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Sample records for differential cellular retention

  1. Cellular cardiomyoplasty: routes of cell delivery and retention.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Adil; Ge, Yin; Shum-Tim, Dominique; Chiu, Ray C-J

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies have proven the feasibility of cellular cardiomyoplasty in treating the damaged myocardium following ischemic injury. Over the years, this field has exploded with different investigators trying different routes of cell delivery ranging from direct cell injection into the heart to peripheral intravenous delivery utilizing the various signaling mechanisms known. These different routes have resulted in a wide range of retention and engraftment of cells in the target tissues. In this review, we will explore the different modalities of cell delivery, the pros and cons of each route and the cellular retention and therapeutic efficacy of these routes. We will then look into the different theories that try to explain the observed retention and engraftment of cells in the target tissues. Finally, we will discuss various methods that can improve cellular retention and engraftment and hence better improvement in myocardial function.

  2. A cellular mechanism for imidocarb retention in edible bovine tissues.

    PubMed

    Moore, A S; Coldham, N G; Sauer, M J

    1996-10-01

    Imidocarb dipropionate, formulated as Imizol, is used for the treatment and prophylaxis of bovine babesiosis. Several studies have shown that imidocarb remains detectable in edible ovine and bovine tissues for several months after dosing but the mechanism of retention remains unknown. In this study, the mechanism of imidocarb retention was investigated by measuring the binding of [14C]imidocarb to bovine hepatocytes, erythrocytes, sub-cellular fractions and isolated bovine macromolecules. The proportion of [14C]imidocarb (10 microM) bound to cells in suspension culture (1 x 10(7) cells.ml-1) was found to be substantially greater to hepatocytes (56.5%) than to erythrocytes (4.6%). Studies with washed erythrocytes reconstituted in plasma indicated that approximately 70% of the [14C]imidocarb was bound to plasma proteins, 10% to erythrocytes, and 20% remained free. Measurement of [14C]imidocarb binding to sub-cellular fractions prepared from bovine liver revealed preferential accumulation in the nuclear, rather than in the mitochondrial, microsomal or cytosolic fractions. Binding capacities of selected bovine macromolecules for [14C]imidocarb were in the order deoxy-ribonucleic acid (DNA) = ribonucleic acid (RNA) > > alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) > serum albumin (BSA) > haemoglobin (Hb). DNA binding sites for imidocarb remained unsaturated over the concentration range 0-100 microM [14C]imidocarb. Competitive binding studies between imidocarb and pentamidine or spermidine provided evidence for common DNA binding sites. These studies indicated that preferential binding of [14C]imidocarb to hepatocytes compared with erythrocytes observed in vitro was a result of substantial reversible binding to nucleic acids and that the same cellular mechanism may be implicated in the slow elimination of imidocarb from edible tissues in vivo.

  3. Hypoxia, pseudohypoxia and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mohlin, Sofie; Wigerup, Caroline; Jögi, Annika; Påhlman, Sven

    2017-07-15

    Tumor hypoxia correlates to aggressive disease, and while this is explained by a variety of factors, one clue to understand this phenomena was the finding that hypoxia induces a de-differentiated, stem cell-like phenotype in neuroblastoma and breast tumor cells. The hypoxia inducible transcription factors (HIFs) are regulated at the translational level by fluctuating oxygen concentrations, but emerging data reveal that both HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression can be induced by aberrantly activated growth factor signaling independently of oxygen levels. Furthermore, HIF-2α is regulated by hypoxia also at the transcriptional level in neuroblastoma and glioma cells. In cultured tumor cells, HIF-2α is stabilized at physiological oxygen concentrations followed by induced expression of classical hypoxia-driven genes, resulting in a pseudohypoxic phenotype. In addition, in neuroblastoma and glioma specimens, a small subset of HIF-2α positive, HIF-1α negative, tumor cells is found adjacent to blood vessels, i.e. in areas with presumably adequate oxygenation. These tumor niches are thus pseudohypoxic, and the HIF-2α expressing cells present immature features. We have postulated that this niche in neuroblastomas encompass the tumor stem cells. Oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes associated with pseudohypoxia are frequently mutated or deleted in the germline, implicating that the pseudohypoxic phenotype indeed is tumorigenic. In summary, the hypoxic and pseudohypoxic phenotypes of solid tumors are attractive therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chromatin modifiers: regulators of cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taiping; Dent, Sharon Y. R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, by definition, is epigenetic. Genome-wide profiling of pluripotent cells and differentiated cells suggests global chromatin remodeling during differentiation, resulting in progressive transition from a relatively open chromatin configuration to a more compact state. Genetic studies in mouse models demonstrate major roles for a variety of histone modifiers and chromatin remodelers in key developmental transitions, such as the segregation of embryonic and extraembryonic lineages in blastocyst stage embryos, the formation of the three germ layers during gastrulation, and differentiation of adult stem cells. Furthermore, rather than merely stabilizing the gene expression changes driven by developmental transcription factors, evidence is emerging that chromatin regulators have multifaceted roles in cell fate decisions. PMID:24366184

  5. Protein S-palmitoylation in cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzi M; Hang, Howard C

    2017-02-08

    Reversible protein S-palmitoylation confers spatiotemporal control of protein function by modulating protein stability, trafficking and activity, as well as protein-protein and membrane-protein associations. Enabled by technological advances, global studies revealed S-palmitoylation to be an important and pervasive posttranslational modification in eukaryotes with the potential to coordinate diverse biological processes as cells transition from one state to another. Here, we review the strategies and tools to analyze in vivo protein palmitoylation and interrogate the functions of the enzymes that put on and take off palmitate from proteins. We also highlight palmitoyl proteins and palmitoylation-related enzymes that are associated with cellular differentiation and/or tissue development in yeasts, protozoa, mammals, plants and other model eukaryotes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Protein S-palmitoylation in cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzi M.

    2017-01-01

    Reversible protein S-palmitoylation confers spatiotemporal control of protein function by modulating protein stability, trafficking and activity, as well as protein–protein and membrane–protein associations. Enabled by technological advances, global studies revealed S-palmitoylation to be an important and pervasive posttranslational modification in eukaryotes with the potential to coordinate diverse biological processes as cells transition from one state to another. Here, we review the strategies and tools to analyze in vivo protein palmitoylation and interrogate the functions of the enzymes that put on and take off palmitate from proteins. We also highlight palmitoyl proteins and palmitoylation-related enzymes that are associated with cellular differentiation and/or tissue development in yeasts, protozoa, mammals, plants and other model eukaryotes. PMID:28202682

  7. Differential retention of PCB congeners in cockroaches Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingmei; Gandini, Carlo; Sabuneti, Andrew; Fasola, Mauro; Lambiase, Simonetta; Grigolo, Aldo

    2007-05-01

    Organisms differ widely in their ability to metabolize and eliminate polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). We evaluated the retention of PCB congeners, reference standard mixture, experimentally injected into cockroach Blattella germanica, in relation to sex and time, and its elimination through the feces, exuviae and oothecae. The nymphs that died prematurely had a higher average PCB retention than those with a longer lifetime, 88% of the injected dose for those that died within 1 to 10 days, and 76% for those within 11-20 days. Diverse PCB congeners showed differential retention, and particularly the more volatile, low weight congeners were recovered in lower concentrations, the medium-weight ones were intermediate, while the high-weight congeners attained the highest concentration. PCBs were also detected in the excrements and in exuviae, which may therefore act as detoxification paths, and in the oothecae, thus showing that PCBs can be transferred from mother to progeny.

  8. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orza, Anamaria I.; Mihu, Carmen; Soritau, Olga; Diudea, Mircea; Florea, Adrian; Matei, Horea; Balici, Stefana; Mudalige, Thilak; Kanarpardy, Ganesh K.; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2014-02-01

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues.

  9. Hierarchical Targeting Strategy for Enhanced Tumor Tissue Accumulation/Retention and Cellular Internalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Huang, Peng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-09-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutic agents is an important way to improve the therapeutic index and reduce side effects. To design nanoparticles for targeted delivery, both enhanced tumor tissue accumulation/retention and enhanced cellular internalization should be considered simultaneously. So far, there have been very few nanoparticles with immutable structures that can achieve this goal efficiently. Hierarchical targeting, a novel targeting strategy based on stimuli responsiveness, shows good potential to enhance both tumor tissue accumulation/retention and cellular internalization. Here, the recent design and development of hierarchical targeting nanoplatforms, based on changeable particle sizes, switchable surface charges and activatable surface ligands, will be introduced. In general, the targeting moieties in these nanoplatforms are not activated during blood circulation for efficient tumor tissue accumulation, but re-activated by certain internal or external stimuli in the tumor microenvironment for enhanced cellular internalization.

  10. Boolean linear differential operators on elementary cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Del Rey, Ángel

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the notion of boolean linear differential operator (BLDO) on elementary cellular automata (ECA) is introduced and some of their more important properties are studied. Special attention is paid to those differential operators whose coefficients are the ECA with rule numbers 90 and 150.

  11. SPECIFIC PROTEIN SYNTHESIS IN CELLULAR DIFFERENTIATION

    PubMed Central

    Paul, M.; Goldsmith, M. R.; Hunsley, J. R.; Kafatos, F. C.

    1972-01-01

    Silkmoth follicles, arranged in a precise developmental sequence within the ovariole, yield pure and uniform populations of follicular epithelial cells highly differentiated for synthesis of the proteinaceous eggshell (chorion). These cells can be maintained and labeled efficiently in organ culture; their in vitro (and cell free) protein synthetic activity reflects their activity in vivo. During differentiation the cells undergo dramatic changes in protein synthesis. For 2 days the cells are devoted almost exclusively to production of distinctive chorion proteins of low molecular weight and of unusual amino acid composition. Each protein has its own characteristic developmental kinetics of synthesis. Each is synthesized as a separate polypeptide, apparently on monocistronic messenger RNA (mRNA), and thus reflects the expression of a distinct gene. The rapid changes in this tissue do not result from corresponding changes in translational efficiency. Thus, the peptide chain elongation rate is comparable for chorion and for proteins synthesized at earlier developmental stages (1.3–1.9 amino acids/sec); moreover, the spacing of ribosomes on chorion mRNA (30–37 codons per ribosome) is similar to that encountered in other eukaryotic systems. PMID:4656706

  12. Noisy out of necessity: Probabilistic behavior during cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suel, Gurol

    2008-03-01

    Diverse organisms ranging from bacteria to mammalian stem cells undergo pluripotent differentiation where a single cell can commit to one out of several cell fates. How do underlying genetic circuits comprised of interactions between genes and proteins allow cells to ``choose'' a specific cell fate and execute the appropriate differentiation program? To address this question we investigate a simple bacterial differentiation system utilizing mathematical modeling and quantitative single cell measurements. In particular we are interested in elucidating the role of circuit dynamics and stochastic behavior in cellular differentiation.

  13. A Data-Mining Approach to Differentiate Predictors of Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong Ho; DiGangi, Samuel A.; Jannasch-Pennell, Angel; Lo, Wenjuo; Kaprolet, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Student retention is an important issue for all university administrators and faculty due to the potential negative impact of student attrition. In this study, retention rates will be studied with data from sophomore students who initially enrolled in the 2002 academic year at Arizona State University, following these students through their junior…

  14. Retention of Differential and Integral Calculus: A Case Study of a University Student in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukic Matic, Ljerka; Dahl, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a study on retention of differential and integral calculus concepts of a second-year student of physical chemistry at a Danish university. The focus was on what knowledge the student retained 14 months after the course and on what effect beliefs about mathematics had on the retention. We argue that if a student can quickly…

  15. Retention of Differential and Integral Calculus: A Case Study of a University Student in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukic Matic, Ljerka; Dahl, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a study on retention of differential and integral calculus concepts of a second-year student of physical chemistry at a Danish university. The focus was on what knowledge the student retained 14 months after the course and on what effect beliefs about mathematics had on the retention. We argue that if a student can quickly…

  16. Oxidative Stress, Redox Regulation and Diseases of Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Jie; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Within cells, there is a narrow concentration threshold that governs whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce toxicity or act as second messengers. Scope of review We discuss current understanding of how ROS arise, facilitate cell signaling, cause toxicities and disease related to abnormal cell differentiation and those (primarily) sulfur based pathways that provide nucleophilicity to offset these effects. Primary conclusions Cellular redox homeostasis mediates a plethora of cellular pathways that determine life and death events. For example, ROS intersect with GSH based enzyme pathways to influence cell differentiation, a process integral to normal hematopoiesis, but also affecting a number of diverse cell differentiation related human diseases. Recent attempts to manage such pathologies have focused on intervening in some of these pathways, with the consequence that differentiation therapy targeting redox homeostasis has provided a platform for drug discovery and development. General Significance The balance between electrophilic oxidative stress and protective biomolecular nucleophiles predisposes the evolution of modern life forms. Imbalances of the two can produce aberrant redox homeostasis with resultant pathologies. Understanding the pathways involved provides opportunities to consider interventional strategies. PMID:25445706

  17. Differentiating connexin hemichannels and pannexin channels in cellular ATP release

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W; Isakson, Brant E

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays a fundamental role in cellular communication, with its extracellular accumulation triggering purinergic signaling cascades in a diversity of cell types. While the roles for purinergic signaling in health and disease have been well established, identification and differentiation of the specific mechanisms controlling cellular ATP release is less well understood. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to regulate ATP release with connexin (Cx) hemichannels and pannexin (Panx) channels receiving major focus. However, segregating the specific roles of Panxs and Cxs in ATP release in a plethora of physiological and pathological contexts has remained enigmatic. This multifaceted problem has arisen from the selectivity of pharmacological inhibitors for Panxs and Cxs, methodological differences in assessing Panx and Cx function and the potential compensation by other isoforms in gene silencing and genetic knockout models. Consequently, there remains a void in the current understanding of specific contributions of Panxs and Cxs in releasing ATP during homeostasis and disease. Differentiating the distinct signaling pathways that regulate these two channels will advance our current knowledge of cellular communication and aid in the development of novel rationally-designed drugs for modulation of Panx and Cx activity, respectively. PMID:24548565

  18. Cellular and molecular partners involved in gut morphogenesis and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Kedinger, M; Lefebvre, O; Duluc, I; Freund, J N; Simon-Assmann, P

    1998-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa represents an interesting model to study the cellular and molecular basis of epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk participating in the development and maintenance of the digestive function. This cross-talk involves extracellular matrix molecules, cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules as well as paracrine factors and their receptors. The cellular and molecular unit is additionally regulated by hormonal, immune and neural inputs. Such integrated cell interactions are involved in pattern formation, in proximodistal regionalization, in maintenance of a gradient of epithelial proliferation and differentiation, and in epithelial cell migration. We focus predominantly on two aspects of these integrated interactions in this paper: (i) the role of basement membrane molecules, namely laminins, in the developmental and spatial epithelial behaviour; and (ii) the importance of the mesenchymal cell compartment in these processes. PMID:9684282

  19. Contaminant effect on cellular metabolic differential pressure curves.

    PubMed

    Milani, Marziale; Ballerini, Monica; Ferraro, L; Zabeo, M; Barberis, M; Cannone, M; Faraone, V

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of a pressure monitoring system by differential pressure sensors to detect contaminant effects on cellular cultures metabolic activity is discussed using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lymphocyte, and AHH1 cell cultures. Metabolic (aerobic and anaerobic) processes in cells are accompanied by CO(2) production that induces changes in pressure values when cells are cultured in sealed vessels. These values are subsequently converted in voltage units and plotted pressure dynamics versus time. This procedure leads to a standard curve, typical of the cellular line, which characterizes cellular metabolism when all parameters are controlled, such as temperature and nutrients. Different phases appear in the S. cerevisiae differential pressure curve: an initial growth up to a maximum, followed by a decrement that leads to a typical "depression" (pressure values inside the test-tubes are lower than the initial one) after about 35 h from the beginning. The S. cerevisiae differential pressure curve is successfully used to test the effects of chemical (Amuchina, trieline) and physical (UV radiation, blue light, magnetic fields) contaminants. The same technique is applied to lymphocytes and AHH1 cultures to investigate the effects generated by a 72-h exposure to a 50-Hz, 60-microT electromagnetic field. Lymphocyte samples, cultured in a PHA medium, grow less than control ones, but exhibit a greater metabolic activity: changes in the exposure system configuration influence neither sample growth differences nor metabolic response variations between control and irradiated samples, while all the other irradiation parameters remain constant. Control and irradiated lymphocyte samples, without PHA in culture medium, show the same behavior both during irradiation and metabolic test. AHH1 control and irradiated samples show no difference both in growth percentage during irradiation and in metabolic activity. Different cell cultures respond to the same stimulus in different

  20. Comparative cellular catabolism and retention of astatine-, bismuth-, and lead-radiolabeled internalizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Garmestani, K; Wong, K J; Park, L S; Dadachova, E; Yordanov, A; Waldmann, T A; Eckelman, W C; Paik, C H; Carrasquillo, J A

    2001-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) labeled with alpha-emitting radionuclides such as (211)At, (212)Bi, (213)Bi, and (212)Pb (which decays by beta-emission to its alpha-emitting daughter, (212)Bi) are being evaluated for their potential applications for cancer therapy. The fate of these radionuclides after cells are targeted with mAbs is important in terms of dosimetry and tumor detection. In this study, we attached various radionuclides that result in alpha-emissions to T101, a rapidly internalizing anti-CD5 mAb. We then evaluated the catabolism and cellular retention and compared them with those of (125)I- and (111)In-labeled T101. T101 was labeled with (211)At, (125)I, (205,6)Bi, (111)In, and (203)Pb. CD5 antigen-positive cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC), and MOLT-4 leukemia cells were used. The labeled T101 was incubated with the cells for 1 h at 4 degrees C for surface labeling. Unbound activity was removed and 1 mL medium added. The cells were then incubated at 37 degrees C for 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h. The activity on the cell surface that internalized and the activity on the cell surface remaining in the supernatant were determined. The protein in the supernatant was further precipitated by methanol for determining protein-bound and non-protein-bound radioactivity. Sites of internal cellular localization of radioactivity were determined by Percoll gradient centrifugation. All radiolabeled antibodies bound to the cells were internalized rapidly. After internalization, (205,6)Bi, (203)Pb, and (111)In radiolabels were retained in the cell, with little decrease of cell-associated radioactivity. However, (211)At and (125)I were released from cells rapidly ((211)At < (125)I) and most of the radioactivity in the supernatant was in a non-protein-bound form. Intracellular distribution of radioactivity revealed a transit of the radiolabel from the cell surface to the lysosome. The catabolism patterns of MOLT-4 cells and PBMNC were similar. (211)At catabolism

  1. Role of reactive oxygen species in fungal cellular differentiations.

    PubMed

    Scott, Barry; Eaton, Carla J

    2008-12-01

    Regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by specific fungal NADPH oxidases (Noxs) plays a key role in fungal cellular differentiation and development. Fungi have up to three different Nox isoforms, NoxA, B and C. The NoxA isoform has a key role in triggering the development of fruiting bodies in several sexual species whereas NoxB plays a key role in ascospore germination. The function of NoxC remains unknown. Both NoxA and NoxB are required for the development of fungal infection structures by some plant pathogens. ROS production by NoxA is critical for maintaining a fungal-plant symbiosis. Localised synthesis of ROS is also important in establishing and maintaining polarised hyphal growth. Activation of NoxA/NoxB requires the regulatory subunit, NoxR, and the small GTPase RacA. The BemA scaffold protein may also be involved in the assembly of the Nox complex. By analogy with mammalian systems MAP and PAK kinases may regulate fungal Nox activation. How fungal cells sense and respond to ROS associated with cellular differentiations remains to be discovered.

  2. Operating principles of tristable circuits regulating cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongya; Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Harrison, William; Boareto, Marcelo; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Many cell-fate decisions during embryonic development are governed by a motif comprised of two transcription factors (TFs) A and B that mutually inhibit each other and may self-activate. This motif, called as a self-activating toggle switch (SATS), can typically have three stable states (phenotypes)—two corresponding to differentiated cell fates, each of which has a much higher level of one TF than the other—≤ft(A,~B\\right)=≤ft(1,~0\\right) or ≤ft(0,~1\\right) —and the third state corresponding to an ‘undecided’ stem-like state with similar levels of both A and B—≤ft(A,~B\\right)=≤ft(1/2,1/2\\right) . Furthermore, two or more SATSes can be coupled together in various topologies in different contexts, thereby affecting the coordination between multiple cellular decisions. However, two questions remain largely unanswered: (a) what governs the co-existence and relative stability of these three stable states? (b) What orchestrates the decision-making of coupled SATSes? Here, we first demonstrate that the co-existence and relative stability of the three stable states in an individual SATS can be governed by the relative strength of self-activation, external signals activating and/or inhibiting A and B, and mutual degradation between A and B. Simultaneously, we investigate the effects of these factors on the decision-making of two coupled SATSes. Our results offer novel understanding into the operating principles of individual and coupled tristable self-activating toggle switches (SATSes) regulating cellular differentiation and can yield insights into synthesizing three-way genetic circuits and understanding of cellular reprogramming.

  3. Branched amphiphilic peptide capsules: Cellular uptake and retention of encapsulated solutes☆

    PubMed Central

    Sukthankar, Pinakin; Avila, L. Adriana; Whitaker, Susan K.; Iwamoto, Takeo; Morgenstern, Alfred; Apostolidis, Christos; Liu, Ke; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Tomich, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs) are peptide nanospheres comprised of equimolar proportions of two branched peptide sequences bis(FLIVI)-K-KKKK and bis(FLIVIGSII)-K-KKKK that self-assemble to form bi-layer delimited capsules. In two recent publications we described the lipid analogous characteristics of our BAPCs, examined their initial assembly, mode of fusion, solute encapsulation, and resizing and delineated their capability to be maintained at a specific size by storing them at 4 °C. In this report we describe the stability, size limitations of encapsulation, cellular localization, retention and, bio-distribution of the BAPCs in vivo. The ability of our constructs to retain alpha particle emitting radionuclides without any apparent leakage and their persistence in the peri-nuclear region of the cell for extended periods of time, coupled with their ease of preparation and potential tune-ability, makes them attractive as biocompatible carriers for targeted cancer therapy using particle emitting radioisotopes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially active peptides and proteins. PMID:24565797

  4. Branched amphiphilic peptide capsules: cellular uptake and retention of encapsulated solutes.

    PubMed

    Sukthankar, Pinakin; Avila, L Adriana; Whitaker, Susan K; Iwamoto, Takeo; Morgenstern, Alfred; Apostolidis, Christos; Liu, Ke; Hanzlik, Robert P; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Tomich, John M

    2014-09-01

    Branched amphiphilic peptide capsules (BAPCs) are peptide nano-spheres comprised of equimolar proportions of two branched peptide sequences bis(FLIVI)-K-KKKK and bis(FLIVIGSII)-K-KKKK that self-assemble to form bilayer delimited capsules. In two recent publications we described the lipid analogous characteristics of our BAPCs, examined their initial assembly, mode of fusion, solute encapsulation, and resizing and delineated their capability to be maintained at a specific size by storing them at 4°C. In this report we describe the stability, size limitations of encapsulation, cellular localization, retention and, bio-distribution of the BAPCs in vivo. The ability of our constructs to retain alpha particle emitting radionuclides without any apparent leakage and their persistence in the peri-nuclear region of the cell for extended periods of time, coupled with their ease of preparation and potential tune-ability, makes them attractive as biocompatible carriers for targeted cancer therapy using particle emitting radioisotopes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova.

  5. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium.

    PubMed

    Walker, Nancy M; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R; Stefanski, Casey D; Strubberg, Ashlee M; Clarke, Lane L

    2016-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3 (-))-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3 (-)-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl(-) concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl(-) concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl(-) and HCO3 (-) efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl(-) and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine.

  6. Cellular chloride and bicarbonate retention alters intracellular pH regulation in Cftr KO crypt epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Nancy M.; Liu, Jinghua; Stein, Sydney R.; Stefanski, Casey D.; Strubberg, Ashlee M.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), an anion channel providing a major pathway for Cl− and HCO3− efflux across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the intestine, CF manifests as obstructive syndromes, dysbiosis, inflammation, and an increased risk for gastrointestinal cancer. Cftr knockout (KO) mice recapitulate CF intestinal disease, including intestinal hyperproliferation. Previous studies using Cftr KO intestinal organoids (enteroids) indicate that crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline intracellular pH (pHi). We hypothesized that Cftr has a cell-autonomous role in downregulating pHi that is incompletely compensated by acid-base regulation in its absence. Here, 2′,7′-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein microfluorimetry of enteroids showed that Cftr KO crypt epithelium sustains an alkaline pHi and resistance to cell acidification relative to wild-type. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that Cftr KO enteroids exhibit downregulated transcription of base (HCO3−)-loading proteins and upregulation of the basolateral membrane HCO3−-unloader anion exchanger 2 (Ae2). Although Cftr KO crypt epithelium had increased Ae2 expression and Ae2-mediated Cl−/HCO3− exchange with maximized gradients, it also had increased intracellular Cl− concentration relative to wild-type. Pharmacological reduction of intracellular Cl− concentration in Cftr KO crypt epithelium normalized pHi, which was largely Ae2-dependent. We conclude that Cftr KO crypt epithelium maintains an alkaline pHi as a consequence of losing both Cl− and HCO3− efflux, which impairs pHi regulation by Ae2. Retention of Cl− and an alkaline pHi in crypt epithelium may alter several cellular processes in the proliferative compartment of Cftr KO intestine. PMID:26542396

  7. Retention of differential and integral calculus: a case study of a university student in physical chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jukić Matić, Ljerka; Dahl, Bettina

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports a study on retention of differential and integral calculus concepts of a second-year student of physical chemistry at a Danish university. The focus was on what knowledge the student retained 14 months after the course and on what effect beliefs about mathematics had on the retention. We argue that if a student can quickly reconstruct the knowledge, given a few hints, this is just as good as retention. The study was conducted using a mixed method approach investigating students' knowledge in three worlds of mathematics. The results showed that the student had a very low retention of concepts, even after hints. However, after completing the calculus course, the student had successfully used calculus in a physical chemistry study programme. Hence, using calculus in new contexts does not in itself strengthen the original calculus learnt; they appeared as disjoint bodies of knowledge.

  8. Matrix-mediated retention of osteogenic differentiation potential by human adult bone marrow stromal cells during ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Mauney, Joshua R; Kaplan, David L; Volloch, Vladimir

    2004-07-01

    During prolonged cultivation ex vivo, adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) undergo two probably interdependent processes, replicative aging and a decline in differentiation potential. Recently, our results with primary human fibroblasts indicated that growth on denatured collagen (DC) matrix results in the reduction of the rate of cellular aging. The present study has been undertaken to test whether the growth of human BMSCs under the same conditions would translate into preservation of cellular aging-attenuated functions, such as the ability to express HSP70 in response to stress as well as of osteogenic differentiation potential. We report here that growth of BMSCs on a DC matrix versus tissue culture polystyrene significantly reduced one of the main manifestations of cellular aging, the attenuation of the ability to express a major protective stress response component, HSP70, increased the proliferation capacity of ex vivo expanded BMSCs, reduced the rate of morphological changes, and resulted in a dramatic increase in the retention of the potential to express osteogenic-specific functions and markers upon treatment with osteogenic stimulants. BMSCs are a promising and increasingly important cell source for tissue engineering as well as cell and gene therapeutic strategies. For use of BMSCs in these applications, ex vivo expansion is necessary to obtain a sufficient, therapeutically useful, number of cells; however, this results in the loss of differentiation potential. This problem is especially acute in older patients where more extensive in vitro expansion of smaller number of stem/progenitor cells is needed. The finding that growth on certain biomaterials preserves aging-attenuated functions, enhances proliferation capacity, and maintains differentiation potential of BMSCs indicates a promising approach to address this problem.

  9. Cellular interactions regulate stem cell differentiation in tri-culture.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Ning E; Bogdanowicz, Danielle R; Mitroo, Siddarth; Shan, Jing; Kala, Sonam; Lu, Helen H

    2016-11-01

    Currently, the mechanism governing the regeneration of the soft tissue-to-bone interface, such as the transition between the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and bone, is not known. Focusing on the ACL-to-bone insertion, this study tests the novel hypothesis that interactions between cells from the ligament (fibroblasts) and bone (osteoblasts) initiate interface regeneration. Specifically, these heterotypic cell interactions direct the fibrochondrogenic differentiation of interface-relevant cell populations, defined here as ligament fibroblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). The objective of this study is to examine the effects of heterotypic cellular interactions on BMSC or fibroblast growth and biosynthesis, as well as expression of fibrocartilage-relevant markers in tri-culture. The effects of cell-cell physical contact and paracrine interactions between fibroblasts and osteoblasts were also determined. It was found that, in tri-culture with fibroblasts and osteoblasts, BMSC exhibited greater fibrochondrogenic potential than ligament fibroblasts. The growth of BMSC decreased while proteoglycan production and TGF-β3 expression increased. Moreover, tri-culture regulated BMSC response via paracrine factors, and interestingly, fibroblast-osteoblast contact further promoted proteoglycan and TGF-β1 synthesis as well as induced SOX9 expression in BMSC. Collectively, the findings of this study suggest that fibroblast-osteoblast interactions play an important role in regulating the stem cell niche for fibrocartilage regeneration, and the mechanisms of these interactions are directed by paracrine factors and augmented with direct cell-cell contact.

  10. Formyl Peptide Receptors in Cellular Differentiation and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Mingyu; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2017-06-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are a family of classical chemoattractant receptors. Although FPRs are mainly expressed in phagocytic innate immune cells including monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils, recent reports demonstrated that additional different cell types such as T-lymphocytes and several non-immune cells also express functional FPRs. FPRs were first reported as a specific receptor to detect bacteria-derived N-formyl peptides. However, accumulating evidence has shown that FPRs can recognize various ligands derived from pathogens, mitochondria, and host. This review summarizes studies on some interesting endogenous agonists for FPRs. Here, we discuss functional roles of FPRs and their ligands concerning the regulation of cellular differentiation focusing on myeloid lineage cells. Accumulating evidence also suggests that FPRs may contribute to the control of inflammatory diseases. Here, we briefly review the current understanding of the functional role of FPRs and their ligands in inflammatory disorders in some animal disease models. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1300-1307, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Differential cellular immune response of Galleria mellonella to Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Arteaga Blanco, Luis Andrés; Crispim, Josicelli Souza; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Pereira, Monalessa Fábia; Bazzolli, Denise Mara Soares; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira

    2017-07-08

    In the present work, we have investigate the cellular immune response of Galleria mellonella larvae against three strains of the gram-negative bacterium Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae: low-virulence (780), high-virulence (1022) and the serotype 8 reference strain (R8). Prohemocytes, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, oenocytoids and spherulocytes were distinguished according to their size and morphology, their molecular markers and dye-staining properties and their role in the immune response. Total hemocyte count, differential hemocyte count, lysosome activity, autophagic response, cell viability and caspase-3 activation were determined in circulating hemocytes of naive and infected larvae. The presence of the autophagosome protein LC3 A/B within the circulating hemocytes of G. mellonella was dependent on and related to the infecting A. pleuropneumoniae strain and duration of infection. Hemocytes treated with the high-virulence strain expressed higher levels of LC3 A/B, whereas treatment with the low-virulence strain induced lower expression levels of this protein in the cells. Moreover, our results showed that apoptosis in circulating hemocytes of G. mellonella larvae after exposure to virulent bacterial strains occurred simultaneously with excessive cell death response induced by stress and subsequent caspase-3 activation.

  12. Differential Gene Retention in Plastids of Common Recent Origin

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Yoon, Hwan Su; Moustafa, Ahmed; Yang, Eun Chan; Andersen, Robert A.; Boo, Sung Min; Nakayama, Takuro; Ishida, Ken-ichiro; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2010-01-01

    The cyanobacterium-derived plastids of algae and plants have supported the diversification of much of extant eukaryotic life. Inferences about early events in plastid evolution must rely on reconstructing events that occurred over a billion years ago. In contrast, the photosynthetic amoeba Paulinella chromatophora provides an exceptional model to study organelle evolution in a prokaryote–eukaryote (primary) endosymbiosis that occurred approximately 60 mya. Here we sequenced the plastid genome (0.977 Mb) from the recently described Paulinella FK01 and compared the sequence with the existing data from the sister taxon Paulinella M0880/a. Alignment of the two plastid genomes shows significant conservation of gene order and only a handful of minor gene rearrangements. Analysis of gene content reveals 66 differential gene losses that appear to be outright gene deletions rather than endosymbiotic gene transfers to the host nuclear genome. Phylogenomic analysis validates the plastid ancestor as a member of the Synechococcus–Prochlorococcus group, and the cyanobacterial provenance of all plastid genes suggests that these organelles were not targets of interphylum gene transfers after endosymbiosis. Inspection of 681 DNA alignments of protein-encoding genes shows that the vast majority have dN/dS ratios <<1, providing evidence for purifying selection. Our study demonstrates that plastid genomes in sister taxa are strongly constrained by selection but follow distinct trajectories during the earlier phases of organelle evolution. PMID:20123796

  13. Differential cytotoxicity of selenite for tumor cells can be achieved by differential depletion of cellular glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, P.B.; Abdullaev, F.; Frenkel, G.D. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors have previously shown with HeLa cells that the inhibitory effect of selenite on nucleic acid synthesis and colony formation can be decreased by lowering the level of cellular sulfhydryl (SH) compounds, suggesting that this level can be a determining factor in the sensitivity of a cell to selenite. To investigate whether manipulation of cellular SH levels could be used to achieve a differential effect of selenite on tumor cells vs normal cells, the authors utilized two human cell lines: A549 cells and 210 cells. The level of SH compounds in A549 cells is normally 5 times that of 210 cells. However, since A549 cells are less sensitive than 210 cells to depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), after BSO treatment, A549 cells contain 70 times more SH than 210 cells. The authors have found that under normal conditions the two cell types had the same sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of selenite on colony formation. However, after BSO treatment the A549 cells were significantly more sensitive than the 210 cells to the inhibition of colony formation by selenite. Thus, differential depletion of intracellular glutathione resulted in a differential sensitivity of the tumor cells to selenite cytotoxicity.

  14. [Correlations between cellular immunity and invasiveness in differentiated thyroid cancer].

    PubMed

    Han, Ting; Liang, Jun; Meng, Chao; Yang, Ke; Li, Xiao-yi; Lin, Yan-song

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between the immunity and invasiveness in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Totally 74 DTC who were treated in Peking Union Medical College Hospital from September 2012 to December 2012 were enrolled in this study. These 74 patients were divided into membrane invasion group (n=36) and without membrane invasion group (n=38); also, they were divided into distant metastasis group (n=18) and without distant metastasis group (n=56). Natural killer (NK) cells and T-cell subsets were chosen as indicators for cellular immunity to investigate the correlation between cellular immunity and invasiveness in DTC. Univariate analysis showed that the membrane invasion (Χ(2)=12.175, P=0.000) and distant metastasis (Χ(2)=8.139, P=0.006) correlated with cell immunity, whereas distant metastasis correlated with lymphocytic thyroiditis (Χ(2)=7.094, P=0.008). Further investigation shows that distant metastasis was associated with the percentage of CD8+T cell subgroup (Χ(2)=5.429, P=0.020), and membrane invasion was significantly associated with NK cells (Χ(2)=2.445, P=0.018) and CD4/CD8 disorder subgroup (Χ(2)=8.079, P=0.002). Multivariate analysis showed that cell immunity disorder was a risk factor for membrane invasion [OR=5.701,95%CI(2.075~15.666), P=0.001] and distant metastasis [OR=5.063,95%CI (1.571~16.320), P=0.008]. Further analysis showed that CD8+T cell was a risk factor for metastasis [OR=2.236,95%CI( 1.084~4.613), P=0.029], and CD4/CD8 disorders were the risk factors for membrane invasion [OR=2.802,95%CI(1.257~6.244), P=0.012]. Cell immunity in thyroid cancer has close relationship with membrane invasion and distant metastasis, especially when the percentage of CD8+T cells decreases and when the NK cells and CD4/CD8 are abnormal, which may lead to membrane invasion and distant metastasis.

  15. Preparation and retention mechanism exploration of mesostructured cellular foam silica as stationary phase for high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoai; Zhang, Xiaoqiong; Han, Qiang; Wan, Wei; Ding, Mingyu

    2016-01-01

    Siliceous mesostructured cellular foam (MCF) with highly interconnected porous structure, ultralarge pore size and relatively uniform particle size (3-5μm) was prepared to achieve the mixed-mode and efficient separation of intact proteins. And molecular sieving effect for the first time played an important role in protein separation using mesoporous silica materials as HPLC stationary phase. The spherical silica particles were synthesized via hydrothermal method and the pore size was easily regulated by adding NH4F as well as altering the aging time. After aminopropyl derivatization, the chromatographic performance of functionalized mesoporous silica particles was investigated in comparison with those without modification and commercial NH2 column, and their mixed-mode retention mechanisms were investigated in detail. The superior separation performance for the retention of proteins was obtained on our home-made column in comparison with commercial NH2 column. The influences of aminopropyl derivatization and mobile phase composition on the column property were also investigated. Moreover, the home-made column showed similar performance for separation of polar anilines and neutral PAHs with the commercial column, owing to mixed-mode retention mechanisms including p-π stacking, electron interaction, hydrophobic effect, π-π EDA interaction and hydrogen bonding. All these results indicated that the aminopropyl modified MCF would be promising in the mixed-mode and efficient separation of biomolecules in addition with small molecules.

  16. Influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; McClelen, C. E.; Wang, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    We launched imbibed seeds of Zea mays into outer space aboard the space shuttle Columbia to determine the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps. The influence of microgravity varied with different stages of cellular differentiation. Overall, microgravity tended to 1) increase relative volumes of hyaloplasm and lipid bodies, 2) decrease the relative volumes of plastids, mitochondria, dictyosomes, and the vacuome, and 3) exert no influence on the relative volume of nuclei in cells comprising the root cap. The reduced allocation of dictyosomal volume in peripheral cells of flight-grown seedlings correlated positively with their secretion of significantly less mucilage than peripheral cells of Earth-grown seedlings. These results indicate that 1) microgravity alters the patterns of cellular differentiation and structures of all cell types comprising the root cap, and 2) the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays is organelle specific.

  17. Influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Fondren, W. M.; McClelen, C. E.; Wang, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    We launched imbibed seeds of Zea mays into outer space aboard the space shuttle Columbia to determine the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps. The influence of microgravity varied with different stages of cellular differentiation. Overall, microgravity tended to 1) increase relative volumes of hyaloplasm and lipid bodies, 2) decrease the relative volumes of plastids, mitochondria, dictyosomes, and the vacuome, and 3) exert no influence on the relative volume of nuclei in cells comprising the root cap. The reduced allocation of dictyosomal volume in peripheral cells of flight-grown seedlings correlated positively with their secretion of significantly less mucilage than peripheral cells of Earth-grown seedlings. These results indicate that 1) microgravity alters the patterns of cellular differentiation and structures of all cell types comprising the root cap, and 2) the influence of microgravity on cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays is organelle specific.

  18. Diversity in TAF Proteomics: Consequences for Cellular Differentiation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Kazantseva, Jekaterina; Palm, Kaia

    2014-01-01

    Development is a highly controlled process of cell proliferation and differentiation driven by mechanisms of dynamic gene regulation. Specific DNA binding factors for establishing cell- and tissue-specific transcriptional programs have been characterised in different cell and animal models. However, much less is known about the role of “core transcription machinery” during cell differentiation, given that general transcription factors and their spatiotemporally patterned activity govern different aspects of cell function. In this review, we focus on the role of TATA-box associated factor 4 (TAF4) and its functional isoforms generated by alternative splicing in controlling lineage-specific differentiation of normal mesenchymal stem cells and cancer stem cells. In the light of our recent findings, induction, control and maintenance of cell differentiation status implies diversification of the transcription initiation apparatus orchestrated by alternative splicing. PMID:25244017

  19. Cellular uptake, retention and bioabsorption of HO-3867, a fluorinated curcumin analog with potential antitumor properties

    PubMed Central

    Dayton, Alex; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Kuppusamy, M Lakshmi; Rivera, Brian K; Meduru, Sarath; Kálai, Tamás; Hideg, Kálmán

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin, a naturally-occurring compound found in the rhizome of Curcuma longa plant, is known for its antitumor activities. However, its clinical efficacy is limited due to poor bioabsorption. A new class of synthetic analogs of curcumin, namely diarylidenylpiperidone (DAP), has been developed with substantially higher anticancer activity than curcumin. However, its cellular uptake and bioabsorption have not been evaluated. In this study we have determined the absorption of a representative DAP compound, HO-3867, using optical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry. The cellular uptake of HO-3867 was measured in a variety of cancer cell lines. HO-3867 was taken in cells within 15 minutes of exposure and its uptake was more than 100-fold higher than curcumin. HO-3867 was also retained in cells in an active form for 72 hours and possibly longer. HO-3867 was substantially cytotoxic to all the cancer cells tested. However, there was no direct correlation between cellular uptake and cytotoxicity suggesting that the cytotoxic mechanisms could be cell-type specific. When administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection, significantly high levels of HO-3867 were found in the liver, kidney, stomach and blood after 3 hours. Also, significant accumulation of HO-3867 was found in murine tumor xenografts with a dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth. The results suggest that the curcumin analog has substantially higher bioabsorption when compared to curcumin. PMID:20798598

  20. Study of the cellular retention time and the partial biomass renovation in a fungal decolourisation continuous process.

    PubMed

    Blánquez, P; Sarrà, M; Vicent, M T

    2006-05-01

    The long-term continuous decolourisation treatment of the textile dye Grey Lanaset G (150 mg/l) was carried out in an air-pulsed bed bioreactor with retained pellets of the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Maximum cellular retention time (CRT) was established at 40 days. During this time period, colour reduction remained at 90% and laccase activity was over 400 AU/l. Higher CRTs involved operational problems related to biomass conglomerates formed at the top of the bioreactor, which made individual movement of the pellets difficult. In order to carry out the long-term continuous treatment, a strategy of purge and biomass renovation that had to allow fungal stable activity levels to be maintained was planned. The purge and biomass renovation strategy consists of partial biomass renovations: 1/3 of the total biomass of the system is renewed every 1/3 of the CRT. Different CRTs were tested; with a CRT of 21 days carrying out partial biomass renovations every 7 days and with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days, decolourisation percentages higher than 80% were obtained, maintaining a young culture in the bioreactor and guaranteeing microbial activity. In accordance with the strategy observed, different simulations of the age of the biomass in the bioreactor were carried out, obtaining suitable age distributions for CRT of 20-21 days.

  1. Emerging role of cytokinin as a regulator of cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dello Ioio, Raffaele; Linhares, Francisco Scaglia; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2008-02-01

    Perhaps the most amazing feature of plants is their ability to grow and regenerate for years, sometimes even centuries. This fascinating characteristic is achieved thanks to the activity of stem cells, which reside in the shoot and root apical meristems. Stem cells function as a reserve of undifferentiated cells to replace organs and sustain postembryonic plant growth. To maintain meristem function, stem cells have to generate new cells at a rate similar to that of cells leaving the meristem and differentiating, thus achieving a balance between cell division and cell differentiation. Recent findings have improved our knowledge on the molecular mechanisms necessary to establish this balance and reveal a fundamental signaling role for the plant hormone cytokinin. Evidence has been provided to show that in the root meristem cytokinin acts in defined developmental domains to control cell differentiation rate, thus controlling root meristem size.

  2. Transvenous intramyocardial cellular delivery increases retention in comparison to intracoronary delivery in a porcine model of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    George, Jon C; Goldberg, Jonathan; Joseph, Matthew; Abdulhameed, Nasreen; Crist, Joshua; Das, Hiranmoy; Pompili, Vincent J

    2008-10-01

    Clinical trials using intracoronary (IC) delivery of cells have addressed efficacy but the optimal delivery technique is unknown. Our study aimed to determine whether transvenous intramyocardial (TVIM) approach was advantageous for cellular retention in AMI. Domestic pigs (n = 4) underwent catheterization with coronary angiography and ventriculography prior to infarction and pre- and post-cells. Pigs underwent 90-minute balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). After one week they were prepared for IC (n = 2) or TVIM (n = 2) delivery of bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) labeled with GFP. IC infusion used an over-the-wire catheter to engage the LAD and balloon inflation to prevent retrograde flow. Venography via the coronary sinus was used for TVIM delivery. The anterior interventricular vein was engaged with a guidewire allowing use of the TransAccess catheter that is outfitted with an ultrasound tip for visualization. Animals were sacrificed one hour after delivery and tissue was analyzed. Procedures were performed without complication and monitoring was uneventful. 1 x 10(8) MNC were isolated from each bone marrow (BM) preparation and 1 x 10(7) MNC delivered. Ventriculography at one week revealed wall motion abnormalities consistent with an anterior AMI. TVIM and IC delivery revealed mean 452 cells per section and 235 cells per section on average, respectively, in the infarct zone (P = 0.01). We have demonstrated that TVIM approach for cell delivery is feasible and safe. Moreover, this approach may provide an advantage over IC infusion in retention of the cellular product; however, larger studies will be necessary.

  3. Transvenous Intramyocardial Cellular Delivery Increases Retention in Comparison to Intracoronary Delivery in a Porcine Model of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    George, Jon C.; Goldberg, Jonathan; Joseph, Matthew; Abdulhameed, Nasreen; Crist, Joshua; Das, Hiranmoy; Pompili, Vincent J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials using intracoronary (IC) delivery of cells have addressed efficacy but the optimal delivery technique is unknown. Our study aimed to determine whether transvenous intramyocardial (TVIM) approach was advantageous for cellular retention in AMI. Methods Domestic pigs (n=4) underwent catheterization with coronary angiography and ventriculography prior to infarction and pre- and post-cells. Pigs underwent 90 minute balloon occlusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). After one week they were prepared for IC (n=2) or TVIM (n=2) delivery of bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) labeled with GFP. IC infusion used an over-the-wire catheter to engage the LAD and balloon inflation to prevent retrograde flow. Venography via the coronary sinus was used for TVIM delivery. The anterior interventricular vein was engaged with a guide wire allowing use of the TransAccess™ catheter, which is outfitted with an ultrasound tip for visualization. Animals were sacrificed one hour after delivery and tissue was analyzed. Results Procedures were performed without complication and monitoring was uneventful. 1 × 108 MNC’s were isolated from each BM preparation and 1 × 107 MNC delivered. Ventriculography at one week revealed wall motion abnormalities consistent with an anterior AMI. TVIM and IC delivery revealed mean 452 cells/section and 235 cells/section on average, respectively in the infarct zone (p = 0.01). Conclusion We have demonstrated that TVIM approach for cell delivery is feasible and safe. Moreover, this approach may provide an advantage over IC infusion in retention of the cellular product, however, larger studies will be necessary. PMID:19012733

  4. Emdogain regulation of cellular differentiation in wounded rat periodontium.

    PubMed

    Chano, Laura; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Lekic, P Charles; Sodek, Jaro; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2003-04-01

    Emdogain is an enamel matrix derivative that may promote periodontal regeneration by recapitulating critical events in tooth morphogenesis. We hypothesized that Emdogain enhances periodontal regeneration by promoting the differentiation of cells required for the synthesis of periodontal ligament, bone and cementum. Cell differentiation was examined in rat periodontal window wounds in which there is no microbial biofilm or epithelial downgrowth, thereby simplifying the model system. Defects were filled with vehicle control or Emdogain (3 mg/ml or 30 mg/ml). Rats were sacrificed at 7, 14 and 21 d after wounding. Specimens of periodontium were immunostained for osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin as markers of osteogenic differentiation and for alpha-smooth muscle actin, a myofibroblastic marker. Morphometry and 3H-proline radioautography were used for assessment of tissue homeostasis and matrix production. Rats treated with Emdogain (only at 30 mg/ml) showed widening of the periodontal ligament at 7 d; by 14 and 21 d, periodontal ligament width was restored to normal values for all groups. Emdogain exerted no effect on cementum thickness, bone volume, osteoid deposition rates, or extracellular staining for osteopontin, bone sialoprotein or osteocalcin. Further, the percentage of cells with intracellular staining for osteopontin, osteocalcin or bone sialoprotein was unaffected by Emdogain. Staining for alpha-smooth muscle actin was abundant in the repopulating wound but was also unaffected by Emdogain. In conclusion, Emdogain does not apparently affect the expression of differentiation markers or bone matrix protein synthesis in the repopulation response of wounded rat molar periodontium. Therefore the effect of Emdogain on wound healing in the periodontium may be independent of differentiation in the cell populations examined in this model.

  5. Peptide modified gold nanoparticles for improved cellular uptake, nuclear transport, and intracellular retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Uertz, J.; Yohan, D.; Chithrani, B. D.

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP complex. The peptide-capped GNPs showed a five-fold increase in NP uptake followed by effective nuclear localization. The fraction of NPs exocytosed was less for peptide-capped NPs as compared to citrate-capped ones. Enhanced uptake and prolonged intracellular retention of peptide-capped GNPs could allow NPs to perform their desired applications more efficiently in cells. These studies will provide guidelines for developing NPs for therapeutic applications, which will require ``controlling'' of the NP accumulation rate while maintaining low toxicity.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are being extensively used in cancer therapeutic applications due to their ability to act both as an anticancer drug carrier in chemotherapy and as a dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The therapeutic response can be further enhanced if nanoparticles (NPs) can be effectively targeted into the nucleus. Here, we present an uptake and removal of GNPs functionalized with three peptides. The first peptide (RGD peptide) enhanced the uptake, the second peptide (NLS peptide) facilitated the nuclear delivery, while the third one (pentapeptide) covered the rest of the surface and protected it from the binding of serum proteins onto the NP surface. The pentapeptide also stabilized the conjugated GNP

  6. Cellular Differentiation in Moss Protonemata: A Morphological and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Pressel, Silvia; Ligrone, Roberto; Duckett, Jeffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Previous studies of protonemal morphogenesis in mosses have focused on the cytoskeletal basis of tip growth and the production of asexual propagules. This study provides the first comprehensive description of the differentiation of caulonemata and rhizoids, which share the same cytology, and the roles of the cytoskeleton in organelle shaping and spatial arrangement. Methods Light and electron microscope observations were carried out on in vitro cultured and wild protonemata from over 200 moss species. Oryzalin and cytochalasin D were used to investigate the role of the cytoskeleton in the cytological organization of fully differentiated protonemal cells; time-lapse photography was employed to monitor organelle positions. Key Results The onset of differentiation in initially highly vacuolate subapical cells is marked by the appearance of tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) profiles with crystalline inclusions, closely followed by an increase in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The tonoplast disintegrates and the original vacuole is replaced by a population of vesicles and small vacuoles originating de novo from RER. The cytoplasm then becomes distributed throughout the cell lumen, an event closely followed by the appearance of endoplasmic microtubules (MTs) in association with sheets of ER, stacks of vesicles that subsequently disperse, elongate mitochondria and chloroplasts and long tubular extensions at both poles of the nucleus. The production of large vesicles by previously inactive dictysomes coincides with the deposition of additional cell wall layers. At maturity, the numbers of endoplasmic microtubules decline, dictyosomes become inactive and the ER is predominantly smooth. Fully developed cells remain largely unaffected by cytochalasin; oryzalin elicits profound cytological changes. Both inhibitors elicit the formation of giant plastids. The plastids and other organelles in fully developed cells are largely stationary. Conclusions

  7. Cellular differentiation in moss protonemata: a morphological and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Pressel, Silvia; Ligrone, Roberto; Duckett, Jeffrey G

    2008-08-01

    Previous studies of protonemal morphogenesis in mosses have focused on the cytoskeletal basis of tip growth and the production of asexual propagules. This study provides the first comprehensive description of the differentiation of caulonemata and rhizoids, which share the same cytology, and the roles of the cytoskeleton in organelle shaping and spatial arrangement. Light and electron microscope observations were carried out on in vitro cultured and wild protonemata from over 200 moss species. Oryzalin and cytochalasin D were used to investigate the role of the cytoskeleton in the cytological organization of fully differentiated protonemal cells; time-lapse photography was employed to monitor organelle positions. The onset of differentiation in initially highly vacuolate subapical cells is marked by the appearance of tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) profiles with crystalline inclusions, closely followed by an increase in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The tonoplast disintegrates and the original vacuole is replaced by a population of vesicles and small vacuoles originating de novo from RER. The cytoplasm then becomes distributed throughout the cell lumen, an event closely followed by the appearance of endoplasmic microtubules (MTs) in association with sheets of ER, stacks of vesicles that subsequently disperse, elongate mitochondria and chloroplasts and long tubular extensions at both poles of the nucleus. The production of large vesicles by previously inactive dictysomes coincides with the deposition of additional cell wall layers. At maturity, the numbers of endoplasmic microtubules decline, dictyosomes become inactive and the ER is predominantly smooth. Fully developed cells remain largely unaffected by cytochalasin; oryzalin elicits profound cytological changes. Both inhibitors elicit the formation of giant plastids. The plastids and other organelles in fully developed cells are largely stationary. Differentiation of caulonemata and rhizoids involves a

  8. Kinetics of cellular uptake and retention of the benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD): relevance to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Anna M.; Meadows, Howard; Jain, Ashok K.; Canaan, Alice J.; Levy, Julia G.

    1995-01-01

    Uptake and release/retention of the photosensitizer, benzoporphyrin derivative, monoacid ring A (BPD; 1 - 20 (mu) g/mL) was studied using cell lines (K562, L1210) and normal, non- activated and Concanavalin A-activated murine splenocytes. Concentrations of BPD in cell lysates were determined by fluorescence (440 nm excitation, 694 nm emission). The results showed that BPD was taken up and released rapidly by all types of cells within the same time frame. Maximum of BPD depended on the type of cells and was greatest in tumor cells, lowest in normal, non-activated cells and intermediate in activated cells. In addition, the maximum uptake depended on BPD concentration in the medium, length of incubation and presence of serum. All cells, regardless of type, retained a constant proportion (20 - 30%) of the amount of BPD taken up. This proportion was independent of length of incubation, BPD concentration in the medium and presence of serum. However, due to differences in maximum amounts of BPD taken up under the same conditions, tumor cells retained more BPD than normal cells and activated cells more than non-activated. The retained BPD was able to photosensitize the cells. The results were found to be relevant to the in vivo studies.

  9. ETO2 coordinates cellular proliferation and differentiation during erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Goardon, Nicolas; Lambert, Julie A; Rodriguez, Patrick; Nissaire, Philippe; Herblot, Sabine; Thibault, Pierre; Dumenil, Dominique; Strouboulis, John; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Hoang, Trang

    2006-01-01

    The passage from proliferation to terminal differentiation is critical for normal development and is often perturbed in malignancies. To define the molecular mechanisms that govern this process during erythropoiesis, we have used tagging/proteomics approaches and characterized protein complexes nucleated by TAL-1/SCL, a basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor that specifies the erythrocytic lineage. In addition to known TAL-1 partners, GATA-1, E2A, HEB, LMO2 and Ldb1, we identify the ETO2 repressor as a novel component recruited to TAL-1 complexes through interaction with E2A/HEB. Ectopic expression and siRNA knockdown experiments in hematopoietic progenitor cells show that ETO2 actively represses erythroid TAL-1 target genes and governs the expansion of erythroid progenitors. At the onset of erythroid differentiation, a change in the stoichiometry of ETO2 within the TAL-1 complex activates the expression of known erythroid-specific TAL-1 target genes and of Gfi-1b and p21Cip, encoding two essential regulators of erythroid cell proliferation. These results suggest that the dynamics of ETO2 recruitment within nuclear complexes couple cell proliferation to cell differentiation and determine the onset of terminal erythroid maturation. PMID:16407974

  10. A smart fluorescence nanoprobe for the detection of cellular alkaline phosphatase activity and early osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Yi; Fan, Jin-Xuan; Long, Yue; Zeng, Xuan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-07-01

    In the past decades, biomaterials were designed to induce stem cell toward osteogenic differentiation. However, conventional methods for evaluation osteogenic differentiation all required a process of cell fixation or lysis, which induce waste of a large number of cells. In this study, a fluorescence nanoprobe was synthesized by combining phosphorylated fluoresceinamine isomer I (FLA) on the surface of mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4@mSiO2) nanoparticles. In the presence of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), the phosphorylated FLA on the nanoprobe would be hydrolyzed, resulting in a fluorescence recovery of FLA. During early osteogenic differentiation, a high-level expression of cellular ALP was induced, which accelerated the hydrolysis of phosphorylated FLA, resulting in an enhancement of cellular fluorescence intensity. This fluorescence nanoprobe provides us a rapid and non-toxic method for the detection of cellular ALP activity and early osteogenic differentiation.

  11. Abscisic-acid-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation in glioma via the retinoid acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Yao, Yu; Ye, Hongxing; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2016-04-15

    Retinoid acid (RA) plays critical roles in regulating differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Abscisic acid (ABA) and RA are direct derivatives of carotenoids and share structural similarities. Here we proposed that ABA may also play a role in cellular differentiation and apoptosis by sharing a similar signaling pathway with RA that may be involved in glioma pathogenesis. We reported for the first time that the ABA levels were twofold higher in low-grade gliomas compared with high-grade gliomas. In glioma tissues, there was a positive correlation between the ABA levels and the transcription of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and a negative correlation between the ABA levels and transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5). ABA treatment induced a significant increase in the expression of CRABP2 and a decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, both cellular apoptosis and differentiation were increased in the glioblastoma cells after ABA treatment. ABA-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation were significantly reduced by selectively silencing RAR-α, while RAR-α overexpression exaggerated the ABA-induced effects. These results suggest that ABA may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioma by promoting cellular apoptosis and differentiation through the RA signaling pathway. © 2015 UICC.

  12. Generating pluripotent stem cells: differential epigenetic changes during cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Stacey C; Kim, Kitai

    2012-08-31

    Pluripotent stem cells hold enomous potential for therapuetic applications in tissue replacement therapy. Reprogramming somatic cells from a patient donor to generate pluripotent stem cells involves both ethical concerns inherent in the use of embryonic and oocyte-derived stem cells, as well as issues of histocompatibility. Among the various pluripotent stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)--derived by ectopic expression of four reprogramming factors in donor somatic cells--are superior in terms of ethical use, histocompatibility, and derivation method. However, iPSC also show genetic and epigenetic differences that limit their differentiation potential, functionality, safety, and potential clinical utility. Here, we discuss the unique characteristics of iPSC and approaches that are being taken to overcome these limitations.

  13. Generating pluripotent stem cells: Differential epigenetic changes during cellular reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Stacey C.; Kim, Kitai

    2013-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold enomous potential for therapuetic applications in tissue replacement therapy. Reprogramming somatic cells from a patient donor to generate pluripotent stem cells involves both ethical concerns inherent in the use of embryonic and oocyte-derived stem cells, as well as issues of histocompatibility. Among the various pluripotent stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC)—derived by ectopic expression of four reprogramming factors in donor somatic cells—are superior in terms of ethical use, histocompatibility, and derivation method. However, iPSC also show genetic and epigenetic differences that limit their differentiation potential, functionality, safety, and potential clinical utility. Here, we discuss the unique characteristics of iPSC and approaches that are being taken to overcome these limitations. PMID:22819821

  14. RNA-Seq Analysis of Differential Splice Junction Usage and Intron Retentions by DEXSeq

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yafang; Rao, Xiayu; Mattox, William W.; Amos, Christopher I.; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important biological process in the generation of multiple functional transcripts from the same genomic sequences. Differential analysis of splice junctions (SJs) and intron retentions (IRs) is helpful in the detection of alternative splicing events. In this study, we conducted differential analysis of SJs and IRs by use of DEXSeq, a Bioconductor package originally designed for differential exon usage analysis in RNA-seq data analysis. We set up an analysis pipeline including mapping of RNA-seq reads, the preparation of count tables of SJs and IRs as the input files, and the differential analysis in DEXSeq. We analyzed the public RNA-seq datasets generated from RNAi experiments on Drosophila melanogaster S2-DRSC cells to deplete RNA-binding proteins (GSE18508). The analysis confirmed previous findings on the alternative splicing of the trol and Ant2 (sesB) genes in the CG8144 (ps)-depletion experiment and identified some new alternative splicing events in other RNAi experiments. We also identified IRs that were confirmed in our SJ analysis. The proposed method used in our study can output the genomic coordinates of differentially used SJs and thus enable sequence motif search. Sequence motif search and gene function annotation analysis helped us infer the underlying mechanism in alternative splicing events. To further evaluate this method, we also applied the method to public RNA-seq data from human breast cancer (GSE45419) and the plant Arabidopsis (SRP008262). In conclusion, our study showed that DEXSeq can be adapted to differential analysis of SJs and IRs, which will facilitate the identification of alternative splicing events and provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of transcription processes and disease development. PMID:26327458

  15. Cellular network entropy as the energy potential in Waddington's differentiation landscape

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Christopher R. S.; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Severini, Simone; Widschwendter, Martin; Enver, Tariq; Zhou, Joseph X.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation is a key cellular process in normal tissue development that is significantly altered in cancer. Although molecular signatures characterising pluripotency and multipotency exist, there is, as yet, no single quantitative mark of a cellular sample's position in the global differentiation hierarchy. Here we adopt a systems view and consider the sample's network entropy, a measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, computable from a sample's genome-wide expression profile. We demonstrate that network entropy provides a quantitative, in-silico, readout of the average undifferentiated state of the profiled cells, recapitulating the known hierarchy of pluripotent, multipotent and differentiated cell types. Network entropy further exhibits dynamic changes in time course differentiation data, and in line with a sample's differentiation stage. In disease, network entropy predicts a higher level of cellular plasticity in cancer stem cell populations compared to ordinary cancer cells. Importantly, network entropy also allows identification of key differentiation pathways. Our results are consistent with the view that pluripotency is a statistical property defined at the cellular population level, correlating with intra-sample heterogeneity, and driven by the degree of signaling promiscuity in cells. In summary, network entropy provides a quantitative measure of a cell's undifferentiated state, defining its elevation in Waddington's landscape. PMID:24154593

  16. Cellular network entropy as the energy potential in Waddington's differentiation landscape.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Christopher R S; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Severini, Simone; Widschwendter, Martin; Enver, Tariq; Zhou, Joseph X; Teschendorff, Andrew E

    2013-10-24

    Differentiation is a key cellular process in normal tissue development that is significantly altered in cancer. Although molecular signatures characterising pluripotency and multipotency exist, there is, as yet, no single quantitative mark of a cellular sample's position in the global differentiation hierarchy. Here we adopt a systems view and consider the sample's network entropy, a measure of signaling pathway promiscuity, computable from a sample's genome-wide expression profile. We demonstrate that network entropy provides a quantitative, in-silico, readout of the average undifferentiated state of the profiled cells, recapitulating the known hierarchy of pluripotent, multipotent and differentiated cell types. Network entropy further exhibits dynamic changes in time course differentiation data, and in line with a sample's differentiation stage. In disease, network entropy predicts a higher level of cellular plasticity in cancer stem cell populations compared to ordinary cancer cells. Importantly, network entropy also allows identification of key differentiation pathways. Our results are consistent with the view that pluripotency is a statistical property defined at the cellular population level, correlating with intra-sample heterogeneity, and driven by the degree of signaling promiscuity in cells. In summary, network entropy provides a quantitative measure of a cell's undifferentiated state, defining its elevation in Waddington's landscape.

  17. Stalk cell differentiation without polyketides in the cellular slime mold.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yukie G; Suarez, Teresa; Saito, Tamao

    2016-07-01

    Polyketides induce prestalk cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. In the double-knockout mutant of the SteelyA and B polyketide synthases, most of the pstA cells-the major part of the prestalk cells-are lost, and we show by whole mount in situ hybridization that expression of prestalk genes is also reduced. Treatment of the double-knockout mutant with the PKS inhibitor cerulenin gave a further reduction, but some pstA cells still remained in the tip region, suggesting the existence of a polyketide-independent subtype of pstA cells. The double-knockout mutant and cerulenin-treated parental Ax2 cells form fruiting bodies with fragile, single-cell layered stalks after cerulenin treatment. Our results indicate that most pstA cells are induced by polyketides, but the pstA cells at the very tip of the slug are induced in some other way. In addition, a fruiting body with a single-cell layered, vacuolated stalk can form without polyketides.

  18. Mannuronan C-5 epimerases and cellular differentiation of Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Høidal, H K; Glaerum Svanem, B I; Gimmestad, M; Valla, S

    2000-02-01

    Differentiation in Azotobacter vinelandii involves the encystment of the vegetative cell under adverse environmental circumstances and the germination of the resting cell into the vegetative state when growth conditions are satisfactory again. Morphologically, the encystment process involves the development of a protective coat around the resting cell. This coat partly consists of multiple layers of alginate, which is a copolymer of beta-D-mannuronic acid (M) and alpha-L-guluronic acid (G). Alginate contributes to coat rigidity by virtue of a high content of GG blocks. Such block structures are generated through a family of mannuronan C-5 epimerases that convert M to G after polymerization. Results from immunodetection and light microscopy, using stains that distinguish between different cyst components and types, indicate a correlation between cyst coat organization and the amount and appearance of mannuronan C-5 epimerases in the extracellular medium and attached to the cells. Specific roles of individual members of the epimerase family are indicated. Calcium and magnesium ions appear to have different roles in the structural organization of the cyst coat. Also reported is a new gene sharing strong sequence homology with parts of the epimerase-encoded R-modules. This gene is located within the epimerase gene cluster of Azotobacter vinelandii.

