, IGF

  12. Bacterial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, L; Agabian-Keshishian, N; Bendis, I

    1971-09-01

    The foregoing studies are intended to define a differentiation process and to permit genetic access to the mechanisms that control this process. In order to elucidate the basic mechanisms whereby a cell dictates its own defined morphogenic changes, we have found it helpful to study an organism that can be manipulated both biochemically and genetically. We have attempted to develop the studies initiated by Poindexter,Stove and Stanier, and Schmidt and Stanier (16, 17, 20) with the Caulobacter genus so that these bacteria can serve as a model system for prokaryotic differentiation. The Caulobacter life cycle, defined in synchronously growing cultures, includes a sequential series of morphological changes that occur at specific times in the cycle and at specific locations in the cell. Six distinct cellular characteristics, which are peculiar to these bacteria, have been defined and include (i) the synthesis of a polar organelle which may be membranous (21-23), (ii) a satellite DNA in the stalked cell (26), (iii) pili to which RNA bacteriophage specifically adsorb (16, 33), (iv) a single polar flagellum(17), (v) a lipopolysaccharide phage receptor site (27), and (vi) new cell wall material at the flagellated pole of the cell giving rise to a stalk (19, 20). Cell division, essential for the viability of the organism, is dependent on the irreversible differentiation of a flagellated swarmer cell to a mature stalked cell. The specific features of the Caulobacter system which make it a system of choice for studies of the control of sequential events resulting in cellular differentiation can be summarized as follows. 1) Cell populations can be synchronized, and homogeneous populations at each stage in the differentiation cycle can thus be obtained. 2) A specific technique has been developed whereby the progress of the differentiation cycle can be accurately measured by adsorption of labeled RNA phage or penetration of labeled phage DNA into specific cell forms. This

  13. Localization of tritiated 1-(2, 4-dichlorobenzyl)-/sup 1/H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid ((/sup 3/H) AF 1890) in rat testis using freeze-drying autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hilderbrandt-Stark, H.E.; Mills, J.W.; Fawcett, D.W.

    1982-09-01

    Tritiated 1-(2, 4-dichlorobenzyl)-/sup 1/H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid ((/sup 3/H)AF 1890) was localized within rat testis using freeze-drying autoradiographic techniques. Ligated seminiferous tubule preparations were exposed in vitro to 80 microCi of (/sup 3/H)AF 1890 in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled AF 1890 for 30 min at 31 degrees C. Autoradiographs showed a generalized distribution of silver grains over the seminiferous epithelium, in the tubular lumen, and in the interstitial spaces. In addition, clusters of grains were concentrated over the seminiferous epithelium in regions of spermatid heads and tails and in the basal portion of the Sertoli cell cytoplasm, and over Leydig cells in the interstitial space. The generalized distribution was reduced and the grain clusters eliminated by incubation in an excess of unlabeled AF 1890. (/sup 3/H)inulin was used to assess the effectiveness of the tubular ligation because inulin does not normally penetrate the blood-testis barrier. This extracellular marker was not localized in the tubular lumen or in the seminiferous epithelium. Therefore, the labeling observed with (/sup 3/H)AF 1890 indicates that this compound crosses the blood-testis barrier.

  14. Effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvento, G.; Lacombe, P.; Seylaz, J. )

    1989-06-01

    We have studied the effects of electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF), as assessed by the quantitative ({sup 14}C)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus in the alpha-chloralose anesthetized rat caused a significant decrease in LCBF, ranging from -13 to -26% in 24 brain structures out of 33 investigated. The most pronounced decreases (-23 to -26%) were observed in the accumbens, amygdaloid, interpeduncular nuclei and in the median raphe nucleus, limbic system relays. The decreases also concerned cortical regions and the extrapyramidal system. These results indicate that activation of ascending serotonergic system produces a vasoconstriction and that the dorsal raphe nucleus has a widespread modulatory influence on the cerebral circulation.

  15. Differential gearing

    SciTech Connect

    Tamiya, S.

    1986-07-29

    A differential for motor vehicles is described and the like comprising, an input drive shaft, a pair of coaxially spaced drive gears simultaneously driven by the input shaft in a same direction at a same speed of rotation about a common axis of rotation, a driven gear driven peripherally by the pair of drive gears for transmission of power from the input drive shaft, two coaxial opposed bevel sun gears having an axis of rotation concentric with an axis of rotation of the driven gear, two planetary gears disposed between the sun gears for differential driving thereof during turns of the vehicle to the right and to the left of each meshing with the sun gears for driving the suns gears. Each planetary gear has a separate axis of rotation carried by the driven gear disposed therein radially and symmetrically relative to the axis of rotation of the sun gears, and each sun gear having a respective power output shaft connected thereto for rotation therewith.

  16. Localization of mechanoreceptors in the protozoan, Stentor coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Wood, D C

    1989-01-01

    Mechanoreceptor channels were localized by using the ligands, tubocurarine (TC), decamethonium (Deca), and gallamine (Gall), which have been shown to bind specifically to these channels. The binding of radioactively labeled TC (TC*) was found to be directly proportional to the cell surface area suggesting that the channels are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. Intracellular TC and Gall injections did not depress mechanical stimulus sensitivity though these drugs did depress sensitivity when applied extracellularly at the same concentrations; therefore, the ligand binding sites are on or near the external surface of the cell. Autoradiographs revealed that radioactively labeled Deca (Deca*) bound to the pigmented stripes but not to the ciliary stripes or membranellar band. Further, Stentor induced to shed their membranellar band through exposure to 8% urea were more sensitive to mechanical stimuli than were controls; therefore, the membranellar cilia do not appear to contain mechanoreceptor channels. Collectively, these data indicate that the mechanoreceptor channels are located in the somatic surface covering the pigmented stripes. The density of mechanoreceptor channels in the plasma membrane covering the somatic surface is tentatively estimated to be between 5500 and 14,500 microns-2 based on the density of TC* binding, the apparent number of TC molecules binding per mechanoreceptor channel, and data suggesting that only one fifth to one fourth of the bound TC* is bound to structures in the plasma membrane. PMID:2746550

  17. Local cerebral glucose utilization during status epilepticus in newborn primates

    SciTech Connect

    Fujikawa, D.G.; Dwyer, B.E.; Lake, R.R.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of bicuculline-induced status epilepticus (SE) on local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (LCMRglc) was studied in 2-wk-old ketamine-anesthetized marmoset monkeys, using the 2-(/sup 14/C)-deoxy-D-glucose autoradiographical technique. To estimate LCMRglc in cerebral cortex and thalamus during SE, the lumped constant (LC) for 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and the rate constants for 2-DG and glucose were calculated for these regions. The control LC was 0.43 in frontoparietal cortex, 0.51 in temporal cortex, and 0.50 in thalamus; it increased to 1.07 in frontoparietal cortex, 1.13 in temporal cortex, and 1.25 in thalamus after 30 min of seizures. With control LC values, LCMRglc in frontoparietal cortex, temporal cortex, and dorsomedial thalamus appeared to increase four to sixfold. With seizure LC values, LCMRglc increased 1.5- to 2-fold and only in cortex. During 45-min seizures, LCMRglc in cortex and thalamus probably increases 4- to 6-fold initially and later falls to the 1.5- to 2-fold level as tissue glucose concentrations decrease. Together with our previous results demonstrating depletion of high-energy phosphates and glucose in these regions, the data suggest that energy demands exceed glucose supply. The long-term effects of these metabolic changes on the developing brain remain to be determined.

  18. A historical overview of bromo-substituted DNA and sister chromatid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mezzanotte, Roberto; Nieddu, Mariella

    2014-01-01

    The thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) has been widely used to make sister chromatid differentiation (SCD) evident in metaphase chromosomes of cells grown for two cycles in BrdU and, thus, containing varying amounts of the thymidine analogue. A direct consequence was the possibility of making sister chromatid exchange (SCE) evident without using autoradiographic procedures. The latter phenomenon was first discovered in 1953, and its frequency is considered a reliable marker of pathological cell situations, as well as an indicator of mutagenic compounds. Several experimental procedures were found which produced SCD, such as the use of fluorochromes like 33258 Hoechst or acridine orange, whose observation under fluorescence microscopy was directly recorded by photos or stained with Giemsa to make chromosome preparations permanent. Other treatments followed by Giemsa staining required the use of saline hot solutions, acid solutions, nuclease attack and specific monoclonal antibodies. Basically two molecular mechanisms were invoked to explain the different affinity of Giemsa stain for differential BrdU-substituted chromatid DNA. The first implied debromination of chromatid DNA, whose occurrence would be greater in chromatids containing an amount of BrdU greater than that present in sister chromatids. The second mechanism, although not denying the importance of DNA debromination, postulated that chromatin structural organization, in terms of DNA-protein and/or protein-protein DNA interaction, is responsible for SCD production.

  19. Local Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P.; Yoon, S. E.; Isenburg, M.

    2007-05-31

    The LOCAL Toolkit contains tools and libraries developed under the LLNL LOCAL LDRD project for managing and processing large unstructured data sets primrily from parallel numerical simulations, such as triangular, tetrahedral, and hexahedral meshes, point sets, and graphs. The tools have three main functionalities: cache-coherent, linear ordering of multidimensional data; lossy and lossless data compression optimized for different data types; and an out-of-core streaming I/O library with simple processing modules for unstructed data.

  20. Nitrogen starvation and TorC1 inhibition differentially affect nuclear localization of the Gln3 and Gat1 transcription factors through the rare glutamine tRNACUG in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tate, Jennifer J; Rai, Rajendra; Cooper, Terrance G

    2015-02-01

    A leucine, leucyl-tRNA synthetase-dependent pathway activates TorC1 kinase and its downstream stimulation of protein synthesis, a major nitrogen consumer. We previously demonstrated, however, that control of Gln3, a transcription activator of catabolic genes whose products generate the nitrogenous precursors for protein synthesis, is not subject to leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. This led us to conclude that excess nitrogen-dependent down-regulation of Gln3 occurs via a second mechanism that is independent of leucine-dependent TorC1 activation. A major site of Gln3 and Gat1 (another GATA-binding transcription activator) control occurs at their access to the nucleus. In excess nitrogen, Gln3 and Gat1 are sequestered in the cytoplasm in a Ure2-dependent manner. They become nuclear and activate transcription when nitrogen becomes limiting. Long-term nitrogen starvation and treatment of cells with the glutamine synthetase inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (Msx) also elicit nuclear Gln3 localization. The sensitivity of Gln3 localization to glutamine and inhibition of glutamine synthesis prompted us to investigate the effects of a glutamine tRNA mutation (sup70-65) on nitrogen-responsive control of Gln3 and Gat1. We found that nuclear Gln3 localization elicited by short- and long-term nitrogen starvation; growth in a poor, derepressive medium; Msx or rapamycin treatment; or ure2Δ mutation is abolished in a sup70-65 mutant. However, nuclear Gat1 localization, which also exhibits a glutamine tRNACUG requirement for its response to short-term nitrogen starvation or growth in proline medium or a ure2Δ mutation, does not require tRNACUG for its response to rapamycin. Also, in contrast with Gln3, Gat1 localization does not respond to long-term nitrogen starvation. These observations demonstrate the existence of a specific nitrogen-responsive component participating in the control of Gln3 and Gat1 localization and their downstream production of nitrogenous precursors. This

  1. Interaction of /sup 125/I-labeled botulinum neurotoxins with nerve terminals. I. Ultrastructural autoradiographic localization and quantitation of distinct membrane acceptors for types A and B on motor nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.D.; Dolly, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    The labeling patterns produced by radioiodinated botulinum neurotoxin (/sup 125/I-BoNT) types A and B at the vertebrate neuromuscular junction were investigated using electron microscopic autoradiography. The data obtained allow the following conclusions to be made. (a) /sup 125/I-BoNT type A, applied in vivo or in vitro to mouse diaphragm or frog cutaneous pectoris muscle, interacts saturably with the motor nerve terminal only; silver grains occur on the plasma membrane, within the synaptic bouton, and in the axoplasm of the nerve trunk, suggesting internalization and retrograde intra-axonal transport of toxin or fragments thereof. (b) /sup 125/I-BoNT type B, applied in vitro to the murine neuromuscular junction, interacts likewise with the motor nerve terminal except that a lower proportion of internalized radioactivity is seen. This result is reconcilable with the similar, but not identical, pharmacological action of these toxin types. (c) The saturability of labeling in each case suggested the involvement of acceptors; on preventing the internalization step with metabolic inhibitors, their precise location became apparent. They were found on all unmyelinated areas of the nerve terminal membrane, including the preterminal axon and the synaptic bouton. (d) It is not proposed that these membrane acceptors target BoNT to the nerve terminal and mediate its delivery to an intracellular site, thus contributing to the toxin's selective inhibitory action on neurotransmitter release.

  2. Interpolated Differential Operator (IDO) scheme for solving partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Takayuki

    1997-05-01

    We present a numerical scheme applicable to a wide variety of partial differential equations (PDEs) in space and time. The scheme is based on a high accurate interpolation of the profile for the independent variables over a local area and repetitive differential operations regarding PDEs as differential operators. We demonstrate that the scheme is uniformly applicable to hyperbolic, ellipsoidal and parabolic equations. The equations are solved in terms of the primitive independent variables, so that the scheme has flexibility for various types of equations including source terms. We find out that the conservation holds accurate when a Hermite interpolation is used. For compressible fluid problems, the shock interface is found to be sharply described by adding an artificial viscosity term.

