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Sample records for differential quantum tunneling

  1. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-07-01

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations.

  2. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-01-01

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations. PMID:27465107

  3. Differential quantum tunneling contributions in nitroalkane oxidase catalyzed and the uncatalyzed proton transfer reaction

    PubMed Central

    Major, Dan T.; Heroux, Annie; Orville, Allen M.; Valley, Michael P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    The proton transfer reaction between the substrate nitroethane and Asp-402 catalyzed by nitroalkane oxidase and the uncatalyzed process in water have been investigated using a path-integral free-energy perturbation method. Although the dominating effect in rate acceleration by the enzyme is the lowering of the quasiclassical free energy barrier, nuclear quantum effects also contribute to catalysis in nitroalkane oxidase. In particular, the overall nuclear quantum effects have greater contributions to lowering the classical barrier in the enzyme, and there is a larger difference in quantum effects between proton and deuteron transfer for the enzymatic reaction than that in water. Both experiment and computation show that primary KIEs are enhanced in the enzyme, and the computed Swain-Schaad exponent for the enzymatic reaction is exacerbated relative to that in the absence of the enzyme. In addition, the computed tunneling transmission coefficient is approximately three times greater for the enzyme reaction than the uncatalyzed reaction, and the origin of the difference may be attributed to a narrowing effect in the effective potentials for tunneling in the enzyme than that in aqueous solution. PMID:19926855

  4. Quantum Tunneling and Complex Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynig, Max; Haggard, Hal

    2017-01-01

    In general, the semiclassical approximation of quantum mechanical tunneling fails to treat tunneling through barriers if real initial conditions and trajectories are used. By analytically continuing classical dynamics to the complex plane the problems encountered in the approximation can be resolved. While, the complex methods discussed here have been previously explored, no one has exhibited an analytically solvable case. The essential features of the complex method will be discussed in the context of a novel, analytically solvable problem. These methods could be useful in quantum gravity, with applications to the tunneling of spacetime geometries.

  5. Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers

    PubMed Central

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Denchev, Vasil S.; Amin, Mohammad H.; Smirnov, Anatoly Yu; Mohseni, Masoud; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational multiqubit tunnelling has not yet been observed, and a theory of co-tunnelling under high- and low-frequency noises is lacking. Here we show that 8-qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational primitive where classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In support of the design of quantum annealers we develop a nonperturbative theory of open quantum dynamics under realistic noise characteristics. This theory accurately predicts the rate of many-body dissipative quantum tunnelling subject to the polaron effect. Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate that quantum tunnelling outperforms thermal hopping along classical paths for problems with up to 200 qubits containing the computational primitive. PMID:26739797

  6. Quantum Tunneling Time: Relativistic Extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dai-Yu; Wang, Towe; Xue, Xun

    2013-11-01

    Several years ago, in quantum mechanics, Davies proposed a method to calculate particle's traveling time with the phase difference of wave function. The method is convenient for calculating the sojourn time inside a potential step and the tunneling time through a potential hill. We extend Davies' non-relativistic calculation to relativistic quantum mechanics, with and without particle-antiparticle creation, using Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac Equation, for different forms of energy-momentum relation. The extension is successful only when the particle and antiparticle creation/annihilation effect is negligible.

  7. Tunneling of quantum rotobreathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorignac, J.; Flach, S.

    2002-06-01

    We analyze the quantum properties of a system consisting of two nonlinearly coupled pendulums. This nonintegrable system exhibits two different symmetries: a permutational symmetry and another one related to the reversal of the total momentum of the system. Each of these symmetries is responsible for the existence of two kinds of quasidegenerate states. At sufficiently high energy, pairs of symmetry-related states glue together to form quadruplets. We show that, starting from the anticontinuous limit, particular quadruplets allow us to construct quantum states whose properties are very similar to those of classical rotobreathers. Contrary to the classical situation, the coupling between pendulums necessarily introduces a periodic exchange of energy between them at a frequency which is proportional to the energy splitting between quasidegenerate states related to the permutation symmetry. This splitting may remain very small as the coupling strength increases and is a decreasing function of the pair energy. The energy may be therefore stored in one pendulum during a time period very long as compared to the inverse of the internal rotobreather frequency.

  8. Effect of Chaos on Relativistic Quantum Tunneling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Effect of chaos on relativistic quantum tunneling This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article...of chaos on relativistic quantum tunneling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...tunneling dynamics even in the relativistic quantum regime. Similar phenomena have been observed in graphene. A physical theory is developed to

  9. Direct Approach to Quantum Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, Anders; Farhi, David; Frost, William; Schwartz, Matthew D.

    2016-12-01

    The decay rates of quasistable states in quantum field theories are usually calculated using instanton methods. Standard derivations of these methods rely in a crucial way upon deformations and analytic continuations of the physical potential and on the saddle-point approximation. While the resulting procedure can be checked against other semiclassical approaches in some one-dimensional cases, it is challenging to trace the role of the relevant physical scales, and any intuitive handle on the precision of the approximations involved is at best obscure. In this Letter, we use a physical definition of the tunneling probability to derive a formula for the decay rate in both quantum mechanics and quantum field theory directly from the Minkowski path integral, without reference to unphysical deformations of the potential. There are numerous benefits to this approach, from nonperturbative applications to precision calculations and aesthetic simplicity.

  10. Resonant tunnelling in a quantum oxide superlattice

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang A.; You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Suyoun; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-06-24

    Resonant tunneling is a quantum mechanical process that has long been attracting both scientific and technological attention owing to its intriguing underlying physics and unique applications for high-speed electronics. The materials system exhibiting resonant tunneling, however, has been largely limited to the conventional semiconductors, partially due to their excellent crystalline quality. Here we show that a deliberately designed transition metal oxide superlattice exhibits a resonant tunneling behaviour with a clear negative differential resistance. The tunneling occurred through an atomically thin, lanthanum δ- doped SrTiO3 layer, and the negative differential resistance was realized on top of the bi-polar resistance switching typically observed for perovskite oxide junctions. This combined process resulted in an extremely large resistance ratio (~105) between the high and low resistance states. Lastly, the unprecedentedly large control found in atomically thin δ-doped oxide superlattices can open a door to novel oxide-based high-frequency logic devices.

  11. Resonant tunnelling in a quantum oxide superlattice

    DOE PAGES

    Choi, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang A.; You, Jeong Ho; ...

    2015-06-24

    Resonant tunneling is a quantum mechanical process that has long been attracting both scientific and technological attention owing to its intriguing underlying physics and unique applications for high-speed electronics. The materials system exhibiting resonant tunneling, however, has been largely limited to the conventional semiconductors, partially due to their excellent crystalline quality. Here we show that a deliberately designed transition metal oxide superlattice exhibits a resonant tunneling behaviour with a clear negative differential resistance. The tunneling occurred through an atomically thin, lanthanum δ- doped SrTiO3 layer, and the negative differential resistance was realized on top of the bi-polar resistance switching typicallymore » observed for perovskite oxide junctions. This combined process resulted in an extremely large resistance ratio (~105) between the high and low resistance states. Lastly, the unprecedentedly large control found in atomically thin δ-doped oxide superlattices can open a door to novel oxide-based high-frequency logic devices.« less

  12. Quantum Tunneling Affects Engine Performance.

    PubMed

    Som, Sibendu; Liu, Wei; Zhou, Dingyu D Y; Magnotti, Gina M; Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Longman, Douglas E; Skodje, Rex T; Davis, Michael J

    2013-06-20

    We study the role of individual reaction rates on engine performance, with an emphasis on the contribution of quantum tunneling. It is demonstrated that the effect of quantum tunneling corrections for the reaction HO2 + HO2 = H2O2 + O2 can have a noticeable impact on the performance of a high-fidelity model of a compression-ignition (e.g., diesel) engine, and that an accurate prediction of ignition delay time for the engine model requires an accurate estimation of the tunneling correction for this reaction. The three-dimensional model includes detailed descriptions of the chemistry of a surrogate for a biodiesel fuel, as well as all the features of the engine, such as the liquid fuel spray and turbulence. This study is part of a larger investigation of how the features of the dynamics and potential energy surfaces of key reactions, as well as their reaction rate uncertainties, affect engine performance, and results in these directions are also presented here.

  13. Virtual Processes and Quantum Tunnelling as Fictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Richard T. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper it is argued that virtual processes are dispensable fictions. The argument proceeds by a comparison with the phenomenon of quantum tunnelling. Building on an analysis of Levy-Leblond and Balibar, it is argued that, although the phenomenon known as quantum tunnelling certainly occurs and is at the basis of many paradigmatic quantum…

  14. Dissipation and tunneling in quantum Hall bilayers.

    PubMed

    Jack, Robert L; Lee, Derek K K; Cooper, Nigel R

    2004-09-17

    We discuss the interplay between transport and intrinsic dissipation in quantum Hall bilayers, within the framework of a simple thought experiment. We compute, for the first time, quantum corrections to the semiclassical dynamics of this system. This allows us to reinterpret tunneling measurements on these systems. We find a strong peak in the zero-temperature tunneling current that arises from the decay of Josephson-like oscillations into incoherent charge fluctuations. In the presence of an in-plane field, resonances in the tunneling current develop an asymmetric line shape.

  15. Scheme for accelerating quantum tunneling dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khujakulov, Anvar; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    We propose a scheme of the exact fast forwarding of standard quantum dynamics for a charged particle. The present idea allows the acceleration of both the amplitude and the phase of the wave function throughout the fast-forward time range and is distinct from that of Masuda and Nakamura [Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 1135 (2010), 10.1098/rspa.2009.0446], which enabled acceleration of only the amplitude of the wave function on the way. We apply the proposed method to the quantum tunneling phenomena and obtain the electromagnetic field to ensure the rapid penetration of wave functions through a tunneling barrier. Typical examples described here are (1) an exponential wave packet passing through the δ -function barrier and (2) the opened Moshinsky shutter with a δ -function barrier just behind the shutter. We elucidate the tunneling current in the vicinity of the barrier and find a remarkable enhancement of the tunneling rate (tunneling power) due to the fast forwarding. In the case of a very high barrier, in particular, we present the asymptotic analysis and exhibit a suitable driving force to recover a recognizable tunneling current. The analysis is also carried out on the exact acceleration of macroscopic quantum tunneling with use of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which accommodates a tunneling barrier.

  16. Quantum transport in multiple-barrier resonant-tunneling devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newaz, A. K. M.

    I have studied experimentally the quantum transport in multiple-barrier resonant-tunneling devices, namely double-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes (DBRTD) and triple-barrier resonant-tunneling diodes (TBRTD), to understand the tunneling processes in multiple-barrier resonant structures. We have performed various types of transport measurements, such as current, conductance, resonant magnetotunneling spectroscopy and shot noise measurements at low temperature (T=4.2K). To test the validity of the in-plane momentum conservation rule when electrons tunnel through a multiple-barrier resonant-tunneling device, I have studied in details the current and conductance with and without magnetic field perpendicular to the interfaces. We have found conclusive evidence that though this conservation rule governs the tunneling processes in DBRTD, the conservation rule breaks down in TBRTD. In addition, I have observed profound effect of nonparabolicity in the tunneling processes. By measuring the shot noise in TBRTDs at low temperature, I have found that the shot noise in a TBRTD is reduced over the Poissonian value, 2 eI, whenever the differential conductance is positive and is enhanced over 2eI when the differential conductance is negative. This behavior, although qualitatively similar to that found in DBRTD, differs from it in important details. In TBRTDs the noise reduction is considerably greater than that predicted by a semiclassical model, and the enhancement does not correlate with the strength of the negative differential conductance. Moreover, I have not observed any signature of the effect of the coherent tunneling on the shot noise suppression in coherently coupled TBRTDs. This suggests that the phase coherence does not have any effect on the shot noise suppression. On the other hand, the failure of a semiclassical model to explain shot noise suppression suggests an incomplete understanding of the noise properties of multiple-barrier heterostructures and a need for

  17. Quantum electron tunneling in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2011-05-12

    We have simulated the atomistic details of electronic wiring of all Fe/S clusters in complex I, a key enzyme in the respiratory electron transport chain. The tunneling current theory of many-electron systems is applied to the broken-symmetry (BS) states of the protein at the ZINDO level. While the one-electron tunneling approximation is found to hold in electron tunneling between the antiferromagnetic binuclear and tetranuclear Fe/S clusters without major orbital or spin rearrangement of the core electrons, induced polarization of the core electrons contributes significantly to decrease the electron transfer rates to 19-56 %. Calculated tunneling energy is about 3 eV higher than Fermi level in the band gap of the protein, which supports that the mechanism of electron transfer is quantum mechanical tunneling, as in the rest of the electron transport chain. Resulting electron tunneling pathways consist of up to three key contributing protein residues between neighboring Fe/S clusters. A signature of the wave properties of electrons is observed as distinct quantum interferences when multiple tunneling pathways exist. In N6a-N6b, electron tunnels along different pathways depending on the involved BS states, suggesting possible fluctuations of the tunneling pathways driven by the local protein environment. The calculated distance dependence of the electron transfer rates with internal water molecules included is in good agreement with a reported phenomenological relation.