  19. The induction of cellular senescence in dental follicle cells inhibits the osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Gresser, Jan; Ettl, Tobias

    2016-06-01

    Dental stem cells such as human dental follicle cells (DFCs) have opened new promising treatment alternatives for today's dental health issues such as periodontal tissue regeneration. However, cellular senescence represents a restricting factor to cultured stem cells, resulting in limited lifespan and reduced cell differentiation potential. Therefore, this study evaluated if and how DFCs exhibit features of cellular senescence after being expanded in cell culture. The cell proliferation of DFCs decreased, while the cell size increased during prolonged cell culture. Moreover, DFCs expressed the senescence-associated β-galactosidase after a prolonged cell culture. The onset of senescence inhibited both the induction of osteoblast markers RUNX2 and osteopontin and the biomineralization of DFCs after stimulation of the osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, we showed that a prolonged cell culture induces cellular senescence and inhibits the osteogenic differentiation in DFCs.

  20. Modeling of coupled differential equations for cellular chemical signaling pathways: Implications for assay protocols utilized in cellular engineering.

    PubMed

    O'Clock, George D

    2016-08-01

    Cellular engineering involves modification and control of cell properties, and requires an understanding of fundamentals and mechanisms of action for cellular derived product development. One of the keys to success in cellular engineering involves the quality and validity of results obtained from cell chemical signaling pathway assays. The accuracy of the assay data cannot be verified or assured if the effect of positive feedback, nonlinearities, and interrelationships between cell chemical signaling pathway elements are not understood, modeled, and simulated. Nonlinearities and positive feedback in the cell chemical signaling pathway can produce significant aberrations in assay data collection. Simulating the pathway can reveal potential instability problems that will affect assay results. A simulation, using an electrical analog for the coupled differential equations representing each segment of the pathway, provides an excellent tool for assay validation purposes. With this approach, voltages represent pathway enzyme concentrations and operational amplifier feedback resistance and input resistance values determine pathway gain and rate constants. The understanding provided by pathway modeling and simulation is strategically important in order to establish experimental controls for assay protocol structure, time frames specified between assays, and assay concentration variation limits; to ensure accuracy and reproducibility of results.

  1. Cellular basis of differential limb growth in postnatal gray short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica).

    PubMed

    Beiriger, Anastasia; Sears, Karen E

    2014-06-01

    While growth has been studied extensively in invertebrates, the mechanisms by which it is controlled in vertebrates, particularly in mammals, remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the cellular basis of differential limb growth in postnatal Monodelphis domestica, the gray short-tailed opossum, to gain insights into the mechanisms regulating mammalian growth. Opossums are an ideal model for the study of growth because they are born with relatively large, well-developed forelimbs and small hind limbs that must "catch up" to the forelimb before the animal reaches adulthood. Postnatal Days 1-17 were identified as a key period of growth for the hind limbs, during which they undergo accelerated development and nearly quadruple in length. Histology performed on fore- and hind limbs from this period indicates a higher rate of cellular differentiation in the long bones of the hind limbs. Immunohistochemical assays indicate that cellular proliferation is also occurring at a significantly greater rate in the long bones of the hind limb at 6 days after birth. Taken together, these results suggest that a faster rate of cellular proliferation and differentiation in the long bones of the hind limb relative to those of the forelimb generates a period of accelerated growth through which the adult limb phenotype of M. domestica is achieved. Assays for gene expression suggest that the molecular basis of this differential growth differs from that previously identified for differential pre-natal growth in opossum fore- and hind limbs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Differential susceptibility of naive and differentiated PC-12 cells to methylglyoxal-induced apoptosis: influence of cellular redox.

    PubMed

    Okouchi, Masahiro; Okayama, Naotsuka; Aw, Tak Yee

    2005-01-01

    Neuropathologies have been associated with neuronal de-differentiation and oxidative susceptibility. To address whether cellular states determines their oxidative vulnerability, we have challenged naive (undifferentiated) and nerve growth factor-induced differentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) with methylglyoxal (MG), a model of carbonyl stress. MG dose-dependently induced greater apoptosis (24 h) in naive (nPC12) than differentiated (dPC12) cells. This enhanced nPC12 susceptibility was correlated with a high basal oxidized cellular glutathione-to-glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) redox and an MG-induced GSH-to-Disulfide (GSSG plus protein-bound SSG) imbalance. The loss of redox balance occurred at 30 min post-MG exposure, and was prevented by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) that was unrelated to de novo GSH synthesis. NAC was ineffective when added at 1h post-MG, consistent with an early window of redox signaling. This redox shift was kinetically linked to decreased BcL-2, increased Bax, and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c which preceded caspase-9 and -3 activation and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage (1-2 h), consistent with mitochondrial apoptotic signaling. The blockade of apoptosis by cyclosporine A supported an involvement of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. The enhanced vulnerability of nPC12 cells to MG and its relationship to cellular redox shifts will have important implications for understanding differential oxidative vulnerability in various cell types and their transition states.

  3. Cellular and molecular drivers of differential organ growth: insights from the limbs of Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Anna; Doroba, Carolyn; Maier, Jennifer A; Cohen, Lorna; VandeBerg, John; Sears, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental question in biology is "how is growth differentially regulated during development to produce organs of particular sizes?" We used a new model system for the study of differential organ growth, the limbs of the opossum (Monodelphis domestica), to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of differential organ growth in mammals. Opossum forelimbs grow much faster than hindlimbs, making opossum limbs an exceptional system with which to study differential growth. We first used the great differences in opossum forelimb and hindlimb growth to identify cellular processes and molecular signals that underlie differential limb growth. We then used organ culture and pharmacological addition of FGF ligands and inhibitors to test the role of the Fgf/Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway in driving these cellular processes. We found that molecular signals from within the limb drive differences in cell proliferation that contribute to the differential growth of the forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums. We also found that alterations in the Fgf/MAPK pathway can generate differences in cell proliferation that mirror those observed between wild-type forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums and that manipulation of Fgf/MAPK signaling affects downstream focal adhesion-extracellular matrix (FA-ECM) and Wnt signaling in opossum limbs. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionary changes in the Fgf/MAPK pathway could help drive the observed differences in cell behaviors and growth in opossum forelimb and hindlimbs.

  4. Cardiomyocyte Differentiation Promotes Cell Survival During Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Inhibition Through Increased Maintenance of Cellular Energy Stores

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Erin M.; Broniowska, Katarzyna A.; Waas, Matthew; Nycz, Alyssa; Corbett, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To address concerns regarding the tumorigenic potential of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) that may remain after in vitro differentiation and ultimately limit the broad use of hPSC‐derivatives for therapeutics, we recently described a method to selectively eliminate tumorigenic hPSC from their progeny by inhibiting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). Limited exposure to NAMPT inhibitors selectively removes hPSC from hPSC‐derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC‐CM) and spares a wide range of differentiated cell types; yet, it remains unclear when and how cells acquire resistance to NAMPT inhibition during differentiation. In this study, we examined the effects of NAMPT inhibition among multiple time points of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Overall, these studies show that in vitro cardiomyogenic commitment and continued culturing provides resistance to NAMPT inhibition and cell survival is associated with the ability to maintain cellular ATP pools despite depletion of NAD levels. Unlike cells at earlier stages of differentiation, day 28 hPSC‐CM can survive longer periods of NAMPT inhibition and maintain ATP generation by glycolysis and/or mitochondrial respiration. This is distinct from terminally differentiated fibroblasts, which maintain mitochondrial respiration during NAMPT inhibition. Overall, these results provide new mechanistic insight into how regulation of cellular NAD and energy pools change with hPSC‐CM differentiation and further inform how NAMPT inhibition strategies could be implemented within the context of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1191–1201 PMID:28224719

  5. Chromatin dynamics during cellular differentiation in the female reproductive lineage of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Baroux, Célia; Autran, Daphné

    2015-07-01

    Sexual reproduction in flowering plants offers a number of remarkable aspects to developmental biologists. First, the spore mother cells - precursors of the plant reproductive lineage - are specified late in development, as opposed to precocious germline isolation during embryogenesis in most animals. Second, unlike in most animals where meiosis directly produces gametes, plant meiosis entails the differentiation of a multicellular, haploid gametophyte, within which gametic as well as non-gametic accessory cells are formed. These observations raise the question of the factors inducing and modus operandi of cell fate transitions that originate in floral tissues and gametophytes, respectively. Cell fate transitions in the reproductive lineage imply cellular reprogramming operating at the physiological, cytological and transcriptome level, but also at the chromatin level. A number of observations point to large-scale chromatin reorganization events associated with cellular differentiation of the female spore mother cells and of the female gametes. These include a reorganization of the heterochromatin compartment, the genome-wide alteration of the histone modification landscape, and the remodeling of nucleosome composition. The dynamic expression of DNA methyltransferases and actors of small RNA pathways also suggest additional, global epigenetic alterations that remain to be characterized. Are these events a cause or a consequence of cellular differentiation, and how do they contribute to cell fate transition? Does chromatin dynamics induce competence for immediate cellular functions (meiosis, fertilization), or does it also contribute long-term effects in cellular identity and developmental competence of the reproductive lineage? This review attempts to review these fascinating questions.

  6. A morphometric analysis of cellular differentiation in caps of primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine if patterns of cell differentiation are similar in primary and lateral roots, I performed a morphometric analysis of the ultrastructure of calyptrogen, columella, and peripheral cells in primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus. Each cell type is characterized by a unique ultrastructure, and the ultrastructural changes characteristic of cellular differentiation in root caps are organelle specific. No major structural differences exist in the structures of the composite cell types, or in patterns of cell differentiation in caps of primary vs. lateral roots.

  7. A morphometric analysis of cellular differentiation in caps of primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine if patterns of cell differentiation are similar in primary and lateral roots, I performed a morphometric analysis of the ultrastructure of calyptrogen, columella, and peripheral cells in primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus. Each cell type is characterized by a unique ultrastructure, and the ultrastructural changes characteristic of cellular differentiation in root caps are organelle specific. No major structural differences exist in the structures of the composite cell types, or in patterns of cell differentiation in caps of primary vs. lateral roots.

  8. Cellular sites of estrogen and antiestrogen uptake, retention and action: comparative autoradiographic studies in the immature rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism of action of antiestrogens: agents used for treating breast cancer and as probes for studying the mechanisms of action of estrogen. Nuclear uptake and retention of estrogen and antiestrogen were determined in the different cell types of the immature rat uterus, by quantitative autoradiography, after an injection of tritiated hydroxytamoxifen ((/sup 3/H)TAM(OH)) or tritiated estradiol ((/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/). The effect of TAM(OH) and E/sub 2/ on progesterone receptor content was assessed in the different cell types by determining nuclear uptake of the synthetic progestin (/sup 3/H)Org 2058. The results indicate that antiestrogen and estrogen localize to nuclei of the same uterine cell types, but that this nuclear uptake differs among the uterine tissue compartments, that antiestrogen is taken up considerably slower and retained longer than estrogen and that antiestrogen and estrogen differentially affect progesterone receptor content in the different cell types. The results further suggest that antiestrogen-specific binding sites exist in the cytoplasm of uterine luminal epithelium.

  9. PI3K/AKT and ERK regulate retinoic acid-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Jingbo; Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora; Qiao, Lan; Josifi, Erlena; Tiao, Joshua R.; Chung, Dai H.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Retinoic acid (RA) induces neuroblastoma cells differentiation, which is accompanied by G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA resulted in neuroblastoma cell survival and inhibition of DNA fragmentation; this is regulated by PI3K pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RA activates PI3K and ERK1/2 pathway; PI3K pathway mediates RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of p21 is necessary for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. -- Abstract: Neuroblastoma, the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in infants and children, is characterized by a high rate of spontaneous remissions in infancy. Retinoic acid (RA) has been known to induce neuroblastoma differentiation; however, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways that are responsible for RA-mediated neuroblastoma cell differentiation remain unclear. Here, we sought to determine the cell signaling processes involved in RA-induced cellular differentiation. Upon RA administration, human neuroblastoma cell lines, SK-N-SH and BE(2)-C, demonstrated neurite extensions, which is an indicator of neuronal cell differentiation. Moreover, cell cycle arrest occurred in G1/G0 phase. The protein levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21 and p27{sup Kip}, which inhibit cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression at G1/S phase, increased after RA treatment. Interestingly, RA promoted cell survival during the differentiation process, hence suggesting a potential mechanism for neuroblastoma resistance to RA therapy. Importantly, we found that the PI3K/AKT pathway is required for RA-induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Our results elucidated the molecular mechanism of RA-induced neuroblastoma cellular differentiation, which may be important for developing novel therapeutic strategy against poorly differentiated neuroblastoma.

  10. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Sexual Differentiation in the Mammalian Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Forger, Nancy G.; Strahan, J. Alex; Castillo-Ruiz, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscientists are likely to discover new sex differences in the coming years, spurred by the National Institutes of Health initiative to include both sexes in preclinical studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying sex differences in the mammalian nervous system, based primarily on work in rodents. Cellular mechanisms examined include neurogenesis, migration, the differentiation of neurochemical and morphological cell phenotype, and cell death. At the molecular level we discuss evolving roles for epigenetics, sex chromosome complement, the immune system, and newly identified cell signaling pathways. We review recent findings on the role of the environment, as well as genome-wide studies with some surprising results, causing us to rethink often-used models of sexual differentiation. We end by pointing to future directions, including an increased awareness of the important contributions of tissues outside of the nervous system to sexual differentiation of the brain. PMID:26790970

  11. Applying Attractor Dynamics to Infer Gene Regulatory Interactions Involved in Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ghaffarizadeh, Ahmadreza; Podgorski, Gregory J; Flann, Nicholas S

    2017-02-27

    The dynamics of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) guide cellular differentiation. Determining the ways regulatory genes control expression of their targets is essential to understand and control cellular differentiation. The way a regulatory gene controls its target can be expressed as a gene regulatory function. Manual derivation of these regulatory functions is slow, error-prone and difficult to update as new information arises. Automating this process is a significant challenge and the subject of intensive effort. This work presents a novel approach to discovering biologically plausible gene regulatory interactions that control cellular differentiation. This method integrates known cell type expression data, genetic interactions, and knowledge of the effects of gene knockouts to determine likely GRN regulatory functions. We employ a genetic algorithm to search for candidate GRNs that use a set of transcription factors that control differentiation within a lineage. Nested canalyzing functions are used to constrain the search space to biologically plausible networks. The method identifies an ensemble of GRNs whose dynamics reproduce the gene expression pattern for each cell type within a particular lineage. The method's effectiveness was tested by inferring consensus GRNs for myeloid and pancreatic cell differentiation and comparing the predicted gene regulatory interactions to manually derived interactions. We identified many regulatory interactions reported in the literature and also found differences from published reports. These discrepancies suggest areas for biological studies of myeloid and pancreatic differentiation. We also performed a study that used defined synthetic networks to evaluate the accuracy of the automated search method and found that the search algorithm was able to discover the regulatory interactions in these defined networks with high accuracy. We suggest that the GRN functions derived from the methods described here can be used to fill

  12. Identification of driving network of cellular differentiation from single sample time course gene expression data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ye; Wolanyk, Nathaniel; Ilker, Tunc; Gao, Shouguo; Wang, Xujing

    Methods developed based on bifurcation theory have demonstrated their potential in driving network identification for complex human diseases, including the work by Chen, et al. Recently bifurcation theory has been successfully applied to model cellular differentiation. However, there one often faces a technical challenge in driving network prediction: time course cellular differentiation study often only contains one sample at each time point, while driving network prediction typically require multiple samples at each time point to infer the variation and interaction structures of candidate genes for the driving network. In this study, we investigate several methods to identify both the critical time point and the driving network through examination of how each time point affects the autocorrelation and phase locking. We apply these methods to a high-throughput sequencing (RNA-Seq) dataset of 42 subsets of thymocytes and mature peripheral T cells at multiple time points during their differentiation (GSE48138 from GEO). We compare the predicted driving genes with known transcription regulators of cellular differentiation. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of our proposed methods, as well as potential further improvements of our methods.

  13. The Wnt signaling pathway in cellular proliferation and differentiation: A tale of two coactivators.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jia-Ling; Kahn, Michael

    2010-09-30

    Wnt signaling pathways play divergent roles during development, normal homeostasis and disease. The responses that result from the activation of the pathway control both proliferation and differentiation. Tight regulation and controlled coordination of the Wnt signaling cascade is required to maintain the balance between proliferation and differentiation. The non-redundant roles of the coactivator proteins CBP and p300, within the context of Wnt signaling are discussed. We highlight their roles as integrators of the various inputs that a cell receives to elicit the correct and coordinated response. We propose that essentially all cellular information - i.e. from other signaling pathways, nutrient levels, etc. - is funneled down into a choice of coactivators usage, either CBP or p300, by their interacting partner beta-catenin (or catenin-like molecules in the absence of beta-catenin) to make the critical decision to either remain quiescent, or once entering cycle to proliferate without differentiation or to initiate the differentiation process.

  14. DNA methylation control of tissue polarity and cellular differentiation in the mammary epithelium.

    PubMed

    Plachot, Cedric; Lelièvre, Sophie A

    2004-08-01

    Alterations in gene expression accompany cell-type-specific differentiation. In complex systems where functional differentiation depends on the organization of specific cell types into highly specialized structures (tissue morphogenesis), it is not known how epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression influence this stepwise differentiation process. We have investigated the effect of DNA methylation, a major epigenetic pathway of gene silencing, on the regulation of mammary acinar differentiation. Our in vitro model of differentiation encompasses human mammary epithelial cells that form polarized and hollow tissue structures (acini) when cultured in the presence of basement membrane components. We found that acinar morphogenesis was accompanied with chromatin remodeling, as shown by alterations in histone 4 acetylation, heterochromatin 1 protein, and histone 3 methylated on lysine 9, and with an increase in expression of MeCP2, a mediator of DNA-methylation-induced gene silencing. DNA hypomethylation induced by treatment with 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine during acinar differentiation essentially prevented the formation of apical tissue polarity. This treatment also induced the expression of CK19, a marker of cells that are in a transitional differentiation stage. These results suggest that DNA methylation is a mechanism by which mammary epithelial differentiation is coordinated both at the tissue and cellular levels.

  15. Harnessing cellular differentiation to improve ALA-based photodynamic therapy in an artificial skin model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maytin, Edward; Anand, Sanjay; Sato, Nobuyuki; Mack, Judith; Ortel, Bernhard

    2005-04-01

    During ALA-based photodynamic therapy (PDT), a pro-drug (aminolevulinic acid; ALA) is taken up by tumor cells and metabolically converted to a photosensitizing intermediate (protoporphyrin IX; PpIX). ALA-based PDT, while an emerging treatment modality, remains suboptimal for most cancers (e.g. squamous cell carcinoma of the skin). Many treatment failures may be largely due to insufficient conversion of ALA to PpIX within cells. We discovered a novel way to increase the conversion of ALA to PpIX, by administering agents that can drive terminal differentiation (i.e., accelerate cellular maturation). Terminally-differentiated epithelial cells show higher levels of intracellular PpIX, apparently via increased levels of a rate-limiting enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO). To study these mechanisms in a three-dimensional tissue, we developed an organotypic model that mimics true epidermal physiology in a majority of respects. A line of rat epidermal keratinocytes (REKs), when grown in raft cultures, displays all the features of a fully-differentiated epidermis. Addition of ALA to the culture medium results in ALA uptake and PpIX synthesis, with subsequent death of keratinocytes upon exposure to blue light. Using this model, we can manipulate cellular differentiation via three different approaches. (1) Vitamin D, a hormone that enhances keratinocyte differentiation; (2) Hoxb13, a nuclear transcription factor that affects the genetically-controlled differentiation program of stratifying cells (3) Hyaluronan, an abundant extracellular matrix molecule that regulates epidermal differentiation. Because the raft cultures contain only a single cell type (no blood, fibroblasts, etc.) the effects of terminal differentiation upon CPO, PpIX, and keratinocyte cell death can be specifically defined.

  16. Cardiomyocyte Differentiation Promotes Cell Survival During Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Inhibition Through Increased Maintenance of Cellular Energy Stores.

    PubMed

    Kropp, Erin M; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Waas, Matthew; Nycz, Alyssa; Corbett, John A; Gundry, Rebekah L

    2017-04-01

    To address concerns regarding the tumorigenic potential of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) that may remain after in vitro differentiation and ultimately limit the broad use of hPSC-derivatives for therapeutics, we recently described a method to selectively eliminate tumorigenic hPSC from their progeny by inhibiting nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT). Limited exposure to NAMPT inhibitors selectively removes hPSC from hPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CM) and spares a wide range of differentiated cell types; yet, it remains unclear when and how cells acquire resistance to NAMPT inhibition during differentiation. In this study, we examined the effects of NAMPT inhibition among multiple time points of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Overall, these studies show that in vitro cardiomyogenic commitment and continued culturing provides resistance to NAMPT inhibition and cell survival is associated with the ability to maintain cellular ATP pools despite depletion of NAD levels. Unlike cells at earlier stages of differentiation, day 28 hPSC-CM can survive longer periods of NAMPT inhibition and maintain ATP generation by glycolysis and/or mitochondrial respiration. This is distinct from terminally differentiated fibroblasts, which maintain mitochondrial respiration during NAMPT inhibition. Overall, these results provide new mechanistic insight into how regulation of cellular NAD and energy pools change with hPSC-CM differentiation and further inform how NAMPT inhibition strategies could be implemented within the context of cardiomyocyte differentiation. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1191-1201. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  17. Chromatin dynamics during cellular differentiation in the female reproductive lineage of flowering plants

    PubMed Central

    Baroux, Célia; Autran, Daphné

    2015-01-01

    Sexual reproduction in flowering plants offers a number of remarkable aspects to developmental biologists. First, the spore mother cells – precursors of the plant reproductive lineage – are specified late in development, as opposed to precocious germline isolation during embryogenesis in most animals. Second, unlike in most animals where meiosis directly produces gametes, plant meiosis entails the differentiation of a multicellular, haploid gametophyte, within which gametic as well as non-gametic accessory cells are formed. These observations raise the question of the factors inducing and modus operandi of cell fate transitions that originate in floral tissues and gametophytes, respectively. Cell fate transitions in the reproductive lineage imply cellular reprogramming operating at the physiological, cytological and transcriptome level, but also at the chromatin level. A number of observations point to large-scale chromatin reorganization events associated with cellular differentiation of the female spore mother cells and of the female gametes. These include a reorganization of the heterochromatin compartment, the genome-wide alteration of the histone modification landscape, and the remodeling of nucleosome composition. The dynamic expression of DNA methyltransferases and actors of small RNA pathways also suggest additional, global epigenetic alterations that remain to be characterized. Are these events a cause or a consequence of cellular differentiation, and how do they contribute to cell fate transition? Does chromatin dynamics induce competence for immediate cellular functions (meiosis, fertilization), or does it also contribute long-term effects in cellular identity and developmental competence of the reproductive lineage? This review attempts to review these fascinating questions. PMID:26031902

  18. Gene turnover and differential retention in the relaxin/insulin-like gene family in primates.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, José Ignacio; Hoffmann, Federico G; Opazo, Juan C

    2012-06-01

    The relaxin/insulin-like gene family is related to the insulin gene family, and includes two separate types of peptides: relaxins (RLNs) and insulin-like peptides (INSLs) that perform a variety of physiological roles including testicular descent, growth and differentiation of the mammary glands, trophoblast development, and cell differentiation. In vertebrates, these genes are found on three separate genomic loci, and in mammals, variation in the number and nature of genes in this family is mostly restricted to the Relaxin Family Locus B. For example, this locus contains a single copy of RLN in platypus and opossum, whereas it contains copies of the INSL6, INSL4, RLN2 and RLN1 genes in human and chimp. The main objective of this research is to characterize changes in the size and membership composition of the RLN/INSL gene family in primates, reconstruct the history of the RLN/INSL genes of primates, and test competing evolutionary scenarios regarding the origin of INSL4 and of the duplicated copies of the RLN gene of apes. Our results show that the relaxin/INSL-like gene family of primates has had a more dynamic evolutionary history than previously thought, including several examples of gene duplications and losses which are consistent with the predictions of the birth-and-death model of gene family evolution. In particular, we found that the differential retention of relatively old paralogs played a key role in shaping the gene complement of this family in primates. Two examples of this phenomenon are the origin of the INSL4 gene of catarrhines (the group that includes Old World monkeys and apes), and of the duplicate RLN1 and RLN2 paralogs of apes. In the case of INSL4, comparative genomics and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the origin of this gene, which was thought to represent a catarrhine-specific evolutionary innovation, is as old as the split between carnivores and primates, which took place approximately 97 million years ago. In addition, in the case

  19. Cellular Automata for Spatiotemporal Pattern Formation from Reaction-Diffusion Partial Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Shousuke; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Ultradiscrete equations are derived from a set of reaction-diffusion partial differential equations, and cellular automaton rules are obtained on the basis of the ultradiscrete equations. Some rules reproduce the dynamical properties of the original reaction-diffusion equations, namely, bistability and pulse annihilation. Furthermore, other rules bring about soliton-like preservation and periodic pulse generation with a pacemaker, which are not obtained from the original reaction-diffusion equations.

  20. Emergence of a prestressed eukaryotic nucleus during cellular differentiation and development.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Aprotim; Shivashankar, G V

    2010-06-06

    Nuclear shape and size are emerging as mechanistic regulators of genome function. Yet, the coupling between chromatin assembly and various nuclear and cytoplasmic scaffolds is poorly understood. The present work explores the structural organization of a prestressed nucleus in a variety of cellular systems ranging from cells in culture to those in an organism. A combination of laser ablation and cellular perturbations was used to decipher the dynamic nature of the nucleo-cytoplasmic contacts. In primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts, ablation of heterochromatin nodes caused an anisotropic shrinkage of the nucleus. Depolymerization of actin and microtubules, and inhibition of myosin motors, resulted in the differential stresses that these cytoplasmic systems exert on the nucleus. The onset of nuclear prestress was then mapped in two contexts--first, in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells, where signatures of prestress appeared with differentiation; second, at an organism level, where nuclear or cytoplasmic laser ablations of cells in the early Drosophila embryo induced a collapse of the nucleus only after cellularization. We thus show that the interplay of physical connections bridging the nucleus with the cytoplasm governs the size and shape of a prestressed eukaryotic nucleus.

  1. Differential redox regulation of ORAI ion channels: a mechanism to tune cellular calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Al-Ansary, Dalia; Schwarz, Eva C; Koehler, Richard; Kozai, Daisuke; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Peinelt, Christine; Griesemer, Desiree; Bozem, Monika; Mori, Yasuo; Hoth, Markus; Niemeyer, Barbara A

    2010-03-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological cellular processes. We used lymphocytes, which are exposed to highly oxidizing environments during inflammation, to study the influence of ROS on cellular function. Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) influx through Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels composed of proteins of the ORAI family is essential for the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of T lymphocytes, but whether and how ROS affect ORAI channel function have been unclear. Here, we combined Ca(2+) imaging, patch-clamp recordings, and measurements of cell proliferation and cytokine secretion to determine the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on ORAI channel activity and human T helper lymphocyte (T(H) cell) function. ORAI1, but not ORAI3, channels were inhibited by oxidation by H(2)O(2). The differential redox sensitivity of ORAI1 and ORAI3 channels depended mainly on an extracellularly located reactive cysteine, which is absent in ORAI3. T(H) cells became progressively less redox-sensitive after differentiation into effector cells, a shift that would allow them to proliferate, differentiate, and secrete cytokines in oxidizing environments. The decreased redox sensitivity of effector T(H) cells correlated with increased expression of Orai3 and increased abundance of several cytosolic antioxidants. Knockdown of ORAI3 with small-interfering RNA rendered effector T(H) cells more redox-sensitive. The differential expression of Orai isoforms between naïve and effector T(H) cells may tune cellular responses under oxidative stress.

  2. Retention of duplicated long-wavelength opsins in mosquito lineages by positive selection and differential expression.

    PubMed

    Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria I; Zanis, Michael J; Hill, Catherine A

    2017-03-21

    Opsins are light sensitive receptors associated with visual processes. Insects typically possess opsins that are stimulated by ultraviolet, short and long wavelength (LW) radiation. Six putative LW-sensitive opsins predicted in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti and malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, and eight in the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, suggest gene expansion in the Family Culicidae (mosquitoes) relative to other insects. Here we report the first detailed molecular and evolutionary analyses of LW opsins in three mosquito vectors, with a goal to understanding the molecular basis of opsin-mediated visual processes that could be exploited for mosquito control. Time of divergence estimates suggest that the mosquito LW opsins originated from 18 or 19 duplication events between 166.9/197.5 to 1.07/0.94 million years ago (MY) and that these likely occurred following the predicted divergence of the lineages Anophelinae and Culicinae 145-226 MY. Fitmodel analyses identified nine amino acid residues in the LW opsins that may be under positive selection. Of these, eight amino acids occur in the N and C termini and are shared among all three species, and one residue in TMIII was unique to culicine species. Alignment of 5' non-coding regions revealed potential Conserved Non-coding Sequences (CNS) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in seven pairs of LW opsin paralogs. Our analyses suggest opsin gene duplication and residues possibly associated with spectral tuning of LW-sensitive photoreceptors. We explore two mechanisms - positive selection and differential expression mediated by regulatory units in CNS - that may have contributed to the retention of LW opsin genes in Culicinae and Anophelinae. We discuss the evolution of mosquito LW opsins in the context of major Earth events and possible adaptation of mosquitoes to LW-dominated photo environments, and implications for mosquito control strategies based on disrupting vision

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus infection of monoblastoid cells: cellular differentiation determines the pattern of virus replication.

    PubMed Central

    Pauza, C D; Galindo, J; Richman, D D

    1988-01-01

    Stringent control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication was observed in the human monoblastoid cell line U937. A low-multiplicity infection of these cells by the LAV1 strain of HIV was productive for 2.5 days; then virus replication became restricted and no further evidence of virion production was observed. The dramatic decrease in HIV production was due in part of reduced accumulation of cytoplasmic viral RNA and occurred in the absence of evident cytopathic effects. In contrast, infected cells induced to differentiate by phorbol ester, vitamin D3, or lymphokine supernatant did not release markers of HIV despite the accumulation of significant levels of cytoplasmic viral RNA. HIV infection altered the pattern of c-myc RNA accumulation in U937 cells. Expression of this gene changes normally in response to the state of cellular differentiation; in infected cells the level of c-myc expression was correlated to the levels of viral RNA accumulation and not to cellular differentiation. These results suggest that restricted replication of HIV in monocytes might be an important mechanism of virus persistence and demonstrate a relationship between HIV replication and monocyte differentiation. Images PMID:2458483

  4. Cellular Trafficking of Phospholamban and Formation of Functional Sarcoplasmic Reticulum During Myocyte DIfferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stenoien, David L.; Knyushko, Tatyana V.; Londono, Monica P.; Opresko, Lee; Mayer, M. Uljana; Brady, Scott T.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2007-06-01

    The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) family members are transmembrane proteins that play an essential role in regulating intracellular calcium levels. Phospholamban (PLB), a 52 amino acid phosphoprotein, regulates SERCA activity in adult heart and skeletal muscle. Using the C2C12 myocyte cell line, we find endogenous PLB constitutively expressed in both myoblasts and myotubes, whereas SERCA expression coincides with activation of the differentiation program. PLB has a punctuate distribution in myoblasts changing to a reticular distribution in myotubes where it colocalizes with SERCAs. To examine the distribution and dynamics of PLB and SERCA, we expressed fluorescent fusion proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) of PLB and SERCA in myoblasts. Coexpressed PLB and SERCA localize to distinct cellular compartments in myoblasts but begin to colocalize as cells differentiate. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) studies show different recovery patterns for each protein in myoblasts confirming their localization to distinct compartments. To extend these studies, we created stable cell lines expressing O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) fusions with PLB or SERCA to track their localization as myocytes differentiate. These experiments demonstrate that PLB localizes to punctate vesicles in myoblasts and adopts a reticular distribution that coincides with SERCA distribution after differentiation. Colocalization experiments indicate that a subset of PLB in myoblasts colocalizes with endosomes, Golgi, and the plasma membrane however PLB also localizes to other, as yet unidentified vesicles. Our results indicate that differentiation plays a critical role in regulating PLB distribution to ensure its colocalization within the same cellular compartment as SERCA in differentiated cells. The presence and altered distribution of PLB in undifferentiated myoblasts raises the possibility that this protein has additional functions distinct from SERCA regulation.

  5. Cellular differentiation and I-FABP protein expression modulate fatty acid uptake and diffusion.

    PubMed

    Atshaves, B P; Foxworth, W B; Frolov, A; Roths, J B; Kier, A B; Oetama, B K; Piedrahita, J A; Schroeder, F

    1998-03-01

    The effect of cellular differentiation on fatty acid uptake and intracellular diffusion was examined in transfected pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells stably expressing intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP). Control ES cells, whether differentiated or undifferentiated, did not express I-FABP. The initial rate and maximal uptake of the fluorescent fatty acid, 12-(N-methyl)-N-[(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-octadec anoic acid (NBD-stearic acid), was measured in single cells by kinetic digital fluorescence imaging. I-FABP expression in undifferentiated ES cells increased the initial rate and maximal uptake of NBD-stearic acid 1.7- and 1.6-fold, respectively, as well as increased its effective intracellular diffusion constant (Deff) 1.8-fold as measured by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. In contrast, ES cell differentiation decreased I-FABP expression up to 3-fold and decreased the NBD-stearic acid initial rate of uptake, maximal uptake, and Deff by 10-, 4.7-, and 2-fold, respectively. There were no significant differences in these parameters between the differentiated control and differentiated I-FABP-expressing ES cell lines. In summary, differentiation and expression of I-FABP oppositely modulated NBD-stearic acid uptake parameters and intracellular diffusion in ES cells.

  6. Ultrastructural features of the differentiating thyroid primordium in the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis L.) from the differentiation of the cellular cords to the formation of the follicular lumen.

    PubMed

    Rupik, Weronika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Swadźba, Elwira; Maślak, Robert

    2016-04-01

    The differentiation of the thyroid primordium of lacertilian species is poorly understood. The present study reports on the ultrastructural analysis of the developing thyroid primordium in the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis) during the early stages of differentiation. The early thyroid primordium of sand lizard embryos was composed of cellular cords that contained single cells with a giant lipid droplet, which were eliminated by specific autophagy (lipophagy). The follicular lumens at the periphery of the primordium differentiated even before the division of the cellular cords. When the single cells within the cords started to die through paraptosis, the adjacent cells started to polarise and junctional complexes began to form around them. After polarisation and clearing up after the formation of the lumens, the cellular cords divided into definitive follicles. The cellular cords in the central part of the primordium started to differentiate later than those at the periphery. The cellular cords divided into presumptive follicles first and only later differentiated into definitive follicles. During this process, a population of centrally located cells was removed through apoptosis to form the lumen. Although the follicular lumen in sand lizard embryos is differentiated by cavitation similar to that in the grass snake, there were very important differences during the early stages of the differentiation of the cellular cords and the formation of the thyroid follicles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Mitochondria in mesenchymal stem cell biology and cell therapy: From cellular differentiation to mitochondrial transfer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Wu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Ting-Hsien; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are characterized to have the capacity of self-renewal and the potential to differentiate into mesoderm, ectoderm-like and endoderm-like cells. MSCs hold great promise for cell therapies due to their multipotency in vitro and therapeutic advantage of hypo-immunogenicity and lower tumorigenicity. Moreover, it has been shown that MSCs can serve as a vehicle to transfer mitochondria into cells after cell transplantation. Mitochondria produce most of the energy through oxidative phosphorylation in differentiated cells. It has been increasingly clear that the switch of energy supply from glycolysis to aerobic metabolism is essential for successful differentiation of MSCs. Post-translational modifications of proteins have been established to regulate mitochondrial function and metabolic shift during MSCs differentiation. In this article, we review and provide an integrated view on the roles of different protein kinases and sirtuins in the maintenance and differentiation of MSCs. Importantly, we provide evidence to suggest that alteration in the expression of Sirt3 and Sirt5 and relative changes in the acylation levels of mitochondrial proteins might be involved in the activation of mitochondrial function and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived MSCs. We summarize their roles in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism, oxidative responses and differentiation of MSCs. On the other hand, we discuss recent advances in the study of mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial transfer as well as their roles in the differentiation and therapeutic application of MSCs to improve cell function in vitro and in animal models. Accumulating evidence has substantiated that the therapeutic potential of MSCs is conferred not only by cell replacement and paracrine effects but also by transferring mitochondria into injured tissues or cells to modulate the cellular metabolism in situ. Therefore, elucidation of the underlying mechanisms

  8. Locus- and cell type-specific epigenetic switching during cellular differentiation in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Tao; Fasolino, Maria; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epigenomic reconfiguration, including changes in DNA methylation and histone modifications, is crucial for the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into somatic cells. However, the extent to which the epigenome is reconfigured and the interplay between components of the epigenome during cellular differentiation remain poorly defined. METHODS We systematically analyzed and compared DNA methylation, various histone modification, and transcriptome profiles in ESCs with those of two distinct types of somatic cells from human and mouse. RESULTS We found that global DNA methylation levels are lower in somatic cells compared to ESCs in both species. We also found that 80% of regions with histone modification occupancy differ between human ESCs and the two human somatic cell types. Approximately 70% of the reconfigurations in DNA methylation and histone modifications are locus- and cell type-specific. Intriguingly, the loss of DNA methylation is accompanied by the gain of different histone modifications in a locus- and cell type-specific manner. Further examination of transcriptional changes associated with epigenetic reconfiguration at promoter regions revealed an epigenetic switching for gene regulation—a transition from stable gene silencing mediated by DNA methylation in ESCs to flexible gene repression facilitated by repressive histone modifications in somatic cells. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that the epigenome is reconfigured in a locus- and cell type-specific manner and epigenetic switching is common during cellular differentiation in both human and mouse. PMID:28261266

  9. Tomato ribonuclease LX with the functional endoplasmic reticulum retention motif HDEF is expressed during programmed cell death processes, including xylem differentiation, germination, and senescence.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, K; Hause, B; Altmann, D; Köck, M

    2001-10-01

    We have studied the subcellular localization of the acid S-like ribonuclease (RNase) LX in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells using a combination of biochemical and immunological methods. It was found that the enzyme, unexpectedly excluded from highly purified vacuoles, accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum. The evidence that RNase LX is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is supported by an independent approach showing that the C-terminal peptide HDEF of RNase LX acts as an alternative ER retention signal in plants. For functional testing, the cellular distribution of chimeric protein constructs based on a marker protein, Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) 2S albumin, was analyzed immunochemically in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Here, we report that the peptide motif is necessary and sufficient to accumulate 2S albumin constructs of both vacuolar and extracellular final destinations in the ER. We have shown immunochemically that RNase LX is specifically expressed during endosperm mobilization and leaf and flower senescence. Using immunofluorescence, RNase LX protein was detected in immature tracheary elements, suggesting a function in xylem differentiation. These results support a physiological function of RNase LX in selective cell death processes that are also thought to involve programmed cell death. It is assumed that RNase LX accumulates in an ER-derived compartment and is released by membrane disruption into the cytoplasma of those cells that are intended to undergo autolysis. These processes are accompanied by degradation of cellular components supporting a metabolic recycling function of the intracellular RNase LX.

  10. Tomato Ribonuclease LX with the Functional Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention Motif HDEF Is Expressed during Programmed Cell Death Processes, Including Xylem Differentiation, Germination, and Senescence1

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Karin; Hause, Bettina; Altmann, Dorit; Köck, Margret

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the subcellular localization of the acid S-like ribonuclease (RNase) LX in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells using a combination of biochemical and immunological methods. It was found that the enzyme, unexpectedly excluded from highly purified vacuoles, accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum. The evidence that RNase LX is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is supported by an independent approach showing that the C-terminal peptide HDEF of RNase LX acts as an alternative ER retention signal in plants. For functional testing, the cellular distribution of chimeric protein constructs based on a marker protein, Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) 2S albumin, was analyzed immunochemically in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Here, we report that the peptide motif is necessary and sufficient to accumulate 2S albumin constructs of both vacuolar and extracellular final destinations in the ER. We have shown immunochemically that RNase LX is specifically expressed during endosperm mobilization and leaf and flower senescence. Using immunofluorescence, RNase LX protein was detected in immature tracheary elements, suggesting a function in xylem differentiation. These results support a physiological function of RNase LX in selective cell death processes that are also thought to involve programmed cell death. It is assumed that RNase LX accumulates in an ER-derived compartment and is released by membrane disruption into the cytoplasma of those cells that are intended to undergo autolysis. These processes are accompanied by degradation of cellular components supporting a metabolic recycling function of the intracellular RNase LX. PMID:11598219

  11. Probabilistically determining the cellular source of DNA derived from differential extractions in sexual assault scenarios.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Duncan

    2016-09-01

    Sexual assault cases are the type of case that often produces questions about the cellular source of DNA. In these cases multiple findings of microscopy, DNA profiling and presumptive testing need to be considered when addressing source level propositions. In this work, I consider a line of questioning that has been raised a number of times in the recent past, where in court it was disputed that low levels of sperm seen on a microscope slide were the cellular source of the male DNA profile component generated from the sperm fraction of a differential DNA extraction. I demonstrate how the cell scoring results and DNA profiling results can be considered together, in helping address this source level question through the use of Bayesian Networks.

  12. Examining tissue differentiation stability through large scale, multi-cellular pathway modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Schiek, Richard Louis

    2005-03-01

    Using a multi-cellular, pathway model approach, we investigate the Drosophila sp. segmental differentiation network's stability as a function of initial conditions. While this network's functionality has been investigated in the absence of noise, this is the first work to specifically investigate how natural systems respond to random errors or noise. Our findings agree with earlier results that the overall network is robust in the absence of noise. However, when one includes random initial perturbations in intracellular protein WG levels, the robustness of the system decreases dramatically. The effect of noise on the system is not linear, and appears to level out at high noise levels.

  13. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Tang, Yao; Qiu, Bo; Wu, Ziqing; Yan, Jinhai; Zhou, Xinhua; Zhao, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin’s and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20) into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (cHL) cells (L428) into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2) in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL. PMID:26000982

  14. SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN Regulate CD99-Mediated Cellular Differentiation in Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wenjing; Zhong, Lin; Wen, Jing; Tang, Yao; Qiu, Bo; Wu, Ziqing; Yan, Jinhai; Zhou, Xinhua; Zhao, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is a lymphoid neoplasm characterized by Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells, which is regulated by CD99. We previously reported that CD99 downregulation led to the transformation of murine B lymphoma cells (A20) into cells with an H/RS phenotype, while CD99 upregulation induced differentiation of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) cells (L428) into terminal B-cells. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, using fluorescence two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), we have analyzed the alteration of protein expression following CD99 upregulation in L428 cells as well as downregulation of mouse CD99 antigen-like 2 (mCD99L2) in A20 cells. Bioinformatics analysis showed that SEPTIN2 and STATHMIN, which are cytoskeleton proteins, were significantly differentially expressed, and chosen for further validation and functional analysis. Differential expression of SEPTIN2 was found in both models and was inversely correlated with CD99 expression. STATHMIN was identified in the A20 cell line model and its expression was positively correlated with that of CD99. Importantly, silencing of SEPTIN2 with siRNA substantially altered the cellular cytoskeleton in L428 cells. The downregulation of STATHMIN by siRNA promoted the differentiation of H/RS cells toward terminal B-cells. These results suggest that SEPTIN2-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement and STATHMIN-mediated differentiation may contribute to changes in cell morphology and differentiation of H/RS cells with CD99 upregulation in HL.

  15. Cellular senescence checkpoint function determines differential Notch1-dependent oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, S; Natsuizaka, M; Whelan, K A; Facompre, N; Naganuma, S; Ohashi, S; Kinugasa, H; Egloff, A M; Basu, D; Gimotty, P A; Klein-Szanto, A J; Bass, A J; Wong, K-K; Diehl, J A; Rustgi, A K; Nakagawa, H

    2015-04-30

    Notch activity regulates tumor biology in a context-dependent and complex manner. Notch may act as an oncogene or a tumor-suppressor gene even within the same tumor type. Recently, Notch signaling has been implicated in cellular senescence. Yet, it remains unclear as to how cellular senescence checkpoint functions may interact with Notch-mediated oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities. Herein, we used genetically engineered human esophageal keratinocytes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to delineate the functional consequences of Notch activation and inhibition along with pharmacological intervention and RNA interference experiments. When expressed in a tetracycline-inducible manner, the ectopically expressed activated form of Notch1 (ICN1) displayed oncogene-like characteristics inducing cellular senescence corroborated by the induction of G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, Rb dephosphorylation, flat and enlarged cell morphology and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Notch-induced senescence involves canonical CSL/RBPJ-dependent transcriptional activity and the p16(INK4A)-Rb pathway. Loss of p16(INK4A) or the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene products not only prevented ICN1 from inducing senescence but permitted ICN1 to facilitate anchorage-independent colony formation and xenograft tumor growth with increased cell proliferation and reduced squamous-cell differentiation. Moreover, Notch1 appears to mediate replicative senescence as well as transforming growth factor-β-induced cellular senescence in non-transformed cells and that HPV E6/E7 targets Notch1 for inactivation to prevent senescence, revealing a tumor-suppressor attribute of endogenous Notch1. In aggregate, cellular senescence checkpoint functions may influence dichotomous Notch activities in the neoplastic context.

  16. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shijun; Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Shao, Ning-Yi; Lee, Won Hee; Chen, Haodong; Snyder, Michael P; Wu, Joseph C

    2016-06-02

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC-derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC-ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31(+) population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC-ECs maintained a higher CD31(+) population than FB-iPSC-ECs and CPC-iPSC-ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation.

  17. Effects of cellular origin on differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming-Tao; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Lee, Won Hee; Snyder, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be derived from various types of somatic cells by transient overexpression of 4 Yamanaka factors (OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4). Patient-specific iPSC derivatives (e.g., neuronal, cardiac, hepatic, muscular, and endothelial cells [ECs]) hold great promise in drug discovery and regenerative medicine. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the cellular origin can affect the differentiation, in vivo behavior, and single-cell gene expression signatures of human iPSC–derived ECs. We derived human iPSCs from 3 types of somatic cells of the same individuals: fibroblasts (FB-iPSCs), ECs (EC-iPSCs), and cardiac progenitor cells (CPC-iPSCs). We then differentiated them into ECs by sequential administration of Activin, BMP4, bFGF, and VEGF. EC-iPSCs at early passage (10 < P < 20) showed higher EC differentiation propensity and gene expression of EC-specific markers (PECAM1 and NOS3) than FB-iPSCs and CPC-iPSCs. In vivo transplanted EC-iPSC–ECs were recovered with a higher percentage of CD31+ population and expressed higher EC-specific gene expression markers (PECAM1, KDR, and ICAM) as revealed by microfluidic single-cell quantitative PCR (qPCR). In vitro EC-iPSC–ECs maintained a higher CD31+ population than FB-iPSC–ECs and CPC-iPSC–ECs with long-term culturing and passaging. These results indicate that cellular origin may influence lineage differentiation propensity of human iPSCs; hence, the somatic memory carried by early passage iPSCs should be carefully considered before clinical translation. PMID:27398408

  18. Dexamethasone alone and in combination with desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam interferes with 5-ALA-mediated PpIX production and cellular retention in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Johnathan E; Steele, Christopher J; Rovin, Richard A; Belton, Robert J; Winn, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Extent of resection of glioblastoma (GBM) correlates with overall survival. Fluorescence-guided resection (FGR) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) can improve the extent of resection. Unfortunately not all patients given 5-ALA accumulate sufficient quantities of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) for successful FGR. In this study, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone, desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid, and levetiracetam on the production and accumulation of PpIX in U87MG cells. All of these drugs, except levetiracetam, reduce the total amount of PpIX produced by GBM cells (p < 0.05). When dexamethasone is mixed with another drug (desipramine, phenytoin, valproic acid or levetiracetam) the amount of PpIX produced is further decreased (p < 0.01). However, when cells are analyzed for PpIX cellular retention, dexamethasone accumulated significantly more PpIX than the vehicle control (p < 0.05). Cellular retention of PpIX was not different from controls in cells treated with dexamethasone plus desipramine, valproic acid or levetiracetam, but was significantly less for dexamethasone plus phenytoin (p < 0.01). These data suggest that medications given before and during surgery may interfere with PpIX accumulation in malignant cells. At this time, levetiracetam appears to be the best medication in its class (anticonvulsants) for patients undergoing 5-ALA-mediated FGR.

  19. Nostopeptolide plays a governing role during cellular differentiation of the symbiotic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Liaimer, Anton; Helfrich, Eric J N; Hinrichs, Katrin; Guljamow, Arthur; Ishida, Keishi; Hertweck, Christian; Dittmann, Elke

    2015-02-10

    Nostoc punctiforme is a versatile cyanobacterium that can live either independently or in symbiosis with plants from distinct taxa. Chemical cues from plants and N. punctiforme were shown to stimulate or repress, respectively, the differentiation of infectious motile filaments known as hormogonia. We have used a polyketide synthase mutant that accumulates an elevated amount of hormogonia as a tool to understand the effect of secondary metabolites on cellular differentiation of N. punctiforme. Applying MALDI imaging to illustrate the reprogramming of the secondary metabolome, nostopeptolides were identified as the predominant difference in the pks2(-) mutant secretome. Subsequent differentiation assays and visualization of cell-type-specific expression of nostopeptolides via a transcriptional reporter strain provided evidence for a multifaceted role of nostopeptolides, either as an autogenic hormogonium-repressing factor or as a chemoattractant, depending on its extracellular concentration. Although nostopeptolide is constitutively expressed in the free-living state, secreted levels dynamically change before, during, and after the hormogonium differentiation phase. The metabolite was found to be strictly down-regulated in symbiosis with Gunnera manicata and Blasia pusilla, whereas other metabolites are up-regulated, as demonstrated via MALDI imaging, suggesting plants modulate the fine-balanced cross-talk network of secondary metabolites within N. punctiforme.

  20. Coordination of cellular differentiation, polarity, mitosis and meiosis - New findings from early vertebrate oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Elkouby, Yaniv M; Mullins, Mary C

    2017-10-15

    A mechanistic dissection of early oocyte differentiation in vertebrates is key to advancing our knowledge of germline development, reproductive biology, the regulation of meiosis, and all of their associated disorders. Recent advances in the field include breakthroughs in the identification of germline stem cells in Medaka, in the cellular architecture of the germline cyst in mice, in a mechanistic dissection of chromosomal pairing and bouquet formation in meiosis in mice, in tracing oocyte symmetry breaking to the chromosomal bouquet of meiosis in zebrafish, and in the biology of the Balbiani body, a universal oocyte granule. Many of the major events in early oogenesis are universally conserved, and some are co-opted for species-specific needs. The chromosomal events of meiosis are of tremendous consequence to gamete formation and have been extensively studied. New light is now being shed on other aspects of early oocyte differentiation, which were traditionally considered outside the scope of meiosis, and their coordination with meiotic events. The emerging theme is of meiosis as a common groundwork for coordinating multifaceted processes of oocyte differentiation. In an accompanying manuscript we describe methods that allowed for investigations in the zebrafish ovary to contribute to these breakthroughs. Here, we review these advances mostly from the zebrafish and mouse. We discuss oogenesis concepts across established model organisms, and construct an inclusive paradigm for early oocyte differentiation in vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nostopeptolide plays a governing role during cellular differentiation of the symbiotic cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme

    PubMed Central

    Liaimer, Anton; Helfrich, Eric J. N.; Hinrichs, Katrin; Guljamow, Arthur; Ishida, Keishi; Hertweck, Christian; Dittmann, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Nostoc punctiforme is a versatile cyanobacterium that can live either independently or in symbiosis with plants from distinct taxa. Chemical cues from plants and N. punctiforme were shown to stimulate or repress, respectively, the differentiation of infectious motile filaments known as hormogonia. We have used a polyketide synthase mutant that accumulates an elevated amount of hormogonia as a tool to understand the effect of secondary metabolites on cellular differentiation of N. punctiforme. Applying MALDI imaging to illustrate the reprogramming of the secondary metabolome, nostopeptolides were identified as the predominant difference in the pks2− mutant secretome. Subsequent differentiation assays and visualization of cell-type-specific expression of nostopeptolides via a transcriptional reporter strain provided evidence for a multifaceted role of nostopeptolides, either as an autogenic hormogonium-repressing factor or as a chemoattractant, depending on its extracellular concentration. Although nostopeptolide is constitutively expressed in the free-living state, secreted levels dynamically change before, during, and after the hormogonium differentiation phase. The metabolite was found to be strictly down-regulated in symbiosis with Gunnera manicata and Blasia pusilla, whereas other metabolites are up-regulated, as demonstrated via MALDI imaging, suggesting plants modulate the fine-balanced cross-talk network of secondary metabolites within N. punctiforme. PMID:25624477

  2. A general allometric and life-history model for cellular differentiation in the transition to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-03-01

    The transition from unicellular, to colonial, to larger multicellular organisms has benefits, costs, and requirements. Here we present a model inspired by the volvocine green algae that explains the dynamics involved in the unicellular-multicellular transition using life-history theory and allometry. We model the two fitness components (fecundity and viability) and compare the fitness of hypothetical colonies of different sizes with varying degrees of cellular differentiation to understand the general principles that underlie the evolution of multicellularity. We argue that germ-soma separation may have evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. The model shows that the cost of investing in soma decreases with size. For lineages such as the Volvocales, as reproduction costs increase with size for undifferentiated colonies, soma specialization benefits the colony indirectly by decreasing such costs and directly by helping reproductive cells acquire resources for their metabolic needs. Germ specialization is favored once soma evolves and takes care of vegetative functions. To illustrate the model, we use some allometric relationships measured in Volvocales. Our analysis shows that the cost of reproducing an increasingly larger group has likely played an important role in the transition to multicellularity and cellular differentiation.

  3. Contaminant effects on cellular metabolic differential pressure curve: a quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Ballerini, Monica; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Zabeo, Matteo; Barberis, Massimo; Cannone, Maria; Faraone, Venera

    2002-06-01

    The possibility of using a pressure monitoring system based on differential pressure sensors to detect contaminant effects on cellular cultures metabolic activity is discussed using Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cultures: differential pressure curves' shape, starting slope and maximum are affected both by physical and chemical contamination. Aim of the present study is the investigation of the effects generated by a 72h exposition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, human lymphocytes and AHH1 cellular line cultures to 50Hz, 60(mu) T electromagnetic field. No significant differences have been recorded between irradiated and control yeast samples. On other hand irradiated lymphocytes samples, cultures in a PHA medium, grow less than control ones, but exhibit a greater metabolic activity: changes in the exposure system configuration influence neither sample growth differences nor metabolic response variations between control and irradiated samples. Control and irradiated lymphocyte samples, without PHA in culture medium, show the same behavior both during irradiation and metabolic test. AHH1 control and irradiated samples show no difference both in growth percentage during irradiation and in metabolic test. Different cell cultures respond to the same stimulus in different manners.

  4. The Calcium-Sensing Receptor and Integrins in Cellular Differentiation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Hampson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a widely expressed homodimeric G-protein coupled receptor structurally related to the metabotropic glutamate receptors and GPRC6A. In addition to its well characterized role in maintaining calcium homeostasis and regulating parathyroid hormone release, evidence has accumulated linking the CaSR with cellular differentiation and migration, brain development, stem cell engraftment, wound healing, and tumor growth and metastasis. Elevated expression of the CaSR in aggressive metastatic tumors has been suggested as a potential novel prognostic marker for predicting metastasis, especially to bone tissue where extracellular calcium concentrations may be sufficiently high to activate the receptor. Recent evidence supports a model whereby CaSR-mediated activation of integrins promotes cellular migration. Integrins are single transmembrane spanning heterodimeric adhesion receptors that mediate cell migration by binding to extracellular matrix proteins. The CaSR has been shown to form signaling complexes with the integrins to facilitate both the movement and differentiation of cells, such as neurons during normal brain development and tumor cells under pathological circumstances. Thus, CaSR/integrin complexes may function as a universal cell migration or homing complex. Manipulation of this complex may be of potential interest for treating metastatic cancers, and for developmental disorders pertaining to aberrant neuronal migration. PMID:27303307

  5. Proliferating activity in differential diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor and cellular fibroadenomas: is it helpful?

    PubMed

    Kaya, R; Pestereli, H E; Erdogan, G; Gülkesen, K H; Karaveli, S

    2001-01-01

    Benign phyllodes tumors and fibroadenomas are two types of fibroepithelial tumors of breast that are usually difficult to differentiate. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the proliferative activity of these tumors and to find out if it helps in differential diagnosis. Thirty-one benign phyllodes tumors and twelve cellular fibroadenomas were retrieved from the archives of Pathology Department of Akdeniz University, School of Medicine. Proliferating activity of epithelial and stromal cells were evaluated by using labeling index (LI) of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67 antigen by immunohistochemistry. The results were compared with other clinicopathologic findings. There was not any significant difference between the proliferating activity of phyllodes tumor and cellular fibroadenomas. Mean LI of PCNA was 28.01 (+/-22.85) in stromal cells and 56.57 (+/-30.98) in epithelial cells of phyllodes tumor where it was 28.92 (+/-24.02) and 62.53 (+/-32.56) in fibroadenomas. Ki-67 indices were 0.05 (+/-0.19) in stromal cells, 2.65 (+/-12.53) in epithelial cells of phyllodes tumors and 0.0 (+/-0) in stromal cells, 0.43 (+/-0.63) in epithelial cells of fibroadenomas. There was no correlation between the diameter of tumors and proliferating activity in both groups. Proliferating activity, determined by immunohistochemistry with PCNA and Ki-67 antibodies did not reveal significant difference between phyllodes tumor and fibroadenoma.

  6. Volvox: A simple algal model for embryogenesis, morphogenesis and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Matt, Gavriel; Umen, James

    2016-11-01

    Patterning of a multicellular body plan involves a coordinated set of developmental processes that includes cell division, morphogenesis, and cellular differentiation. These processes have been most intensively studied in animals and land plants; however, deep insight can also be gained by studying development in simpler multicellular organisms. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri (Volvox) is an excellent model for the investigation of developmental mechanisms and their evolutionary origins. Volvox has a streamlined body plan that contains only a few thousand cells and two distinct cell types: reproductive germ cells and terminally differentiated somatic cells. Patterning of the Volvox body plan is achieved through a stereotyped developmental program that includes embryonic cleavage with asymmetric cell division, morphogenesis, and cell-type differentiation. In this review we provide an overview of how these three developmental processes give rise to the adult form in Volvox and how developmental mutants have provided insights into the mechanisms behind these events. We highlight the accessibility and tractability of Volvox and its relatives that provide a unique opportunity for studying development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sparse-grid-based adaptive model predictive control of HL60 cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Noble, Sarah L; Wendel, Lindsay E; Donahue, Maia M; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative methods such as model-based predictive control are known to facilitate the design of strategies to manipulate biological systems. This study develops a sparse-grid-based adaptive model predictive control (MPC) strategy to direct HL60 cellular differentiation. Sparse-grid sampling and interpolation support a computationally efficient adaptive MPC scheme in which multiple data-consistent regions of the model parameter space are identified and used to calculate a control compromise. The algorithm is evaluated in silico with structural model mismatch. Simulations demonstrate how the multiscenario control strategy more effectively manages the mismatch compared to a single scenario approach. Furthermore, the controller is evaluated in vitro to differentiate HL60 cells in both normal and perturbed environments. The controller-derived input sequence successfully achieves and sustains the specified target level of granulocytes when implemented in the laboratory. The results and analysis given here imply that adoption of this experiment planning technique to direct cell differentiation within more complex tissue engineered constructs will require the use of a reasonably accurate mathematical model and an extension of this algorithm to multiobjective controller design. © 2011 IEEE

  8. Biosynthesis of cellular and secreted proteins during follicle-stimulating hormone-induced granulosa cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Knecht, M; Shinohara, O; Catt, K J

    1986-09-01

    The synthesis of cellular and secreted proteins by differentiating granulosa cells from diethylstilbestrol-treated immature rats was studied by one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In cultured granulosa cells, FSH altered the relative biosynthesis of specific cellular and secreted proteins in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The incorporation of [35S]methionine into cellular proteins of Mr 42,000, 48,000, and 58,000 was enhanced by increasing amounts of the gonadotropin, whereas the labeling of a 44,000 Mr protein was reduced. Similarly, FSH increased the labeling of secreted proteins with relative Mr of 16,000, 17,000, 20,000, 25,000, 36,000, 41,000, 46,000, 111,000, and 153,000, and decreased that of proteins with Mr of 38,000, 48,000, 191,000, and 250,000. The expression of specific proteins was related to the degree of cellular maturation, since some proteins were newly synthesized during the early stages of granulosa cell development (less than 6 h), whereas others were more evident in the middle (24 h) or later (48 h) phases of culture. Also, the level of specific protein synthesis was variable since certain proteins were progressively produced during culture, and the biosynthesis of others fluctuated or was reduced during development. The effects of FSH on protein synthesis were mimicked by other cAMP-inducing ligands, including cholera toxin, forskolin, and 8-bromo-cAMP. Removal of FSH at 24 h of culture was followed by reversion of the protein biosynthetic pattern at 48 h to that of control cells, indicating that continued exposure to the gonadotropin is required during development. Cells cultured in the absence of ligands for 24 h synthesized proteins characteristic of differentiated cells when subsequently cultured with forskolin. These results indicate that FSH selectively alters the biosynthesis of cell-associated and secreted proteins during granulosa cell maturation. The characterization of these gene products and

  9. Development of dermal denticles in skates (Chondrichthyes, Batoidea): patterning and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miyake, T; Vaglia, J L; Taylor, L H; Hall, B K

    1999-07-01

    Patterning, cellular differentiation, and developmental sequences of dermal denticles (denticles) are described for the skate Leucoraja erinacea. Development of denticles proceeds caudo-rostrally in the tail and trunk. Once three rows of denticles form in the tail and trunk, denticles begin to appear in the region of the pelvic girdle, medio-caudal to the eyes and on the pectoral fins. Although timing of cellular differentiation of denticles differs among different locations of the body, cellular development of a denticle is identical in all locations. Thickening of the epidermis as a denticle lamina marks initiation of development. A single lamina for each denticle forms, and a small group of mesenchymal cells aggregates underneath it. The lamina then invaginates caudo-rostrally to form the inner- and outer-denticle epithelia (IDE and ODE, respectively). Before nuclei of IDE cells are polarized, enameloid matrix appears between the basement membrane of the IDE and the apical surface of the pre-odontoblasts. Pre-dentin is then laid down along with collagenous materials. Von Kossa stain visualizes initial mineralization of dentin, but not enameloid. During the growth of a denticle, dense fibrous connective tissue of the dermis forms the deep dermal tissue over the dorsal musculature. Attachment fibers and tendons anchor denticles and dorsal musculature, respectively, on deep dermal tissue. Basal tissue of the denticles develops as the denticle crown grows. If the basal tissue is bone of attachment, then the cells along the basal tissue would be osteoblasts. However, these cells could not be distinguished from odontoblasts using immunolocalization of type I pro-collagen (Col I), alkaline phosphatase (APase), and neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM). Well-developed dentin, (not pre-dentin), the enameloid matrix (probably when it begins to mineralize), and deep dermal tissue are Verhoeff stain-positive, suggesting that these tissues contain elastin and/or elastin

  10. Differential intron retention in Jumonji chromatin modifier genes is implicated in reptile temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    Deveson, Ira W.; Holleley, Clare E.; Blackburn, James; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Mattick, John S.; Waters, Paul D.; Georges, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    In many vertebrates, sex of offspring is determined by external environmental cues rather than by sex chromosomes. In reptiles, for instance, temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) is common. Despite decades of work, the mechanism by which temperature is converted into a sex-determining signal remains mysterious. This is partly because it is difficult to distinguish the primary molecular events of TSD from the confounding downstream signatures of sexual differentiation. We use the Australian central bearded dragon, in which chromosomal sex determination is overridden at high temperatures to produce sex-reversed female offspring, as a unique model to identify TSD-specific features of the transcriptome. We show that an intron is retained in mature transcripts from each of two Jumonji family genes, JARID2 and JMJD3, in female dragons that have been sex-reversed by temperature but not in normal chromosomal females or males. JARID2 is a component of the master chromatin modifier Polycomb Repressive Complex 2, and the mammalian sex-determining factor SRY is directly regulated by an independent but closely related Jumonji family member. We propose that the perturbation of JARID2/JMJD3 function by intron retention alters the epigenetic landscape to override chromosomal sex-determining cues, triggering sex reversal at extreme temperatures. Sex reversal may then facilitate a transition from genetic sex determination to TSD, with JARID2/JMJD3 intron retention preserved as the decisive regulatory signal. Significantly, we also observe sex-associated differential retention of the equivalent introns in JARID2/JMJD3 transcripts expressed in embryonic gonads from TSD alligators and turtles, indicative of a reptile-wide mechanism controlling TSD. PMID:28630932

  11. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation.