  3. Localized shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Daniel A.; Stanford, Douglas; Susskind, Leonard

    2015-03-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, , where W x ( t) = e - iHt W x e iHt . Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in t. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  4. Temporal Bone Localized Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Hasan; Acioğlu, Engin; Durna, Yusuf Muhammed; Yiğit, Özgür; Bozkurt, Erol Rüştü; Karagöz, Yeşim

    2015-11-01

    Chondroblastoma is a highly destructive tumor originating from immature cartilage cells. Although chondroblastoma is defined as a benign tumor, it may exhibit malign tumor behaviors such as invasion or metastasis on neighboring structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) image is a solid mass lesion, which included heterogeneous hypointense in T2A and heterogeneous minimal hyperintense in T1A with destructive expansile characteristics and millimetric calcifications. Temporal bone chondroblastomas may complicate the diagnosis because of their different histologic characteristics. Microscopically, chondroblastic cell nests and calcification of locally "chicken wire" type around the cells are observed. These tumors secrete s-100 and vimentin and are used for differential diagnosis. In this study, a temporal bone localized chondroblastoma case is presented.

  5. Temporal Bone Localized Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Hasan; Acioğlu, Engin; Durna, Yusuf Muhammed; Yiğit, Özgür; Bozkurt, Erol Rüştü; Karagöz, Yeşim

    2015-11-01

    Chondroblastoma is a highly destructive tumor originating from immature cartilage cells. Although chondroblastoma is defined as a benign tumor, it may exhibit malign tumor behaviors such as invasion or metastasis on neighboring structures. Magnetic resonance (MR) image is a solid mass lesion, which included heterogeneous hypointense in T2A and heterogeneous minimal hyperintense in T1A with destructive expansile characteristics and millimetric calcifications. Temporal bone chondroblastomas may complicate the diagnosis because of their different histologic characteristics. Microscopically, chondroblastic cell nests and calcification of locally "chicken wire" type around the cells are observed. These tumors secrete s-100 and vimentin and are used for differential diagnosis. In this study, a temporal bone localized chondroblastoma case is presented. PMID:26517458

  6. The GABA(A) receptor complex in the chicken brain: immunocytochemical distribution of alpha 1- and gamma 2-subunits and autoradiographic distribution of BZ1 and BZ2 binding sites.

    PubMed

    Aller, Maria Isabel; Paniagua, Miguel Angel; Pollard, Simon; Stephenson, F Anne; Fernandez-Lopez, Arsenio

    2003-01-01

    Two antibodies, raised against the rat GABA(A) receptor alpha1- and gamma2-subunits, were used for an immunocytochemical study of the distribution of these proteins in the chicken brain. The immunoreactive bands obtained by Western blotting and the similar labelling distribution found in the rat and chicken brain support the suitability of these antibodies for the labelling of GABA(A) receptors in birds. We found abundant alpha1 and gamma2 immunoreactivity throughout the chicken brain, mainly in the paleostriata and lobus paraolfactorius, dorsal thalamus and some nuclei of the brainstem. The alpha1-subunit was more abundant in the telencephalon, thalamus and cerebellum, while the presence of the gamma2-subunit was stronger in the optic tectum and brainstem. We also report the autoradiographic distribution of the BZ1 and BZ2 benzodiazepine receptor subtypes in the chicken brain using [3H]flunitrazepam. Benzodiazepine binding was unevenly distributed throughout the chicken brain, and the anatomical distribution of the BZ1 and BZ2 subtypes was similar to that described in mammals. The highest binding values were found in the olfactory bulb, paleostriatum primitivum, optic tectum, nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis pars dorsalis and nucleus isthmi pars parvocellularis, the BZ2 subtype being predominant in the paleostriatum primitivum and optic tectum. A general agreement in the distribution of BZ1 and alpha1 immunoreactivity was observed in structures such as the olfactory bulb, paleostriata, lobus parolfactorius and dorsal thalamus, although some discrepancies were observed in areas such as the optic tectum or nucleus isthmi pars parvocellularis, with high BZ1 binding and low or no alpha1 immunolabelling.

  7. Localization of Cellular Retinol-Binding Protein and Retinol-Binding Protein in Cells Comprising the Blood-Brain Barrier of Rat and Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Paul N.; Bok, Dean; Ong, David E.

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requiries vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the endothelial cells of the brain microvasculature and within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  8. Characterization of the interaction between local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose and acid-base index in ischemic rat brain employing a double-isotope methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Peek, K.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    The association between increases in cerebral glucose metabolism and the development of acidosis is largely inferential, based on reports linking hyperglycemia with poor neurological outcome, lactate accumulation, and the severity of acidosis. We measured local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (lCMRglc) and an index of brain pH-the acid-base index (ABI)-concurrently and characterized their interaction in a model of focal cerebral ischemia in rats in a double-label autoradiographic study, using ({sup 14}C)2-deoxyglucose and ({sup 14}C)dimethyloxazolidinedione. Computer-assisted digitization and analysis permitted the simultaneous quantification of the two variables on a pixel-by-pixel basis in the same brain slices.

  9. Localization of cellular retinol-binding protein and retinol-binding protein in cells comprising the blood-brain barrier of rat and human

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.N.; Ong, D.E. ); Bok, D. )

    1990-06-01

    Brain is not generally recognized as an organ that requires vitamin A, perhaps because no obvious histologic lesions have been observed in severely vitamin A-deficient animals. However, brain tissue does contain cellular vitamin A-binding proteins and a nuclear receptor protein for retinoic acid. In the present study, immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine the cell-specific location of cellular retinol-binding protein in human and rat brain tissue. Cellular retinol-binding protein was localized specifically within the cuboidal epithelial cells of the choroid plexus, two primary sites of the mammalian blood-brain barrier. In addition, autoradiographic procedures demonstrated binding sites for serum retinol-binding protein in the choroidal epithelium. These observations suggest that a significant movement of retinol across the blood-brain barrier may occur.

  10. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  11. UV-induced DNA excision repair in rat fibroblasts during immortalization and terminal differentiation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Vijg, J.; Mullaart, E.; Berends, F.; Lohman, P.H.; Knook, D.L.

    1986-12-01

    UV-induced DNA excision repair was studied as DNA repair synthesis and dimer removal in rat fibroblast cultures, initiated from either dense or sparse inocula of primary cells grown from skin biopsies. During passaging in vitro an initial increase in DNA repair synthesis, determined both autoradiographically as unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and by means of the BrdU photolysis assay as the number and average size of repair patches, was found to be associated with a morphological shift from small spindle-shaped to large pleiomorphic cells observed over the first twenty generations. In cell populations in growth crisis, a situation exclusively associated with thin-inoculum cultures in which the population predominantly consisted of large pleiomorphic cells, UDS was found to occur at a low level. After development of secondary cultures into immortal cell lines, both repair synthesis and morphology appeared to be the same as in the original primary spindle-shaped cells. At all passages the capacity to remove UV-induced pyrimidine dimers was found to be low, as indicated by the persistence of Micrococcus luteus UV endonuclease-sensitive sites. These results are discussed in the context of terminal differentiation and immortalization of rat fibroblasts upon establishment in vitro.

  12. Out On The Ice (OOTI): Studies of Bromine Monoxide (BrO) and ozone (O3) in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic Marine Boundary Layer by Multiple Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAXDOAS): Local Emissions or Transport Processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netcheva, S.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Staebler, R. M.; Steffen, A.

    2009-12-01

    BrO is an important tropospheric trace gas species in the marine boundary layer with potentially harmful effects on the polar environment. It changes the atmospheric oxidizing capacity by altering normally O3 dominating oxidation pathways via a series of autocatalytic heterogeneous O3 destroying reactions. There have been many reports of elevated BrO concentrations in the Polar atmospheric boundary layer by ground based and satellite DOAS measurements since the first positive identification by Hausmann and Platt in 1994 at Alert, Canada. Satellite acquired data revealed that enhanced tropospheric BrO concentrations in the spring are a widespread, reoccurring phenomena in the polar regions, and that they are possibly linked to the spatial distribution of first year sea ice. While the main source of bromine in the marine boundary layer is clearly sea salt, the processes of migration from the ocean surface to the air, and mechanisms of activation, are not fully understood. Conceivably these processes operate on a much smaller spatial scale than satellite measurements suggest In a study under the OASIS-Canada program funded by the Canadian Federal Program Office for the International Polar Year, ground based measurements of BrO and O3 over the ice of the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay, were compared with concurrent BrO satellite measurements, ice conditions, back trajectory and meteorological surface analyses to identify BrO source regions and to estimate the influence of transport on the evolution of enhanced BrO events. Conducting measurements directly on ice surfaces enabled us to improve the understanding of the chemistry involved because we could directly target reactive halogen emission and try to assess the role of various ocean surfaces during halogen activation and propagation. Some of the recorded events were characterised by fast decreases of O3 during the night, which clearly indicates transport rather than local chemistry. Other events required more

  13. Computations involving differential operators and their actions on functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouch, Peter E.; Grossman, Robert; Larson, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The algorithms derived by Grossmann and Larson (1989) are further developed for rewriting expressions involving differential operators. The differential operators involved arise in the local analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems. These algorithms are extended in two different directions: the algorithms are generalized so that they apply to differential operators on groups and the data structures and algorithms are developed to compute symbolically the action of differential operators on functions. Both of these generalizations are needed for applications.

  14. Differentiated Instruction. Fastback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smutny, Joan Franklin

    This fastback presents the essentials for understanding how to differentiate instruction to meet the learning needs of all students in today's classrooms. It focuses on: "The Need for Differentiated Instruction" (determining learning needs, deciding what to differentiate, and principles of differentiated instruction); "Strategies for…

  15. Characterization and autoradiographic visualization of (+)-(3H)SKF10,047 binding in rat and mouse brain: further evidence for phencyclidine/sigma opiate receptor commonality

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, R.; Nichtenhauser, R.; Ieni, J.R.; Zukin, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    The binding specificity of (+)-(/sup 3/H)N-allylnormetazocine, the dextrorotatory isomer of the prototypical sigma opiate SKF10,047, was determined in rat and mouse brain and the neuroanatomical distribution of its binding sites elucidated by quantitative autoradiography in sections of rat brain. Computer-assisted Scatchard analysis revealed an apparent two-site fit of the binding data in both species and in all rat brain regions examined. In whole rat brain, the Kd values were 3.6 and 153 nM and the maximum binding values were 40 fmol and 1.6 pmol/mg of protein for the apparent high- and low-affinity binding sites, respectively. (+)-SKF10,047, haloperidol and pentazocine were among the most potent inhibitors of 7 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF10,047 binding to the higher affinity sites; rank orders of ligand potencies at these sites differ sharply from those that have been reported for the (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine (PCP) site, or for eliciting PCP-like or SKF10,047-like behaviors. By contrast, rank orders of potency of sigma opiods, PCP derivatives and dioxolanes for displacement of 100 nM (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF10,047 from the more numerous lower affinity sites in the presence of 100 nM haloperidol agreed closely with their potencies in the (/sup 3/H)PCP binding assay as well as their potencies in exerting PCP- or SKF10,047-like behavioral effects. In order to compare directly the anatomical localizations of PCP and (+)-SKF10,047 binding sites, quantitative light microscopy autoradiography utilizing tritium-labeled PCP and (+)-SKF10,047 was carried out in rat brain sections. (+)-(/sup 3/H)SKF10,047 binding was observed to follow the regional pattern of (3H)PCP binding but also to bind in other regions not associated with PCP receptors.

  16. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse

    PubMed Central

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R.; Pike, Victor W.; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F.; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB1Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CTPLUS (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB1 receptor knock-out (CB1R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB1R-/- mice (n = 3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n = 7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [125I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6 ± 3.6 (average ± SD) in CB1R-/- mice and 22.1 ± 12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p < 0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB1R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [125I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB1R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [125I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT radioligand for

  17. In vivo SPECT and ex vivo autoradiographic brain imaging of the novel selective CB1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]SD7015 in CB1 knock-out and wildtype mouse.

    PubMed

    Máthé, Domokos; Horváth, Ildikó; Szigeti, Krisztián; Donohue, Sean R; Pike, Victor W; Jia, Zisheng; Ledent, Catherine; Palkovits, Miklós; Freund, Tamás F; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs

    2013-02-01

    We aimed to evaluate the novel high-affinity and relatively lipophilic CB(1) receptor (CB(1)R) antagonist radioligand [(125)I]SD7015 for SPECT imaging of CB(1)Rs in vivo using the multiplexed multipinhole dedicated small animal SPECT/CT system, NanoSPECT/CT(PLUS) (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary), in knock-out CB(1) receptor knock-out (CB(1)R-/-) and wildtype mice. In order to exclude possible differences in cerebral blood flow between the two types of animals, HMPAO SPECT scans were performed, whereas in order to confirm the brain uptake differences of the radioligand between knock-out mice and wildtype mice, in vivo scans were complemented with ex vivo autoradiographic measurements using the brains of the same animals. With SPECT/CT imaging, we measured the brain uptake of radioactivity, using %SUV (% standardised uptake values) in CB(1)R-/- mice (n=3) and C57BL6 wildtype mice (n=7) under urethane anaesthesia after injecting [(125)I]SD7015 intravenously or intraperitoneally. The Brookhaven Laboratory mouse MRI atlas was fused to the SPECT/CT images by using a combination of rigid and non-rigid algorithms in the Mediso Fusion™ (Mediso, Budapest, Hungary) and VivoQuant (inviCRO, Boston, MA, USA) softwares. Phosphor imager plate autoradiography (ARG) was performed on 4 μm-thin cryostat sections of the excised brains. %SUV was 8.6±3.6 (average±SD) in CB(1)R-/- mice and 22.1±12.4 in wildtype mice between 2 and 4 h after injection (p<0.05). ARG of identically taken sections from wildtype mouse brain showed moderate radioactivity uptake when compared with the in vivo images, with a clear difference between grey matter and white matter, whereas ARG in CB(1)R(-/-) mice showed practically no radioactivity uptake. [(125)I]SD7015 enters the mouse brain in sufficient amount to enable SPECT imaging. Brain radioactivity distribution largely coincides with that of the known CB(1)R expression pattern in rodent brain. We conclude that [(125)I]SD7015 should be a useful SPECT

  18. Gene flow and population differentiation.

    PubMed

    Endler, J A

    1973-01-19

    There are many possible spatial patterns of selection and gene flow that can produce a given cline structure; the actual geography of natural selection and gene flow must be worked out before an attempt is made to explain a given natural cline in terms of a model. The results of experimental and theoretical models show that it is possible for local differentiation to evolve parapatrically in spite of considerable gene flow if the selection gradients are relatively uniform. Irregularities in environmental gradients increase the sensitivity of clines to the effects of gene flow in proportion to the increase in the differences in gene frequencies between the emigrants and the demes receiving the immigrants. It is not necessary for a sharp spatial environmental change to be present for distinct differentiation to occur. In some cases even a gentle environmental gradient can give rise to marked spatial differentiation along a genetically continuous series of demes; such environmental differences may be below the practical limits of resolution in field studies. Any asymmetry in gene flow does not lead to dedifferentiation if the environmental gradient is smooth; it merely shifts the position of the transition zone between the differentiated areas from that which would be expected if there were no asymmetry. Abrupt geographic differences in gene, genotype, or morph frequencies should not, therefore, be interpreted as evidence for environmental changes in the immediate vicinity of the steepest part of the cline; neither should they be interpreted as evidence for geographic barriers, sharp environmental differences, or sexual isolation among the differentiated groups of populations when there are no other sources of evidence for these phenomena. Gene flow may be unimportant in the differentiation of populations along environmental gradients.