  18. Chaos regularization of quantum tunneling rates.

    PubMed

    Pecora, Louis M; Lee, Hoshik; Wu, Dong-Ho; Antonsen, Thomas; Lee, Ming-Jer; Ott, Edward

    2011-06-01

    Quantum tunneling rates through a barrier separating two-dimensional, symmetric, double-well potentials are shown to depend on the classical dynamics of the billiard trajectories in each well and, hence, on the shape of the wells. For shapes that lead to regular (integrable) classical dynamics the tunneling rates fluctuate greatly with eigenenergies of the states sometimes by over two orders of magnitude. Contrarily, shapes that lead to completely chaotic trajectories lead to tunneling rates whose fluctuations are greatly reduced, a phenomenon we call regularization of tunneling rates. We show that a random-plane-wave theory of tunneling accounts for the mean tunneling rates and the small fluctuation variances for the chaotic systems.

  19. Decoding DNA, RNA and peptides with quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2016-02-01

    Drugs and treatments could be precisely tailored to an individual patient by extracting their cellular- and molecular-level information. For this approach to be feasible on a global scale, however, information on complete genomes (DNA), transcriptomes (RNA) and proteomes (all proteins) needs to be obtained quickly and at low cost. Quantum mechanical phenomena could potentially be of value here, because the biological information needs to be decoded at an atomic level and quantum tunnelling has recently been shown to be able to differentiate single nucleobases and amino acids in short sequences. Here, we review the different approaches to using quantum tunnelling for sequencing, highlighting the theoretical background to the method and the experimental capabilities demonstrated to date. We also explore the potential advantages of the approach and the technical challenges that must be addressed to deliver practical quantum sequencing devices.

  20. Quantum Tunneling Parameter in Global Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itami, Teturo

    Quantum tunneling that helps particles escape from local minima has been applied in “quantum annealing” method to global optimization of nonlinear functions. To control size of kinetic energy of quantum particles, we form a “quantum tunneling parameter” QT≡m/HR2, where HR corresponds to a physical constant h, Planck's constant divided by 2π, that determines the lowest eigenvalue of quantum particles with mass m. Assumptions on profiles of the function V(x) around its minimum point x0, harmonic oscillator type and square well type, make us possible to write down analytical formulae of the kinetic energy K in terms of QT. The formulae tell that we can make quantum expectation value of particle coordinates x approximate to the minimum point x0 in QT→∞. For systems where we have almost degenerate eigenvalues, examination working with our QT, that x→x0 in QT→∞, is analytically shown also efficient. Similar results that x→x0 under QT→∞ are also obtained when we utilize random-walk quantum Monte Carlo method to represent tunneling phenomena according to conventional quantum annealing.

  1. Computational Multiqubit Tunnelling in Programmable Quantum Annealers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-25

    Masoud Mohseni1 & Hartmut Neven1 Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state traverses energy barriers higher than the energy of the...the initial temperature must be high to overcome tall energy barriers. As the algorithm progresses, the temperature is gradually lowered to distinguish...between local minima with small energy differences. This causes the stochastic process to freeze once the thermal energy is lower than the height of

  2. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Description of Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K.

    2012-06-15

    The quantum hydrodynamic approach is based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting fluid-like equations of motion describe the flow of probability and an accurate solution to these equations is equivalent to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic approach provides new insight into the mechanisms as well as an alternative computational approach for treating tunneling phenomena. New concepts include well-defined 'quantum trajectories', 'quantum potential', and 'quantum force' all of which have classical analogues. The quantum potential and its associated force give rise to all quantum mechanical effects such as zero point energy, tunneling, and interference. A new numerical approach called the Iterative Finite Difference Method (IFDM) will be discussed. The IFDM is used to solve the set of non-linear coupled hydrodynamic equations. It is 2nd-order accurate in both space and time and exhibits exponential convergence with respect to the iteration count. The stability and computational efficiency of the IFDM is significantly improved by using a 'smart' Eulerian grid which has the same computational advantages as a Lagrangian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) grid. The IFDM is also capable of treating anharmonic potentials. Example calculations using the IFDM will be presented which include: a one-dimensional Gaussian wave packet tunneling through an Eckart barrier, a one-dimensional bound-state Morse oscillator, and a two-dimensional (2D) model collinear reaction using an anharmonic potential energy surface. Approximate treatments of the quantum hydrodynamic equations will also be discussed which could allow scaling of the calculations to hundreds of degrees of freedom which is important for treating tunneling phenomena in condensed phase systems.

  3. Boundary conditions in tunneling via quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1993-01-01

    Via the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics, an approach to the problem of tunneling through sharp-edged potential barriers is developed. Above all, it is shown how more general boundary conditions follow from the continuity of mass, momentum, and energy.

  4. Quantum Simulation of Tunneling in Small Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sornborger, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    A number of quantum algorithms have been performed on small quantum computers; these include Shor's prime factorization algorithm, error correction, Grover's search algorithm and a number of analog and digital quantum simulations. Because of the number of gates and qubits necessary, however, digital quantum particle simulations remain untested. A contributing factor to the system size required is the number of ancillary qubits needed to implement matrix exponentials of the potential operator. Here, we show that a set of tunneling problems may be investigated with no ancillary qubits and a cost of one single-qubit operator per time step for the potential evolution, eliminating at least half of the quantum gates required for the algorithm and more than that in the general case. Such simulations are within reach of current quantum computer architectures. PMID:22916333

  5. Quantum Beats of Resonant Tunneling between Fractional Quantum Hall Edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari J.; Goldman, V. J.

    1997-03-01

    We report measurements of resonant tunneling between two fractional quantum Hall edges in a quantum antidot geometry (I. J. Maasilta and V. J. Goldman, to appear in Phys. Rev. B 55),(1997).. We observe beats in the conductance oscillations, whose evolution as a function of experimental parameters is discussed. Possible explanations in terms of different models (G. Kirczenow Phys. Rev. B 53), 15767 (1996), M. Geller et. al, preprint. are presented.

  6. Tunneling current through fractional quantum Hall interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, O.; Slingerland, J. K.; Simon, S. H.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the tunneling current through a Fabry-Pérot interferometer in the fractional quantum Hall regime. Within linear response theory (weak tunneling but arbitrary source-drain voltage), we find a general expression for the current due to tunneling of quasiparticles in terms of Carlson's R function. Our result is valid for fractional quantum Hall states with an edge theory consisting of a charged channel and any number of neutral channels, with possibly different edge velocities and different chiralities. We analyze the case with a single neutral channel in detail, which applies for instance to the edge of the Moore-Read state. In addition, we consider an asymmetric interferometer with different edge lengths between the point contacts on opposite edges, and we study the behavior of the current as a function of varying edge length. Recent experiments attempted to measure the Aharanov-Bohm effect by changing the area inside the interferometer using a plunger gate. Theoretical analyses of these experiments have so far not taken into account the accompanying change in the edge lengths. We show that the tunneling current exhibits multiple oscillations as a function of this edge length, with frequencies proportional to the injected edge current and inversely proportional to the edge velocities. In particular, the edge velocities can be measured by looking at the Fourier spectrum of the edge current. We provide a numerical scheme to calculate and plot the R function, and include sample plots for a variety of edge states with parameter values, which are experimentally relevant.

  7. In-in formalism on tunneling background: Multidimensional quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki

    2013-07-01

    We reformulate quantum tunneling in a multidimensional system where the tunneling sector is nonlinearly coupled to oscillators. The WKB wave function is explicitly constructed under the assumption that the system was in the ground state before tunneling. We find that the quantum state after tunneling can be expressed in the language of the conventional in-in formalism. Some implications of the result to cosmology are discussed.

  8. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian; GNS theory Group Team

    In between 2 metallic nanopads, adding identical and independent electron transfer paths in parallel increases the electronic effective coupling between the 2 nanopads through the quantum circuit defined by those paths. Measuring this increase of effective coupling using the tunnelling current intensity can lead for example for 2 paths in parallel to the now standard G =G1 +G2 + 2√{G1 .G2 } conductance superposition law (1). This is only valid for the tunnelling regime (2). For large electronic coupling to the nanopads (or at resonance), G can saturate and even decay as a function of the number of parallel paths added in the quantum circuit (3). We provide here the explanation of this phenomenon: the measurement of the effective Rabi oscillation frequency using the current intensity is constrained by the normalization principle of quantum mechanics. This limits the quantum conductance G for example to go when there is only one channel per metallic nanopads. This ef fect has important consequences for the design of Boolean logic gates at the atomic scale using atomic scale or intramolecular circuits. References: This has the financial support by European PAMS project.

  9. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  10. Quantum-Sequencing: Biophysics of quantum tunneling through nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    Tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy has extensively been used in physical surface sciences to study quantum tunneling to measure electronic local density of states of nanomaterials and to characterize adsorbed species. Quantum-Sequencing (Q-Seq) is a new method based on tunneling microscopy for electronic sequencing of single molecule of nucleic acids. A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the unique ``electronic fingerprints'' for all nucleotides on DNA and RNA using Q-Seq along their intrinsic biophysical parameters. We have analyzed tunneling spectra for the nucleotides at different pH conditions and analyzed the HOMO, LUMO and energy gap for all of them. In addition we show a number of biophysical parameters to further characterize all nucleobases (electron and hole transition voltage and energy barriers). These results highlight the robustness of Q-Seq as a technique for next-generation sequencing.

  11. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    PubMed Central

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  12. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  13. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-25

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  14. Tunnelling between the edges of two lateral quantum Hall systems

    PubMed

    Kang; Stormer; Pfeiffer; Baldwin; West

    2000-01-06

    The edge of a two-dimensional electron system in a magnetic field consists of one-dimensional channels that arise from the confining electric field at the edge of the system. The crossed electric and magnetic fields cause electrons to drift parallel to the sample boundary, creating a chiral current that travels along the edge in only one direction. In an ideal two-dimensional electron system in the quantum Hall regime, all the current flows along the edge. Quantization of the Hall resistance arises from occupation of N one-dimensional edge channels, each contributing a conductance of e2/h. Here we report differential conductance measurements, in the integer quantum Hall regime, of tunnelling between the edges of a pair of two-dimensional electron systems that are separated by an atomically precise, high-quality, tunnel barrier. The resultant interaction between the edge states leads to the formation of new energy gaps and an intriguing dispersion relation for electrons travelling along the barrier: for example, we see a persistent conductance peak at zero bias voltage and an absence of tunnelling features due to electron spin. These features are unexpected and are not consistent with a model of weakly interacting edge states. Remnant disorder along the barrier and charge screening may each play a role, although detailed numerical studies will be required to elucidate these effects.

  15. Josephson inplane and tunneling currents in bilayer quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2013-12-04

    A Bose-Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (–e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν = 1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless in tunneling experiments with various geometries.

  16. Quantum terahertz electrodynamics and macroscopic quantum tunneling in layered superconductors.

    PubMed

    Savel'ev, Sergey; Rakhmanov, A L; Nori, Franco

    2007-02-16

    We derive a quantum field theory of Josephson plasma waves (JPWs) in layered superconductors, which describes two types of interacting JPW bosonic quanta (one heavy and one lighter). We propose a mechanism of enhancement of macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) in stacks of intrinsic Josephson junctions. Because of the long-range interaction between junctions in layered superconductors, the calculated MQT escape rate Gamma has a nonlinear dependence on the number of junctions in the stack. We show that the crossover temperature between quantum and thermal escape increases when increasing the number of junctions. This allows us to quantitatively describe striking recent experiments in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+delta stacks.

  17. Experimental simulation of quantum tunneling in small systems.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guan-Ru; Lu, Yao; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that quantum computers are superior to classical computers in efficiently simulating quantum systems. Here we report the first experimental simulation of quantum tunneling through potential barriers, a widespread phenomenon of a unique quantum nature, via NMR techniques. Our experiment is based on a digital particle simulation algorithm and requires very few spin-1/2 nuclei without the need of ancillary qubits. The occurrence of quantum tunneling through a barrier, together with the oscillation of the state in potential wells, are clearly observed through the experimental results. This experiment has clearly demonstrated the possibility to observe and study profound physical phenomena within even the reach of small quantum computers.

  18. Sensing the quantum limit in scanning tunnelling spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ast, Christian R.; Jäck, Berthold; Senkpiel, Jacob; Eltschka, Matthias; Etzkorn, Markus; Ankerhold, Joachim; Kern, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The tunnelling current in scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) is typically and often implicitly modelled by a continuous and homogeneous charge flow. If the charging energy of a single-charge quantum sufficiently exceeds the thermal energy, however, the granularity of the current becomes non-negligible. In this quantum limit, the capacitance of the tunnel junction mediates an interaction of the tunnelling electrons with the surrounding electromagnetic environment and becomes a source of noise itself, which cannot be neglected in STS. Using a scanning tunnelling microscope operating at 15 mK, we show that we operate in this quantum limit, which determines the ultimate energy resolution in STS. The P(E)-theory describes the probability for a tunnelling electron to exchange energy with the environment and can be regarded as the energy resolution function. We experimentally demonstrate this effect with a superconducting aluminium tip and a superconducting aluminium sample, where it is most pronounced. PMID:27708282

  19. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  20. Quantum Adiabatic Algorithms and Large Spin Tunnelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulatov, A.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a theoretical study of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm with different evolution paths proposed in this paper. The algorithm is applied to a random binary optimization problem (a version of the 3-Satisfiability problem) where the n-bit cost function is symmetric with respect to the permutation of individual bits. The evolution paths are produced, using the generic control Hamiltonians H (r) that preserve the bit symmetry of the underlying optimization problem. In the case where the ground state of H(0) coincides with the totally-symmetric state of an n-qubit system the algorithm dynamics is completely described in terms of the motion of a spin-n/2. We show that different control Hamiltonians can be parameterized by a set of independent parameters that are expansion coefficients of H (r) in a certain universal set of operators. Only one of these operators can be responsible for avoiding the tunnelling in the spin-n/2 system during the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We show that it is possible to select a coefficient for this operator that guarantees a polynomial complexity of the algorithm for all problem instances. We show that a successful evolution path of the algorithm always corresponds to the trajectory of a classical spin-n/2 and provide a complete characterization of such paths.