    PubMed

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-05-17

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium.

  12. Akt and c-Myc differentially activate cellular metabolic programs and prime cells to bioenergetic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yongjun; Dickman, Kathleen G; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2010-03-05

    The high glucose consumption of tumor cells even in an oxygen-rich environment, referred to as the Warburg effect, has been noted as a nearly universal biochemical characteristic of cancer cells. Targeting the glycolysis pathway has been explored as an anti-cancer therapeutic strategy to eradicate cancer based on this fundamental biochemical property of cancer cells. Oncoproteins such as Akt and c-Myc regulate cell metabolism. Accumulating studies have uncovered various molecular mechanisms by which oncoproteins affect cellular metabolism, raising a concern as to whether targeting glycolysis will be equally effective in treating cancers arising from different oncogenic activities. Here, we established a dual-regulatable FL5.12 pre-B cell line in which myristoylated Akt is expressed under the control of doxycycline, and c-Myc, fused to the hormone-binding domain of the human estrogen receptor, is activated by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Using this system, we directly compared the effect of these oncoproteins on cell metabolism in an isogenic background. Activation of either Akt or c-Myc leads to the Warburg effect as indicated by increased cellular glucose uptake, glycolysis, and lactate generation. When cells are treated with glycolysis inhibitors, Akt sensitizes cells to apoptosis, whereas c-Myc does not. In contrast, c-Myc but not Akt sensitizes cells to the inhibition of mitochondrial function. This is correlated with enhanced mitochondrial activities in c-Myc cells. Hence, although both Akt and c-Myc promote aerobic glycolysis, they differentially affect mitochondrial functions and render cells susceptible to the perturbation of cellular metabolic programs.

  13. Extreme cellular adaptations and cell differentiation required by a cyanobacterium for carbonate excavation

    PubMed Central

    Guida, Brandon Scott; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Some cyanobacteria, known as euendoliths, excavate and grow into calcium carbonates, with their activity leading to significant marine and terrestrial carbonate erosion and to deleterious effects on coral reef and bivalve ecology. Despite their environmental relevance, the mechanisms by which they can bore have remained elusive and paradoxical, in that, as oxygenic phototrophs, cyanobacteria tend to alkalinize their surroundings, which will encourage carbonate precipitation, not dissolution. Therefore, cyanobacteria must rely on unique adaptations to bore. Studies with the filamentous euendolith, Mastigocoleus testarum, indicated that excavation requires both cellular energy and transcellular calcium transport, mediated by P-type ATPases, but the cellular basis for this phenomenon remains obscure. We present evidence that excavation in M. testarum involves two unique cellular adaptations. Long-range calcium transport is based on active pumping at multiple cells along boring filaments, orchestrated by the preferential localization of calcium ATPases at one cell pole, in a ring pattern, facing the cross-walls, and by repeating this placement and polarity, a pattern that breaks at branching and apical cells. In addition, M. testarum differentiates specialized cells we call calcicytes, that which accumulate calcium at concentrations more than 500-fold those found in other cyanobacteria, concomitantly and drastically lowering photosynthetic pigments and enduring severe cytoplasmatic alkalinization. Calcicytes occur commonly, but not exclusively, in apical parts of the filaments distal to the excavation front. We suggest that calcicytes allow for fast calcium flow at low, nontoxic concentrations through undifferentiated cells by providing buffering storage for excess calcium before final excretion to the outside medium. PMID:27140633

  14. Cellular Adhesion Gene SELP Is Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Displays Differential Allelic Expression

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Teixeira, Elisabeth; Hugo Teixeira, Vitor; Steiner, Anke; Quente, Elfi; Wolfram, Grit; Scholz, Markus; Pierlot, Céline; Migliorini, Paola; Bombardieri, Stefano; Balsa, Alejandro; Westhovens, René; Barrera, Pilar; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Alves, Helena; Bardin, Thomas; Prum, Bernard; Emmrich, Frank; Cornelis, François

    2014-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a key event is infiltration of inflammatory immune cells into the synovial lining, possibly aggravated by dysregulation of cellular adhesion molecules. Therefore, single nucleotide polymorphisms of 14 genes involved in cellular adhesion processes (CAST, ITGA4, ITGB1, ITGB2, PECAM1, PTEN, PTPN11, PTPRC, PXN, SELE, SELP, SRC, TYK2, and VCAM1) were analyzed for association with RA. Association analysis was performed consecutively in three European RA family sample groups (Nfamilies = 407). Additionally, we investigated differential allelic expression, a possible functional consequence of genetic variants. SELP (selectin P, CD62P) SNP-allele rs6136-T was associated with risk for RA in two RA family sample groups as well as in global analysis of all three groups (ptotal = 0.003). This allele was also expressed preferentially (p<10−6) with a two- fold average increase in regulated samples. Differential expression is supported by data from Genevar MuTHER (p1 = 0.004; p2 = 0.0177). Evidence for influence of rs6136 on transcription factor binding was also found in silico and in public datasets reporting in vitro data. In summary, we found SELP rs6136-T to be associated with RA and with increased expression of SELP mRNA. SELP is located on the surface of endothelial cells and crucial for recruitment, adhesion, and migration of inflammatory cells into the joint. Genetically determined increased SELP expression levels might thus be a novel additional risk factor for RA. PMID:25147926

  15. Seeking the ultimate and proximate causes of volvox multicellularity and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kirk, David L

    2003-04-01

    Volvox and its relatives provide an exceptional model for integrative studies of the evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation. The volvocine algae range in complexity from unicellular Chlamydomonas through several colonial genera with a single cell type, to multicellular Volvox with its germ-soma division of labor. Within the monophyletic family Volvocaceae, several species of Volvox have evolved independently in different lineages, the ultimate cause presumably being the advantage that large size and cellular differentiation provide in competing for limiting resources such as phosphorous. The proximate causes of this type of evolutionary transition are being studied in V. carteri. All volvocine algae except Volvox exhibit biphasic development: cells grow during a motile, biflagellate phase, then they lose motility and divide repeatedly during the reproductive phase. In V. carteri three kinds of genes transform this ancestral biphasic program into a dichotomous one that generates non-motile reproductive cells and biflagellate somatic cells with no reproductive potential: first the gls genes act in early embryos to cause asymmetric division and production of large-small sister-cell pairs; then lag genes act in the large cells to repress the biflagellate half of the ancestral program, while regA acts in the small cells to repress the reproductive half of the program. Molecular-genetic analysis of these genes is progressing, as will be illustrated with regA, which encodes a transcription factor that acts in somatic cells to repress nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins. Repression of chloroplast biogenesis prevents these obligately photoautotrophic cells from growing, and since they cannot grow, they cannot reproduce.

  16. Differential influenza H1N1-specific humoral and cellular response kinetics in kidney transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Rambal, Vinay; Müller, Karin; Dang-Heine, Chantip; Sattler, Arne; Dziubianau, Mikalai; Weist, Benjamin; Luu, Si-Hong; Stoyanova, Alexandra; Nickel, Peter; Thiel, Andreas; Neumann, Avidan; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Reinke, Petra; Babel, Nina

    2014-02-01

    Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are considered at high risk for influenza-associated complications due to immunosuppression. The efficacy of standard influenza vaccination in RTRs is unclear. Hence, we evaluated activation of the adaptive immunity by the pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 (A(H1N1)pdm09) vaccine in RTRs as compared to healthy controls. To determine cross-reactivity and/or bystander activation, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine and tetanus/diphteria toxoid (TT/DT) vaccine-specific T cells along with allospecific T cells were quantified before and after A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination. Vaccination-induced alloimmunity was additionally determined by quantifying serum creatinine and proinflammatory protein IP-10. Contrary to healthy controls, RTRs required a booster vaccination to achieve seroconversion (13.3 % day 21; 90 % day 90). In contrast to humoral immunity, sufficient A(H1N1)pdm09-specific T-cell responses were mounted in RTRs already after the first immunization with a magnitude comparable with healthy controls. Interestingly, vaccination simultaneously boosted T cells reacting to seasonal flu but not to TT/DT, suggesting cross-activation. No alloimmune effects were recorded. In conclusion, protective antibody responses required booster vaccination. However, sufficient cellular immunity is established already after the first vaccination, demonstrating differential kinetics of humoral and cellular immunity.

  17. Root graviresponsiveness and cellular differentiation in wild-type and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1989-01-01

    Primary roots of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana L. are strongly graviresponsive despite lacking amyloplasts in their columella cells. The ultrastructures of calyptrogen and peripheral cells in wild-type as compared to mutant seedlings are not significantly different. The largest difference in cellular differentiation in caps of mutant and wild-type roots is the relative volume of plastids in columella cells. Plastids occupy 12.3% of the volume of columella cells in wild-type seedlings, but only 3.69% of columella cells in mutant seedlings. These results indicate that: (1) amyloplasts and starch are not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; (2) the increase in relative volume of plastids that usually accompanies differentiation of columella cells is not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; and (3) the absence of starch and amyloplasts does not affect the structure of calyptrogen (i.e. meristematic) and secretory (i.e. peripheral) cells in root caps. These results are discussed relative to proposed models for root gravitropism.

  18. Extrachromosomal HPV-16 LCR transcriptional activation by HDACi opposed by cellular differentiation and DNA integration

    PubMed Central

    Bojilova, Ekaterina Dimitrova; Weyn, Christine; Antoine, Marie-Hélène; Fontaine, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have been shown to render HPV-carrying cells susceptible to intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic signals. As such, these epigenetic drugs have entered clinical trials in the effort to treat cervical cancer. Here, we studied the effect of common HDACi, with an emphasis on Trichostatin A (TSA), on the transcriptional activity of the HPV-16 Long Control Region (LCR) in order to better understand the impact of these agents in the context of the HPV life cycle and infection. HDACi strongly induced transcription of the firefly luciferase reporter gene under the control of the HPV-16 LCR in a variety of cell lines. In the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line undergoing differentiation induced by TSA, we observed a reduction in LCR-controlled transcription. Three major AP-1 binding sites in the HPV-16 LCR are involved in the regulation by TSA. However, whatever the status of differentiation of the HaCaT cells, TSA induced integration of extra-chromosomal transfected DNA into the cellular genome. Although these data suggest caution using HDACi in the treatment of HR HPV infection, further in vivo studies are necessary to better assess the risk. PMID:27705914

  19. Root graviresponsiveness and cellular differentiation in wild-type and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1989-01-01

    Primary roots of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana L. are strongly graviresponsive despite lacking amyloplasts in their columella cells. The ultrastructures of calyptrogen and peripheral cells in wild-type as compared to mutant seedlings are not significantly different. The largest difference in cellular differentiation in caps of mutant and wild-type roots is the relative volume of plastids in columella cells. Plastids occupy 12.3% of the volume of columella cells in wild-type seedlings, but only 3.69% of columella cells in mutant seedlings. These results indicate that: (1) amyloplasts and starch are not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; (2) the increase in relative volume of plastids that usually accompanies differentiation of columella cells is not necessary for root graviresponsiveness; and (3) the absence of starch and amyloplasts does not affect the structure of calyptrogen (i.e. meristematic) and secretory (i.e. peripheral) cells in root caps. These results are discussed relative to proposed models for root gravitropism.

  20. Cellular differentiation state modulates the mRNA export activity of SR proteins.

    PubMed

    Botti, Valentina; McNicoll, François; Steiner, Michaela C; Richter, Florian M; Solovyeva, Anfisa; Wegener, Marius; Schwich, Oliver D; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Wittig, Ilka; Neugebauer, Karla M; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela

    2017-07-03

    SR proteins function in nuclear pre-mRNA processing, mRNA export, and translation. To investigate their cellular dynamics, we developed a quantitative assay, which detects differences in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling among seven canonical SR protein family members. As expected, SRSF2 and SRSF5 shuttle poorly in HeLa cells but surprisingly display considerable shuttling in pluripotent murine P19 cells. Combining individual-resolution cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) and mass spectrometry, we show that elevated arginine methylation of SRSF5 and lower phosphorylation levels of cobound SRSF2 enhance shuttling of SRSF5 in P19 cells by modulating protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Moreover, SRSF5 is bound to pluripotency-specific transcripts such as Lin28a and Pou5f1/Oct4 in the cytoplasm. SRSF5 depletion reduces and overexpression increases their cytoplasmic mRNA levels, suggesting that enhanced mRNA export by SRSF5 is required for the expression of pluripotency factors. Remarkably, neural differentiation of P19 cells leads to dramatically reduced SRSF5 shuttling. Our findings indicate that posttranslational modification of SR proteins underlies the regulation of their mRNA export activities and distinguishes pluripotent from differentiated cells. © 2017 Botti et al.

  1. Differential retention and divergent resolution of duplicate genes following whole-genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Casey L.; Gout, Jean-Francois; Johri, Parul; Doak, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The Paramecium aurelia complex is a group of 15 species that share at least three past whole-genome duplications (WGDs). The macronuclear genome sequences of P. biaurelia and P. sexaurelia are presented and compared to the published sequence of P. tetraurelia. Levels of duplicate-gene retention from the recent WGD differ by >10% across species, with P. sexaurelia losing significantly more genes than P. biaurelia or P. tetraurelia. In addition, historically high rates of gene conversion have homogenized WGD paralogs, probably extending the paralogs’ lifetimes. The probability of duplicate retention is positively correlated with GC content and expression level; ribosomal proteins, transcription factors, and intracellular signaling proteins are overrepresented among maintained duplicates. Finally, multiple sources of evidence indicate that P. sexaurelia diverged from the two other lineages immediately following, or perhaps concurrent with, the recent WGD, with approximately half of gene losses between P. tetraurelia and P. sexaurelia representing divergent gene resolutions (i.e., silencing of alternative paralogs), as expected for random duplicate loss between these species. Additionally, though P. biaurelia and P. tetraurelia diverged from each other much later, there are still more than 100 cases of divergent resolution between these two species. Taken together, these results indicate that divergent resolution of duplicate genes between lineages acts to reinforce reproductive isolation between species in the Paramecium aurelia complex. PMID:25085612

  2. Differential gene retention as an evolutionary mechanism to generate biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Morel, Guillaume; Sterck, Lieven; Swennen, Dominique; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Onesime, Djamila; Levasseur, Anthony; Jacques, Noémie; Mallet, Sandrine; Couloux, Arnaux; Labadie, Karine; Amselem, Joëlle; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Henrissat, Bernard; Van de Peer, Yves; Wincker, Patrick; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Gabaldón, Toni; Tinsley, Colin R; Casaregola, Serge

    2015-06-25

    The evolutionary history of the characters underlying the adaptation of microorganisms to food and biotechnological uses is poorly understood. We undertook comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary relationships of the dairy yeast Geotrichum candidum within Saccharomycotina. Surprisingly, a remarkable proportion of genes showed discordant phylogenies, clustering with the filamentous fungus subphylum (Pezizomycotina), rather than the yeast subphylum (Saccharomycotina), of the Ascomycota. These genes appear not to be the result of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT), but to have been specifically retained by G. candidum after the filamentous fungi-yeasts split concomitant with the yeasts' genome contraction. We refer to these genes as SRAGs (Specifically Retained Ancestral Genes), having been lost by all or nearly all other yeasts, and thus contributing to the phenotypic specificity of lineages. SRAG functions include lipases consistent with a role in cheese making and novel endoglucanases associated with degradation of plant material. Similar gene retention was observed in three other distantly related yeasts representative of this ecologically diverse subphylum. The phenomenon thus appears to be widespread in the Saccharomycotina and argues that, alongside neo-functionalization following gene duplication and HGT, specific gene retention must be recognized as an important mechanism for generation of biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts.

  3. Differential gene retention as an evolutionary mechanism to generate biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Guillaume; Sterck, Lieven; Swennen, Dominique; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Onesime, Djamila; Levasseur, Anthony; Jacques, Noémie; Mallet, Sandrine; Couloux, Arnaux; Labadie, Karine; Amselem, Joëlle; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Henrissat, Bernard; Van de Peer, Yves; Wincker, Patrick; Souciet, Jean-Luc; Gabaldón, Toni; Tinsley, Colin R.; Casaregola, Serge

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary history of the characters underlying the adaptation of microorganisms to food and biotechnological uses is poorly understood. We undertook comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary relationships of the dairy yeast Geotrichum candidum within Saccharomycotina. Surprisingly, a remarkable proportion of genes showed discordant phylogenies, clustering with the filamentous fungus subphylum (Pezizomycotina), rather than the yeast subphylum (Saccharomycotina), of the Ascomycota. These genes appear not to be the result of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT), but to have been specifically retained by G. candidum after the filamentous fungi–yeasts split concomitant with the yeasts’ genome contraction. We refer to these genes as SRAGs (Specifically Retained Ancestral Genes), having been lost by all or nearly all other yeasts, and thus contributing to the phenotypic specificity of lineages. SRAG functions include lipases consistent with a role in cheese making and novel endoglucanases associated with degradation of plant material. Similar gene retention was observed in three other distantly related yeasts representative of this ecologically diverse subphylum. The phenomenon thus appears to be widespread in the Saccharomycotina and argues that, alongside neo-functionalization following gene duplication and HGT, specific gene retention must be recognized as an important mechanism for generation of biodiversity and adaptation in yeasts. PMID:26108467

  4. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-09

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  5. Cellular differentiation in the emerging fetal rat small intestinal epithelium: mosaic patterns of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rubin, D C; Ong, D E; Gordon, J I

    1989-02-01

    We have examined the pattern of differentiation of the small intestinal epithelium in fetal rats during the 17th through 21st days of gestation. Five genes expressed in late fetal, neonatal, and adult enterocytes were used as markers of differentiation. They encode three homologous small cytoplasmic hydrophobic ligand binding proteins--liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP), and cellular retinol binding protein II (CRBP II)--and two apolipoproteins--apoAI and apoAIV. RNA blot hybridization studies indicated that gradients in mRNA concentration from the proximal small intestine to colon appear coincident with the initiation of rapid epithelial cell proliferation and villus formation (days 17-19 of the 22-day gestation period). Immunocytochemical studies disclosed a remarkably heterogeneous pattern of cell-specific expression of the three hydrophobic ligand binding proteins that was not apparent with either apoAIV or apoAI. This "mosaic" staining pattern was observed in morphologically similar cells occupying identical topographic positions along nascent villi in 17- to 18-day fetuses. The onset and resolution of this mosaicism varies between I-FABP, L-FABP, and CRBP II in the proximal small bowel, although it completely resolves by the first postnatal day. The distal small intestine exhibits a developmental delay of 1-2 days in the appearance of this heterogeneous pattern of initial gene expression. Double-label immunofluorescent analyses using L-FABP and I-FABP antibodies indicated that on the 18th day of gestation the proximal small intestinal columnar epithelium contains several populations of enterocytes expressing neither, one, or both proteins. The potential significance of this mosaic pattern of intestinal epithelial differentiation is discussed in light of recent studies with transgenic and chimeric mice.

  6. Human papillomavirus 16E6 and NFX1-123 potentiate notch signaling and differentiation without activating cellular arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.

    2015-04-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) oncoproteins bind host cell proteins to dysregulate and uncouple apoptosis, senescence, differentiation, and growth. These pathways are important for both the viral life cycle and cancer development. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and they collaboratively increase the growth and differentiation master regulator, Notch1. In 16E6 expressing keratinocytes (16E6 HFKs), the Notch canonical pathway genes Hes1 and Hes5 were increased with overexpression of NFX1-123, and their expression was directly linked to the activation or blockade of the Notch1 receptor. Keratinocyte differentiation genes Keratin 1 and Keratin 10 were also increased, but in contrast their upregulation was only indirectly associated with Notch1 receptor stimulation and was fully unlinked to growth arrest, increased p21{sup Waf1/CIP1}, or decreased proliferative factor Ki67. This leads to a model of 16E6, NFX1-123, and Notch1 differently regulating canonical and differentiation pathways and entirely uncoupling cellular arrest from increased differentiation. - Highlights: • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the Notch canonical pathway through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the differentiation pathway indirectly through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased differentiation gene expression without growth arrest. • Increased NFX1-123 with 16E6 may create an ideal cellular phenotype for HPV.

  7. The First Slow Step: Differential Effects of Object and Word-Form Familiarization on Retention of Fast-Mapped Words

    PubMed Central

    Kucker, Sarah C.; Samuelson, Larissa K.

    2011-01-01

    Recent research demonstrated that although twenty-four month-old infants do well on the initial pairing of a novel word and novel object in fast-mapping tasks, they are unable to retain the mapping after a five-minute delay. The current study examines the role of familiarity with the objects and words on infants' ability to bridge between the initial fast mapping of a name and object, and later retention in the service of slow mapping. Twenty-four-month-old infants were familiarized with either novel objects or novel names prior to the referent selection portion of a fast-mapping task. When familiarized with the novel objects, infants retained the novel mapping after a delay, but not when familiarized with the novel words. This suggests familiarity with the object versus the word form leads to differential encoding of the name-object link. We discuss the implications of this finding for subsequent slow mapping. PMID:22661907

  8. Differential contribution of key metabolic substrates and cellular oxygen in HIF signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, Alexander V.; Waters, Alicia H.C.; Golubeva, Anna V.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in availability and utilisation of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates are common in ischemia and cancer. We examined effects of substrate deprivation on HIF signalling in PC12 cells exposed to different atmospheric O{sub 2}. Upon 2–4 h moderate hypoxia, HIF-α protein levels were dictated by the availability of glutamine and glucose, essential for deep cell deoxygenation and glycolytic ATP flux. Nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α dramatically decreased upon inhibition of glutaminolysis or glutamine deprivation. Elevation of HIF-2α levels was transcription-independent and associated with the activation of Akt and Erk1/2. Upon 2 h anoxia, HIF-2α levels strongly correlated with cellular ATP, produced exclusively via glycolysis. Without glucose, HIF signalling was suppressed, giving way to other regulators of cell adaptation to energy crisis, e.g. AMPK. Consequently, viability of cells deprived of O{sub 2} and glucose decreased upon inhibition of AMPK with dorsomorphin. The capacity of cells to accumulate HIF-2α decreased after 24 h glucose deprivation. This effect, associated with increased AMPKα phosphorylation, was sensitive to dorsomorphin. In chronically hypoxic cells, glutamine played no major role in HIF-2α accumulation, which became mainly glucose-dependent. Overall, the availability of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates intricately regulates HIF signalling by affecting cell oxygenation, ATP levels and pathways involved in production of HIF-α. - Highlights: • Gln and Glc regulate HIF levels in hypoxic cells by maintaining low O{sub 2} and high ATP. • HIF-α levels under anoxia correlate with cellular ATP and critically depend on Glc. • Gln and Glc modulate activity of Akt, Erk and AMPK, regulating HIF production. • HIF signalling is differentially inhibited by prolonged Glc and Gln deprivation. • Unlike Glc, Gln plays no major role in HIF signalling in chronically hypoxic cells.

  9. Decreased non-specific adhesivity, receptor targeted (DART) nanoparticles exhibit improved dispersion, cellular uptake, and tumor retention in invasive gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wadajkar, Aniket S; Dancy, Jimena G; Roberts, Nathan B; Connolly, Nina P; Strickland, Dudley K; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J

    2017-09-05

    The most common and deadly form of primary brain cancer, glioblastoma (GBM), is characterized by significant intratumoral heterogeneity, microvascular proliferation, immune system suppression, and brain tissue invasion. Delivering effective and sustained treatments to the invasive GBM cells intermixed with functioning neural elements is a major goal of advanced therapeutic systems for brain cancer. Previously, we investigated the nanoparticle characteristics that enable targeting of invasive GBM cells. This revealed the importance of minimizing non-specific binding within the relatively adhesive, 'sticky' microenvironment of the brain and brain tumors in particular. We refer to such nanoformulations with decreased non-specific adhesivity and receptor targeting as 'DART' therapeutics. In this work, we applied this information toward the design and characterization of biodegradable nanocarriers, and in vivo testing in orthotopic experimental gliomas. We formulated particulate nanocarriers using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) polymers to generate sub-100nm nanoparticles with minimal binding to extracellular brain components and strong binding to the Fn14 receptor - an upregulated, conserved component in invasive GBM. Multiple particle tracking in brain tissue slices and in vivo testing in orthotopic murine malignant glioma revealed preserved nanoparticle diffusivity and increased uptake in brain tumor cells. These combined characteristics also resulted in longer retention of the DART nanoparticles within the orthotopic tumors compared to non-targeted versions. Taken together, these results and nanoparticle design considerations offer promising new methods to optimize therapeutic nanocarriers for improving drug delivery and treatment for invasive brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Price Differential's Impact on Retention, Recruitment, and Quality in a Public University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Michale W.; O'Toole, Dennis; Wetzel, James

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 467 business students at Virginia Commonwealth University investigated results of the business school's tuition differential pricing strategy, which charges a higher tuition in order to provide students with strong computer and technological instruction and support. Results indicated the additional services created added value for…

  11. Butyrate plays differential roles in cellular signaling in cancerous HCT116 and noncancerous NCM460 colon cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, exhibits chemoprevention effects in colon. However, the mechanistic action of butyrate at the cellular level remains to be determined. We hypothesize that butyrate plays differential roles in cancerous and non-cancerous cells through si...

  12. Exploring cellular adhesion and differentiation in a micro-/nano-hybrid polymer scaffold.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ke; Kisaalita, William S

    2010-01-01

    Polymer scaffolds play an important role in three dimensional (3-D) cell culture and tissue engineering. To best mimic the archiecture of natural extracellular matrix (ECM), a nano-fibrous and micro-porous combined (NFMP) scaffold was fabricated by combining phase separation and particulate leaching techniques. The NFMP scaffold possesses architectural features at two levels, including the micro-scale pores and nano-scale fibers. To evaluate the advantages of micro/nano combination, control scaffolds with only micro-pores or nano-fibers were fabricated. Cell grown in NFMP and control scaffolds were characterized with respect to morphology, proliferation rate, diffentiation and adhesion. The NFMP scaffold combined the advantages of micro- and nano-scale structures. The NFMP scaffold nano-fibers promoted neural differentiation and induced "3-D matrix adhesion", while the NFMP scaffold micro-pores facilitated cell infiltration. This study represents a systematic comparison of cellular activities on micro-only, nano-only and micro/nano combined scaffolds, and demonstrates the unique advantages of the later.

  13. Metal Ions May Suppress or Enhance Cellular Differentiation in Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis Biofilms▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Joe J.; Ceri, Howard; Yerly, Jerome; Rabiei, Maryam; Hu, Yaoping; Martinuzzi, Robert; Turner, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are polymorphic fungi that develop antimicrobial-resistant biofilm communities that are characterized by multiple cell morphotypes. This study investigated cell type interconversion and drug and metal resistance as well as community organization in biofilms of these microorganisms that were exposed to metal ions. To study this, Candida biofilms were grown either in microtiter plates containing gradient arrays of metal ions or in the Calgary Biofilm Device for high-throughput susceptibility testing. Biofilm formation and antifungal resistance were evaluated by viable cell counts, tetrazolium salt reduction, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy in conjunction with three-dimensional visualization. We discovered that subinhibitory concentrations of certain metal ions (CrO42−, Co2+, Cu2+, Ag+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, AsO2−, and SeO32−) caused changes in biofilm structure by blocking or eliciting the transition between yeast and hyphal cell types. Four distinct biofilm community structure types were discerned from these data, which were designated “domed,” “layer cake,” “flat,” and “mycelial.” This study suggests that Candida biofilm populations may respond to metal ions to form cell-cell and solid-surface-attached assemblages with distinct patterns of cellular differentiation. PMID:17557844

  14. Differential, regional, and cellular expression of the stathmin family transcripts in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ozon, S; El Mestikawy, S; Sobel, A

    1999-06-01

    Stathmin is a ubiquitous cytosolic phosphoprotein, preferentially expressed in the nervous system, and previously described as a relay integrating diverse intracellular signaling pathways. Stathmin is the generic element of a mammalian protein family including SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3 with its splice variants RB3' and RB3". In contrast with stathmin, SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3/RB3'/RB3" are exclusively expressed in the nervous system, stathmin and SCG10 being mostly expressed during cell proliferation and differentiation, and SCLIP and RB3 rather in mature neural cells. To further understand their specific roles in the CNS, we compared the localization of the stathmin, SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3 transcripts in adult rat brain. Northern blot analysis as well as in situ hybridization experiments showed that all stathmin-related mRNAs are expressed in a wide range of adult rat brain areas. At a regional level, SCG10 and SCLIP appear generally distributed similarly except in a few areas. The pattern of expression of the RB3 transcript is very different from that of the three other members of the stathmin family. Furthermore, unlike SCG10 and SCLIP, which were detected only in neurons, but like stathmin, RB3 was detected in neurons and also in glial cells of the white matter. Altogether, our results suggest distinct roles for each member of the stathmin-related phosphoprotein family, in regard to their specific regional and cellular localization in the rat brain.

  15. A universal concept based on cellular neural networks for ultrafast and flexible solving of differential equations.

    PubMed

    Chedjou, Jean Chamberlain; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere

    2015-04-01

    This paper develops and validates a comprehensive and universally applicable computational concept for solving nonlinear differential equations (NDEs) through a neurocomputing concept based on cellular neural networks (CNNs). High-precision, stability, convergence, and lowest-possible memory requirements are ensured by the CNN processor architecture. A significant challenge solved in this paper is that all these cited computing features are ensured in all system-states (regular or chaotic ones) and in all bifurcation conditions that may be experienced by NDEs.One particular quintessence of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a solver concept that shows and ensures that CNN processors (realized either in hardware or in software) are universal solvers of NDE models. The solving logic or algorithm of given NDEs (possible examples are: Duffing, Mathieu, Van der Pol, Jerk, Chua, Rössler, Lorenz, Burgers, and the transport equations) through a CNN processor system is provided by a set of templates that are computed by our comprehensive templates calculation technique that we call nonlinear adaptive optimization. This paper is therefore a significant contribution and represents a cutting-edge real-time computational engineering approach, especially while considering the various scientific and engineering applications of this ultrafast, energy-and-memory-efficient, and high-precise NDE solver concept. For illustration purposes, three NDE models are demonstratively solved, and related CNN templates are derived and used: the periodically excited Duffing equation, the Mathieu equation, and the transport equation.

  16. A cellular Potts model analyzing differentiated cell behavior during in vivo vascularization of a hypoxic tissue.

    PubMed

    Scianna, Marco; Bassino, Eleonora; Munaron, Luca

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessel networks from existing capillary or post-capillary venules, is an intrinsically multiscale process occurring in several physio-pathological conditions. In particular, hypoxic tissue cells activate downstream cascades culminating in the secretion of a wide range of angiogenic factors, including VEGF isoforms. Such diffusive chemicals activate the endothelial cells (ECs) forming the external walls of the nearby vessels that chemotactically migrate toward the hypoxic areas of the tissue as multicellular sprouts. A functional network eventually emerges by further branching and anastomosis processes. We here propose a CPM-based approach reproducing selected features of the angiogenic progression necessary for the reoxygenation of a hypoxic tissue. Our model is able to span the different scale involved in the angiogenic progression as it incorporates reaction-diffusion equations for the description of the evolution of microenvironmental variables in a discrete mesoscopic cellular Potts model (CPM) that reproduces the dynamics of the vascular cells. A key feature of this work is the explicit phenotypic differentiation of the ECs themselves, distinguished in quiescent, stalk and tip. The simulation results allow identifying a set of key mechanisms underlying tissue vascularization. Further, we provide evidence that the nascent pattern is characterized by precise topological properties. Finally, we link abnormal sprouting angiogenesis with alteration in selected cell behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential effect of aphidicolin on adenovirus DNA synthesis and cellular DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kwant, M M; van der Vliet, P C

    1980-09-11

    There is strong evidence for a participation of DNA polymerase gamma in the replication of adenovirus (Ad) DNA. To study a possible additional role of DNA polymerase alpha we measured the effect of aphidicolin on viral DNA replication. In intact cells, aphidicolin inhibits Ad DNA synthesis weakly. The drug concentration required for 50% inhibition of Ad DNA replication was 300-400 fold higher than for a similar effect on cellular DNA synthesis. Such a differential inhibition was also observed in AGMK cells doubly infected with SV40 and the simian adenovirus SA7. No evidence was found for modification of aphidicolin in infected cells or for a change in aphidicolin sensitivity of DNA polymerase alpha after infection. The extent of inhibition of purified DNA polymerase alpha was dependent upon the dCTP concentration. The same situation was observed when DNA synthesis was studied in isolated nuclei from uninfected cells. However, in nuclei from Ad infected cells no effect of dCTP on aphidicolin sensitivity was found. These results were taken as evidence that DNA polymerase alpha does not participate in the replication of adenovirus DNA.

  18. Metal ions may suppress or enhance cellular differentiation in Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Ceri, Howard; Yerly, Jerome; Rabiei, Maryam; Hu, Yaoping; Martinuzzi, Robert; Turner, Raymond J

    2007-08-01

    Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis are polymorphic fungi that develop antimicrobial-resistant biofilm communities that are characterized by multiple cell morphotypes. This study investigated cell type interconversion and drug and metal resistance as well as community organization in biofilms of these microorganisms that were exposed to metal ions. To study this, Candida biofilms were grown either in microtiter plates containing gradient arrays of metal ions or in the Calgary Biofilm Device for high-throughput susceptibility testing. Biofilm formation and antifungal resistance were evaluated by viable cell counts, tetrazolium salt reduction, light microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy in conjunction with three-dimensional visualization. We discovered that subinhibitory concentrations of certain metal ions (CrO(4)(2-), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ag(+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Pb(2+), AsO(2)(-), and SeO(3)(2-)) caused changes in biofilm structure by blocking or eliciting the transition between yeast and hyphal cell types. Four distinct biofilm community structure types were discerned from these data, which were designated "domed," "layer cake," "flat," and "mycelial." This study suggests that Candida biofilm populations may respond to metal ions to form cell-cell and solid-surface-attached assemblages with distinct patterns of cellular differentiation.

  19. Cellular differentiation in the process of generation of the eukaryotic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hakobu; Hase, Atsushi

    1990-11-01

    Primitive atmosphere of the earth did not contain oxygen gas (O2) when the proto-cells were generated successfully as the resut of chemical evolution and then evolved. Therefore, they first had acquired anaerobic energy metabolism, fermentation. The cellular metabolisms have often been formed by reorganizing to combine or recombinate between pre-existing metabolisms and newly born bioreactions. Photosynthetic metabolism in eukaryotic chloroplast consists of an electron-transfer photosystem and a fermentative reductive pentose phosphate cycle. On the other hand, O2-respiration of eukaryotic mitochondrion is made of Embden-Meyerhof (EM) pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle, which originate from a connection of fermentative metabolisms, and an electron-transfer respiratory chain, which has been derived from the photosystem. These metabolisms already are completed in some evolved prokaryotes, for example the cyanobacteriumChlorogloea fritschii and aerobic photosynthetic bacteriaRhodospirillum rubrum andErythrobacter sp. Therefore, it can be reasonably presumed that the eukaryotic chloroplast and mitochondrion have once been formed as the result of metabolic (and genetic) differentiations in most evolved cyanobacterium. Symbiotic theory has explained the origin of eukaryotic cell as that in which the mitochondrion and chloroplast have been derived from endosymbionts of aerobic bacterium and cyanobacterium, respectively, and has mentioned as one of the most potent supportive evidences that amino acid sequences of the photosynthetic and O2 -respiratory enzymes show similarities to corresponding prokaryotic enzymes. However, as will be shown in this discussion, many examples have shown currently that prokaryotic sequences of informative molecules are conserved well not only in those of the mitochondrial and chloroplast molecules but also in the nuclear molecules. In fact, the similarities in sequence of informative molecules are preserved well among the organisms not only

  20. Differential Loss and Retention of Cytoglobin, Myoglobin, and Globin-E during the Radiation of Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Federico G.; Opazo, Juan C.; Storz, Jay F.

    2011-01-01

    If rates of postduplication gene retention are positively correlated with levels of functional constraint, then gene duplicates that have been retained in a restricted number of taxonomic lineages would be expected to exhibit relatively low levels of sequence conservation. Paradoxical patterns are presented by gene duplicates that have been retained in a small number of taxa but which are nonetheless subject to strong purifying selection relative to paralogous members of the same multigene family. This pattern suggests that such genes may have been co-opted for novel, lineage-specific functions. One possible example involves the enigmatic globin-E gene (GbE), which appears to be exclusively restricted to birds. Available data indicate that this gene is expressed exclusively in the avian eye, but its physiological function remains a mystery. In contrast to the highly restricted phyletic distribution of GbE, the overwhelming majority of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) possess copies of the related cytoglobin (Cygb) and myoglobin (Mb) genes. The purpose of the present study was 1) to assess the phyletic distribution of the Cygb, Mb, and GbE genes among vertebrates, 2) to elucidate the duplicative origins and evolutionary histories of these three genes, and 3) to evaluate the relative levels of functional constraint of these genes based on comparative sequence analysis. To accomplish these objectives, we conducted a combined phylogenetic and comparative genomic analysis involving taxa that represent each of the major lineages of gnathostome vertebrates. Results of synteny comparisons and phylogenetic topology tests revealed that GbE is clearly not the product of a recent, bird-specific duplication event. Instead, GbE originated via duplication of a proto-Mb gene in the stem lineage of gnathostomes. Unlike the Mb gene, which has been retained in all major gnathostome lineages other than amphibians, the GbE gene has been retained only in the lineage leading to modern

  1. Differential sensitivities of cellular XPA and PARP-1 to arsenite inhibition and zinc rescue.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Xixi; Cooper, Karen L; Huestis, Juliana; Hudson, Laurie G; Liu, Ke Jian

    2017-09-15

    Arsenite directly binds to the zinc finger domains of the DNA repair protein poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1, and inhibits PARP-1 activity in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. PARP inhibition by arsenite enhances ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage in keratinocytes, and the increase in DNA damage is reduced by zinc supplementation. However, little is known about the effects of arsenite and zinc on the zinc finger nucleotide excision repair (NER) protein xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). In this study, we investigated the difference in response to arsenite exposure between XPA and PARP-1, and the differential effectiveness of zinc supplementation in restoring protein DNA binding and DNA damage repair. Arsenite targeted both XPA and PARP-1 in human keratinocytes, resulting in zinc loss from each protein and a pronounced decrease in XPA and PARP-1 binding to chromatin as demonstrated by Chip-on-Western assays. Zinc effectively restored DNA binding of PARP-1 and XPA to chromatin when zinc concentrations were equal to those of arsenite. In contrast, zinc was more effective in rescuing arsenite-augmented direct UVR-induced DNA damage than oxidative DNA damage. Taken together, our findings indicate that arsenite interferes with PARP-1 and XPA binding to chromatin, and that zinc supplementation fully restores DNA binding activity to both proteins in the cellular context. Interestingly, rescue of arsenite-inhibited DNA damage repair by supplemental zinc was more sensitive for DNA damage repaired by the XPA-associated NER pathway than for the PARP-1-dependent BER pathway. This study expands our understanding of arsenite's role in DNA repair inhibition and co-carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. TIPS to manipulate myogenesis: retention of myoblast differentiation capacity using microsphere culture.

    PubMed

    Parmar, N; Day, R M

    2015-07-27

    Cell therapy is an emerging option for regenerating skeletal muscle. Improved delivery methods for anchorage-dependent myoblasts are likely to improve integration and function of transplanted muscle cells. Highly porous microspheres, produced using thermally induced phase separation (TIPS), have features ideally suited for minimally invasive cell delivery. The purpose of this study was to investigate, for the first time, the use of TIPS microspheres as highly porous microcarriers for manipulation of human skeletal muscle myoblasts (HSMM) under defined culture conditions. HSMM cells readily attached to the surface of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) TIPS microcarriers, where they were induced to continue proliferating or to be driven towards differentiation whilst under static-dynamic culture conditions for 7 days. Switching from proliferation medium to differentiation medium for 7 days, resulted in increased protein expression of skeletal muscle cell contractile apparatus components, MyoD and skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, compared with cells cultured on conventional culture plasticware for the same duration (p < 0.001). Growth of myoblasts on the surface of the microcarriers and their migration following simulated delivery, caused no change to the proliferative capacity of cells over 7 days. Results from this study demonstrate that TIPS microspheres provide an ideal vehicle for the expansion and delivery of myoblasts for therapeutic applications. Transplantation of myoblasts anchored to a substrate, rather than in suspension, will reduce the amount of ex vivo manipulation required during preparation of the product and allows cells to be delivered in a more natural state. This will improve the ability to control cell dosage and increase the likelihood of efficacy.

  3. Interaction of SDF-1alpha and CXCR4 plays an important role in pulmonary cellular infiltration in differentiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jin; Hu, Longhu; Cui, Zhe; Jiang, Xian; Wang, Guifang; Krissansen, Geoffrey W; Sun, Xueying

    2010-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha) and its receptor CXCR4 in cellular infiltration of the lung in differentiation syndrome (DS). The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) NB4 cells and freshly prepared APL cells from the patients were differentiated by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). The expression of SDF-1alpha in human lung tissues was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The cells were subjected to adhesion, migration or invasion assays, and co-cultured with human lung tissues in a microgravity rotary cell culture system to examine cellular infiltration in situ. ATRA-differentiated cells expressed high levels of CXCR4, and adhered more strongly to matrigel. Their ability to migrate and invade was enhanced by SDF-1alpha and lung homogenate, and diminished by pre-treatment with an anti-CXCR4 blocking antibody. SDF-1alpha was expressed in the lung tissues of all seven human donors. ATRA-differentiated NB4 cells infiltrated into lung tissues, and this was reduced by pre-treatment with an anti-CXCR4 blocking antibody. The interaction of SDF-1alpha and CXCR4 plays an important role in pulmonary cellular infiltration during DS, suggesting that targeting SDF-1alpha and CXCR4 may provide the basis for potential treatments in the management of DS.

  4. MYB64 and MYB119 Are Required for Cellularization and Differentiation during Female Gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Rabiger, David S.; Drews, Gary N.

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, the egg cell forms within the multicellular, haploid female gametophyte. Female gametophyte and egg cell development occurs through a unique process in which a haploid spore initially undergoes several rounds of synchronous nuclear divisions without cytokinesis, resulting in a single cell containing multiple nuclei. The developing gametophyte then forms cell walls (cellularization) and the resulting cells differentiate to generate the egg cell and several accessory cells. The switch between free nuclear divisions and cellularization-differentiation occurs during developmental stage FG5 in Arabidopsis, and we refer to it as the FG5 transition. The molecular regulators that initiate the FG5 transition during female gametophyte development are unknown. In this study, we show using mutant analysis that two closely related MYB transcription factors, MYB64 and MYB119, act redundantly to promote this transition. MYB64 and MYB119 are expressed during the FG5 transition, and most myb64 myb119 double mutant gametophytes fail to initiate the FG5 transition, resulting in uncellularized gametophytes with supernumerary nuclei. Analysis of cell-specific markers in myb64 myb119 gametophytes that do cellularize suggests that gametophytic polarity and differentiation are also affected. We also show using multiple-mutant analysis that MYB119 expression is regulated by the histidine kinase CKI1, the primary activator of two-component signaling (TCS) during female gametophyte development. Our data establish a molecular pathway regulating the FG5 transition and implicates CKI1-dependent TCS in the promotion of cellularization, differentiation, and gamete specification during female gametogenesis. PMID:24068955

  5. MYB64 and MYB119 are required for cellularization and differentiation during female gametogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rabiger, David S; Drews, Gary N

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, the egg cell forms within the multicellular, haploid female gametophyte. Female gametophyte and egg cell development occurs through a unique process in which a haploid spore initially undergoes several rounds of synchronous nuclear divisions without cytokinesis, resulting in a single cell containing multiple nuclei. The developing gametophyte then forms cell walls (cellularization) and the resulting cells differentiate to generate the egg cell and several accessory cells. The switch between free nuclear divisions and cellularization-differentiation occurs during developmental stage FG5 in Arabidopsis, and we refer to it as the FG5 transition. The molecular regulators that initiate the FG5 transition during female gametophyte development are unknown. In this study, we show using mutant analysis that two closely related MYB transcription factors, MYB64 and MYB119, act redundantly to promote this transition. MYB64 and MYB119 are expressed during the FG5 transition, and most myb64 myb119 double mutant gametophytes fail to initiate the FG5 transition, resulting in uncellularized gametophytes with supernumerary nuclei. Analysis of cell-specific markers in myb64 myb119 gametophytes that do cellularize suggests that gametophytic polarity and differentiation are also affected. We also show using multiple-mutant analysis that MYB119 expression is regulated by the histidine kinase CKI1, the primary activator of two-component signaling (TCS) during female gametophyte development. Our data establish a molecular pathway regulating the FG5 transition and implicates CKI1-dependent TCS in the promotion of cellularization, differentiation, and gamete specification during female gametogenesis.

  6. MicroRNAs Regulate Cellular ATP Levels by Targeting Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism Genes during C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Siengdee, Puntita; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we identified an miRNA regulatory network involved in energy metabolism in porcine muscle. To better understand the involvement of miRNAs in cellular ATP production and energy metabolism, here we used C2C12 myoblasts, in which ATP levels increase during differentiation, to identify miRNAs modulating these processes. ATP level, miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles during C2C12 differentiation into myotubes were assessed. The results suggest 14 miRNAs (miR-423-3p, miR-17, miR-130b, miR-301a/b, miR-345, miR-15a, miR-16a, miR-128, miR-615, miR-1968, miR-1a/b, and miR-194) as cellular ATP regulators targeting genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism (Cox4i2, Cox6a2, Ndufb7, Ndufs4, Ndufs5, and Ndufv1) during C2C12 differentiation. Among these, miR-423-3p showed a high inverse correlation with increasing ATP levels. Besides having implications in promoting cell growth and cell cycle progression, its function in cellular ATP regulation is yet unknown. Therefore, miR-423-3p was selected and validated for the function together with its potential target, Cox6a2. Overexpression of miR-423-3p in C2C12 myogenic differentiation lead to decreased cellular ATP level and decreased expression of Cox6a2 compared to the negative control. These results suggest miR-423-3p as a novel regulator of ATP/energy metabolism by targeting Cox6a2.

  7. MicroRNAs Regulate Cellular ATP Levels by Targeting Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism Genes during C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Siengdee, Puntita; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we identified an miRNA regulatory network involved in energy metabolism in porcine muscle. To better understand the involvement of miRNAs in cellular ATP production and energy metabolism, here we used C2C12 myoblasts, in which ATP levels increase during differentiation, to identify miRNAs modulating these processes. ATP level, miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles during C2C12 differentiation into myotubes were assessed. The results suggest 14 miRNAs (miR-423-3p, miR-17, miR-130b, miR-301a/b, miR-345, miR-15a, miR-16a, miR-128, miR-615, miR-1968, miR-1a/b, and miR-194) as cellular ATP regulators targeting genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism (Cox4i2, Cox6a2, Ndufb7, Ndufs4, Ndufs5, and Ndufv1) during C2C12 differentiation. Among these, miR-423-3p showed a high inverse correlation with increasing ATP levels. Besides having implications in promoting cell growth and cell cycle progression, its function in cellular ATP regulation is yet unknown. Therefore, miR-423-3p was selected and validated for the function together with its potential target, Cox6a2. Overexpression of miR-423-3p in C2C12 myogenic differentiation lead to decreased cellular ATP level and decreased expression of Cox6a2 compared to the negative control. These results suggest miR-423-3p as a novel regulator of ATP/energy metabolism by targeting Cox6a2. PMID:26010876

  8. Stochastic cellular automata model of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation: validation with in vitro cultures of muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Garijo, N; Manzano, R; Osta, R; Perez, M A

    2012-12-07

    Cell migration and proliferation has been modelled in the literature as a process similar to diffusion. However, using diffusion models to simulate the proliferation and migration of cells tends to create a homogeneous distribution in the cell density that does not correlate to empirical observations. In fact, the mechanism of cell dispersal is not diffusion. Cells disperse by crawling or proliferation, or are transported in a moving fluid. The use of cellular automata, particle models or cell-based models can overcome this limitation. This paper presents a stochastic cellular automata model to simulate the proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. These processes are considered as completely stochastic as well as discrete. The model developed was applied to predict the behaviour of in vitro cell cultures performed with adult muscle satellite cells. Moreover, non homogeneous distribution of cells has been observed inside the culture well and, using the above mentioned stochastic cellular automata model, we have been able to predict this heterogeneous cell distribution and compute accurate quantitative results. Differentiation was also incorporated into the computational simulation. The results predicted the myotube formation that typically occurs with adult muscle satellite cells. In conclusion, we have shown how a stochastic cellular automata model can be implemented and is capable of reproducing the in vitro behaviour of adult muscle satellite cells.

  9. Achaete-Scute Homolog 1 Expression Controls Cellular Differentiation of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Kasim, Mumtaz; Heß, Vicky; Scholz, Holger; Persson, Pontus B.; Fähling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the major cause of infant cancer deaths, results from fast proliferation of undifferentiated neuroblasts. Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma includes differentiation with retinoic acid (RA); however, the resistance of many of these tumors to RA-induced differentiation poses a considerable challenge. Human achaete-scute homolog 1 (hASH1) is a proneural basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor essential for neurogenesis and is often upregulated in neuroblastoma. Here, we identified a novel function for hASH1 in regulating the differentiation phenotype of neuroblastoma cells. Global analysis of 986 human neuroblastoma datasets revealed a negative correlation between hASH1 and neuron differentiation that was independent of the N-myc (MYCN) oncogene. Using RA to induce neuron differentiation in two neuroblastoma cell lines displaying high and low levels of hASH1 expression, we confirmed the link between hASH1 expression and the differentiation defective phenotype, which was reversed by silencing hASH1 or by hypoxic preconditioning. We further show that hASH1 suppresses neuronal differentiation by inhibiting transcription at the RA receptor element. Collectively, our data indicate hASH1 to be key for understanding neuroblastoma resistance to differentiation therapy and pave the way for hASH1-targeted therapies for augmenting the response of neuroblastoma to differentiation therapy. PMID:28066180

  10. Transcriptional program of Kpna2/Importin-α2 regulates cellular differentiation-coupled circadian clock development in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Umemura, Yasuhiro; Koike, Nobuya; Matsumoto, Tsuguhiro; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Chen, Zheng; Yasuhara, Noriko; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Yagita, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock in mammalian cells is cell-autonomously generated during the cellular differentiation process, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Here we show that perturbation of the transcriptional program by constitutive expression of transcription factor c-Myc and DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) ablation disrupts the differentiation-coupled emergence of the clock from mouse ESCs. Using these model ESCs, 484 genes are identified by global gene expression analysis as factors correlated with differentiation-coupled circadian clock development. Among them, we find the misregulation of Kpna2 (Importin-α2) during the differentiation of the c-Myc-overexpressed and Dnmt1−/− ESCs, in which sustained cytoplasmic accumulation of PER proteins is observed. Moreover, constitutive expression of Kpna2 during the differentiation culture of ESCs significantly impairs clock development, and KPNA2 facilitates cytoplasmic localization of PER1/2. These results suggest that the programmed gene expression network regulates the differentiation-coupled circadian clock development in mammalian cells, at least in part via posttranscriptional regulation of clock proteins. PMID:25389311

  11. Futile attempts to differentiate provide molecular evidence for individual differences within a population of cells during cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Xenia-Katharina; Tesmer, Jens; Souquet, Manfred; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2012-04-01

    The heterogeneity of cell populations and the influence of stochastic noise might be important issues for the molecular analysis of cellular reprogramming at the system level. Here, we show that in Physarum polycephalum, the expression patterns of marker genes correlate with the fate decision of individual multinucleate plasmodial cells that had been exposed to a differentiation-inducing photostimulus. For several hours after stimulation, the expression kinetics of PI-3-kinase, piwi, and pumilio orthologs and other marker genes were qualitatively similar in all stimulated cells but quantitatively different in those cells that subsequently maintained their proliferative potential and failed to differentiate accordingly. The results suggest that the population of nuclei in an individual plasmodium behaves synchronously in terms of gene regulation to an extent that the plasmodium provides a source for macroscopic amounts of homogeneous single-cell material for analysing the dynamic processes of cellular reprogramming. Based on the experimental findings, we predict that circuits with switch-like behaviour that control the cell fate decision of a multinucleate plasmodium operate through continuous changes in the concentration of cellular regulators because the nuclear population suspended in a large cytoplasmic volume damps stochastic noise.

  12. Correlation of cellular factors and differential scrapie prion permissiveness in ovine microglia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders by which the native cellular prion protein (PrP-C) is misfolded into an accumulating, disease-associated isoform (PrP-D). To improve the understanding of prion pathogenesis and develop effective treatments, it is essential to elucidate factors con...

  13. Differential p38-dependent signalling in response to cellular stress and mitogenic stimulation in fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    p38 MAP kinase is known to be activated by cellular stress finally leading to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Furthermore, a tumour suppressor role of p38 MAPK has been proposed. In contrast, a requirement of p38 for proliferation has also been described. To clarify this paradox, we investigated stress- and mitogen-induced p38 signalling in the same cell type using fibroblasts. We demonstrate that - in the same cell line - p38 is activated by mitogens or cellular stress, but p38-dependent signalling is different. Exposure to cellular stress, such as anisomycin, leads to a strong and persistent p38 activation independent of GTPases. As a result, MK2 and downstream the transcription factor CREB are phosphorylated. In contrast, mitogenic stimulation results in a weaker and transient p38 activation, which upstream involves small GTPases and is required for cyclin D1 induction. Consequently, the retinoblastoma protein is phosphorylated and allows G1/S transition. Our data suggest a dual role of p38 and indicate that the level and/or duration of p38 activation determines the cellular response, i.e either proliferation or cell cycle arrest. PMID:22404972

  14. Alcohol and thiamine deficiency trigger differential mitochondrial transition pore opening mediating cellular death.

    PubMed

    Bâ, Abdoulaye

    2017-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that binge-type alcohol intake in mothers interferes with thiamine deficiency (TD) to promote the fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Developmental alcohol or TD exposures act either synergistically or separately to reproduce FAS features e.g. intrauterine growth retardation and related microcephaly characterized by extensive cellular death induced by one another neurotoxicant. However molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying apoptosis in both alcohol and TD toxicities are unknown. The current review addresses mechanisms of apoptosis underlying alcohol and TD toxicities for further understanding FAS pathology. This study indicates two different mitochondria pathways regulating cellular death: The first mechanism may engage alcohol which activates the c-subunit ring of the F0-ATP synthase to form MPT pore-dependent apoptosis; following the second mechanism, TD activates CyP-D translocation from mitochondrial matrix towards the mitochondrial inner membrane to form MPT pore-dependent necrosis. These studies shed light upon molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying apoptosis and necrosis in developemental brain disorders related to alcohol and thiamine deficiency, in hopes of developing new therapeutic strategies for FAS medication.

  15. Prenatal alcohol exposure and cellular differentiation: a role for Polycomb and Trithorax group proteins in FAS phenotypes?

    PubMed

    Veazey, Kylee J; Muller, Daria; Golding, Michael C

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol significantly alters the developmental trajectory of progenitor cells and fundamentally compromises tissue formation (i.e., histogenesis). Emerging research suggests that ethanol can impair mammalian development by interfering with the execution of molecular programs governing differentiation. For example, ethanol exposure disrupts cellular migration, changes cell-cell interactions, and alters growth factor signaling pathways. Additionally, ethanol can alter epigenetic mechanisms controlling gene expression. Normally, lineage-specific regulatory factors (i.e., transcription factors) establish the transcriptional networks of each new cell type; the cell's identity then is maintained through epigenetic alterations in the way in which the DNA encoding each gene becomes packaged within the chromatin. Ethanol exposure can induce epigenetic changes that do not induce genetic mutations but nonetheless alter the course of fetal development and result in a large array of patterning defects. Two crucial enzyme complexes--the Polycomb and Trithorax proteins--are central to the epigenetic programs controlling the intricate balance between self-renewal and the execution of cellular differentiation, with diametrically opposed functions. Prenatal ethanol exposure may disrupt the functions of these two enzyme complexes, altering a crucial aspect of mammalian differentiation. Characterizing the involvement of Polycomb and Trithorax group complexes in the etiology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders will undoubtedly enhance understanding of the role that epigenetic programming plays in this complex disorder.

  16. Cellular Zinc Homeostasis Contributes to Neuronal Differentiation in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pfaender, Stefanie; Föhr, Karl; Lutz, Anne-Kathrin; Putz, Stefan; Achberger, Kevin; Linta, Leonhard; Liebau, Stefan; Boeckers, Tobias M.; Grabrucker, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in neuronal differentiation and function are an underlying factor of many brain disorders. Zinc homeostasis and signaling are important mediators for a normal brain development and function, given that zinc deficiency was shown to result in cognitive and emotional deficits in animal models that might be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. One underlying mechanism of the observed detrimental effects of zinc deficiency on the brain might be impaired proliferation and differentiation of stem cells participating in neurogenesis. Thus, to examine the molecular mechanisms regulating zinc metabolism and signaling in differentiating neurons, using a protocol for motor neuron differentiation, we characterized the expression of zinc homeostasis genes during neurogenesis using human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and evaluated the influence of altered zinc levels on the expression of zinc homeostasis genes, cell survival, cell fate, and neuronal function. Our results show that zinc transporters are highly regulated genes during neuronal differentiation and that low zinc levels are associated with decreased cell survival, altered neuronal differentiation, and, in particular, synaptic function. We conclude that zinc deficiency in a critical time window during brain development might influence brain function by modulating neuronal differentiation. PMID:27247802

  17. The Effect of Cellular Differentiation on HSV-1 Infection of Oligodendrocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bello-Morales, Raquel; Crespillo, Antonio Jesús; García, Beatriz; Dorado, Luis Ángel; Martín, Beatriz; Tabarés, Enrique; Krummenacher, Claude; de Castro, Fernando; López-Guerrero, José Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that infects many types of cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that oligodendrocytic cells are highly susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Here we analysed HSV-1 infection of a human oligodendrocytic cell line, HOG, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) cultured under growth or differentiation conditions. In addition to cell susceptibility, the role of the major cell receptors for viral entry was assessed. Our results revealed that OPCs and HOG cells cultured under differentiation conditions became more susceptible to HSV-1. On the other hand, viral infection induced morphological changes corresponding to differentiated cells, suggesting that HSV-1 might be inducing cell differentiation. We also observed colocalization of HVEM and nectin-1 with viral particles, suggesting that these two major HSV-1 receptors are functional in HOG cells. Finally, electron microscopy assays indicated that HSV-1 may be also entering OLs by macropinocytosis depending on their differentiation stage. In addition, vesicles containing intracellular enveloped virions observed in differentiated cells point to an endocytic mechanism of virus entry. All these data are indicative of diverse entry pathways dependent on the maturation stage of OLs. PMID:24551233

  18. Rational bioprocess design for human pluripotent stem cell expansion and endoderm differentiation based on cellular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ungrin, Mark D; Clarke, Geoff; Yin, Ting; Niebrugge, Sylvia; Nostro, M Cristina; Sarangi, Farida; Wood, Geoffrey; Keller, Gordon; Zandstra, Peter W

    2012-04-01

    We present a predictive bioprocess design strategy employing cell- and molecular-level analysis of rate-limiting steps in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) expansion and differentiation, and apply it to produce definitive endoderm (DE) progenitors using a scalable directed-differentiation technology. We define a bioprocess optimization parameter (L; targeted cell Loss) and, with quantitative cell division tracking and fate monitoring, identify and overcome key suspension bioprocess bottlenecks. Adapting process operating conditions to pivotal parameters (single cell survival and growth rate) in a cell-line-specific manner enabled adherent-equivalent expansion of hPSCs in feeder- and matrix-free defined-medium suspension culture. Predominantly instructive differentiation mechanisms were found to underlie a subsequent 18-fold expansion, during directed differentiation, to high-purity DE competent for further commitment along pancreatic and hepatic lineages. This study demonstrates that iPSC expansion and differentiation conditions can be prospectively specified to guide the enhanced production of target cells in a scale-free directed differentiation system. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Early changes in staurosporine-induced differentiated RGC-5 cells indicate cellular injury response to nonlethal blue light exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei; Huang, Chen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Minshu

    2015-06-01

    Blue light has been previously demonstrated to induce injury of retinal cells. The cellular responses to nonlethal blue light exposure for each type of retinal cell are of particular interest but remain undetermined. Based on the doses of blue light reported in previous research to be nonlethal to retinal pigment epithelial cells, here we investigated whether and to what extent such doses of blue light are cytotoxic to staurosporine-differentiated RGC-5 cells. RGC-5 cells were differentiated for 24 hours using 200 nM staurosporine. The resulting cells were cultured and exposed to blue light at three different energy levels (1, 10, and 50 J cm(-2)). Cellular morphologies were investigated with an inverted microscope and cell viability was assessed with a Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated by H2DCFDA. After loading of MitoTracker Green FM dye, the mitochondrial contents were analyzed using flow cytometry. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the media were also measured. The level of lipid peroxidation was determined by measuring the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA). Treatment of the cells for 24 hours with 200 nM staurosporine successfully induced the differentiation of RGC-5 cells. No morphological changes were observed in the ssdRGC-5 cells exposed to blue light at 50 J cm(-2), which was the highest energy level tested. Exposure of the ssdRGC-5 cells to this energy level of blue light did, however, decrease their numbers by approximately 72.1% compared to the numbers of such cells found after being left in the dark. Remarkably, the levels of ROS generation and mitochondrial contents were, respectively, increased to 142% and 118% of those of the control by a 10 J cm(-2) exposure of blue light. The LDH activities and MDA levels exhibited no obvious changes in the blue light-exposed ssdRGC-5 cells compared to the control cells. In vitro nonlethal blue light exposure led to cellular

  20. Furanodictine A and B: amino sugar analogues produced by cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum showing neuronal differentiation activity.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, H; Saito, Y; Komiya, J; Takaya, Y; Honma, S; Nakahata, N; Ito, A; Oshima, Y

    2001-10-19

    We investigated the constituents of Dictyostelium discoideum to clarify the diversity of secondary metabolites of Dictyostelium cellular slime molds and to explore biologically active substances that could be useful in the development of novel drugs. From a methanol extract of the multicellular fruit body of D. discoideum, we isolated two novel amino sugar analogues, furanodictine A (1) and B (2). They are the first 3,6-anhydrosugars to be isolated from natural sources. Their relative structures were elucidated by spectral means, and the absolute configurations were confirmed by asymmetric syntheses of 1 and 2. These furanodictines potently induce neuronal differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells.

  1. Differential requirements for clathrin endocytic pathway components in cellular entry by Ebola and Marburg glycoprotein pseudovirions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Suchita; Hope, Thomas J; Young, John A T

    2011-10-10

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was previously implicated as one of the cellular pathways involved in filoviral glycoprotein mediated viral entry into target cells. Here we have further dissected the requirements for different components of this pathway in Ebola versus Marburg virus glycoprotein (GP) mediated viral infection. Although a number of these components were involved in both cases; Ebola GP-dependent viral entry specifically required the cargo recognition proteins Eps15 and DAB2 as well as the clathrin adaptor protein AP-2. In contrast, Marburg GP-mediated infection was independent of these three proteins and instead required beta-arrestin 1 (ARRB1). These findings have revealed an unexpected difference between the clathrin pathway requirements for Ebola GP versus Marburg GP pseudovirion infection. Anthrax toxin also uses a clathrin-, and ARRB1-dependent pathway for cellular entry, indicating that the mechanism used by Marburg GP pseudovirions may be more generally important for pathogen entry.

  2. Differential control of cellular gene expression by diffusible and non-diffusible EGF.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Chen, G; Imanishi, Y; Morooka, T; Nishida, E; Okabayashi, Y; Kasuga, M

    2001-05-01

    Cell gene expression is affected by both the kind and mode of growth factor stimulation (diffusive vs. non-diffusive). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was pattern-immobilized on a polystyrene plate. Although the growth of the rat phaeochromocytoma cell line PC12 is stimulated by diffusible EGF, and differentiation is stimulated by diffusible nerve growth factor (NGF), immobilized (non-diffusible) EGF stimulated PC12 differentiation. The immobilized EGF caused a long-lasting stimulation of the intracellular signal protein mitogen-associated protein MAP kinase (MAPK, also known as ERK) and p38 (a subfamily of the MAPK superfamily) in cells, as did diffusible NGF. The switching between growth stimulation and differentiation is considered to be due to the duration of the stimulus. The function of the biosignal conjugate was regulated using conjugation methodology.