  19. Mortality level, trends and differentials in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Palamuleni, M E

    1994-01-01

    "This article examines the levels, and trends and differentials in mortality in Malawi.... The study has shown that (i) the level of mortality is very high in Malawi; (ii) mortality has declined during the period under review; (iii) there was reduction in the rate of mortality decline in the seventies; and (iv) [there are] interesting differences in mortality in terms of rural-urban localities, regions and age-sex differentials. The observed levels, trends and differentials in mortality are however consistent with the level of social and economic development in the country."

  20. Local Adaptation in Marine Invertebrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Eric; Kelly, Morgan W.

    2011-01-01

    Local adaptation in the sea was regarded historically as a rare phenomenon that was limited to a handful of species with exceptionally low dispersal potential. However, a growing body of experimental studies indicates that adaptive differentiation occurs in numerous marine invertebrates in response to selection imposed by strong gradients (and more complex mosaics) of abiotic and biotic conditions. Moreover, a surprisingly high proportion of the marine invertebrates known or suspected of exhibiting local adaptation are species with planktonic dispersal. Adaptive divergence among populations can occur over a range of spatial scales, including those that are fine-grained (i.e., meters to kilometers), reflecting a balance between scales of gene flow and selection. Addressing the causes and consequences of adaptive genetic differentiation among invertebrate populations promises to advance community ecology, climate change research, and the effective management of marine ecosystems.

  1. Automatic differentiation bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Corliss, G.F.

    1992-07-01

    This is a bibliography of work related to automatic differentiation. Automatic differentiation is a technique for the fast, accurate propagation of derivative values using the chain rule. It is neither symbolic nor numeric. Automatic differentiation is a fundamental tool for scientific computation, with applications in optimization, nonlinear equations, nonlinear least squares approximation, stiff ordinary differential equation, partial differential equations, continuation methods, and sensitivity analysis. This report is an updated version of the bibliography which originally appeared in Automatic Differentiation of Algorithms: Theory, Implementation, and Application.

  2. Fast Differential Adder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arditti, Mort A.; Silva, Rosemary

    1993-01-01

    Differential adding circuit (or, equivalently, subtracting circuit) faster and consumes less power because it contains only one differential amplifier. Suitable for use in high-frequency-switching, high power-regulating circuit.

  3. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    , in response to Griffiths' challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has described is flawed.

  4. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  5. Using Differentials to Differentiate Trigonometric and Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Tevian

    2013-01-01

    Starting from geometric definitions, we show how differentials can be used to differentiate trigonometric and exponential functions without limits, numerical estimates, solutions of differential equations, or integration.

  6. Localization of quantitative changes in pulmonary beta-receptors in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gatto, C.; Green, T.P.; Johnson, M.G.; Marchessault, R.P.; Seybold, V.; Johnson, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    Impaired beta-receptor function has been postulated as one factor contributing to airway hyperreactivity in asthmatic patients. Although numerous indirect studies have cast doubt on this theory, none of these previous investigations has been able to directly measure changes in beta-receptor number on intrapulmonary structures capable of affecting the physiologic changes seen in this disease state. To help clarify the intrapulmonary location of such changes, a model of allergic bronchoconstriction was prepared by sensitizing guinea pigs to ovalbumin intraperitoneally (ip) 2 wk prior to testing (Group S). A second group of animals was sensitized to ovalbumin, then 2 wk later partially desensitized (Group D) during a 4- to 6-wk period by repeated exposure to increasing doses of nebulized ovalbumin with epinephrine rescue. Control animals received ip administered and nebulized normal saline alone. Pulmonary function assessed by plethysmography revealed an increase in airway resistance to 294 +/- 42% (SE) of control in Group S (p less than 0.005) and a decrease in dynamic compliance to 76 +/- 8% of control in Group D and 39 +/- 10% of control in Group S (p less than 0.002) after exposure to nebulized ovalbumin. Using L-(/sup 3/H) dihydroalprenolol ((/sup 3/H) DHA), beta-receptors were autoradiographically localized and quantitated in lung sections from all 3 groups. Significant decreases (p less than 0.02) in /sup 3/H-DHA binding were noted in alveolar and conducting airway epithelium, and bronchiolar and vascular smooth muscle in ovalbumin-exposed animals.

  7. Graphical Construction of a Local Perspective on Differentiation and Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Ye Yoon; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of the transition from school to university mathematics have identified a number of epistemological gaps, including the need to change from an emphasis on equality to that of inequality. Another crucial epistemological change during this transition involves the movement from the pointwise and global perspectives of functions usually…

  8. Jagged1 Instructs Macrophage Differentiation in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kibbie, Jon; Teles, Rosane M B; Wang, Zhiming; Hong, Patrick; Montoya, Dennis; Krutzik, Stephan; Lee, Seung; Kwon, Ohyun; Modlin, Robert L; Cruz, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    As circulating monocytes enter the site of disease, the local microenvironment instructs their differentiation into tissue macrophages (MΦ). To identify mechanisms that regulate MΦ differentiation, we studied human leprosy as a model, since M1-type antimicrobial MΦ predominate in lesions in the self-limited form, whereas M2-type phagocytic MΦ are characteristic of the lesions in the progressive form. Using a heterotypic co-culture model, we found that unstimulated endothelial cells (EC) trigger monocytes to become M2 MΦ. However, biochemical screens identified that IFN-γ and two families of small molecules activated EC to induce monocytes to differentiate into M1 MΦ. The gene expression profiles induced in these activated EC, when overlapped with the transcriptomes of human leprosy lesions, identified Jagged1 (JAG1) as a potential regulator of MΦ differentiation. JAG1 protein was preferentially expressed in the lesions from the self-limited form of leprosy, and localized to the vascular endothelium. The ability of activated EC to induce M1 MΦ was JAG1-dependent and the addition of JAG1 to quiescent EC facilitated monocyte differentiation into M1 MΦ with antimicrobial activity against M. leprae. Our findings indicate a potential role for the IFN-γ-JAG1 axis in instructing MΦ differentiation as part of the host defense response at the site of disease in human leprosy. PMID:27532668

  9. Jagged1 Instructs Macrophage Differentiation in Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Teles, Rosane M. B.; Wang, Zhiming; Hong, Patrick; Montoya, Dennis; Krutzik, Stephan; Lee, Seung; Kwon, Ohyun; Modlin, Robert L.; Cruz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    As circulating monocytes enter the site of disease, the local microenvironment instructs their differentiation into tissue macrophages (MΦ). To identify mechanisms that regulate MΦ differentiation, we studied human leprosy as a model, since M1-type antimicrobial MΦ predominate in lesions in the self-limited form, whereas M2-type phagocytic MΦ are characteristic of the lesions in the progressive form. Using a heterotypic co-culture model, we found that unstimulated endothelial cells (EC) trigger monocytes to become M2 MΦ. However, biochemical screens identified that IFN-γ and two families of small molecules activated EC to induce monocytes to differentiate into M1 MΦ. The gene expression profiles induced in these activated EC, when overlapped with the transcriptomes of human leprosy lesions, identified Jagged1 (JAG1) as a potential regulator of MΦ differentiation. JAG1 protein was preferentially expressed in the lesions from the self-limited form of leprosy, and localized to the vascular endothelium. The ability of activated EC to induce M1 MΦ was JAG1-dependent and the addition of JAG1 to quiescent EC facilitated monocyte differentiation into M1 MΦ with antimicrobial activity against M. leprae. Our findings indicate a potential role for the IFN-γ-JAG1 axis in instructing MΦ differentiation as part of the host defense response at the site of disease in human leprosy. PMID:27532668

  10. Autoradiographic studies of the rat renotropic system.

    PubMed

    Castillo, O; Robertson, D; Goldin, H; Preuss, H G

    1980-01-01

    Rat sera, 10-30 h after unilateral nephrectomy (UNI), enhance 3H-thymidine ("3H-Tdr) incorporation into DNA of incubating renal tissue from control rats. Stimulation is even greater when extracts from remaining growing kidneys 20 h after UNI are combined with sera from rats after UNI. UNI extracts, i.e., extracts from the kidney remaining after uninephrectomy, are nonstimulatory alone. UNI sera and UNI sera plus UNI extracts could theoretically augment 3H-Tdr incorporation into renal DNA via dilutional means rather than enhanced DNA synthesis. To determine if our results were secondary to enhanced DNA synthesis, we performed our in vitro assay using the labelling of nuclei via autoradiography as another index. The addition of UNI sera compared to sera from sham-operated rats (SHAM) in seven paired experiments enhanced incorporation of 3H-Tdr into DNA by 30% (p less than 0.02) and the addition of both UNI sera and UNI extracts compared to SHAM sera and SHAM extracts enhanced incorporation by 48% (p less than 0.001). Unlike a dilutional effect, nuclear labelling also increased in these same seven experiments: UNI sera versus SHAM sera increased 25% (p less than 0.05) and UNI sera + UNI extracts versus SHAM sera + SHAM extracts increased 37% (p less than 0.01). We conclude that UNI sera and UNI sera + UNI extracts enhance 3H-Tdr incorporation into DNA by augmenting DNA synthesis, driving cells into the "S" phase. The use of 3H-Tdr incorporation into DNA in our assay does estimate DNA synthesis.

  11. Lectin binding as a probe of proliferative and differentiative phases in primary monolayer cultures of cutaneous keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, W.W.; Bernstein, I.A. )

    1988-04-01

    The surface of cells in the cutaneous epidermis of the newborn rat exhibits a discrete change in lectin-binding specificity from Griffonia simplicifolia I-B4 (GS I-B4), specific for {alpha}-D-galactosyl residues, to Ulex europeus agglutinin I (UEA), specific for {alpha}-L-fucose, as the cell leaves the basal layer and differentiates. Primary monolayer cultures of rat keratinocytes maintained in low Ca{sup 2+} medium exhibited a characteristic unimodal pattern in the ratio of bound UEA to bound GS I-B4 (UEA/B4 ratio) over a 7-day culture period as determined by a quantitative fluorometric assay. Estimation of DNA synthesis showed (a) a higher ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation when the UEA/B4 ratio was low and (b) a steady but lower incorporation between Days 3 and 4, coincident with the higher UEA/B4 ratio. Autoradiographic results further showed that cells stained intensely with UEA failed to incorporate ({sup 3}H)thymidine into their nuclei. Overall, the results suggest that (a) the increase in the UEA/B4 ratio between Days 2 and 4 reflects the progression of a proportion of the cells in the monolayer to an early spinous cell stage, the ultimate fate of which is desquamation into the medium and (b) the decrease in the UEA/B4 ratio between Days 5 and 7 reflects a consequent proliferative response to this loss of cells.

  12. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  13. Studies of the effect of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol on the proliferation and differentiation of the human promyelocytic leukaemia cell line HL-60.

    PubMed

    Djulbegović, B; Christmas, S E; Evans, G; Moore, M

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of the human promyelocytic leukaemia cell line HL-60 with 1,25(OH)2D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D3, led to a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth and 3H-TdR incorporation at the population level. A similar effect was noted at the single cell level in clonogenic assays and autoradiographic experiments. Flow cytometry indicated that there was an arrest of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. Parallel to the loss of proliferative capacity 1,25(OH)2D3 induced differentiation of HL-60 into monocyte/macrophages as measured by the enzyme NSE and the macrophage membrane antigen recognised by the monoclonal antibody EB11 as well as by morphological changes. These findings reinforce the concept of concordant induction of differentiation and loss of proliferative capacity and demonstrate that the latter occurs not only at the population level but also at the single cell level in this system. In limiting dilution assays in liquid culture there was evidence for positive interactions between HL-60 cells as untreated cells gave less colonies at low dilutions than would have been expected by Poisson statistical analysis. In the presence of 10(-8) M 1,25(OH)2D3 more complex growth parameters were noted indicating the involvement of both positive and negative cellular interactions.

  14. Variable-mesh method of solving differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wyk, R.

    1969-01-01

    Multistep predictor-corrector method for numerical solution of ordinary differential equations retains high local accuracy and convergence properties. In addition, the method was developed in a form conducive to the generation of effective criteria for the selection of subsequent step sizes in step-by-step solution of differential equations.