  1. Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life

    PubMed Central

    Trixler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating in photon tunnelling mode. However, this review demonstrates that tunnelling can do far more, being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes which are crucial in theories about the origin and evolution of life can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the chemical evolution in stellar interiors and within the cold interstellar medium, prebiotic chemistry in the atmosphere and subsurface of planetary bodies, planetary habitability via insolation and geothermal heat as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines. This review shows that quantum tunnelling has many highly important implications to the field of molecular and biological evolution, prebiotic chemistry and astrobiology. PMID:24039543

  2. Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life.

    PubMed

    Trixler, Frank

    2013-08-01

    Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating in photon tunnelling mode. However, this review demonstrates that tunnelling can do far more, being of vital importance for life: physical and chemical processes which are crucial in theories about the origin and evolution of life can be traced directly back to the effects of quantum tunnelling. These processes include the chemical evolution in stellar interiors and within the cold interstellar medium, prebiotic chemistry in the atmosphere and subsurface of planetary bodies, planetary habitability via insolation and geothermal heat as well as the function of biomolecular nanomachines. This review shows that quantum tunnelling has many highly important implications to the field of molecular and biological evolution, prebiotic chemistry and astrobiology.

  3. Dynamical symmetries in Kondo tunneling through complex quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenko, T; Kikoin, K; Avishai, Y

    2002-10-07

    Kondo tunneling reveals hidden SO(n) dynamical symmetries of evenly occupied quantum dots. As is exemplified for an experimentally realizable triple quantum dot in parallel geometry, the possible values n=3,4,5,7 can be easily tuned by gate voltages. Following construction of the corresponding o(n) algebras, scaling equations are derived and Kondo temperatures are calculated. The symmetry group for a magnetic field induced anisotropic Kondo tunneling is SU(2) or SO(4).

  4. Electron Tunneling, a Quantum Probe for the Quantum World of Nanotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipps, K. W.; Scudiero, L.

    2005-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical probe is essential to study the quantum world, which is provided by electron tunneling. A spectroscopic mapping to image the electron-transport pathways on a sub-molecular scale is used.

  5. Computational Role of Tunneling in a Programmable Quantum Annealer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Amin, Mohammad; Mohseni, Masoud; Denchev, Vasil S.; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state tunnels through energy barriers above the energy of the state itself. Tunneling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we present the first experimental evidence of a computational role of multiqubit quantum tunneling in the evolution of a programmable quantum annealer. We developed a theoretical model based on a NIBA Quantum Master Equation to describe the multi-qubit dissipative cotunneling effects under the complex noise characteristics of such quantum devices.We start by considering a computational primitive, the simplest non-convex optimization problem consisting of just one global and one local minimum. The quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In our study the non-convex potentials are realized by frustrated networks of qubit clusters with strong intra-cluster coupling. We show that the collective effect of the quantum environment is suppressed in the critical phase during the evolution where quantum tunneling decides the right path to solution. In a later stage dissipation facilitates the multiqubit cotunneling leading to the solution state. The predictions of the model accurately describe the experimental data from the D-WaveII quantum annealer at NASA Ames. In our computational primitive the temperature dependence of the probability of success in the quantum model is opposite to that of the classical paths with thermal hopping. Specially, we provide an analysis of an optimization problem with sixteen qubits,demonstrating eight qubit cotunneling that increases success probabilities. Furthermore, we report results for larger problems with up to 200 qubits that contain the primitive as subproblems.

  6. Effects of the generalised uncertainty principle on quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blado, Gardo; Prescott, Trevor; Jennings, James; Ceyanes, Joshuah; Sepulveda, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    In a previous paper (Blado et al 2014 Eur. J. Phys. 35 065011), we showed that quantum gravity effects can be discussed with only a background in non-relativistic quantum mechanics at the undergraduate level by looking at the effect of the generalised uncertainty principle (GUP) on the finite and infinite square wells. In this paper, we derive the GUP corrections to the tunnelling probability of simple quantum mechanical systems which are accessible to undergraduates (alpha decay, simple models of quantum cosmogenesis and gravitational tunnelling radiation) and which employ the WKB approximation, a topic discussed in undergraduate quantum mechanics classes. It is shown that the GUP correction increases the tunnelling probability in each of the examples discussed.

  7. Quantum simulation of collective proton tunneling in hexagonal ice crystals.

    PubMed

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Marx, Dominik

    2014-04-11

    The effect of proton tunneling on many-body correlated proton transfer in hexagonal ice is investigated by quantum simulation. Classical single-particle hopping along individual hydrogen bonds leads to charge defects at high temperature, whereas six protons in ringlike topologies can move concertedly as a delocalized quasiparticle via collective tunneling at low temperature, thus preventing the creation of high-energy topological defects. Our findings rationalize many-body quantum tunneling in hydrogen-bonded networks and suggest that this phenomenon might be more widespread than previously thought.

  8. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K.; Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  9. Correlated dynamics of a Rabi oscillation and a quantum tunneling in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Weidong; Chu, Bingxin; Duan, Suqing; Xie, Yan; Chu, Weidong; Yang, Ning; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2015-08-01

    We couple the Rabi oscillation in a double quantum dot (DQD) with the quantum tunneling in another DQD by Coulomb interaction between the neighboring dots. Such a coupling leads to correlation of the Rabi oscillating electron and the quantum tunneling one, and gives a tendency of synchronizing them under appropriate Rabi frequency ΩR and tunneling rate Tc. The correlated oscillation is shown clearly in the tunneling current. As ΩR =Tc, the Rabi oscillation and the quantum tunneling reach their strongest correlation and the two electrons finish their complete transitions simultaneously. And then, a single optical signal accomplishes a gang control of two electrons. This result encourages superior design of two-qubit quantum gates based on correlated DQDs.

  10. Instantons in Quantum Annealing: Thermally Assisted Tunneling Vs Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Zhang; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V.; Neven, Hartmut; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recent numerical result (arXiv:1512.02206) from Google suggested that the D-Wave quantum annealer may have an asymptotic speed-up than simulated annealing, however, the asymptotic advantage disappears when it is compared to quantum Monte Carlo (a classical algorithm despite its name). We show analytically that the asymptotic scaling of quantum tunneling is exactly the same as the escape rate in quantum Monte Carlo for a class of problems. Thus, the Google result might be explained in our framework. We also found that the transition state in quantum Monte Carlo corresponds to the instanton solution in quantum tunneling problems, which is observed in numerical simulations.

  11. Tunneling into microstate geometries: quantum effects stop gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Mayerson, Daniel R.; Puhm, Andrea; Vercnocke, Bert

    2016-07-01

    Collapsing shells form horizons, and when the curvature is small classical general relativity is believed to describe this process arbitrarily well. On the other hand, quantum information theory based (fuzzball/firewall) arguments suggest the existence of some structure at the black hole horizon. This structure can only form if classical general relativity stops being the correct description of the collapsing shell before it reaches the horizon size. We present strong evidence that classical general relativity can indeed break down prematurely, by explicitly computing the quantum tunneling amplitude of a collapsing shell of branes into smooth horizonless microstate geometries. We show that the amplitude for tunneling into microstate geometries with a large number of topologically non-trivial cycles is parametrically larger than e - S BH , which indicates that the shell can tunnel into a horizonless configuration long before the horizon has any chance to form. We also use this technology to investigate the tunneling of M2 branes into LLM bubbling geometries.

  12. Dissipative macroscopic quantum tunneling in type-I superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzuela, R.; Tejada, J.; Chudnovsky, E. M.

    2011-11-01

    We study macroscopic quantum tunneling of interfaces separating normal and superconducting regions in type-I superconductors. A mathematical model is developed that describes dissipative quantum escape of a two-dimensional manifold from a planar potential well. It corresponds to, e.g., a current-driven quantum depinning of the interface from a grain boundary or from an artificially manufactured pinning layer. Effective action is derived and instantons of the equations of motion are investigated. The crossover between thermal activation and quantum tunneling is studied and the crossover temperature is computed. Our results, together with recent observation of nonthermal low-temperature magnetic relaxation in lead, suggest the possibility of a controlled measurement of quantum depinning of the interface in a type-I superconductor.

  13. Enhancement of macroscopic quantum tunneling by Landau-Zener transitions.

    PubMed

    Ankerhold, Joachim; Grabert, Hermann

    2003-07-04

    Motivated by recent realizations of qubits with a readout by macroscopic quantum tunneling in a Josephson junction, we study the problem of barrier penetration in the presence of coupling to a spin-1 / 2 system. It is shown that, when the diabatic potentials for fixed spin intersect in the barrier region, Landau-Zener transitions lead to an enhancement of the tunneling rate. The effect of these spin flips in imaginary time is in qualitative agreement with experimental observations.

  14. Quantum tunneling of the non-stationary BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Juan; Yang, Shu Zheng

    2009-07-01

    The semi-classical tunneling method is extended to study the Hawking tunneling radiation from the non-stationary BTZ black hole via general tortoise coordination transformation and WKB approximation. In this paper, we simplify the spin-0 scalar field equation and the spin-1/2 Dirac equation at the event horizon of this black hole, and then the quantum tunneling probability and Hawking temperature are obtained. Finally, the correctional tunneling rate is researched, and the results show that after considering the changed background space-time of the non-stationary BTZ black hole, the tunneling rate depends not only on the entropy change but also on the integral about {\\dot r}_H .

  15. Ferroelectric tunnel junctions with multi-quantum well structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zhijun; Zhang, Tianjin; Liang, Kun; Qi, Yajun; Wang, Duofa; Wang, Jinzhao; Jiang, Juan

    2014-06-02

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions (FTJs) with multi-quantum well structures are proposed and the tunneling electroresistance (TER) effect is investigated theoretically. Compared with conventional FTJs with monolayer ferroelectric barriers, FTJs with single-well structures provide TER ratio improvements of one order of magnitude, while FTJs with optimized multi-well structures can enhance this improvement by another order of magnitude. It is believed that the increased resonant tunneling strength combined with appropriate asymmetry in these FTJs contributes to the improvement. These studies may help to fabricate FTJs with large TER ratio experimentally and put them into practice.

  16. A new teaching approach to quantum mechanical tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfoyle, G. P.

    1999-09-01

    The transfer matrix method has been used to investigate quantum mechanical tunneling in introductory quantum mechanics. The method is applied first to calculate the transmission coefficient for tunneling through a rectangular barrier and is then extended to the problem of potential barriers of arbitrary shape, in particular, to radioactive decay. This approach uses matrix methods that are accessible to a broader range of undergraduates than other numerical techniques, the connection between the rectangular barrier problem and potential barriers of arbitrary shape is transparent, and it can be readily executed by undergraduates. The classroom experience with this approach is discussed.

  17. Aharonov-Bohm effect in the tunnelling of a quantum rotor in a linear Paul trap.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Atsushi; Shikano, Yutaka; Toyoda, Kenji; Urabe, Shinji

    2014-05-13

    Quantum tunnelling is a common fundamental quantum mechanical phenomenon that originates from the wave-like characteristics of quantum particles. Although the quantum tunnelling effect was first observed 85 years ago, some questions regarding the dynamics of quantum tunnelling remain unresolved. Here we realize a quantum tunnelling system using two-dimensional ionic structures in a linear Paul trap. We demonstrate that the charged particles in this quantum tunnelling system are coupled to the vector potential of a magnetic field throughout the entire process, even during quantum tunnelling, as indicated by the manifestation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system. The tunnelling rate of the structures periodically depends on the strength of the magnetic field, whose period is the same as the magnetic flux quantum φ0 through the rotor [(0.99 ± 0.07) × φ0].

  18. Phonon-mediated negative differential conductance in molecular quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazunov, Alex; Feinberg, Denis; Martin, Thierry

    2006-03-01

    Transport through a single-molecular conductor is considered, showing negative differential conductance behavior associated with phonon-mediated electron tunneling processes. This theoretical work is motivated by a recent experiment by Leroy using a carbon nanotube contacted by a scanning tunneling microscope tip [Nature 432, 371 (2004)], where negative differential conductance of the breathing-mode phonon side peaks could be observed. A peculiarity of this system is that the tunneling couplings which inject electrons and those which collect them on the substrate are highly asymmetrical. A quantum dot model is used, coupling a single electronic level to a local phonon, forming polaron levels. A “half-shuttle” mechanism is also introduced. A quantum kinetic formulation allows us to derive rate equations. Assuming asymmetric tunneling rates and in the absence of the half-shuttle coupling, negative differential conductance (NDC) is obtained for a wide range of parameters. A detailed explanation of this phenomenon is provided, showing that NDC is maximal for intermediate electron-phonon coupling. In addition, in the absence of a gate, the “floating” level results in two distinct lengths for the current plateaus, related to the capacitive couplings at the two junctions. It is shown that the half-shuttle mechanism tends to reinforce the negative differential regions, but it cannot trigger this behavior on its own.