  3. Influenza virus budding from the tips of cellular microvilli in differentiated human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikova, Larissa; Heck, Sonja; Matrosovich, Tatyana; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Becker, Stephan; Matrosovich, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    The epithelium of conducting airways represents the main target for influenza virus in mammals. However, the peculiarities of virus interactions with differentiated airway epithelial cells remain largely unknown. Here, influenza virus budding was studied in differentiated cultures of human tracheobronchial epithelial cells using transmission electron microscopy. Budding of spherical and filamentous virions was observed on the apical surfaces of cells with no association with cilia and secretory granules. Quantitative analysis of the distribution of viral buds on the cell surface indicated that the tips of the microvilli represented a prominent site of influenza virus budding in the human airway epithelium. As the microvilli of differentiated cells are involved in many fundamental cell functions, these data will prompt further studies on the biological significance of microvilli-associated budding for virus replication, transmission and pathogenicity.

  4. The Wnt11 Signaling Pathway in Potential Cellular EMT and Osteochondral Differentiation Progression in Nephrolithiasis Formation.

    PubMed

    He, Deng; Lu, Yuchao; Hu, Henglong; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Qin, Baolong; Wang, Yufeng; Xing, Shuai; Xi, Qilin; Wang, Shaogang

    2015-07-17

    The molecular events leading to nephrolithiasis are extremely complex. Previous studies demonstrated that calcium and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) may participate in the pathogenesis of stone formation, but the explicit mechanism has not been defined. Using a self-created genetic hypercalciuric stone-forming (GHS) rat model, we observed that the increased level of serous/uric TGF-β1 and elevated intracellular calcium in primary renal tubular epithelial cells (PRECs) was associated with nephrolithiasis progression in vivo. In the setting of high calcium plus high TGF-β1 in vitro, PRECs showed great potential epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) progression and osteochondral differentiation properties, representing the multifarious increased mesenchymal and osteochondral phenotypes (Zeb1, Snail1, Col2A1, OPN, Sox9, Runx2) and decreased epithelial phenotypes (E-cadherin, CK19) bythe detection of mRNAs and corresponding proteins. Moreover, TGF-β-dependent Wnt11 knockdown and L-type Ca2+ channel blocker could greatly reverse EMT progression and osteochondral differentiation in PRECs. TGF-β1 alone could effectively promote EMT, but it had no effect on osteochondral differentiation in NRK cells (Rat kidney epithelial cell line). Stimulation with Ca2+ alone did not accelerate differentiation of NRK. Co-incubation of extracellular Ca2+ and TGF-β1 synergistically promotes EMT and osteochondral differentiation in NRK control cells. Our data supplied a novel view that the pathogenesis of calcium stone development may be associated with synergic effects of TGF-β1 and Ca2+, which promote EMT and osteochondral differentiation via Wnt11 and the L-type calcium channel.

  5. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species.

  6. Distinct roles of the steroid receptor coactivator 1 and of MED1 in retinoid-induced transcription and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Flajollet, Sébastien; Lefebvre, Bruno; Rachez, Christophe; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2006-07-21

    Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are the molecular relays of retinoid action on transcription, cellular differentiation and apoptosis. Transcriptional activation of retinoid-regulated promoters requires the dismissal of corepressors and the recruitment of coactivators to promoter-bound RAR. RARs recruit in vitro a plethora of coactivators whose actual contribution to retinoid-induced transcription is poorly characterized in vivo. Embryonal carcinoma P19 cells, which are highly sensitive to retinoids, were depleted from archetypical coactivators by RNAi. SRC1-deficient P19 cells showed severely compromised retinoid-induced responses, in agreement with the supposed role of SRC1 as a RAR coactivator. Unexpectedly, Med1/TRAP220/DRIP205-depleted cells exhibited an exacerbated response to retinoids, both in terms transcriptional responses and of cellular differentiation. Med1 depletion affected TFIIH and cdk9 detection at the prototypical retinoid-regulated RARbeta2 promoter, and favored a higher RNA polymerase II detection in transcribed regions of the RARbeta2 gene. Furthermore, the nature of the ligand impacted strongly on the ability of RARs to interact with a given coactivator and to activate transcription in intact cells. Thus RAR accomplishes transcriptional activation as a function of the ligand structure, by recruiting regulatory complexes which control distinct molecular events at retinoid-regulated promoters.

  7. AFM studies of cellular mechanics during osteogenic differentiation of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, Pan; Chen, Jia-Nan; Cai, Ji-Ye; Cai, Xiao-Fang; Ding, Hui; Pan, Yun-Long

    2010-01-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are becoming an important source of cells for regenerative medicine given with apparent advantages of accessibility, renewal capacity and multipotentiality. In this study, the mechanical properties of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (hAFSCs), such as the average Young's modulus, were determined by atomic force microscopy (3.97 ± 0.53 kPa for hAFSCs vs. 1.52 ± 0.63 kPa for fully differentiated osteoblasts). These differences in cell elasticity result primarily from differential actin cytoskeleton organization in these two cell types. Furthermore, ultrastructures, nanostructural details on the surface of cell, were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was clearly shown that surface of osteoblasts were covered by mineralized particles, and the histogram of particles size showed that most of the particles on the surface of osteoblasts distributed from 200 to 400 nm in diameter, while the diameter of hAFSCs particles ranged from 100 to 200 nm. In contrast, there were some dips on the surface of hAFSCs, and particles were smaller than that of osteoblasts. Additionally, as osteogenic differentiation of hAFSCs progressed, more and more stress fibers were replaced by a thinner actin network which is characteristic of mature osteoblasts. These results can improve our understanding of the mechanical properties of hAFSCs during osteogenic differentiation. AFM can be used as a powerful tool for detecting ultrastructures and mechanical properties.

  8. Cellular internalization of LiNbO3 nanocrystals for second harmonic imaging and the effects on stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianhua; Qiu, Jichuan; Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Ma, Baojin; Mou, Xiaoning; Tanes, Michael; Jiang, Huaidong; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) nanocrystals have recently been reported to label cancer cells and other functional cell lines due to their unique double-frequency property. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals as SHG labels for imaging stem cells. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were labeled with LN nanocrystals in order to study the cellular internalization of the nanocrystals and the influence on stem cell differentiation. The results showed that LN nanocrystals were endocytosed by the rMSCs and the distribution of the internalized nanoparticles demonstrated a high consistency with the orientation of the actin filaments. Besides, LN-labeled rMSCs showed a concentration-dependent viability. Most importantly, rMSCs labeled with 50 μg per mL of LN nanocrystals retained their ability to differentiate into both osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. The results prove that LN nanocrystals can be used as a cytocompatible, near-infrared (NIR) light driven cell label for long-term imaging, without hindering stem cell differentiation. This work will promote the use of LN nanocrystals to broader applications like deep-tissue tracking, remote drug delivery and stem cell therapy.Second harmonic generation (SHG) nanocrystals have recently been reported to label cancer cells and other functional cell lines due to their unique double-frequency property. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of lithium niobate (LiNbO3, LN) nanocrystals as SHG labels for imaging stem cells. Rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) were labeled with LN nanocrystals in order to study the cellular internalization of the nanocrystals and the influence on stem cell differentiation. The results showed that LN nanocrystals were endocytosed by the rMSCs and the distribution of the internalized nanoparticles demonstrated a high consistency with the orientation of the actin filaments. Besides, LN-labeled rMSCs showed a concentration

  9. Apc Restoration Promotes Cellular Differentiation and Reestablishes Crypt Homeostasis in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dow, Lukas E; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Simon, Janelle; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-06-18

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated in the vast majority of human colorectal cancers (CRC) and leads to deregulated Wnt signaling. To determine whether Apc disruption is required for tumor maintenance, we developed a mouse model of CRC whereby Apc can be conditionally suppressed using a doxycycline-regulated shRNA. Apc suppression produces adenomas in both the small intestine and colon that, in the presence of Kras and p53 mutations, can progress to invasive carcinoma. In established tumors, Apc restoration drives rapid and widespread tumor-cell differentiation and sustained regression without relapse. Tumor regression is accompanied by the re-establishment of normal crypt-villus homeostasis, such that once aberrantly proliferating cells reacquire self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capability. Our study reveals that CRC cells can revert to functioning normal cells given appropriate signals and provide compelling in vivo validation of the Wnt pathway as a therapeutic target for treatment of CRC.

  10. Self-organization of engineered epithelial tubules by differential cellular motility

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Hidetoshi; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Inman, Jamie L; Bissell, Mina J; Nelson, Celeste M

    2009-02-04

    Patterning of developing tissues arises from a number of mechanisms, including cell shape change, cell proliferation, and cell sorting from differential cohesion or tension. Here, we reveal that differences in cell motility can also lead to cell sorting within tissues. Using mosaic engineered mammary epithelial tubules, we found that cells sorted depending on their expression level of the membrane-anchored collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14. These rearrangements were independent of the catalytic activity of MMP14 but absolutely required the hemopexin domain. We describe a signaling cascade downstream of MMP14 through Rho kinase that allows cells to sort within the model tissues. Cell speed and persistence time were enhanced by MMP14 expression, but only the latter motility parameter was required for sorting. These results indicate that differential directional persistence can give rise to patterns within model developing tissues.

  11. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  12. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  13. Pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes: using materials to define cellular differentiation and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lucendo-Villarin, B; Rashidi, H; Cameron, K; Hay, D C

    2016-05-28

    Pluripotent stem cell derived liver cells (hepatocytes) represent a promising alternative to primary tissue for biological and clinical applications. To date, most hepatocyte maintenance and differentiation systems have relied upon the use of animal derived components. This serves as a significant barrier to large scale production and application of stem cell derived hepatocytes. Recently, the use of defined biologics has overcome those limitations in two-dimensional monolayer culture. In order to improve the cell phenotype further, three-dimensional culture systems have been employed to better mimic the in vivo situation, drawing upon materials chemistry, engineering and biology. In this review we discuss efforts in the field, to differentiate pluripotent stem cells towards hepatocytes under defined conditions.

  14. Pluripotent stem cell derived hepatocytes: using materials to define cellular differentiation and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Lucendo-Villarin, B.; Rashidi, H.; Cameron, K.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell derived liver cells (hepatocytes) represent a promising alternative to primary tissue for biological and clinical applications. To date, most hepatocyte maintenance and differentiation systems have relied upon the use of animal derived components. This serves as a significant barrier to large scale production and application of stem cell derived hepatocytes. Recently, the use of defined biologics has overcome those limitations in two-dimensional monolayer culture. In order to improve the cell phenotype further, three-dimensional culture systems have been employed to better mimic the in vivo situation, drawing upon materials chemistry, engineering and biology. In this review we discuss efforts in the field, to differentiate pluripotent stem cells towards hepatocytes under defined conditions. PMID:27746914

  15. Cellular mechanism for norepinephrine suppression of pineal photoreceptor-like cell differentiation in rat pineal cultures.

    PubMed

    Araki, M

    1992-02-01

    Although the rat pineal is an endocrine organ and has no photoreceptor activity, pineals from neonatal rats contain cells that can differentiate into rod-like cells with rhodopsin immunoreactivity (Rho-I), when cultured in vitro. Norepinephrine (NE) reduces the number of Rho-I cells in a dose-dependent manner and has a considerable effect even at 20 nM. When cultured in vitro, pineals removed up to Postnatal Day 4 differentiated into Rho-I cells to the same extent as did those removed at Day 1 (neonatal), but those removed at Day 5 showed a sharp reduction in the number of differentiated Rho-I cells. This suggests that either pineal cells in situ lose their potential to differentiate by Day 5 or the subpopulation of cells involved normally disappears in pineals older than Day 5. The effect of NE was examined in cultures of neonatal pineals by administering it for 1 or 2 days at different stages during a 9-day culture period. NE was most effective when present in the culture medium at an early culture phase and was not efficacious if present only later than Culture Day 7. This indicates that presumptive pineal photoreceptors may become sensitive to NE only for a limited period and that once they are exposed to NE within this period they are irreversibly affected, possibly to degenerate. These cells are similarly and severely affected by potassium ion concentrations as low as 15 mM, suggesting that NE may act at the adrenoreceptor to modify the membrane properties. Serotonin-immunoreactive cells, another cell type (endocrine) found in the cultures, appeared to be regulated by NE by a separate mechanism. NE suppresses process extension by serotonin cells in a reversible manner, and KCl does not have this effect. These findings further evidence that neurotransmitters may have essential roles, other than the transmission of signals, in modulating the developing nervous system.

  16. Epithelial Xbp1 Is Required for Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation during Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Calvo, Veronica; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Lade, Abigale; Chou, Hsin-I; Lee, Youngmin A.; Farias, Eduardo F.; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2015-01-01

    Xbp1, a key mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated by IRE1α-mediated splicing, which results in a frameshift to encode a protein with transcriptional activity. However, the direct function of Xbp1 in epithelial cells during mammary gland development is unknown. Here we report that the loss of Xbp1 in the mammary epithelium through targeted deletion leads to poor branching morphogenesis, impaired terminal end bud formation, and spontaneous stromal fibrosis during the adult virgin period. Additionally, epithelial Xbp1 deletion induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the epithelium and dramatically inhibits epithelial proliferation and differentiation during lactation. The synthesis of milk and its major components, α/β-casein and whey acidic protein (WAP), is significantly reduced due to decreased prolactin receptor (Prlr) and ErbB4 expression in Xbp1-deficient mammary epithelium. Reduction of Prlr and ErbB4 expression and their diminished availability at the cell surface lead to reduced phosphorylated Stat5, an essential regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation during lactation. As a result, lactating mammary glands in these mice produce less milk protein, leading to poor pup growth and postnatal death. These findings suggest that the loss of Xbp1 induces a terminal UPR which blocks proliferation and differentiation during mammary gland development. PMID:25713103

  17. Differentiation of cellular processes involved in the induction and maintenance of stimulated neutrophil adherence.

    PubMed

    English, D; Gabig, T G

    1986-05-01

    Neutrophil adherence stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was investigated by quantitating the attachment of 51Cr-labeled neutrophils to plastic surfaces and to the endothelium of umbilical veins mounted in compartmentalized Lucite chambers. PMA-induced adherence could be functionally separated into an induction phase requiring cellular metabolism and a Mg++ dependent maintenance phase that was independent of cellular metabolism. Thus, metabolic inhibitors (N-ethylmaleimide, 2-deoxyglucose) blocked adherence when added to neutrophils prior to PMA, but did not cause detachment of cells adhering as a consequence of prior exposure to PMA. PMA failed to induce adherence of neutrophils incubated at low (0.4 degree C) temperature, but temperature reduction, even for prolonged periods, did not cause detachment of adherent cells. Thus, the attractive forces that mediate stimulated adherence persist independently of any sustained metabolic response to the inducing stimulus. However, removal of Mg++ from the media above adherent cells resulted in immediate detachment, indicating that the cation was required for the persistent expression or maintenance of the attractive forces involved. The extent of stimulated adherence correlated well with the extent of degranulation when rates were varied by limiting the incubation time or stimulus concentration. This correlation was not absolute; in the absence of Mg++, PMA induced degranulation normally but failed to enhance adherence. To explain these findings, we investigated the possibility that PMA-stimulated adherence was maintained by Mg++-dependent cellular adherence molecules released during exocytosis. Supernatants of stimulated neutrophils were devoid of adherence-promoting activity, and only weak activity was recovered in supernatants of mechanically disrupted neutrophils. PMA effectively stimulated the tight adherence of degranulated neutrophil cytoplasts to plastic surfaces and did so in the absence of stimulated

  18. Differential cellular increase in cerebrospinal fluid after encephalography in mentally retarded patients1

    PubMed Central

    Iivanainen, M.; Taskinen, E.

    1974-01-01

    The behaviour of the CSF cells during gas encephalography (GEG) with O2, N2O, and halothane is poorly known in cerebral developmental disorders. One hundred and fifty CSF samples taken during pneumoencephalography from 75 mentally retarded patients were examined cytologically by the millipore technique with Papanicolaou staining. The results were processed automatically. An approximately 25-fold increase in CSF cells (P<0·001), mainly meningeal, reticulohistiocytic, and monocytic types, was found to occur. The cortical gas filling rate had a positive correlation (P<0·001) with the increase of number of CSF cells. There were no significant differences between the cellular changes in different cerebral disorders. Thus, though the irritant effect of GEG gives a rich cell yield, diagnostic atypical cells in developmental disorders of the central nervous system probably rarely exfoliate into the lumbar CSF. Images PMID:4142044

  19. Differential impact of nicotine on cellular proliferation and cytokine production by LPS-stimulated murine splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Hakki, A; Hallquist, N; Friedman, H; Pross, S

    2000-06-01

    The immunoregulatory effects of nicotine have not been fully clarified and the reported data are often conflicting. The present study investigated the role of nicotine as an immunomodulator of murine splenocytes stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the endotoxin component of gram-negative bacteria. BALB/c female mice of two different ages, young (2-3 months) and old (18-22 months), were used. The cells were incubated with nicotine at two different time points, 3 h pre-incubation and concurrent incubation relevant to LPS stimulation, before further incubation for 48 or 72 h. Treatment of murine splenocytes with nicotine showed an impact on cellular proliferation as well as on the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). The results indicated that nicotine significantly inhibited cellular proliferation of murine splenocytes in a concentration-related manner (32, 64 and 128 microg/ml). Timing of nicotine exposure prior to LPS stimulation was critical in terms of immunological impact on cytokine production. TNF-alpha and IL-6 production were significantly enhanced by 1 microg/ml of nicotine when cells were pre-incubated with nicotine for 3 h compared to concurrent incubation relative to LPS stimulation. The alteration in cytokine production varied with the age of the mouse. TNF-alpha production was significantly inhibited by nicotine in young mice, while IL-6 production was significantly inhibited by nicotine in old mice. Since any immunomodulation that alters the profile of these cytokines may cause an imbalance in the immune system impinging on health status, these findings may be important when dealing with the concept of nicotine as a therapeutic agent.

  20. Bupivacaine-induced cellular entry of QX-314 and its contribution to differential nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, C; Kistner, K; Puopolo, M; Jo, S; Roberson, DP; Sisignano, M; Segal, D; Cobos, EJ; Wainger, BJ; Labocha, S; Ferreirós, N; Hehn, C; Tran, J; Geisslinger, G; Reeh, PW; Bean, BP; Woolf, C J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Selective nociceptor fibre block is achieved by introducing the cell membrane impermeant sodium channel blocker lidocaine N-ethyl bromide (QX-314) through transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels into nociceptors. We screened local anaesthetics for their capacity to activate TRP channels, and characterized the nerve block obtained by combination with QX-314. Experimental Approach: We investigated TRP channel activation in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings, and cellular QX-314 uptake by MS. To characterize nerve block, compound action potential (CAP) recordings from isolated nerves and behavioural responses were analysed. Key Results: Of the 12 compounds tested, bupivacaine was the most potent activator of ruthenium red-sensitive calcium entry in DRG neurons and activated heterologously expressed TRPA1 channels. QX-314 permeated through TRPA1 channels and accumulated intracellularly after activation of these channels. Upon sciatic injections, QX-314 markedly prolonged bupivacaine's nociceptive block and also extended (to a lesser degree) its motor block. Bupivacaine's blockade of C-, but not A-fibre, CAPs in sciatic nerves was extended by co-application of QX-314. Surprisingly, however, this action was the same in wild-type, TRPA1-knockout and TRPV1/TRPA1-double knockout mice, suggesting a TRP-channel independent entry pathway. Consistent with this, high doses of bupivacaine promoted a non-selective, cellular uptake of QX-314. Conclusions and Implications: Bupivacaine, combined with QX-314, produced a long-lasting sensory nerve block. This did not require QX-314 permeation through TRPA1, although bupivacaine activated these channels. Regardless of entry pathway, the greatly extended duration of block produced by QX-314 and bupivacaine may be clinically useful. PMID:24117225

  1. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  2. Cellular differentiation regulated by gibberellin in the Arabidopsis thaliana pickle mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Ogas, J.; Somerville, C.; Cheng, Jin-Chen; Sung, R.

    1997-07-04

    The plant growth regulator gibberellin (GA) has a profound effect on shoot development and promotes developmental transitions such as flowering. Little is known about any analogous effect GA might have on root development. In a screen for mutants, Arabi-dopsis plants carrying a mutation designated pickle (pkl) were isolated in which the primary root meristem retained characteristics of embryonic tissue. Expression of this aberrant differentiation state was suppressed by GA. Root tissue from plants carrying the pkl mutation spontaneously regenerated new embryos and plants. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Aldehyde dehydrogenase and estrogen receptor define a hierarchy of cellular differentiation in the normal human mammary epithelium

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although estrogen and progesterone play a key role in normal mammary development and in breast cancer, the potential for proliferation and lineage differentiation as well as origin of cells that express the estrogen receptor (ER) in normal breast epithelium are not known. Some evidence suggests that normal human mammary stem/progenitor cells are ER–, but the identity of these cells and the cellular hierarchy of breast epithelium are still subjects of controversy. It is likely that elucidation of these aspects will bring insight into the cellular origin of breast cancer subtypes. Methods We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting of primary human mammary epithelial cells along with in vitro and in vivo functional assays to examine the hierarchic relation between cells with aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymatic activity (ALDH+ cells) and ER+ cells in the normal human breast epithelium. We assessed the proliferation and lineage differentiation potential of these cells in vitro and in vivo. A gene reporter assay was used to separate live ER+ and ER– mammary epithelial cells. With shRNA-mediated knockdown, we investigated the role of ALDH isoforms in the functionality of mammary epithelial progenitor cells. Results We describe a cellular hierarchy in the normal human mammary gland in which ER–/ALDH+ cells with functional properties of stem/progenitor cells generate ER+ progenitor cells, which in turn give rise to cells of luminal lineage. We show that the ALDH1A1 isoform, through its function in the retinoic acid metabolism, affects the proliferation and/or early differentiation of stem/progenitor cells and is important for branching morphogenesis. Conclusions This study presents direct evidence that ER+ cells are generated by ER–/ALDH+ stem/progenitor cells. We also show that ER+ cells are able to generate cell progeny of luminal lineage in vitro and in vivo. Loss of ALDH1A1 function impairs this process, as well as branching morphogenesis and

  4. Differential Atmospheric Controls on Transpiration of Boreal Trees: A Potential Factor in Pre-mature Tree Mortality in Green-Tree Retention Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladon, K. D.; Silins, U.; Lieffers, V. J.

    2004-05-01

    Green-tree retention, a harvesting strategy that involves the preservation of isolated and interconnected patches of live trees within the boundaries of harvested areas, is assumed to emulate natural disturbance, while preserving forest canopy continuity for wildlife habitat, maintaining forest biodiversity, and many other landscape level objectives. Unfortunately, many of the retention trees die within a few years after harvesting, thus much of the desired function of these trees is lost. This research focuses on understanding the relationship between changes in micro-climate following harvesting and transpiration, potentially leading to drought-induced mortality of aspen, balsam poplar, white spruce, and white birch. Continuous measurements of whole-tree water use (sap flow) and micro-climate were taken before and after harvesting of two adjacent boreal mixedwood stands in west-central Alberta in the summer of 2003. Differences in micro-climate including radiation, air temperature, relative humidity and wind penetration into the canopy produced large differences in atmospheric moisture demand (PET) between partially harvested (green-tree retention) and undisturbed forest canopies. The variability in atmospheric conditions created large differences in sap flow velocity and transpiration rates among these four boreal species. Differential transpiration rates among species will be discussed in context of atmospheric controls on water use and drought tolerance of boreal trees with differing autecology and/or hydraulic architecture.

  5. Differential expression of growth factors at the cellular level in virus-infected brain

    PubMed Central

    Prosniak, Mikhail; Zborek, Anna; Scott, Gwen S.; Roy, Anirban; Phares, Timothy W.; Koprowski, Hilary; Hooper, D. Craig

    2003-01-01

    The contribution of host factors to rabies virus (RV) transcription/replication and axonal/transsynaptic spread is largely unknown. We previously identified several host genes that are up-regulated in the mouse brain during RV infection, including neuroleukin, which is involved in neuronal growth and survival, cell motility, and differentiation, and fibroblast growth factor homologous factor 4 (FHF4), which has been implicated in limb and nervous system development. In this study, we used real-time quantitative RT-PCR to assess the expression of mRNAs specific for neuroleukin, the two isoforms of FHF4 (FHF4-1a and -1b) encoded by the FHF4 gene, and N protein of RV in neurons and astrocytes isolated by laser capture microdissection from mouse brains infected with the laboratory-adapted RV strain CVS-N2c or with a street RV of silver-haired bat origin. Differences in the gene expression patterns suggest that the capacity of RV strains to infect nonneuronal cells and differentially modulate host gene expression may be important in virus replication and spread in the CNS. PMID:12736376

  6. The differentiation of mammalian ovarian granulosa cells – living in the shadow of cellular developmental capacity.

    PubMed

    Chachuła, A; Kranc, W; Budna, J; Bryja, A; Ciesiólka, S; Wojtanowicz-Markiewicz, K; Piotrowska, H; Bukowska, D; Krajecki, M; Antosik, P; Brüssow, K P; Bruska, M; Nowicki, M; Zabel, M; Kempisty, B

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian cumulus-oocyte complex (COCs) promotes oocyte growth and development during long stages of folliculogenesis and oogenesis. Before ovulation, the follicle is formed by a variety of fully differentiated cell populations; cumulus cells (CCs) that tightly surround the female gamete, granulosa cells (GCs) and theca cells (TCs) which build the internal and external mass of the follicular wall. It is well documented that CCs surrounding the oocyte are necessary for resumption of meiosis and full maturation of the gamete. However, the role of the granulosa cells in acquisition of MII stage and/or full fertilization ability is not yet entirely known. In this article, we present an overview of mammalian oocytes and their relationship to the surrounding cumulus and granulosa cells. We also describe the processes of GCs differentiation and developmental capacity. Finally, we describe several markers of mammalian GCs, which could be used for positive identification of isolated cells. The developmental capacity of oocytes and surrounding somatic cells – a “fingerprint” of folliculogenesis and oogenesis.

  7. Cellular attachment and osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on natural cuttlefish bone

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Sung, Hark-Mo; You, Hyung-Keun; Lee, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe an approach that aims to provide fundamental information for the application of natural cuttlefish bone. Before applying cuttlefish bone as a bone defect filling material, we evaluated proliferation, adhesion, and cell viability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on cuttlefish bone. Cuttlefish bone was separated into two parts (dorsal shield and lamellar region) and each part was used. Cell proliferation and viability were assessed using the MTS assay and live/dead fluorescence staining method. The morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). hMSCs were stimulated with osteogenic medium and osteoblast differentiation was evaluated. The fluorescence images showed that the seeded cells grew well and that cell distribution was in accordance with the surface morphology of the cuttlefish bone. Compared with the dorsal shield, cells penetrated deeper into the three-dimensional inner space of the lamellar part. Furthermore, under osteogenic differentiation conditions, alkaline phosphatase activity increased and the mRNA expression of ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2, and collagen type I α1 was increased in hMSCs cultured on both the dorsal shield and lamellar block. These results indicate the potential of cuttlefish bone as an ideal scaffold for bone regenerative materials. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A, 2012. PMID:22447716

  8. Cellular attachment and osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on natural cuttlefish bone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beom-Su; Kim, Jin Seong; Sung, Hark-Mo; You, Hyung-Keun; Lee, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe an approach that aims to provide fundamental information for the application of natural cuttlefish bone. Before applying cuttlefish bone as a bone defect filling material, we evaluated proliferation, adhesion, and cell viability of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on cuttlefish bone. Cuttlefish bone was separated into two parts (dorsal shield and lamellar region) and each part was used. Cell proliferation and viability were assessed using the MTS assay and live/dead fluorescence staining method. The morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). hMSCs were stimulated with osteogenic medium and osteoblast differentiation was evaluated. The fluorescence images showed that the seeded cells grew well and that cell distribution was in accordance with the surface morphology of the cuttlefish bone. Compared with the dorsal shield, cells penetrated deeper into the three-dimensional inner space of the lamellar part. Furthermore, under osteogenic differentiation conditions, alkaline phosphatase activity increased and the mRNA expression of ALP, runt-related transcription factor 2, and collagen type I α1 was increased in hMSCs cultured on both the dorsal shield and lamellar block. These results indicate the potential of cuttlefish bone as an ideal scaffold for bone regenerative materials. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis isolates in stage-specific forms and during cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Salem-Izacc, S M; Jesuino, R S; Brito, W A; Pereira, M; Felipe, M S; Soares, C M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we compared the protein synthesis patterns of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolates. The protein profiles were compared for both yeast and mycelial forms and similarity analysis among them was performed by calculating similarity matrices and grouping the isolates in dendrograms. The examined isolates exhibited highly variable cellular morphology at 36 degrees C, when typical yeast cells were expected. On the other hand, at 26 degrees C all the isolates showed mycelial morphology. The analysis of protein synthesis profiles made it possible to cluster the P. brasiliensis isolates into groups that correlated with the morphological data. Interestingly, growth at 36 degrees C strongly decreased the heterogeneity of protein synthesis patterns seen in mycelial isolates. It was possible to cluster the isolates grown at 36 degrees C in three groups based on their two-dimensional protein synthesis analysis. The similarity index observed among the mycelial isolates was lower than that obtained with yeast cells, suggesting a more homogenous gene expression pattern in the host-adapted form than in the saprobic phase.

  10. Differential changes in the cellular composition of the developing marsupial brain.

    PubMed

    Seelke, Adele M H; Dooley, James C; Krubitzer, Leah A

    2013-08-01

    Throughout development both the body and the brain change at remarkable rates. Specifically, the number of cells in the brain undergoes dramatic nonlinear changes, first exponentially increasing in cell number and then decreasing in cell number. Different cell types, such as neurons and glia, undergo these changes at different stages of development. The current investigation used the isotropic fractionator method to examine the changes in cellular composition at multiple developmental milestones in the short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica. Here we report several novel findings concerning marsupial brain development and organization. First, during the later stages of neurogenesis (P18), neurons make up most of the cells in the neocortex, although the total number of neurons remains the same throughout the life span. In contrast, in the subcortical regions, the number of neurons decreases dramatically after P18, and a converse relationship is observed for nonneuronal cells. In the cerebellum, the total number of cells gradually increases until P180 and then remains constant, and then the number of neurons is consistent across the developmental ages examined. For the three major structures examined, neuronal density and the percentage of neurons within a structure are highest during neurogenesis and then decrease after this point. Finally, the total number of neurons in the opossum brain is relatively low compared with other small-brained mammals such as mice. The relatively low number of neurons and correspondingly high number of nonneurons suggests that in the marsupial brain nonneurons may play a significant role in signal processing.

  11. Expression of Arabidopsis FCS-Like Zinc finger genes is differentially regulated by sugars, cellular energy level, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Jamsheer K, Muhammed; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Cellular energy status is an important regulator of plant growth, development, and stress mitigation. Environmental stresses ultimately lead to energy deficit in the cell which activates the SNF1-RELATED KINASE 1 (SnRK1) signaling cascade which eventually triggering a massive reprogramming of transcription to enable the plant to survive under low-energy conditions. The role of Arabidopsis thaliana FCS-Like Zinc finger (FLZ) gene family in energy and stress signaling is recently come to highlight after their interaction with kinase subunits of SnRK1 were identified. In a detailed expression analysis in different sugars, energy starvation, and replenishment series, we identified that the expression of most of the FLZ genes is differentially modulated by cellular energy level. It was found that FLZ gene family contains genes which are both positively and negatively regulated by energy deficit as well as energy-rich conditions. Genetic and pharmacological studies identified the role of HEXOKINASE 1- dependent and energy signaling pathways in the sugar-induced expression of FLZ genes. Further, these genes were also found to be highly responsive to different stresses as well as abscisic acid. In over-expression of kinase subunit of SnRK1, FLZ genes were found to be differentially regulated in accordance with their response toward energy fluctuation suggesting that these genes may work downstream to the established SnRK1 signaling under low-energy stress. Taken together, the present study provides a conceptual framework for further studies related to SnRK1-FLZ interaction in relation to sugar and energy signaling and stress response.

  12. Obatoclax, saliphenylhalamide and gemcitabine inhibit Zika virus infection in vitro and differentially affect cellular signaling, transcription and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kuivanen, Suvi; Bespalov, Maxim M; Nandania, Jatin; Ianevski, Aleksandr; Velagapudi, Vidya; De Brabander, Jef K; Kainov, Denis E; Vapalahti, Olli

    2017-03-01

    An epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection associated with congenital abnormalities such as microcephaly, is ongoing in the Americas and the Pacific. Currently there are no approved therapies to treat this emerging viral disease. Here, we tested three cell-directed broad-spectrum antiviral compounds against ZIKV replication using human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and a low-passage ZIKV strain isolated from fetal brain. We found that obatoclax, SaliPhe, and gemcitabine inhibited ZIKV infections at noncytotoxic concentrations. Moreover, all three compounds prevented production of viral RNA and proteins as well as activation of cellular caspase 8, 3 and 7. However, these compounds differentially affected ZIKV-mediated transcription, translation and posttranslational modifications of cellular factors as well as metabolic pathways indicating that these agents possess different mechanisms of action. Interestingly, combination of obatoclax and SaliPhe at nanomolar concentrations had a synergistic effect against ZIKV infection. Thus, our results provided the foundation for development of broad-spectrum cell-directed antivirals or their combinations for treatment of ZIKV and other emerging viral diseases.

  13. Anacardic Acid, Salicylic Acid, and Oleic Acid Differentially Alter Cellular Bioenergetic Function in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Radde, Brandie N; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Price, Stephanie M; Schultz, David J; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-11-01

    Anacardic acid is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical that inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Since mitochondrial-targeted anticancer therapy (mitocans) may be useful in breast cancer, we examined the effect of anacardic acid on cellular bioenergetics and OXPHOS pathway proteins in breast cancer cells modeling progression to endocrine-independence: MCF-7 estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ endocrine-sensitive; LCC9 and LY2 ERα+, endocrine-resistant, and MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. At concentrations similar to cell proliferation IC50 s, anacardic acid reduced ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate (OCR), mitochondrial reserve capacity, and coupling efficiency while increasing proton leak, reflecting mitochondrial toxicity which was greater in MCF-7 compared to endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells. These results suggest tolerance in endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells to mitochondrial stress induced by anacardic acid. Since anacardic acid is an alkylated 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, the effects of salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety) and oleic acid (OA, monounsaturated alkyl moiety) were tested. SA inhibited whereas OA stimulated cell viability. In contrast to stimulation of basal OCR by anacardic acid (uncoupling effect), neither SA nor OA altered basal OCR- except OA inhibited basal and ATP-linked OCR, and increased ECAR, in MDA-MB-231 cells. Changes in OXPHOS proteins correlated with changes in OCR. Overall, neither the 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety nor the monounsaturated alky moiety of anacardic acid is solely responsible for the observed mitochondria-targeted anticancer activity in breast cancer cells and hence both moieties are required in the same molecule for the observed effects. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2521-2532, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Structural Development, Cellular Differentiation and Proliferation of the Respiratory Epithelium in the Bovine Fetal Lung.

    PubMed

    Drozdowska, J; Cousens, C; Finlayson, J; Collie, D; Dagleish, M P

    2016-01-01

    Fetal bovine lung samples of 11 different gestational ages were assigned to a classical developmental stage based on histological morphology. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the morphology of forming airways, proliferation rate of airway epithelium and the presence of epithelial cell types (i.e. ciliated cells, club cells, neuroepithelial cells (NECs) and type II pneumocytes). Typical structural organization of pseudoglandular (84-98 days gestational age [DGA]), canalicular (154-168 DGA) and alveolar (224-266 DGA) stages was recognized. In addition, transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular (112-126 DGA) and canalicular-saccular (182 DGA) morphologies were present. The embryonic stage was not observed. A significantly (P <0.05) higher proliferation rate of pulmonary epithelium, on average 5.5% and 4.4% in bronchi and bronchioles, respectively, was present in the transitional pseudoglandular-canalicular phase (112-126 DGA) compared with all other phases, while from 8 weeks before term (224-266 DGA) proliferation had almost ceased. The first epithelial cells identified by specific marker proteins in the earliest samples available for study (84 DGA) were ciliated cells and NECs. Club cells were present initially at 112 DGA and type II pneumocytes at 224 DGA. At the latest time points (224-226 DGA) these latter cell types were still present at a much lower percentage compared with adult cattle. This study characterized bovine fetal lung development by histological morphology and cellular composition of the respiratory epithelium and suggests that the apparent structural anatomical maturity of the bovine lung at term is not matched by functional maturity of the respiratory epithelium.

  15. Differential changes in the cellular composition of the developing marsupial brain

    PubMed Central

    Seelke, Adele M. H.; Dooley, James C.; Krubitzer, Leah A.

    2014-01-01

    Throughout development both the body and the brain change at remarkable rates. Specifically, the number of cells in the brain undergoes dramatic non-linear changes; first exponentially increasing in cell number and then decreasing in cell number. Importantly, different cell types, such as neurons and glia, undergo these changes at different stages of development. In the current investigation we used the isotropic fractionator method to examine the changes in cellular composition at multiple developmental milestones in the short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica. Here we report several novel findings concerning marsupial brain development and organization. First, during the later stages of neurogenesis (P18) neurons comprise most of the cells in the neocortex, although the total number of neurons remains the same throughout the lifespan. In contrast, in the subcortical regions the number of neurons decreases dramatically after P18, and a converse relationship is observed for non-neuronal cells. In the cerebellum, the total number of cells gradually increases until P180 and then remains constant, and then the number of neurons is consistent across the developmental ages examined. For the three major structures examined, neuronal density and the percent of neurons within a structure is highest during neurogenesis and then decreases after this time point. Finally, the total number of neurons in the opossum brain is relatively low compared to other small-brained mammals such as mice. The relatively low number of neurons and correspondingly high number of non-neurons suggests that in the marsupial brain non-neurons may play a significant role in signal processing. PMID:23322491

  16. Non-invasive intravital imaging of cellular differentiation with a bright red-excitable fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Haynes, Russell D; Corbel, Stéphane Y; Li, Pengpeng; González-González, Emilio; Burg, John S; Ataie, Niloufar J; Lam, Amy J; Cranfill, Paula J; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Ng, Ho-Leung; Garcia, K Christopher; Contag, Christopher H; Shen, Kang; Blau, Helen M; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-01-01

    A method for non-invasive visualization of genetically labelled cells in animal disease models with micron-level resolution would greatly facilitate development of cell-based therapies. Imaging of fluorescent proteins (FPs) using red excitation light in the “optical window” above 600 nm is one potential method for visualizing implanted cells. However, previous efforts to engineer FPs with peak excitation beyond 600 nm have resulted in undesirable reductions in brightness. Here we report three new red-excitable monomeric FPs obtained by structure-guided mutagenesis of mNeptune, previously the brightest monomeric FP when excited beyond 600 nm. Two of these, mNeptune2 and mNeptune2.5, demonstrate improved maturation and brighter fluorescence, while the third, mCardinal, has a red-shifted excitation spectrum without reduction in brightness. We show that mCardinal can be used to non-invasively and longitudinally visualize the differentiation of myoblasts and stem cells into myocytes in living mice with high anatomical detail. PMID:24633408

  17. Chromatin assembly factor CAF-1 is required for cellular differentiation during plant development.

    PubMed

    Exner, Vivien; Taranto, Patti; Schönrock, Nicole; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Hennig, Lars

    2006-11-01

    Chromatin assembly factor CAF-1 facilitates the formation of nucleosomes on newly replicated DNA in vitro. However, the role of CAF-1 in development is poorly understood because mutants are not available in most multicellular model organisms. Biochemical evidence suggests that FASCIATA1, FASCIATA2 and MSI1 form CAF-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Because fasciata mutants are viable, CAF-1 is not essential for cell division in plants. Arabidopsis CAF-1 mutants have defects in shoot apical meristems; in addition, CAF-1 is required to establish seedling architecture, leaf size and trichome differentiation. CAF-1 is needed to restrict branching of trichomes on rosette leaves. Increased trichome branching in CAF-1 mutants is not strictly correlated with increased nuclear DNA content. In addition, fas2 glabra3 double mutants show an additive genetic interaction, demonstrating that CAF-1 acts genetically parallel to the GLABRA3-containing, endoreduplication-coupled trichome branching pathway. However, CAF-1 is often needed to restrict endoreduplication, because seedlings of most CAF-1 mutants have increased ploidy. Notably, in the Landsberg erecta background, loss of CAF-1 does not affect ploidy, demonstrating that loss of CAF-1 can be compensated in some Arabidopsis accessions. These results reveal that the functions of FAS1, FAS2 and MSI1 are not restricted to meristems, but are also needed to control genome replication at multiple steps of development.

  18. PROX1 gene is differentially expressed in oral cancer and reduces cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria F S D; de Oliveira Rodini, Camila; de Aquino Xavier, Flávia C; Paiva, Katiúcia B; Severino, Patrícia; Moyses, Raquel A; López, Rossana M; DeCicco, Rafael; Rocha, Lília A; Carvalho, Marcos B; Tajara, Eloiza H; Nunes, Fabio D

    2014-12-01

    Homeobox genes are a family of transcription factors that play a pivotal role in embryogenesis. Prospero homeobox 1 (PROX1) has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor gene or oncogene in various types of cancer, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We have previously identified PROX1 as a downregulated gene in OSCC. The aim of this study is to clarify the underlying mechanism by which PROX1 regulates tumorigenicity of OSCC cells. PROX1 mRNA and protein expression levels were first investigated in 40 samples of OSCC and in nontumor margins. Methylation and amplification analysis was also performed to assess the epigenetic and genetic mechanisms involved in controlling PROX1 expression. OSCC cell line SCC9 was also transfected to stably express the PROX1 gene. Next, SCC9-PROX1-overexpressing cells and controls were subjected to proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion assays in vitro. OSCC samples showed reduced PROX1 expression levels compared with nontumor margins. PROX1 amplification was associated with better overall survival. PROX1 overexpression reduces cell proliferation and downregulates cyclin D1. PROX1-overexpressing cells also exhibited reduced CK18 and CK19 expression and transcriptionally altered the expression of WISP3, GATA3, NOTCH1, and E2F1. Our results suggest that PROX1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in oral carcinogenesis.

  19. PROX1 Gene is Differentially Expressed in Oral Cancer and Reduces Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria F.S.D.; de Oliveira Rodini, Camila; de Aquino Xavier, Flávia C.; Paiva, Katiúcia B.; Severino, Patrícia; Moyses, Raquel A.; López, Rossana M.; DeCicco, Rafael; Rocha, Lília A.; Carvalho, Marcos B.; Tajara, Eloiza H.; Nunes, Fabio D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Homeobox genes are a family of transcription factors that play a pivotal role in embryogenesis. Prospero homeobox 1 (PROX1) has been shown to function as a tumor suppressor gene or oncogene in various types of cancer, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We have previously identified PROX1 as a downregulated gene in OSCC. The aim of this study is to clarify the underlying mechanism by which PROX1 regulates tumorigenicity of OSCC cells. PROX1 mRNA and protein expression levels were first investigated in 40 samples of OSCC and in nontumor margins. Methylation and amplification analysis was also performed to assess the epigenetic and genetic mechanisms involved in controlling PROX1 expression. OSCC cell line SCC9 was also transfected to stably express the PROX1 gene. Next, SCC9-PROX1-overexpressing cells and controls were subjected to proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion assays in vitro. OSCC samples showed reduced PROX1 expression levels compared with nontumor margins. PROX1 amplification was associated with better overall survival. PROX1 overexpression reduces cell proliferation and downregulates cyclin D1. PROX1-overexpressing cells also exhibited reduced CK18 and CK19 expression and transcriptionally altered the expression of WISP3, GATA3, NOTCH1, and E2F1. Our results suggest that PROX1 functions as a tumor suppressor gene in oral carcinogenesis. PMID:25526434

  20. Differential effect of P-gp and MRP2 on cellular translocation of gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Kwatra, Deep; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2011-11-25

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics widely indicated in the treatment of both human and animal diseases. The primary objective of this study was to assess short and long term affinities of gemifloxacin towards efflux transporters (P-gp, MRP2) and nuclear hormone receptor (PXR). Uptake and dose dependent inhibition studies were performed with [(14)C] erythromycin (0.25 μCi/ml) on MDCKII-MDR1 and MDCKII-MRP2 cells. Cellular accumulation of calcein-AM was further determined to confirm the affinity of gemifloxacin towards P-gp and MRP2. Transport studies were conducted to determine bi-directional permeability and to assess efflux ratio of gemifloxacin. LS-180 cells were treated with three different concentrations of gemifloxacin for 72 h and real-time PCR analysis was performed to study the quantitative gene expression levels of PXR, MDR1 and MRP2. Further, [(14)C] erythromycin uptake was also performed on LS-180 treated cells to better delineate the functional activity of efflux transporters. Results from our study suggest that gemifloxacin may be a substrate of both the efflux transporters studied. This compound inhibited both P-gp and MRP2 mediated efflux of [(14)C] erythromycin in a dose dependent manner with IC(50) values of 123 ± 2 μM and 16 ± 2 μM, respectively. The efflux ratio of [(14)C] erythromycin lowered from 3.56 to 1.63 on MDCKII-MDR1 cells and 4.93 to 1.26 on MDCKII-MRP2 cells. This significant reduction in efflux ratio further confirmed the substrate specificity of gemifloxacin towards P-gp and MRP2. Long term exposure significantly induced the expression of PXR (18 fold), MDR1 (6 fold) and MRP2 (6 fold). A decrease (20%) in [(14)C] erythromycin uptake further confirmed the elevated functional activity of P-gp and MRP2. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that gemifloxacin is effluxed by both P-gp and MRP2. Long term exposure induced their gene expression and functional activity. This substrate specificity of gemifloxacin towards

  1. Differential effect of P-gp and MRP2 on cellular translocation of gemifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Kwatra, Deep; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad spectrum antibiotics widely indicated in the treatment of both human and animal diseases. The primary objective of this study was to assess short and long term affinity of gemifloxacin towards efflux transporters (P-gp, MRP2) and nuclear hormone receptor (PXR). Uptake and dose dependent inhibition studies were performed with [14C] erythromycin (0.25μCi/ml) on MDCKII-MDR1 and MDCKII-MRP2 cells. Cellular accumulation of calcein-AM was further determined to confirm the affinity of gemifloxacin towards P-gp and MRP2. Transport studies were conducted to determine bi-directional permeability and to assess efflux ratio of gemifloxacin. LS-180 cells were treated with three different concentrations of gemifloxacin for 72hrs and real-time PCR analysis was performed to study the quantitative gene expression levels of PXR, MDR1 and MRP2. Further, [14C] erythromycin uptake was also performed on LS-180 treated cells to better delineate the functional activity of efflux transporters. Results from our study suggest that gemifloxacin may be a substrate of both the efflux transporters studied. This compound inhibited both P-gp and MRP2 mediated efflux of [14C] erythromycin in a dose dependent manner with IC50 values of 123 ± 2μM and 16 ± 2μM, respectively. The efflux ratio of [14C] erythromycin lowered from 3.56 to 1.63 on MDCKII-MDR1 cells and 4.93 to 1.26 on MDCKII-MRP2 cells. This significant reduction in efflux ratio further confirmed the substrate specificity of gemifloxacin towards P-gp and MRP2. Long term exposure significantly induced the expression of PXR (18 fold), MDR1 (6 fold) and MRP2 (6 fold). A decrease (20%) in [14C] erythromycin uptake further confirmed the elevated functional activity of P-gp and MRP2. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that gemifloxacin is effluxed by both P-gp and MRP2. Long term exposure induced their gene expression and functional activity. This substrate specificity of gemifloxacin towards these efflux

  2. Significance of Compression in Binucleation while Differentiating Reactive Cellular Changes Between Human Papillomavirus and Candida Infections

    PubMed

    Okodo, Mitsuaki; Okayama, Kaori; Fukui, Tadasi; Shiina, Natsuko; Caniz, Timothy; Yabusaki, Hiromi; Fujii, Masahiko

    2017-09-27

    Purpose: Binucleation is a reactive cellular change (RCC) in Pap smears due to Candida infection. However, the origin of these binucleated cells as RCCs remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine binucleation in patients negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy (NILM) and infected with Candida and those infected with high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) and to clarify the origin of the binucleated cells. Methods: A total of 115 endocervical swab specimens with a combined diagnosis of NILM, Candida infection, and RCCs were used for this study. Pap smears were used to identify binucleated cells and then separate them into two groups, compression-positive and compression-negative. In addition, hr-HPV was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with a specific primer on the DNA extracted from the remaining residual cytology specimens. To make the hr-HPV-infected binucleated cells visible, an in situ PCR assay was performed on the Pap smear. Result: Of the 115 specimens, 69.6% contained binucleated cells, 26 (32.5%) showed only the compressed form, 35 (43.8%) showed only the non-compressed form, and 19 showed both the compressed and non-compressed forms of binucleated cells. Also, 34 specimens (29.6%) were positive for hr-HPV. The sensitivity and specificity of compression-positive binucleated cells were 91.2% and 82.7% (p < 0.001), but they were not significant in the compression-negative group (p = 0.156). Also, 34 cases with hr-HPV contained 99 compression-positive and 24 compression-negative cells. The hr-HPV-positive cells accounted for 68 (68.7%) of the 99 compression-positive and 2 (8.3%) of the 24 compression-negative binucleated cells as determined by an in situ PCR assay for hr-HPV. The relationship between compression and hr-HPV was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Compression-positive binucleated cells may be present as a result of hr-HPV infection and not RCC, which is caused due to inflammation in NILM

  3. Activated Notch1 Target Genes during Embryonic Cell Differentiation Depend on the Cellular Context and Include Lineage Determinants and Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Meier-Stiegen, Franziska; Schwanbeck, Ralf; Bernoth, Kristina; Martini, Simone; Hieronymus, Thomas; Ruau, David; Zenke, Martin; Just, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Background Notch receptor signaling controls developmental cell fates in a cell-context dependent manner. Although Notch signaling directly regulates transcription via the RBP-J/CSL DNA binding protein, little is known about the target genes that are directly activated by Notch in the respective tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings To analyze how Notch signaling mediates its context dependent function(s), we utilized a Tamoxifen-inducible system to activate Notch1 in murine embryonic stem cells at different stages of mesodermal differentiation and performed global transcriptional analyses. We find that the majority of genes regulated by Notch1 are unique for the cell type and vary widely dependent on other signals. We further show that Notch1 signaling regulates expression of genes playing key roles in cell differentiation, cell cycle control and apoptosis in a context dependent manner. In addition to the known Notch1 targets of the Hes and Hey families of transcriptional repressors, Notch1 activates the expression of regulatory transcription factors such as Sox9, Pax6, Runx1, Myf5 and Id proteins that are critically involved in lineage decisions in the absence of protein synthesis. Conclusion/Significance We suggest that Notch signaling determines lineage decisions and expansion of stem cells by directly activating both key lineage specific transcription factors and their repressors (Id and Hes/Hey proteins) and propose a model by which Notch signaling regulates cell fate commitment and self renewal in dependence of the intrinsic and extrinsic cellular context. PMID:20628604

  4. ATRA-Induced Cellular Differentiation and CD38 Expression Inhibits Acquisition of BCR-ABL Mutations for CML Acquired Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiwei; Chu, Su; Wang, Jinhui; Yuan, Hongfeng; Roth, Mendel; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Bhatia, Ravi; Chen, WenYong

    2014-01-01

    Acquired resistance through genetic mutations is a major obstacle in targeted cancer therapy, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we studied mechanisms of acquired resistance of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) by examining genome-wide gene expression changes in KCL-22 CML cells versus their resistant KCL-22M cells that acquire T315I BCR-ABL mutation following TKI exposure. Although T315I BCR-ABL is sufficient to confer resistance to TKIs in CML cells, surprisingly we found that multiple drug resistance pathways were activated in KCL-22M cells along with reduced expression of a set of myeloid differentiation genes. Forced myeloid differentiation by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) effectively blocked acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations and resistance to the TKIs imatinib, nilotinib or dasatinib in our previously described in vitro models of acquired TKI resistance. ATRA induced robust expression of CD38, a cell surface marker and cellular NADase. High levels of CD38 reduced intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) levels and blocked acquired resistance by inhibiting the activity of the NAD+-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase that we have previously shown to promote resistance in CML cells by facilitating error-prone DNA damage repair. Consequently, ATRA treatment decreased DNA damage repair and suppressed acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations. This study sheds novel insight into mechanisms underlying acquired resistance in CML, and suggests potential benefit of combining ATRA with TKIs in treating CML, particularly in advanced phases. PMID:24967705

  5. ATRA-induced cellular differentiation and CD38 expression inhibits acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations for CML acquired resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Xiwei; Chu, Su; Wang, Jinhui; Yuan, Hongfeng; Roth, Mendel; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Bhatia, Ravi; Chen, WenYong

    2014-06-01

    Acquired resistance through genetic mutations is a major obstacle in targeted cancer therapy, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we studied mechanisms of acquired resistance of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) by examining genome-wide gene expression changes in KCL-22 CML cells versus their resistant KCL-22M cells that acquire T315I BCR-ABL mutation following TKI exposure. Although T315I BCR-ABL is sufficient to confer resistance to TKIs in CML cells, surprisingly we found that multiple drug resistance pathways were activated in KCL-22M cells along with reduced expression of a set of myeloid differentiation genes. Forced myeloid differentiation by all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) effectively blocked acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations and resistance to the TKIs imatinib, nilotinib or dasatinib in our previously described in vitro models of acquired TKI resistance. ATRA induced robust expression of CD38, a cell surface marker and cellular NADase. High levels of CD38 reduced intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) levels and blocked acquired resistance by inhibiting the activity of the NAD+-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase that we have previously shown to promote resistance in CML cells by facilitating error-prone DNA damage repair. Consequently, ATRA treatment decreased DNA damage repair and suppressed acquisition of BCR-ABL mutations. This study sheds novel insight into mechanisms underlying acquired resistance in CML, and suggests potential benefit of combining ATRA with TKIs in treating CML, particularly in advanced phases.

  6. Neocortex and allocortex respond differentially to cellular stress in vitro and aging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Posimo, Jessica M; Titler, Amanda M; Choi, Hailey J H; Unnithan, Ajay S; Leak, Rehana K

    2013-01-01

    cerebrum may reflect differential responses to low level protein-misfolding stress but also reveal impressive compensatory adaptations in allocortex.

  7. Knockdown of XAB2 enhances all-trans retinoic acid-induced cellular differentiation in all-trans retinoic acid-sensitive and -resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma-Ishikawa, Kumiko; Morio, Tomohiro; Yamada, Takayuki; Sugawara, Yuji; Ono, Makoto; Nagasawa, Masayuki; Yasuda, Akio; Morimoto, Chikao; Ohnuma, Kei; Dang, Nam H; Hosoi, Hajime; Verdin, Eric; Mizutani, Shuki

    2007-02-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA)-binding protein 2 (XAB2) is composed of 855 amino acids, contains 15 tetratricopeptide repeat motifs, and associates with Cockayne syndrome group A and B proteins and RNA polymerase II, as well as XPA. In vitro and in vivo studies showed that XAB2 is involved in pre-mRNA splicing, transcription, and transcription-coupled DNA repair, leading to preimplantation lethality, and is essential for mouse embryogenesis. Retinoids are effective for the treatment of preneoplastic diseases including xeroderma pigmentosum and other dermatologic diseases such as photoaging. We therefore focused on defining the effect of XAB2 on cellular differentiation in the presence of ATRA treatment. In the present study, we showed that overexpression of XAB2 inhibited ATRA-induced cellular differentiation in human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line, and that knockdown of XAB2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased ATRA-sensitive cellular differentiation in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL60 at both physiologic (10(-9)-10(-8) mol/L) and therapeutic (10(-7) mol/L) concentrations of ATRA. Moreover, we found that XAB2 was associated with retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) and histone deacetylase 3 in the nuclei. Finally, using siRNA against XAB2, we showed that the ATRA-resistant neuroblastoma cell line IMR-32 underwent cellular differentiation induced by ATRA at a therapeutic concentration (10(-6) mol/L). These results strongly suggest that XAB2 is a component of the RAR corepressor complex with an inhibitory effect on ATRA-induced cellular differentiation and that XAB2 plays a role in ATRA-mediated cellular differentiation as an important aspect of cancer therapy.

  8. Developmental expression and differential cellular localization of obscurin and obscurin-associated kinase in cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Andrei B; Raeker, Maide O; Russell, Mark W

    2008-04-01

    Obscurin and obscurin-associated kinase are two products of the obscurin transcriptional unit that encodes a recently identified giant muscle-specific protein obscurin. In this study, we characterized the developmental expression and cellular localization of obscurin and obscurin-associated kinase in cardiac muscle cells. We cloned murine obscurin-associated kinase and found that it is abundantly expressed in the heart as two isotypes encoded by 2.2 and 4.9 kb sequences. The 2.2 kb isotype of the kinase was more prominently expressed than the 4.9 kb isotype. Both obscurin and the kinase-like domains were progressively upregulated since the early stages of cardiac development. Obscurin-associated kinase was expressed at higher levels than obscurin at early stages of cardiomyogenesis. Increasing intensity of obscurin expression in the developing heart positively correlated with progressive cell differentiation and was higher in the ventricles compared to the atria. These data were supported by the results of experiments with primary cardiac cell cultures. Obscurin localization changed from a weakly immunopositive diffuse pattern in poorly differentiated cells to an intensely immunolabeled cross-striated distribution at the level of mid-A-bands and Z-disks during the assembly of the myofibrillar contractile apparatus. In dividing myocytes, unlike the interphase cells, obscurin translocated from disassembling myofibrils into a diffuse granulated pattern segregated separately from alpha-actinin-immunopositive aggregates. Obscurin-associated kinase was localized mainly to cell nuclei with increasing incorporation into the Z-disks during differentiation. Our results suggest that these two novel proteins are involved in the progression of cardiac myogenesis during the transition to advanced stages of heart development. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. A septation related gene AcsepH in Acremonium chrysogenum is involved in the cellular differentiation and cephalosporin production.

    PubMed

    Long, Liang-Kun; Wang, Yanling; Yang, Jing; Xu, Xinxin; Liu, Gang

    2013-01-01

    T-DNA inserted mutants of Acremonium chrysogenum were constructed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT). One mutant 1223 which grew slowly was selected. TAIL-PCR and sequence analysis indicated that a putative septation protein encoding gene AcsepH was partially deleted in this mutant. AcsepH contains nine introns, and its deduced protein AcSEPH has a conserved serine/threonine protein kinase catalytic (S_TKc) domain at its N-terminal region. AcSEPH shows high similarity with septation H proteins from other filamentous fungi based on the phylogenetic analysis of S_TKc domains. In sporulation (LPE) medium, the conidia of AcsepH mutant was only about one-seventh of the wild-type, and more than 20% of conidia produced by the mutant contain multiple nuclei which were rare in the wild-type. During fermentation, the AcsepH disruption mutant grew slowly and its cephalosporin production was only about one quarter of the wild-type, and the transcription analysis showed that pcbC expression was delayed and the expressions of cefEF, cefD1 and cefD2 were significantly decreased. The vegetative hyphae of AcsepH mutant swelled abnormally and hardly formed the typical yeast-like cells. The amount of yeast-like cells was about one-tenth of the wild-type after fermentation for 5days. Comparison of hyphal viabilities revealed that the cells of AcsepH mutant died easily than the wild-type at the late stage of fermentation. Fluorescent stains revealed that the absence of AcsepH in A. chrysogenum led to reduction of septation and formation of multinucleate cells. These data indicates that AcsepH is required for the normal cellular septation and differentiation of A. chrysogenum, and its absence may change the cellular physiological status and causes the decline in cephalosporin production.

  10. Differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells to a neuronal phenotype changes cellular bioenergetics and the response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Lonnie; Giordano, Samantha; Zelickson, Blake R.; Johnson, Michelle; Benavides, Gloria; Ouyang, Xiaosen; Fineberg, Naomi; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Zhang, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Cell differentiation is associated with changes in metabolism and function. Understanding these changes during differentiation is important in the context of stem cell research, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. An early event in neurodegenerative diseases is the alteration of mitochondrial function and increased oxidative stress. Studies using both undifferentiated and differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells have shown distinct responses to cellular stressors, however the mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized that since the regulation of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are modulated during cellular differentiation, this would change bioenergetic function and the response to oxidative stress. To test this, we used retinoic acid (RA) to induce differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells and assessed changes in cellular bioenergetics using extracellular flux analysis. After exposure to RA, the SH-SY5Y cells had an increased mitochondrial membrane potential, without changing mitochondrial number. Differentiated cells exhibited greater stimulation of mitochondrial respiration with uncoupling and an increased bioenergetic reserve capacity. The increased reserve capacity in the differentiated cells was suppressed by the inhibitor of glycolysis, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). Furthermore, we found that differentiated cells were substantially more resistant to cytotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by reactive lipid species 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) or the reactive oxygen species generator 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ). We then analyzed the levels of selected mitochondrial proteins and found an increase in complex IV subunits which we propose contributes to the increase in reserve capacity in the differentiated cells. Furthermore, we found an increase in MnSOD that could, at least in part, account for the increased resistance to oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that profound changes in mitochondrial metabolism and antioxidant defenses occur

  11. A Novel Protocol to Differentiate Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Neuronal microRNAs to Provide a Suitable Cellular Model.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mehrak; Soleimani, Masoud; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Bakhshandeh, Behnaz; Aghaee-Bakhtiari, Seyed Hamid; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2015-08-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are one of the most challenging subjects in medicine. Investigation of their underlying genetic or epigenetic factors is hampered by lack of suitable models. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) represent a valuable approach to provide a proper model for poorly understood mechanisms of neuronal diseases and the related drug screenings. miR-124 and miR-128 are the two brain-enriched miRNAs with different time-points of expression during neuronal development. Herein, we transduced human iPS cells with miR-124 and miR-128 harboring lentiviruses sequentially. The transduced plasmids contained GFP and puromycin antibiotic-resistant genes for easier selection and identification. Morphological assessment and immunocytochemistry (overexpressions of beta-tubulin and neuron-specific enolase) confirmed that induced hiPS cells by miR-124 and miR-128 represent similar characteristics to those of mature neurons. In addition, the upregulation of neuron-specific enolase, beta-tubulin, Map2, GFAP, and BDNF was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. In conclusion, it seems that our novel protocol remarks the combinatorial effect of miR-124 and miR-128 on neural differentiation in the absence of any extrinsic factor. Moreover, such cellular models could be used in personalized drug screening and applied for more effective therapies.

  12. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Y; Tsusu, K; Minami, K; Nakanishi, Y

    2014-06-01

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique.

  13. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Y.; Tsusu, K.; Minami, K.; Nakanishi, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique.

  14. Development of a cell culture surface conversion technique using alginate thin film for evaluating effect upon cellular differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Y.; Tsusu, K.; Minami, K.; Nakanishi, Y.

    2014-06-15

    Here, we sought to develop a cell culture surface conversion technique that would not damage living cells. An alginate thin film, formed on a glass plate by spin coating of sodium alginate solution and dipping into calcium chloride solution, was used to inhibit adhesion of cells. The film could be removed by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) at any time during cell culture, permitting observation of cellular responses to conversion of the culture surface in real time. Additionally, we demonstrated the validity of the alginate thin film coating method and the performance of the film. The thickness of the alginate thin film was controlled by varying the rotation speed during spin coating. Moreover, the alginate thin film completely inhibited the adhesion of cultured cells to the culture surface, irrespective of the thickness of the film. When the alginate thin film was removed from the culture surface by EDTA, the cultured cells adhered to the culture surface, and their morphology changed. Finally, we achieved effective differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts into myotube cells by cell culture on the convertible culture surface, demonstrating the utility of our novel technique.