  15. Unique continuation of solutions of differential equations with weighted derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Shananin, N A

    2000-04-30

    The paper contains a generalization of Calderon's theorem on the local uniqueness of the solutions of the Cauchy problem for differential equations with weighted derivatives. Anisotropic estimates of Carleman type are obtained. A class of differential equations with weighted derivatives is distinguished in which germs of solutions have unique continuation with respect to part of the variables.

  16. Self-localized states in species competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulau, Pavel V.; Gomila, DamiÃ; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2014-03-01

    We study the conditions under which species interaction, as described by continuous versions of the competitive Lotka-Volterra model (namely the nonlocal Kolmogorov-Fisher model, and its differential approximation), can support the existence of localized states, i.e., patches of species with enhanced population surrounded in niche space by species at smaller densities. These states would arise from species interaction, and not by any preferred niche location or better fitness. In contrast to previous works we include only quadratic nonlinearities, so that the localized patches appear on a background of homogeneously distributed species coexistence, instead of on top of the no-species empty state. For the differential model we find and describe in detail the stable localized states. For the full nonlocal model, however, competitive interactions alone do not allow the conditions for the observation of self-localized states, and we show how the inclusion of additional facilitative interactions leads to the appearance of them.

  17. Self-localized states in species competition.

    PubMed

    Paulau, Pavel V; Gomila, Damià; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2014-03-01

    We study the conditions under which species interaction, as described by continuous versions of the competitive Lotka-Volterra model (namely the nonlocal Kolmogorov-Fisher model, and its differential approximation), can support the existence of localized states, i.e., patches of species with enhanced population surrounded in niche space by species at smaller densities. These states would arise from species interaction, and not by any preferred niche location or better fitness. In contrast to previous works we include only quadratic nonlinearities, so that the localized patches appear on a background of homogeneously distributed species coexistence, instead of on top of the no-species empty state. For the differential model we find and describe in detail the stable localized states. For the full nonlocal model, however, competitive interactions alone do not allow the conditions for the observation of self-localized states, and we show how the inclusion of additional facilitative interactions leads to the appearance of them. PMID:24730891

  18. Depolarizing differential Mueller matrices.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-07-01

    The evolution of a polarized beam can be described by the differential formulation of Mueller calculus. The nondepolarizing differential Mueller matrices are well known. However, they only account for 7 out of the 16 independent parameters that are necessary to model a general anisotropic depolarizing medium. In this work we present the nine differential Mueller matrices for general depolarizing media, highlighting the physical implications of each of them. Group theory is applied to establish the relationship between the differential matrix and the set of transformation generators in the Minkowski space, of which Lorentz generators constitute a particular subgroup. PMID:21725434

  19. Mueller matrix differential decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-05-15

    We present a Mueller matrix decomposition based on the differential formulation of the Mueller calculus. The differential Mueller matrix is obtained from the macroscopic matrix through an eigenanalysis. It is subsequently resolved into the complete set of 16 differential matrices that correspond to the basic types of optical behavior for depolarizing anisotropic media. The method is successfully applied to the polarimetric analysis of several samples. The differential parameters enable one to perform an exhaustive characterization of anisotropy and depolarization. This decomposition is particularly appropriate for studying media in which several polarization effects take place simultaneously. PMID:21593943

  20. Matrix differentiation formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.; Tkhabisimov, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A compact differentiation technique (without using indexes) is developed for scalar functions that depend on complex matrix arguments which are combined by operations of complex conjugation, transposition, addition, multiplication, matrix inversion and taking the direct product. The differentiation apparatus is developed in order to simplify the solution of extremum problems of scalar functions of matrix arguments.

  1. Differential Person Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George; Alsmadi, Abdalla

    In many testing situations, differential item functioning (DIF) is a potentially serious problem. It occurs when a test item appears to be easier for one group of examinees than another even after controlling for overall skill level. Differential person functioning (DPF) can occur when "items" can be considered raters and the persons are the…

  2. Differentiated Staffing and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    The development of the positions of nurse practitioner and physician assistant is a good example of differentiating staffing and practice to meet individual needs in an effective and cost-efficient way. This type of differentiation has been confined to the healthcare industry, principally to health maintenance organizations, but perhaps those in…

  3. Automatic Differentiation Package

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David M.; Phipps, Eric; Bratlett, Roscoe

    2007-03-01

    Sacado is an automatic differentiation package for C++ codes using operator overloading and C++ templating. Sacado provide forward, reverse, and Taylor polynomial automatic differentiation classes and utilities for incorporating these classes into C++ codes. Users can compute derivatives of computations arising in engineering and scientific applications, including nonlinear equation solving, time integration, sensitivity analysis, stability analysis, optimization and uncertainity quantification.

  4. Differential Grading Standards Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strenta, A. Christopher; Elliott, Rogers

    1987-01-01

    Differential grading standards were examined in a sample of 1,029 Dartmouth College graduates. Fields of study that attracted students (as majors) who scored higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) employed stricter grading standards. These differential standards attenuated the substantial correlation between SAT scores and grades.…

  5. Differentiating Instruction: Why Bother?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Carol Ann

    2005-01-01

    In her more than 30 years of teaching, the author has practiced differentiation in her own classroom at all educational levels. Although she is well familiar with the vocabulary, research and reasoning behind it, the most compelling answer she can give for why differentiation matters in the middle grades comes from her personal experience as an…

  6. Lifting the Differentiation Embargo.

    PubMed

    Latif, Anne-Louise; Holyoake, Tessa L

    2016-09-22

    Effective differentiation therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been restricted to a small subset of patients with one defined genetic abnormality. Using an unbiased small molecule screen, Sykes et al. now identify a mechanism of de-repression of differentiation in several models of AML driven by distinct genetic drivers. PMID:27662083

  7. Nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresner, L.

    1988-01-01

    This report is the text of a graduate course on nonlinear differential equations given by the author at the University of Wisconsin-Madison during the summer of 1987. The topics covered are: direction fields of first-order differential equations; the Lie (group) theory of ordinary differential equations; similarity solutions of second-order partial differential equations; maximum principles and differential inequalities; monotone operators and iteration; complementary variational principles; and stability of numerical methods. The report should be of interest to graduate students, faculty, and practicing scientists and engineers. No prior knowledge is required beyond a good working knowledge of the calculus. The emphasis is on practical results. Most of the illustrative examples are taken from the fields of nonlinear diffusion, heat and mass transfer, applied superconductivity, and helium cryogenics.

  8. Some problems in fractal differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weiyi

    2016-06-01

    Based upon the fractal calculus on local fields, or p-type calculus, or Gibbs-Butzer calculus ([1],[2]), we suggest a constructive idea for "fractal differential equations", beginning from some special examples to a general theory. However, this is just an original idea, it needs lots of later work to support. In [3], we show example "two dimension wave equations with fractal boundaries", and in this note, other examples, as well as an idea to construct fractal differential equations are shown.

  9. Differential effects of vasopressin and phenylephrine on protein kinase C-mediated protein phosphorylations in isolated hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, R.H.; Johanson, R.A.; Wiliamson, J.R.

    1986-05-01

    Receptor-mediated breakdown of inositol lipids produces two intracellular signals, diacylglycerol, which activates protein kinase C, and inositol trisphosphate, which causes release of intracellular vesicular Ca/sup 2 +/. This study examined the effects of Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophores, vasopressin, phenylephrine, and phorbol ester (PMA) on hepatocyte protein phosphorylations. (/sup 32/P) Phosphoproteins from hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/P were resolved by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE and corresponding autoradiographs were quantitated by densitometric analysis. The phosphorylation of five proteins, a plasma membrane bound 16 kDa protein with pI 6.4, a cytosolic 16 kDa protein with pI 5.8, and proteins with Mr's of 36 kDa, 52 kDa, and 68 kDa, could be attributed to phosphorylation by protein kinase C since the phosphorylation was stimulated by PMA. When the vasopressin concentration was varied, low vasopressin stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein of the above set of proteins, while higher vasopressin concentrations were required to stimulate the phosphorylation of all five proteins. Phenylephrine, even at supramaximal concentrations, stimulated the phosphorylation of only the membrane bound 16 kDa protein. These results suggest that phenylephrine is a less potent activator of protein kinase C than vasopressin by virtue of limited or localized diacylglycerol production.

  10. Local cerebral metabolic effects of L-dopa therapy in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced parkinsonism in monkeys

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Burns, R.S.; Crane, A.M.; Palombo, E.; Kopin, I.J.; Sokoloff, L.

    1987-08-01

    The quantitative 2-deoxy(/sup 14/C) glucose autoradiographic method was used to map the distribution of alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization that accompanies clinically effective chronic L-dopa therapy of rhesus monkeys made parkinsonian by the administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This pattern of changes was compared to the effects of a similar treatment regimen in normal monkeys. L-Dopa was administered orally to normal and parkinsonian monkeys 3 times daily for 60-120 days prior to measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization. In parkinsonian monkeys treated with L-dopa, signs and symptoms of parkinsonism were controlled or suppressed, and widespread increases in glucose utilization were seen throughout the brain. Cerebral metabolic activity was increased both in areas rich in dopaminergic receptors, such as the caudate and putamen, and in nondopaminergic areas involved in motor functions. In many structures the rates of glucose utilization in L-dopa-treated parkinsonian monkeys were increased to levels that far exceeded rates measured in normal monkeys. In sharp contrast, similar treatment with L-dopa in normal monkeys had little if any effect on local cerebral glucose utilization. L-Dopa, then, appears to have an action in animals with selective lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta produced by MPTP that is distinctly different from its effects in the normal monkey.

  11. Ectopic lymphoid tissues and local immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carragher, Damian M.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Randall, Troy D.

    2008-01-01

    Ectopic or tertiary lymphoid tissues develop at sites of inflammation or infection in peripheral, non-lymphoid organs. These tissues are architecturally similar to conventional secondary lymphoid organs, with separated B and T cell areas, specialized populations of dendritic cells, well-differentiated stromal cells and high endothelial venules. Ectopic lymphoid tissues are often associated with the local pathology that results from chronic infection or chronic inflammation. However, there are also examples in which ectopic lymphoid tissues appear to contribute to local protective immune responses. Here we review how ectopic lymphoid structures develop and function in the context of local immunity and pathology. PMID:18243731

  12. Musculoskeletal mnemonics: differentiating features.

    PubMed

    Currie, Jonathan W; Davis, Kirkland W; Lafita, Vaishali S; Blankenbaker, Donna G; De Smet, Arthur A; Rosas, Humberto; Lee, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    Mnemonics are often used in musculoskeletal radiology to help radiologists remember long differential diagnoses. However, unless the specific appearance of each entity on a differential is also recalled, mnemonics become useless. This article presents 8 mnemonics with their corresponding differential diagnoses and distinguishing features. Bubbly lucent lesions of bone are recalled with the FEGNOMASHIC mnemonic, but when only lucent lesions of the diaphysis are included, a more appropriate mnemonic is FEMALE. The lucent lesions of bone differentials often can be narrowed based on specific characteristics of the lesion but radiographic findings elsewhere and clinical information often help. Osseous metastases may present as lucent or sclerotic lesions; when sclerotic, the differential is best remembered with the mnemonic 5 "BEES" Like Pollen. The mnemonic for Wormian bones is PORKCHOPS. The Wormian bones in most of these entities are indistinguishable, so one must rely on radiographic findings outside the skull for diagnosis. By contrast, differentiating causes of acro-osteolysis is often possible with findings seen only on the hand radiographs; the mnemonic for acro-osteolysis is RADSHIP. In skeletally immature patients with frayed metaphyses, the mnemonic is CHARMS. Although the appearance of the fraying is seldom diagnostic, findings in the adjacent portions of the long bones may be characteristic. FETISH is the mnemonic used to remember the entities for the differential diagnosis of vertebra plana. Age of the patient, clinical history, and findings in the adjacent spine often help to provide the specific diagnosis. Nearly all the entities on the differential diagnosis for distal clavicle erosion (mnemonic: SHIRT Pocket) are included in other differentials in this article. PMID:21266270

  13. Stringy differential geometry, beyond Riemann

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Imtak; Lee, Kanghoon; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2011-08-01

    While the fundamental object in Riemannian geometry is a metric, closed string theories call for us to put a two-form gauge field and a scalar dilaton on an equal footing with the metric. Here we propose a novel differential geometry that treats the three objects in a unified manner, manifests not only diffeomorphism and one-form gauge symmetry but also O(D,D) T-duality, and enables us to rewrite the known low energy effective action of them as a single term. Further, we develop a corresponding vielbein formalism and gauge the internal symmetry that is given by a direct product of two local Lorentz groups, SO(1,D-1)×SŌ(1,D-1). We comment that the notion of cosmological constant naturally changes.

  14. Differential Complexes in Continuum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angoshtari, Arzhang; Yavari, Arash

    2015-04-01

    We study some differential complexes in continuum mechanics that involve both symmetric and non-symmetric second-order tensors. In particular, we show that the tensorial analogue of the standard grad-curl-div complex can simultaneously describe the kinematics and the kinetics of motion of a continuum. The relation between this complex and the de Rham complex allows one to readily derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the compatibility of displacement gradient and the existence of stress functions on non-contractible bodies.We also derive the local compatibility equations in terms of the Green deformation tensor for motions of 2D and 3D bodies, and shells in curved ambient spaces with constant curvatures.