  19. Quantum tunneling observed without its characteristic large kinetic isotope effects

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ueta, Hirokazu; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Classical transition-state theory is fundamental to describing chemical kinetics; however, quantum tunneling is also important in explaining the unexpectedly large reaction efficiencies observed in many chemical systems. Tunneling is often indicated by anomalously large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), because a particle’s ability to tunnel decreases significantly with its increasing mass. Here we experimentally demonstrate that cold hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms can add to solid benzene by tunneling; however, the observed H/D KIE was very small (1–1.5) despite the large intrinsic H/D KIE of tunneling (≳100). This strong reduction is due to the chemical kinetics being controlled not by tunneling but by the surface diffusion of the H/D atoms, a process not greatly affected by the isotope type. Because tunneling need not be accompanied by a large KIE in surface and interfacial chemical systems, it might be overlooked in other systems such as aerosols or enzymes. Our results suggest that surface tunneling reactions on interstellar dust may contribute to the deuteration of interstellar aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which could represent a major source of the deuterium enrichment observed in carbonaceous meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These findings could improve our understanding of interstellar physicochemical processes, including those during the formation of the solar system. PMID:26034285

  20. Frustrated Total Internal Reflection applied to Quantum Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Nathaniel; Yan, Jia-An

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an optical phenomenon, frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR), by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) in quantum mechanics, and to illustrate the correlations between FTIR and the quantum tunneling in one-dimensional quantum structures. We will use a MATLAB program to numerically propagate a Gaussian wave packet to penetrate finite square barriers. The transmission coefficient is then calculated as a function of the distance between two rectangular barriers/wells. The results will be useful to elucidate the correlations between optical FTIR and quantum tunneling. This work was supported by the FCSM Undergraduate Research Committee, the FCSM Fisher General Endowment and the FDRC Grant (OSPR No. 140269) at Towson University.

  1. Room-temperature resonant quantum tunneling transport of macroscopic systems.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhengwei; Wang, Xuemin; Yan, Dawei; Wu, Weidong; Peng, Liping; Li, Weihua; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xinmin; An, Xinyou; Xiao, Tingting; Zhan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Xiangrong

    2014-11-21

    A self-assembled quantum dots array (QDA) is a low dimensional electron system applied to various quantum devices. This QDA, if embedded in a single crystal matrix, could be advantageous for quantum information science and technology. However, the quantum tunneling effect has been difficult to observe around room temperature thus far, because it occurs in a microcosmic and low temperature condition. Herein, we show a designed a quasi-periodic Ni QDA embedded in a single crystal BaTiO3 matrix and demonstrate novel quantum resonant tunneling transport properties around room-temperature according to theoretical calculation and experiments. The quantum tunneling process could be effectively modulated by changing the Ni QDA concentration. The major reason was that an applied weak electric field (∼10(2) V cm(-1)) could be enhanced by three orders of magnitude (∼10(5) V cm(-1)) between the Ni QDA because of the higher permittivity of BaTiO3 and the 'hot spots' of the Ni QDA. Compared with the pure BaTiO3 films, the samples with embedded Ni QDA displayed a stepped conductivity and temperature (σ-T curves) construction.

  2. Coupling quantum tunneling with cavity photons.

    PubMed

    Cristofolini, Peter; Christmann, Gabriel; Tsintzos, Simeon I; Deligeorgis, George; Konstantinidis, George; Hatzopoulos, Zacharias; Savvidis, Pavlos G; Baumberg, Jeremy J

    2012-05-11

    Tunneling of electrons through a potential barrier is fundamental to chemical reactions, electronic transport in semiconductors and superconductors, magnetism, and devices such as terahertz oscillators. Whereas tunneling is typically controlled by electric fields, a completely different approach is to bind electrons into bosonic quasiparticles with a photonic component. Quasiparticles made of such light-matter microcavity polaritons have recently been demonstrated to Bose-condense into superfluids, whereas spatially separated Coulomb-bound electrons and holes possess strong dipole interactions. We use tunneling polaritons to connect these two realms, producing bosonic quasiparticles with static dipole moments. Our resulting three-state system yields dark polaritons analogous to those in atomic systems or optical waveguides, thereby offering new possibilities for electromagnetically induced transparency, room-temperature condensation, and adiabatic photon-to-electron transfer.

  3. Quantum Tunneling Enabled Self-Assembly of Hydrogen Atoms on Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, April D.; Peng, Guowen; Mattera, Michael F.; Lewis, Emily A.; Murphy, Colin J.; Kyriakou, Georgios; Mavrikakis, Manos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2012-11-27

    Atomic and molecular self-assembly are key phenomena that underpin many important technologies. Typically, thermally enabled diffusion allows a system to sample many areas of configurational space, and ordered assemblies evolve that optimize interactions between species. Herein we describe a system in which the diffusion is quantum tunneling in nature and report the self-assembly of H atoms on a Cu(111) surface into complex arrays based on local clustering followed by larger scale islanding of these clusters. By scanning tunneling microscope tip-induced scrambling of H atom assemblies, we are able to watch the atomic scale details of H atom self-assembly in real time. The ordered arrangements we observe are complex and very different from those formed by H on other metals that occur in much simpler geometries. We contrast the diffusion and assembly of H with D, which has a much slower tunneling rate and is not able to form the large islands observed with H over equivalent time scales. Using density functional theory, we examine the interaction of H atoms on Cu(111) by calculating the differential binding energy as a function of H coverage. At the temperature of the experiments (5 K), H(D) diffusion by quantum tunneling dominates. The quantum-tunneling-enabled H and D diffusion is studied using a semiclassically corrected transition state theory coupled with density functional theory. This system constitutes the first example of quantum-tunneling-enabled self-assembly, while simultaneously demonstrating the complex ordering of H on Cu(111), a catalytically relevant surface.

  4. Quantum Annealing and Tunable Magnetic Domain Wall Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Thomas F.

    2001-03-01

    Traditional simulated annealing utilizes thermal fluctuations for convergence in optimization problems. Quantum tunneling provides a different mechanism for moving between states, with the potential for reduced time scales. We compare thermal and quantum annealing in a model Ising ferromagnet composed of holmium dipoles in a lithium tetrafluoride matrix. The effects of quantum mechanics can be tuned in the laboratory by varying a magnetic field applied transverse to the Ising axis. This new knob permits us to: (1) tune the crossover between a classical Arrhenius response at high temperatures and an athermal response below 100 mK; (2) quantify the tunneling of magnetic domain walls through potential energy barriers in terms of an effective mass [1]; and (3) hasten convergence to the optimal state [2]. [1] "Tunable Quantum Tunneling of Magnetic Domain Walls," J. Brooke, T.F. Rosenbaum and G. Aeppli, preprint (2000). [2] "Quantum Annealing of a Disordered Magnet," J. Brooke, D. Bitko, T.F. Rosenbaum and G. Aeppli, Science 284, 779 (1999).

  5. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-22

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  6. Quantum and tunneling capacitance in charge and spin qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, R.; Otxoa, R. M.; Betz, A. C.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of the capacitance of a double quantum dot in the charge and spin qubit configurations probed at high frequencies. We find that, in general, the total capacitance of the system consists of two state-dependent terms: the quantum capacitance arising from adiabatic charge motion and the tunneling capacitance that appears when repopulation occurs at a rate comparable or faster than the probing frequency. The analysis of the capacitance lineshape as a function of externally controllable variables offers a way to characterize the qubits' charge and spin state as well as relevant system parameters such as charge and spin relaxation rates, tunnel coupling, electron temperature, and electron g factor. Overall, our analysis provides a formalism to understand dispersive qubit-resonator interactions which can be applied to high-sensitivity and noninvasive quantum-state readout.

  7. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  8. Evolution of Plasmonic Metamolecule Modes in the Quantum Tunneling Regime.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Jonathan A; Garcia-Etxarri, Aitzol; Aguirregabiria, Garikoitz; Esteban, Ruben; Narayan, Tarun C; Koh, Ai Leen; Aizpurua, Javier; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-01-26

    Plasmonic multinanoparticle systems exhibit collective electric and magnetic resonances that are fundamental for the development of state-of-the-art optical nanoantennas, metamaterials, and surface-enhanced spectroscopy substrates. While electric dipolar modes have been investigated in both the classical and quantum realm, little attention has been given to magnetic and other "dark" modes at the smallest dimensions. Here, we study the collective electric, magnetic, and dark modes of colloidally synthesized silver nanosphere trimers with varying interparticle separation using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This technique enables direct visualization and spatially selective excitation of individual trimers, as well as manipulation of the interparticle distance into the subnanometer regime with the electron beam. Our experiments reveal that bonding electric and magnetic modes are significantly impacted by quantum effects, exhibiting a relative blueshift and reduced EELS amplitude compared to classical predictions. In contrast, the trimer's electric dark mode is not affected by quantum tunneling for even Ångström-scale interparticle separations. We employ a quantum-corrected model to simulate the effect of electron tunneling in the trimer which shows excellent agreement with experimental results. This understanding of classical and quantum-influenced hybridized modes may impact the development of future quantum plasmonic materials and devices, including Fano-like molecular sensors and quantum metamaterials.

  9. Quantum and semiclassical Cooper-pair tunneling in finite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleber, M.

    2016-12-01

    We derive analytic solutions for the tunneling dynamics of two weakly coupled finite BCS-condensates. Pairing interaction between the finite-size condensates is taken into account. Using particle-number dependent chemical potentials the time-dependent transfer of Cooper pairs is obtained from a phenomenological calculation. The results of this theory are compared to a microscopic calculation within the quasispin formulation in its semiclassical limit. In both cases the tunneling current can be mapped onto the motion of a simple pendulum: The results are analogous to the Josephson current between two superconductors and can be used as a starting point to include quantum fluctuations and Josephson radiation.

  10. Tunneling between the Edges of Laterally Separated Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Woowon

    2001-03-01

    In the quantum Hall effect (QHE) effect regime of a two-dimensional electron system (2DES), quantization of the Hall resistance, σ_xy= Ne^2/h, arises from occupation of N one-dimensional edge channels. As a prototypical one-dimensional electronic system, the physics of edge states in the QHE regime is of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. In this talk, we present our study of tunneling between two counter-flowing edge states separated by a barrier with high integrity. By embedding a thin, precise barrier in the plane of 2DES via cleaved edge overgrowth, we have successfully fabricated an in-plane tunneling device in which two 2DES's are separated by an atomically precise barrier on the order of magnetic length[1]. The tunneling in the quantum Hall regime is characterized by a rich spectrum of tunnel gaps and conductance peaks. While the relevant energy scale in the tunneling is largely determined by the bulk 2DES, evolution of the tunneling spectra with magnetic field reveals the electronic structure arising from superposition of two edge states near the barrier. However, the observed features are not consistent with a model of weakly interacting edge states and indicates importance of electron-electron interaction. In particular, absence of features due to the electron spin and the persistence of conductance peaks at zero bias point to existence of novel electronic correlation between the two edge states[2]. [1] W. Kang, H.L. Stormer, K.B. Baldwin, L.N. Pfeiffer, and K.W. West, Nature 403, 59 (2000) [2] A. Mitra and S. Girvin, preprint.

  11. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling of protons in the KHCO 3 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillaux, François; Cousson, Alain; Gutmann, Matthias J.

    2006-06-01

    Macroscopic quantum entanglement reveals an unforeseen mechanism for proton transfer across hydrogen bonds in the solid state. We utilize neutron scattering techniques to study proton dynamics in the crystal of potassiumhydrogencarbonate (KHCO 3) composed of small planar centrosymmetric dimer entities ( linked by moderately strong hydrogen bonds. All protons are indistinguishable, they behave as fermions, and they are degenerate. The sublattice of protons is a superposition of macroscopic single-particle states. At elevated temperature, protons are progressively transferred to secondary sites at ≈0.6 Å from the main position, via tunnelling along hydrogen bonds. The macroscopic quantum entanglement, still observed at 300 K, reveals that proton transfer is a coherent process throughout the crystal arising from a superposition of macroscopic tunnelling states.

  12. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Massarotti, D; Pal, A; Rotoli, G; Longobardi, L; Blamire, M G; Tafuri, F

    2015-06-09

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits.

  13. Macroscopic quantum tunnelling in spin filter ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    PubMed Central

    Massarotti, D.; Pal, A.; Rotoli, G.; Longobardi, L.; Blamire, M. G.; Tafuri, F.

    2015-01-01

    The interfacial coupling of two materials with different ordered phases, such as a superconductor (S) and a ferromagnet (F), is driving new fundamental physics and innovative applications. For example, the creation of spin-filter Josephson junctions and the demonstration of triplet supercurrents have suggested the potential of a dissipationless version of spintronics based on unconventional superconductivity. Here we demonstrate evidence for active quantum applications of S-F-S junctions, through the observation of macroscopic quantum tunnelling in Josephson junctions with GdN ferromagnetic insulator barriers. We show a clear transition from thermal to quantum regime at a crossover temperature of about 100 mK at zero magnetic field in junctions, which present clear signatures of unconventional superconductivity. Following previous demonstration of passive S-F-S phase shifters in a phase qubit, our result paves the way to the active use of spin filter Josephson systems in quantum hybrid circuits. PMID:26054495

  14. Nuclear quantum tunnelling in enzymatic reactions--an enzymologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Johannissen, Linus O; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-12-14

    Enzyme-catalysed H-transfer reactions are ubiquitous, yet fundamental details of these reactions remain unresolved. In this perspective, we discuss the roles of nuclear quantum tunnelling and (compressive) dynamics during these reactions. Evidence for the coupling of specific substrate and/or protein vibrations to the chemical coordinate is considered and a case is made for the combination of multiple experimental and computational/theoretical approaches when studying these reactions.