  15. Differential proteome and cellular adhesion analyses of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM grown on raffinose - an emerging prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Celebioglu, Hasan Ufuk; Ejby, Morten; Majumder, Avishek; Købler, Carsten; Goh, Yong Jun; Thorsen, Kristian; Schmidt, Bjarne; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Abou Hachem, Maher; Lahtinen, Sampo J; Jacobsen, Susanne; Klaenhammer, Todd R; Brix, Susanne; Mølhave, Kristian; Svensson, Birte

    2016-05-01

    Whole cell and surface proteomes were analyzed together with adhesive properties of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM (NCFM) grown on the emerging prebiotic raffinose, exemplifying a synbiotic. Adhesion of NCFM to mucin and intestinal HT-29 cells increased three-fold after culture with raffinose versus glucose, as also visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Comparative proteomics using 2D-DIGE showed 43 unique proteins to change in relative abundance in whole cell lysates from NCFM grown on raffinose compared to glucose. Furthermore, 14 unique proteins in 18 spots of the surface subproteome underwent changes identified by differential 2DE, including elongation factor G, thermostable pullulanase, and phosphate starvation inducible stress-related protein increasing in a range of +2.1 - +4.7 fold. By contrast five known moonlighting proteins decreased in relative abundance by up to -2.4 fold. Enzymes involved in raffinose catabolism were elevated in the whole cell proteome; α-galactosidase (+13.9 fold); sucrose phosphorylase (+5.4 fold) together with metabolic enzymes from the Leloir pathway for galactose utilization and the glycolysis; β-galactosidase (+5.7 fold); galactose (+2.9/+3.1 fold) and fructose (+2.8 fold) kinases. The insights at the molecular and cellular levels contributed to the understanding of the interplay of a synbiotic composed of NCFM and raffinose with the host. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Cellular and Molecular Dynamics of Th17 Differentiation and its Developmental Plasticity in the Intestinal Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bhaumik, Suniti; Basu, Rajatava

    2017-01-01

    After emerging from the thymus, naive CD4 T cells circulate through secondary lymphoid tissues, including gut-associated lymphoid tissue of the intestine. The activation of naïve CD4 T cells by antigen-presenting cells offering cognate antigen initiate differentiation programs that lead to the development of highly specialized T helper (Th) cell lineages. Although initially believed that developmental programing of effector T cells such as T helper 1 (Th1) or T helper 2 (Th2) resulted in irreversible commitment to a fixed fate, subsequent studies have demonstrated greater flexibility, or plasticity, in effector T cell stability than originally conceived. This is particularly so for the Th17 subset, differentiation of which is a highly dynamic process with overlapping developmental axes with inducible regulatory T (iTreg), T helper 22 (Th22), and Th1 cells. Accordingly, intermediary stages of Th17 cells are found in various tissues, which co-express lineage-specific transcription factor(s) or cytokine(s) of developmentally related CD4 T cell subsets. A highly specialized tissue like that of the intestine, which harbors the largest immune compartment of the body, adds several layers of complexity to the intricate process of Th differentiation. Due to constant exposure to millions of commensal microbes and periodic exposure to pathogens, the intestinal mucosa maintains a delicate balance between regulatory and effector T cells. It is becoming increasingly clear that equilibrium between tolerogenic and inflammatory axes is maintained in the intestine by shuttling the flexible genetic programming of a developing CD4 T cell along the developmental axis of iTreg, Th17, Th22, and Th1 subsets. Currently, Th17 plasticity remains an unresolved concern in the field of clinical research as targeting Th17 cells to cure immune-mediated disease might also target its related subsets. In this review, we discuss the expanding sphere of Th17 plasticity through its shared

  17. Determination of tenogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells by terahertz waves for measurement of the optical property of cellular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yasuyuki; Azuchi, Kosuke; Ju, Yang; Suzuki, Satoshi; Xu, Baiyao; Yamamoto, Shuhei

    2014-06-01

    Technology for identifying stem cell-to-tenocyte differentiation that is non-contact and non-destructive in vitro is essential in tissue engineering. It has been found that expression of various RNA and proteins produced by differentiated cells is elevated when human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) differentiate into tenocytes. Also, such biomolecules have absorption bands in the terahertz range. Thus, we attempted to evaluate whether terahertz waves could be used to distinguish hBMSC-to-tenocyte differentiation. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) using femtosecond laser pulses was used for terahertz measurements. HBMSCs differentiated into tenocytes with mechanical stimulation: 10% cyclical uniaxial stretching at 1 Hz for 24 or 48 h. Cellular suspensions before and after differentiation were measured with terahertz waves. Complex refractive index, consisting of a refractive index (real) and an extinction coefficient (imaginary) obtained from the transmitted terahertz signals, was evaluated before and after differentiation at 1.0 THz. As a result, the THz-TDS system enabled discrimination of hBMSC-to-tenocyte differentiation due to the marked contrast in optical parameter before and after differentiation. This is the first report of the potential of a THz-TDS system for the detection of tenogenic differentiation using a non-contact and non-destructive in vitro technique.

  18. Cellular Attachment and Differentiation on Titania Nanotubes Exposed to Air- or Nitrogen-Based Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hye Yeon; Kwon, Jae-Sung; Choi, Yu-Ri; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2014-01-01

    The surface topography and chemistry of titanium implants are important factors for successful osseointegration. However, chemical modification of an implant surface using currently available methods often results in the disruption of topographical features and the loss of beneficial effects during the shelf life of the implant. Therefore, the aim of this study was to apply the recently highlighted portable non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ), elicited from one of two different gas sources (nitrogen and air), to TiO2 nanotube surfaces to further improve their osteogenic properties while preserving the topographical morphology. The surface treatment was performed before implantation to avoid age-related decay. The surface chemistry and morphology of the TiO2 nanotube surfaces before and after the NTAPPJ treatment were determined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a surface profiler, a contact angle goniometer, and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. The MC3T3-E1 cell viability, attachment and morphology were confirmed using calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 staining, and analysis of gene expression using rat mesenchymal stem cells was performed using a real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that both portable nitrogen- and air-based NTAPPJ could be used on TiO2 nanotube surfaces easily and without topographical disruption. NTAPPJ resulted in a significant increase in the hydrophilicity of the surfaces as well as changes in the surface chemistry, which consequently increased the cell viability, attachment and differentiation compared with the control samples. The nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment group exhibited a higher osteogenic gene expression level than the air-based NTAPPJ treatment group due to the lower atomic percentage of carbon on the surface that resulted from treatment. It was concluded that NTAPPJ treatment of TiO2 nanotube surfaces results in an increase in cellular activity

  19. Nuclear medicine imaging of gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The key role of cellular differentiation and tumor grade: from theory to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Edmond; Hubele, Fabrice; Marzano, Ettore; Goichot, Bernard; Pessaux, Patrick; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear medicine imaging is a powerful diagnostic tool for the management of patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, mainly developed considering some cellular characteristics that are specific to the neuroendocrine phenotype. Hence, overexpression of specific trans membrane receptors as well as the cellular ability to take up, accumulate, and decarboxylate amine precursors have been considered for diagnostic radiotracer development. Moreover, the glycolytic metabolism, which is not a specific energetic pathway of neuroendocrine tumors, has been proposed for radionuclide imaging of neuroendocrine tumors. The results of scintigraphic examinations reflect the pathologic features and tumor metabolic properties, allowing the in vivo characterization of the disease. In this article, the influence of both cellular differentiation and tumor grade in the scintigraphic pattern is reviewed according to the literature data. The relationship between nuclear imaging results and prognosis is also discussed. Despite the existence of a relationship between the results of scintigraphic imaging and cellular differentiation, tumor grade and patient outcome, the mechanism explaining the variability of the results needs further investigation. PMID:22743056

  20. Difference in root K+ retention ability and reduced sensitivity of K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species confer differential salt tolerance in three Brassica species

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Brassica species are known to possess significant inter and intraspecies variability in salinity stress tolerance, but the cell-specific mechanisms conferring this difference remain elusive. In this work, the role and relative contribution of several key plasma membrane transporters to salinity stress tolerance were evaluated in three Brassica species (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. oleracea) using a range of electrophysiological assays. Initial root growth assay and viability staining revealed that B. napus was most tolerant amongst the three species, followed by B. juncea and B. oleracea. At the mechanistic level, this difference was conferred by at least three complementary physiological mechanisms: (i) higher Na+ extrusion ability from roots resulting from increased expression and activity of plasma membrane SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchangers; (ii) better root K+ retention ability resulting from stress-inducible activation of H+-ATPase and ability to maintain more negative membrane potential under saline conditions; and (iii) reduced sensitivity of B. napus root K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The last two mechanisms played the dominant role and conferred most of the differential salt sensitivity between species. Brassica napus plants were also more efficient in preventing the stress-induced increase in GORK transcript levels and up-regulation of expression of AKT1, HAK5, and HKT1 transporter genes. Taken together, our data provide the mechanistic explanation for differential salt stress sensitivity amongst these species and shed light on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of key ion transport systems involved in the maintenance of the root plasma membrane potential and cytosolic K/Na ratio as a key attribute for salt tolerance in Brassica species. PMID:27340231

  1. Unravelling the retention of proliferation and differentiation potency in extensive culture of human subcutaneous fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells in different media.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, M; Indumathi, S; Rashmi, M; Rajkumar, J S; Sudarsanam, D

    2012-12-01

    This study has intended to investigate longevity of subcutaneous fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SF-MSCs) under extensive culturing. It has also focused on optimization of culture media for them over prolonged periods in vitro. We evaluated SF-MSCs with reference to phenotypic characterization, proliferative ability, karyotype stability and differentiation potency with early (P3) and late passage (P20) conditions, using four different media, DMEM-LG, ALPHA-MEM, DMEM-F12 and DMEM-KO. This study unravels retention of SF-MSC characteristics in facets of phenotypic expression profile (CD 90, CD 105, CD 73, CD 34, CD 29, CD 54, CD 49d, CD 117, HLA-DR, CD 166, CD 31, CD 44), proliferative characteristics, karyotyping and differentiation potency prolonged culturing to P25 in all media. Population doubling time (PDT) in Alpha MEM, DMEM LG, DMEM F 12, DMEM KO were identified to be (1.81, 1.84, 1.9, 2.08 days) at early passage and (2.93, 2.94, 3.12, 3.06 days) at late passage. As a corollary, Alpha MEM and DMEM LG serve as appropriate basal media for SF-MSC when proliferative potency is considered. In research, it is imperative that SF-MSC uphold their expansion potency in the aforesaid attributes in all media over extensive culturing, thereby transforming their colossal in vitro potency, with the aim of curing a wide horizon of diseases. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. An integrated transcriptomics-guided genome-wide promoter analysis and next-generation proteomics approach to mine factor(s) regulating cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Kamal; Bader, Samuel L.; Kumar, Pankaj; Malakar, Dipankar; Campbell, David S.; Pradhan, Bhola Shankar; Sarkar, Rajesh K.; Wadhwa, Neerja; Sensharma, Souvik; Jain, Vaibhav; Moritz, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Differential next-generation-omics approaches aid in the visualization of biological processes and pave the way for divulging important events and/or interactions leading to a functional output at cellular or systems level. To this end, we undertook an integrated Nextgen transcriptomics and proteomics approach to divulge differential gene expression of infant and pubertal rat Sertoli cells (Sc).Unlike, pubertal Sc, infant Sc are immature and fail to support spermatogenesis. We found exclusive association of 14 and 19 transcription factor binding sites to infantile and pubertal states of Sc, respectively, using differential transcriptomics-guided genome-wide computational analysis of relevant promoters employing 220 Positional Weight Matrices from the TRANSFAC database. Proteomic SWATH-MS analysis provided extensive quantification of nuclear and cytoplasmic protein fractions revealing 1,670 proteins differentially located between the nucleus and cytoplasm of infant Sc and 890 proteins differentially located within those of pubertal Sc. Based on our multi-omics approach, the transcription factor YY1 was identified as one of the lead candidates regulating differentiation of Sc.YY1 was found to have abundant binding sites on promoters of genes upregulated during puberty. To determine its significance, we generated transgenic rats with Sc specific knockdown of YY1 that led to compromised spermatogenesis. PMID:28065881

  3. An integrated transcriptomics-guided genome-wide promoter analysis and next-generation proteomics approach to mine factor(s) regulating cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kamal; Bader, Samuel L; Kumar, Pankaj; Malakar, Dipankar; Campbell, David S; Pradhan, Bhola Shankar; Sarkar, Rajesh K; Wadhwa, Neerja; Sensharma, Souvik; Jain, Vaibhav; Moritz, Robert L; Majumdar, Subeer S

    2017-04-01

    Differential next-generation-omics approaches aid in the visualization of biological processes and pave the way for divulging important events and/or interactions leading to a functional output at cellular or systems level. To this end, we undertook an integrated Nextgen transcriptomics and proteomics approach to divulge differential gene expression of infant and pubertal rat Sertoli cells (Sc).Unlike, pubertal Sc, infant Sc are immature and fail to support spermatogenesis. We found exclusive association of 14 and 19 transcription factor binding sites to infantile and pubertal states of Sc, respectively, using differential transcriptomics-guided genome-wide computational analysis of relevant promoters employing 220 Positional Weight Matrices from the TRANSFAC database. Proteomic SWATH-MS analysis provided extensive quantification of nuclear and cytoplasmic protein fractions revealing 1,670 proteins differentially located between the nucleus and cytoplasm of infant Sc and 890 proteins differentially located within those of pubertal Sc. Based on our multi-omics approach, the transcription factor YY1 was identified as one of the lead candidates regulating differentiation of Sc.YY1 was found to have abundant binding sites on promoters of genes upregulated during puberty. To determine its significance, we generated transgenic rats with Sc specific knockdown of YY1 that led to compromised spermatogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  4. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photoreceptors, and corresponding signaling pathways have evolved, in almost all kingdoms of life, to monitor light continuously and adjust their growth and development accordingly. However, considering the fact that different cell types should be enable to trigger distinct light signaling pathways according to their needs, cell-type specific light signaling pathways are required to guarantee cell type-matched modulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to different light signals. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, which has only 2 cell types with clear division of labor, possesses cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways which allow differential regulation of genes involved in various cellular and metabolic pathways in response to environmental light. The existence of cell-type specific light signaling pathways in muticellular organism like Volvox reflects an early development of cell-type specific signaling mechanisms during evolution to ensure maintenance of differentiation. PMID:25874475

  5. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photoreceptors, and corresponding signaling pathways have evolved, in almost all kingdoms of life, to monitor light continuously and adjust their growth and development accordingly. However, considering the fact that different cell types should be enable to trigger distinct light signaling pathways according to their needs, cell-type specific light signaling pathways are required to guarantee cell type-matched modulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to different light signals. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, which has only 2 cell types with clear division of labor, possesses cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways which allow differential regulation of genes involved in various cellular and metabolic pathways in response to environmental light. The existence of cell-type specific light signaling pathways in multicellular organism like Volvox reflects an early development of cell-type specific signaling mechanisms during evolution to ensure maintenance of differentiation.

  6. Differential Activation of Cellular DNA Damage Responses by Replication-Defective and Replication-Competent Adenovirus Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Anand; Jayaram, Sumithra

    2012-01-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) mutants that lack early region 4 (E4) activate the phosphorylation of cellular DNA damage response proteins. In wild-type Ad type 5 (Ad5) infections, E1b and E4 proteins target the cellular DNA repair protein Mre11 for redistribution and degradation, thereby interfering with its ability to activate phosphorylation cascades important during DNA repair. The characteristics of Ad infection that activate cellular DNA repair processes are not yet well understood. We investigated the activation of DNA damage responses by a replication-defective Ad vector (AdRSVβgal) that lacks E1 and fails to produce the immediate-early E1a protein. E1a is important for activating early gene expression from the other viral early transcription units, including E4. AdRSVβgal can deliver its genome to the cell, but it is subsequently deficient for viral early gene expression and DNA replication. We studied the ability of AdRSVβgal-infected cells to induce cellular DNA damage responses. AdRSVβgal infection does activate formation of foci containing the Mdc1 protein. However, AdRSVβgal fails to activate phosphorylation of the damage response proteins Nbs1 and Chk1. We found that viral DNA replication is important for Nbs1 phosphorylation, suggesting that this step in the viral life cycle may provide an important trigger for activating at least some DNA repair proteins. PMID:23015708

  7. Translation of Pur-α is targeted by cellular miRNAs to modulate the differentiation-dependent susceptibility of monocytes to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chan-Juan; Jia, Yan-Hui; Tian, Ren-Rong; Ding, Ming; Zhang, Chiyu; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The postentry restriction of HIV-1 replication in monocytes can be relieved when they differentiate to dendritic cells (DCs) or macrophages. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to interpret the differentiation-dependent susceptibility of monocytes to HIV-1 infection, and the absence of host-cell-encoded essential factors for HIV-1 completing the life cycle may provide an explanation. We have analyzed the gene expression profile in monocytes by mRNA microarray and compared it with that of differentiated DCs. We demonstrated that purine-rich element binding protein α (Pur-α), a host-cell-encoded ubiquitous, sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein, showed inadequate expression in monocytes, and the translation of Pur-α mRNA was repressed by cell-expressed microRNA (miRNA). These Pur-α-targeted miRNAs modulated the differentiation-dependent susceptibility of monocytes/DCs to HIV-1 infection, because rescue of Pur-α expression by transfection of miRNA inhibitors relieved the restriction of HIV-1 infection in monocytes, and ectopic input of miRNA mimics significantly reduced HIV-1 infection of monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs). Collectively, our data emphasized that inadequate host factors contribute to HIV-1 restriction in monocytes, and cellular miRNAs modulate differentiation-dependent susceptibility of host cells to HIV-1 infection. Elaboration of HIV-1 restriction in host cells facilitates our understanding of viral pathogenesis and the search for a new antiviral strategy.

  8. Down-regulation of Dicer1 promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youshan; Wu, Dong; Fei, Chengming; Guo, Juan; Gu, Shuncheng; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been reported that mesenchymal stromal cells are unable to provide sufficient hematopoietic support in myelodysplastic syndrome, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we found that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome displayed a significant increase in senescence, as evidenced by their decreased proliferative capacity, flattened morphology and increased expression of SA-β-gal and p21. Senescent mesenchymal stromal cells from patients had decreased differentiation potential and decreased stem cell support capacity. Gene knockdown of Dicer1, which was down-regulated in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients, induced senescence. The differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities were significantly inhibited by Dicer1 knockdown. Overexpression of Dicer1 in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients reversed cellular senescence and enhanced stem cell properties. Furthermore, we identified reduced expression in the microRNA-17 family (miR-17-5p, miR-20a/b, miR-106a/b and miR-93) as a potential factor responsible for increased p21 expression, a key senescence mediator, in Dicer1 knockdown cells. Moreover, we found that miR-93 and miR-20a expression levels were significantly reduced in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients and miR-93/miR-20a gain of function resulted in a decrease of cellular senescence. Collectively, the results of our study show that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome are prone to senescence and that Dicer1 down-regulation promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells. Dicer1 down-regulation seems to contribute to the insufficient hematopoietic support capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  9. Contrasting roles for c-Myc and L-Myc in the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Morgenbesser, S D; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bidder, M; Mahon, K A; Overbeek, P A; Horner, J; DePinho, R A

    1995-01-01

    Although myc family genes are differentially expressed during development, their expression frequently overlaps, suggesting that they may serve both distinct and common biological functions. In addition, alterations in their expression occur at major developmental transitions in many cell lineages. For example, during mouse lens maturation, the growth arrest and differentiation of epithelial cells into lens fiber cells is associated with a decrease in L- and c-myc expression and a reciprocal rise in N-myc levels. To determine whether the down-regulation of L- and c-myc are required for mitotic arrest and/or completion of differentiation and whether these genes have distinct or similar activities in the same cell type, we have studied the consequences of forced L- and c-myc expression in the lens fiber cell compartment using the alpha A-crystallin promoter in transgenic mice (alpha A/L-myc and alpha A/c-myc mice). With respect to morphological and molecular differentiation, alpha A/L-myc lenses were characterized by a severely disorganized lens fiber cell compartment and a significant decrease in the expression of a late-stage differentiation marker (MIP26); in contrast, differentiation appeared to be unaffected in alpha A/c-myc mice. Furthermore, an analysis of proliferation indicated that while alpha A/L-myc fiber cells withdrew properly from the cell cycle, inappropriate cell cycle progression occurred in the lens fiber cell compartment of alpha A/c-myc mice. These observations indicate that continued late-stage expression of L-myc affected differentiation processes directly, rather than indirectly through deregulated growth control, whereas constitutive c-myc expression inhibited proliferative arrest, but did not appear to disturb differentiation. As a direct corollary, our data indicate that L-Myc and c-Myc are involved in distinct physiological processes in the same cell type. Images PMID:7882978

  10. Promoting Retention

    PubMed Central

    Hall, LaToya N.; Ficker, Lisa J.; Chadiha, Letha A.; Green, Carmen R.; Jackson, James S.; Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the capability of a research volunteer registry to retain community-dwelling African American older adults, and to explore demographic and health factors associated with retention. Method: A logistic regression model was used to determine the influence of demographics, health factors, and registry logic model activities on retention in a sample of 1,730 older African American adults. Results: Almost 80% of participants active in the volunteer research registry between January 2012 and June 2015 were retained. Employment, being referred to research studies, a higher number of medical conditions, and more follow-up contacts were associated with an increased likelihood of retention. Older age, more months in the registry, and more mobility problems decreased the likelihood of retention. Discussion: These results suggest the Michigan Center for Urban African American Aging Research logic model promotes retention through involving older African American adults in research through study referrals and intensive follow-up. The loss of participants due to age- and mobility-related issues indicate the registry may be losing its most vulnerable participants. PMID:28138501

  11. Deciphering an underlying mechanism of differential cellular effects of nanoparticles: an example of Bach-1 dependent induction of HO-1 expression by gold nanorod.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhenlin; Yang, Xiao; Li, Yiye; Li, Suping; Niu, Shiwen; Wu, Xiaochun; Wei, Jingyan; Nie, Guangjun

    2012-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles are extensively investigated for their potential biomedical applications. Therefore, it is pertinent to thoroughly evaluate their biological effects at different levels and their underlying molecular mechanism. Frequently, there are discrepancies about the biological effects of various gold nanoparticles among the reports dealing with different models. Most of the studies focused on the different biological effects of various nano-properties of the nanomaterials. We hypothesize that the biological models with different metabolic processes would be taken into account to explain the observed discrepancies of biological effects of nanomaterials. Herein, by using mouse embryo fibroblast cell line (MEF-1) and human embryonal lung fibroblast cell line (MRC-5) as in vitro models, we studied the cellular effects of gold nanorods (AuNRs) coated with poly (diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDAC), polyethylene glycol and polystyrene sulfonae (PSS). We found that all three AuNRs had no effects on cellular viability at the concentration of 1 nM; however, AuNRs that coated with PDDAC and PSS induced significant up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which was believed to be involved in cellular defense activities in MEF-1 but not in MRC-5 cells. Further study showed that the low fundamental expression of transcription factor Bach-1, the major regulator of HO-1 expression, in MEF-1 was responsible for the up-regulation of HO-1 induced by the AuNRs. Our results indicate that although AuNRs we used are non-cytotoxic, they cell-specifically induce change of gene expression, such as HO-1. Our current study provides a good example to explain the molecular mechanisms of differential biological effects of nanomaterials in different cellular models. This finding raises a concern on evaluation of cellular effects of nanoparticles where the cell models should be critically considered.

  12. Sertraline promotes hippocampus-derived neural stem cells differentiating into neurons but not glia and attenuates LPS-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zheng-Wu; Xue, Yun-Yun; Wang, Hua-Ning; Wang, Huai-Hai; Xue, Fen; Kuang, Fang; Wang, Bai-Ren; Chen, Yun-Chun; Zhang, Li-Yi; Tan, Qing-Rong

    2012-01-10

    Sertraline is one of the most commonly used antidepressants in clinic. Although it is well accepted that sertraline exerts its action through inhibition of the reuptake of serotonin at presynaptic site in the brain, its effect on the neural stem cells (NSCs) has not been well elucidated. In this study, we utilized NSCs separated from the hippocampus of fetal rat to investigate the effect of sertraline on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs. The study demonstrated that sertraline had no effect on NSCs proliferation but it significantly promoted NSCs to differentiate into serotoninergic neurons other than glia cells. Furthermore, we found that sertraline protected NSCs against the lipopolysaccharide-induced cellular damage. These data indicate that sertraline can promote neurogenesis and protect the viability of neural stem cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cyclophilin A enhances macrophage differentiation and lipid uptake in high glucose conditions: a cellular mechanism for accelerated macro vascular disease in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Surya; Vinitha, Anandan; Kartha, Cheranellore Chandrasekharan

    2016-11-03

    Vascular disease in diabetes is initiated by monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, transmigration and formation of foam cells. Increasing clinical evidence supports a role for the secretory protein, cyclophilin A in diabetic vascular disease. The means by which cyclophilin A contributes to vascular lesion development in diabetes is however largely unknown. In this study we investigated using THP1 cells and human monocytes whether cyclophilin A under hyperglycemic conditions, functions in the inflammatory cascade as a chemoattractant and increases lipid uptake by formation of foam cells invitro. We developed an invitro model of monocytes cultured in 20 mm glucose (high glucose) equivalent to 360 mg/dL of plasma glucose levels. These monocytes were then differentiated into macrophages using PMA and subsequently transformed to lipid laden foam cells using oxidized low density lipoproteins in the presence and absence of cyclophilin A. This cellular model was used to study monocyte to macrophage differentiation, transmigration and foam cell formation. A similar cellular model using siRNA mediated transient elimination of the cyclophilin A gene as well as chemical inhibitors were used to further confirm the role of cyclophilin A in the differentiation and foam cell formation process. Cyclophilin A effectively increased migration of high glucose treated monocytes to the endothelial cell monolayer (p < 0.0001). In the presence of cyclophilin A, differentiated macrophages, when treated with oxLDL had a 36 percent increase in intracellular lipid accumulation (p = 0.01) when compared to cells treated with oxLDL alone. An increased flux of reactive oxygen species was also observed (p = 0.01). Inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, MCP-1 and cyclophilin A were significantly increased. Silencing cyclophilin A in THP-1 cells and human monocytes using siRNA or chemical inhibitor, TMN355 resulted in decrease in lipid uptake by 65-75% even after exposure to oxidized LDL

  14. Knockdown of SALL4 Protein Enhances All-trans Retinoic Acid-induced Cellular Differentiation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Liu, Liang; Leung, Lai-Han; Cooney, Austin J.; Chen, Changyi; Rosengart, Todd K.; Ma, Yupo; Yang, Jianchang

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is a differentiation agent that revolutionized the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, it has not been useful for other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we explored the effect of SALL4, a stem cell factor, on ATRA-induced AML differentiation in both ATRA-sensitive and ATRA-resistant AML cells. Aberrant SALL4 expression has been found in nearly all human AML cases, whereas, in normal bone marrow and peripheral blood cells, its expression is only restricted to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We reason that, in AMLs, SALL4 activation may prevent cell differentiation and/or protect self-renewal that is seen in normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Indeed, our studies show that ATRA-mediated myeloid differentiation can be largely blocked by exogenous expression of SALL4, whereas ATRA plus SALL4 knockdown causes significantly increased AML differentiation and cell death. Mechanistic studies indicate that SALL4 directly associates with retinoic acid receptor α and modulates ATRA target gene expression. SALL4 is shown to recruit lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) to target genes and alter the histone methylation status. Furthermore, coinhibition of LSD1 and SALL4 plus ATRA treatment exhibited the strongest anti-AML effect. These findings suggest that SALL4 plays an unfavorable role in ATRA-based regimes, highlighting an important aspect of leukemia therapy. PMID:25737450

  15. Glycomics of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells can be used to evaluate their cellular differentiation stage.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Annamari; Hirvonen, Tia; Salo, Hanna; Impola, Ulla; Olonen, Anne; Laitinen, Anita; Tiitinen, Sari; Natunen, Suvi; Aitio, Olli; Miller-Podraza, Halina; Wuhrer, Manfred; Deelder, André M; Natunen, Jari; Laine, Jarmo; Lehenkari, Petri; Saarinen, Juhani; Satomaa, Tero; Valmu, Leena

    2009-04-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent progenitor cells. They hold an enormous therapeutic potential, but at the moment there is little information on the properties of MSCs, including their surface structures. In the present study, we analyzed the mesenchymal stem cell glycome by using mass spectrometric profiling as well as a panel of glycan binding proteins. Structural verifications were obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometric fragmentation, and glycosidase digestions. The MSC glycome was compared to the glycome of corresponding osteogenically differentiated cells. More than one hundred glycan signals were detected in mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts differentiated from them. The glycan profiles of MSCs and osteoblasts were consistently different in biological replicates, indicating that stem cells and osteoblasts have characteristic glycosylation features. Glycosylation features associated with MSCs rather than differentiated cells included high-mannose type N-glycans, linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains and alpha2-3-sialylation. Mesenchymal stem cells expressed SSEA-4 and sialyl Lewis x epitopes. Characteristic glycosylation features that appeared in differentiated osteoblasts included abundant sulfate ester modifications. The results show that glycosylation analysis can be used to evaluate MSC differentiation state.

  16. [Prognostic value of the grade of cellular differentiation, of mucus presence and the growth pattern of the invasive margin in colorectal adenocarcinomas Dukes B].

    PubMed

    Henrique-Filho, Clodoaldo; Bromberg, Sansom Henrique; Barreto, Elci; Godoy, Antônio Claudio de; Mattosinho-França, Luís Celso

    2004-01-01

    The unfavorable evolution of approximately 1/3 of the patients with colorectal cancer, classified in the Dukes B stage, shows to be desirable the addition of another approaches morphologic prognostics. The reports of the literature about prognostic significance of cellular differentiation, mucus presence and the pattern of growth of the invasive margin in colorectal cancer were controversial. To evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor differentiation, mucus presence and the growth pattern of the invasive margin in patients with colorectal carcinomas classified in Dukes B stage. A retrospective study of 156 patients who had undergone curative resection for colorectal cancer was made at the Department of Gastroenterology Surgery of the "Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual", in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Their mean age was 58 (range 28-83) years and consisted of 94 (60.26%) women and 62 (39.74%) men. The cellular differentiation was classified in two degrees: low and high malignancy degree, in agreement with the area of predominant differentiation of the tumor. Tumors with at least 60% of its volume in mucus were called mucinous carcinoma. The growth of the invasive margin was classified as expanding when the tumor showed a well-delineated and circumscribed border pushing the adjacent structures and infiltrating when the tumor advances by a process of seemingly effortless dissection between the normal structures of the bowel wall. There were predominance of tumors of low malignancy (139 (89.10%)), non-mucinous (142 (91.03%)) and with margin of the infiltrating type (123 (78.85%)). Only the growth of the invasive margin influenced the survival of 5 years. Patients with tumor exhibiting margin of the expanding type, presented a favorable outcome than those with margin of the infiltrating type -- 81.82% x 60.98%. The type of growth of the invasive tumor margin may help to identify the prognosis of low and high-risk subgroups of patients.

  17. 5 CFR 575.309 - Payment of retention incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment of retention incentives. 575.309... RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Retention Incentives § 575.309 Payment of retention incentives. (a) An authorized agency official...

  18. Urinary Retention

    MedlinePlus

    ... indicates the bladder does not empty completely. A health care provider performs this test during an office visit. The patient often receives ... more urodynamic tests to diagnose urinary retention. The health care provider will perform these tests during an office visit. For tests that use ...

  19. Retention Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio

    Designed to improve student retention at Bronx Community College (BCC), this workbook is comprised of sets checklists for use by students in evaluating their progress toward a number of academic, personal, and work-related goals. The workbook is divided into five sections, each containing a set of goals and associated checklists. Part I deals with…

  20. SPO14 separation-of-function mutations define unique roles for phospholipase D in secretion and cellular differentiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rudge, S A; Pettitt, T R; Zhou, C; Wakelam, M J; Engebrecht, J A

    2001-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, phospholipase D (PLD), encoded by the SPO14 gene, catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine, producing choline and phosphatidic acid. SPO14 is essential for cellular differentiation during meiosis and is required for Golgi function when the normal secretory apparatus is perturbed (Sec14-independent secretion). We isolated specific alleles of SPO14 that support Sec14-independent secretion but not sporulation. Identification of these separation-of-function alleles indicates that the role of PLD in these two physiological processes is distinct. Analyses of the mutants reveal that the corresponding proteins are stable, phosphorylated, catalytically active in vitro, and can localize properly within the cell during meiosis. Surprisingly, the separation-of-function mutations map to the conserved catalytic region of the PLD protein. Choline and phosphatidic acid molecular species profiles during Sec14-independent secretion and meiosis reveal that while strains harboring one of these alleles, spo14S-11, hydrolyze phosphatidylcholine in Sec14-independent secretion, they fail to do so during sporulation or normal vegetative growth. These results demonstrate that Spo14 PLD catalytic activity and cellular function can be differentially regulated at the level of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis. PMID:11514437

  1. The Arabidopsis homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS has cellular and meristem-organisational roles with differential requirements for cytokinin and CYCD3 activity.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Simon; Dewitte, Walter; Nieuwland, Jeroen; Murray, James A H

    2013-07-01

    The Arabidopsis class-1 KNOX gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) encodes a homeodomain transcription factor essential for shoot apical meristem (SAM) formation and sustained activity. STM activates cytokinin (CK) biosynthesis in the SAM, but the extent to which STM function is mediated through CK is unclear. Here we show that STM inhibits cellular differentiation and endoreduplication, acting through CK and the CK-inducible CYCD3 cell cycle regulators, establishing a mechanistic link to cell cycle control which provides sustained mitotic activity to maintain a pool of undifferentiated cells in the SAM. Equivalent functions are revealed for the related KNOX genes KNAT1/BP and KNAT2 through ectopic expression. STM is also required for proper meristem organisation and can induce de novo meristem formation when expressed ectopically, even when CK levels are reduced or CK signaling is impaired. This function in meristem establishment and organisation can be replaced by KNAT1/BP, but not KNAT2, despite its activation of CK responses, suggesting that promotion of CK responses alone is insufficient for SAM organisation. We propose that STM has dual cellular and meristem-organisational functions that are differentially represented in the class-1 KNOX gene family and have differing requirements for CK and CYCD3. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The homeoprotein SIX1 controls cellular senescence through the regulation of p16INK4A and differentiation-related genes.

    PubMed

    Adrados, I; Larrasa-Alonso, J; Galarreta, A; López-Antona, I; Menéndez, C; Abad, M; Gil, J; Moreno-Bueno, G; Palmero, I

    2016-07-07

    Cellular senescence is an antiproliferative response with essential functions in tumor suppression and tissue homeostasis. Here we show that SIX1, a member of the SIX family of homeobox transcriptional factors, is a novel repressor of senescence. Our data show that SIX1 is specifically downregulated in fibroblasts upon oncogenic stress and other pro-senescence stimuli, as well as in senescent skin premalignant lesions. Silencing of SIX1 in human fibroblasts suffices to trigger senescence, which is mediated by p16INK4A and lacks a canonical senescence-associated secretory phenotype. Interestingly, SIX1-associated senescence is further characterized by the expression of a set of development and differentiation-related genes that significantly overlap with genes associated with SIX1 in organogenesis or human tumors, and show coincident regulation in oncogene-induced senescence. Mechanistically, we show that gene regulation by SIX1 during senescence is mediated, at least in part, by cooperation with Polycomb repressive complexes. In summary, our results identify SIX1, a key development regulator altered in human tumors, as a critical repressor of cellular senescence, providing a novel connection between senescence, differentiation and tumorigenesis.

  3. Differential protein-protein interactions of LRRK1 and LRRK2 indicate roles in distinct cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Reyniers, Lauran; Del Giudice, Maria Grazia; Civiero, Laura; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Beilina, Alexandra; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Li, Yan; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro; Cookson, Mark R.; Baekelandt, Veerle; Greggio, Elisa; Taymans, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies show that LRRK2, and not its closest paralogue LRRK1, is linked to Parkinson’s disease. To gain insight into the molecular and cellular basis of this discrepancy, we searched for LRRK1- and LRRK2-specific cellular processes by identifying their distinct interacting proteins. A protein microarray-based interaction screen was performed with recombinant 3xFlag-LRRK1 and 3xFlag-LRRK2 and, in parallel, co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry was performed from SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines stably expressing 3xFlag-LRRK1 or 3xFlag-LRRK2. We identified a set of LRRK1- and LRRK2-specific as well as common interactors. One of our most prominent findings was that both screens pointed to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) as a LRRK1-specific interactor, while 14-3-3 proteins were LRRK2-specific. This is consistent with phosphosite mapping of LRRK1, revealing phosphosites outside of 14-3-3 consensus binding motifs. To assess the functional relevance of these interactions, SH-SY5Y-LRRK1 and -LRRK2 cell lines were treated with LRRK2 kinase inhibitors that disrupt 14-3-3 binding, or with EGF, an EGF-R agonist. Redistribution of LRRK2, not LRRK1, from diffuse cytoplasmic to filamentous aggregates was observed after inhibitor treatment. Similarly, EGF induced translocation of LRRK1, but not of LRRK2, to endosomes. Our study confirms that LRRK1 and LRRK2 can carry out distinct functions by interacting with different cellular proteins. PMID:24947832

  4. A Differential Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis: Impact of Cellular Copper on Complex Biological Processes like Aging and Development

    PubMed Central

    Servos, Jörg; Hamann, Andrea; Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of cellular copper homeostasis is crucial in biology. Impairments lead to severe dysfunctions and are known to affect aging and development. Previously, a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the copper-sensing and copper-regulated transcription factor GRISEA of the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina was reported to lead to cellular copper depletion and a pleiotropic phenotype with hypopigmentation of the mycelium and the ascospores, affected fertility and increased lifespan by approximately 60% when compared to the wild type. This phenotype is linked to a switch from a copper-dependent standard to an alternative respiration leading to both a reduced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). We performed a genome-wide comparative transcriptome analysis of a wild-type strain and the copper-depleted grisea mutant. We unambiguously assigned 9,700 sequences of the transcriptome in both strains to the more than 10,600 predicted and annotated open reading frames of the P. anserina genome indicating 90% coverage of the transcriptome. 4,752 of the transcripts differed significantly in abundance with 1,156 transcripts differing at least 3-fold. Selected genes were investigated by qRT-PCR analyses. Apart from this general characterization we analyzed the data with special emphasis on molecular pathways related to the grisea mutation taking advantage of the available complete genomic sequence of P. anserina. This analysis verified but also corrected conclusions from earlier data obtained by single gene analysis, identified new candidates of factors as part of the cellular copper homeostasis system including target genes of transcription factor GRISEA, and provides a rich reference source of quantitative data for further in detail investigations. Overall, the present study demonstrates the importance of systems biology approaches also in cases were mutations in single genes are analyzed to explain the

  5. Differentially expressed nuclear proteins in human CCRF-CEM, HL-60, MEC-1 and Raji cells correlate with cellular properties.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Silke; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-10-01

    The human cell lines CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia), HL-60 (acute myeloid leukemia), MEC-1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and Raji (Burkitt's B-cell lymphoma) have been analysed for differences in their nuclear proteomes. Using 2-D DIGE, 55 nuclear proteins have been identified that are differentially expressed (p<0.025) between the four cell lines, including proteins associated with transcription, proliferation, DNA repair and apoptosis. Of these 55 proteins, 22 were over-expressed in just one cell line, and four were down-regulated in one cell line. Proteins uniquely over-expressed between myeloid and lymphoid cell lines include those that may have use as markers for diagnosis, disease progression and B-cell maturation and differentiation. Expression of various proliferation-associated nuclear proteins correlated with relative growth rates of the cell lines, giving these proteins potential diagnostic applications for distinction of chronic versus acute subtypes of haematological malignancies. Identification of these differentially expressed nuclear proteins should facilitate elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying leukocyte differentiation and transformation to leukemias and lymphomas. The nuclear expression profiles should enable classification of subtypes of leukemia, and identify potential nuclear protein targets for development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  6. Modulation of enhancer looping and differential gene targeting by Epstein-Barr virus transcription factors directs cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    McClellan, Michael J; Wood, C David; Ojeniyi, Opeoluwa; Cooper, Tim J; Kanhere, Aditi; Arvey, Aaron; Webb, Helen M; Palermo, Richard D; Harth-Hertle, Marie L; Kempkes, Bettina; Jenner, Richard G; West, Michelle J

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) epigenetically reprogrammes B-lymphocytes to drive immortalization and facilitate viral persistence. Host-cell transcription is perturbed principally through the actions of EBV EBNA 2, 3A, 3B and 3C, with cellular genes deregulated by specific combinations of these EBNAs through unknown mechanisms. Comparing human genome binding by these viral transcription factors, we discovered that 25% of binding sites were shared by EBNA 2 and the EBNA 3s and were located predominantly in enhancers. Moreover, 80% of potential EBNA 3A, 3B or 3C target genes were also targeted by EBNA 2, implicating extensive interplay between EBNA 2 and 3 proteins in cellular reprogramming. Investigating shared enhancer sites neighbouring two new targets (WEE1 and CTBP2) we discovered that EBNA 3 proteins repress transcription by modulating enhancer-promoter loop formation to establish repressive chromatin hubs or prevent assembly of active hubs. Re-ChIP analysis revealed that EBNA 2 and 3 proteins do not bind simultaneously at shared sites but compete for binding thereby modulating enhancer-promoter interactions. At an EBNA 3-only intergenic enhancer site between ADAM28 and ADAMDEC1 EBNA 3C was also able to independently direct epigenetic repression of both genes through enhancer-promoter looping. Significantly, studying shared or unique EBNA 3 binding sites at WEE1, CTBP2, ITGAL (LFA-1 alpha chain), BCL2L11 (Bim) and the ADAMs, we also discovered that different sets of EBNA 3 proteins bind regulatory elements in a gene and cell-type specific manner. Binding profiles correlated with the effects of individual EBNA 3 proteins on the expression of these genes, providing a molecular basis for the targeting of different sets of cellular genes by the EBNA 3s. Our results therefore highlight the influence of the genomic and cellular context in determining the specificity of gene deregulation by EBV and provide a paradigm for host-cell reprogramming through modulation of

  7. Epidermal cellular proliferation and differentiation in sexually mature male Salmo salar with androgen levels depressed by oil.

    PubMed

    Burton, D; Burton, M P; Truscott, B; Idler, D R

    1985-07-22

    Sexually mature male Salmo salar exhibit epidermal thickening and an increase in goblet cell concentration during the spawning season. The ventral skin, which is likely to experience most abrasive contact during the spawning period, has the thickest epidermis and the greatest goblet cell concentration. Following exposure to crude oil there is inhibition of cellular proliferation and elongation associated with epidermal thickening, and also inhibition of mucigenesis. Data on the androgen levels in these fish, and data from earlier studies involving treatment with hormones, indicate that oil-related epidermal effects during the spawning period are most likely systemic in origin, probably arising from reduced plasmatic androgen levels.

  8. Biosynthetic profiles of neutrophil serine proteases in a human bone marrow-derived cellular myeloid differentiation model.

    PubMed

    Garwicz, Daniel; Lennartsson, Andreas; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Gullberg, Urban; Lindmark, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Human leukocyte elastase, proteinase 3 and cathepsin G are neutrophil granule proteins belonging to the hematopoietic serine protease superfamily. In addition to their established roles in inflammation, they have recently been implicated as regulators of granulopoiesis and mediators of apoptosis. We set out to characterize the individual biosynthetic profiles of these proteins in a neutrophil differentiation model. CD34+CD38+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from 21 healthy human bone marrow donors were cultured in vitro in the presence of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Biosynthetic radiolabeling was performed in cells from 13 subjects after various periods of differentiation induction. Following protein extraction, the proteins were specifically immunoprecipitated from cell lysates and media and run in gel electrophoresis. Biosynthetic profiles of azurophil granule proteins, in particular members of the neutrophil serine protease family, were examined during myeloid differentiation. The onset of synthesis of myeloperoxidase, lysozyme, leukocyte elastase, and proteinase 3 occurred early after differentiation induction with G-CSF, while synthesis of cathepsin G, azurocidin, and bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein was detected somewhat later. Cathepsin G and proteinase 3 were retained intracellularly relatively efficiently, while leukocyte elastase and lysozyme were secreted to a greater extent. Cell morphology and positive immunocytochemistry for lactoferrin as well as flow cytometric analysis of selected surface antigens confirmed neutrophil-like maturation. We demonstrate that azurophil granule proteins, including proforms of human leukocyte elastase, proteinase 3 and cathepsin G, are constitutively secreted to various degrees during in vitro myeloid differentiation of human hematopoietic progenitor cells, in addition to being stored intracellularly in active forms. These findings suggest protein-specific sorting mechanisms

  9. Colloidal Vesicular System of Inositol Hexaphosphate to Counteract DMBA Induced Dysregulation of Markers Pertaining to Cellular Proliferation/Differentiation and Inflammation of Epidermal Layer in Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Arya, Malti; Tiwari, Prakash; Tripathi, Chandra Bhushan; Parashar, Poonam; Singh, Mahendra; Sinha, Priyam; Yadav, Narayan P; Kaithwas, Gaurav; Gupta, Krishna P; Saraf, Shubhini A

    2017-03-06

    Cancer is a global health problem and chemoprevention is a promising approach for reducing cancer burden. Inositol hexaphosphate (IP6), a natural bioactive constituent of cereals, legumes, etc., has momentous potential as an antiangiogenic agent, that specifically affects malignant cells. The shortcoming is its quick absorption on oral/topical administration. Niosomes are flexible carriers for topical drug delivery. The central venture of current research was to optimize and characterize niosomal delivery system of IP6 for treatment of skin cancer. Thin film hydration method was utilized to prepare IP6 niosomes, and these were dispersed as a suspension in a suitable base. Developed formulations were analyzed for various physicochemical and pharmacological parameters such as particle size, encapsulation efficiency, morphology, drug release, texture analysis, irritability, cell line studies, Western blotting, RT-PCR, and histopathology. IP6 niosomal suspension and IP6 in acetone displayed IC50 value at the concentration of 0.96 mM (0.63 mg/mL) and 1.39 mM (0.92 mg/mL), respectively. IP6 niosomal suspension showed significantly higher (p < 0.05) activity and showed cytotoxic effect in SK-MEL-2 cancer cell line. Crucial events of cellular proliferation and differentiation, like expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and Cyclin D1 were initiated from the fourth hour through application of 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) on albino mice. The DMBA altered expression of aforesaid enzymes was significantly (P < 0.001) prevented by concomitant application of niosomal formulations. Results of cell line study, Western blotting, RT-PCR, and histopathology suggested that IP6 niosomal suspension could constitute a promising approach for prevention of cellular proliferation as well as DMBA induced dysregulation of cellular proliferation/differentiation and inflammation.

  10. Differential cellular responses in healthy mice and in mice with established airway inflammation when exposed to hematite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Åsa; Bergström, Ulrika; Ågren, Lina; Österlund, Lars; Sandström, Thomas; Bucht, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory and immunological responses in airways and lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs), following lung exposure to iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles (NPs). The responses to the hematite NPs were evaluated in both healthy non-sensitized mice, and in sensitized mice with an established allergic airway disease. The mice were exposed intratracheally to either hematite NPs or to vehicle (PBS) and the cellular responses were evaluated on days 1, 2, and 7, post-exposure. Exposure to hematite NPs increased the numbers of neutrophils, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the airways of non-sensitized mice on days 1 and 2 post-exposure; at these time points the number of lymphocytes was also elevated in the LDLNs. In contrast, exposing sensitized mice to hematite NPs induced a rapid and unspecific cellular reduction in the alveolar space on day 1 post-exposure; a similar decrease of lymphocytes was also observed in the LDLN. The results indicate that cells in the airways and in the LDLN of individuals with established airway inflammation undergo cell death when exposed to hematite NPs. A possible explanation for this toxic response is the extensive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pro-oxidative environment of inflamed airways. This study demonstrates how sensitized and non-sensitized mice respond differently to hematite NP exposure, and it highlights the importance of including individuals with respiratory disorders when evaluating health effects of inhaled nanomaterials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Differential cellular expression of galectin family mRNAs in the epithelial cells of the mouse digestive tract.

    PubMed

    Nio, Junko; Kon, Yasuhiro; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2005-11-01

    Galectin is an animal lectin that recognizes beta-galactosides of glycoconjugates and is abundant in the gut. This study revealed the cellular expression of galectin subtypes throughout the mouse digestive tract by in situ hybridization. Signals for five subtypes (galectin-2, -3, -4/6, and -7) were detected exclusively in the epithelia. In the glandular stomach, galectin-2 and -4/6 were predominantly expressed from gastric pits to neck of gastric glands, where mucous cells were the main cellular sources. The small intestine exhibited intense, maturation-associated expressions of galectin-2, -3, and -4/6 mRNAs. Galectin-2 was intensely expressed from crypts to the base of villi, whereas transcripts of galectin-3 gathered at villous tips. Signals for galectin-4/6 were most intense at the lower half of villi. Galectin-2 was also expressed in goblet cells of the small intestine but not in those of the large intestine. In the large intestine, galectin-4/6 predominated, and the upper half of crypts simultaneously contained transcripts of galectin-3. Stratified epithelium from the lip to forestomach and anus intensely expressed galectin-7 with weak expressions of galectin-3. Because galectins in the digestive tract may be multi-functional, information on their cell/stage-specific expression contributes to a better understanding of the functions and pathological involvements of galectins.

  12. Differentiation of cellular reaction to alloantigens and bacterial infection in human skin graft--immunosuppressive drugs or antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moscicka-Wesolowska, M; Olszewski, W L; Zolich, D; Stelmach, E

    2002-01-01

    The human hand transplantations prompted revival of interest in evaluation of the rejection process of the grafted skin and its control with the antirejection drugs [1-3]. In case of first hand transplantation a combined immunosuppressive regimen was applied with currently available drugs resulting in acceptance of the entire composite graft. No major untoward systemic effects of antirejection therapy were observed. The most important clinical conclusion was that allogeneic skin can be accepted and function as in a normal extremity, although the attack of host cells on the graft can not be totally eliminated. Chronic perivascular and subepidermal infiltrates with recipient cells could be seen [4]. Another problem connected with skin transplantation is graft infection. Skin is inhabited by a specific spectrum of bacteria [5]. Allografted skin is more sensitive to bacterial penetration than normal skin due to local damage by the host-versus-graft cellular reaction and compromised immune reactivity to bacterial antigens by the immunosuppressive therapy. The histological pictures of rejecting skin represent a mixture of cellular reaction against the graft and penetrating microbes. Alloreaction requires modification of immunosuppressive regimen and infection is an indication for prolonged antibiotic therapy against skin bacterial flora. The question arises how to discriminate the alloreactive and bacterial changes in the skin graft. We studied the histological pictures of rejecting and infected human skin after transplantion to scid mice.

  13. Tart cherry juice induces differential dose-dependent effects on apoptosis, but not cellular proliferation, in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Wooden, Alissa

    2012-11-01

    Consumption of polyphenol-rich fruits, for example, tart cherries, is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and cancer. This is due, in large part, to the diverse myriad bioactive agents, that is, polyphenol anthocyanins, present in fruits. Anthocyanin-rich tart cherries purportedly modulate numerous cellular processes associated with oncogenesis such as apoptosis, cellular proliferation (CP), and cell cycle progression, although the effective concentrations eliciting these effects are unclear. We hypothesized that several dose-dependent effects over a large concentration range of 100% tart cherry juice (TCJ) would exist and affect these processes differentially with the potential for cellular protection and cellular death either by apoptosis or by necrosis. In this in vitro study, we tested the dose response of TCJ on CP and cell death in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. TCJ was added at 0.03-30% (v/v) to cells and incubated overnight with the medium alone or with increasing TCJ. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly reduced by 20% at ≥10% (v/v) TCJ and associated with necrosis, but was not different between the control and treatment groups at <10% TCJ. MTT reduction was also significantly reduced by 27% and 80% at 10% and 30% TCJ, respectively, and associated with necrosis. Apoptosis, but not necrosis, was increased ∼63% at 3% TCJ (∼307 nM monomeric anthocyanins), yet significantly decreased (P<.05) by 20% at 1% TCJ (920 nM) both of which were physiologically relevant concentrations of anthocyanins. The data support a biphasic effect on apoptosis and no effect on proliferation.

  14. Differential Roles for the Interferon-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 Innate Immune Sensors for Cytosolic DNA in Cellular Senescence of Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xin; Ponomareva, Larissa; Veeranki, Sudhakar; Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Dickerson, Eric; Choubey, Divaker

    2011-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 proteins act as innate immune sensors for cytosolic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Upon sensing dsDNA, the IFI16 protein induces the expression of IFN-β whereas the AIM2 protein forms an inflammasome, which promotes the secretion of IL-1β. Given that the knockdown of IFI16 expression in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) delays the onset of cellular senescence, we investigated the potential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence. We found that increased IFI16 protein levels in old (versus young) HDFs were associated with the induction of IFN-β. In contrast, increased levels of the AIM2 protein in the senescent (versus old) HDFs were associated with increased production of IL-1β. The knockdown of type I IFN-receptor subunit-α, which reduced the basal levels of the IFI16, but not the AIM2, protein delayed the onset of cellular senescence. Accordingly, increased constitutive levels of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) HDFs were associated with the activation of the IFN-signaling and increased levels of IL-1β. The IFN-β treatment of the young HDFs, which induced the expression of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins, activated a DNA-damage response and also increased basal levels of IL-1β. Interestingly, the knockdown of AIM2 expression in HDFs increased the basal levels of IFI16 protein and activated the IFN-signaling. In contrast, the knockdown of the IFI16 expression in HDFs decreased the basal and dsDNA-induced activation of the IFN-signaling. Collectively, our observations demonstrate differential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence and associated secretory phenotype. PMID:21471287

  15. Differential roles for the interferon-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 innate immune sensors for cytosolic DNA in cellular senescence of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xin; Ponomareva, Larissa; Veeranki, Sudhakar; Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Dickerson, Eric; Choubey, Divaker

    2011-05-01

    The IFN-inducible IFI16 and AIM2 proteins act as innate immune sensors for cytosolic double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). On sensing dsDNA, the IFI16 protein induces the expression of IFN-β whereas the AIM2 protein forms an inflammasome, which promotes the secretion of IL-1β. Given that the knockdown of IFI16 expression in human diploid fibroblasts (HDF) delays the onset of cellular senescence, we investigated the potential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence. We found that increased IFI16 protein levels in old (vs. young) HDFs were associated with the induction of IFN-β. In contrast, increased levels of the AIM2 protein in the senescent (vs. old) HDFs were associated with increased production of IL-1β. The knockdown of type I IFN-α receptor subunit, which reduced the basal levels of the IFI16 but not of the AIM2, protein delayed the onset of cellular senescence. Accordingly, increased constitutive levels of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) HDFs were associated with the activation of the IFN signaling and increased levels of IL-1β. The IFN-β treatment of the young HDFs, which induced the expression of IFI16 and AIM2 proteins, activated a DNA damage response and also increased basal levels of IL-1β. Interestingly, the knockdown of AIM2 expression in HDFs increased the basal levels of IFI16 protein and activated the IFN signaling. In contrast, the knockdown of the IFI16 expression in HDFs decreased the basal and dsDNA-induced activation of the IFN signaling. Collectively, our observations show differential roles for the IFI16 and AIM2 proteins in cellular senescence and associated secretory phenotype.

  16. Changes in the distribution of plastids and endoplasmic reticulum during cellular differentiation in root caps of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    In calyptrogen cells of Zea mays, proplastids are distributed randomly throughout the cell, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is distributed parallel to the cell walls. The differentiation of calyptrogen cells into columella statocytes is characterized by the following sequential events: (1) formation of ER complexes at the distal and proximal ends of the cell, (2) differentiation of proplastids into amyloplasts, (3) sedimentation of amyloplasts onto the distal ER complex, (4) breakdown of the distal ER complex and sedimentation of amyloplasts to the bottom of the cell, and (5) formation of sheets of ER parallel to the longitudinal cell walls. Columella statocytes located in the centre of the cap each possess 4530 +/- 780 micrometers2 of ER surface area, an increase of 670 per cent over that of calyptrogen cells. The differentiation of peripheral cells correlates positively with (1) the ER becoming arranged in concentric sheets, (2) amyloplasts and ER becoming randomly distributed, and (3) a 280 per cent increase in ER surface area over that of columella statocytes. These results are discussed relative to graviperception and mucilage secretion, which are functions of columella and peripheral cells, respectively.

  17. Functional cross-talk between the cellular prion protein and the neural cell adhesion molecule is critical for neuronal differentiation of neural stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Prodromidou, Kanella; Papastefanaki, Florentia; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Matsas, Rebecca

    2014-06-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrP) is prominently expressed in brain, in differentiated neurons but also in neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs). The misfolding of PrP is a central event in prion diseases, yet the physiological function of PrP is insufficiently understood. Although PrP has been reported to associate with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), the consequences of concerted PrP-NCAM action in NPC physiology are unknown. Here, we generated NPCs from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of postnatal day 5 wild-type and PrP null (-/-) mice and observed that PrP is essential for proper NPC proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Moreover, we found that PrP is required for the NPC response to NCAM-induced neuronal differentiation. In the absence of PrP, NCAM not only fails to promote neuronal differentiation but also induces an accumulation of doublecortin-positive neuronal progenitors at the proliferation stage. In agreement, we noted an increase in cycling neuronal progenitors in the SVZ of PrP-/- mice compared with PrP+/+ mice, as evidenced by double labeling for the proliferation marker Ki67 and doublecortin as well as by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation experiments. Additionally, fewer newly born neurons were detected in the rostral migratory stream of PrP-/- mice. Analysis of the migration of SVZ cells in microexplant cultures from wild-type and PrP-/- mice revealed no differences between genotypes or a role for NCAM in this process. Our data demonstrate that PrP plays a critical role in neuronal differentiation of NPCs and suggest that this function is, at least in part, NCAM-dependent.

  18. Differential effects of cyclophosphamide and mycophenolate mofetil on cellular and serological parameters in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fassbinder, Till; Saunders, Ute; Mickholz, Eva; Jung, Elisabeth; Becker, Heidemarie; Schlüter, Bernhard; Jacobi, Annett Marita

    2015-04-03

    Disease activity and therapy show an impact on cellular and serological parameters in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study was performed to compare the influence of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclophosphamide (CYC) therapy on these parameters in patients with flaring, organ-threatening disease. SLE patients currently receiving CYC (n = 20), MMF (n = 25) or no immunosuppressive drugs (n = 22) were compared using a cross-sectional design. Median disease activity and daily corticosteroid dose were similar in these treatment groups. Concurrent medication, organ manifestations, and disease activity were recorded, and cellular and serological parameters were determined by routine diagnostic tests or flow cytometric analysis. In addition follow-up data were obtained from different sets of patients (CYC n = 24; MMF n = 23). Although both drugs showed a significant effect on disease activity and circulating B cell subsets, only MMF reduced circulating plasmablasts and plasma cells as well as circulating free light chains within three months of induction therapy. Neither MMF nor CYC were able to reduce circulating memory B cells. MMF lowered IgA levels more markedly than CYC. We did not observe a significant difference in the reduction of IgG levels or anti-dsDNA antibodies comparing patients receiving MMF or CYC. In contrast to MMF, induction therapy with CYC was associated with a significant increase of circulating CD8+ effector T cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) after three months. The results indicate differences between MMF and CYC with regard to the mechanism of action. MMF, but not CYC, treatment leads to a fast and enduring reduction of surrogate markers of B cell activation, such as circulating plasmablasts, plasma cells and free light chains but a comparable rate of hypogammaglobulinemia.

  19. Differential effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on cellular drug transporters and their implications for using epigenetic modifiers in combination chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Benigno C.; Li, Yang; Murray, David; Brammer, Jonathan E.; Liu, Yan; Hosing, Chitra; Nieto, Yago; Champlin, Richard E.; Andersson, Borje S.

    2016-01-01

    HDAC inhibitors, DNA alkylators and nucleoside analogs are effective components of combination chemotherapy. To determine a possible mechanism of their synergism, we analyzed the effects of HDAC inhibitors on the expression of drug transporters which export DNA alkylators. Exposure of PEER lymphoma T-cells to 15 nM romidepsin (Rom) resulted in 40%-50% reduction in mRNA for the drug transporter MRP1 and up to ~500-fold increase in the MDR1 mRNA within 32-48 hrs. MRP1 protein levels concomitantly decreased while MDR1 increased. Other HDAC inhibitors − panobinostat, belinostat and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) − had similar effects on these transporters. The protein level of MRP1 correlated with cellular resistance to busulfan and chlorambucil, and Rom exposure sensitized cells to these DNA alkylators. The decrease in MRP1 correlated with decreased cellular drug export activity, and increased level of MDR1 correlated with increased export of daunorubicin. A similar decrease in the level of MRP1 protein, and increase in MDR1, were observed when mononuclear cells derived from patients with T-cell malignancies were exposed to Rom. Decreased MRP1 and increased MDR1 expressions were also observed in blood mononuclear cells from lymphoma patients who received SAHA-containing chemotherapy in a clinical trial. This inhibitory effect of HDAC inhibitors on the expression of MRP1 suggests that their synergism with DNA alkylating agents is partly due to decreased efflux of these alkylators. Our results further imply the possibility of antagonistic effects when HDAC inhibitors are combined with anthracyclines and other MDR1 drug ligands in chemotherapy. PMID:27564097

  20. CD1d-dependent expansion of NKT follicular helper cells in vivo and in vitro is a product of cellular proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rampuria, Pragya

    2015-01-01

    NKT follicular helper cells (NKTfh cells) are a recently discovered functional subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells. Given the potential for NKTfh cells to promote specific antibody responses and germinal center reactions, there is much interest in determining the conditions under which NKTfh cells proliferate and/or differentiate in vivo and in vitro. We confirm that NKTfh cells expressing the canonical semi-invariant Vα14 TCR were CXCR5+/ICOS+/PD-1+/Bcl6+ and increased in number following administration of the CD1d-binding glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) to C57Bl/6 mice. We show that the α-GC-stimulated increase in NKTfh cells was CD1d-dependent since the effect was diminished by reduced CD1d expression. In vivo and in vitro treatment with α-GC, singly or in combination with IL-2, showed that NKTfh cells increased in number to a greater extent than total NKT cells, but proliferation was near-identical in both populations. Acquisition of the NKTfh phenotype from an adoptively transferred PD-1-depleted cell population was also evident, showing that peripheral NKT cells differentiated into NKTfh cells. Therefore, the α-GC-stimulated, CD1d-dependent increase in peripheral NKTfh cells is a result of cellular proliferation and differentiation. These findings advance our understanding of the immune response following immunization with CD1d-binding glycolipids. PMID:25710490

  1. Application of Mycobacterium Leprae-specific cellular and serological tests for the differential diagnosis of leprosy from confounding dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Aline Araújo; Hungria, Emerith Mayra; Costa, Maurício Barcelos; Sousa, Ana Lúcia Osório Maroccolo; Castilho, Mirian Lane Oliveira; Gonçalves, Heitor Sá; Pontes, Maria Araci Andrade; Duthie, Malcolm S; Stefani, Mariane Martins Araújo

    2016-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae-specific serological and cell-mediated-immunity/CMI test were evaluated for the differential diagnosis of multibacillary/MB, and paucibacillary/PB leprosy from other dermatoses. Whole-blood assay/WBA/IFNγ stimulated with LID-1 antigen and ELISA tests for IgG to LID-1 and IgM to PGL-I were performed. WBA/LID-1/IFNγ production was observed in 72% PB, 11% MB leprosy, 38% dermatoses, 40% healthy endemic controls/EC. The receiver operating curve/ROC for WBA/LID-1 in PB versus other dermatoses showed 72.5% sensitivity, 61.5% specificity and an area-under-the-curve/AUC=0.75; 74% positive predictive value/PPV, 59% negative predictive value/NPV. Anti PGL-I serology was positive in 67% MB, 8% PB leprosy, 6% of other dermatoses; its sensitivity for MB=66%, specificity=93%, AUC=0.89; PPV=91%, NPV=72%. Anti-LID-1 serology was positive in 87% MB, 7% PB leprosy, all other participants were seronegative; 87.5% sensitivity for MB, 100% specificity, AUC=0.97; PPV=100%, NPV=88%. In highly endemic areas anti-LID-1/PGL-I serology and WBA/LID-1-represent useful tools for the differential diagnosis of leprosy from other confounding dermatoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential expression and cellular localization of ERKs during organogenic nodule formation from internodes of Humulus lupulus var. Nugget.

    PubMed

    Sousa Silva, Marta; Margarida Fortes, Ana; Sanchéz Testillanob, Pilar; Risueño, Maria del Carmen; Salom'e Pais, Maria

    2004-08-01

    The expression and subcellular localization of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 or 2 (ERK1/2) homologues (HLERK1/2) during the process of organogenic nodule formation in Humulus lupulus var. Nugget was studied using antibodies specific for ERK1 and ERK2, and for phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The increase in HLERK levels, detected by Western blotting 12 hours after wounding suggests their involvement in response to the wounding treatment applied for morphogenesis induction. In dividing cambial cells, occurring in between 4 and 7 days after morphogenesis induction, as well as in dividing prenodular cells (15 days after induction) HLERK1 and/or 2 were localized in the nucleus. However, as soon as nodular cells start proliferating to form shoot meristems, HLERK1 and 2 were detected in the cytoplasm and not in the nucleus. The data reported account for a differential expression and activation of HLERK1 and HLERK2 throughout the process of nodule formation and plantlet regeneration. HLERK1 appears to be expressed in the stages of nodule formation and plantlet regeneration, playing a possible role in controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. HLERK2 may be induced as a response to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by wounding of internodes as its expression is reduced in liquid medium with less oxygen availability compared to solid medium. However, addition of a ROS inhibitor to the liquid medium does not result in a further decrease in the HLERK2 level.