  15. Pseudo Perceptual Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Julian; King, Catherine

    1970-01-01

    Two studies employing rod-and-frame test (RFT) and a size-estimation measure of "extensiveness of scanning reported. Results indicated perceptual differentiation interpretation of RFT performance erroneous for certain kinds of Ss. (Author)

  16. Palmitate differentially regulates the polarization of differentiating and differentiated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Xiu, Fangming; Diao, Li; Qi, Peter; Catapano, Michael; Jeschke, Marc G

    2016-01-01

    The tissue accumulation of M1 macrophages in patients with metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been well-documented. Interestingly, it is an accumulation of M2 macrophages that is observed in the adipose, liver and lung tissues, as well as in the circulation, of patients who have had major traumas such as a burn injury or sepsis; however, the trigger for the M2 polarization observed in these patients has not yet been identified. In the current study, we explored the effects of chronic palmitate and high glucose treatment on macrophage differentiation and function in murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages. We found that chronic treatment with palmitate decreased phagocytosis and HLA-DR expression in addition to inhibiting the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Chronic palmitate treatment of bone marrows also led to M2 polarization, which correlated with the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ signalling pathway. Furthermore, we found that chronic palmitate treatment increased the expression of multiple endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, including binding immunoglobulin protein. Preconditioning with the universal ER stress inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate attenuated ER stress signalling and neutralized the effect of palmitate, inducing a pro-inflammatory phenotype. We confirmed these results in differentiating human macrophages, showing an anti-inflammatory response to chronic palmitate exposure. Though alone it did not promote M2 polarization, hyperglycaemia exacerbated the effects of palmitate. These findings suggest that the dominant accumulation of M2 in adipose tissue and liver in patients with critical illness may be a result of hyperlipidaemia and hyperglycaemia, both components of the hypermetabolism observed in critically ill patients.

  17. Neuroanatomical localization of endocrine control of reproductive behavior in the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica)

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.T. III.

    1989-01-01

    Steroid autoradiography and systematic and intracranial steroid treatment were undertaken to determine the neuroanatomical loci which are sufficient to activate steroid sensitive behaviors in the Japanese quail. (1) Autoradiographic localization of steroid binding cells was performed on male and female quail brains using tritiated ({sup 3}H) testosterone (T), estradiol (E2), or 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The distributions of labelled cells in the quail brain following {sup 3}H-T or {sup 3}H-E2 injection and autoradiography were similar to one another. The distribution of labelled cells following {sup 3}H-DHT autoradiography was limited in comparison to that following {sup 3}H-T autoradiography. Males were found to have more labelled cells than females in nucleus taeniae. (2) Intracranial implantation of minute pellets of testoterone propionate (TP) and estradiol benzoate (EB) was performed to determine neuroanatomical loci at which steroids activate sexual behavior. Both TP and EB implants in the preoptic area (POA) activated male copulatory behavior. (3) Systematic injection of aromatase inhibitor prior to and concurrent with implantation completely blocked copulatory behavior in males with TP implants in the POA but failed to block copulation in males with EB implants in the POA. (4) Intact males and castrated males given 5 dosages of systematic EB treatment were tested for sexual behavior, and blood samples from each group were assayed for E2 concentration. (5) Midbrain DHTP implants were activated crowing without significantly stimulating peripheral androgen-sensitive tissues, but the effect on crowing was not localized to any one nucleus.

  18. Iodination by stimulated human neutrophils. Studies on its stoichiometry, subcellular localization and relevance to microbial killing.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, A W; Garcia, R C; Harper, A M; Banga, J P

    1983-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase of phagocytic leucocytes is thought to utilize H2O2 to oxidize halides, which then react with and kill ingested microbes. This hypothesis was based largely on the incorporation of radiolabelled iodide into cells that had phagocytosed bacteria. The present studies investigated the stoichiometry of these reactions and the subcellular localization and electrophoretic pattern of the cellular components that became iodinated. 1. The stoichiometry of the reactions are such that only a small proportion (less than 0.3%) of the total oxygen consumed is utilized for iodination. Iodination after stimulation with the soluble stimulus phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which is not known to involve the azurophil granules and their contained myeloperoxidase, was comparable with that occurring after bacterial ingestion. 2. Analytical subcellular fractionation of cells that had phagocytosed bacteria localized about 25% of the radioactivity to the membranes, and most of the residual radioactivity distributed with the bacteria and dense granules. In cells stimulated with PMA, more of the radioactivity was associated with the membranes, but about half was still associated with the dense granules. 3. Autoradiographs after dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of cells stimulated with opsonized bacteria gave a similar distribution of iodinated components to that obtained with cells that had been stimulated with PMA or iodinated with Iodogen. These patterns of iodination were very different from those obtained when bacteria alone were iodinated with Iodogen or myeloperoxidase and H2O2. Preparations in which bacteria had been phagocytosed did not show evidence of iodination of bacterial proteins or coating opsonins. Thus positive evidence for the iodination of bacteria has not been produced, and the role of iodination in the microbicidal process of neutrophils remains to be established. Images Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6303312

  19. Characterization and localization of atypical beta-adrenoceptors in rat ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S. J.; Russell, F. D.; Molenaar, P.; Summers, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. Homogenate binding studies and receptor autoradiography have been used to examine the binding characteristics and localization of propranolol-resistant (-)-[125I]-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding sites in rat ileum. 2. Saturation studies with (-)-[125I]-CYP and homogenates of rat ileum identified a site with pKD 8.89 +/- 0.08 and Bmax = 50.3 +/- 4.1 fmol mg-1 protein (n = 6). Both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors (AR) were not detected in these preparations. 3. (-)-Isoprenaline infusion (400 micrograms kg-1 h-1) for 14 days caused no significant change in the density of (-)-[125I]-CYP binding which was 48.9 +/- 12.8 and 40.6 +/- 12.3 fmol mg-1 protein in control and isoprenaline-treated animals respectively (n = 6) (P = 0.97). 4. Competition for (-)-[125I]-CYP binding in the presence of 0.1 microM (-)-propranolol gave affinity values for CYP, tertatolol, alprenolol, ICI 118551 and CGP 20712A that correspond to known affinities at atypical beta-ARs. Stereoselectivity ratios for tertatolol and alprenolol were low. 5. Autoradiographic localization of propranolol resistant (-)-[125I]-CYP binding showed sites associated with the mucosa and to a lesser extent to the muscularis. A small population of beta 2-ARs were detected located predominantly in the longitudinal and circular smooth muscle layers. 6. This study identifies an (-)-[125I]-CYP binding site in rat ileum that is resistant to blockade by propranolol (0.1 microM), is located predominantly in the mucosa, shows resistance to downregulation by isoprenaline and has binding characteristics of the atypical beta-AR. Images Figure 6 PMID:8590969

  20. Solving Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krogh, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Initial-value ordinary differential equation solution via variable order Adams method (SIVA/DIVA) package is collection of subroutines for solution of nonstiff ordinary differential equations. There are versions for single-precision and double-precision arithmetic. Requires fewer evaluations of derivatives than other variable-order Adams predictor/ corrector methods. Option for direct integration of second-order equations makes integration of trajectory problems significantly more efficient. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  1. Local uptake of (14)C-labeled acetate and butyrate in rat brain in vivo during spreading cortical depression.

    PubMed

    Dienel, G A; Liu, K; Cruz, N F

    2001-12-01

    Spreading depression severely disrupts ion homeostasis, causes sensory neglect and motor impairment, and is associated with stroke and migraine. Glucose utilization (CMR(glc)) and lactate production rise during spreading depression, but the metabolic changes in different brain cell types are unknown. Uptake of (14)C-labeled compounds known to be preferentially metabolized by the glial tricarboxylic acid cycle was, therefore, examined during unilateral KCl-induced spreading cortical depression in conscious, normoxic rats. [(14)C]Metabolites derived from [(14)C]butyrate in K+ -treated tissue rose 21% compared to that of untreated contralateral control cortex, whereas incorporation of H(14)CO(3) into metabolites in K+ -treated tissue was reduced to 86% of control. Autoradiographic analysis showed that laminar labeling of cerebral cortex by both (14)C-labeled acetate and butyrate was elevated heterogeneously throughout cortex by an average of 23%; the increase was greatest (approximately 40%) in tissue adjacent to the K+ application site. Local uptake of acetate, butyrate, and deoxyglucose showed similar patterns, and monocarboxylic acid uptake was highest in the structures in which apparent loss of labeled metabolites of [6-(14)C]glucose was greatest. Enhancement of net uptake of acetate and butyrate in cerebral cortex during spreading depression is tentatively ascribed to increased astrocyte metabolism.

  2. Strain localization during deformation of Westerly granite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodsky, N. S.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    A specimen of Westerly granite was cyclically loaded to near failure at 50 MPa confining pressure. Holographic interferometry provided detailed measurements of localized surface deformations during loading and unloading. The data are consistent with deformation occurring primarily elastically at low differential stress; in conjunction with one incipient fault zone between approximately 350 and 520 MPa differential stress; and in conjunction with a second incipient fault zone above 580 MPa and/or during creep. During unloading only one fault zone, that which is active at the intermediate stress levels during loading, is seen to recede.

  3. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially-locally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roeck, W.; Schütz, M.

    2015-06-01

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, "local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate]." This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835-871 (2012)], relying on the "spectral flow technique" or "quasi-adiabatic continuation" [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique "bulk ground state" or "topological quantum order." We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  4. [Differential diagnosis of hoarseness].

    PubMed

    Voigt-Zimmermann, S; Lampe, K; Arens, C

    2014-04-01

    Hoarseness can be the leading symptom of dysphonia. In combination with impaired vocal performance and subjective voice-related discomfort, it can represent an individually different handicap for patients and lead to limited participation in social and professional life. Since the reasons for dysphonia may be not only functional but also organic with a potentially poor prognosis, hoarseness must be clarified using differential diagnosis. In addition to the knowledge of possible diseases, pathogenesis, and treatment options for dysphonia, the differential diagnostic approach requires profound knowledge of the various diagnostic methods, and of the interpretation of the results in particular. The etiology of dysphonia is very diverse and rarely monocausal. Therefore, a team-based and interdisciplinary differential diagnostic approach is recommended.

  5. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jun-Ha; Byun, Mi Ran; Kim, A. Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hang Jun; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Juwon; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM) through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation. PMID:26262877

  6. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness Regulates Osteogenic Differentiation through MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jun-Ha; Byun, Mi Ran; Kim, A Rum; Kim, Kyung Min; Cho, Hang Jun; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Juwon; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is regulated by the extracellular matrix (ECM) through activation of intracellular signaling mediators. The stiffness of the ECM was shown to be an important regulatory factor for MSC differentiation, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) was identified as an effector protein for MSC differentiation. However, the detailed underlying mechanism regarding the role of ECM stiffness and TAZ in MSC differentiation is not yet fully understood. In this report, we showed that ECM stiffness regulates MSC fate through ERK or JNK activation. Specifically, a stiff hydrogel matrix stimulates osteogenic differentiation concomitant with increased nuclear localization of TAZ, but inhibits adipogenic differentiation. ERK and JNK activity was significantly increased in cells cultured on a stiff hydrogel. TAZ activation was induced by ERK or JNK activation on a stiff hydrogel because exposure to an ERK or JNK inhibitor significantly decreased the nuclear localization of TAZ, indicating that ECM stiffness-induced ERK or JNK activation is important for TAZ-driven osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, these results suggest that ECM stiffness regulates MSC differentiation through ERK or JNK activation.

  7. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  8. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  9. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  10. Cross-differential amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajimiri, Seyed-Ali (Inventor); Kee, Scott D. (Inventor); Aoki, Ichiro (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A cross-differential amplifier is provided. The cross-differential amplifier includes an inductor connected to a direct current power source at a first terminal. A first and second switch, such as transistors, are connected to the inductor at a second terminal. A first and second amplifier are connected at their supply terminals to the first and second switch. The first and second switches are operated to commutate the inductor between the amplifiers so as to provide an amplified signal while limiting the ripple voltage on the inductor and thus limiting the maximum voltage imposed across the amplifiers and switches.

  11. Stochastic differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, K. )

    1990-01-01

    This book provides a unified treatment of both regular (or random) and Ito stochastic differential equations. It focuses on solution methods, including some developed only recently. Applications are discussed, in particular an insight is given into both the mathematical structure, and the most efficient solution methods (analytical as well as numerical). Starting from basic notions and results of the theory of stochastic processes and stochastic calculus (including Ito's stochastic integral), many principal mathematical problems and results related to stochastic differential equations are expounded here for the first time. Applications treated include those relating to road vehicles, earthquake excitations and offshore structures.

  12. Complex Patterns of Local Adaptation in Teosinte

    PubMed Central

    Pyhäjärvi, Tanja; Hufford, Matthew B.; Mezmouk, Sofiane; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Populations of widely distributed species encounter and must adapt to local environmental conditions. However, comprehensive characterization of the genetic basis of adaptation is demanding, requiring genome-wide genotype data, multiple sampled populations, and an understanding of population structure and potential selection pressures. Here, we used single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and data on numerous environmental variables to describe the genetic basis of local adaptation in 21 populations of teosinte, the wild ancestor of maize. We found complex hierarchical genetic structure created by altitude, dispersal events, and admixture among subspecies, which complicated identification of locally beneficial alleles. Patterns of linkage disequilibrium revealed four large putative inversion polymorphisms showing clinal patterns of frequency. Population differentiation and environmental correlations suggest that both inversions and intergenic polymorphisms are involved in local adaptation. PMID:23902747

  13. Differential comparator cirucit

    DOEpatents

    Hickling, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    A differential comparator circuit for an Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) or other application includes a plurality of differential comparators and a plurality of offset voltage generators. Each comparator includes first and second differentially connected transistor pairs having equal and opposite voltage offsets. First and second offset control transistors are connected in series with the transistor pairs respectively. The offset voltage generators generate offset voltages corresponding to reference voltages which are compared with a differential input voltage by the comparators. Each offset voltage is applied to the offset control transistors of at least one comparator to set the overall voltage offset of the comparator to a value corresponding to the respective reference voltage. The number of offset voltage generators required in an ADC application can be reduced by a factor of approximately two by applying the offset voltage from each offset voltage generator to two comparators with opposite logical sense such that positive and negative offset voltages are produced by each offset voltage generator.