  15. Quantum tunneling between bent semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, A. A.; Chaves, Andrey Farias, G. A.; Pereira, T. A. S.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-11-07

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties of two closely spaced L-shaped semiconductor quantum wires, for different configurations of the output channel widths as well as the distance between the wires. Within the effective-mass approximation, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the split-operator technique that allows us to calculate the transmission probability, the total probability current, the conductance, and the wave function scattering between the energy subbands. We determine the maximum distance between the quantum wires below which a relevant non-zero transmission is still found. The transmission probability and the conductance show a strong dependence on the width of the output channel for small distances between the wires.

  16. Coulomb drag and tunneling studies in quantum Hall bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Debaleena

    The bilayer quantum Hall state at total filling factor νT=1, where the total electron density matches the degeneracy of the lowest Landau level, is a prominent example of Bose-Einstein condensation of excitons. A macroscopically ordered state is realized where an electron in one layer is tightly bound to a "hole" in the other layer. If exciton transport were the only bulk transportmechanism, a current driven in one layer would spontaneously generate a current of equal magnitude and opposite sign in the other layer. The Corbino Coulomb drag measurements presented in this thesis demonstrate precisely this phenomenon. Excitonic superfluidity has been long sought in the νT=1 state. The tunneling between the two electron gas layers exihibit a dc Josephson-like effect. A simple model of an over-damped voltage biased Josephson junction is in reasonable agreement with the observed tunneling I -- V. At small tunneling biases, it exhibits a tunneling "supercurrent". The dissipation is carefully studied in this tunneling "supercurrent" and found to remain small but finite.

  17. Comment on 'Realism and quantum flux tunneling'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, A. J.; Garg, Anupam

    1987-01-01

    A reply is presented to Ballentine's (1987) critique of the Legett and Garg (1985) experiment to discriminate between the experimental predictions of quantum mechanics (QM) and those of a class of macrorealistic theories. Legett and Garg uphold their earlier conclusions on the basis of the fact that the present critique refers to an experiment which was not in fact proposed. It is stressed that the original work involved an analysis according to macrorealism, while the calculations of Ballentine only demonstrate the internal consistency of the formalism of QM when applied to three consecutive actually performed experiments.

  18. de Sitter Tunneling, Emission Spectrum and Entropy/Area Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qing-Quan

    2012-08-01

    The Banerjee—Majhi's recent work shows that the Hawking radiation and entropy/area quantum of the black hole horizon (EH) can be well described in the tunneling picture. In this paper, we develop this idea to the case of a de Sitter tunneling from the cosmological horizon (CH), and obtain the Hawking emission spectrum and entropy/area spectroscopy from the CH of the purely de Sitter black hole as well as the Schwarzschild-de Sitter black hole. It is interestingly found that the area of the CH is quantized by ΔA = 4l2pl, as was given by Hod for the area quantum of -the EH by considering the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and Schwinger-type emission process. Also, we conclude from our derivation that the entropy/area quantum of the CH is universal in the sense that it is independent of the black hole parameters. This realization implies that, (at least) at a semiclassical level, the de Sitter gravity shares the similar quantum behavior as the usual gravity without presence of a cosmological constant.

  19. Electron tunneling characteristics of a cubic quantum dot, (PbS)32

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Banyai, Douglas; Kandalam, Anil K.; Pandey, Ravindra

    2013-12-01

    The electron transport properties of the cubic quantum dot, (PbS)32, are investigated. The stability of the quantum dot has been established by recent scanning tunneling microscope experiments [B. Kiran, A. K. Kandalam, R. Rallabandi, P. Koirala, X. Li, X. Tang, Y. Wang, H. Fairbrother, G. Gantefoer, and K. Bowen, J. Chem. Phys. 136(2), 024317 (2012)]. In spite of the noticeable energy band gap (˜2 eV), a relatively high tunneling current for (PbS)32 is predicted affirming the observed bright images for (PbS)32. The calculated I-V characteristics of (PbS)32 are predicted to be substrate-dependent; (PbS)32 on the Au (001) exhibits the molecular diode-like behavior and the unusual negative differential resistance effect, though this is not the case with (PbS)32 on the Au (110). Appearance of the conduction channels associated with the hybridized states of quantum dot and substrate together with their asymmetric distribution at the Fermi level seem to determine the tunneling characteristics of the system.

  20. Observation of negative differential transconductance in tunneling emitter bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenhuizen, Marc J.; Locatelli, Nicolas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Chang, Joonyeon

    2009-08-01

    We report on measurement of negative differential transconductance (NDTC) of iron (Fe)/magnesium-oxide (MgO)/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors. Device simulations reveal that the NDTC is a consequence of an inversion layer at the tunneling-oxide/P-silicon interface for low base voltages. Electrons travel laterally through the inversion layer into the base and give rise to an increase in collector current. The NDTC results from the recombination of those electrons at the interface between emitter and base contact which is dependent on the base voltage. For larger base voltages, the inversion layer disappears marking the onset of normal bipolar transistor behavior.

  1. Single Nucleobase Identification Using Biophysical Signatures from Nanoelectronic Quantum Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Korshoj, Lee E; Afsari, Sepideh; Khan, Sajida; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2017-03-01

    Nanoelectronic DNA sequencing can provide an important alternative to sequencing-by-synthesis by reducing sample preparation time, cost, and complexity as a high-throughput next-generation technique with accurate single-molecule identification. However, sample noise and signature overlap continue to prevent high-resolution and accurate sequencing results. Probing the molecular orbitals of chemically distinct DNA nucleobases offers a path for facile sequence identification, but molecular entropy (from nucleotide conformations) makes such identification difficult when relying only on the energies of lowest-unoccupied and highest-occupied molecular orbitals (LUMO and HOMO). Here, nine biophysical parameters are developed to better characterize molecular orbitals of individual nucleobases, intended for single-molecule DNA sequencing using quantum tunneling of charges. For this analysis, theoretical models for quantum tunneling are combined with transition voltage spectroscopy to obtain measurable parameters unique to the molecule within an electronic junction. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy is then used to measure these nine biophysical parameters for DNA nucleotides, and a modified machine learning algorithm identified nucleobases. The new parameters significantly improve base calling over merely using LUMO and HOMO frontier orbital energies. Furthermore, high accuracies for identifying DNA nucleobases were observed at different pH conditions. These results have significant implications for developing a robust and accurate high-throughput nanoelectronic DNA sequencing technique.

  2. Theory of chaos regularization of tunneling in chaotic quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Jer; Antonsen, Thomas M; Ott, Edward; Pecora, Louis M

    2012-11-01

    Recent numerical experiments of Pecora et al. [Phys. Rev. E 83, 065201 (2011)] have investigated tunneling between two-dimensional symmetric double wells separated by a tunneling barrier. The wells were bounded by hard walls and by the potential barrier which was created by a step increase from the zero potential within a well to a uniform barrier potential within the barrier region, which is a situation potentially realizable in the context of quantum dots. Numerical results for the splitting of energy levels between symmetric and antisymmetric eigenstates were calculated. It was found that the splittings vary erratically from state to state, and the statistics of these variations were studied for different well shapes with the fluctuation levels being much less in chaotic wells than in comparable nonchaotic wells. Here we develop a quantitative theory for the statistics of the energy level splittings for chaotic wells. Our theory is based on the random plane wave hypothesis of Berry. While the fluctuation statistics are very different for chaotic and nonchaotic well dynamics, we show that the mean splittings of differently shaped wells, including integrable and chaotic wells, are the same if their well areas and barrier parameters are the same. We also consider the case of tunneling from a single well into a region with outgoing quantum waves.

  3. Tunneling modulation of a quantum-well transistor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, M.; Qiu, J.; Wang, C. Y.; Holonyak, N.

    2016-11-01

    Different than the Bardeen and Brattain transistor (1947) with the current gain depending on the ratio of the base carrier spontaneous recombination lifetime to the emitter-collector transit time, the Feng and Holonyak transistor laser current gain depends upon the base electron-hole (e-h) stimulated recombination, the base dielectric relaxation transport, and the collector stimulated tunneling. For the n-p-n transistor laser tunneling operation, the electron-hole pairs are generated at the collector junction under the influence of intra-cavity photon-assisted tunneling, with electrons drifting to the collector and holes drifting to the base. The excess charge in the base lowers the emitter junction energy barrier, allowing emitter electron injection into the base and satisfying charge neutrality via base dielectric relaxation transport (˜femtoseconds). The excess electrons near the collector junction undergo stimulated recombination at the base quantum-well or transport to the collector, thus supporting tunneling current amplification and optical modulation of the transistor laser.

  4. Quantum Tunneling Sb-Heterostructures for Millimeter Wave Radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Joel N.

    2003-03-01

    Imaging in the millimeter wavelength range has been making rapid progress as high speed electronics increase in frequency. Applications include viewing through adverse visibility conditions (fog, smoke, dust, precipitation) and also the relative transparency of clothing (concealed-weapons-detection) and some building materials (through-the-wall-detection). Atmospheric radiometry (climate assessment and weather prediction) already depend heavily on this wavelength range. Astronomical applications include incorporation in instruments for cosmic microwave background detection. An important ingredient is a diode that "rectifies" in a special way. It must convert input power, i.e., voltage squared, into a DC voltage output -- a "square-law" detector. We have recently found that quantum tunneling through an InAs/AlSb/GaAlSb heterostructure system provides the ideal physical mechanism for this purpose.1,2 We will present our results to date, demonstrating how a close coupling of semiconductor quantum tunneling theory with electrical engineering know-how have brought an "exotic" quantum phenomon to practical and economic application. 1. "Sb-heterostructure interband backward diodes" J.N. Schulman and D.H. Chow. IEEE Electron Device Letters 21, 353-355 (2000). 2. "High-Performance Antimonide-Based Heterostructure Backward Diodes for Millimeter-wave Detection" P. Fay, J. N. Schulman, S. Thomas III, D. H. Chow, Y. K. Boegeman, and K. S. Holabird, IEEE Electron Device Letters 23, 585-587 (2002).

  5. Observation of quantum tunneling between two plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Jonathan A; García-Etxarri, Aitzol; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-02-13

    The plasmon resonances of two closely spaced metallic particles have enabled applications including single-molecule sensing and spectroscopy, novel nanoantennas, molecular rulers, and nonlinear optical devices. In a classical electrodynamic context, the strength of such dimer plasmon resonances increases monotonically as the particle gap size decreases. In contrast, a quantum mechanical framework predicts that electron tunneling will strongly diminish the dimer plasmon strength for subnanometer-scale separations. Here, we directly observe the plasmon resonances of coupled metallic nanoparticles as their gap size is reduced to atomic dimensions. Using the electron beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), we manipulate pairs of ~10-nm-diameter spherical silver nanoparticles on a substrate, controlling their convergence and eventual coalescence into a single nanosphere. We simultaneously employ electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to observe the dynamic plasmonic properties of these dimers before and after particle contact. As separations are reduced from 7 nm, the dominant dipolar peak exhibits a redshift consistent with classical calculations. However, gaps smaller than ~0.5 nm cause this mode to exhibit a reduced intensity consistent with quantum theories that incorporate electron tunneling. As the particles overlap, the bonding dipolar mode disappears and is replaced by a dipolar charge transfer mode. Our dynamic imaging, manipulation, and spectroscopy of nanostructures enables the first full spectral mapping of dimer plasmon evolution and may provide new avenues for in situ nanoassembly and analysis in the quantum regime.

  6. Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.

    2008-08-19

    A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

  7. First-principles theory of quantum well resonance in double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Zhang, X-G; Han, X F

    2006-08-25

    Quantum well (QW) resonances in Fe(001)/MgO/Fe/MgO/Fe double barrier magnetic tunnel junctions are calculated from first principles. By including the Coulomb blockade energy due to the finite size islands of the middle Fe film, we confirm that the oscillatory differential resistance observed in a recent experiment [T. Nozaki, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 027208 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.027208] originates from the QW resonances from the Delta1 band of the Fe majority-spin channel. The primary source of smearing at low temperatures is shown to be the variation of the Coulomb blockade energy.

  8. Quantum-size resonance tunneling in the field emission phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, V.; Evtukh, A.; Kryuchenko, Yu.; Goncharuk, N.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Mutamba, K.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2004-07-01

    Theoretical analyses have been performed of the quantum-size (QS) resonance tunneling in the field-emission (FE) phenomenon for different models of the emitting structures. Such experimentally observed peculiarities have been considered as the enhancement of the FE current, the deviation from the Fowler-Nordheim law, the appearance of sharp current peaks, and a negative resistance. Different types of FE cathodes with QS structures (quantized layers, wires, or dots) have been studied experimentally. Resonance current peaks have been observed, from which the values of the energy-level splitting can be estimated.

  9. Quantum tunneling from the charged non-rotating BTZ black hole with GUP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Jafar; Reza Shajiee, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    In the present paper, the quantum corrections to the temperature, entropy and specific heat capacity of the charged non-rotating BTZ black hole are studied by the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism. It is shown that quantum corrected entropy would be of the form of predicted entropy in quantum gravity theories like string theory and loop quantum gravity.