  3. Specific requirement of the chromatin modifier mSin3B in cell cycle exit and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    David, Gregory; Grandinetti, Kathryn B; Finnerty, Patricia M; Simpson, Natalie; Chu, Gerald C; Depinho, Ronald A

    2008-03-18

    The Sin3-histone deacetylase (HDAC) corepressor complex is conserved from yeast to humans. Mammals possess two highly related Sin3 proteins, mSin3A and mSin3B, which serve as scaffolds tethering HDAC enzymatic activity, and numerous sequence-specific transcription factors to enable local chromatin regulation at specific gene targets. Despite broad overlapping expression of mSin3A and mSin3B, mSin3A is cell-essential and vital for early embryonic development. Here, genetic disruption of mSin3B reveals a very different phenotype characterized by the survival of cultured cells and lethality at late stages of embryonic development with defective differentiation of multiple lineages-phenotypes that are strikingly reminiscent of those associated with loss of retinoblastoma family members or E2F transcriptional repressors. Additionally, we observe that, whereas mSin3B(-/-) cells cycle normally under standard growth conditions, they show an impaired ability to exit the cell cycle with limiting growth factors. Correspondingly, mSin3B interacts physically with the promoters of known E2F target genes, and its deficiency is associated with derepression of these gene targets in vivo. Together, these results reveal a critical role for mSin3B in the control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in mammals and establish contrasting roles for the mSin3 proteins in the growth and development of specific lineages.

  4. Antiviral responses in mouse embryonic stem cells: differential development of cellular mechanisms in type I interferon production and response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruoxing; Wang, Jundi; Acharya, Dhiraj; Paul, Amber M; Bai, Fengwei; Huang, Faqing; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2014-09-05

    We have recently reported that mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) are deficient in expressing type I interferons (IFNs) in response to viral infection and synthetic viral RNA analogs (Wang, R., Wang, J., Paul, A. M., Acharya, D., Bai, F., Huang, F., and Guo, Y. L. (2013) J. Biol. Chem. 288, 15926-15936). Here, we report that mESCs are able to respond to type I IFNs, express IFN-stimulated genes, and mediate the antiviral effect of type I IFNs against La Crosse virus and chikungunya virus. The major signaling components in the IFN pathway are expressed in mESCs. Therefore, the basic molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of type I IFNs are functional in mESCs; however, these mechanisms may not yet be fully developed as mESCs express lower levels of IFN-stimulated genes and display weaker antiviral activity in response to type I IFNs when compared with fibroblasts. Further analysis demonstrated that type I IFNs do not affect the stem cell state of mESCs. We conclude that mESCs are deficient in type I IFN expression, but they can respond to and mediate the cellular effects of type I IFNs. These findings represent unique and uncharacterized properties of mESCs and are important for understanding innate immunity development and ESC physiology.

  5. 5 CFR 575.311 - Continuation, reduction, and termination of retention incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of retention incentives. 575.311 Section 575.311 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Retention Incentives § 575.311 Continuation, reduction, and...

  6. SEM and x-ray microanalysis of cellular differentiation in Sea Urchin Embryos: a frozen hydrated study

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.B.

    1985-12-01

    Quantitative studies of major chemical element distribution among individual differentiating cells were attempted using scanning electron microscopy. Frozen hydrated embryos of the sea urchin Strongelocentrotus purpuratus were examined at three stages: blastula, mesenchyme blastula, and early gastrula. The blastocoel matrix contained large beads of approximately 1 ..mu..m diameter. The cells of the archenteron lacked well defined cell boundaries. Characteristic levels of beam damage and charging provided structural information. The primary mesenchyme cells within the blastocoel were particularly susceptible to both effects. Damaging effects were noted in material stored in liquid nitrogen longer than three months. Ice crystal growth, shrinkage, elemental shift, density changes and charge accumulation may take place in these stored specimens. 151 refs., 50 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. ZmPIN1-Mediated Auxin Transport Is Related to Cellular Differentiation during Maize Embryogenesis and Endosperm Development1[W

    PubMed Central

    Forestan, Cristian; Meda, Silvia; Varotto, Serena

    2010-01-01

    To study the influence of PINFORMED1 (PIN1)-mediated auxin transport during embryogenesis and endosperm development in monocots, the expression pattern of the three identified ZmPIN1 genes was determined at the transcript level. Localization of the corresponding proteins was also analyzed during maize (Zea mays) kernel development. An anti-indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) monoclonal antibody was used to visualize IAA distribution and correlate the direction of auxin active transport, mediated by ZmPIN1 proteins, with the actual amount of auxin present in maize kernels at different developmental stages. ZmPIN1 genes are expressed in the endosperm soon after double fertilization occurs; however, unlike other tissues, the ZmPIN1 proteins were never polarly localized in the plasma membrane of endosperm cells. ZmPIN1 transcripts and proteins also colocalize in developing embryos, and the ZmPIN1 proteins are polarly localized in the embryo cell plasma membrane from the first developmental stages, indicating the existence of ZmPIN1-mediated auxin fluxes. Auxin distribution visualization indicates that the aleurone, the basal endosperm transfer layer, and the embryo-surrounding region accumulate free auxin, which also has a maximum in the kernel maternal chalaza. During embryogenesis, polar auxin transport always correlates with the differentiation of embryo tissues and the definition of the embryo organs. On the basis of these reports and of the observations on tissue differentiation and IAA distribution in defective endosperm-B18 mutant and in N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid-treated kernels, a model for ZmPIN1-mediated transport of auxin and the related auxin fluxes during maize kernel development is proposed. Common features between this model and the model previously proposed for Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are discussed. PMID:20044449

  8. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase isoforms composition regulates cellular pH homeostasis in differentiating PC12 cells in a manner dependent on cytosolic Ca2+ elevations.

    PubMed

    Boczek, Tomasz; Lisek, Malwina; Ferenc, Bozena; Kowalski, Antoni; Stepinski, Dariusz; Wiktorska, Magdalena; Zylinska, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca(2+) outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Acting as Ca(2+)/H(+) counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four isoforms (PMCA1-4) but only PMCA2 and PMCA3, due to their unique localization and features, perform more specialized function. Using differentiated PC12 cells we assessed the role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in the regulation of intracellular pH in steady-state conditions and during Ca(2+) overload evoked by 59 mM KCl. We observed that manipulation in PMCA expression elevated pHmito and pHcyto but only in PMCA2-downregulated cells higher mitochondrial pH gradient (ΔpH) was found in steady-state conditions. Our data also demonstrated that PMCA2 or PMCA3 knock-down delayed Ca(2+) clearance and partially attenuated cellular acidification during KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) influx. Because SERCA and NCX modulated cellular pH response in neglectable manner, and all conditions used to inhibit PMCA prevented KCl-induced pH drop, we considered PMCA2 and PMCA3 as mainly responsible for transport of protons to intracellular milieu. In steady-state conditions, higher TMRE uptake in PMCA2-knockdown line was driven by plasma membrane potential (Ψp). Nonetheless, mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in this line was dissipated during Ca(2+) overload. Cyclosporin and bongkrekic acid prevented Ψm loss suggesting the involvement of Ca(2+)-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient.

  9. Plasma Membrane Ca2+-ATPase Isoforms Composition Regulates Cellular pH Homeostasis in Differentiating PC12 Cells in a Manner Dependent on Cytosolic Ca2+ Elevations

    PubMed Central

    Ferenc, Bozena; Kowalski, Antoni; Stepinski, Dariusz; Wiktorska, Magdalena; Zylinska, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) by extruding Ca2+ outside the cell, actively participates in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration. Acting as Ca2+/H+ counter-transporter, PMCA transports large quantities of protons which may affect organellar pH homeostasis. PMCA exists in four isoforms (PMCA1-4) but only PMCA2 and PMCA3, due to their unique localization and features, perform more specialized function. Using differentiated PC12 cells we assessed the role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in the regulation of intracellular pH in steady-state conditions and during Ca2+ overload evoked by 59 mM KCl. We observed that manipulation in PMCA expression elevated pHmito and pHcyto but only in PMCA2-downregulated cells higher mitochondrial pH gradient (ΔpH) was found in steady-state conditions. Our data also demonstrated that PMCA2 or PMCA3 knock-down delayed Ca2+ clearance and partially attenuated cellular acidification during KCl-stimulated Ca2+ influx. Because SERCA and NCX modulated cellular pH response in neglectable manner, and all conditions used to inhibit PMCA prevented KCl-induced pH drop, we considered PMCA2 and PMCA3 as mainly responsible for transport of protons to intracellular milieu. In steady-state conditions, higher TMRE uptake in PMCA2-knockdown line was driven by plasma membrane potential (Ψp). Nonetheless, mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) in this line was dissipated during Ca2+ overload. Cyclosporin and bongkrekic acid prevented Ψm loss suggesting the involvement of Ca2+-driven opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore as putative underlying mechanism. The findings presented here demonstrate a crucial role of PMCA2 and PMCA3 in regulation of cellular pH and indicate PMCA membrane composition important for preservation of electrochemical gradient. PMID:25014339

  10. An hypothesis on the role of cellular colloid osmotic pressure in determining behavior of cells in vitro including anchorage dependency and maintenance of the differentiated state.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, C

    1984-12-21

    The osmotic problems involved when cells are isolated from tissues are analyzed. Evidence is considered which indicates that in vivo the Na pump is operating at maximal or near maximal rates and that this depends on low leak rates for salts and water due to various aspects of the tissues structure. Dispersion of the tissue results in breakdown of these barriers on free diffusion and the isolated cell is subjected to an enormous increase in passive influx due to colloid osmotic pressure without being able to increase its pumping rate to the extent needed to maintain volume control. It is proposed that the primary problem the cell faces in vitro is to compensate for the effective increase in its colloid pressure, e.g. the colloid osmotic pressure excess, emerging with the breakdown of the tissue structure. The finding that most normal cells have to adhere to a surface in order to grow or "anchorage dependency" is analyzed in terms of the way adhesion and spreading result in changes in ion and water movements into cells enabling them to achieve fluid balance in the face of the colloid pressure excess. It is also proposed that the differentiated state is more dependent on colloid osmotic balance than proliferation. The failure of conditions used in tissue culture to compensate adequately for the colloid pressure excess results in limiting the amount of protein which can be synthesized, dissipation of cellular energy, and changes in orientation of cellular components which contribute directly to the loss of differentiation which occurs during growth in vitro.

  11. Differential effects of IL-15 on the generation, maintenance and cytotoxic potential of adaptive cellular responses induced by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinyao; Valentin, Antonio; Ng, Sinnie; Beach, Rachel Kelly; Alicea, Candido; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Felber, Barbara K; Pavlakis, George N

    2015-02-25

    IL-15 is an important cytokine for the regulation of lymphocyte homeostasis. However, the role of IL-15 in the generation, maintenance and cytotoxic potential of antigen specific T cells is not fully understood. Because the route of antigenic delivery and the vaccine modality could influence the IL-15 requirement for mounting and preserving cytotoxic T cell responses, we have investigated the immunogenicity of DNA-based vaccines in IL-15 KO mice. DNA vaccination with SIV Gag induced antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the absence of IL-15. However, the absolute number of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells was decreased in IL-15 KO mice compared to WT animals, suggesting that IL-15 is important for the generation of maximal number of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Interestingly, antigen-specific memory CD8 cells could be efficiently boosted 8 months after the final vaccination in both WT and KO strains of mice, suggesting that the maintenance of antigen-specific long-term memory T cells induced by DNA vaccination is comparable in the absence and presence of IL-15. Importantly, boosting by DNA 8-months after vaccination revealed severely reduced granzyme B content in CD8(+) T cells of IL-15 KO mice compared to WT mice. This suggests that the cytotoxic potential of the long-term memory CD8(+) T cells is impaired. These results suggest that IL-15 is not essential for the generation and maintenance of adaptive cellular responses upon DNA vaccination, but it is critical for the preservation of maximal numbers and for the activity of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Immortalization by c-myc, H-ras, and Ela oncogenes induces differential cellular gene expression and growth factor responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelekar, A.; Cole, M.D.

    1987-11-01

    Early-passage rat kidney cells were immortalized or rescued from senescence with three different oncogenes: viral promoter-driven c-myc, H-ras (Val-12), and adenovirus type 5 E1a. The normal c-myc and H-ras (Gly-12) were unable to immortalize cells under similar conditions. Quantitation of RNA in the ras-immortalized lines demonstrated that the H-ras oncogene was expressed at a level equivalent to that of the normal H-ras gene in established human or rat cell lines. Cell lines immortalized by different oncogenes were found to have distinct growth responses to individual growth factors in a short-term assay. E1a-immortalized cells were largely independent of serum growth factors, whereas c-myc-immortalized cells responded to serum better than to epidermal growth factor and insulin. H-ras-immortalized cells responded significantly to insulin alone and gave a maximal response to epidermal growth factor and insulin. Several cellular genes associated with platelet-derived growth factor stimulation, including c-myc, were expressed at high levels in the H-ras-immortalized cells, and c-myc expression was deregulated, suggesting that the H-ras oncogene has provided a ''competence'' function. H-ras-immortalized cells could not be morphologically transformed by secondary transfection with a long terminal repeat-c-myc oncogene, but secondary transfection of the same cells with H-ras (Val-12) produced morphologically transformed colonies that had 20- to 40-fold higher levels of H-ras oncogene expression. Thus transformation in this system is dependent on high levels of H-ras oncogene expression rather than on the presence of activated H-ras and c-myc oncogenes in the same cell.

  13. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Casas, Josefina; Lacorte, Sílvia; Porte, Cinta

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  14. Suppression and promotion of tumor growth by monoclonal antibodies to ErbB-2 differentially correlate with cellular uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, E; Stancovski, I; Sela, M; Yarden, Y

    1995-01-01

    Amplification and overexpression of the erbB-2/neu protooncogene are frequently associated with aggressive clinical course of certain human adenocarcinomas, and therefore the encoded surface glycoprotein is considered a candidate target for immunotherapy. We previously generated a series of anti-ErbB-2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that either accelerate or inhibit the tumorigenic growth of erbB-2-transformed murine fibroblasts. The present study extended this observation to a human tumor cell line grown as xenografts in athymic mice and addressed the biochemical differences between the two classes of mAbs. We show that the inhibitory effect is dominant in an antibody mixture, and it depends on antibody bivalency. By using radiolabeled mAbs we found that all of three tumor-inhibitory mAbs became rapidly inaccessible to acid treatment when incubated with tumor cells. However, a tumor-stimulatory mAb remained accessible to extracellular treatments, indicating that it did not undergo endocytosis. In addition, intracellular fragments of the inhibitory mAbs, but not of the stimulatory mAb, were observed. Electron microscopy of colloidal gold-antibody conjugates confirmed the absence of endocytosis of the stimulatory mAb but detected endocytic vesicles containing an inhibitory mAb. We conclude that acceleration of cell growth by ErbB-2 correlates with cell surface localization, whereas inhibition of tumor growth is associated with an intrinsic ability of anti-ErbB-2 mAbs to induce endocytosis. These conclusions are relevant to the selection of optimal mAbs for immunotherapy and may have implications for the mechanism of cellular transformation by an overexpressed erbB-2 gene. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7724565

  15. Perfluorinated chemicals: differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells.

    PubMed

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet; Casas, Josefina; Lacorte, Sílvia; Porte, Cinta

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs--PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA--showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA>PFOS≫PFNA>PFOA>PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57-80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells.

  16. Differential localization of ion transporters suggests distinct cellular mechanisms for calcification and photosynthesis between two coral species.

    PubMed

    Barott, Katie L; Perez, Sidney O; Linsmayer, Lauren B; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-08-01

    Ion transport is fundamental for multiple physiological processes, including but not limited to pH regulation, calcification, and photosynthesis. Here, we investigated ion-transporting processes in tissues from the corals Acropora yongei and Stylophora pistillata, representatives of the complex and robust clades that diverged over 250 million years ago. Antibodies against complex IV revealed that mitochondria, an essential source of ATP for energetically costly ion transporters, were abundant throughout the tissues of A. yongei. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy revealed septate junctions in all cell layers of A. yongei, as previously reported for S. pistillata, as well as evidence for transcellular vesicular transport in calicoblastic cells. Antibodies against the alpha subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) immunolabeled cells in the calicoblastic epithelium of both species, suggesting conserved roles in calcification. However, NKA was abundant in the apical membrane of the oral epithelium in A. yongei but not S. pistillata, while PMCA was abundant in the gastroderm of S. pistillata but not A. yongei. These differences indicate that these two coral species utilize distinct pathways to deliver ions to the sites of calcification and photosynthesis. Finally, antibodies against mammalian sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBC; SLC4 family) resulted in strong immunostaining in the apical membrane of oral epithelial cells and in calicoblastic cells in A. yongei, a pattern identical to NKA. Characterization of ion transport mechanisms is an essential step toward understanding the cellular mechanisms of coral physiology and will help predict how different coral species respond to environmental stress. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Differential expression of cellular prion protein in mouse brain as detected with multiple anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Zwingman, T; Li, R; Pan, T; Wong, B S; Petersen, R B; Gambetti, P; Herrup, K; Sy, M S

    2001-03-30

    The normal cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) plays an essential role in the development of prion diseases. Indirect evidence has suggested that different PrP(C) glycoforms may be expressed in different brain regions and perform distinct functions. However, due to a lack of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) that are specific for mouse PrP(C), the expression of PrP(C) in the mouse brain has not been studied in great detail. We used Mabs specific for either the N-terminus or the C-terminus of the mouse PrP(C) to study its expression in the mouse brain by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Immunoblotting studies demonstrated that the expression of PrP(C) differed quantitatively as well as qualitatively in different regions of the brain. The anti-C-terminus Mabs reacted with all three molecular weight bands of PrP(C); the anti-N-terminus Mabs only reacted with the 39-42 kDa PrP(C). The results from immunohistochemical staining revealed the spatial distribution of PrP(C) in the mouse brain, which were consistent with that from immunoblotting. Although expression of PrP(C) has been reported to be required for long-term survival of Purkinje cells, we were unable to detect PrP(C) in the Purkinje cell layer in the cerebellum with multiple anti-PrP Mabs. Our findings suggest that PrP(C) variants, i.e. various glycoforms and truncated forms, might be specifically expressed in different regions of mouse brain and might have different functions.

  18. Differential effects of Sp cellular transcription factors on viral promoter activation by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IE62 protein.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Ruyechan, William T; Hay, John; Arvin, Ann

    2015-11-01

    The immediate early (IE) 62 protein is the major varicella-zoster virus (VZV) regulatory factor. Analysis of the VZV genome revealed 40 predicted GC-rich boxes within 36 promoters. We examined effects of ectopic expression of Sp1-Sp4 on IE62- mediated transactivation of three viral promoters. Ectopic expression of Sp3 and Sp4 enhanced IE62 activation of ORF3 and gI promoters while Sp3 reduced IE62 activation of ORF28/29 promoter and VZV DNA replication. Sp2 reduced IE62 transactivation of gI while Sp1 had no significant influence on IE62 activation with any of these viral promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) confirmed binding of Sp1 and Sp3 but not Sp2 and Sp4 to the gI promoter. Sp1-4 bound to IE62 and amino acids 238-258 of IE62 were important for the interaction with Sp3 and Sp4 as well as Sp1. This work shows that Sp family members have differential effects on IE62-mediated transactivation in a promoter-dependent manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Host and non-host roots in rice: cellular and molecular approaches reveal differential responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    PubMed Central

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Vallino, Marta; Biselli, Chiara; Faccio, Antonella; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Oryza sativa, a model plant for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, has both host and non-host roots. Large lateral (LLR) and fine lateral (FLR) roots display opposite responses: LLR support AM colonization, but FLR do not. Our research aimed to study the molecular, morphological and physiological aspects related to the non-host behavior of FLR. RNA-seq analysis revealed that LLR and FLR displayed divergent expression profiles, including changes in many metabolic pathways. Compared with LLR, FLR showed down-regulation of genes instrumental for AM establishment and gibberellin signaling, and a higher expression of nutrient transporters. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, FLR had higher phosphorus content. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that, surprisingly, in the Selenio cultivar, FLR have a two-layered cortex, which is theoretically compatible with AM colonization. According to RNA-seq, a gibberellin inhibitor treatment increased anticlinal divisions leading to a higher number of cortex cells in FLR. We propose that some of the differentially regulated genes that lead to the anatomical and physiological properties of the two root types also function as genetic factors regulating fungal colonization. The rice root apparatus offers a unique tool to study AM symbiosis, allowing direct comparisons of host and non-host roots in the same individual plant. PMID:26322072

  20. Host and non-host roots in rice: cellular and molecular approaches reveal differential responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Fiorilli, Valentina; Vallino, Marta; Biselli, Chiara; Faccio, Antonella; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Bonfante, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Oryza sativa, a model plant for Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, has both host and non-host roots. Large lateral (LLR) and fine lateral (FLR) roots display opposite responses: LLR support AM colonization, but FLR do not. Our research aimed to study the molecular, morphological and physiological aspects related to the non-host behavior of FLR. RNA-seq analysis revealed that LLR and FLR displayed divergent expression profiles, including changes in many metabolic pathways. Compared with LLR, FLR showed down-regulation of genes instrumental for AM establishment and gibberellin signaling, and a higher expression of nutrient transporters. Consistent with the transcriptomic data, FLR had higher phosphorus content. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that, surprisingly, in the Selenio cultivar, FLR have a two-layered cortex, which is theoretically compatible with AM colonization. According to RNA-seq, a gibberellin inhibitor treatment increased anticlinal divisions leading to a higher number of cortex cells in FLR. We propose that some of the differentially regulated genes that lead to the anatomical and physiological properties of the two root types also function as genetic factors regulating fungal colonization. The rice root apparatus offers a unique tool to study AM symbiosis, allowing direct comparisons of host and non-host roots in the same individual plant.

  1. Gentamicin differentially alters cellular metabolism of cochlear hair cells as revealed by NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Ward, Kristina G.; Nichols, Michael G.; Smith, Heather Jensen

    2015-05-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are implicated as culprits of hearing loss in more than 120,000 individuals annually. Research has shown that the sensory cells, but not supporting cells, of the cochlea are readily damaged and/or lost after use of such antibiotics. High-frequency outer hair cells (OHCs) show a greater sensitivity to antibiotics than high- and low-frequency inner hair cells (IHCs). We hypothesize that variations in mitochondrial metabolism account for differences in susceptibility. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy was used to quantify changes in NAD(P)H in sensory and supporting cells from explanted murine cochleae exposed to mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and an ototoxic antibiotic, gentamicin (GM). Changes in metabolic state resulted in a redistribution of NAD(P)H between subcellular fluorescence lifetime pools. Supporting cells had a significantly longer lifetime than sensory cells. Pretreatment with GM increased NAD(P)H intensity in high-frequency sensory cells, as well as the NAD(P)H lifetime within IHCs. GM specifically increased NAD(P)H concentration in high-frequency OHCs, but not in IHCs or pillar cells. Variations in NAD(P)H intensity in response to mitochondrial toxins and GM were greatest in high-frequency OHCs. These results demonstrate that GM rapidly alters mitochondrial metabolism, differentially modulates cell metabolism, and provides evidence that GM-induced changes in metabolism are significant and greatest in high-frequency OHCs.

  2. Natural Killer (NK) Cell Education Differentially Influences HIV Antibody-Dependent NK Cell Activation and Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Nicole F; Kiani, Zahra; Tremblay-McLean, Alexandra; Kant, Sanket A; Leeks, Christopher E; Dupuy, Franck P

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy using broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) endowed with Fc-mediated effector functions has been shown to be critical for protecting or controlling viral replication in animal models. In human, the RV144 Thai trial was the first trial to demonstrate a significant protection against HIV infection following vaccination. Analysis of the correlates of immune protection in this trial identified an association between the presence of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies (Abs) to HIV envelope (Env) V1/V2 loop structures and protection from infection, provided IgA Abs with competing specificity were not present. Systems serology analyses implicated a broader range of Ab-dependent functions in protection from HIV infection, including but not limited to ADCC and Ab-dependent NK cell activation (ADNKA) for secretion of IFN-γ and CCL4 and expression of the degranulation marker CD107a. The existence of such correlations in the absence of bNAbs in the RV144 trial suggest that NK cells could be instrumental in protecting against HIV infection by limiting viral spread through Fc-mediated functions such as ADCC and the production of antiviral cytokines/chemokines. Beside the engagement of FcγRIIIa or CD16 by the Fc portion of anti-Env IgG1 and IgG3 Abs, natural killer (NK) cells are also able to directly kill infected cells and produce cytokines/chemokines in an Ab-independent manner. Responsiveness of NK cells depends on the integration of activating and inhibitory signals through NK receptors, which is determined by a process during their development known as education. NK cell education requires the engagement of inhibitory NK receptors by their human leukocyte antigen ligands to establish tolerance to self while allowing NK cells to respond to self cells altered by virus infection, transformation, stress, and to allogeneic cells. Here, we review recent findings regarding the impact of inter

  3. Identification and characterization of cellular binding proteins (receptors) for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2B, an initiator of bone differentiation cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Paralkar, V.M.; Reddi, A.H. ); Hammonds, R.G. )

    1991-04-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein 2B (BMP 2B), is a heparin-binding bone differentiation factor that initiates endochondral bone formation in rats when implanted subcutaneously. The molecular mechanism of action of this differentiation factor is not known, and as a first step the authors have examined BMP 2B-responsive cells for the presence of specific cellular binding proteins. Using {sup 125}I-labeled BMP 2B, specific high-affinity binding sites for recombinant human BMP 2B on MC3T3 E1 osteoblast-like cells as well as on NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were identified. Platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and transforming growth factor {beta} did not compete for the binding of radiolabeled BMP 2B. The binding of BMP 2B is a time- and temperature-dependent process. Chemical crosslinking of radiolabeled BMP showed two components. These data demonstrate specific, high-affinity cell-surface binding proteins for BMP 2B.

  4. Functional Oil from Black Seed Differentially Inhibits Aldose-reductase and Ectonucleotidase Activities by Up-regulating Cellular Energy in Haloperidol-induced Hepatic Toxicity in Rat Liver.

    PubMed

    Kehinde, Akintunde Jacob

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the effect of rate-limiting enzymes involved in degradation of hepatic adenosine and intracellular sorbitol was investigated in rats exposed to haloperidol (HAL) and treated with functional oil (FO), containing principal active phytochemicals from black seed. Animals were divided into six groups (n=10): Distilled water, HAL 15 mg/kg, pre-administration/HAL 15 mg/kg, co-administration/HAL 15 mg/kg, post-administration/HAL 15 mg/kg, FO 150 mg/kg. The results of this study revealed that the activities of ectonucleotidase and aldose-reductase were significantly increased in HAL-treated rats when compared with the control (p < 0.05). However, differential treatments (pre, co and post) with FO depleted the activities of these enzymes compared with HAL-treated rats. Furthermore, therapeutic HAL administration increased the levels of key hepatic biomarkers (ALT, AST, and ALP) and malondialdehyde level with a concomitant decrease in functional hepatic cellular ATP. However, differential treatment with FO increases hepatic ATP and non-enzymatic antioxidant status, with a concomitant decrease in the levels of malondialdehyde and liver biomarkers. Therefore, results of this finding underlined the importance of aldose-reductase and econucleotidase activities in HAL induced toxicity and suggest some possible mechanisms of action by which FO prevent HAL-induced hepatic toxicity in rats.

  5. PCP-based mice models of schizophrenia: differential behavioral, neurochemical and cellular effects of acute and subchronic treatments.

    PubMed

    Castañé, Anna; Santana, Noemí; Artigas, Francesc

    2015-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) hypofunction has been proposed to account for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Thus, NMDA-R blockade has been used to model schizophrenia in experimental animals. Acute and repeated treatments have been successfully tested; however, long-term exposure to NMDA-R antagonists more likely resembles the core symptoms of the illness. To explore whether schizophrenia-related behaviors are differentially induced by acute and subchronic phencyclidine (PCP) treatment in mice and to examine the neurobiological bases of these differences. Subchronic PCP induced a sensitization of acute locomotor effects. Spontaneous alternation in a T-maze and novel object recognition performance were impaired after subchronic but not acute PCP, suggesting a deficit in working memory. On the contrary, reversal learning and immobility in the tail suspension test were unaffected. Subchronic PCP significantly reduced basal dopamine but not serotonin output in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and markedly decreased the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral tegmental area. Finally, acute and subchronic PCP treatments evoked a different pattern of c-fos expression. At 1 h post-treatment, acute PCP increased c-fos expression in many cortical regions, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, and dorsal raphe. However, the increased c-fos expression produced by subchronic PCP was restricted to the retrosplenial cortex, thalamus, hippocampus, and supramammillary nucleus. Four days after the last PCP injection, c-fos expression was still increased in the hippocampus of subchronic PCP-treated mice. Acute and subchronic PCP administration differently affects neuronal activity in brain regions relevant to schizophrenia, which could account for their different behavioral effects.

  6. Cellular Differentiation Regulator BLIMP1 Induces Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Reactivation in Epithelial and B Cells by Activating Transcription from both the R and Z Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Jessica A.; Nawandar, Dhananjay M.; Wright, Kenneth L.; Kenney, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) maintains a lifelong latent infection within a subset of its host's memory B cells, while lytic EBV replication takes place in plasma cells and differentiated epithelial cells. Therefore, cellular transcription factors, such as BLIMP1, that are key mediators of differentiation likely contribute to the EBV latent-to-lytic switch. Previous reports showed that ectopic BLIMP1 expression induces reactivation in some EBV-positive (EBV+) B-cell lines and transcription from Zp, with all Z+ cells in oral hairy leukoplakia being BLIMP1+. Here, we examined BLIMP1's role in inducing EBV lytic gene expression in numerous EBV+ epithelial and B-cell lines and activating transcription from Rp. BLIMP1 addition was sufficient to induce reactivation in latently infected epithelial cells derived from gastric cancers, nasopharyngeal carcinomas, and normal oral keratinocytes (NOK) as well as some, but not all B-cell lines. BLIMP1 strongly induced transcription from Rp as well as Zp, with there being three or more synergistically acting BLIMP1-responsive elements (BRE) within Rp. BLIMP1's DNA-binding domain was required for reactivation, but BLIMP1 did not directly bind the nucleotide (nt) −660 Rp BRE. siRNA knockdown of BLIMP1 inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced lytic reactivation in NOK-Akata cells, cells that can be reactivated by R, but not Z. Thus, we conclude that BLIMP1 expression is both necessary and sufficient to induce EBV lytic replication in many (possibly all) EBV+ epithelial-cell types, but in only a subset of EBV+ B-cell types; it does so, at least in part, by strongly activating expression of both EBV immediately early genes, BZLF1 and BRLF1. IMPORTANCE This study is the first one to show that the cellular transcription factor BLIMP1, a key player in both epithelial and B-cell differentiation, induces reactivation of the oncogenic herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) out of latency into lytic replication in a

  7. Differential modulation of cellular antioxidant status in zebrafish liver and kidney exposed to low dose arsenic trioxide.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shuvasree; Mukherjee, Sandip; Chattopadhyay, Ansuman; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish were exposed to a nonlethal dose (1/350LC50; 50µg/L) of As2O3 and sampled at 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days of treatment. The oxidative stress response was assessed in terms of time-dependent histopathological changes, lipid peroxidation, GSH status, activities of detoxification enzymes and expression of antioxidant genes in liver and kidney. As2O3 treatment enhanced lipid peroxidation except at day 90 in liver and day 30 in kidney. Glutathione depleted significantly in the liver except on day 30; whereas in kidney, it increased initially but thereafter depleted significantly. The liver GST activity was high until day 30, low on day 60 and high on day 90. On the other hand, activity of GST in kidney remained high throughout the exposure. GR activity in liver decreased initially but augmented from 30 days onwards whereas in kidney it remained high until 30 days of exposure. Significant increase in GPx and CAT activities in liver and kidney confirmed oxidative stress in zebrafish which correlated with mRNA expression of antioxidant genes. Upregulation in mRNA level of Cu-Zn Sod in liver and kidney was prominent. Gpx1 upregulation was more conspicuous in kidney as compared to liver while the pattern of Cat expression was almost similar in both the organs. Among the mitochondrial genes, expression of Cox1 was significantly high only after 90 days in liver, while in kidney it enhanced at 7, 30 and 60 days of arsenic exposure. Ucp2 was upregulated in liver after 15 days of exposure but significantly downregulated at day 90; in kidney it remained unchanged at other time points except at day 90. An overall increased expression of Bcl2 further confirmed As2O3 induced oxidative stress in zebrafish liver and kidney. The pattern of mRNA expression of Nrf2 was not uniform and was in accordance to its downstream antioxidant genes. Present findings elucidate that low dose of As2O3 exposure induces a time dependent differential modulation of antioxidant status in liver and

  8. TGF-β1-Mediated Differentiation of Fibroblasts Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial Content and Cellular Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Godic, Zarko; Rizvi, Farhan; Emelyanova, Larisa; Ross, Gracious; Richards, John; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L.; Jahangir, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    ). Conclusions TGF-β1 induced differentiation of fibroblasts is accompanied by energetic remodeling of myofibroblasts with an increase in mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial content. PMID:25849590

  9. TGF-β1-mediated differentiation of fibroblasts is associated with increased mitochondrial content and cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Godic, Zarko; Rizvi, Farhan; Emelyanova, Larisa; Ross, Gracious; Richards, John; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Jahangir, Arshad

    2015-01-01

    Cytokine-dependent activation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, a key event in fibrosis, is accompanied by phenotypic changes with increased secretory and contractile properties dependent on increased energy utilization, yet changes in the energetic profile of these cells are not fully described. We hypothesize that the TGF-β1-mediated transformation of myofibroblasts is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and function when compared to naive fibroblasts. Cultured NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, a profibrotic cytokine, or vehicle were assessed for transformation to myofibroblasts (appearance of α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA] stress fibers) and associated changes in mitochondrial content and functions using laser confocal microscopy, Seahorse respirometry, multi-well plate reader and biochemical protocols. Expression of mitochondrial-specific proteins was determined using western blotting, and the mitochondrial DNA quantified using Mitochondrial DNA isolation kit. Treatment with TGF-β1 (5 ng/mL) induced transformation of naive fibroblasts into myofibroblasts with a threefold increase in the expression of α-SMA (6.85 ± 0.27 RU) compared to cells not treated with TGF-β1 (2.52 ± 0.11 RU). TGF-β1 exposure increased the number of mitochondria in the cells, as monitored by membrane potential sensitive dye tetramethylrhodamine, and expression of mitochondria-specific proteins; voltage-dependent anion channels (0.54 ± 0.05 vs. 0.23 ± 0.05 RU) and adenine nucleotide transporter (0.61 ± 0.11 vs. 0.22 ± 0.05 RU), as well as mitochondrial DNA content (530 ± 12 μg DNA/106 cells vs. 307 ± 9 μg DNA/106 cells in control). TGF-β1 treatment was associated with an increase in mitochondrial function with a twofold increase in baseline oxygen consumption rate (2.25 ± 0.03 vs. 1.13 ± 0.1 nmol O2/min/106 cells) and FCCP-induced mitochondrial respiration (2.87 ± 0.03 vs. 1.46 ± 0.15 nmol O2/min/106 cells). TGF-β1 induced differentiation

  10. Mapping differential cellular protein response of mouse alveolar epithelial cells to multi-walled carbon nanotubes as a function of atomic layer deposition coating.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Gina M; Taylor, Alexia J; Hussain, Salik; Dandley, Erinn C; Griffith, Emily H; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C; Bereman, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a prototypical engineered nanomaterial, have been increasingly manufactured for a variety of novel applications over the past two decades. However, since CNTs possess fiber-like shape and cause pulmonary fibrosis in rodents, there is concern that mass production of CNTs will lead to occupational exposure and associated pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to use contemporary proteomics to investigate the mechanisms of cellular response in E10 mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro after exposure to multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs) that were functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a method used to generate highly uniform and conformal nanoscale thin-film coatings of metals to enhance novel conductive properties of CNTs. We hypothesized that specific types of metal oxide coatings applied to the surface of MWCNTs by ALD would determine distinct proteomic profiles in mouse alveolar epithelial cells in vitro that could be used to predict oxidative stress and pulmonary inflammation. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs were functionalized by ALD with zinc oxide (ZnO) to yield Z-MWCNTs or aluminum oxide (Al2O3) to yield A-MWCNTs. Significant differential protein expression was found in the following critical pathways: mTOR/eIF4/p70S6K signaling and Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response increased following exposure to Z-MWCNTs, interleukin-1 signaling increased following U-MWCNT exposure, and inhibition of angiogenesis by thrombospondin-1, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction increased following A-MWCNT exposure. This study demonstrates that specific types of metal oxide thin film coatings applied by ALD produce distinct cellular and biochemical responses related to lung inflammation and fibrosis compared to uncoated MWCNT exposure in vitro.

  11. Differential cellular gene expression in duck trachea infected with a highly or low pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Avian influenza A (AI) viruses of subtypes H5 can cause serious disease outbreaks in poultry including panzootic due to H5N1 highly pathogenic (HP) viruses. These viruses are a threat not only for animal health but also public health due to their zoonotic potential. The domestic duck plays a major role in the epidemiological cycle of influenza virus subtypes H5 but little is known concerning host/pathogen interactions during influenza infection in duck species. In this study, a subtracted library from duck trachea (a primary site of influenza virus infection) was constructed to analyse and compare the host response after a highly or low pathogenic (LP) H5N1-infection. Results Here, we show that more than 200 different genes were differentially expressed in infected duck trachea to a significant degree. In addition, significant differentially expressed genes between LPAI- and HPAI-infected tracheas were observed. Gene ontology annotation was used and specific signalling pathways were identified. These pathways were different for LPAI and HPAI-infected tracheas, except for the CXCR4 signalling pathway which is implicated in immune response. A different modulation of genes in the CXCR4 signalling pathway and TRIM33 was induced in duck tracheas infected with a HPAI- or a LPAI-H5N1. Conclusion First, this study indicates that Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is an alternative approach to gain insights into the pathogenesis of influenza infection in ducks. Secondly, the results indicate that cellular gene expression in the duck trachea was differently modulated after infection with a LPAI-H5N1 or after infection with a HPAI-H5N1 virus. Such difference found in infected trachea, a primary infection site, could precede continuation of infection and could explain appearance of respiratory symptoms or not. PMID:24015922

  12. Managing retention.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2007-01-01

    To build this process it is necessary to consult customers for preferences, build familiarity and knowledge to build a relationship and conduct business in a customized fashion. The process takes every opportunity to build customer satisfaction with each customer contact. It is an important process to have, since customers today are more demanding, sophisticated, educated and comfortable speaking to the company as an equal (Belk, 2003). Customers have more customized expectations so they want to be reached as individuals (Raymond and Tanner, 1994). Also, a disproportionate search for new business is costly. The cost to cultivate new customers is more than maintaining existing customers (Cathcart, 1990). Other reasons that customer retention is necessary is because many unhappy customers will never buy again from a company that dissatisfied them and they will communicate their displeasure to other people. These dissatisfied customers may not even convey their displeasure but without saying anything just stop doing business with that company, which may keep them unaware for some time that there is any problem (Cathcart, 1990).

  13. Loss of Keratin 17 induces tissue-specific cytokine polarization and cellular differentiation in HPV16-driven cervical tumorigenesis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, RP; Batazzi, AS; Han, MC; Coulombe, PA

    2017-01-01

    Despite preventive human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination efforts, cervical cancer remains a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Development of therapeutic approaches for cervical cancer are hampered by a lack of mechanistic insight during tumorigenesis. The cytoskeletal protein Keratin 17 (KRT17;K17) is robustly expressed in a broad array of carcinomas, including in cervical tumors, where it has both diagnostic and prognostic value. In this study, we have established multiple functional roles for K17 in the promotion of cervical tumorigenesis in vivo using the established HPV16tg mouse model for cervical squamous cell carcinoma. In HPV16tg/+;Krt17−/−relative to HPV16tg/+ reference female mice, onset of cervical lesions is delayed and closely paralleled by marked reductions in hyperplasia, dysplasia and vascularization. In addition, loss of Krt17 is associated with a cytokine polarization and recruitment of effector immune cells to lesion-prone cervical epithelia. Further, we observed marked enhancement of terminal differentiation in HPV16tg/+;Krt17−/−cervical epithelium accompanied by a stimulation and expansion in the expression of p63, a known basal/reserve cell marker in this tissue. Altogether, the data suggest that the loss of Krt17 may foster an overall protective environment for lesion-prone cervical tissue. In addition to providing new insights into the immunomodulatory and cellular mechanisms of cervical tumorigenesis, these findings may help guide the development of future therapies including vaccines. PMID:27065324

  14. Differential secretion of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein occurs in the Golgi complex of isolated rat hepatocytes. Evidence of partial retention in the Golgi.

    PubMed

    Poüs, C; Guibourdenche, J; Drechou, A; Durand, G

    1994-02-01

    Using weakly basic amines, we investigated the step at which the secretion kinetics of concanavalin-A-retained and nonretained alpha 1-acid glycoprotein glycoforms diverge in isolated rat hepatocytes. Both chloroquine and primaquine, whose action on protein secretion is targeted to terminal domains of the Golgi apparatus, cancelled the kinetic difference without influencing carbohydrate chain sialylation. To test for a possible interaction of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein with Golgi membranes, we also permeabilized control and primaquine-treated hepatocytes, as well as purified Golgi preparations, with saponin. In each case, we found that alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was associated with Golgi membranes, the association being more marked in primaquine-treated cells than in control cells. Membrane-bound alpha 1-acid glycoprotein appeared to be preferentially retained on concanavalin A. Such retention could account for the divergent secretion kinetics of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein glycoforms.

  15. Strategies for Teacher Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Patricia

    1995-01-01

    Strategies for teacher retention are presented, including successful approaches and elements for operating a state system for personnel recruitment and retention in special education. Such initiatives as the Utah Mentor Teacher Academy; the Texas Teacher Recruitment, Retention and Assistance Program; and the Kansas Recruitment/Retention Project…

  16. Differential cellular distribution of tonicity-induced expression of transcription factor TonEBP in the rat brain following prolonged systemic hypertonicity.

    PubMed

    Maallem, S; Mutin, M; Kwon, H M; Tappaz, M L

    2006-01-01

    In a previous work performed on cerebral cortex and hippocampus we reported that tonicity-responsive enhancer binding protein (TonEBP), originally identified as a transactivator of osmoprotective genes involved in osmoadaptation of renal cells, was induced in neurons only, but to varying levels, following acute systemic hypertonicity. Whether or not this cellular specificity reflected a unique ability of neurons or a differential time course among brain cells for tonicity-induction of TonEBP was investigated throughout the brain in this study by subjecting the animals to prolonged systemic hypertonicity. In normal rats, TonEBP immunolabeling and TonEBP-mRNA in situ hybridization labeling showed a widespread, uneven and parallel distribution. TonEBP was expressed primarily in the cell nuclei of neurons, where it was heterogeneously distributed in a nucleoplasmic and a granular pool. In rats subjected to prolonged systemic hypertonicity, TonEBP labeling increased in the cell nuclei of neurons only. The tonicity-induced expression of TonEBP for a given cell group of neurons was rather uniform but varied greatly among neuronal cell groups and was positively correlated with the average size of the cell nuclei, as determined by quantitative analysis of digitized images. The detailed distribution of tonicity-induced expression of TonEBP is reported throughout the brain. In normal rats, a very minor proportion of non-neuronal cells, identified as a subset of astrocytes and possibly oligodendrocytes, showed faint nuclear immunolabeling, which however did not increase in hypertonic animals. Ependymocytes, capillary endothelial cells, and microglial cells showed no TonEBP labeling, even in hypertonic animals. Altogether our data indicate that neurons, albeit possibly to a varying extent, are the only brain cells able to use TonEBP-mediated processes for adaptation to a systemic hyperosmotic unbalance.

  17. A role of cellular glutathione in the differential effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on antigen-specific T cell cytokine expression

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chien-Chang; Liang, Hong-Jen; Wang, Chia-Chi; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates that iron oxide nanoparticles modulate immune responses, and induce oxidative stress in macrophages. It was recently reported that iron oxide nanoparticles attenuated antigen-specific immunity in vivo, though the underlying mechanism remains elusive. The present study investigates the direct effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on antigen-specific cytokine expression by T cells, and potential underlying mechanisms. Methods Ovalbumin-primed splenocytes were exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles, followed by restimulation with ovalbumin. Cell viability, cytokine production, and cellular levels of glutathione and reactive oxygen species were measured. Results The splenocyte viability and the production of interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 were unaffected, whereas interferon-γ production was markedly attenuated by iron oxide nanoparticles (10–100 μg iron/mL) in a concentration-dependent manner. Iron oxide nanoparticles also transiently diminished the intracellular level of glutathione, with a peak response at 6 hours posttreatment. The effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on interferon-γ and glutathione were attenuated by the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a precursor of glutathione. However, iron oxide nanoparticles did not influence the generation of reactive oxygen species. Conclusion Iron oxide nanoparticles induced a differential effect on antigen-specific cytokine expression by T cells, in which the T helper 1 cytokine IFN-γ was sensitive, whereas the T helper 2 cytokine interleukin-4 was refractory. In addition, the suppressive effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on interferon-γ was closely associated with the diminishment of glutathione. PMID:22114506

  18. Integrated detection of both 5-mC and 5-hmC by high-throughput tag sequencing technology highlights methylation reprogramming of bivalent genes during cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Xia, Yudong; Wang, Junwen; Luo, Huijuan; Gao, Zhaowei; Han, Xu; Zhang, Juyong; Huang, Xiaojun; Yao, Yu; Lu, Hanlin; Yi, Na; Zhou, Baojin; Lin, Zhilong; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun

    2013-04-01

    5-methylcytosine (5-mC) can be oxidized to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC). Genome-wide profiling of 5-hmC thus far indicates 5-hmC may not only be an intermediate form of DNA demethylation but could also constitute an epigenetic mark per se. Here we describe a cost-effective and selective method to detect both the hydroxymethylation and methylation status of cytosines in a subset of cytosines in the human genome. This method involves the selective glucosylation of 5-hmC residues, short-Sequence tag generation and high-throughput sequencing. We tested this method by screening H9 human embryonic stem cells and their differentiated embroid body cells, and found that differential hydroxymethylation preferentially occurs in bivalent genes during cellular differentiation. Especially, our results support hydroxymethylation can regulate key transcription regulators with bivalent marks through demethylation and affect cellular decision on choosing active or inactive state of these genes upon cellular differentiation. Future application of this technology would enable us to uncover the status of methylation and hydroxymethylation in dynamic biological processes and disease development in multiple biological samples.

  19. Differential patterns of accumulation and retention of dietary trace elements associated with coal ash during larval development and metamorphosis of an amphibian.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Andrew; Rowe, Christopher L; Conrad, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    We performed an experiment in which larval gray tree frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis) were raised through metamorphosis on diets increased with a suite of elements associated with coal combustion residues (silver [Ag], arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], mercury [Hg], lead [Pb], selenium [Se], vanadium [V], and zinc [Zn]) at "low" and "high" concentrations. We quantified accumulation of metals at three life stages (mid-larval development, initiation of metamorphosis, and completion of metamorphosis) as well as effects on survival, metabolic rate, size at metamorphosis, and duration and loss of weight during metamorphosis. Most elements were accumulated in a dose-dependent pattern by some or all life stages, although this was not the case for Hg. For most elements, larval body burdens exceeded those of later life stages in some or all treatments (control, low, or high). However for Se, As, and Hg, body burdens in control and low concentrations were increased in later compared with earlier life stages. A lack of dose-dependent accumulation of Hg suggests that the presence of high concentrations of other elements (possibly Se) either inhibited accumulation or increased depuration of Hg. The duration of metamorphosis (forelimb emergence through tail resorption) was lengthened in individuals exposed to the highest concentrations of elements, but there were no other statistically significant biological effects. This study shows that patterns of accumulation and possibly depuration of metals and trace elements are complex in animals possessing complex life cycles. Further study is required to determine specific interactions affecting these patterns, in particular which elements may be responsible for affecting accumulation or retention of Hg when organisms are exposed to complex mixtures of elements.

  20. Differential N-glycosylation of a monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco leaves with and without endoplasmic reticulum retention signal apparently induces similar in vivo stability in mice.

    PubMed

    Triguero, Ada; Cabrera, Gleysin; Rodríguez, Meilyn; Soto, Jeny; Zamora, Yasser; Pérez, Marlene; Wormald, Mark R; Cremata, José A

    2011-12-01

    Plant cells are able to perform most of the post-translational modifications that are required by recombinant proteins to achieve adequate bioactivity and pharmacokinetics. However, regarding N-glycosylation the processing of plant N-glycans in the Golgi apparatus displays major differences when compared with that of mammalian cells. These differences in N-glycosylation are expected to influence serum clearance rate of plant-derived monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibody against the hepatitis B virus surface antigen expressed in Nicotiana tabacum leaves without KDEL endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (CB.Hep1(-)KDEL) and with a KDEL (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu) fused to both IgG light and heavy chains (CB.Hep1(+)KDEL) were tested for in vivo stability in mice. Full characterization of N-glycosylation and aggregate formation in each monoclonal antibody batch was determined. The mouse counterpart (CB.Hep1) was used as control. Both (CB.Hep1(-)KDEL) and (CB.Hep1(+)KDEL) showed a faster initial clearance rate (first 24 h) compared with the analogous murine antibody while the terminal phase was similar in the three antibodies. Despite the differences between CB.Hep1(+)KDEL and CB.Hep1(-)KDEL N-glycans, the in vivo elimination in mice was indistinguishable from each other and higher than the murine monoclonal antibody. Molecular modelling confirmed that N-glycans linked to plantibodies were oriented away from the interdomain region, increasing the accessibility of the potential glycan epitopes by glycoprotein receptors that might be responsible for the difference in stability of these molecules. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    DOEpatents

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  2. 5 CFR 575.307 - Agency retention incentive plan and approval levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency retention incentive plan and... SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Retention Incentives § 575.307 Agency retention incentive plan and approval...

  3. Toward completely constructed and cellularized blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Menu, Patrick; Stoltz, Jean-François; Kerdjoudj, Halima

    2012-01-01

    Vascular tissue engineering aims to develop implantable blood-vessels, exhibiting biological and biomechanical characteristics close to those of the native vessels. The ultimate goal of our group is to engineer suitable blood vessel substitutes which could be stored for a long time in vascular bank conditions.First attempts tried to develop coating procedures allowing endothelial cells (EC) differentiation, adhesion and retention on current vascular substitutes but the weak in vivo patency of these grafts was related. Since 2003, our group have been evaluated a new surface modification of internal surface of blood vessels based on polyelectrolyte films coating. The layer-by-layer self-assembly and the resulting polyelectrolyte multiplayer films (PEM) is a simple and versatile way to engineer surfaces with highly specific properties. Previous studies indicated that the poly(sodium-4 styrene sulfonate)/poly (allylamine hydrochloride) PSS/PAH multilayered films when ended by PAH, induce strong adhesion and retention of mature EC which spread and keep their phenotype as well on glass, on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene ePTFE and on cryopreserved arteries. The mechanical properties (compliance), leading to early intimal hyperplasia and graft failure, were lost after artery cryopreservation. We have demonstrated that the compliance and elasticity restoration of PEM treated cryopreserved arteries close to native arteries.In other respect, the use of the circulating progenitor which could be differentiated into matures vascular cell offers new opportunities in vascular engineering. Currents protocols, expend at least 1 month to observe both smooth muscle (SMCs) and endothelium (ECs)-like morphology and about two months for confluent monolayer cells. The progenitor cells cultivated on PEM treated glass showed mature and functional vascular cells (SMCs and ECs) development after only 14 days of culture. The morphological appearance, mature and healthy phenotype markers

  4. Complementation of non-tumorigenicity of HPV18-positive cervical carcinoma cells involves differential mRNA expression of cellular genes including potential tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 11q13.

    PubMed

    Kehrmann, Angela; Truong, Ha; Repenning, Antje; Boger, Regina; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Pascheberg, Ulrich; Beckmann, Alf; Opalka, Bertram; Kleine-Lowinski, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The fusion between human tumorigenic cells and normal human diploid fibroblasts results in non-tumorigenic hybrid cells, suggesting a dominant role for tumor suppressor genes in the generated hybrid cells. After long-term cultivation in vitro, tumorigenic segregants may arise. The loss of tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 11q13 has been postulated to be involved in the induction of the tumorigenic phenotype of human papillomavirus (HPV)18-positive cervical carcinoma cells and their derived tumorigenic hybrid cells after subcutaneous injection in immunocompromised mice. The aim of this study was the identification of novel cellular genes that may contribute to the suppression of the tumorigenic phenotype of non-tumorigenic hybrid cells in vivo. We used cDNA microarray technology to identify differentially expressed cellular genes in tumorigenic HPV18-positive hybrid and parental HeLa cells compared to non-tumorigenic HPV18-positive hybrid cells. We detected several as yet unknown cellular genes that play a role in cell differentiation, cell cycle progression, cell-cell communication, metastasis formation, angiogenesis, antigen presentation, and immune response. Apart from the known differentially expressed genes on 11q13 (e.g., phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein 1 (PACS1) and FOS ligand 1 (FOSL1 or Fra-1)), we detected novel differentially expressed cellular genes located within the tumor suppressor gene region (e.g., EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (EFEMP2) and leucine rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32) (also known as glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP)) that may have potential tumor suppressor functions in this model system of non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast hybrid cells.

  5. The effect of myotonic dystrophy transcript levels and location on muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikolaos P.; Chrysanthou, Elina; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Uney, James B.; Mahadevan, Mani S.; Phylactou, Leonidas A.

    2008-12-12

    In myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), nuclear retention of mutant DMPK transcripts compromises muscle cell differentiation. Although several reports have identified molecular defects in myogenesis, it remains still unclear how exactly the retention of the mutant transcripts induces this defect. We have recently created a novel cellular model in which the mutant DMPK 3' UTR transcripts were released to the cytoplasm of myoblasts by using the WPRE genetic element. As a result, muscle cell differentiation was repaired. In this paper, this cellular model was further exploited to investigate the effect of the levels and location of the mutant transcripts on muscle differentiation. Results show that the levels of these transcripts were proportional to the inhibition of both the initial fusion of myoblasts and the maturity of myotubes. Moreover, the cytoplasmic export of the mutant RNAs to the cytoplasm caused less inhibition only in the initial fusion of myoblasts.

  6. Early differential cell death and survival mechanisms initiate and contribute to the development of OPIDN: A study of molecular, cellular, and anatomical parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Damodaran, T.V.; Attia, M.K.; Abou-Donia, M.B.

    2011-11-15

    Organophosphorus-ester induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ataxia progressing to paralysis with a concomitant central and peripheral, distal axonapathy. Diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) produces OPIDN in the chicken that results in mild ataxia in 7-14 days and severe paralysis as the disease progresses with a single dose. White leghorn layer hens were treated with DFP (1.7 mg/kg, sc) after prophylactic treatment with atropine (1 mg/kg, sc) in normal saline and eserine (1 mg/kg, sc) in dimethyl sulfoxide. Control groups were treated with vehicle propylene glycol (0.1 ml/kg, sc), atropine in normal saline and eserine in dimethyl sulfoxide. The hens were euthanized at different time points such as 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20 days, and the tissues from cerebrum, midbrain, cerebellum, brainstem and spinal cord were quickly dissected and frozen for mRNA (northern) studies. Northern blots were probed with BCL2, GADD45, beta actin, and 28S RNA to investigate their expression pattern. Another set of hens was treated for a series of time points and perfused with phosphate buffered saline and fixative for histological studies. Various staining protocols such as Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E); Sevier-Munger; Cresyl echt Violet for Nissl substance; and Gallocynin stain for Nissl granules were used to assess various patterns of cell death and degenerative changes. Complex cell death mechanisms may be involved in the neuronal and axonal degeneration. These data indicate altered and differential mRNA expressions of BCL2 (anti apoptotic gene) and GADD45 (DNA damage inducible gene) in various tissues. Increased cell death and other degenerative changes noted in the susceptible regions (spinal cord and cerebellum) than the resistant region (cerebrum), may indicate complex molecular pathways via altered BCL2 and GADD45 gene expression, causing the homeostatic imbalance between cell survival and cell death mechanisms. Semi quantitative

  7. A strategic approach to employee retention.

    PubMed

    Gering, John; Conner, John

    2002-11-01

    A sound retention strategy should incorporate a business plan, a value proposition, progress measures, and management influences. The business plan will indicate whether a healthcare organization will achieve a return on investment for its effort. A value proposition will showcase an organization's strengths and differentiate it from its competitors. Measuring progress toward meeting retention goals at regular intervals will help keep an organization on track. The best managers require accountability, rewarding employees for their successes and taking corrective action as necessary. Retention rate targets must be at a level that will achieve a competitive advantage in the served market.

  8. Silk Fibroin Scaffolds Promote Formation of the Ex Vivo Niche for Salivary Gland Epithelial Cell Growth, Matrix Formation, and Retention of Differentiated Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin-Xian; Zhang, Zhi-Liang; Lin, Alan L.; Wang, Hanzhou; Pilia, Marcello; Ong, Joo L.; Dean, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland hypofunction often results from a number of causes, including the use of various medications, radiation for head and neck tumors, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, and aging. Since treatments for this condition are lacking and adult salivary glands have little regenerative capacity, there is a need for cell-based therapies to restore salivary gland function. Development of these treatment strategies requires the establishment of a system that is capable of replicating the salivary gland cell “niche” to support the proliferation and differentiation of salivary gland progenitor cells. In this study, a culture system using three-dimensional silk fibroin scaffolds (SFS) and primary salivary gland epithelial cells (pSGECs) from rat submandibular (SM) gland and parotid gland (PG) was established and characterized. pSGECs grown on SFS, but not tissue culture plastic (TCP), formed aggregates of cells with morphological features resembling secretory acini. High levels of amylase were released into the media by both cell types after extended periods in culture on SFS. Remarkably, cultures of PG-derived cells on SFS, but not SM cells, responded to isoproterenol, a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, with increased enzyme release. This behavior mimics that of the salivary glands in vivo. Decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) formed by pSGECs in culture on SFS contained type IV collagen, a major component of the basement membrane. These results demonstrate that pSGECs grown on SFS, but not TCP, retain important functional and structural features of differentiated salivary glands and produce an ECM that mimics the native salivary gland cell niche. These results demonstrate that SFS has potential as a scaffold for creating the salivary gland cell niche in vitro and may provide an approach for inducing multipotent stem cells to provide therapeutically meaningful numbers of salivary gland progenitor cells for regenerating these tissues in patients. PMID:25625623

  9. Matrix-mediated retention of adipogenic differentiation potential by human adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells during ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Mauney, Joshua R; Volloch, Vladimir; Kaplan, David L

    2005-11-01

    Recently, cell-based approaches utilizing adipogenic progenitor cells for fat tissue engineering have been developed and reported to have success in promoting in vivo adipogenesis and the repair of defect sites. For autologous applications, human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been suggested as a potential cell source for adipose tissue engineering applications due to their ability to be isolated and ex vivo expanded from adult bone marrow aspirates and their versatility for pluripotent differentiation into various mesenchymal lineages including adipogenic. Due to the relatively low frequency of MSCs present within bone marrow, extensive ex vivo expansion of these cells is necessary to obtain therapeutic cell populations for tissue engineering strategies. Currently, utilization of MSCs for adipose tissue engineering is limited due to the attenuation of their adipogenic differentiation potential following extensive ex vivo expansion on conventional tissue culture plastic (TCP) substrates. In the present study, the ability of a denatured collagen type I (DC) matrix to preserve MSC adipogenic potential during ex vivo expansion was examined. Adipocyte-related markers and functions were examined in vitro in response to adipogenic culture conditions for 21 days in comparison to early passage MSCs and late passage MSCs ex vivo expanded on TCP. The results demonstrated significant preservation of the ability of late passage MSCs ex vivo expanded on the DC matrix to express adipogenic markers (fatty acid-binding protein-4, lipoprotein lipase, acyl-CoA synthetase, adipsin, facilitative glucose transporter-4, and accumulation of lipids) similar to the early passage cells and in contrast to late passage MSCs expanded on TCP. The ability of the DC matrix to preserve adipocyte-related markers and functions of MSCs following extensive ex vivo expansion represents a novel culture technique to expand functional adipogenic progenitors for tissue engineering

  10. Fall 1984 Retention Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    A study was conducted of the retention patterns of students enrolled in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) in fall 1984 using college reports on withdrawals and grade distributions. The study focused on successful retention (i.e., all students who received a passing grade) and on total retention (i.e., all students who received any…

  11. Differential polymer structure tunes mechanism of cellular uptake and transfection routes of poly(β-amino ester) polyplexes in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-15

    Successful gene delivery with nonviral particles has several barriers, including cellular uptake, endosomal escape, and nuclear transport. Understanding the mechanisms behind these steps is critical to enhancing the effectiveness of gene delivery. Polyplexes formed with poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs) have been shown to effectively transfer DNA to various cell types, but the mechanism of their cellular uptake has not been identified. This is the first study to evaluate the uptake mechanism of PBAE polyplexes and the dependence of cellular uptake on the end group and molecular weight of the polymer. We synthesized three different analogues of PBAEs with the same base polymer poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol) (B4S4) but with small changes in the end group or molecular weight. We quantified the uptake and transfection efficiencies of the pDNA polyplexes formulated from these polymers in hard-to-transfect triple negative human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231). All polymers formed positively charged (10-17 mV) nanoparticles of ∼200 nm in size. Cellular internalization of all three formulations was inhibited the most (60-90% decrease in cellular uptake) by blocking caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Greater inhibition was shown with polymers that had a 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end group (E7) than the others with a 2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethanol end group (E6) or higher molecular weight. However, caveolae-mediated endocytosis was generally not as efficient as clathrin-mediated endocytosis in leading to transfection. These findings indicate that PBAE polyplexes can be used to transfect triple negative human breast cancer cells and that small changes to the same base polymer can modulate their cellular uptake and transfection routes.

  12. Differential Polymer Structure Tunes Mechanism of Cellular Uptake and Transfection Routes of Poly(β-amino ester) Polyplexes in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Sunshine, Joel C.; Green, Jordan J.

    2014-01-01

    Successful gene delivery with non-viral particles has several barriers, including cellular uptake, endosomal escape, and nuclear transport. Understanding the mechanisms behind these steps is critical to enhancing the effectiveness of gene delivery. Polyplexes formed with poly(β-amino ester)s (PBAEs) have been shown to effectively transfer DNA to various cell types, but the mechanism of their cellular uptake has not been identified. This is the first study to evaluate the uptake mechanism of PBAE polyplexes and the dependence of cellular uptake on the end group and molecular weight of the polymer. We synthesized three different analogs of PBAEs with the same base polymer poly(1,4-butanediol diacrylate-co-4-amino-1-butanol) (B4S4) but with small changes in the end group or molecular weight. We quantified the uptake and transfection efficiencies of the pDNA polyplexes formulated from these polymers in hard-to-transfect triple negative human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB 231). All polymers formed positively charged (10 – 17 mV) nanoparticles of ~ 200 nm in size. Cellular internalization of all three formulations was inhibited the most (60 – 90% decrease in cellular uptake) by blocking caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Greater inhibition was shown with polymers that had a 1-(3-aminopropyl)-4-methylpiperazine end group (E7) than the others with a 2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethanol end group (E6) or higher molecular weight. However, caveolae-mediated endocytosis was generally not as efficient as clathrin-mediated endocytosis in leading to transfection. These findings indicate that PBAE polyplexes can be used to transfect triple negative human breast cancer cells, and that small changes to the same base polymer can modulate their cellular uptake and transfection routes. PMID:24320687

  13. The cellular form of the prion protein guides the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into neuron-, oligodendrocyte-, and astrocyte-committed lineages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Jin; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2014-01-01

    Prion protein, PrP(C), is a glycoprotein that is expressed on the cell surface beginning with the early stages of embryonic stem cell differentiation. Previously, we showed that ectopic expression of PrP(C) in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) triggered differentiation toward endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal lineages, whereas silencing of PrP(C) suppressed differentiation toward ectodermal but not endodermal or mesodermal lineages. Considering that PrP(C) might be involved in controlling the balance between cells of different lineages, the current study was designed to test whether PrP(C) controls differentiation of hESCs into cells of neuron-, oligodendrocyte-, and astrocyte-committed lineages. PrP(C) was silenced in hESCs cultured under three sets of conditions that were previously shown to induce hESCs differentiation into predominantly neuron-, oligodendrocyte-, and astrocyte-committed lineages. We found that silencing of PrP(C) suppressed differentiation toward all three lineages. Similar results were observed in all three protocols, arguing that the effect of PrP(C) was independent of differentiation conditions employed. Moreover, switching PrP(C) expression during a differentiation time course revealed that silencing PrP(C) expression during the very initial stage that corresponds to embryonic bodies has a more significant impact than silencing at later stages of differentiation. The current work illustrates that PrP(C) controls differentiation of hESCs toward neuron-, oligodendrocyte-, and astrocyte-committed lineages and is likely involved at the stage of uncommitted neural progenitor cells rather than lineage-committed neural progenitors.