  14. Differentiation. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The idea of differentiation was initiated by educators of and researchers for students who were classified as gifted and talented. Subsequently, this concept has become part of the general belief system that educators must meet and address the needs of every child, regardless of ability levels. Researchers have found that most teachers state that…

  15. Differentiation: Transparent or Opaque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder-Davis, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the author's experience, when concerns about camouflaging differentiation occur, they tend to center around issues related to fear of stigmatizing students who are working ahead of (or behind) their age-peers. These fears often manifest in specific concerns about grouping arrangements, as well as the issues of fairness, grading, and confusion…

  16. Differentiated Science Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llewellyn, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Given that each child learns differently, it makes sense that one type of science instruction does not fit all. Best-selling author Douglas Llewellyn gives teachers standards-based strategies for differentiating inquiry-based science instruction to more effectively meet the needs of all students. This book takes the concept of inquiry-based…

  17. [Cluster headache differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Guégan-Massardier, Evelyne; Laubier, Cécile

    2015-11-01

    Cluster headache is characterized by disabling stereotyped headache. Early diagnosis allows appropriate treatment, unfortunately diagnostic errors are frequent. The main differential diagnoses are other primary or essential headaches. Migraine, more frequent and whose diagnosis is carried by excess, trigeminal neuralgia or other trigemino-autonomic cephalgia. Vascular or tumoral underlying condition can mimic cluster headache, neck and brain imaging is recommended, ideally MRI.

  18. Environmental Attitudes Semantic Differential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehne, Paul R.; Goulard, Cary J.

    This booklet is an evaluation instrument which utilizes semantic differential data to assess environmental attitudes. Twelve concepts are included: regulated access to beaches, urban planning, dune vegetation, wetlands, future cities, reclaiming wetlands for building development, city parks, commercial development of beaches, existing cities,…

  19. Molecular Typing and Differentiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, general background and bench protocols are provided for a number of molecular typing techniques in common use today. Methods for the molecular typing and differentiation of microorganisms began to be widely adopted following the development of the polymerase chai...

  20. Do Differential Equations Swing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    One of the units of in a standard differential equations course is a discussion of the oscillatory motion of a spring and the associated material on forcing functions and resonance. During the presentation on practical resonance, the instructor may tell students that it is similar to when they take their siblings to the playground and help them on…

  1. Modelling by Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaachoua, Hamid; Saglam, Ayse

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to show the close relation between physics and mathematics taking into account especially the theory of differential equations. By analysing the problems posed by scientists in the seventeenth century, we note that physics is very important for the emergence of this theory. Taking into account this analysis, we show the…

  2. Analyticity without Differentiability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirillova, Evgenia; Spindler, Karlheinz

    2008-01-01

    In this article we derive all salient properties of analytic functions, including the analytic version of the inverse function theorem, using only the most elementary convergence properties of series. Not even the notion of differentiability is required to do so. Instead, analytical arguments are replaced by combinatorial arguments exhibiting…

  3. Issues in Differential Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Ronald C.; Rycus, Judith S.; Saunders-Adams, Stacey M.; Hughes, Laura K.; Hughes, Kelli N.

    2013-01-01

    Differential response (DR), also referred to as alternative response (AR), family assessment response (FAR), or multiple track response, was developed to incorporate family-centered, strengths-based practices into child protective services (CPS), primarily by diverting lower risk families into an assessment track rather than requiring the…

  4. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  5. Time to Go Local!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Time to Go Local! Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take you to information about ...

  6. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  7. Face recognition with histograms of fractional differential gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lei; Ma, Yan; Cao, Qi

    2014-05-01

    It has proved that fractional differentiation can enhance the edge information and nonlinearly preserve textural detailed information in an image. This paper investigates its ability for face recognition and presents a local descriptor called histograms of fractional differential gradients (HFDG) to extract facial visual features. HFDG encodes a face image into gradient patterns using multiorientation fractional differential masks, from which histograms of gradient directions are computed as the face representation. Experimental results on Yale, face recognition technology (FERET), Carnegie Mellon University pose, illumination, and expression (CMU PIE), and A. Martinez and R. Benavente (AR) databases validate the feasibility of the proposed method and show that HFDG outperforms local binary patterns (LBP), histograms of oriented gradients (HOG), enhanced local directional patterns (ELDP), and Gabor feature-based methods.

  8. [Autoradiographic investigations on the effect of city smog extract on DNA synthesis and cell cycle of mammalian cells in vitro. I. Effect of city smog extract on DNA synthesis of kidney- and embryonic cells of the golden hamster in vitro (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Krampitz, G; Seemayer, N

    1979-05-01

    We analysed the effect of city smog extract from Düsseldorf on DNA synthesis of mammalian cells in vitro. Airborne dust was extracted with aceton and thereafter transferred to dimethylsulfoxide. Dosage was calculated according to the benzo(a)pyrene content. We used logarithmically growing cultures of hamster kidney and embryonic cells. DNA synthesis was determined autoradiographically by incorporation of 3H-Thymidine. We found that city smog extract exerted a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect leading to a decrease of DNA synthesizing cells. High concentrations of city smog extract induced cell necrosis and suppressed DNA synthesis completely. Moderate doses of extract caused a dose-dependent, but temporary cessation of DNA synthesis. Cells resumed DNA synthesis after a certain delay. Low concentrations of city smog extract induced no detectable effects. Inhibition of DNA synthesis was evident already one hour after addition of extract. Therefore a direct effect on DNA metabolism could be supposed. Furthermore, exposed cultures demonstrated a delay in entrance of new cells into the DNA synthesis. Alterations in DNA synthesis could be of great importance for carcinogenesis, especially if we take in consideration the content of carcinogens in city smog extract.

  9. [Autoradiographic investigations on the effect of city smog extract on DNA synthesis and cell cycle of mammalian cells in vitro. II. Alterations of the cell cycle of hamsters kidney cells and hamster embryonic cells in presence of city smog extract (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Seemayer, N; Krampitz, G

    1979-06-01

    We used the autoradiographic method according to Quastler and Sherman to analyse alterations in the cell cycle under the influence of city smog extracts. Investigations were performed on logarithmically growing cultures of kidney and embryonic cells of the Syrian golden hamster. Low concentrations of city smog extracts (0.125 micrograms/ml Benzo(a)pyren-equivalent) induced a remarkable delay of cell entrance into DNA-synthesis. Furthermore a considerable prolongation of generation time and phase of DNA-synthesis was detected. The number of mitosis was strongly reduced. Already a doubling of concentration of city smog extract caused an almost complete breakdown of the cell cycle and a disappearing of mitosis for a time period of 10 hours. Our results strongly indicate that city smog extracts lead to a severe alteration of the molecular biology of the cell. Taking this in consideration, it can be assumed that a long term exposure of human beings to the city smog could induce an injury of health.

  10. Studies on the neuronal Golgi apparatus-complex. I. Quantitative ultrastructural autoradiographic analysis of the endocytosis into the Golgi complex of wheat germ agglutinin by cultured murine neuroblastoma cells. II. Identification of a 160 Kd polypeptide of the medial cisterns of the Golgi complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mezitis, S.G.E.

    1987-01-01

    An ultrastructural autoradiographic method is presented which quantitates the sequential endocytosis of tritiated wheat germ agglutinin (N-(acetyl-/sup 3/H)-WGA) into the Golgi complex and lysosomes of cultured murine neuroblastoma cells. Cells were incubated with /sup 3/H-WGA for one hour at 4/sup 0/C, washed and incubated in complete medium without ligand at 37/sup 0/C for 5, 15, 30, and 120 minutes. At 15 minutes, the optimized sources/..mu..m/sup 2/ of neuroblastoma cell area, which represented the grain density of each compartment, were: Golgi associated vesicles, i.e. clusters of vesicles within a one micron radius of the Golgi cisterns, (1.41 + -0.28), Golgi cisterns (0.73 + -0.41), lysosomes (0.1 + -0.09); at two hours, Golgi associated vesicles exhibited some labeling ((0.71 + -0.1), while lysosomes were heavily labeled (2.17 + -0.22). These results are consistent with the hypotheses that either the Golgi complex (cisterns and associated vesicles) is an early and intermediate step of the endocytosis of /sup 3/H-WGA into lysosomes, or that it constitutes part of a separate and quantitatively significant pathway of endocytosis of this ligand.

  11. Differential eigenvalue problems in which the parameter appears nonlinearly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, T. J.; Morris, P. J.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods are examined for determining the eigenvalues of a system of equations in which the parameter appears nonlinearly. The equations are the result of the discretization of differential eigenvalue problems using a finite Chebyshev series. Two global methods are considered which determine the spectrum of eigenvalues without an initial estimate. A local iteration scheme with cubic convergence is presented. Calculations are performed for a model second order differential problem and the Orr-Sommerfeld problem for plane Poiseuille flow.

  12. Local network assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glen, D. V.

    1985-04-01

    Local networks, related standards activities of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers the American National Standards Institute and other elements are presented. These elements include: (1) technology choices such as topology, transmission media, and access protocols; (2) descriptions of standards for the 802 local area networks (LAN's); high speed local networks (HSLN's) and military specification local networks; and (3) intra- and internetworking using bridges and gateways with protocols Interconnection (OSI) reference model. The convergence of LAN/PBX technology is also described.

  13. Learning from Software Localization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, She-Sen

    2003-01-01

    Localization is the process of adapting a product to meet the language, cultural and other requirements of a specific target environment or market. This article describes ways in which software localization impacts upon curriculum, and discusses what students will learn from software localization. (AEF)

  14. HISTONE DEACETYLASE 7 (HDAC7) REGULATES MYOCYTE MIGRATION AND DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chengzhuo; Liu, Yu; Lam, Minh; Kao, Hung-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Summary Class IIa HDACs including HDAC7 play a role in gene expression, cell differentiation, and animal development through their association with transcription factors such as myogenic enhancer factors 2 (MEF2s). In this study, we show that endogenous HDAC7 localizes to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of C2C12 myoblasts, but is exclusively retained in the cytoplasm of myotubes after completion of differentiation process. To elucidate the role of differential distribution of HDAC7 during myogenesis, we examined the effects of stably expressed HDAC7 mutants on myogenesis. Expression of nuclear-retained HDAC7 mutants significantly inhibits myogenesis in C2C12 cells and reduces the expression of muscle-specific myosin heavy chain (MHC) and myogenin. The inhibition in myocyte differentiation can be partially relieved by introduction of a mutation disrupting HDAC7:MEF2 interaction. Since phosphorylation of HDAC7 plays an important role in its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, we further investigated the expression and distribution of phosphorylated HDAC7. To our surprise, the phosphorylation levels of HDAC7 at S344 and S479 were slightly decreased upon differentiation, whereas the phosphorylation of S178 was unchanged. Interestingly, a significant fraction of pS344- and/or pS479-HDAC7 localizes to plasma membrane of myotubes. In addition, Ser178-phosphorylated (pS178) HDAC7 shows a predominant actin filament-like staining prior to muscle differentiation and cytoplasmic and plasma membrane staining after differentiation. Consistent with this notion, HDAC7 partially co-localizes with actin filaments; in particular, pS178-HDAC7 largely colocalizes with actin filaments as indicated by phalloidin counter staining in myocytes. Furthermore, C2C12 cells expressing nuclear-retained HDAC7 display defects in migration. Our results provide novel insight into the mechanisms that regulate myocyte differentiation and migration by controlling the subcellular distribution of HDAC7 in

  15. Canonical Wnt signaling in differentiated osteoblasts controls osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Glass, Donald A; Bialek, Peter; Ahn, Jong Deok; Starbuck, Michael; Patel, Millan S; Clevers, Hans; Taketo, Mark M; Long, Fanxin; McMahon, Andrew P; Lang, Richard A; Karsenty, Gerard

    2005-05-01

    Inactivation of beta-catenin in mesenchymal progenitors prevents osteoblast differentiation; inactivation of Lrp5, a gene encoding a likely Wnt coreceptor, results in low bone mass (osteopenia) by decreasing bone formation. These observations indicate that Wnt signaling controls osteoblast differentiation and suggest that it may regulate bone formation in differentiated osteoblasts. Here, we study later events and find that stabilization of beta-catenin in differentiated osteoblasts results in high bone mass, while its deletion from differentiated osteoblasts leads to osteopenia. Surprisingly, histological analysis showed that these mutations primarily affect bone resorption rather than bone formation. Cellular and molecular studies showed that beta-catenin together with TCF proteins regulates osteoblast expression of Osteoprotegerin, a major inhibitor of osteoclast differentiation. These findings demonstrate that beta-catenin, and presumably Wnt signaling, promote the ability of differentiated osteoblasts to inhibit osteoclast differentiation; thus, they broaden our knowledge of the functions Wnt proteins have at various stages of skeletogenesis. PMID:15866165

  16. Fertility differentials in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogum, G E

    1980-01-01

    A review of the numerous fertility studies carried out in Nigeria during the last 3 decades. Evidence of differences in fertility among subgroups of the population is gleaned from these studies, as very few have addressed this issue specifically. Results still need to be evaluated. The only strong indication of possible geographic fertility differentials remains Van de Walle's analysis of age data from the census of 1952-53. 2 studies among populations of southwestern Nigeria yielded conflicting results with regard to urban-rural differentials, 1 finding lower fertility among urban residents while the other found no differences. Similarly, 2 studies with regard to religious differences yielded somewhat conflicting results, 1 showing Moslems and traditional worshippers having higher fertility than Christians, the other showing Moslems with lower fertility than traditional believers. There is some consensus among researchers that education has some depressing effect on fertility.