  10. Quantum tunneling of vortices in two-dimensional condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Auerbach, Assa; Arovas, Daniel P.; Ghosh, Sankalpa

    2006-08-01

    The tunneling rate t{sub v}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) of a vortex between two pinning sites (of strength V separated by d) is computed using the Bogoliubov expansion of vortex wave-functions overlap. For BCS vortices, tunneling is suppressed beyond a few Fermi wavelengths. For Bose condensates, t{sub v}=V exp(-{pi}n{sub s}d{sup 2}/2), where n{sub s} is the boson density. The analogy between vortex hopping in a superconducting film and two-dimensional electrons in a perpendicular magnetic field is exploited. We derive the variable range hopping temperature, below which vortex tunneling contributes to magnetoresistance. Using the 'quantum Hall insulator' analogy we argue that the Hall conductivity (rather than the inverse Hall resistivity) measures the effective carrier density in domains of mobile vortices. Details of vortex wave functions and overlap calculations, and a general derivation of the Magnus coefficient for any wave function on the sphere, are provided in appendixes.

  11. Quantum tunneling and vibrational dynamics of ultra-confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Ehlers, Georg; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Prisk, Timothy R.; Seel, Andrew; Reiter, George F.

    2015-03-01

    Vibrational dynamics of ultra-confined water in single crystals beryl, the structure of which contains ~ 5 Å diameter channels along the c-axis was studied with inelastic (INS), quasi-elastic (QENS) and deep inelastic (DINS) neutron scattering. The results reveal significantly anisotropic dynamical behavior of confined water, and show that effective potential experienced by water perpendicular to the channels is significantly softer than along them. The observed 7 peaks in the INS spectra (at energies 0.25 to 15 meV), based on their temperature and momentum transfer dependences, are explained by transitions between the split ground states of water in beryl due to water quantum tunneling between the 6-fold equivalent positions across the channels. DINS study of beryl at T=4.3 K shows narrow, anisotropic water proton momentum distribution with corresponding kinetic energy, EK=95 meV, which is much less than was previously observed in bulk water (~150 meV). We believe that the exceptionally small EK in beryl is a result of water quantum tunneling ∖ delocalization in the nanometer size confinement and weak water-cage interaction. The neutron experiment at ORNL was sponsored by the Sci. User Facilities Div., BES, U.S. DOE. This research was sponsored by the Div. Chemical Sci, Geosciences, and Biosciences, BES, U.S. DOE. The STFC RAL is thanked for access to ISIS neutron facilities.

  12. Lineshape of Resonant Tunneling Peaks in Fractional Quantum Hall Regime.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, Ilari J.; Goldman, V. J.

    1996-03-01

    Recently an experiment that measures the tunneling conductance between two fractional quantum Hall edges in a quantum antidot geometry was performed(V.J. Goldman and B. Su, Science 267), 1010 (1995).. We present measurements of the lineshape of these resonant tunneling peaks at ν=1/3 at several temperatures for 13 mK <= T < 100 mK. This subject was considered within the theories of one dimensional Luttinger liquids(X.G. Wen, Int. J. Mod. Phys. B6), 1711 (1992).(C.L. Kane and M.P.A. Fisher, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68), 1220 (1992).. Our analysis shows that, in an experiment at a given T, it is extremely difficult to distinguish between the recently calculated(K. Moon et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 4381 (1993); P. Fendley, A.W.W. Ludwig and H. Saleur, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3005 (1995). universal Luttinger liquid resonance lineshape and a regular thermally broadened Fermi liquid peak. Instead, the temperature dependence of the widths of the resonances can be analyzed, since the widths are predicted to scale as T^2/3 for ν=1/3 in the Luttinger case as opposed to T in the Fermi liquid.

  13. Quantum-Coherence-Assisted Tunable On- and Off-Resonance Tunneling through a Quantum-Dot-Molecule Dielectric Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian Qi; Zeng, Rui Xi

    2017-02-01

    Quantum-dot-molecular phase coherence (and the relevant quantum-interference-switchable optical response) can be utilized to control electromagnetic wave propagation via a gate voltage, since quantum-dot molecules can exhibit an effect of quantum coherence (phase coherence) when quantum-dot-molecular discrete multilevel transitions are driven by an electromagnetic wave. Interdot tunneling of carriers (electrons and holes) controlled by the gate voltage can lead to destructive quantum interference in a quantum-dot molecule that is coupled to an incident electromagnetic wave, and gives rise to a quantum coherence effect (e.g., electromagnetically induced transparency, EIT) in a quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film. The tunable on- and off-resonance tunneling effect of an incident electromagnetic wave (probe field) through such a quantum-coherent quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film is investigated. It is found that a high gate voltage can lead to the EIT phenomenon of the quantum-dot-molecular systems. Under the condition of on-resonance light tunneling through the present quantum-dot-molecule dielectric film, the probe field should propagate without loss if the probe frequency detuning is zero. Such an effect caused by both EIT and resonant tunneling, which is sensitive to the gate voltage, can be utilized for designing devices such as photonic switching, transistors, and logic gates.

  14. Transmission and tunneling probability in two-band metals: Influence of magnetic breakdown on the Onsager phase of quantum oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Jean-Yves; Audouard, Alain

    2017-02-01

    Tunneling amplitude through magnetic breakdown (MB) gap is considered for two-bands Fermi surfaces illustrated in many organic metals. In particular, the S-matrix associated to the wave function transmission through the MB gap for the relevant class of differential equations is the main object allowing the determination of tunneling probabilities and phases. The calculated transmission coefficients include a field-dependent Onsager phase. As a result, quantum oscillations are not periodic in 1 / B for finite magnetic breakdown gap. Exact and approximate methods are proposed for computing ratio amplitudes of the wave function in interacting two-band models.

  15. Simulation of chaos-assisted tunneling in a semiclassical regime on existing quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Chepelianskii, A.D.; Shepelyansky, D.L.

    2002-11-01

    We present a quantum algorithm that allows one to simulate chaos-assisted tunneling in deep semiclassical regime on existing quantum computers. This opens additional possibilities for investigation of macroscopic quantum tunneling and realization of semiclassical Schroedinger cat oscillations [E. Schroedinger, Naturwissenschaften 32, 807 (1935)]. Our numerical studies determine the decoherence rate induced by noisy gates for these oscillations and propose a suitable parameter regime for their experimental implementation.

  16. One-Dimensional Nature of InAs/InP Quantum Dashes Revealed by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papatryfonos, Konstantinos; Rodary, Guillemin; David, Christophe; Lelarge, François; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Girard, Jean-Christophe

    2015-07-08

    We report on low-temperature cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on InAs(P)/InGaAsP/InP(001) quantum dashes, embedded in a diode-laser structure. The laser active region consists of nine InAs(P) quantum dash layers separated by the InGaAsP quaternary alloy barriers. The effect of the p-i-n junction built-in potential on the band structure has been evidenced and quantified on large-scale tunneling spectroscopic measurements across the whole active region. By comparing the tunneling current onset channels, a consistent energy shift has been measured in successive quantum dash or barrier layers, either for the ground state energy of similar-sized quantum dashes or for the conduction band edge of the barriers, corresponding to the band-bending slope. The extracted values are in good quantitative agreement with the theoretical band structure calculations, demonstrating the high sensitivity of this spectroscopic measurement to probe the electronic structure of individual nanostructures, relative to local potential variations. Furthermore, by taking advantage of the potential gradient, we compared the local density of states over successive quantum dash layers. We observed that it does not vanish while increasing energy, for any of the investigated quantum dashes, in contrast to what would be expected for discrete level zero-dimensional (0D) structures. In order to acquire further proof and fully address the open question concerning the quantum dash dimensionality nature, we focused on individual quantum dashes obtaining high-energy-resolution measurements. The study of the local density of states clearly indicates a 1D quantum-wirelike nature for these nanostructures whose electronic squared wave functions were subsequently imaged by differential conductivity mapping.

  17. Quantum tunneling and scattering of a composite object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahsan, Naureen

    Reaction physics involving composite objects with internal degrees of freedom is an important subject since it is encountered in the context of nuclear processes like fusion, fission, particle decay, as well as many other branches of science. Quantum tunneling and scattering of a composite object are explored in this work. A few model Hamiltonians are chosen as examples where a two-particle system interacts, in one dimension, with a target that poses a delta-potential or an infinite wall potential. It is assumed that only one of the two components interacts with the target. The study includes the harmonic oscillator and the infinite square well as examples of intrinsic Hamiltonians that do not allow the projectile to break up, and a finite square well and a delta-well as examples of Hamiltonians that do. The Projection Method and the Variable Phase Method are applied with the aim of an exact solution to the relevant scattering problems. These methods are discussed in the context of the pertinent convergence issues related thereto, and of their applicability. Virtual excitations of the projectile into the classically forbidden energy-domain are found to play a dominant and non-perturbative role in shaping reaction observables, giving rise to enhanced or reduced tunneling in various situations. Cusps and discontinuities are found to appear in observables as manifestations of unitarity and redistribution of flux at the thresholds. The intrinsic structure gives rise to resonancelike behavior in tunneling probabilities. It is also shown that there is charge asymmetry in the scattering of a composite object, unlike in the case of a structureless particle.

  18. S-matrix and quantum tunneling in gravitational collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciafaloni, M.; Colferai, D.

    2008-11-01

    Using the recently introduced ACV reduced-action approach to transplanckian scattering of light particles, we show that the S-matrix in the region of classical gravitational collapse is related to a tunneling amplitude in an effective field space. We understand in this way the role of both real and complex field solutions, the choice of the physical ones, the absorption of the elastic channel associated to inelastic multigraviton production and the occurrence of extra absorption below the critical impact parameter. We are also able to compute a class of quantum corrections to the original semiclassical S-matrix that we argue to be qualitatively sensible and which, generally speaking, tend to smooth out the semiclassical results.

  19. Influence of InGaN sub-quantum-well on performance of InAlN/GaN/InAlN resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haoran; Yang, Lin'an Hao, Yue

    2014-08-21

    The resonant tunneling mechanism of the GaN based resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with an InGaN sub-quantum-well has been investigated by means of numerical simulation. At resonant-state, Electrons in the InGaN/InAlN/GaN/InAlN RTD tunnel from the emitter region through the aligned discrete energy levels in the InGaN sub-quantum-well and GaN main-quantum-well into the collector region. The implantation of the InGaN sub-quantum-well alters the dominant transport mechanism, increase the transmission coefficient and give rise to the peak current and peak-to-valley current ratio. We also demonstrate that the most pronounced negative-differential-resistance characteristic can be achieved by choosing appropriately the In composition of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N at around x = 0.06.

  20. Tunnel magnetoresistance in quantum dots in the presence of singlet and triplet states.

    PubMed

    Michałek, G; Bułka, B R

    2011-05-04

    We study transport through a two-level quantum dot (QD) weakly coupled to ferromagnetic electrodes, the mutual magnetization orientation of which can be changed from a parallel to an antiparallel configuration. Calculations are performed in a sequential tunnelling regime taking into account an inter-level Coulomb and an exchange interaction on the QD with many-body electronic states. Our interests are mainly focused on the role of singlet and triplet states on the tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR). We have found that TMR characteristics strongly depend on different local spin configurations in the QD, which originate from an anti- or ferromagnetic exchange coupling J as well as its strength. A strong inter-channel Coulomb blockade (which influences the TMR) appears when the ground state is singly occupied. Activation of the singlet or the triplet states and competition between various tunnelling rates are responsible for the spin accumulation even in the parallel configuration. We have also found negative TMR and negative differential resistance (NDR) effects in the system with strong coupling asymmetry.

  1. Quantum mechanical methods for calculating proton tunneling splittings and proton-coupled electron transfer vibronic couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skone, Jonathan H.