  14. Cyber Workforce Retention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Retention 25 Congressional Concerns about Cyber Retention 25 Contemporary Civilian Labor Market Study Findings on Retention Best Practices 26...occupational categories in the labor markets in the United States and around the world in the coming years. This demand is increasing based on the rising...professionals collides with a world labor market already experi- encing a dramatic deficit in individuals with these skills. At the same time, the United

  15. Salmonella Adhesion, Invasion and Cellular Immune Responses Are Differentially Affected by Iron Concentrations in a Combined In Vitro Gut Fermentation-Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Dostal, Alexandra; Gagnon, Mélanie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; O'Mahony, Liam; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In regions with a high infectious disease burden, concerns have been raised about the safety of iron supplementation because higher iron concentrations in the gut lumen may increase risk of enteropathogen infection. The aim of this study was to investigate interactions of the enteropathogen Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica Typhimurium with intestinal cells under different iron concentrations encountered in the gut lumen during iron deficiency and supplementation using an in vitro colonic fermentation system inoculated with immobilized child gut microbiota combined with Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture monolayers. Colonic fermentation effluents obtained during normal, low (chelation by 2,2'-dipyridyl) and high iron (26.5 mg iron/L) fermentation conditions containing Salmonella or pure Salmonella cultures with similar iron conditions were applied to cellular monolayers. Salmonella adhesion and invasion capacity, cellular integrity and immune response were assessed. Under high iron conditions in pure culture, Salmonella adhesion was 8-fold increased compared to normal iron conditions while invasion was not affected leading to decreased invasion efficiency (−86%). Moreover, cellular cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α secretion as well as NF-κB activation in THP-1 cells were attenuated under high iron conditions. Low iron conditions in pure culture increased Salmonella invasion correlating with an increase in IL-8 release. In fermentation effluents, Salmonella adhesion was 12-fold and invasion was 428-fold reduced compared to pure culture. Salmonella in high iron fermentation effluents had decreased invasion efficiency (−77.1%) and cellular TNF-α release compared to normal iron effluent. The presence of commensal microbiota and bacterial metabolites in fermentation effluents reduced adhesion and invasion of Salmonella compared to pure culture highlighting the importance of the gut microbiota as a barrier during pathogen invasion. High iron concentrations as

  16. Rapid Turnover of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 3 by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway Defines a Novel Paradigm of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Regulation during Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, Philippe; Rodier, Geneviève; Pelletier, Stéphane; Pellerin, Johanne; Meloche, Sylvain

    2003-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are stable enzymes that are mainly regulated by phosphorylation and subcellular targeting. Here we report that extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 (ERK3), unlike other MAP kinases, is an unstable protein that is constitutively degraded in proliferating cells with a half-life of 30 min. The proteolysis of ERK3 is executed by the proteasome and requires ubiquitination of the protein. Contrary to other protein kinases, the catalytic activity of ERK3 is not responsible for its short half-life. Instead, analysis of ERK1/ERK3 chimeras revealed the presence of two destabilization regions (NDR1 and -2) in the N-terminal lobe of the ERK3 kinase domain that are both necessary and sufficient to target ERK3 and heterologous proteins for proteasomal degradation. To assess the physiological relevance of the rapid turnover of ERK3, we monitored the expression of the kinase in different cellular models of differentiation. We observed that ERK3 markedly accumulates during differentiation of PC12 and C2C12 cells into the neuronal and muscle lineage, respectively. The accumulation of ERK3 during myogenic differentiation is associated with the time-dependent stabilization of the protein. Terminal skeletal muscle differentiation is accompanied by cell cycle withdrawal. Interestingly, we found that expression of stabilized forms of ERK3 causes G1 arrest in NIH 3T3 cells. We propose that ERK3 biological activity is regulated by its cellular abundance through the control of protein stability. PMID:12808096

  17. Long-Term Retention of Conditioned Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Arthur W.; And Others

    The extent to which semantic differential ratings of trigrams remain consistent over a four-week retention period following pairing with positive or negative attitudinal words was determined. The trigrams initially served as stimulus items in a paired associate list consisting of both positive and negative evaluative response terms; and rating and…

  18. Cellular genetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, F; Filareto, A; Spitalieri, P; Sangiuolo, F; Novelli, G

    2005-01-01

    Cellular genetic therapy is the ultimate frontier for those pathologies that are consequent to a specific nonfunctional cellular type. A viable cure for there kinds of diseases is the replacement of sick cells with healthy ones, which can be obtained from the same patient or a different donor. In fact, structures can be corrected and strengthened with the introduction of undifferentiated cells within specific target tissues, where they will specialize into the desired cellular types. Furthermore, consequent to the recent results obtained with the transdifferentiation experiments, a process that allows the in vitro differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells, it has also became clear that many advantages may be obtained from the use of stem cells to produce drugs, vaccines, and therapeutic molecules. Since stem cells can sustain lineage potentials, the capacity for differentiation, and better tolerance for the introduction of exogenous genes, they are also considered as feasible therapeutic vehicles for gene therapy. In fact, it is strongly believed that the combination of cellular genetic and gene therapy approaches will definitely allow the development of new therapeutic strategies as well as the production of totipotent cell lines to be used as experimental models for the cure of genetic disorders.

  19. Typewriting: Retention and Relearning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagman, Joseph D.

    Retention and relearning of straight-copy typewriting skill among thirty-eight administrative specialists, 71L Military Occupational Speciality, were examined after the no-practice retention interval between Advanced Individual Training (AIT) graduation and unit duty. Over this interval, average typing speed decreased and errors increased. As a…

  20. Retention, retention, retention: targeting the young in CPR skills training!

    PubMed

    Roppolo, Lynn P; Pepe, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    The usefulness of basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training in school systems has been questioned, considering that young students may not have the physical or cognitive skills required to perform complex tasks correctly. In the study conducted by Fleishhackl and coworkers, students as young as 9 years were able to successfully and effectively learn basic CPR skills, including automated external defibrillator deployment, correct recovery position, and emergency calling. As in adults, physical strength may limit the depth of chest compressions and ventilation volumes given by younger individuals with low body mass index; however, skill retention is good. Training all persons across an entire community in CPR may have a logarithmic improvement in survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest because bystanders, usually family members, are more likely to know CPR and can perform it immediately, when it is physiologically most effective. Training captured audiences of trainees, such as the entire work-force of the community or the local school system, are excellent mechanisms to help achieve that goal. In addition to better retention with new half hour training kits, a multiplier effect can be achieved through school children. In addition, early training not only sets the stage for subsequent training and better retention, but it also reinforces the concept of a social obligation to help others.

  1. The Diagnostic Impact of C4d, CD68, and NF-κB Expression in the Differentiation Between Recurrent Hepatitis C and Acute Cellular Rejection After Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa G; Asaad, Nancy Y; Ehsan, Nermin; Younes, Sheren; Gomaa, Asmaa I; Elgendy, Walaa

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation is the selected treatment for patients with advanced liver disease and cirrhosis, mostly as a complication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Recurrent HCV and acute cellular rejection (ACR) of the graft are the most common causes of graft failure. The distinction between the 2 conditions is essential because they are managed differently. In some cases, the clinical and histopathologic features may overlap between recurrent hepatitis C and ACR, making differentiation difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of C4d, CD68, and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) in the differentiation between ACR and recurrent HCV in the post-liver-transplant biopsy using immunohistochemistry. C4d expression in endothelial cells of portal or central veins (P=0.001) and the number of macrophages highlighted by CD68 (P=0.02) were in favor of ACR, whereas NF-κB expression by hepatocytes was in favor of recurrent hepatitis C. Vascular injury demonstrated by endothelial expression of C4d and prominent macrophage infiltration identified by CD68 expression were the distinguishing criteria for ACR and representing humoral and cellular-mediated immunity as evoking factors for graft injury. The upregulation of NF-κB in the hepatocytes of recurrent hepatitis C could be an immune response to infection or it may be induced by HCV itself.

  2. Myocardial strain and strain rate from speckle-tracking echocardiography are unable to differentiate asymptomatic biopsy-proven cellular rejection in the first year after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ambardekar, Amrut V; Alluri, Nitya; Patel, Amit C; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Dorosz, Jennifer L

    2015-04-01

    Cellular rejection after cardiac transplantation is treatable with timely diagnosis. Because noninvasive methods for diagnosis are limited, surveillance endomyocardial biopsies are routinely performed in the first year after transplantation. The aim of this study was to test whether myocardial strain and strain rate as assessed by speckle-tracking echocardiography would be a sensitive noninvasive method for the detection of asymptomatic rejection. Surveillance biopsies and echocardiograms obtained in the first year after transplantation were retrospectively reviewed, and patients with asymptomatic biopsy-proven cellular rejection were identified, as well as control transplantation patients without rejection or cardiac complications. Circumferential and longitudinal strain and strain rate were measured using Velocity Vector Imaging software from echocardiograms performed at three time points for patients with rejection-baseline (no rejection), rejection, and resolution (of rejection)-and three time points for control patients-baseline (within the first month after transplantation), 6 months, and 12 months after transplantation. Speckle-tracking strain and strain rate measurements were obtained from 30 patients with asymptomatic biopsy-proven rejection and 14 control transplantation patients. There were no significant differences in circumferential and longitudinal strain or strain rate between the baseline, rejection, and resolution studies. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in strain and strain rate in control transplantation patients during the first year after transplantation or compared with patients with rejection. Speckle-tracking analysis was unable to detect changes on serial studies from patients with asymptomatic rejection and thus cannot replace biopsy. Other noninvasive methods for the diagnosis of cellular-mediated rejection are needed. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. In vitro mimicking of estrous cycle stages in porcine oviduct epithelium cells: estradiol and progesterone regulate differentiation, gene expression, and cellular function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Einspanier, Ralf; Schoen, Jennifer

    2013-09-01

    Throughout the estrous cycle the oviduct epithelium undergoes dramatic morphological and functional changes. To elucidate cyclic cellular events and associated regulation mechanisms of 17beta estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4), we mimicked estrous cycle stages in vitro using a culture system of primary porcine oviduct epithelium cells (POEC). Cells were polarized in an air/liquid interface and then treated with E2 and P4 for physiological time periods: In experiment 1, high concentration of P4 with low concentration of E2 for 10 days resembled diestrus; in experiment 2, following the previous diestrus, sequential high E2 with low P4 for 2.5 days represented estrus. Histomorphometry and electron microscopy showed cyclic changes in cellular height, cell population, and cilia density under the influence of hormone stimulation. Transepithelial electrical resistance was high in simulated diestrus but reduced in estrus. Thus, E2 and P4 affect cellular polarity, transformation of ciliated and secretory cells, as well as electrical conductivity of oviduct epithelium. Simulation of diestrus led to significant decrease in expression of hormone receptors (PGR and ESR1) and other epithelial markers (MUC16, OVGP1, and HSP90B1), while sequential simulated estrus caused an increase in these markers. The hormonal regulation of some marker genes was clearly time-dependent. Furthermore, POEC showed increased sperm-binding capacity in simulated estrus. In this study, we also present a novel approach based on the AndroVision software, which can be routinely utilized as a parameter for ciliary activity, and for the first time, we showed fluid movement patterns along the epithelium lining in vitro.

  4. Control of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation by the heterochronic genes and the cellular asymmetry machinery in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Omid F.; Ambros, Victor R.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between asymmetric (self-renewing) and symmetric (proliferative) cell divisions are robustly regulated in the context of normal development and tissue homeostasis. To genetically assess the regulation of these transitions, we used the postembryonic epithelial stem (seam) cell lineages of Caenorhabditis elegans. In these lineages, the timing of these transitions is regulated by the evolutionarily conserved heterochronic pathway, whereas cell division asymmetry is conferred by a pathway consisting of Wnt (Wingless) pathway components, including posterior pharynx defect (POP-1)/TCF, APC related/adenomatosis polyposis coli (APR-1)/APC, and LIT-1/NLK (loss of intestine/Nemo-like kinase). Here we explore the genetic regulatory mechanisms underlying stage-specific transitions between self-renewing and proliferative behavior in the seam cell lineages. We show that mutations of genes in the heterochronic developmental timing pathway, including lin-14 (lineage defect), lin-28, lin-46, and the lin-4 and let-7 (lethal defects)-family microRNAs, affect the activity of LIT-1/POP-1 cellular asymmetry machinery and APR-1 polarity during larval development. Surprisingly, heterochronic mutations that enhance LIT-1 activity in seam cells can simultaneously also enhance the opposing, POP-1 activity, suggesting a role in modulating the potency of the cellular polarizing activity of the LIT-1/POP-1 system as development proceeds. These findings illuminate how the evolutionarily conserved cellular asymmetry machinery can be coupled to microRNA-regulated developmental pathways for robust regulation of stem cell maintenance and proliferation during the course of development. Such genetic interactions between developmental timing regulators and cell polarity regulators could underlie transitions between asymmetric and symmetric stem cell fates in other systems and could be deregulated in the context of developmental disorders and cancer. PMID:25561544

  5. Acyclonucleosides, modified seco-nucleosides, and salicyl- or catechol-derived acyclic 5-fluorouracil O,N-acetals: antiproliferative activities, cellular differentiation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Juan A; Núñez, María C; Aránega, Antonia; Gallo, Miguel A; Espinosa, Antonio; Campos, Joaquín M

    2009-01-01

    The goal of cancer chemotherapy with classical drugs - the destruction of the tumor cells - is often complicated by significant toxicity. As an alternative, induced differentiation modulates the cell programme by transforming malignant cells into mature cells with no proliferative potential. Our data demonstrate that (+/-)-1-{[3-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-1-isopropoxy]propyl}-5-fluorouracil inhibits proliferation, induces myogenic differentiation, increases the expression of proteins specifically present in normally differentiated skeletal muscle cells, and modifies the adhesion capacity of these cells against the rhabdomyosarcoma cell line RD. From a designing point of view, a benzene ring was fused to the side chain in order to increase the lipophilicity and anticancer activity of our molecules. Herein we report the preparation and biological activity of three compounds having the general formula (+/-)-1-[2-(5-substituted-2-hydroxybenzyloxy)-1-methoxyethyl]-5-fluorouracils. A catechol-derived compound such as (+/-)-1-[3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-1-methoxypropyl]-5-fluorouracil and two salicyl-derived compounds such as (+/-)-(Z)-1-[4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1-methoxy-but-3-enyl]-5-fluorouracil [(Z)-43] and its dihydrogenated derivative (+/-)-1-[4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1-methoxybutyl]-5-fluorouracil were prepared to complete the set of six O,N-acetals. The most active compound against the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was (+/-)-(Z)-43 with an IC(50) = 9.40 +/- 0.64 microM. Differentiated breast cancer cells generate fat deposits within the cytoplasm. The MCF-7 cells trea-ed with (+/-)-(Z)-43 caused an increase in the lipid content over control cells after 3 days of treatment. Our results suggest that there may be significant potential advantages in the use of this new differentiating agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  6. Plant viral nanoparticles-based HER2 vaccine: Immune response influenced by differential transport, localization and cellular interactions of particulate carriers.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sourabh; Myers, Jay T; Woods, Sarah E; Gong, Xingjian; Czapar, Anna E; Commandeur, Ulrich; Huang, Alex Y; Levine, Alan D; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2017-03-01

    Cancer vaccines are designed to elicit an endogenous adaptive immune response that can successfully recognize and eliminate residual or recurring tumors. Such approaches can potentially overcome shortcomings of passive immunotherapies by generating long-lived therapeutic effects and immune memory while limiting systemic toxicities. A critical determinant of vaccine efficacy is efficient transport and delivery of tumor-associated antigens to professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Plant viral nanoparticles (VNPs) with natural tropism for APCs and a high payload carrying capacity may be particularly effective vaccine carriers. The applicability of VNP platform technologies is governed by stringent structure-function relationships. We compare two distinct VNP platforms: icosahedral cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) and filamentous potato virus X (PVX). Specifically, we evaluate in vivo capabilities of engineered VNPs delivering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) epitopes for therapy and prophylaxis of HER2(+) malignancies. Our results corroborate the structure-function relationship where icosahedral CPMV particles showed significantly enhanced lymph node transport and retention, and greater uptake by/activation of APCs compared to filamentous PVX particles. These enhanced immune cell interactions and transport properties resulted in elevated HER2-specific antibody titers raised by CPMV- vs. PVX-based peptide vaccine. The 'synthetic virology' field is rapidly expanding with numerous platforms undergoing development and preclinical testing; our studies highlight the need for systematic studies to define rules guiding the design and rational choice of platform, in the context of peptide-vaccine display technologies.

  7. NK cell-derived interferon-γ orchestrates the cellular dynamics and differentiation of monocytes into inflammatory dendritic cells at the site of infection

    PubMed Central

    Goldszmid, Romina S.; Caspar, Pat; Rivollier, Aymeric; White, Sandy; Dzutsev, Amiran; Hieny, Sara; Kelsall, Brian; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Sher, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs), monocyte and/or macrophages initiate host-protective immune responses to intracellular pathogens in part through interleukin-12 (IL-12) production, although the relative contribution of tissue resident versus recruited cells has been unclear. Here we showed that after intraperitoneal infection with Toxoplasma gondii cysts, resident mononuclear phagocytes are replaced by circulating monocytes that differentiate in situ into inflammatory DCs (moDCs) and F4/80+ macrophages. Importantly, NK cell-derived interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was required for both the loss of resident mononuclear phagocytes and the local differentiation of monocytes into macrophages and moDCs. This newly generated moDC population and not the resident DCs (or macrophages) served as the major source of IL-12 at the site of infection. Thus, NK cell-derived IFN-γ is important in both regulating inflammatory cell dynamics and in driving the local differentiation of monocytes into the cells required for initiating the immune response to an important intracellular pathogen. PMID:22749354

  8. Application of low-frequency alternating current electric fields via interdigitated electrodes: effects on cellular viability, cytoplasmic calcium, and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    McCullen, Seth D; McQuilling, John P; Grossfeld, Robert M; Lubischer, Jane L; Clarke, Laura I; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2010-12-01

    Electric stimulation is known to initiate signaling pathways and provides a technique to enhance osteogenic differentiation of stem and/or progenitor cells. There are a variety of in vitro stimulation devices to apply electric fields to such cells. Herein, we describe and highlight the use of interdigitated electrodes to characterize signaling pathways and the effect of electric fields on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). The advantage of the interdigitated electrode configuration is that cells can be easily imaged during short-term (acute) stimulation, and this identical configuration can be utilized for long-term (chronic) studies. Acute exposure of hASCs to alternating current (AC) sinusoidal electric fields of 1 Hz induced a dose-dependent increase in cytoplasmic calcium in response to electric field magnitude, as observed by fluorescence microscopy. hASCs that were chronically exposed to AC electric field treatment of 1 V/cm (4 h/day for 14 days, cultured in the osteogenic differentiation medium containing dexamethasone, ascorbic acid, and β-glycerol phosphate) displayed a significant increase in mineral deposition relative to unstimulated controls. This is the first study to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal AC electric fields on hASCs and to demonstrate that acute and chronic electric field exposure can significantly increase intracellular calcium signaling and the deposition of accreted calcium under osteogenic stimulation, respectively.

  9. Cellular Adjuvant Properties, Direct Cytotoxicity of Re-differentiated Vα24 Invariant NKT-like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, Shuichi; Zhang, Rong; Liu, Tian-Yi; Ueda, Norihiro; Iriguchi, Shoichi; Yasui, Yutaka; Kawai, Yohei; Tatsumi, Minako; Hirai, Norihito; Mizoro, Yasutaka; Iwama, Tatsuaki; Watanabe, Akira; Nakanishi, Mahito; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Uemura, Yasushi; Kaneko, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vα24 invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes implicated in the regulation of broad immune responses. They recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d on antigen-presenting cells and induce both innate and adaptive immune responses, which enhance effective immunity against cancer. Conversely, reduced iNKT cell numbers and function have been observed in many patients with cancer. To recover these numbers, we reprogrammed human iNKT cells to pluripotency and then re-differentiated them into regenerated iNKT cells in vitro through an IL-7/IL-15-based optimized cytokine combination. The re-differentiated iNKT cells showed proliferation and IFN-γ production in response to α-galactosylceramide, induced dendritic cell maturation and downstream activation of both cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells, and exhibited NKG2D- and DNAM-1-mediated NK cell-like cytotoxicity against cancer cell lines. The immunological features of re-differentiated iNKT cells and their unlimited availability from induced pluripotent stem cells offer a potentially effective immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:26862702

  10. Differential regulation of cellular tropism and sensitivity to soluble CD4 neutralization by the envelope gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Stamatatos, L; Werner, A; Cheng-Mayer, C

    1994-01-01

    Using recombinant and mutant viruses generated between two human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates that display differences in cell tropism and sensitivity to soluble CD4 neutralization, we show that these two properties of the virus are regulated by different mechanisms. Whereas there is an association between V3 loop conformation and a particular cellular tropism, soluble CD4 neutralization sensitivity appears to be determined by amino acid differences in the C2 domain of the envelope gp120 that modulate the stability of gp120-gp41 association. Our findings further illustrate the importance of functional interactions among different regions of the envelope gp120 in regulating the biological phenotypes of human immunodeficiency virus and suggest that additional probing of the V3 loop with monoclonal antibodies may identify specific structural features of this loop that determine cell tropism. Images PMID:8035496

  11. Postoperative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Daniela M; Griebling, Tomas L; Silverstein, Jeffrey H

    2009-09-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (PUR) is a common complication of surgery and anesthesia. The risk of retention is especially high after anorectal surgery, hernia repair, and orthopedic surgery and increases with advancing age. Certain anesthetic and analgesic modalities, particularly spinal anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics and epidural analgesia, promote the development of urinary retention. Portable ultrasound provides rapid and accurate assessment of bladder volume and aids in the diagnosis and management of PUR. Catheterization is recommended when bladder volume exceeds 600 mL to prevent the negative sequelae of prolonged bladder overdistention.

  12. Compensatory cellular reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on osteogenic differentiation in canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Namgil; Kim, Sangho; Hosoya, Kenji; Okumura, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    The suppressive effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the bone healing process have remained controversial, since no clinical data have clearly shown the relationship between NSAIDs and bone healing. The aim of this study was to assess the compensatory response of canine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) to several classes of NSAIDs, including carprofen, meloxicam, indomethacin and robenacoxib, on osteogenic differentiation. Each of the NSAIDs (10 µM) was administered during 20 days of the osteogenic process with human recombinant IL-1β (1 ng/ml) as an inflammatory stimulator. Gene expression of osteoblast differentiation markers (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin), receptors of PGE2 (EP2 and EP4) and enzymes for prostaglandin (PG) E2 synthesis (COX-1, COX-2, cPGES and mPGES-1) was measured by using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Protein production levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin and PGE2 were quantified using an alkaline phosphatase activity assay, osteocalcin immunoassay and PGE2 immunoassay, respectively. Histologic analysis was performed using alkaline phosphatase staining, von Kossa staining and alizarin red staining. Alkaline phosphatase and calcium deposition were suppressed by all NSAIDs. However, osteocalcin production showed no significant suppression by NSAIDs. Gene expression levels of PGE2-related receptors and enzymes were upregulated during continuous treatment with NSAIDs, while certain channels for PGE2 synthesis were utilized differently depending on the kind of NSAIDs. These data suggest that canine BMSCs have a compensatory mechanism to restore PGE2 synthesis, which would be an intrinsic regulator to maintain differentiation of osteoblasts under NSAID treatment.

  13. Cellular heterogeneity during embryonic stem cell differentiation to epiblast stem cells is revealed by the ShcD/RaLP adaptor protein.

    PubMed

    Turco, Margherita Y; Furia, Laura; Dietze, Anja; Fernandez Diaz, Luis; Ronzoni, Simona; Sciullo, Anna; Simeone, Antonio; Constam, Daniel; Faretta, Mario; Lanfrancone, Luisa

    2012-11-01

    The Shc family of adaptor proteins are crucial mediators of a plethora of receptors such as the tyrosine kinase receptors, cytokine receptors, and integrins that drive signaling pathways governing proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Here, we report the role of the newly identified family member, ShcD/RaLP, whose expression in vitro and in vivo suggests a function in embryonic stem cell (ESC) to epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) transition. The transition from the naïve (ESC) to the primed (EpiSC) pluripotent state is the initial important step for ESCs to commit to differentiation and the mechanisms underlying this process are still largely unknown. Using a novel approach to simultaneously assess pluripotency, apoptosis, and proliferation by multiparameter flow cytometry, we show that ESC to EpiSC transition is a process involving a tight coordination between the modulation of the Oct4 expression, cell cycle progression, and cell death. We also describe, by high-content immunofluorescence analysis and time-lapse microscopy, the emergence of cells expressing caudal-related homeobox 2 (Cdx2) transcription factor during ESC to EpiSC transition. The use of the ShcD knockout ESCs allowed the unmasking of this process as they presented deregulated Oct4 modulation and an enrichment in Oct4-negative Cdx2-positive cells with increased MAPK/extracellular-regulated kinases 1/2 activation, within the differentiating population. Collectively, our data reveal ShcD as an important modulator in the switch of key pathway(s) involved in determining EpiSC identity. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  14. (18)F and (18)FDG PET imaging of osteosarcoma to non-invasively monitor in situ changes in cellular proliferation and bone differentiation upon MYC inactivation.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Constadina; Bendapudi, Pavan K; Tseng, Jeffrey R; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Felsher, Dean W

    2008-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Accurate imaging of osteosarcoma is important for proper clinical staging of the disease and monitoring of the tumor's response to therapy. The MYC oncogene has been commonly implicated in the pathogenesis of human osteosarcoma. Previously, we have described a conditional transgenic mouse model of MYC-induced osteosarcoma. These tumors are highly invasive and are frequently associated with pulmonary metastases. In our model, upon MYC inactivation osteosarcomas lose their neoplastic properties, undergo proliferative arrest and differentiate into mature bone. We reasoned that we could use our model system to develop noninvasive imaging modalities to interrogate the consequences of MYC inactivation on tumor cell biology in situ. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) combining the use of both (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)FDG) and (18)F-flouride ((18)F) to detect metabolic activity and bone mineralization/remodeling. We found that upon MYC inactivation, tumors exhibited a slight reduction in uptake of (18)FDG and a significant increase in the uptake of (18)F along with associated histological changes. Thus, these cells have apparently lost their neoplastic properties based upon both examination of their histology and biologic activity. However, these tumors continue to accumulate (18)FDG at levels significantly elevated compared to normal bone. Therefore, PET can be used to distinguish normal bone cells from tumors that have undergone differentiation upon oncogene inactivation. In addition, we found that (18)F is a highly sensitive tracer for detection of pulmonary metastasis. Collectively, we conclude that combined modality PET/CT imaging incorporating both (18)FDG and (18)F is a highly sensitive means to non-invasively measure osteosarcoma growth and the therapeutic response, as well as to detect tumor cells that have undergone differentiation upon oncogene inactivation.

  15. 18F and 18FDG PET imaging of osteosarcoma to non-invasively monitor in situ changes in cellular proliferation and bone differentiation upon MYC inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Constadina; Bendapudi, Pavan K.; Tseng, Jeffrey R.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Felsher, Dean W.

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is one of the most common pediatric cancers. Accurate imaging of osteosarcoma is important for proper clinical staging of the disease and monitoring of the tumor’s response to therapy. The MYC oncogene has been commonly implicated in the pathogenesis of human osteosarcoma. Previously, we have described a conditional transgenic mouse model of MYC-induced osteosarcoma. These tumors are highly invasive and are frequently associated with pulmonary metastases. In our model, upon MYC inactivation osteosarcomas lose their neoplastic properties, undergo proliferative arrest, and differentiate into mature bone. We reasoned that we could use our model system to develop noninvasive imaging modalities to interrogate the consequences of MYC inactivation on tumor cell biology in situ. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) combining the use of both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) and 18F-flouride (18F) to detect metabolic activity and bone mineralization/remodeling. We found that upon MYC inactivation, tumors exhibited a slight reduction in uptake of 18FDG and a significant increase in the uptake of 18F along with associated histological changes. Thus, these cells have apparently lost their neoplastic properties based upon both examination of their histology and biologic activity. However, these tumors continue to accumulate 18FDG at levels significantly elevated compared to normal bone. Therefore, PET can be used to distinguish normal bone cells from tumors that have undergone differentiation upon oncogene inactivation. In addition, we found that 18F is a highly sensitive tracer for detection of pulmonary metastasis. Collectively, we conclude that combined modality PET/CT imaging incorporating both 18FDG and 18F is a highly sensitive means to non-invasively measure osteosarcoma growth and the therapeutic response, as well as to detect tumor cells that have undergone differentiation upon oncogene inactivation. PMID:18981708

  16. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user.

  17. Retention in Tough Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Beverly; Jordan-Evans, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with 25 global talent leaders discuss keeping good people and the challenges and emerging practices for retaining employees. Sidebars discuss retention tips and what keeps people on the job. (JOW)

  18. Mentorship: increasing retention probabilities.

    PubMed

    Leners, Debra Woodard; Wilson, Vicki W; Connor, Peggy; Fenton, Joanne

    2006-11-01

    Retaining nurses is a significant workforce issue. Experienced nurses in particular are getting harder to retain within hospitals and the discipline at large. One solution to boost retention is to give serious attention to professional socialization activities through contemporary nurse mentorship experiences. The authors contend that contemporary mentoring programmes, targeting developmental quality of life issues of the expert nurse, would appreciably benefit retention programmes within the hospital environment.

  19. Antiproliferative activity, cell-cycle dysregulation, and cellular differentiation: salicyl- and catechol-derived acyclic 5-fluorouracil O,N-acetals against breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Juan A; Rodríguez-Serrano, Fernando; Caba, Octavio; Aránega, Antonia; Gallo, Miguel A; Espinosa, Antonio; Campos, Joaquín M

    2007-12-01

    Herein we report the preparation and biological activity of three compounds with the general formula 1-[2-(5-substituted-2-hydroxybenzyloxy)-1-methoxyethyl]-5-fluorouracil. A catechol-derived compound such as 1-[3-(2-hydroxyphenoxy)-1-methoxypropyl]-5-fluorouracil and two salicyl-derived compounds such as (Z)-1-[4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1-methoxybut-3-enyl]-5-fluorouracil [(Z)-11] and its dihydrogenated derivative 1-[4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1-methoxybutyl]-5-fluorouracil were prepared to complete the set of six O,N-acetals. The most active compound against the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was (Z)-11: IC(50)=9.40+/-0.64 microM. Differentiated breast cancer cells generate fat deposits in the cytoplasm. MCF-7 cells treated with (Z)-11 underwent an increase in lipid content relative to control cells after three days of treatment. Our results suggest that there may be significant potential advantages in the use of this new differentiating agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Ankrd2/ARPP is a novel Akt2 specific substrate and regulates myogenic differentiation upon cellular exposure to H(2)O(2).

    PubMed

    Cenni, Vittoria; Bavelloni, Alberto; Beretti, Francesca; Tagliavini, Francesca; Manzoli, Lucia; Lattanzi, Giovanna; Maraldi, Nadir M; Cocco, Lucio; Marmiroli, Sandra

    2011-08-15

    Activation of Akt-mediated signaling pathways is crucial for survival, differentiation, and regeneration of muscle cells. A proteomic-based search for novel substrates of Akt was therefore undertaken in C(2)C(12) murine muscle cells exploiting protein characterization databases in combination with an anti-phospho-Akt substrate antibody. A Scansite database search predicted Ankrd2 (Ankyrin repeat domain protein 2, also known as ARPP) as a novel substrate of Akt. In vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that Akt phosphorylates Ankrd2 at Ser-99. Moreover, by kinase assay with recombinant Akt1 and Akt2, as well as by single-isoform silencing, we demonstrated that Ankrd2 is a specific substrate of Akt2. Ankrd2 is typically found in skeletal muscle cells, where it mediates the transcriptional response to stress conditions. In an attempt to investigate the physiological implications of Ankrd2 phosphorylation by Akt2, we found that oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2) triggers this phosphorylation. Moreover, the forced expression of a phosphorylation-defective mutant form of Ankrd2 in C(2)C(12) myoblasts promoted a faster differentiation program, implicating Akt-dependent phosphorylation at Ser-99 in the negative regulation of myogenesis in response to stress conditions.

  1. Cerebral ischemia or intrauterine inflammation promotes differentiation of oligodendroglial precursors in preterm ovine fetuses: possible cellular basis for white matter injury.

    PubMed

    Kitanishi, Ryuta; Matsuda, Tadashi; Watanabe, Shinpei; Saito, Masatoshi; Hanita, Takushi; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    White matter injury in premature infants is known to be major cause of long-term neurocognitive disability, but the pathogenic mechanism remains unclear, hampering our ability to develop preventions. Periventricular leukomalacia is a severe form of white matter injury. In the present study, we explored the effects of cerebral ischemia and/or intrauterine inflammation on the development of oligodendroglia in the cerebral white matter using chronically instrumented fetal sheep. Each fetus received one of three insults: hemorrhage, inflammation and their combination. In the hemorrhage group, 40% of the fetoplacental blood volume was acutely withdrawn, and 24 hours after removal, the blood was returned to the fetus. The inflammation group received intravenous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and intra-amniotic endotoxin and thus suffered from necrotizing funisitis and chorioamnionitis. The inflammatory hemorrhage group underwent acute hemorrhage under the inflammatory state. The sham group received no insults. Importantly, periventricular leukomalacia was not detected in the sham and the inflammation groups. Differentiating oligodendroglia at various developmental stages were identified by immunohistochemical analysis with specific antibodies. No difference in the density of oligodendroglial progenitors was detected among the four groups, whereas oligodendroglial precursors were significantly reduced in the three insult groups, compared to sham control. Moreover, the density of immature oligodendroglia was higher in the inflammation group and the inflammatory hemorrhage group, while the density of mature oligodendroglia was highest in the hemorrhage group. We propose that cerebral ischemia or intrauterine inflammation induces the differentiation of oligodendroglial precursors in preterm fetuses, eventually resulting in their exhaustion.

  2. Gene Expression Profiles of HIV/AIDS Patients with Qi-Yin Deficiency and Dampness-Heat Retention

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sa; Chen, Yulong; Xu, Qianlei; Chen, Jianshe; Wang, Changhai; Wang, Zhao; Ma, Suna; Wu, Xingwei; Zhang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) applied in the clinic as a complementary and alternative therapy has helped improve immunity and reduce side effects and symptomatic treatment in patients with HIV/AIDS. However, the mechanisms of TCM syndromes are not clear. Transcriptomics enables the study of such TCM syndromes. Design: This study compared the messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of healthy persons and patients with HIV/AIDS who had two common TCM syndromes, qi-yin deficiency and dampness-heat retention, to find the difference in HIV/AIDS with TCM syndromes. Results: Comparison with healthy persons identified 113 mRNAs—41 enhanced and 72 decreased—in the qi-yin deficiency group. Additionally, 76 mRNAs were found in the dampness-heat retention group: 14 increased and 62 decreased. Functional genetic analysis of the mRNAs indicated that two TCM syndromes were correlated with cell apoptosis, immunoinflammatory responses, and lymphocyte activation. Differentially expressed mRNAs in the qi-yin deficiency group were obviously associated with cellular activity, communication, protein localization, cellular ion homeostasis, and regulation of cell motion, whereas mRNAs in the dampness-heat retention group were associated with sequence-specific DNA binding, cellular response to stress, and hemopoietic or lymphoid organ development. Conclusions: These results suggest that the formation of different TCM syndromes in patients with HIV/AIDS were founded on biological transcriptomics, which reveal mechanisms of the formation of these syndromes in HIV/AIDS. Differentially expressed mRNAs in two TCM syndrome groups tended to normalize after TCM intervention, which indicates that TCM might remit symptoms by changing genetic expression. PMID:27759429

  3. Mussel-inspired bioceramics with self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer: preparation, formation mechanism, improved cellular bioactivity and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chengtie; Han, Pingping; Liu, Xiaoguo; Xu, Mengchi; Tian, Tian; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2014-01-01

    The nanostructured surface of biomaterials plays an important role in improving their in vitro cellular bioactivity as well as stimulating in vivo tissue regeneration. Inspired by the mussel's adhesive versatility, which is thought to be due to the plaque-substrate interface being rich in 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalamine (DOPA) and lysine amino acids, in this study we developed a self-assembly method to prepare a uniform calcium phosphate (Ca-P)/polydopamine composite nanolayer on the surface of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) bioceramics by soaking β-TCP bioceramics in Tris-dopamine solution. It was found that the addition of dopamine, reaction temperature and reaction time are three key factors inducing the formation of a uniform Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer. The formation mechanism of a Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer involved two important steps: (i) the addition of dopamine to Tris-HCl solution decreases the pH value and accelerates Ca and P ionic dissolution from the crystal boundaries of β-TCP ceramics; (ii) dopamine is polymerized to form self-assembled polydopamine film and, at the same time, nanosized Ca-P particles are mineralized with the assistance of polydopamine, in which the formation of polydopamine occurs simultaneously with Ca-P mineralization (formation of nanosized microparticles composed of calcium phosphate-based materials), and finally a self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer forms on the surface of the β-TCP ceramics. Furthermore, the formed self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayer significantly enhances the surface roughness and hydrophilicity of β-TCP ceramics, and stimulates the attachment, proliferation, alkaline phosphate (ALP) activity and bone-related gene expression (ALP, OCN, COL1 and Runx2) of human bone marrow stromal cells. Our results suggest that the preparation of self-assembled Ca-P/polydopamine composite nanolayers is a viable method to modify the surface of biomaterials by

  4. Differential Requirements of Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses for Fv2-Associated Resistance to Erythroleukemia and for Regulation of Retrovirus-Induced Myeloid Leukemia Development

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Hiroyuki; Matsukuma, Hideaki; Kinoshita, Saori; Chikaishi, Tomomi; Sakamoto, Mayumi; Kawasaki, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    To assess the possible contribution of host immune responses to the exertion of Fv2-associated resistance to Friend virus (FV)-induced disease development, we inoculated C57BL/6 (B6) mice that lacked various subsets of lymphocytes with FV containing no lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus. Fv2r B6 mice lacking CD4+ T cells developed early polycythemia and fatal erythroleukemia, while B6 mice lacking CD8+ T cells remained resistant. Erythroid progenitor cells infected with spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) were eliminated, and no polycythemia was observed in B cell-deficient B6 mice, but they later developed myeloid leukemia associated with oligoclonal integration of ecotropic Friend murine leukemia virus. Additional depletion of natural killer and/or CD8+ T cells from B cell-deficient B6 mice resulted in the expansion of SFFV proviruses and the development of polycythemia, indicating that SFFV-infected erythroid cells are not only restricted in their growth but are actively eliminated in Fv2r mice through cellular immune responses. PMID:24109240

  5. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the Extra-Cellular Space Affects Proliferation, Differentiation and Morphogenetic Events Regulated by the Two Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Daniela; Borello, Ugo; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cannata, Stefano; Clementi, Emilio; Brunelli, Silvia; Cossu, Giulio

    2008-01-01

    Background sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh) to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane receptors belonging to the Frizzled family, several other molecules have been described which share homology in the CRD domain and lack the putative trans-membrane domain, such as sFRP molecules (soluble Frizzled Related Protein). Among them, sFRP-3 was originally isolated from bovine articular cartilage and also as a component of the Spemann organizer. sFRP-3 blocks Wnt-8 induced axis duplication in Xenopus embryos and binds to the surface of cells expressing a membrane-anchored form of Wnt-1. Injection of sFRP-3 mRNA blocks expression of XMyoD mRNA and leads to embryos with enlarged heads and shortened trunks. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that sFRP-3 specifically blocks EGF-induced fibroblast proliferation and foci formation. Over-expression of sFRP-3 reverts EGF-mediated inhibition of hair follicle development in the mouse ectoderm while its ablation in Xenopus maintains EGF-mediated inhibition of ectoderm differentiation. Conversely, over-expression of EGF reverts the inhibition of somitic myogenesis and axis truncation in Xenopus and mouse embryos caused by sFRP-3. In vitro experiments demonstrated a direct binding of EGF to sFRP-3 both on heparin and on the surface of CHO cells where the molecule had been membrane anchored. Conclusions/Significance sFRP-3 and EGF reciprocally inhibit their effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis and indeed are expressed in contiguous domains of the embryo, suggesting that in addition to their

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Differential Expression of Cellular Proteins in Response to Avian H9N2 Virus Infection of A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guanliu; Liang, Wei; Liu, Jiyuan; Meng, Dan; Wei, Liangmeng; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, differentially expressed proteins in A549 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line) infected with H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV) were investigated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Sixteen different spots between the groups (ratio > 2, p < 0.05) were identified with mass spectrometry identification. Proteins located in the downstream of the NF-κB and IFN transcription factor pathways were identified, e.g., ISG15. Actin and keratin were also identified, suggesting that the cytoskeleton may plays an important role in the AIV infection of mammalian cells. These findings could provide insights into the interaction between host and influenza viruses and might provide valuable information for clarifying the pathogenesis of viral infections as well. PMID:28018302

  7. Campus Retention Committee Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, David P.; Alford, Veronica; Alpha-Kpetewama, Tamba; Clagett, Craig A.; Engleberg, Isa N.

    In January 1996, Prince George's Community College (PGCC) established the Campus Retention Committee to review community college retention strategies, determine PGCC's strengths and weaknesses in the area of retention, and develop a list of retention goals and an implementation schedule for the college. After reviewing findings from previous…

  8. Differential Cytotoxicity, Cellular Uptake, Apoptosis and Inhibition of BRCA1 Expression of BRCA1-Defective and Sporadic Breast Cancer Cells Induced by an Anticancer Ruthenium(II)-Arene Compound, RAPTA-EA1.

    PubMed

    Ratanaphan, Adisorn; Nhukeaw, Tidarat; Hongthong, Khwanjira; Dyson, Paul J

    2017-01-01

    The RAPTA-EA1 complex [ruthenium(II)-arene 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (pta) complex with an arene-tethered ethacrynic acid ligand] has been reported to overcome drug resistance that developed due to the current use of platinum-based treatments. However, the exact mechanism of action of RAPTA-EA1 remains largely unexplored and unknown. Here we have further studied the effect of RAPTA-EA1 on BRCA1-defective HCC1937 breast cancer cells and compared its effects on BRCA1-competent MCF-7 breast cancer cells. HCC1937 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with the RAPTA-EA1 complex. The cytotoxicity of ruthenium-induced cells was evaluated by a MTT assay. Cellular uptake of ruthenium was determined by ICP-MS. Cell cycle and apoptosis were assessed using a flow cytometer. Expression of BRCA1 mRNA and its encoded protein was quantitated by a real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Differences in cytotoxicity were correlated with the differential accumulations of ruthenium and the induction of apoptosis. The ruthenium complex caused dramatically more damage to the BRCA1 gene in the BRCA1-defective HCC1937 cells than to the BRCA1-competent MCF-7 cells. It decreased the expression of BRCA1 mRNA in the BRCA1-competent cells, while in contrast, its expression increased in the BRCA1-defective cells. However, the expression of the BRCA1 protein was significantly reduced in both types of breast cancer cells. The results presented here have demonstrated a differential cellular response for the BRCA1-defective and BRCA1-competent breast cancer cells to RAPTA-EA1. These findings have provided more insight into the actions and development of the ruthenium-based compounds for use for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. NEDD9 stabilizes focal adhesions, increases binding to the extra-cellular matrix and differentially effects 2D versus 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jessie; Baquiran, Jaime B; Bonakdar, Navid; Lees, Justin; Ching, Yu Wooi; Pugacheva, Elena; Fabry, Ben; O'Neill, Geraldine M

    2012-01-01

    The speed of cell migration on 2-dimensional (2D) surfaces is determined by the rate of assembly and disassembly of clustered integrin receptors known as focal adhesions. Different modes of cell migration that have been described in 3D environments are distinguished by their dependence on integrin-mediated interactions with the extra-cellular matrix. In particular, the mesenchymal invasion mode is the most dependent on focal adhesion dynamics. The focal adhesion protein NEDD9 is a key signalling intermediary in mesenchymal cell migration, however whether NEDD9 plays a role in regulating focal adhesion dynamics has not previously been reported. As NEDD9 effects on 2D migration speed appear to depend on the cell type examined, in the present study we have used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from mice in which the NEDD9 gene has been depleted (NEDD9 -/- MEFs). This allows comparison with effects of other focal adhesion proteins that have previously been demonstrated using MEFs. We show that focal adhesion disassembly rates are increased in the absence of NEDD9 expression and this is correlated with increased paxillin phosphorylation at focal adhesions. NEDD9-/- MEFs have increased rates of migration on 2D surfaces, but conversely, migration of these cells is significantly reduced in 3D collagen gels. Importantly we show that myosin light chain kinase is activated in 3D in the absence of NEDD9 and is conversely inhibited in 2D cultures. Measurement of adhesion strength reveals that NEDD9-/- MEFs have decreased adhesion to fibronectin, despite upregulated α5β1 fibronectin receptor expression. We find that β1 integrin activation is significantly suppressed in the NEDD9-/-, suggesting that in the absence of NEDD9 there is decreased integrin receptor activation. Collectively our data suggest that NEDD9 may promote 3D cell migration by slowing focal adhesion disassembly, promoting integrin receptor activation and increasing adhesion force to the ECM.

  10. Cellular retinol-binding protein-1 is transiently expressed in granulation tissue fibroblasts and differentially expressed in fibroblasts cultured from different organs.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, G.; Redard, M.; Gabbiani, G.; Neuville, P.

    1997-01-01

    We have reported that cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) is transiently expressed by arterial smooth muscle cells during experimental intimal repair (P. Neuville, A. Geinoz, G. Benzonana, M. Redard, F. Gabbiani, P. Ropraz, G. Gabbiani: Am J Pathol 1997, 150:509-521). We have examined here the expression of CRBP-1 during wound healing after a full-thickness rat skin wound. CRBP-1 was transiently expressed by a significant proportion of fibroblastic cells including myofibroblasts. Expression started 4 days after wounding, reached a maximum at 12 days, and persisted up to 30 days when a scar was formed. After wound closure, most CRBP-1-containing fibroblastic cells underwent apoptosis. We have further investigated CRBP-1 expression in rat fibroblasts cultured from different organs. CRBP-1 was abundant in lung and heart fibroblasts and was detected in decreasing amounts in muscle, tendon, subcutaneous tissue, and granulation tissue fibroblasts. Dermis fibroblasts contained no detectable levels of CRBP-1. All-trans retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibited cell proliferation and increased CRBP-1 expression in fibroblastic populations except dermis fibroblasts. We demonstrate that during granulation tissue formation a subpopulation of fibroblastic cells express CRBP-1 de novo. We also demonstrate that CRBP-1 expression by fibroblasts is regulated in vitro by retinoic acid and transforming growth factor-beta1. Our results suggest that CRBP-1 and possibly retinoic acid play a role in the evolution of granulation tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 7 PMID:9403724

  11. Differential effects of viral silencing suppressors on siRNA and miRNA loading support the existence of two distinct cellular pools of ARGONAUTE1

    PubMed Central

    Schott, Gregory; Mari-Ordonez, Arturo; Himber, Christophe; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Voinnet, Olivier; Dunoyer, Patrice

    2012-01-01

    Plant viruses encode RNA silencing suppressors (VSRs) to counteract the antiviral RNA silencing response. Based on in-vitro studies, several VSRs were proposed to suppress silencing through direct binding of short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Because their expression also frequently hinders endogenous miRNA-mediated regulation and stabilizes labile miRNA* strands, VSRs have been assumed to prevent both siRNA and miRNA loading into their common effector protein, AGO1, through sequestration of small RNA (sRNA) duplexes in vivo. These assumptions, however, have not been formally tested experimentally. Here, we present a systematic in planta analysis comparing the effects of four distinct VSRs in Arabidopsis. While all of the VSRs tested compromised loading of siRNAs into AGO1, only P19 was found to concurrently prevent miRNA loading, consistent with a VSR strategy primarily based on sRNA sequestration. By contrast, we provide multiple lines of evidence that the action of the other VSRs tested is unlikely to entail siRNA sequestration, indicating that in-vitro binding assays and in-vivo miRNA* stabilization are not reliable indicator of VSR action. The contrasted effects of VSRs on siRNA versus miRNA loading into AGO1 also imply the existence of two distinct pools of cellular AGO1 that are specifically loaded by each class of sRNAs. These findings have important implications for our current understanding of RNA silencing and of its suppression in plants. PMID:22531783

  12. RNA interference-mediated targeting of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early or early gene products inhibits viral replication with differential effects on cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Xiaofei, E; Stadler, Bradford M; Debatis, Michelle; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kowalik, Timothy F

    2012-05-01

    Viral drug toxicity, resistance, and an increasing immunosuppressed population warrant continued research into new avenues for limiting diseases associated with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In this study, a small interfering RNA (siRNA), siX3, was designed to target coding sequences within shared exon 3 of UL123 and UL122 transcripts encoding IE1 and IE2 immediate-early proteins of HCMV. Pretreatment of cells with siX3 reduced the levels of viral protein expression, DNA replication, and progeny virus production compared to control siRNA. Two siRNAs against UL54 and overlapping transcripts (UL55-57) were compared to siX3 in HCMV infection and were also found to be effective at inhibiting HCMV replication. Further investigation into the effects of the siRNAs on viral replication showed that pretreatment with each of the siRNAs resulted in an inhibition in the formation of mature replication compartments. The ability of these siRNAs to prevent or reduce certain cytopathic effects associated with HCMV infection was also examined. Infected cells pretreated with siX3, but not siUL54, retained promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in cellular PML bodies, an essential component of this host intrinsic antiviral defense. DNA damage response proteins, which are localized in nuclear viral replication compartments, were reduced in the siX3- and siUL54-treated cells. siX3, but not siUL54, prevented DNA damage response signaling early after infection. Therapeutic efficacy was demonstrated by treating cells with siRNAs after HCMV replication had commenced. Together, these findings suggest that siRNAs targeting exon 3 of the major IE genes or the UL54-57 transcripts be further studied for their potential development into anti-HCMV therapeutics.

  13. The proximal pathway of metabolism of the chlorinated signal molecule differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) in the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Morandini, P; Offer, J; Traynor, D; Nayler, O; Neuhaus, D; Taylor, G W; Kay, R R

    1995-01-01

    Stalk cell differentiation during development of the slime mould Dictyostelium is induced by a chlorinated alkyl phenone called differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1). Inactivation of DIF-1 is likely to be a key element in the DIF-1 signalling system, and we have shown previously that this is accomplished by a dedicated metabolic pathway involving up to 12 unidentified metabolites. We report here the structure of the first four metabolites produced from DIF-1, as deduced by m.s., n.m.r. and chemical synthesis. The structures of these compounds show that the first step in metabolism is a dechlorination of the phenolic ring, producing DIF metabolite 1 (DM1). DM1 is identical with the previously known minor DIF activity, DIF-3. DIF-3 is then metabolized by three successive oxidations of its aliphatic side chain: a hydroxylation at omega-2 to produce DM2, oxidation of the hydroxy group to a ketone group to produce DM3 and a further hydroxylation at omega-1 to produce DM4, a hydroxyketone of DIF-3. We have investigated the enzymology of DIF-1 metabolism. It is already known that the first step, to produce DIF-3, is catalysed by a novel dechlorinase. The enzyme activity responsible for the first side-chain oxidation (DIF-3 hydroxylase) was detected by incubating [3H]DIF-3 with cell-free extracts and resolving the reaction products by t.l.c. DIF-3 hydroxylase has many of the properties of a cytochrome P-450. It is membrane-bound and uses NADPH as co-substrate. It is also inhibited by CO, the classic cytochrome P-450 inhibitor, and by several other cytochrome P-450 inhibitors, as well as by diphenyliodonium chloride, an inhibitor of cytochrome P-450 reductase. DIF-3 hydroxylase is highly specific for DIF-3: other closely related compounds do not compete for the activity at 100-fold molar excess, with the exception of the DIF-3 analogue lacking the chlorine atom. The Km for DIF-3 of 47 nM is consistent with this enzyme being responsible for DIF-3 metabolism in vivo. The

  14. Functional clustering and lineage markers: insights into cellular differentiation and gene function from large-scale microarray studies of purified primary cell populations.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Raza, Sobia; Baillie, J Kenneth; Freeman, Thomas C

    2010-06-01

    Very large microarray datasets showing gene expression across multiple tissues and cell populations provide a window on the transcriptional networks that underpin the differences in functional activity between biological systems. Clusters of co-expressed genes provide lineage markers, candidate regulators of cell function and, by applying the principle of guilt by association, candidate functions for genes of currently unknown function. We have analysed a dataset comprising pure cell populations from hemopoietic and non-hemopoietic cell types (http://biogps.gnf.org). Using a novel network visualisation and clustering approach, we demonstrate that it is possible to identify very tight expression signatures associated specifically with embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal cells and hematopoietic lineages. Selected examples validate the prediction that gene function can be inferred by co-expression. One expression cluster was enriched in phagocytes, which, alongside endosome-lysosome constituents, contains genes that may make up a 'pathway' for phagocyte differentiation. Promoters of these genes are enriched for binding sites for the ETS/PU.1 and MITF families. Another cluster was associated with the production of a specific extracellular matrix, with high levels of gene expression shared by cells of mesenchymal origin (fibroblasts, adipocytes, osteoblasts and myoblasts). We discuss the limitations placed upon such data by the presence of alternative promoters with distinct tissue specificity within many protein-coding genes.

  15. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  16. Abnormal expression of p27kip1 protein in levator ani muscle of aging women with pelvic floor disorders – a relationship to the cellular differentiation and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bukovsky, Antonin; Copas, Pleas; Caudle, Michael R; Cekanova, Maria; Dassanayake, Tamara; Asbury, Bridgett; Van Meter, Stuart E; Elder, Robert F; Brown, Jeffrey B; Cross, Stephanie B

    2001-01-01

    Background Pelvic floor disorders affect almost 50% of aging women. An important role in the pelvic floor support belongs to the levator ani muscle. The p27/kip1 (p27) protein, multifunctional cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, shows changing expression in differentiating skeletal muscle cells during development, and relatively high levels of p27 RNA were detected in the normal human skeletal muscles. Methods Biopsy samples of levator ani muscle were obtained from 22 symptomatic patients with stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and overlaps (age range 38–74), and nine asymptomatic women (age 31–49). Cryostat sections were investigated for p27 protein expression and type I (slow twitch) and type II (fast twitch) fibers. Results All fibers exhibited strong plasma membrane (and nuclear) p27 protein expression. cytoplasmic p27 expression was virtually absent in asymptomatic women. In perimenopausal symptomatic patients (ages 38–55), muscle fibers showed hypertrophy and moderate cytoplasmic p27 staining accompanied by diminution of type II fibers. Older symptomatic patients (ages 57–74) showed cytoplasmic p27 overexpression accompanied by shrinking, cytoplasmic vacuolization and fragmentation of muscle cells. The plasma membrane and cytoplasmic p27 expression was not unique to the muscle cells. Under certain circumstances, it was also detected in other cell types (epithelium of ectocervix and luteal cells). Conclusions This is the first report on the unusual (plasma membrane and cytoplasmic) expression of p27 protein in normal and abnormal human striated muscle cells in vivo. Our data indicate that pelvic floor disorders are in perimenopausal patients associated with an appearance of moderate cytoplasmic p27 expression, accompanying hypertrophy and transition of type II into type I fibers. The patients in advanced postmenopause show shrinking and fragmentation of muscle fibers associated with strong cytoplasmic p27 expression. PMID:11696252

  17. Antisense inhibition of the plastidial glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator in Vicia seeds shifts cellular differentiation and promotes protein storage.

    PubMed

    Rolletschek, Hardy; Nguyen, Thuy H; Häusler, Rainer E; Rutten, Twan; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Radchuk, Ruslana; Tewes, Annegret; Claus, Bernhard; Klukas, Christian; Linemann, Ute; Weber, Hans; Wobus, Ulrich; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla

    2007-08-01

    The glucose-6-phosphate/phosphate translocator (GPT) acts as an importer of carbon into the plastid. Despite the potential importance of GPT for storage in crop seeds, its regulatory role in biosynthetic pathways that are active during seed development is poorly understood. We have isolated GPT1 from Vicia narbonensis and studied its role in seed development using a transgenic approach based on the seed-specific legumin promoter LeB4. GPT1 is highly expressed in vegetative sink tissues, flowers and young seeds. In the embryo, localized upregulation of GPT1 at the onset of storage coincides with the onset of starch accumulation. Embryos of transgenic plants expressing antisense GPT1 showed a significant reduction (up to 55%) in the specific transport rate of glucose-6-phosphate as determined using proteoliposomes prepared from embryos. Furthermore, amyloplasts developed later and were smaller in size, while the expression of genes encoding plastid-specific translocators and proteins involved in starch biosynthesis was decreased. Metabolite analysis and stable isotope labelling demonstrated that starch biosynthesis was also reduced, although storage protein biosynthesis increased. This metabolic shift was characterized by upregulation of genes related to nitrogen uptake and protein storage, morphological variation of the protein-storing vacuoles, and a crude protein content of mature seeds of transgenics that was up to 30% higher than in wild-type. These findings provide evidence that (1) the prevailing level of GPT1 abundance/activity is rate-limiting for the synthesis of starch in developing seeds, (2) GPT1 exerts a controlling function on assimilate partitioning into storage protein, and (3) GPT1 is essential for the differentiation of embryonic plastids and seed maturation.

  18. Symmetry of integrable cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikami, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Rei

    2001-03-01

    We study an integrable cellular automaton which is called the box-ball system (BBS). The BBS can be derived directly from the integrable differential-difference equation by either ultradiscretization or crystallization. We clarify the integrable structure and the hidden symmetry of the BBS.

  19. Financial Literacy and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruth L.

    2006-01-01

    Higher education administrators know it is more cost-effective to keep students than to recruit them. Understanding financial literacy--and how it impacts student retention and persistence on the campuses--is an important concept for administrators to comprehend. Most students are not financially literate when they enter the world of higher…

  20. Data Show Retention Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee J.; Robelen, Erik W.; Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    New nationwide data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's civil rights office reveal stark racial and ethnic disparities in student retentions, with black and Hispanic students far more likely than white students to repeat a grade, especially in elementary and middle school. The contrast is especially strong for African-Americans. In the…

  1. Retention and Persistence Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Timothy R.

    Two studies are combined with an introductory section: one is "Persistence to Graduation for Freshmen Entering the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1967-75," by Timothy Sanford, and the second is "Freshman, Transfer, Professional, Masters, and Doctoral Student Retention at the University of North Carolina at Chapel…

  2. Data Show Retention Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee J.; Robelen, Erik W.; Shah, Nirvi

    2012-01-01

    New nationwide data collected by the U.S. Department of Education's civil rights office reveal stark racial and ethnic disparities in student retentions, with black and Hispanic students far more likely than white students to repeat a grade, especially in elementary and middle school. The contrast is especially strong for African-Americans. In the…

  3. Financial Literacy and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Ruth L.

    2006-01-01

    Higher education administrators know it is more cost-effective to keep students than to recruit them. Understanding financial literacy--and how it impacts student retention and persistence on the campuses--is an important concept for administrators to comprehend. Most students are not financially literate when they enter the world of higher…

  4. Tritium retention in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Wilson, K.L.

    1988-04-01

    This report discusses the materials physics related to D-T operation in TFTR. Research activities are described pertaining to basic studies of hydrogenic retention in graphite, hydrogen recycling phenomena, first-wall and limiter conditioning, surface analysis of TFTR first-wall components, and estimates of the tritium inventory.

  5. Secrets of Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliniak, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Recruiting students is one thing, but keeping them in a chorus, orchestra, or band is another. Although a music director has no control over some variables, there is much that can be done to help students to stay. Several experts share their advice on retention. One expert said a teacher's own attitude and classroom strategies may be two of the…

  6. Principals Retention. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Many districts are struggling with the problem of administrator retention. Hoffman (2004) identifies some of the reasons for this: (1) Increased accountability expectations; (2) Diminished or static levels of resources to support reform efforts; (3) Greater administrator vulnerability to sanctions; (4) The complex demands of government and the…

  7. Secondary Retention Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baenen, Nancy R.; Hopkins, Patricia

    Two alternatives to retention in grade for secondary school students were evaluated in Austin (Texas). Both were designed to allow students who are potential retainees (PRs) to receive remediation in one semester. The Transitional Academic Program (TAP) allows PRs to enroll in ninth-grade courses while repeating eighth-grade courses they had…

  8. Differentiated Nursing Practice: Concepts and Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Margaret L.

    1991-01-01

    Differentiated practice structures the roles and functions of nurses according to education, experience, and competence. Although differentiation has increased staff retention and reduced recruiting costs, improvements in patient care are difficult to prove. (SK)

  9. Insight on stem cell preconditioning and instructive biomaterials to enhance cell adhesion, retention, and engraftment for tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Muhammad; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells are a promising solution for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the limited survival and engraftment of transplanted cells due to a hostile ischemic environment is a bottleneck for effective utilization and commercialization. Within this environment, the majority of transplanted cells undergo apoptosis prior to participating in lineage differentiation and cellular integration. Therefore, in order to maximize the clinical utility of stem/progenitor cells, strategies must be employed to increase their adhesion, retention, and engraftment in vivo. Here, we reviewed key strategies that are being adopted to enhance the survival, retention, and engraftment of transplanted stem cells through the manipulation of both the stem cells and the surrounding environment. We describe how preconditioning of cells or cell manipulations strategies can enhance stem cell survival and engraftment after transplantation. We also discuss how biomaterials can enhance the function of stem cells for effective tissue regeneration. Biomaterials can incorporate or mimic extracellular function (ECM) function and enhance survival or differentiation of transplanted cells in vivo. Biomaterials can also promote angiogenesis, enhance engraftment and differentiation, and accelerate electromechanical integration of transplanted stem cells. Insight gained from this review may direct the development of future investigations and clinical trials.

  10. Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. E.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Potential water retention, S, is one of parameters commonly used in hydrologic modeling for soil moisture accounting. Physically, S indicates total amount of water which can be stored in soil and is expressed in units of depth. S can be represented as a change of soil moisture content and in this context is commonly used to estimate direct runoff, especially in the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number (CN) method. Generally, the lumped and the distributed hydrologic models can easily use the SCS-CN method to estimate direct runoff. Changes in potential water retention have been used in previous SCS-CN studies; however, these studies have focused on long-term hydrologic simulations where S is allowed to vary at the daily time scale. While useful for hydrologic events that span multiple days, the resolution is too coarse for short-term applications such as flash flood events where S may not recover its full potential. In this study, a new method for estimating a time-variable potential water retention at hourly time-scales is presented. The methodology is applied for the Napa River basin, California. The streamflow gage at St Helena, located in the upper reaches of the basin, is used as the control gage site to evaluate the model performance as it is has minimal influences by reservoirs and diversions. Rainfall events from 2011 to 2012 are used for estimating the event-based SCS CN to transfer to S. As a result, we have derived the potential water retention curve and it is classified into three sections depending on the relative change in S. The first is a negative slope section arising from the difference in the rate of moving water through the soil column, the second is a zero change section representing the initial recovery the potential water retention, and the third is a positive change section representing the full recovery of the potential water retention. Also, we found that the soil water moving has traffic jam within 24 hours after finished first

  11. Mobile Learning and Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fozdar, Bharat Inder; Kumar, Lalita S.

    2007-01-01

    Student retention in open and distance learning (ODL) is comparatively poor to traditional education and, in some contexts, embarrassingly low. Literature on the subject of student retention in ODL indicates that even when interventions are designed and undertaken to improve student retention, they tend to fall short. Moreover, this area has not…

  12. Quantitative structure-retention and retention-activity relationships of beta-blocking agents by micellar liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Detroyer, A; Vander Heyden, Y; Carda-Broch, S; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C; Massart, D L

    2001-04-06

    Sixteen beta-blocking agents (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, bisoprolol, carteolol, celiprolol, esmolol, labetalol, metoprolol, nadolol, oxprenolol, pindolol, practolol, propranolol, sotalol and timolol) showing a large range of hydrophobicity (octanol-water partition coefficients, log P between -0.026 and 2.81) were subjected to micellar liquid chromatography with sodium dodecyl sulfate as micelle forming agent, and n-propanol as organic modifier. The correlation between log P and the retention factor extrapolated to a mobile phase free of micelles and organic modifier was investigated. The use of an interpolated retention factor or the retention factor for specific individual experimental mobile phases was however advantageous since the retention factors of all beta-blocking agents were measurable in the selected mobile phases. Good correlations with log P and with in vitro biological parameters (cellular permeability coefficients in Caco-2 monolayers and apparent permeability coefficients in rat intestinal segments) were found.