  17. Differential auger spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Strongin, Myron; Varma, Matesh Narayan; Anne, Joshi

    1976-06-22

    Differential Auger spectroscopy method for increasing the sensitivity of micro-Auger spectroanalysis of the surfaces of dilute alloys, by alternately periodically switching an electron beam back and forth between an impurity free reference sample and a test sample containing a trace impurity. The Auger electrons from the samples produce representative Auger spectrum signals which cancel to produce an Auger test sample signal corresponding to the amount of the impurity in the test samples.

  18. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, Mark K.; Gulbinski, III, Julian

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods.

  19. SIMULTANEOUS DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION COMPUTER

    DOEpatents

    Collier, D.M.; Meeks, L.A.; Palmer, J.P.

    1960-05-10

    A description is given for an electronic simulator for a system of simultaneous differential equations, including nonlinear equations. As a specific example, a homogeneous nuclear reactor system including a reactor fluid, heat exchanger, and a steam boiler may be simulated, with the nonlinearity resulting from a consideration of temperature effects taken into account. The simulator includes three operational amplifiers, a multiplier, appropriate potential sources, and interconnecting R-C networks.

  20. Differentiability of correlations in realistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Alejandro; Faria, Edson de; Pujals, Enrique; Tresser, Charles

    2015-09-15

    We prove a version of Bell’s theorem in which the locality assumption is weakened. We start by assuming theoretical quantum mechanics and weak forms of relativistic causality and of realism (essentially the fact that observable values are well defined independently of whether or not they are measured). Under these hypotheses, we show that only one of the correlation functions that can be formulated in the framework of the usual Bell theorem is unknown. We prove that this unknown function must be differentiable at certain angular configuration points that include the origin. We also prove that, if this correlation is assumed to be twice differentiable at the origin, then we arrive at a version of Bell’s theorem. On the one hand, we are showing that any realistic theory of quantum mechanics which incorporates the kinematic aspects of relativity must lead to this type of rough correlation function that is once but not twice differentiable. On the other hand, this study brings us a single degree of differentiability away from a relativistic von Neumann no hidden variables theorem.

  1. Local and gauge invariant observables in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khavkine, Igor

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that general relativity (GR) does not possess any non-trivial local (in a precise standard sense) and diffeomorphism invariant observable. We propose a generalized notion of local observables, which retain the most important properties that follow from the standard definition of locality, yet is flexible enough to admit a large class of diffeomorphism invariant observables in GR. The generalization comes at a small price—that the domain of definition of a generalized local observable may not cover the entire phase space of GR and two such observables may have distinct domains. However, the subset of metrics on which generalized local observables can be defined is in a sense generic (its open interior is non-empty in the Whitney strong topology). Moreover, generalized local gauge invariant observables are sufficient to separate diffeomorphism orbits on this admissible subset of the phase space. Connecting the construction with the notion of differential invariants gives a general scheme for defining generalized local gauge invariant observables in arbitrary gauge theories, which happens to agree with well-known results for Maxwell and Yang-Mills theories.

  2. On locally and nonlocally related potential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheviakov, Alexei F.; Bluman, George W.

    2010-07-01

    For any partial differential equation (PDE) system, a local conservation law yields potential equations in terms of some potential variable, which normally is a nonlocal variable. The current paper examines situations when such a potential variable is a local variable, i.e., is a function of the independent and dependent variables of a given PDE system, and their derivatives. In the case of two independent variables, a simple necessary and sufficient condition is presented for the locality of such a potential variable, and this is illustrated by several examples. As a particular example, two-dimensional reductions of equilibrium equations for fluid and plasma dynamics are considered. It is shown that such reductions with respect to helical, axial, and translational symmetries have conservation laws which yield local potential variables. This leads to showing that the well-known Johnson-Frieman-Kruskal-Oberman (JFKO) and Bragg-Hawthorne (Grad-Shafranov) equations are locally related to the corresponding helically and axially symmetric PDE systems of fluid/plasma dynamics. For the axially symmetric case, local symmetry classifications and arising invariant solutions are compared for the original PDE system and the Bragg-Hawthorne (potential) equation. The potential equation is shown to have additional symmetries, denoted as restricted symmetries. Restricted symmetries leave invariant a family of solutions of a given PDE system but not the whole solution manifold, and hence are not symmetries of the given PDE system. Corresponding reductions are shown to yield solutions, which are not obtained as invariant solutions from local symmetry reduction.

  3. Multistate differential transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, B.

    1987-09-01

    A multistate transmission is described having an input shaft and an output shaft comprising: a. planetary gear train means having a ring gear, planetary gears with planetary gear carrier, and a sun gear, the planetary gear train means connected to the output shaft; b. first bypass means connecting the input shaft to the planetary gear train means; c. differential transmission means for receiving its input from the input shaft and having means to adjust the torque and speed output infinitely variable over its range of operation for each state of the transmission; d. power return means for receiving the output of the differential transmission means; e. means including clutch operated speed reversing means for interconnecting the sun gear in the planetary gear train means with the power return means; f. the power return means including a first gear to receive the output of the differential transmission means; g. first multispeed transmission means connecting the means for supporting the carrier shaft to the first bypass means.

  4. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  5. Temperature differential detection device

    DOEpatents

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  6. Temperature differential detection device

    DOEpatents

    Girling, Peter M.

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  7. Differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification

    DOEpatents

    Gresham, Christopher A.; Denton, M. Bonner; Sperline, Roger P.

    2008-07-22

    A differential transimpedance amplifier circuit for correlated differential amplification. The amplifier circuit increase electronic signal-to-noise ratios in charge detection circuits designed for the detection of very small quantities of electrical charge and/or very weak electromagnetic waves. A differential, integrating capacitive transimpedance amplifier integrated circuit comprising capacitor feedback loops performs time-correlated subtraction of noise.

  8. Electric wind in a Differential Mobility Analyzer

    DOE PAGES

    Palo, Marus; Meelis Eller; Uin, Janek; Tamm, Eduard

    2015-10-25

    Electric wind -- the movement of gas, induced by ions moving in an electric field -- can be a distorting factor in size distribution measurements using Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs). The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which electric wind occurs in the locally-built VLDMA (Very Long Differential Mobility Analyzer) and TSI Long-DMA (3081) and to describe the associated distortion of the measured spectra. Electric wind proved to be promoted by the increase of electric field strength, aerosol layer thickness, particle number concentration and particle size. The measured size spectra revealed three types of distortion: wideningmore » of the size distribution, shift of the mode of the distribution to smaller diameters and smoothing out the peaks of the multiply charged particles. Electric wind may therefore be a source of severe distortion of the spectrum when measuring large particles at high concentrations.« less

  9. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine and compared to earlier methods. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  10. Turbomachinery Airfoil Design Optimization Using Differential Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madavan, Nateri K.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An aerodynamic design optimization procedure that is based on a evolutionary algorithm known at Differential Evolution is described. Differential Evolution is a simple, fast, and robust evolutionary strategy that has been proven effective in determining the global optimum for several difficult optimization problems, including highly nonlinear systems with discontinuities and multiple local optima. The method is combined with a Navier-Stokes solver that evaluates the various intermediate designs and provides inputs to the optimization procedure. An efficient constraint handling mechanism is also incorporated. Results are presented for the inverse design of a turbine airfoil from a modern jet engine. The capability of the method to search large design spaces and obtain the optimal airfoils in an automatic fashion is demonstrated. Substantial reductions in the overall computing time requirements are achieved by using the algorithm in conjunction with neural networks.

  11. Electric wind in a Differential Mobility Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Marus; Meelis Eller; Uin, Janek; Tamm, Eduard

    2015-10-25

    Electric wind -- the movement of gas, induced by ions moving in an electric field -- can be a distorting factor in size distribution measurements using Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs). The aim of this study was to determine the conditions under which electric wind occurs in the locally-built VLDMA (Very Long Differential Mobility Analyzer) and TSI Long-DMA (3081) and to describe the associated distortion of the measured spectra. Electric wind proved to be promoted by the increase of electric field strength, aerosol layer thickness, particle number concentration and particle size. The measured size spectra revealed three types of distortion: widening of the size distribution, shift of the mode of the distribution to smaller diameters and smoothing out the peaks of the multiply charged particles. Electric wind may therefore be a source of severe distortion of the spectrum when measuring large particles at high concentrations.

  12. Positive solutions of advanced differential systems.

    PubMed

    Diblík, Josef; Kúdelčíková, Mária

    2013-01-01

    We study asymptotic behavior of solutions of general advanced differential systems y(t) = F(t, y(t)), where F : Ω → [Symbol: see text] (n) is a continuous quasi-bounded functional which satisfies a local Lipschitz condition with respect to the second argument and Ω is a subset in [Symbol: see text] × C(r)(n), C(r)(n) := C([0, r], [Symbol: see text] (n)), y t [Symbol: see text]C(r)(n), and y t (θ) = y(t + θ), θ [Symbol: see text] [0, r]. A monotone iterative method is proposed to prove the existence of a solution defined for t → ∞ with the graph coordinates lying between graph coordinates of two (lower and upper) auxiliary vector functions. This result is applied to scalar advanced linear differential equations. Criteria of existence of positive solutions are given and their asymptotic behavior is discussed.

  13. Differential compaction mechanism for earth fissures near Casa Grande, Arizona.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jachens, R.C.; Holzer, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Precise gravity measurements indicate that earth fissures or tension cracks caused by ground-water withdrawal within a 10km2 area SE of Casa Grande are associated with relief on the buried interface between the alluvial aquifer and underlying bedrock. These relations suggest that the fissures are forming in response to localized differential compaction caused by localized variations of aquifer-system thickness. -from Authors

  14. Putting Differentials Back into Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corrine A.

    2010-01-01

    We argue that the use of differentials in introductory calculus courses is useful and provides a unifying theme, leading to a coherent view of the calculus. Along the way, we meet several interpretations of differentials, some better than others.

  15. Grouping through local, parallel interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proesmans, Marc; Van Gool, Luc J.; Oosterlinck, Andre J.

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes a new approach for computer based visual grouping. A number of computational principles are defined related to results on neurophysiological and psychophysical experiments. The grouping principles have been subdivided into two groups. The 'first-order processes' perform local operations on 'basic' features such as luminance, color, and orientation. 'Second-order processes' consider bilocal interactions (stereo, optical flow, texture, symmetry). The computational scheme developed in this paper relies on the solution of a set of nonlinear differential equations. They are referred to as 'coupled diffusion maps'. Such systems obey the prescribed computational principles. Several maps, corresponding to different features, evolve in parallel, while all computations within and between the maps are localized in a small neighborhood. Moreover, interactions between maps are bidirectional and retinotopically organized, features also underlying processing by the human visual system. Within this framework, new techniques are proposed and developed for e.g. the segmentation of oriented textures, stereo analysis, optical flow detection, etc. Experiments show that the underlying algorithms prove to be successful for first-order as well as second-order grouping processes and show the promising possiblities such a framework can offer for a large number of low-level vision tasks.

  16. ISS Local Environment Spectrometers (ISLES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, Linda Habash; Gilchrist, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the complex interactions between the space environment surrounding the ISS and the ISS surface materials, we propose to use lowcost, high-TRL plasma sensors on the ISS robotic arm to probe the ISS space environment. During many years of ISS operation, we have been able to condut effective (but not perfect) extravehicular activities (both human and robotic) within the perturbed local ISS space environment. Because of the complexity of the interaction between the ISS and the LEO space environment, there remain important questions, such as differential charging at solar panel junctions (the so-called "triple point" between conductor, dielectric, and space plasma), increased chemical contamination due to ISS surface charging and/or thruster activation, water dumps, etc, and "bootstrap" charging of insulating surfaces. Some compelling questions could synergistically draw upon a common sensor suite, which also leverages previous and current MSFC investments. Specific questions address ISS surface charging, plasma contactor plume expansion in a magnetized drifting plasma, and possible localized contamination effects across the ISS.

  17. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  18. Differential operator multiplication method for fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping; Lian, Yanping; Lin, Stephen; Yang, Yibo; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-11-01

    Fractional derivatives play a very important role in modeling physical phenomena involving long-range correlation effects. However, they raise challenges of computational cost and memory storage requirements when solved using current well developed numerical methods. In this paper, the differential operator multiplication method is proposed to address the issues by considering a reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a fractional derivative in time. The linear fractional differential equation is transformed into an integer order differential equation by the proposed method, which can fundamentally fix the aforementioned issues for select fractional differential equations. In such a transform, special attention should be paid to the initial conditions for the resulting differential equation of higher integer order. Through numerical experiments, we verify the proposed method for both fractional ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations.

  19. Differential operator multiplication method for fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping; Lian, Yanping; Lin, Stephen; Yang, Yibo; Wagner, Gregory J.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-08-01

    Fractional derivatives play a very important role in modeling physical phenomena involving long-range correlation effects. However, they raise challenges of computational cost and memory storage requirements when solved using current well developed numerical methods. In this paper, the differential operator multiplication method is proposed to address the issues by considering a reaction-advection-diffusion equation with a fractional derivative in time. The linear fractional differential equation is transformed into an integer order differential equation by the proposed method, which can fundamentally fix the aforementioned issues for select fractional differential equations. In such a transform, special attention should be paid to the initial conditions for the resulting differential equation of higher integer order. Through numerical experiments, we verify the proposed method for both fractional ordinary differential equations and partial differential equations.