    Development of quantum mechanical methods for the calculation of proton tunneling splittings and proton-coupled electron transfer vibronic couplings is presented in this thesis. The fundamental physical principles underlying proton transfer in the electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic limits are illustrated by applying the quantum mechanical methods we developed to chemical systems exemplary of the electronically adiabatic and nonadiabatic proton-tunneling regimes. Overall, this thesis emphasizes the need for quantum chemical methods that avoid the adiabatic separation of the quantum proton and electron, are computationally tractable, and treat all quantum particles three-dimensionally. The nuclear-electronic orbital nonorthogonal configuration interaction (NEO-NOCI) approach is presented for calculating proton tunneling splittings and vibronic couplings. The NEO approach is a molecular orbital based method that avoids the Born-Oppenheimer separation of the select protons and electrons, thereby making methods developed within this scheme, such as NEO-NOCI, applicable to electronically nonadiabatic proton transfer. In the two-state NEO-NOCI approach, the ground and excited state delocalized nuclear-electronic wavefunctions are expressed as linear combinations of two nonorthogonal localized nuclear-electronic wavefunctions obtained at the NEO-Hartree-Fock level. The advantages of the NEO-NOCI approach are the removal of the adiabatic separation between the electrons and the quantum nuclei, the computational efficiency, the potential for systematic improvement by enhancing the basis sets and number of configurations, and the applicability to a broad range of chemical systems. The tunneling splitting is determined by the energy difference between these two delocalized vibronic states. The proton tunneling splittings calculated with the NEO-NOCI approach for the [He-H-He]+ model system with a range of fixed He-He distances are shown to be in excellent agreement with

  2. Magnetic quantum tunneling: insights from simple molecule-based magnets.

    PubMed

    Hill, Stephen; Datta, Saiti; Liu, Junjie; Inglis, Ross; Milios, Constantinos J; Feng, Patrick L; Henderson, John J; del Barco, Enrique; Brechin, Euan K; Hendrickson, David N

    2010-05-28

    This perspectives article takes a broad view of the current understanding of magnetic bistability and magnetic quantum tunneling in single-molecule magnets (SMMs), focusing on three families of relatively simple, low-nuclearity transition metal clusters: spin S = 4 Ni(II)(4), Mn(III)(3) (S = 2 and 6) and Mn(III)(6) (S = 4 and 12). The Mn(III) complexes are related by the fact that they contain triangular Mn(III)(3) units in which the exchange may be switched from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic without significantly altering the coordination around the Mn(III) centers, thereby leaving the single-ion physics more-or-less unaltered. This allows for a detailed and systematic study of the way in which the individual-ion anisotropies project onto the molecular spin ground state in otherwise identical low- and high-spin molecules, thus providing unique insights into the key factors that control the quantum dynamics of SMMs, namely: (i) the height of the kinetic barrier to magnetization relaxation; and (ii) the transverse interactions that cause tunneling through this barrier. Numerical calculations are supported by an unprecedented experimental data set (17 different compounds), including very detailed spectroscopic information obtained from high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance and low-temperature hysteresis measurements. Comparisons are made between the giant spin and multi-spin phenomenologies. The giant spin approach assumes the ground state spin, S, to be exact, enabling implementation of simple anisotropy projection techniques. This methodology provides a basic understanding of the concept of anisotropy dilution whereby the cluster anisotropy decreases as the total spin increases, resulting in a barrier that depends weakly on S. This partly explains why the record barrier for a SMM (86 K for Mn(6)) has barely increased in the 15 years since the first studies of Mn(12)-acetate, and why the tiny Mn(3) molecule can have a barrier approaching 60% of this

  3. Tunneling-assisted coherent population transfer and creation of coherent superposition states in triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Wan, Ren-Gang; Wang, Li-Jie; Shu, Shi-Li; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Wang, Li-Jun

    2016-12-01

    A scheme is proposed for coherent population transfer and creation of coherent superposition states assisted by one time-dependent tunneling pulse and one time-independent tunneling pulse in triple quantum dots. Time-dependent tunneling, which is similar to the Stokes laser pulse used in traditional stimulated Raman adiabatic passage, can lead to complete population transfer from the ground state to the indirect exciton states. Time-independent tunneling can also create double dark states, resulting in the distribution of the population and arbitrary coherent superposition states. Such a scheme can also be extended to multiple quantum dots assisted by one time-dependent tunneling pulse and more time-independent tunneling pulses.

  4. Full counting statistics of phonon-assisted Andreev tunneling through a quantum dot coupled to normal and superconducting leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bing; Ding, G. H.; Lei, X. L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation for the full counting statistics of the Andreev tunneling through a quantum dot (QD) embedded between superconducting (SC) and normal leads in the presence of a strong on-site electron-phonon interaction using nonequilibrium Green function method. For this purpose, we generalize the dressed tunneling approximation (DTA) recently developed in dealing with inelastic tunneling in a normal QD system to the Andreev transport issue. This method takes account of vibrational effect in evaluation of electronic tunneling self energy in comparison with other simple approaches and meanwhile allows us to derive an explicit analytical formula for the cumulant generating function at the subgap region. We then analyze the interplay of polaronic and SC proximity effects on the Andreev reflection spectrum, current-voltage characteristics, and current fluctuations of the hybrid system. Our main findings include: (1) no phonon side peaks in the linear Andreev conductance; (2) a negative differential conductance stemming from the suppressed Andreev reflection spectrum; (3) a novel inelastic resonant peak in the differential conductance due to phonon assisted Andreev reflection; (4) enhancement or suppression of shot noise for the symmetric or asymmetric tunnel-coupling system, respectively.

  5. Discussion on event horizon and quantum ergosphere of evaporating black holes in a tunnelling framework

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingyi; Zhao Zheng

    2011-03-15

    In this paper, with the Parikh-Wilczek tunnelling framework the positions of the event horizon of the Vaidya black hole and the Vaidya-Bonner black hole are calculated, respectively. We find that the event horizon and the apparent horizon of these two black holes correspond, respectively, to the two turning points of the Hawking radiation tunnelling barrier. That is, the quantum ergosphere coincides with the tunnelling barrier. Our calculation also implies that the Hawking radiation comes from the apparent horizon.

  6. Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Ultrasmall Half-Metallic V3O4 Quantum Dots: Displaying Quantum Superparamagnetic State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chong; Zhang, Jiajia; Xu, Jie; Tong, Wei; Cao, Boxiao; Li, Kun; Pan, Bicai; Su, Haibin; Xie, Yi

    2012-10-01

    Quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTMs), stemming from their importance for understanding materials with unconventional properties, has continued to attract widespread theoretical and experimental attention. However, the observation of QTMs in the most promising candidates of molecular magnets and few iron-based compounds is limited to very low temperature. Herein, we first highlight a simple system, ultrasmall half-metallic V3O4 quantum dots, as a promising candidate for the investigation of QTMs at high temperature. The quantum superparamagnetic state (QSP) as a high temperature signature of QTMs is observed at 16 K, which is beyond absolute zero temperature and much higher than that of conventional iron-based compounds due to the stronger spin-orbital coupling of V3+ ions bringing high anisotropy energy. It is undoubtedly that this ultrasmall quantum dots, V3O4, offers not only a promising candidate for theoretical understanding of QTMs but also a very exciting possibility for computers using mesoscopic magnets.

  7. Room-temperature tunneling behavior of boron nitride nanotubes functionalized with gold quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chee Huei; Qin, Shengyong; Savaikar, Madhusudan A; Wang, Jiesheng; Hao, Boyi; Zhang, Dongyan; Banyai, Douglas; Jaszczak, John A; Clark, Kendal W; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Li, An-Ping; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2013-09-06

    One-dimensional arrays of gold quantum dots (QDs) on insulating boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) can form conduction channels of tunneling field-effect transistors. We demonstrate that tunneling currents can be modulated at room temperature by tuning the lengths of QD-BNNTs and the gate potentials. Our discovery will inspire the creative use of nanostructured metals and insulators for future electronic devices.

  8. Cascade of quantum phase transitions in tunnel-coupled edge states.

    PubMed

    Yang, I; Kang, W; Baldwin, K W; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2004-02-06

    We report on the cascade of quantum phase transitions exhibited by tunnel-coupled edge states across a quantum Hall line junction. We identify a series of quantum critical points between successive strong and weak tunneling regimes in the zero-bias conductance. Scaling analysis shows that the conductance near the critical magnetic fields B(c) is a function of a single scaling argument /B-B(c)/T(-kappa), where the exponent kappa=0.42. This puzzling resemblance to a quantum Hall-insulator transition points to the importance of interedge correlation between the coupled edge states.

  9. Control of transient gain absorption via tunneling and incoherent pumping in triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Wan, Ren-Gang; Wang, Li-Jie; Shu, Shi-Li; Wang, Tao; Lu, Ze-Feng; Sun, Fang-Yuan; Tong, Cun-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    The transient gain-absorption properties of the probe field in vertical triple quantum dots assisted by double tunneling and incoherent pumping are investigated. With a proper intensity value and detuning of the second tunneling, the transient gain in triple quantum dots with incoherent pumping can be completely eliminated. In addition, the incoherent pumping affects both the amplitude of the transient absorption and the steady-state value. The dependence of transient behaviors on other parameters, such as the radiative decay rate and the pure dephasing decay rate of the quantum dots, is also discussed. The scheme may have important applications in quantum information networks and communication.

  10. Quantum Tunneling Model of a P-N Junction in Silvaco

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    September 1-5, 2008. [14] M. Shur, Physics of Semiconductor Devices, Prentice–Hall, Inc, 1990. [15] R. P. Feynman , The Feynman Lectures on Physics , Volume... physically based 2-D model was created in Silvaco Inc.’s ATLAS© software to model the quantum tunneling effect that is realized within a multi...photovoltaic cell. A physically based 2-D model was created in Silvaco Inc.’s software to model the quantum tunneling effect that is realized within a

  11. Tunneling spectroscopy of 5/2 fractional quantum Hall excitations in etch defined quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalakulam, Madhu; Pan, Wei; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L.

    2012-02-01

    Ever since its discovery the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state at the even denominator filling fraction v=5/2 has generated immense interests among researchers. 5/2 FQH excitations are believed to obey non-Abelian statistics and posses topological properties making them an ideal candidate for the proposed fault tolerant topological quantum computation. Theoretical proposals to characterize the topological properties of the5/2 state are usually based on confined geometries. In this work we report the characterization of the 5/2 state using quasiparticle tunneling experiments in quantum point contacts (QPC). We have successfully fabricated QPCs on high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using conventional photolithography followed by etching and evaporation of Cr/Au depletion gates. Our samples show very stable FQH plateaus at v = 7/3, 5/2 and 8/3 filling fractions. Tunneling experiments are performed in the QPCs at various temperatures and also at various pinch-off voltages to characterize the effective charge and Coulomb interaction parameters of the quasiparticles. (Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  12. Elastic tunneling charge transport mechanisms in silicon quantum dots / Si O 2 thin films and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illera, S.; Prades, J. D.; Cirera, A.

    2015-05-01

    The role of different charge transport mechanisms in Si / Si O 2 structures has been studied. A theoretical model based on the Transfer Hamiltonian Formalism has been developed to explain experimental current trends in terms of three different elastic tunneling processes: (1) trap assisted tunneling; (2) transport through an intermediate quantum dot; and (3) direct tunneling between leads. In general, at low fields carrier transport is dominated by the quantum dots whereas, for moderate and high fields, transport through deep traps inherent to the SiO2 is the most relevant process. Besides, current trends in Si / Si O 2 superlattice structure have been properly reproduced.

  13. Differential-phase-shift quantum secret sharing.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Ohashi, T; Kukita, T; Watanebe, K; Hayashi, S; Honjo, T; Takesue, H

    2008-09-29

    A quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocol based on a differential-phase-shift scheme is proposed, which quantum mechanically provides a full secret key to one party and partial keys to two other parties. A weak coherent pulse train is utilized instead of individual photons as in conventional schemes. Compared with previous QSS protocols, the present one features a simple setup, is suitable for fiber transmission, and offers the possibility for a high key creation rate. An experiment is also carried out to demonstrate the operation.

  14. Negative tunneling magneto-resistance in quantum wires with strong spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungju; Serra, Llorenç; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2015-06-01

    We consider a two-dimensional magnetic tunnel junction of the FM/I/QW(FM+SO)/I/N structure, where FM, I and QW(FM+SO) stand for a ferromagnet, an insulator and a quantum wire with both magnetic ordering and Rashba spin-orbit (SOC), respectively. The tunneling magneto-resistance (TMR) exhibits strong anisotropy and switches sign as the polarization direction varies relative to the quantum-wire axis, due to interplay among the one-dimensionality, the magnetic ordering, and the strong SOC of the quantum wire.

  15. Instanton paths and coherent quantum tunneling in antiferromagnetic spin clusters subject to a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, B. A. Kireev, V. E.

    2008-09-15

    The coherent quantum tunneling effects in antiferromagnets in the presence of a strong external magnetic field parallel to the easy axis have been investigated using the instanton formalism. In a wide field range including the region of the phase spin-flop transition, the tunneling is described by 180{sup o} instantons for which the Euclidean action is real and destructive interference is absent. At the transition point, 90{sup o} instantons describing the tunneling between the collinear and spin-flop states appear. The Euclidean action decreases, whereas the tunneling probability and tunneling level splitting in both phases increase significantly in the immediate vicinity of the spin-flop transition point. The possibility of observing the coherent tunneling effects for artificial small particles (magnetic dots) made of antiferromagnets is discussed.

  16. Magnetic Relaxation of Superconducting Quantum Dot and Tunneling of Electron in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulevich, D. R.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    Quantum tunneling of vortices had been found to be an important novel phenomena for description of low temperature creep in high temperature superconductors (HTSCs). We speculate that quantum tunneling may be also exhibited in mesoscopic superconductors due to vortices trapped by the Bean-Livingston barrier. The London approximation and method of images is used to estimate the shape of the potential well in superconducting HTSC quantum dot. To calculate the escape rate we use the instanton technique. We model the vortex by a quantum particle tunneling from a two-dimensional ground state under magnetic field applied in the transverse direction. The resulting decay rates obtained by the instanton approach and conventional WKB are compared revealing complete coincidence with each other.

  17. Magnetic Relaxation of Superconducting Quantum Dot and Tunneling of Electron in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulevich, D. R.; Kusmartsev, F. V.

    2010-12-01

    Quantum tunneling of vortices had been found to be an important novel phenomena for description of low temperature creep in high temperature superconductors (HTSCs). We speculate that quantum tunneling may be also exhibited in mesoscopic superconductors due to vortices trapped by the Bean-Livingston barrier. The London approximation and method of images is used to estimate the shape of the potential well in superconducting HTSC quantum dot. To calculate the escape rate we use the instanton technique. We model the vortex by a quantum particle tunneling from a two-dimensional ground state under magnetic field applied in the transverse direction. The resulting decay rates obtained by the instanton approach and conventional WKB are compared revealing complete coincidence with each other.

  18. Backreaction due to quantum tunneling and modification to the black hole evaporation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Sujoy K.