  13. Utility of Ki-67, CD10, CD34, p53, CD117, and mast cell content in the differential diagnosis of cellular fibroadenomas and in the classification of phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Maria Helena Tavares; de Almeida, Fábio Marques; de Paula, Gabriela Moura; Ribeiro, Noara Barros; Cirqueira, Magno Belém; Silva, Andréia Luiza Pereira; Moreira, Marise Amaral Rebouças

    2014-09-01

    Adequate management of phyllodes tumors of the breast (PTB) remains a challenge because of the difficulty in correctly establishing preoperative diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of Ki-67, CD10, CD34, p53, CD117, and of the number of mast cells in the differential diagnosis of benign PTB and cellular fibroadenomas (CFs) as well as in the grading of PTB. Fifty-one primary PTB and 14 CFs were examined by immunohistochemistry.When evaluating CD117 expression, higher epithelial expression was present in CF as well as an increased number of mast cells in benign PTB. Stromal expression of Ki-67, CD10, CD34, and p53 were relevant to PTB grading, of which the first 3 showed significance in the distinction of benign and borderline PTB, as well as between benign and malignant PTB. P53 was relevant only for the discrimination between benign and malign PTB. None of the markers showed significance in distinguishing between borderline and malign PTB. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Psychogenic urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Bird, J R

    1980-01-01

    The literature on psychogenic urinary retention is reviewed. 2 cases treated by analytical psychotherapy are reported, in which significant demand for physical punishment was revealed and seen as linked to unacceptable, unconscious sadistic and aggressive feelings. Some psychodynamic aspects of what is considered to be "a disturbance of internal body space' are discussed. Psychogenic urinary retention has received little attention in the literature. It may represent the uneasy position this disorder of bodily function occupies in clinical practice, with clear physical symptoms and associated psychological factors. The condition is more frequent in females, usually young adults. Case histories regularly record the placid, passive presentation of these patients, childhood enuresis and disturbed backgrounds. The diagnosis, "hysteric', is frequent and most psychodynamic evaluations suggest the symptom represents a displacement of unacceptable sexual wishes and impulse. 2 patients treated by analytical psychotherapy are reported who, whilst fulfilling many of the criteria already noted, additionally revealed an intense desire for physical punishment. This punitive demand had less to do with unacceptable sexual wishes, than guilt at repressed aggressive drives of considerable magnitude. The role of aggression in the genesis of psychogenic urinary retention has so far been little studied.

  15. Understanding Recruitment and Retention in Neurological Research

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Alyssa; Sherwood, Paula; Hricik, Allison; Bradley, Sarah; Kuo, Jean; Crago, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Given, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive deficits in participants and the abrupt and traumatic way in which many neurological conditions present are two examples of the unique challenges in recruiting and retaining subjects with neurological injury for research studies. The purpose of this investigation was to identify obstacles to recruitment and retention in three ongoing research studies. These studies involve persons with neurological disorders across the continuum of care, from those newly diagnosed and with emergent presentation to those with more established, chronic neurological conditions. For the purpose of this analysis, we evaluated the effectiveness of the strategies employed to improve participation rates. The first study was an NIH funded project designed to identify biomarkers of vasospasm in persons (N=496) with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who presented to the neurovascular intensive care unit (NINR, RO1 NR004339). The purpose of the second study was to examine bio-behavioral interactions in family caregivers (N=59) of persons with a primary malignant brain tumor (PMBT) recruited in the community setting. The third project involved recruiting persons (N=1019) within an outpatient neurosurgical center to participate in a research registry. To determine differential effectiveness of strategies, consent and attrition rates were calculated at serial points over time in three studies and recruitment and retention strategies were compared. Sentinel time points in participants' disease trajectories played a key role in determining whether those who were approached to participate gave consent and were retained, particularly in the studies involving persons with aneurysmal SAH (consent = 85%; retention = 89%) and persons with PMBTs and their caregivers (consent = 68%; retention = 83%). In addition, several specific recruiter and interviewer training techniques were associated with higher recruitment and retention. Targeted strategies to improve participation rates are vital

  16. Selenide retention by mackinawite.

    PubMed

    Finck, N; Dardenne, K; Bosbach, D; Geckeis, H

    2012-09-18

    The isotope (79)Se may be of great concern with regard to the safe disposal of nuclear wastes in deep geological repositories due to its long half-life and potential mobility in the geosphere. The Se mobility is controlled by the oxidation state: the oxidized species (Se(IV)) and (Se(VI)) are highly mobile, whereas the reduced species (Se(0) and Se(-II)) form low soluble solids. The mobility of this trace pollutant can be greatly reduced by interacting with the various barriers of the repository. Numerous studies report on the oxidized species retention by mineral phases, but only very scarce studies report on the selenide (Se(-II)) retention. In the present study, the selenide retention by coprecipitation with and by adsorption on mackinawite (FeS) was investigated. XRD and SEM analyses of the samples reveal no significant influence of Se on the mackinawite precipitate morphology and structure. Samples from coprecipitation and from adsorption are characterized at the molecular scale by a multi-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) investigation. In the coprecipitation experiment, all elements (S, Fe, and Se) are in a low ionic oxidation state and the EXAFS data strongly point to selenium located in a mackinawite-like sulfide environment. By contacting selenide ions with FeS in suspension, part of Se is located in an environment similar to that found in the coprecipitation experiment. The explanation is a dynamical dissolution-recrystallization mechanism of the highly reactive mackinawite. This is the first experimental study to report on selenide incorporation in iron monosulfide by a multi-edge XAS approach.

  17. Floating nut retention system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, J. F.; Theakston, H. A. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A floating nut retention system includes a nut with a central aperture. An inner retainer plate has an opening which is fixedly aligned with the nut aperture. An outer retainer member is formed of a base plate having an opening and a surface adjacent to a surface of the inner retainer plate. The outer retainer member includes a securing mechanism for retaining the inner retainer plate adjacent to the outer retainer member. The securing mechanism enables the inner retainer plate to float with respect to the outer retainer number, while simultaneously forming a bearing surface for inner retainer plate.

  18. 5 CFR 575.405 - Calculation and payment of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... differential. 575.405 Section 575.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.405 Calculation and payment of supervisory differential...

  19. 5 CFR 575.405 - Calculation and payment of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... differential. 575.405 Section 575.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.405 Calculation and payment of supervisory differential...

  20. 5 CFR 575.405 - Calculation and payment of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... differential. 575.405 Section 575.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.405 Calculation and payment of supervisory differential...

  1. Tritium retention in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, C. H.; Mueller, D.; Walters, R. T.; TFTR Team; Causey, R.; Luckhardt, S.; Hirooka, J.

    1996-11-01

    The large tritium inventories projected for ITER pose an important constraint in the design of plasma facing components and the selection of first wall materials. Three years of deuterium-tritium operation in TFTR has provided a special opportunity to address the issues of tritium retention in a tokamak environment. More than 18 kCi of tritium has been injected into the torus via neutral beam injection and gas puffs and approximately half of this amount was retained in the vacuum vessel.(C.H. Skinner et al.), PPPL 3172 (Jan 1995). Tritium has been successfully removed by glow discharges, exposure to room air and other techniques and it is not a constraint on continued operations. A vacuum opening is scheduled for September 1996 and we plan to extract samples of tritiated carbon dust and flakes from the limiter and vacuum vessel for elemental and chemical analysis. We will present the TFTR experience in tritium recycling, retention and removal and its implications for ITER.

  2. Boulder Valley Kindergarten Study: Retention Practices and Retention Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.; Smith, Mary Lee

    Having implemented a policy that allowed schools to retain children in kindergarten an extra year, the Boulder Valley Public School District in Colorado conducted a study to determine the cognitive and emotional benefits of retention in kindergarten and the characteristics that led to decisions about retention. The study involved a research review…

  3. Information Integration, Retention, and Levels of Information Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Irwin P.

    A combination of information integration methodology and measures of retention was used to investigate how subjects differentially attend to and weight information in judgmental tasks. Subjects were shown sets of test scores for hypothetical students and were asked to rate the performance of each student or predict each student's performance on a…

  4. Are Asians Forgetful? Perception, Retention, and Recall in Episodic Remembering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Cross-cultural studies have shown that Asians exhibit less accessibility to episodic memories than Euro-Americans. This difference is often attributed to differential cognitive and social influences on memory retention, although there have been no empirical data concerning the underlying mechanism. Three studies were conducted to examine encoding…

  5. Drug Retention Times

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this monograph is to provide information on drug retention times in the human body. The information provided is based on plausible illegal drug use activities that might be engaged in by a recreational drug user. Based on anecdotal evidence, most people “party” during extended time away from the work environment. Therefore, the following scenarios were envisioned: (1) a person uses an illicit drug at a party on Saturday night (infrequent user); (2) a person uses a drug one time on Friday night and once again on Saturday night (infrequent user); and (3) a person uses a drug on Friday night, uses a drug twice on Saturday night, and once again on Sunday (frequent user).

  6. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  7. Stability and Retention.

    PubMed

    Will, Leslie A

    2016-01-01

    Stability of tooth position in the broader sense considers all the forces that may act on the tooth. Reitan reported that significant forces remained in the periodontium after tooth movement, and he carried out research that demonstrated residual stretching of the crestal periodontal fibers more than 7 months after tooth movement. Brain demonstrated that severing the fibers reduced the relapse in tooth position in dogs. Edwards published a series of papers exploring the effects of surgical transection of the gingival fibers on tooth stability, recommending that circumferential fiberotomy be performed in order to increase posttreatment tooth stability. Other researchers have suggested ways to increase the stability of the incisors, which are typically most prone to relapse. Peck and Peck recommended that interproximal reduction be done to broaden the contact point. Boese also recommended interproximal reduction as part of a four-pronged approach to retention.

  8. Retention through redemption.

    PubMed

    Abrashoff, D M

    2001-02-01

    Corporate America and the U.S. Navy share one big problem: employee retention. Today's knowledge workers hop from start-up to start-up. And 40% of the navy's new recruits leave the service before their four-year tours of duty are up. D. Michael Abrashoff came face to face with the navy's retention problem when he took command of the USS Benfold. Before he became captain, sailors couldn't get away from the ship fast enough. Today the vessel is the pride of the Pacific fleet, and sailors from other ships are clamoring to join its crew. In this firsthand account, Abrashoff explains how he got the ship and its crew back on course by breaking bad habits--personal and professional ones--and jettisoning old attitudes. During his 21 months aboard the Benfold, Abrashoff came to realize that in today's technology-intensive U.S. Navy, the traditional command-and-control style wouldn't work. And it hadn't--the Benfold's 310 sailors had cheered derisively when Abrashoff's predecessor had left the ship. So he defied 225 years of navy tradition in his quest to engage the sailors in their work, increase their performance, and keep them around for their entire tours of duty. He retained his crew by redeeming them--showing them how to be not just better sailors but better people, too. That meant breaking them down when they were at their worst and then building them up to reach their best. It also meant personal redemption for Abrashoff; he resolved to really listen to what his sailors were saying. The result? Cost-saving ideas for the entire navy and surging confidence and commitment among crew members.

  9. Toward a Record Retention Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jason

    2007-01-01

    An academic library working group was charged in 2005 to create a records retention schedule and policy applicable to records containing personally identifiable information of library patrons. This group conducted a survey and extensive research, culminating in an adopted library records retention schedule and policy implemented in 2006.

  10. Retention of Motor Skills: Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schendel, J. D.; And Others

    A summary of an extensive literature survey deals with the variables known or suspected to affect the retention of learned motor behaviors over lengthy no-practice intervals. Emphasis was given to research conducted by or for the military. The variables that may affect the retention of motor skills were dichotomized into task variables and…

  11. Toward a Record Retention Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Jason

    2007-01-01

    An academic library working group was charged in 2005 to create a records retention schedule and policy applicable to records containing personally identifiable information of library patrons. This group conducted a survey and extensive research, culminating in an adopted library records retention schedule and policy implemented in 2006.

  12. Rethinking Student Retention in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Linda; Ebbers, Larry

    2002-01-01

    States that student retention is significant for measuring institutional effectiveness in the prevailing environment of accountability and budgetary constraints. Presents recommendations for increasing retention, including training staff on retention issues, reviewing admission and advising strategies affecting minority populations, and piloting…

  13. Orthodontic retention: why when and how?

    PubMed

    McNally, M; Mullin, M; Dhopatkar, A; Rock, W P

    2003-10-01

    Retention is normally required after active orthodontic tooth movement to hold the teeth in their new positions. This article reviews the principles of orthodontic retention and describes common retention regimes and appliances.

  14. Comparison of fully wettable RPLC stationary phases for LC-MS-based cellular metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Si-Hung, Le; Causon, Tim J; Hann, Stephan

    2017-07-10

    Reversed-phase LC combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) is one of the most popular methods for cellular metabolomics studies. Due to the difficulties in analyzing a wide range of polarities encountered in the metabolome, 100%-wettable reversed-phase materials are frequently used to maximize metabolome coverage within a single analysis. Packed with silica-based sub-3 μm diameter particles, these columns allow high separation efficiency and offer a reasonable compromise for metabolome coverage within a single analysis. While direct performance comparison can be made using classical chromatographic characterization approaches, a comprehensive assessment of the column's performance for cellular metabolomics requires use of a full LC-HRMS workflow in order to reflect realistic study conditions used for cellular metabolomics. In this study, a comparison of several reversed-phase LC columns for metabolome analysis using such a dedicated workflow is presented. All columns were tested under the same analytical conditions on an LC-TOF-MS platform using a variety of authentic metabolite standards and biotechnologically relevant yeast cell extracts. Data on total workflow performance including retention behavior, peak capacity, coverage, and molecular feature extraction repeatability from these columns are presented with consideration for both nontargeted screening and differential metabolomics workflows using authentic standards and Pichia pastoris cell extract samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Job embeddedness and nurse retention.

    PubMed

    Reitz, O Ed; Anderson, Mary Ann; Hill, Pamela D

    2010-01-01

    Nurse retention is a different way of conceptualizing the employer-employee relationship when compared with turnover. Job embeddedness (JE), a construct based on retention, represents the sum of reasons why employees remain at their jobs. However, JE has not been investigated in relation to locale (urban or rural) or exclusively with a sample of registered nurses (RNs). The purpose of this study was to determine what factors (JE, age, gender, locale, and income) help predict nurse retention. A cross-sectional mailed survey design was used with RNs in different locales (urban or rural). Job embeddedness was measured by the score on the composite, standardized instrument. Nurse retention was measured by self-report items concerning intent to stay. A response rate of 49.3% was obtained. The typical respondent was female (96.1%), white, non-Hispanic (87.4%), and married (74.9%). Age and JE were predictive of nurse retention and accounted for 26% of the explained variance in intent to stay. Although age was a significant predictor of intent to stay, it accounted for only 1.4% of the variance while JE accounted for 24.6% of the variance of nurse retention (as measured by intent to stay). Older, more "embedded" nurses are more likely to remain employed in their current organization. Based on these findings, JE may form the basis for the development of an effective nurse retention program.

  16. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  17. Retention in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C D; Littlewood, S J

    2015-02-16

    Retention is necessary following orthodontic treatment to prevent relapse of the final occlusal outcome. Relapse can occur as a result of forces from the periodontal fibres around the teeth which tend to pull the teeth back towards their pre-treatment positions, and also from deflecting occlusal contacts if the final occlusion is less than ideal. Age changes, in the form of ongoing dentofacial growth, as well as changes in the surrounding soft tissues, can also affect the stability of the orthodontic outcome. It is therefore essential that orthodontists, patients and their general dental practitioners understand the importance of wearing retainers after orthodontic treatment. This article will update the reader on the different types of removable and fixed retainers, including their indications, duration of wear, and how they should be managed in order to minimise any unwanted effects on oral health and orthodontic outcomes. The key roles that the general dental practitioner can play in supporting their patients wearing orthodontic retainers are also emphasised.

  18. Data Retention and Anonymity Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthold, Stefan; Böhme, Rainer; Köpsell, Stefan

    The recently introduced legislation on data retention to aid prosecuting cyber-related crime in Europe also affects the achievable security of systems for anonymous communication on the Internet. We argue that data retention requires a review of existing security evaluations against a new class of realistic adversary models. In particular, we present theoretical results and first empirical evidence for intersection attacks by law enforcement authorities. The reference architecture for our study is the anonymity service AN.ON, from which we also collect empirical data. Our adversary model reflects an interpretation of the current implementation of the EC Directive on Data Retention in Germany.

  19. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  20. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  1. Regulation of cellular identity in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Nilotpal; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neoplastic transformation requires changes in cellular identity. Emerging evidence increasingly points to cellular reprogramming, a process during which fully differentiated and functional cells lose aspects of their identity while gaining progenitor characteristics, as a critical early step during cancer initiation. This cell identity crisis persists even at the malignant stage in certain cancers, suggesting that reactivation of progenitor functions supports tumorigenicity. Here, we review recent findings that establish the essential role of cellular reprogramming during neoplastic transformation and the major players involved in it with a special emphasis on pancreatic cancer. PMID:26702828

  2. Post-operative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin; Treacy, Colm; Jones, Mark

    Urinary retention is a common complication of surgery and anaesthesia. The risk of post-operative urinary retention is increased following certain surgical procedures and anaesthetic modalities, and with patients' advancing age. Patients at increased risk of post-operative urinary retention should be identified before surgery or the condition should be identified and treated in a timely manner following surgery. If conservative measures do not help the patient to pass urine, the bladder will need to be drained using either an intermittent catheter or an indwelling urethral catheter, which can result in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This article provides an overview of normal bladder function, risk factors for developing post-operative urinary retention, and treatment options. Guidance drawn from the literature aims to assist nurses in identifying at-risk patients and inform patient care.

  3. EA Shuttle Document Retention Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effort of code EA at Johnson Space Center (JSC) to identify and acquire databases and documents from the space shuttle program that are adjudged important for retention after the retirement of the space shuttle.

  4. Pulmonary retention of coal dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, P.E.; Gibb, F.R.; Beiter, H.; Amato, F.; Yuile, C.; Kilpper, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The principal objectives of this study were: to determine, quantitatively, coal dust retention times in the dog lung; to test the appropriateness of a pulmonary retention model which incorporates first order rate coefficients obtained from in vitro and in vivo experiments on neutron-activated coal; to acquire a temporal description of the pulmonary disposition of the retained coal dust, and to compare the behavior of two different Pennsylvania coals in the foregoing regards. The principal findings include: retention half-times for both coals of approximately 2 years following single, hour-long exposures; a vivid association of the retained coal dust with the pulmonic lymphatics; and a general validation of the retention model.

  5. Diversity and Retention in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Cinda-Sue G.; Finelli, Cynthia J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe three initiatives designed to increase the academic achievement and retention of historically underrepresented students (including females and underrepresented students of color) in engineering. (Contains 2 tables.)

  6. An Assessment of Gadonanotubes as Magnetic Nanolabels for Improved Stem Cell Detection and Retention in Cardiomyoplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Lesa A.

    In this work, gadolinium-based carbon nanocapsules are developed as a novel nanotechnology that addresses the shortcomings of current diagnostic and therapeutic methods of stem cell-based cardiomyoplasty. With cardiovascular disease (CVD) responsible for approximately 30% of deaths worldwide, the growing need for improved cardiomyoplasty has spurred efforts in nanomedicine to develop innovative techniques to enhance the therapeutic retention and diagnostic tracking of transplanted cells. Having previously been demonstrated as a high-performance T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, Gadonanotubes (GNTs) are shown for the first time to intracellularly label pig bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Without the use of a transfection agent, micromolar concentrations of GNTs deliver up to 109 Gd3+ ions per cell, allowing for MSCs to be visualized in a 1.5 T clinical MRI scanner. The cellular response to the intracellular incorporation of GNTs is also assessed, revealing that GNTs do not compromise the viability, differentiation potential, or phenotype characteristics of the MSCs. However, it is also found that GNT-labeled MSCs exhibit a decreased response to select cell adhesion proteins and experience a nonapoptotic, non-proliferative cell cycle arrest, from which the cells recover 48 h after GNT internalization. In tandem with developing GNTs as a new stem cell diagnostic agent, this current work also explores for the first time the therapeutic application of the magnetically-active GNTs as a magnetic facilitator to increase the retention of transplanted stem cells during cardiomyoplasty. In vitro flow chamber assays, ex vivo perfusion experiments, and in vivo porcine injection procedures all demonstrate the increased magnetic-assisted retention of GNT-labeled MSCs in the presence of an external magnetic field. These studies prove that GNTs are a powerful 'theranostic' agent that provides a novel platform to simultaneously monitor

  7. Turnover: strategies for staff retention.

    PubMed

    SnowAntle, S

    1990-01-01

    This discussion has focused on a number of areas where organizations may find opportunities for more effectively managing employee retention. Given the multitude of causes and consequences, there is no one quick fix. Effective management of employee retention requires assessment of the entire human resources process, that is, recruitment, selection, job design, compensation, supervision, work conditions, etc. Regular and systematic diagnosis of turnover and implementation of multiple strategies and evaluation are needed (Mobley, 1982).

  8. phosphorus retention data and metadata

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    phosphorus retention in wetlands data and metadataThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Lane , C., and B. Autrey. Phosphorus retention of forested and emergent marsh depressional wetlands in differing land uses in Florida, USA. Wetlands Ecology and Management. Springer Science and Business Media B.V;Formerly Kluwer Academic Publishers B.V., GERMANY, 24(1): 45-60, (2016).

  9. Therapeutic cloning and cellular reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ramon M; Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are capable of differentiating into any cell-type present in an adult organism, and constitute a renewable source of tissue for regenerative therapies. The transplant of allogenic stem cells is challenging due to the risk of immune rejection. Nevertheless, somatic cell reprogramming techniques allow the generation of isogenic embryonic stem cells, genetically identical to the patient. In this chapter we will discuss the cellular reprogramming techniques in the context of regenerative therapy and the biological and technical barriers that they will need to overcome before clinical use.

  10. Positive-contrast cellular MRI of embryonic stem cells for tissue regeneration using a highly efficient T1 MRI contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Loai, Sadi; Haedicke, Inga; Mirzaei, Zahra; Simmons, Craig A; Zhang, Xiao-An; Cheng, Hai Ling

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of high-sensitivity cellular MRI of embryonic stem (ES) cells using a novel cell permeable and cell retentive T1 contrast agent. Mouse ES cells were labeled with a novel manganese porphyrin contrast agent, MnAMP, at 0.1 mM over 2 to 24 h and retained in contrast-free medium for up to 24 h postlabeling. MRI was performed on a 3 Tesla clinical scanner; T1 and T2 relaxation times were measured. Quantification of manganese content was performed using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Viability and proliferation assays were done for the longest labeling interval. Differentiation capacity was assessed using the hanging drop method to direct differentiation toward cardiomyocytes. MnAMP-labeled ES cells exhibited over a fourfold decrease in T1 compared with unlabeled cells, and maintained up to a threefold decrease 24 h postlabeling. Viability and proliferation were not affected. Most importantly, labeled ES cells differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes that exhibited normal contractility patterns. MnAMP-based cellular MRI is a very high sensitivity T1 approach for cellular imaging. It has the potential for noninvasive in vivo monitoring of stem cell therapy in cardiac regeneration and other tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1456-1463. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Retention Rate by Ethnicity. Information Capsule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Anne

    This document discusses retention rate based on ethnicity for Miami-Dade Community College (M-DCC) for December 2002. The study found that the 2001 Fall-Spring retention rates increased among all ethnic groups. The total college retention rate rose by 2.7 percentage points to 75.2%. Among individual groups, the highest retention rate of 76.9% was…

  12. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  13. Cellular immune mechanisms in myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Noutsias, M; Patil, V J; Maisch, B

    2012-12-01

    The introduction of immunohistological techniques enabled a substantially more reliable diagnosis of inflammatory cardiomyopathy (DCMi) in endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) compared to the histological Dallas criteria. Decisive progress has been made in the understanding of cellular immune mechanisms in DCMi using immunohistological techniques, which apart from the field of diagnosis refinement have had prognostic implications and an influence on the selection criteria of DCMi patients who will likely benefit from immunosuppressive treatment. Digital image analysis systems have been employed to standardize quantification of immunohistological EMB stainings. Quantification of T cell-related genes by a methodologically validated preamplified real-time RT-PCR revealed that the T cells are characterized by differential expression of Th1-, Treg-, and CTL-related markers, while no major role could be confirmed for Th17 cells. The reported virus-associated differential T cell receptor Vbeta dominance suggests an antiviral specificity of virus-induced T cell responses in human DCMi.

  14. 5 CFR 575.406 - Adjustment or termination of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... differential. 575.406 Section 575.406 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.406 Adjustment or termination of supervisory...

  15. 5 CFR 575.406 - Adjustment or termination of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... differential. 575.406 Section 575.406 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.406 Adjustment or termination of supervisory...

  16. 5 CFR 575.406 - Adjustment or termination of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... differential. 575.406 Section 575.406 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.406 Adjustment or termination of supervisory...

  17. 5 CFR 575.406 - Adjustment or termination of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... differential. 575.406 Section 575.406 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.406 Adjustment or termination of supervisory...

  18. 5 CFR 575.406 - Adjustment or termination of supervisory differential.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... differential. 575.406 Section 575.406 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION INCENTIVES; SUPERVISORY DIFFERENTIALS; AND EXTENDED ASSIGNMENT INCENTIVES Supervisory Differentials § 575.406 Adjustment or termination of supervisory...

  19. A Cellular Biophysics Textbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, Alan Joseph

    2011-12-01

    In the past two decades, great advances have been made in understanding of the biophysical mechanisms of the protein machines that carry out the fundamental processes of the cell. It is now known that all major eukaryotic cellular processes require a complicated assemblage of proteins acting via a series of concerted motions. In order to grasp current understanding of cellular mechanisms, the new generation of cell biologists needs to be trained in the general characteristics of these cellular properties and the methods with which to study them. This cellular biophysics textbook, to be used in conjunction with the cellular biophysics course (MCB143) at UC-Davis, provides a great tool in the instruction of the new generation of cellular biologists. It provides a hierarchical view of the cell, from atoms to protein machines and explains in depth the mechanisms of cytoskeletal force generators as an example of these principles.

  20. Cellular Functions of Tissue Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Nurminskaya, Maria V.; Belkin, Alexey M.

    2013-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2 or tissue transglutaminase) is a highly complex multifunctional protein that acts as transglutaminase, GTPase/ATPase, protein disulfide isomerase, and protein kinase. Moreover, TG2 has many well-documented nonenzymatic functions that are based on its noncovalent interactions with multiple cellular proteins. A vast array of biochemical activities of TG2 accounts for its involvement in a variety of cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, growth, survival, apoptosis, differentiation, and extracellular matrix organization. In turn, the impact of TG2 on these processes implicates this protein in various physiological responses and pathological states, contributing to wound healing, inflammation, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration, vascular remodeling, tumor growth and metastasis, and tissue fibrosis. TG2 is ubiquitously expressed and is particularly abundant in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, monocytes/macrophages, and smooth muscle cells. The protein is localized in multiple cellular compartments, including the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, endolysosomes, plasma membrane, and cell surface and extracellular matrix, where Ca2+, nucleotides, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, membrane lipids, and distinct protein–protein interactions in the local microenvironment jointly regulate its activities. In this review, we discuss the complex biochemical activities and molecular interactions of TG2 in the context of diverse subcellular compartments and evaluate its wide ranging and cell type-specific biological functions and their regulation. PMID:22364871

  1. CHLORIDE RETENTION IN EXPERIMENTAL HYDRONEPHROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Norman M.; Pulford, D. Schuyler

    1923-01-01

    1. In acute experimental hydronephrosis chloride retention occurs as well as retention of water, urea, and phenolsulfonephthalein. 2. If both water and chlorides are retained there may be no appreciable rise in the plasma chloride content. 3. When chlorides are retained, but not water, the chloride content of the plasma rises strikingly. 4. After the removal of the ureteral obstruction in acute hydronephrosis all renal functions, water, urea, and chloride excretion, may be rapidly restored in equal degree, or the chlorides may be retained temporarily while there is free excretion of water and urea. 5. In chronic hydronephrosis adequate daily excretion of urea and chlorides may be maintained by a compensatory polyuria. 6. Chloride retention or an abnormal chloride excretion may occur in certain renal lesions when there is no change in the urea, phenolsulfonephthalein, or water excretion. PMID:19868720

  2. Fuel retention studies on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mast Team Huang, J.; Lisgo, S.; Maddison, G.

    2011-08-01

    Fuel retention has been studied on MAST using gas-balance analysis. With 8-15 min of inter-shot helium glow-discharge cleaning (4He-GDC), the wall retention fraction stays very high (>90%) during the flat-top of the plasma current, indicating this component is dominant during the discharge. Recovery of wall conditioning with 4He-GDC suggests the retention process is dominated by direct implantation of particles in shallow surface layers. The effect of 4He-GDC duration on the particle balance has also been investigated. It is shown that when there was no preceding 4He-GDC, the wall pumping capacity was reduced, causing higher plasma density and tank pressure for the next shot.

  3. Lake retention of manufactured nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koelmans, A A; Quik, J T K; Velzeboer, I

    2015-01-01

    For twenty-five world lakes and three engineered nanoparticles (ENP), lake retention was calculated using a uniformly mixed lake mass balance model. This follows similar approaches traditionally used in water quality management. Lakes were selected such that lake residence times, depths and areal hydraulic loadings covered the widest possible range among existing lakes. Sedimentation accounted for natural colloid as well as suspended solid settling regimes. An ENP-specific mixed sedimentation regime is proposed. This regime combines ENP sedimentation through slow settling with natural colloids from the water column, with faster settling with suspended solids from a selected part of the water column. Although sedimentation data and hydrodynamic concepts as such were not new, their first time combination or application to ENPs shows in which cases lake retention is important for these particles. In combination with ENP emission data, lake retention translates directly into potential risks of ENPs for lake benthic communities.

  4. Retention of hydrogen in graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.A.

    1986-10-01

    The retention of hydrogen in POCO AXF-5Q graphite has been measured at room temperature as a function of fluence and flux for H/sub 2//sup +/ ions at energies from 250 to 500 eV provided by a glow discharge. More than 2 x 10/sup 18/ H/cm/sup 2/ has been retained, and no indication of saturation has been observed to a fluence of 5 x 10/sup 19/ H/cm/sup 2/. In this experiment, retention was found to increase linearly with fluence for constant flux. A flux dependence was observed; that is, the retention rate was observed to decrease monotonically as the flux increased. A change-over experiment, deuterium to hydrogen, was conducted; the results show that significant change-over occurs (i.e., about 30% change-over for a fluence of 5 x 10/sup 17/ D/cm/sup 2/).

  5. Labial fusion: A rare cause of urinary retention in reproductive age woman and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Erdoğdu, Emre; Demirel, Cem; Tahaoğlu, Ali Emre; Özdemir, Arzu

    2017-01-01

    Labial fusion usually affects prepubertal girls and postmenopausal women, it may rarely occurs in reproductive years in the absence of predisposing factors such as vulvar infections, dermatitis, trauma, female circumcision and lichen sclerosis. Should be considered in differential diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of urinary retention even if the patient doesn’t have history of sexual intercourse. PMID:28270959

  6. The Roles of Cellular Nanomechanics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Katti, Kalpana S.; Katti, Dinesh R.; Mishra, Sanjay R.; Khan, Sheema; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of cells and tissues may be instrumental in increasing our understanding of cellular behavior and cellular manifestations of diseases such as cancer. Nanomechanical properties can offer clinical translation of therapies beyond what are currently employed. Nanomechanical properties, often measured by nanoindentation methods using atomic force microscopy, may identify morphological variations, cellular binding forces, and surface adhesion behaviors that efficiently differentiate normal cells and cancer cells. The aim of this review is to examine current research involving the general use of atomic force microscopy/nanoindentation in measuring cellular nanomechanics; various factors and instrumental conditions that influence the nanomechanical properties of cells; and implementation of nanoindentation methods to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells or tissues. Applying these fundamental nanomechanical properties to current discoveries in clinical treatment may result in greater efficiency in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer, which ultimately can change the lives of patients. PMID:25137233

  7. Evaluation of Helmet Retention Systems Using a Pendulum Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    USAARL Report No. 89-27 00 Evaluation of Helmet Retention Systems Using a Pendulum Device By Peter Vyrnwy-Jones Charles R. Paschal, Jr. Ronald W...Pendulum Device 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Peter Vvrnwv-Jones. Charles R. Paschal, Jr., and Ronald W. Palmer 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14 DATE OF...of Transportation testing device proved to be a simple and efficient means of differentiating between the various helmets. This method should have a

  8. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  9. Reading, Writing, and Retention: A Primer on Grade Retention Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Kaufman, Amber M.

    2003-01-01

    Notes that research shows that neither grade retention nor social promotion improves educational success. Suggests that familiarity with this research is essential when seeking intervention strategies. Considers how it is possible to strengthen the connection between research and practice by recognizing that educational professionals who know…

  10. Correlates of Treatment Retention among Multi-Ethnic Youth with Substance Use Problems Initial Examination of Ethnic Group Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ashley; Wagner, Eric F.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To explore (1) the influence of pretreatment and treatment factors on treatment retention among a multi-ethnic sample of adolescents and (2) the potential differential influence of pretreatment and treatment factors on treatment retention within each ethnic subgroup. Participants: A multi-ethnic sample of 420 adolescent juvenile offenders in…

  11. University Students' Retention of Derivative Concepts 14 Months after the Course: Influence of "Met-Befores" and "Met-Afters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukic, Ljerka; Dahl, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the concluding part of a larger study on retention of key procedural and conceptual concepts in differential and integral calculus among Croatian and Danish university students in non-mathematics study programmes. The first parts of the study examined the retention of the students' knowledge through a questionnaire testing…

  12. Positron emission tomography based in-vivo imaging of early phase stem cell retention after intramyocardial delivery in the mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cajetan; Lehner, Sebastian; Todica, Andrei; Boening, Guido; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael; Bartenstein, Peter; Hacker, Marcus; David, Robert

    2013-10-01

    To establish PET as a tool for in-vivo quantification and monitoring of intramyocardially transplanted stem cells after labelling with FDG in mice with induced myocardial infarction. After inducing myocardial infarction in C57BL/6 mice, murine embryonic stem cells were labelled with FDG and transplanted into the border zone of the infarction. Dynamic PET scans were acquired from 25 to 120 min after transplantation, followed by a scan with 20 MBq FDG administered intravenously for anatomical landmarking. All images were reconstructed using the OSEM 3D and MAP reconstruction algorithms. FDG data were corrected for cellular tracer efflux and used as marker for cellular retention. FACS analysis of transplanted cells expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein was performed to validate the PET data. We observed a rapid loss of cells from the site of transplantation, followed by stable retention over 120 min. Amounts of retention were 5.3 ± 1.1 % at 25 min, 5.0 ± 0.9 % at 60 min and 5.7 ± 1.2 % at 120 min. FACS analysis showed a high correlation without significant differences between the groups (P > 0.05). FDG labelling did not have any adverse effects on cell proliferation or differentiation. Up-to-date imaging is a powerful method for tracking and quantifying intramyocardially transplanted stem cells in vivo in the mouse model. This revealed a massive cell loss within minutes, and thereafter a relatively stable amount of about 5 % remaining cells was observed. Our method may become crucial for further optimization of cardiac cell therapy in the widely used mouse model of infarction.

  13. Retrodifferentiation--a mechanism for cellular regeneration?

    PubMed

    Hass, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Cellular differentiation can be characterized by the acquisition of specified properties during several steps of development whereby the original stem- or precursor-like populations can finally obtain a certain phenotype with highly specific cell functions. The continuing maturation process can be paralleled by progressively reduced proliferative capacity in various cell types functioning as postmitotic tissues. Conversely, other cell populations (e.g., distinct immune cells) may carry out their specific function upon stimulation of proliferation. While these differentiated phenotypes perform their appropriate specific duties throughout the functioning organism, nature may provide an interesting alternative within this concept of life: sometimes, differentiation steps appear to be reversible. Thus, retrograde differentiation--also termed retrodifferentiation--and accordingly rejuvenation may occur when differentiated cells lose their specific properties acquired during previous steps of maturation. Consequently, retrodifferentiation and rejuvenation could provide enormous potential for tissue repair and cell renewal; however, regulatory dysfunctions within these retrograde developments may also involve the risk of tumor promotion.

  14. Course Retention Analysis. Focus Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    A study was conducted at Mount San Antonio College (MSAC), California, to analyze patterns in credit course retention between fall 1986 and spring 1989. The study investigated the development of course prerequisites based on faculty perceptions of the skills necessary for success and minimal skill levels associated with success; student assessment…

  15. Institutionalization of a Retention Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. J.; Campbell, A.

    2006-05-01

    Bowie State University and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have, for the past 10 years, worked diligently together to enhance the science, mathematics, engineering and technology (SMET) domain. Efforts made, because of a Model Institutions for Excellence (MIE) Award, have changed the landscape of the SMET domain by increasing the retention and graduation rates, the number of students entering graduate and professional schools, and the number of students entering SMET related careers for minorities and women. Several initiatives a Scholarship Program, PRISEM Tutoring Center, Safety-net Program, Research emphasis, Focused Mentoring, a Summer Academy for accepted incoming students, a Bridge Program for students needing assistance being admitted to the University, the RISE Program and the Bowie State Satellite Operations and Control Center (BSOCC) provide the nurturing, mentoring, and opportunities for our students. As a result of efforts made, the retention rate has increase to approximately 80%, the graduation rate has increased 40%, and 85% of the SMET students are now interested or entering graduate and professional schools. Successes that have been documented by various assessment activities have led to the institutionalization of the Retention Model of the MIE Initiative. It is anticipated that University-wide application of the retention model will prove the incentives necessary to obtain similar results as the MIE Initiative.

  16. Academic Advising for Retention Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazazes, Barbara A.

    An effective academic advising system can assist in the retention of two-year college students; however, the institution and its faculty must be committed to providing such a system. Establishing a successful advising system would require the following: (1) a clear distinction must be made between academic advising and course scheduling; (2)…

  17. Implicit Memory: Retention without Remembering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Henry L., III

    1990-01-01

    Reviews recent research on retention that is demonstrated without conscious recollection, such as the ability to tie shoelaces or drive a car. Suggests that future research in this field may have implications for such educational issues as the transfer of training and the carryover of abstract classroom learning to problems in other contexts. (EVL)

  18. Course Retention Analysis. Focus Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount San Antonio Coll., Walnut, CA.

    A study was conducted at Mount San Antonio College (MSAC), California, to analyze patterns in credit course retention between fall 1986 and spring 1989. The study investigated the development of course prerequisites based on faculty perceptions of the skills necessary for success and minimal skill levels associated with success; student assessment…

  19. Meeting Individual Needs Fosters Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artman, Johanne I.; Gore, Robert C.

    A 1991 study of non-returning students at Del Mar College (DMC), in Corpus Christi, Texas, revealed that only 37.9% of these students were actual dropouts (i.e., had failed to accomplish their educational goals, and had no plans to take up further study). Retention studies conducted in Texas between 1985 and 1989 have shown that DMC has…

  20. Strategies for improving employee retention.

    PubMed

    Verlander, Edward G; Evans, Martin R

    2007-03-28

    This article proposes a solution to the perennial problem of talent retention in the clinical laboratory. It includes the presentation of 12 strategies that may be used to significantly improve institutional identity formation and establishment of the psychological contract that employees form with laboratory management. Identity formation and psychological contracting are deemed as essential in helping reduce employee turnover and increase retention. The 12 conversational strategies may be used as a set of best practices for all employees, but most importantly for new employees, and should be implemented at the critical moment when employees first join the laboratory. This time is referred to as "retention on-boarding"--the period of induction and laboratory orientation. Retention on-boarding involves a dialogue between employees and management that is focused on the psychological, practical, cultural, and political dimensions of the laboratory. It is placed in the context of the modern clinical laboratory, which is faced with employing and managing Generation X knowledge workers. Specific topics and broad content areas of those conversations are outlined.

  1. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  2. Exploring General Education Development Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Sharon D.

    2013-01-01

    According to the instructors and administrators at a local adult education (AE) program in Houston, Texas, retaining and graduating general education development (GED) students has been a constant challenge. Locating GED attendance barriers could enable AE programs to develop techniques that increase student retention and graduation rates. The…

  3. Classroom Management for Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio

    This guidebook recommends methods for teachers to use to improve teacher-student interaction in the classroom, as a means of increasing student retention. Chapter I introduces eight major systems of classroom management which teachers may use as their values and the classroom situation dictate: "Behavior Modification,""Reality Therapy,""Discipline…

  4. A Research Study in Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knibbe, Marie Vannozzi; Dusewicz, Russell A.

    A study of the Center for Literacy's (CFL) program was conducted to provide information on retention and attrition in an urban, open-entry/open-exit, individualized, goal-based literacy program. An exploratory analysis that used student and tutor records from 1985 through 1989 provided a summary of demographics and attendance patterns. This…

  5. Teacher Retention: An Appreciative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesavento-Conway, Jennifer Jean

    2010-01-01

    Nationally, the problem of teacher retention compounds the unstable nature of the educational situation, especially in urban, high-needs schools. Much of the instability of urban schools is due to teacher movement, the migration of teachers from school to another school within or between school districts, particularly from high-needs schools.…

  6. Maslow's Hierarchy and Student Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookman, David M.

    1989-01-01

    Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs offers perspective on student motivation and a rationale for college retention programing. Student affairs and faculty interventions addressing student safety needs and engaging students' sense of purpose reinforce persistence. A mentor program is a possible cooperative effort between student personnel and…

  7. Three Recruitment and Retention Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronx Community Coll., NY.

    This three-part report summarizes methodology and findings of three recruitment and retention studies conducted by the Bronx Community College (BCC) during 1979-1980. Part I examines a survey of enrolled students conducted to determine student attitudes toward BCC, the services that were most in demand, the reasons for attending BCC, and student…

  8. Plasmonic Nanostructured Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhazraji, Emad; Ghalib, A.; Manzoor, K.; Alsunaidi, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the scattering plasmonic resonance characteristics of silver nanospheres with a geometrical distribution that is modelled by Cellular Automata using time-domain numerical analysis. Cellular Automata are discrete mathematical structures that model different natural phenomena. Two binary one-dimensional Cellular Automata rules are considered to model the nanostructure, namely rule 30 and rule 33. The analysis produces three-dimensional scattering profiles of the entire plasmonic nanostructure. For the Cellular Automaton rule 33, the introduction of more Cellular Automata generations resulted only in slight red and blue shifts in the plasmonic modes with respect to the first generation. On the other hand, while rule 30 introduced significant red shifts in the resonance peaks at early generations, at later generations however, a peculiar effect is witnessed in the scattering profile as new peaks emerge as a feature of the overall Cellular Automata structure rather than the sum of the smaller parts that compose it. We strongly believe that these features that emerge as a result adopting the different 256 Cellular Automata rules as configuration models of nanostructures in different applications and systems might possess a great potential in enhancing their capability, sensitivity, efficiency, and power utilization.

  9. Differential cellular recognition pattern to M. tuberculosis targets defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production in blood from TB + patients from Honduras as compared to health care workers: TB and immune responses in patients from Honduras

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the quality of cellular immune responses directed against molecularly defined targets will guide the development of TB diagnostics and identification of molecularly defined, clinically relevant M.tb vaccine candidates. Methods Recombinant proteins (n = 8) and peptide pools (n = 14) from M. tuberculosis (M.tb) targets were used to compare cellular immune responses defined by IFN-γ and IL-17 production using a Whole Blood Assay (WBA) in a cohort of 148 individuals, i.e. patients with TB + (n = 38), TB- individuals with other pulmonary diseases (n = 81) and individuals exposed to TB without evidence of clinical TB (health care workers, n = 29). Results M.tb antigens Rv2958c (glycosyltransferase), Rv2962c (mycolyltransferase), Rv1886c (Ag85B), Rv3804c (Ag85A), and the PPE family member Rv3347c were frequently recognized, defined by IFN-γ production, in blood from healthy individuals exposed to M.tb (health care workers). A different recognition pattern was found for IL-17 production in blood from M.tb exposed individuals responding to TB10.4 (Rv0288), Ag85B (Rv1886c) and the PPE family members Rv0978c and Rv1917c. Conclusions The pattern of immune target recognition is different in regard to IFN-γ and IL-17 production to defined molecular M.tb targets in PBMCs from individuals frequently exposed to M.tb. The data represent the first mapping of cellular immune responses against M.tb targets in TB patients from Honduras. PMID:23497342

  10. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  11. Cellular neuropathology of tuberous sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huttenlocher, P R; Wollmann, R L

    1991-01-01

    The study of cerebral lesions of TSC by special histologic methods suggests that two populations of neurons and glia occur in TSC brains. One is a population of normally differentiated cells that form a normally constituted cortical plate. The other is a group of cells that are poorly differentiated, fail to organize into a normal cortical architecture, and form a variety of abnormal cellular aggregates in cortex and in subcortical locations. The proportion of these abnormal cells varies greatly from patient to patient. In some the central nervous system appears to be entirely spared. In others, only one or a few islands of dysplastic cells occur, whereas in still others a large number, perhaps even a majority, of neuroectodermal cells in the forebrain may be affected. The proportion of total cells that undergo abnormal differentiation apparently is an important factor relative to cortical function in TSC. At present we have no explanation for this marked heterogeneity in expression of the TSC gene or genes, and it remains one of the many unsolved mysteries of this illness.

  12. Bryostatin induces protein kinase C modulation, Mcl-1 up-regulation and phosphorylation of Bcl-2 resulting in cellular differentiation and resistance to drug-induced apoptosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Alun; Pepper, Chris; Hoy, Terry; Bentley, Paul

    2004-05-01

    Bryostatin, a macrocyclic lactone and protein kinase C (PKC) modulator, has been shown to have differentiation and anti-tumor activity against several leukemia cell lines in vitro. In this study, we demonstrated Bryostatin-induced differentiation in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) cells, characterized by an increase in cell size and a marked up-regulation of CD11c expression. The specific inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C pathways, PD98059 and GF 109203X respectively, each completely blocked Bryostatin-induced differentiation of B-CLL cells, suggesting that activation of the ERK pathway plays a direct role in this process in a PKC-dependent manner. Furthermore, Bryostatin reduced both spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis with chlorambucil, fludarabine and 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-Cda) in B-CLL cells. This resistance was associated with an early up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and post-translational phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at serine 70. The anti-apoptotic effects of Bryostatin were abrogated by GF 109203X, and to a lesser extent by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) inhibitor, LY294002. Interestingly, the ERK inhibitor, PD98059 inhibited Mcl-1 expression but had little effect on Bryostatin-induced survival suggesting that the ERK pathway predominantly affects differentiation. Taken together these results present an explanation for Bryostatin-induced B-CLL cell survival in which modulation of the PKC pathway couples differentiation with an increase in antiapoptotic protein expression and calls into question the rationale for its use in the treatment of B-CLL.

  13. 27 CFR 26.276 - Retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Records and Reports of Liquors From the Virgin Islands Filing and Retention of Records and Reports § 26.276 Retention...

  14. 27 CFR 26.276 - Retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... THE TREASURY LIQUORS LIQUORS AND ARTICLES FROM PUERTO RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Records and Reports of Liquors From the Virgin Islands Filing and Retention of Records and Reports § 26.276 Retention...

  15. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were ... too much at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself ...

  16. Population Ration, Intermarriage and Mother Tongue Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Eddie C. Y.

    1978-01-01

    An explanatory model of the relationship between mother tongue retention, population ratio, and intermarriage is presented. In general, data collected on mother tongue retention in Singapore, a multilingual and multiethnic society, support the proposed model. (DS)

  17. Electromagnetic cellular interactions.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Michal; Fields, Jeremy Z; Farhadi, Ashkan

    2011-05-01

    Chemical and electrical interaction within and between cells is well established. Just the opposite is true about cellular interactions via other physical fields. The most probable candidate for an other form of cellular interaction is the electromagnetic field. We review theories and experiments on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields generally, and if the cell-generated electromagnetic field can mediate cellular interactions. We do not limit here ourselves to specialized electro-excitable cells. Rather we describe physical processes that are of a more general nature and probably present in almost every type of living cell. The spectral range included is broad; from kHz to the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that there is a rather large number of theories on how cells can generate and detect electromagnetic fields and discuss experimental evidence on electromagnetic cellular interactions in the modern scientific literature. Although small, it is continuously accumulating.

  18. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  19. Designing Online Courses to Promote Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz-Uhler, Beth; Fisher, Amy; Han, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Although the issue of student retention is a campus-wide one, it is of special interest in online distance learning courses, where retention rates are reported to be lower than in face-to-face classes. Among the explanations and theories of retention rates in online courses, one that struck us as most useful is a structural one, namely, course…

  20. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This snapshot report provides information on student persistence and retention rates for Spring 2014. Data is presented in tabular format on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Starting Enrollment Intensity (all institutional sectors); (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates by Age at College Entry (all…

  1. Persistence-Retention. Snapshot™ Report, Spring 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Student Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Snapshot Report offers information on student persistence and retention rates for 2009-2013. It offers data on the following: (1) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year Private Nonprofit Institutions; (2) First-Year Persistence and Retention Rates for Students Who Start College at Four-Year…

  2. Designing Online Courses to Promote Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz-Uhler, Beth; Fisher, Amy; Han, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Although the issue of student retention is a campus-wide one, it is of special interest in online distance learning courses, where retention rates are reported to be lower than in face-to-face classes. Among the explanations and theories of retention rates in online courses, one that struck us as most useful is a structural one, namely, course…

  3. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spittle, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Few words have dominated the vocabulary of college retention as has the word "persistence." Many institutions still struggle to engage faculty and administrators in building campuswide retention efforts, to find the organizational levers that translate the abstractions and complexities of retention theory into scalable and durable initiatives, and…

  4. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Zucker, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Over 35 years of retention theory and literature have acknowledged the importance of institutional and student profiles in accounting for cross-sectional differences in retention and completion rates between types of colleges and universities. The first "P" within a 4 Ps framework of student retention--"profile"--recognizes that an institution's…

  5. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  6. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  7. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  8. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  9. 5 CFR 351.404 - Retention register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Retention register. 351.404 Section 351... FORCE Scope of Competition § 351.404 Retention register. (a) When a competing employee is to be released from a competitive level under this part, the agency shall establish a separate retention register...

  10. 12 CFR 202.12 - Record retention.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Record retention. 202.12 Section 202.12 Banks... OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) § 202.12 Record retention. (a) Retention of prohibited information. A creditor...) Applications. For 25 months (12 months for business credit, except as provided in paragraph (b)(5) of...

  11. Reframing Retention Strategy: A Focus on Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalsbeek, David H.; Zucker, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Over 35 years of retention theory and literature have acknowledged the importance of institutional and student profiles in accounting for cross-sectional differences in retention and completion rates between types of colleges and universities. The first "P" within a 4 Ps framework of student retention--"profile"--recognizes that an institution's…

  12. Differential retention of gene functions in a secondary metabolite cluster

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In fungi, distribution of secondary metabolite (SM) gene clusters is often associated with host- or environment-specific benefits provided by the SMs. In the plant pathogen Alternaria brassicicola (Dothideomycetes), the DEP cluster confers an ability to synthesize the SM depudecin, a histone deacety...

  13. Differential lead retention in zircons: implications for nuclear waste containment.

    PubMed

    Gentry, R V; Sworski, T J; McKown, H S; Smith, D H; Eby, R E; Christie, W H

    1982-04-16

    An innovative ultrasensitive technique was used for lead isotopic analysis of individual zircons extracted from granite core samples at depths of 960, 2170, 2900, 3930, and 4310 meters. The results show that lead, a relatively mobile element compared to the nuclear waste-related actinides uranium and thorium, has been highly retained at elevated temperatures (105 degrees to 313 degrees C) under conditions relevant to the burial of synthetic rock waste containers in deep granite holes.

  14. Do We Have a Retention Problem ... Or Do We Have a Problem "about" Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the "problem" of student retention in higher education. But unlike most, this paper focuses not on the problem of retention "per se" but rather on how institutional leaders think about student retention, completion, and success--how the way they frame their concerns about retention can give rise to a different sort of…

  15. Do We Have a Retention Problem ... Or Do We Have a Problem "about" Retention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the "problem" of student retention in higher education. But unlike most, this paper focuses not on the problem of retention "per se" but rather on how institutional leaders think about student retention, completion, and success--how the way they frame their concerns about retention can give rise to a different sort of…

  16. Recent Advances in Cellular Glycomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2013-01-01

    A large variety of glycans is intricately located on the cell surface, and the overall profile (the glycome, given the entire repertoire of glycoconjugate-associated sugars in cells and tissues) is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that control cell-cell adhesion, immune response, microbial pathogenesis and other cellular events. The glycomic profile also reflects cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. A glycoconjugate-based approach would therefore be expected to streamline discovery of novel cellular biomarkers. Development of such an approach has proven challenging, due to the technical difficulties associated with the analysis of various types of cellular glycomes; however, recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various classes of glycoconjugates. This review focuses on recent advances in the technical aspects of cellular glycomic analyses of major classes of glycoconjugates, including N- and O-linked glycans, derived from glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Articles that unveil the glycomics of various biologically important cells, including embryonic and somatic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and cancer cells, are discussed. PMID:24970165

  17. Modulation of foot-and-mouth disease virus pH threshold for uncoating correlates with differential sensitivity to inhibition of cellular Rab GTPases and decreases infectivity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Calvo, Angela; Caridi, Flavia; Rodriguez-Pulido, Miguel; Borrego, Belén; Sáiz, Margarita; Sobrino, Francisco; Martín-Acebes, Miguel A

    2012-11-01

    The role of cellular Rab GTPases that govern traffic between different endosome populations was analysed on foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection. Changes of viral receptor specificity did not alter Rab5 requirement for infection. However, a correlation between uncoating pH and requirement of Rab5 for infection was observed. A mutant FMDV with less acidic uncoating pH threshold was less sensitive to inhibition of Rab5, whereas another mutant with more acidic requirements was more sensitive to inhibition of Rab5. On the contrary, opposed correlations between uncoating pH and dependence of Rab function were observed upon expression of dominant-negative forms of Rab7 or 11. Modulation of uncoating pH also reduced FMDV virulence in suckling mice. These results are consistent with FMDV uncoating inside early endosomes and indicate that displacements from optimum pH for uncoating reduce viral fitness in vivo.

  18. Cellular monosaccharide patterns of Neisseriaceae.

    PubMed

    Jantzen, E; Bryn, K; Bovre, K

    1976-08-01

    Sixty-four strains of Neisseria, Moraxella, and Acinetobacter were screened for cellular monosaccharides by gas-liquid chromatography and other chromatographic techniques. The four sugars ribose, glucose, glucosamine, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO) were detected in all strains. Heptose was detected only in "true neisseriae" (Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, N. sicca, N. cinerea, N. flavescens, and N. elongata) and in the tentaively named species Moraxella urethralis. Some marked interspecies dissimilarities within groups were revealed. Thus, N. ovis and M. atlantae were characterized by the presence of mannose. Intraspecies differences were also encountered. N. meningitidis strains of serogroups B and C were distinguished from strains of serogroup A by their sialic acid content. This sugar was also detected in two out of three examined strains of M. nonliquefaciens. In Acinetobacter, heterogeneity of monosaccharide patterns was rather pronounced. The results show the applicability of gas chromatographic "monosaccharide" profiles fo whole cells or extracted carbohydrate in bacterial classification and identification, including differentiation at the subspecies level. In addition, such profiles may be useful for monitoring during purification of cellular polysaccharides.

  19. Targeting genes in insulin-associated signalling pathway, DNA damage, cell proliferation and cell differentiation pathways by tocotrienol-rich fraction in preventing cellular senescence of human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Durani, L W; Jaafar, F; Tan, J K; Tajul Arifin, K; Mohd Yusof, Y A; Wan Ngah, W Z; Makpol, S

    2015-01-01

    Tocotrienols have been known for their antioxidant properties besides their roles in cellular signalling, gene expression, immune response and apoptosis. This study aimed to determine the molecular mechanism of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) in preventing cellular senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by targeting the genes in senescence-associated signalling pathways. Real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was utilized to evaluate the expression of genes involved in these pathways. Our findings showed that SOD1 and CCS-1 were significantly down-regulated in pre-senescent cells while CCS-1 and PRDX6 were up-regulated in senescent cells (p<0.05). Treatment with TRF significantly down-regulated SOD1 in pre-senescent and senescent HDFs, up-regulated SOD2 in senescent cells, CAT in young HDFs, GPX1 in young and pre-senescent HDFs, and CCS-1 in young, pre-senescent and senescent HDFs (p<0.05). TRF treatment also caused up-regulation of FOXO3A in all age groups of cells (p<0.05). The expression of TP53, PAK2 and CDKN2A was significantly increased in senescent HDFs and treatment with TRF significantly down-regulated TP53 in senescent cells (p<0.05). MAPK14 was significantly up-regulated (p<0.05) in senescent HDFs while no changes was observed on the expression of JUN. TRF treatment, however, down-regulated MAPK14 in young and senescent cells and up-regulated JUN in young and pre-senescent HDFs (p<0.05). TRF modulated the expression of genes involved in senescence-associated signalling pathways during replicative senescence of HDFs.

  20. Retention in the Canadian Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-14

    the reasons that contribute to their personnel and retention problems . The research will then focus on the implemented solutions that the ADF has... one place Desire to live in own home 4 Low morale in work environment Desire to stay in one place Better career prospects in civilian life To... on my career management Low morale in my work environment and impact of job demands on family/personal life A desire for more challenging work

  1. Air Force Pilot Retention-1988.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    ACCESSION NO I I TITLE (include Security Classification) *AIR FORCE PILOT RETENTION - 1988 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Fisk, Robert B. III; Green, James W...FIGURE 13--Geographic Stability ...... ................ 20 FIGURE 14-- Personal Growth/Development .............. 20 - FIGURE 15--Overall Job...40 F ’j3;PE I - Creer Decisions Based on Fami Iy Considerat:on:; .. 40 [ r ,. oa the Air ’cr.e a Career ... . . .......... ~v; EXECUTIVE

  2. Retention of Motor Skills. Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    c) degree to which the learner can organize or impose order upon the elements that define the task; (d) struc- ture of the training environment...term retention of motor skill include (a) degree of proficiency attained by the learner during initial training; (b) amount and kind of refresher...Time to retrain individuals to original performance levels is generally rapid, consistently less than half the original training time. 6. Learners

  3. Acute urinary retention among astronauts.

    PubMed

    Stepaniak, Philip C; Ramchandani, Suneil R; Jones, Jeffrey A

    2007-04-01

    Although acute urinary retention (AUR) is not commonly thought of as a life-threatening condition, its presentation in orbit can lead to a number of medical complications that could compromise a space mission. We report on a middle-aged astronaut who developed urinary retention during two spaceflights. On the first mission of note, the astronaut initially took standard doses of promethazine and scopolamine before launch, and developed AUR immediately after entering orbit. For the first 3 d, the astronaut underwent intermittent catheterizations with a single balloon-tipped catheter. Due to the lack of iodine solution on board and the need for the astronaut to complete certain duties without interruption, the catheter was left in place for a total of 4 d. Although the ability to void returned after day 7, a bout of AUR reemerged on day 10, 1 d before landing. On return to Earth, a cystometrogram was unremarkable. During the astronaut's next mission, AUR again recurred for the first 24 h of microgravity exposure, and the astronaut was subsequently able to void spontaneously while in space. This report details the presentation of this astronaut, the precautions that were taken for space travel subsequent to the initial episode of AUR, and the possible reasons why space travel can predispose astronauts to urinary retention while in orbit. The four major causes of AUR--obstructive, pharmacologic, psychogenic, and neurogenic-are discussed, with an emphasis on how these may have played a role in this case.

  4. The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Eleventh-Grade Students Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al khawaldeh, Salem A.; Al Olaimat, Ali M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study conducted to investigate the contribution of conceptual change texts, accompanied by concept mapping instruction to eleventh-grade students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts, and their retention of this understanding. Cellular respiration concepts test was developed as a result of examination of related literature…

  5. The Contribution of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied by Concept Mapping to Eleventh-Grade Students Understanding of Cellular Respiration Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al khawaldeh, Salem A.; Al Olaimat, Ali M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study conducted to investigate the contribution of conceptual change texts, accompanied by concept mapping instruction to eleventh-grade students' understanding of cellular respiration concepts, and their retention of this understanding. Cellular respiration concepts test was developed as a result of examination of related literature…

  6. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  7. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found.

  8. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  9. Fatigue of cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Lin, J.Y.

    1996-01-01

    The fatigue of cellular materials is analyzed using dimensional arguments. When the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip fails after some cycles of loading, the macrocrack advances one cell diameter, giving the macrocrack growth rate of cellular materials. Paris law for microcrack propagation, Basquin law for high cycle fatigue and Coffin-Manson law for low cycle fatigue are employed in calculating the number of cycles to failure of the first unbroken cell wall ahead of the macrocrack tip. It is found that fatigue of cellular materials depends on cyclic stress intensity range, cell size, relative density and the fatigue parameters of the solid from which they are made. Theoretical modelling of fatigue of foams is compared to data in polymer foams; agreement is good.

  10. Effect of Vibration on Retention Characteristics of Screen Acquisition Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Park, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation of the effect of vibration on the retention characteristics of screen acquisition systems was performed. The functioning of surface tension devices using fine-mesh screens requires that the pressure differential acting on the screen be less than its pressure retention capability. When exceeded, screen breakdown will occur and gas-free expulsion of propellant will no longer be possible. An analytical approach to predicting the effect of vibration was developed. This approach considers the transmission of the vibration to the screens of the device and the coupling of the liquid and the screen in establishing the screen response. A method of evaluating the transient response of the gas/liquid interface within the screen was also developed.

  11. Cellular immunotherapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Berraondo, Pedro; Labiano, Sara; Minute, Luna; Etxeberria, Iñaki; Vasquez, Marcos; Sanchez-Arraez, Alvaro; Teijeira, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Lessons learned over decades on the use of gene and cell therapies have found clinical applicability in the field of cancer immunotherapy. On December 16(th), 2016 a symposium was held in Pamplona (Spain) to analyze and discuss the critical points for the clinical success of adoptive cell transfer strategies in cancer immunotherapy. Cellular immunotherapy is being currently exploited for the development of new cancer vaccines using ex vivo manipulated dendritic cells or to enhance the number of effector cells, transferring reinvigorated NK cells or T cells. In this meeting report, we summarize the main topics covered and provide an overview of the field of cellular immunotherapy.

  12. Cellular structural biology.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yutaka; Selenko, Philipp

    2010-10-01

    While we appreciate the complexity of the intracellular environment as a general property of every living organism, we collectively lack the appropriate tools to analyze protein structures in a cellular context. In-cell NMR spectroscopy represents a novel biophysical tool to investigate the conformational and functional characteristics of biomolecules at the atomic level inside live cells. Here, we review recent in-cell NMR developments and provide an outlook towards future applications in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. We hope to thereby emphasize the usefulness of in-cell NMR techniques for cellular studies of complex biological processes and for structural analyses in native environments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcriptome transfer produces a predictable cellular phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sul, Jai-Yoon; Wu, Chia-wen K.; Zeng, Fanyi; Jochems, Jeanine; Lee, Miler T.; Kim, Tae Kyung; Peritz, Tiina; Buckley, Peter; Cappelleri, David J.; Maronski, Margaret; Kim, Minsun; Kumar, Vijay; Meaney, David; Kim, Junhyong; Eberwine, James

    2009-01-01

    Cellular phenotype is the conglomerate of multiple cellular processes involving gene and protein expression that result in the elaboration of a cell's particular morphology and function. It has been thought that differentiated postmitotic cells have their genomes hard wired, with little ability for phenotypic plasticity. Here we show that transfer of the transcriptome from differentiated rat astrocytes into a nondividing differentiated rat neuron resulted in the conversion of the neuron into a functional astrocyte-like cell in a time-dependent manner. This single-cell study permits high resolution of molecular and functional components that underlie phenotype identity. The RNA population from astrocytes contains RNAs in the appropriate relative abundances that give rise to regulatory RNAs and translated proteins that enable astrocyte identity. When transferred into the postmitotic neuron, the astrocyte RNA population converts 44% of the neuronal host cells into the destination astrocyte-like phenotype. In support of this observation, quantitative measures of cellular morphology, single-cell PCR, single-cell microarray, and single-cell functional analyses have been performed. The host-cell phenotypic changes develop over many weeks and are persistent. We call this process of RNA-induced phenotype changes, transcriptome-induced phenotype remodeling. PMID:19380745

  14. Mechanisms of nutrient retention and its relation to flow connectivity in river-floodplain corridors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Laurel; Harvey, Judson; Maglio, Morgan M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding heterogeneity or patchiness in the distribution of vegetation and retention of C and nutrients in river corridors is critical for setting priorities for river management and restoration. Several mechanisms of spatial differentiation in nutrient retention in river and floodplain corridors have been recognized, but few studies have distinguished their relative importance or established their role in long-term geomorphic change, nutrient retention, and connectivity with downstream systems. We evaluated the ability of 3 mechanisms (evapotranspiration focusing [EF], differential hydrologic exchange [DHE], and particulate nutrient redistribution [PNR]) to explain spatial patterns of P retention and function in the Everglades (Florida, USA). We used field measurements in sloughs and on slightly higher, more densely vegetated ridges to quanti