  20. Differentiating among penal states.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    This review article assesses Loïc Wacquant's contribution to debates on penality, focusing on his most recent book, Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity (Wacquant 2009), while setting its argument in the context of his earlier Prisons of Poverty (1999). In particular, it draws on both historical and comparative methods to question whether Wacquant's conception of 'the penal state' is adequately differentiated for the purposes of building the explanatory account he proposes; about whether 'neo-liberalism' has, materially, the global influence which he ascribes to it; and about whether, therefore, the process of penal Americanization which he asserts in his recent writings is credible. PMID:21138432

  1. Equivariant differential embeddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Daniel J.; Gilmore, R.

    2010-09-01

    Takens [Dynamical Systems and Turbulence, Lecture Notes in Mathematics, edited by D. A. Rand and L. S. Young (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1981), Vol. 898, pp. 366-381] has shown that a dynamical system may be reconstructed from scalar data taken along some trajectory of the system. A reconstruction is considered successful if it produces a system diffeomorphic to the original. However, if the original dynamical system is symmetric, it is natural to search for reconstructions that preserve this symmetry. These generally do not exist. We demonstrate that a differential reconstruction of any nonlinear dynamical system preserves at most a twofold symmetry.

  2. Differentiating among penal states.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Nicola

    2010-12-01

    This review article assesses Loïc Wacquant's contribution to debates on penality, focusing on his most recent book, Punishing the Poor: The Neoliberal Government of Social Insecurity (Wacquant 2009), while setting its argument in the context of his earlier Prisons of Poverty (1999). In particular, it draws on both historical and comparative methods to question whether Wacquant's conception of 'the penal state' is adequately differentiated for the purposes of building the explanatory account he proposes; about whether 'neo-liberalism' has, materially, the global influence which he ascribes to it; and about whether, therefore, the process of penal Americanization which he asserts in his recent writings is credible.

  3. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, M.K.; Gulbinski, J. III.

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing the analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods. 12 figs.

  4. DIFFERENTIAL FAULT SENSING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, J.H.

    1961-09-01

    A differential fault sensing circuit is designed for detecting arcing in high-voltage vacuum tubes arranged in parallel. A circuit is provided which senses differences in voltages appearing between corresponding elements likely to fault. Sensitivity of the circuit is adjusted to some level above which arcing will cause detectable differences in voltage. For particular corresponding elements, a group of pulse transformers are connected in parallel with diodes connected across the secondaries thereof so that only voltage excursions are transmitted to a thyratron which is biased to the sensitivity level mentioned.

  5. Local glucocorticoid production in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Talaber, Gergely; Jondal, Mikael; Okret, Sam

    2015-11-01

    Besides generating immunocompetent T lymphocytes, the thymus is an established site of de novo extra-adrenal glucocorticoid (GC) production. Among the compartments of the thymus, both stromal thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and thymocytes secrete biologically active GCs. Locally produced GCs secreted by the various thymic cellular compartments have been suggested to have different impact on thymic homeostasis. TEC-derived GCs may regulate thymocyte differentiation whereas thymocyte-derived GCs might regulate age-dependent involution. However the full biological significance of thymic-derived GCs is still not fully understood. In this review, we summarize and describe recent advances in the understanding of local GC production in the thymus and immunoregulatory steroid production by peripheral T cells and highlight the possible role of local GCs for thymus function.

  6. Local anesthesia: a review.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Sykes, P; Kubota, Y; Matsuura, H; Lipp, M

    1992-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most widely administered drugs in dentistry. Significant advances have been made in past decades that have greatly increased both the safety and the efficacy of these important drugs. This paper reviews the history of local anesthesia, pharmacokinetics and clinical implications, techniques, complications, and future directions in the quest for more effective pain control in dentistry.

  7. Local health traditions.

    PubMed

    Shankar, D

    1988-03-01

    A very systematic study made in Karjat, Maharasht (a tribal area in India) has found that in comparison with the official health care and primary health centers, the traditional health practices are far more comprehensive. However, although the local traditions are comprehensive in their 'scope', they nevertheless reveal several weaknesses when subjected to critical evaluation by the science of Ayurveda. For example, whereas some remedies are found to be sound, there are others that are incomplete, and some appear to be totally distorted. Similarly, the diagnostic abilities of local practitioners, while sound in some cases, are in several others found to be inadequate. As to the use of local herbs, whereas the local tradition has an amazing knowledge of local flora--the knowledge about properties of plants is in many cases incomplete. There are several reasons that may explain how and why these weaknesses have set in. 1st, the local traditions are 'oral' and in the natural course of things, oral traditions the world over have been found to decay over time. A 2nd, external, reason for the current decay of local traditions is the derision, neglect, and oppression they have suffered due to the intolerance of western scientific tradition. A 3rd reason for weaknesses in the local health stream is the breakdown of active links, during the last few centuries, with the mainstream science of Ayurveda.

  8. Local Power: Tribe & Township.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlala, Padi; Moloi, Dudley

    1995-01-01

    Examines the service infrastructure of a rural township in South Africa and the struggle to acquire services like water and electricity. Discusses the interaction of a system of transitional local councils and tribal authorities in the face of local government elections. (LZ)

  9. Ear biometric recognition using local texture descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzaoui, Amir; Hadid, Abdenour; Boukrouche, Abdelhani

    2014-09-01

    Automated personal identification using the shape of the human ear is emerging as an appealing modality in biometric and forensic domains. This is mainly due to the fact that the ear pattern can provide rich and stable information to differentiate and recognize people. In the literature, there are many approaches and descriptors that achieve relatively good results in constrained environments. The recognition performance tends, however, to significantly decrease under illumination variation, pose variation, and partial occlusion. In this work, we investigate the use of local texture descriptors, namely local binary patterns, local phase quantization, and binarized statistical image features for robust human identification from two-dimensional ear imaging. In contrast to global image descriptors which compute features directly from the entire image, local descriptors representing the features in small local image patches have proven to be more effective in real-world conditions. Our extensive experimental results on the benchmarks IIT Delhi-1, IIT Delhi-2, and USTB ear databases show that local texture features in general and BSIF in particular provide a significant performance improvement compared to the state-of-the-art.

  10. Differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chris; Berl, Tomas; Tejedor, Alberto; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-03-01

    The appropriate management of hyponatraemia is reliant on the accurate identification of the underlying cause of the hyponatraemia. In the light of evidence which has shown that the use of a clinical algorithm appears to improve accuracy in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia, the European Hyponatraemia Network considered the use of two algorithms. One was developed from a nephrologist's view of hyponatraemia, while the other reflected the approach of an endocrinologist. Both of these algorithms concurred on the importance of assessing effective blood volume status and the measurement of urine sodium concentration in the diagnostic process. To demonstrate the importance of accurate diagnosis to the correct treatment of hyponatraemia, special consideration was given to hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients. The differentiation between the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), acute adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency, fluid overload and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was discussed. In patients with SIADH, fluid restriction has been the mainstay of treatment despite the absence of an evidence base for its use. An approach to using fluid restriction to raise serum tonicity in patients with SIADH and to identify patients who are likely to be recalcitrant to fluid restriction was also suggested.

  11. Differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chris; Berl, Tomas; Tejedor, Alberto; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-03-01

    The appropriate management of hyponatraemia is reliant on the accurate identification of the underlying cause of the hyponatraemia. In the light of evidence which has shown that the use of a clinical algorithm appears to improve accuracy in the differential diagnosis of hyponatraemia, the European Hyponatraemia Network considered the use of two algorithms. One was developed from a nephrologist's view of hyponatraemia, while the other reflected the approach of an endocrinologist. Both of these algorithms concurred on the importance of assessing effective blood volume status and the measurement of urine sodium concentration in the diagnostic process. To demonstrate the importance of accurate diagnosis to the correct treatment of hyponatraemia, special consideration was given to hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients. The differentiation between the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH), acute adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency, fluid overload and cerebral salt-wasting syndrome was discussed. In patients with SIADH, fluid restriction has been the mainstay of treatment despite the absence of an evidence base for its use. An approach to using fluid restriction to raise serum tonicity in patients with SIADH and to identify patients who are likely to be recalcitrant to fluid restriction was also suggested. PMID:22469249

  12. Abnormalities of sex differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nawata, H; Takayanagi, R; Yanase, T; Ikuyama, S; Okabe, T

    1996-01-01

    Sex differentiation is determined by a cascade of events proceeding from chromosomal sex to the completion of sexual maturation at puberty. Many factors involved in this cascade have been identified. Here we focus on DAX-1, androgen receptor and cytochrome P450c17, and discuss their functions in sex differentiation. We analyzed the DAX-1 genes of two unrelated Japanese patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism using PCR amplification of genomic DNA and complete exonic sequencing, and established that congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism result from not only inherited but also de novo mutation in the DAX-1 gene. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a good model to clarify the relationship between the structure and function of androgen receptor, the androgen receptor gene mutation and clinical phenotype. We analyzed 15 cases of AIS and demonstrate the structural and functional relationships of the androgen receptor. We have sequenced the CYP17 (P450c17) gene in DNA from several patients with 17 alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, reconstructed the mutations in a human P450c17 cDNA and expressed the mutant P450c17 in COSl cells to characterize the kinetic properties of 17 alpha-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities. The molecular bases of cases clinically reported as 17 alpha-hydroxylase deficiency have turned out to be complete or partial combined deficiencies of 17 alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase. PMID:8864743

  13. The Effects of Testlets on Reliability and Differential Item Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teker, Gulsen Tasdelen; Dogan, Nuri

    2015-01-01

    Reliability and differential item functioning (DIF) analyses were conducted on testlets displaying local item dependence in this study. The data set employed in the research was obtained from the answers given by 1,500 students to the 20 items included in six testlets given in English Proficiency Exam by the School of Foreign Languages of a state…

  14. A Vertical Differential Configuration in GPR prospecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persico, Raffaele; Pochanin, Gennadiy; Varianytsia-Roshchupkina, Liudmyla; Catapano, Ilaria; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    small objects and interfaces. This configuration can be labeled as a vertical differential configuration. At the conference, the reconstruction capabilities of this differential GPR configuration system will be discussed by means of an analysis of the problem based on a properly designed microwave tomographic inversion approach. The proposed approach exploits the Born approximation and faces the imaging as the solution of a linear inverse scattering problem. In this way, the problem of the local minima is avoided [7] and it is possible to impose some regularization to the problem in an easy way problem [8-9]. At the conference, a theoretical analysis of the mathematical propserties of the scattering operator under the vertical differential configuration will be presented showing that, with respect to the horizontal differential configuration, the vertical one allows to reject the direct coupling between the antennas but not the coupling of the antennas occurring through the air-soil interface. On the other hand, the filtering properties of the operator at hand con be considered, let say, less severe in some cases. At the conference, both some numerical and experimental results will be shown. References [1] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "Effects of the background removal in linear inverse scattering", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 46, pp. 1104-1114, April 2008. [2] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Three-Dimensional FDTD modeling of a ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Geosci. Remote Sens, vol. 38, pp. 1513-1521, July 2000. [3] L. Gurel, U. Oguz, "Optimization of the transmitter-receiver separation in the ground penetrating radar", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 51, no 3, pp. 362-370, March 2003. [4] R. Persico, F. Soldovieri, "A microwave tomography approach for a differential configuration in GPR prospecting", IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propag., vol. 54, pp. 3541 - 3548, 2006. [5] Y.A. Kopylov, S.A. Masalov, G.P. Pochanin, "The way of isolation between transmitting

  15. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  16. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution.

  17. Local Solid Shape.

    PubMed

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-10-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches-essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures-of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  18. Ureter growth and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bohnenpoll, Tobias; Kispert, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    The mammalian ureter is a slender tube that connects the renal pelvis with the bladder. It allows the unidirectional movement of urine by means of a peristaltically active smooth muscle layer that together with fibroelastic material ensheathes a water-impermeable multilayered urothelium. The ureteric urothelium as well as the outer mesenchymal coat arise from undifferentiated precursor tissues, the distal ureteric bud and its surrounding mesenchyme, respectively. Specification, growth and differentiation of these ureteric precursor tissues are tightly linked to each other, and are highly integrated with those of the adjacent rudiments of kidney and bladder. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cellular mechanisms as well as the molecular players that guide development of the tissue architecture of the ureter and its peristalsis. PMID:25087982

  19. Practical Differential Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, M; De Supinski, B R

    2007-02-04

    Comparing performance profiles from two runs is an essential performance analysis step that users routinely perform. In this work we present eGprof, a tool that facilitates these comparisons through differential profiling inside gprof. We chose this approach, rather than designing a new tool, since gprof is one of the few performance analysis tools accepted and used by a large community of users. eGprof allows users to 'subtract' two performance profiles directly. It also includes callgraph visualization to highlight the differences in graphical form. Along with the design of this tool, we present several case studies that show how eGprof can be used to find and to study the differences of two application executions quickly and hence can aid the user in this most common step in performance analysis. We do this without requiring major changes on the side of the user, the most important factor in guaranteeing the adoption of our tool by code teams.

  20. DIFFERENTIAL PULSE HEIGHT DISCRIMINATOR

    DOEpatents

    Test, L.D.

    1958-11-11

    Pulse-height discriminators are described, specifically a differential pulse-height discriminator which is adapted to respond to pulses of a band of amplitudes, but to reject pulses of amplitudes greater or less than tbe preselected band. In general, the discriminator includes a vacuum tube having a plurality of grids adapted to cut off plate current in the tube upon the application of sufficient negative voltage. One grid is held below cutoff, while a positive pulse proportional to the amplltude of each pulse is applled to this grid. Another grid has a negative pulse proportional to the amplitude of each pulse simultaneously applied to it. With this arrangement the tube will only pass pulses which are of sufficlent amplitude to counter the cutoff bias but not of sufficlent amplitude to cutoff the tube.