    2014-08-01

    We study the effect of backreaction on the evaporation of quantum black holes. The method used is based on quantum tunneling formalism as proposed by Banerjee and Majhi [Phys. Lett. B 675, 243 (2009)]. We give a more realistic picture by considering the fact that a black hole looses its energy while modes are tunneled outside the event horizon. It is shown how the tunneling quantum field modes affect the geometry and how this change in geometry is arrested in the quantum field. Exploiting this, we calculate the modified (nonthermal) radiation spectrum and associating energy fluxes and discuss various issues related with these. The results obtained here are often expected on physical grounds, but, importantly, we find them in a quantitative manner.

  19. Tunnel spectroscopy of Majorana bound states in topological superconductor/quantum dot Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guang-Yao; Leijnse, Martin; Flensberg, Karsten; Xu, H. Q.

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically investigate electronic transport through a junction where a quantum dot (QD) is tunnel coupled on both sides to semiconductor nanowires with strong spin-orbit interaction and proximity-induced superconductivity. The results are presented as stability diagrams, i.e., the differential conductance as a function of the bias voltage applied across the junction and the gate voltage used to control the electrostatic potential on the QD. A small applied magnetic field splits and modifies the resonances due to the Zeeman splitting of the QD level. Above a critical field strength, Majorana bound states (MBS) appear at the interfaces between the two superconducting nanowires and the QD, resulting in a qualitative change of the entire stability diagram, suggesting this setup as a promising platform to identify MBS. Our calculations are based on a nonequilibrium Green's function description and is exact when Coulomb interactions on the QD can be neglected. In addition, we develop a simple pictorial view of the involved transport processes, which is equivalent to a description in terms of multiple Andreev reflections, but provides an alternative way to understand the role of the QD level in enhancing transport for certain gate and bias voltages. We believe that this description will be useful in future studies of interacting QDs coupled to superconducting leads (with or without MBS), where it can be used to develop a perturbation expansion in the tunnel coupling.

  20. The role of quantum effects in proton transfer reactions in enzymes: quantum tunneling in a noisy environment?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothma, Jacques P.; Gilmore, Joel B.; McKenzie, Ross H.

    2010-05-01

    We consider the role of quantum effects in the transfer of hydrogen-like species in enzyme-catalyzed reactions. This review is stimulated by claims that the observed magnitude and temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) implies that quantum tunneling below the energy barrier associated with the transition state significantly enhances the reaction rate in many enzymes. We review the path integral approach and the Caldeira-Leggett model, which provides a general framework to describe and understand tunneling in a quantum system that interacts with a noisy environment at nonzero temperature. Here the quantum system is the active site of the enzyme, and the environment is the surrounding protein and water. Tunneling well below the barrier only occurs for temperatures less than a temperature T0, which is determined by the curvature of the potential energy surface near the top of the barrier. We argue that for most enzymes this temperature is less than room temperature. We review typical values for the parameters in the Caldeira-Leggett Hamiltonian, including the frequency-dependent friction and noise due to the environment. For physically reasonable parameters, we show that quantum transition state theory gives a quantitative description of the temperature dependence and magnitude of KIEs for two classes of enzymes that have been claimed to exhibit signatures of quantum tunneling. The only quantum effects are those associated with the transition state, both reflection at the barrier top and tunneling just below the barrier. We establish that the friction and noise due to the environment are weak and only slightly modify the reaction rate. Furthermore, at room temperature and for typical energy barriers environmental fluctuations with frequencies much less than 1000 cm-1 do not have a significant effect on quantum corrections to the reaction rate. This is essentially because the time scales associated with the dynamics of proton transfer are faster than

  1. Density-Gradient Theory: A Macroscopic Approach to Quantum Confinement and Tunneling in Semiconductor Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    flow of electrons and holes in Germanium and other semiconductors. Bell Syst. Tech. J. 29, 560 (1950) 4. Maxwell, J.C.: On stresses in rarefied gases...especially by the phenomena of quantum confinement and quantum tunneling. The various mathematical descriptions of electron flow in biased semiconductors...patently inappropriate. 1.2 Quantum transport The three main “quantum” behaviors of an electron gas in a semiconductor—all of course well known—that

  2. Quantum tunneling splittings from path-integral molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mátyus, Edit; Wales, David J.; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2016-03-01

    We illustrate how path-integral molecular dynamics can be used to calculate ground-state tunnelling splittings in molecules or clusters. The method obtains the splittings from ratios of density matrix elements between the degenerate wells connected by the tunnelling. We propose a simple thermodynamic integration scheme for evaluating these elements. Numerical tests on fully dimensional malonaldehyde yield tunnelling splittings in good overall agreement with the results of diffusion Monte Carlo calculations.

  3. Tunneling into quantum wires: Regularization of the tunneling Hamiltonian and consistency between free and bosonized fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippone, Michele; Brouwer, Piet W.

    2016-12-01

    Tunneling between a point contact and a one-dimensional wire is usually described with the help of a tunneling Hamiltonian that contains a δ function in position space. Whereas the leading-order contribution to the tunneling current is independent of the way this δ function is regularized, higher-order corrections with respect to the tunneling amplitude are known to depend on the regularization. Instead of regularizing the δ function in the tunneling Hamiltonian, one may also obtain a finite tunneling current by invoking the ultraviolet cutoffs in a field-theoretic description of the electrons in the one-dimensional conductor, a procedure that is often used in the literature. For the latter case, we show that standard ultraviolet cutoffs lead to different results for the tunneling current in fermionic and bosonized formulations of the theory, when going beyond leading order in the tunneling amplitude. We show how to recover the standard fermionic result using the formalism of functional bosonization and revisit the tunneling current to leading order in the interacting case.

  4. Control of optical bistability and third-order nonlinearity via tunneling induced quantum interference in triangular quantum dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Si-Cong Tong, Cun-Zhu Zhang, Jin-Long; Shan, Xiao-Nan; Fu, Xi-Hong; Zeng, Yu-Gang; Qin, Li; Ning, Yong-Qiang; Wan, Ren-Gang

    2015-06-15

    The optical bistability of a triangular quantum dot molecules embedded inside a unidirectional ring cavity is studied. The type, the threshold and the hysteresis loop of the optical bistability curves can be modified by the tunneling parameters, as well as the probe laser field. The linear and nonlinear susceptibilities of the medium are also studied to interpret the corresponding results. The physical interpretation is that the tunneling can induce the quantum interference, which modifies the linear and the nonlinear response of the medium. As a consequence, the characteristics of the optical bistability are changed. The scheme proposed here can be utilized for optimizing and controlling the optical switching process.

  5. Differentiability of correlations in realistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Alejandro; Faria, Edson de; Pujals, Enrique; Tresser, Charles

    2015-09-15

    We prove a version of Bell’s theorem in which the locality assumption is weakened. We start by assuming theoretical quantum mechanics and weak forms of relativistic causality and of realism (essentially the fact that observable values are well defined independently of whether or not they are measured). Under these hypotheses, we show that only one of the correlation functions that can be formulated in the framework of the usual Bell theorem is unknown. We prove that this unknown function must be differentiable at certain angular configuration points that include the origin. We also prove that, if this correlation is assumed to be twice differentiable at the origin, then we arrive at a version of Bell’s theorem. On the one hand, we are showing that any realistic theory of quantum mechanics which incorporates the kinematic aspects of relativity must lead to this type of rough correlation function that is once but not twice differentiable. On the other hand, this study brings us a single degree of differentiability away from a relativistic von Neumann no hidden variables theorem.

  6. Evidence for quantum tunneling of vortices in superconductors. [Temperature dependence in low magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Haviland, D.B.; Glazman, L.I.; Goldman, A.M. )

    1992-10-01

    Flux creep in disordered superconductors may be governed by quantum tunneling of Abrikosov vortices rather than by thermal activation processes. The expectation is that in the quantum tunneling regime the creep rate would be temperature independent. This assumes that the parameters describing the pinning potential and other aspects of the superconducting films are temperature independent. In the case of extremely thin superconducting films the coherence length retains its temperature dependence well into the quantum tunneling regime, leading to an unusual temperature dependence of the electrical resistance in this regime. This was observed in ultrathin superconducting films of Pb, Al, and Bi. In low magnetic fields, at low temperatures, sheet resistances vary with temperature as R [approx] R[sub 0] exp(T/T[sub 0]), where T[sub 0] and R[sub 0] are constants.

  7. Band gap widening and quantum tunnelling effects of Ag/MgO/p-Si MOS structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarulzaman, Norlida; Badar, Nurhanna; Fadilah Chayed, Nor; Firdaus Kasim, Muhd

    2016-10-01

    MgO films of various thicknesses were fabricated via the pulsed laser deposition method. The MgO thin films obtained have the advantage of high quality mirror finish, good densification and of uniform thickness. The MgO thin films have thicknesses of between 43 to 103 nm. They are polycrystalline in nature with oriented growth mainly in the direction of the [200] and [220] crystal planes. It is observed that the band gap of the thin films increases as the thickness decreases due to quantum effects, however, turn-on voltage has the opposite effect. The decrease of the turn-on as well as the tunnelling voltage of the thinner films, despite their larger band gap, is a direct experimental evidence of quantum tunnelling effects in the thin films. This proves that quantum tunnelling is more prominent in low dimensional structures.

  8. Black hole remnant and quantum tunnelling in three-dimensional Gödel spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Ling; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2015-05-01

    Using the modified Dirac equation in a three-dimensional gravity background, we investigate the quantum correction to tunnelling radiation from a Gödel black hole, and discuss the black hole remnant employing fermion's tunnelling. The corrected tunnelling probability is derived, and the modified Hawking temperature is found as well. It is worth emphasizing that, only when the condition j> αω(3 r -- r +) is satisfied, emitting both a mass particle and a massless particle, the remnant of the Gödel black hole may arise.

  9. Magnetic-Field Dependence of Tunnel Couplings in Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Grap, S.; Paaske, J.; Flensberg, K.; Andergassen, S.; Meden, V.; Jørgensen, H. I.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2012-04-01

    By means of sequential and cotunneling spectroscopy, we study the tunnel couplings between metallic leads and individual levels in a carbon nanotube quantum dot. The levels are ordered in shells consisting of two doublets with strong- and weak-tunnel couplings, leading to gate-dependent level renormalization. By comparison to a one- and two-shell model, this is shown to be a consequence of disorder-induced valley mixing in the nanotube. Moreover, a parallel magnetic field is shown to reduce this mixing and thus suppress the effects of tunnel renormalization.

  10. Time-Resolved Tunneling in Gallium-Arsenide Quantum Well Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Theodore Blake

    Tunneling in quantum well structures has been a subject of considerable interest in semiconductor physics in recent years. Few time-domain experiments, however, have been brought to bear on the questions of the mechanisms or time-dependence of tunneling. We have developed techniques for a measurement of picosecond and femtosecond optical spectra, and applied them for the first time to the study of tunneling in quantum well structures. We have developed a novel dye oscillator and amplifier to generate optical pulses of 100-fs duration at the 15 -muJ level with a repetition rate of 1 kHz. These pulses were used to generate a white-light continuum, which enabled us to perform optical absorption spectroscopy over the visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum with a time resolution of about 100 fs. We have also developed an experimental setup for time-resolved photoluminescence appropriate for GaAs quantum well studies, utilizing a picosecond near-infrared dye laser in conjunction with a synchroscan streak camera. Using time resolved photoluminescence, we have studied the tunneling escape rate of electrons from a quantum well through a thin barrier into a continuum, and its dependence on barrier height and width, and on an applied electric field. The observed rates are well-described by a straightforward semiclassical theory. We have investigated the problem of tunneling between coupled quantum wells using both time-resolved luminescence and absorption spectroscopy. We have directly observed in luminescence the buildup of a "charge-transfer" state via electron and hole tunneling in opposite directions, and the dependence of this charge transfer on an electric field. At moderate fields (2.5 times 10^4 V/cm), the charge transfer occurs faster than 20 ps, indicating an unexpectedly fast hole tunneling rate. The time-resolved absorption experiments measure the time electrons initially excited into one quantum well require to tunnel into a second well. The

  11. Possibility of multiple tunnelling current peaks in a coupled quantum well system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luis, D.; Díaz, J. P.; Capuj, N. E.; Cruz, H.

    2000-07-01

    In this work, we have numerically integrated in space and time the effective-mass nonlinear Schrödinger equation for an electron wave packet in a bilayer electron system. Considering both Hartree and exchange-correlation potentials, we have calculated the tunnelling rates between the two quantum wells when an external bias is applied in the double quantum well system. Due to the nonlinear effective-mass equation, it is found that the charge dynamically trapped in both wells produces a reaction field which modifies the system resonant condition. At different electronic sheet densities, we have shown the possibility of having multiple resonant tunnelling peaks in a bilayer electron system.

  12. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl: A New State of the Water Molecule.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Reiter, George F; Choudhury, Narayani; Prisk, Timothy R; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Ehlers, George; Seel, Andrew G; Wesolowski, David J; Anovitz, Lawrence M

    2016-04-22

    Using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new "quantum tunneling state" of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. In addition, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  13. Imaging correlated wave functions of few-electron quantum dots: Theory and scanning tunneling spectroscopy experimentsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Massimo; Molinari, Elisa; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Janson, Martin; Schramm, Andreas; Meyer, Christian; Matsui, Tomohiro; Heyn, Christian; Hansen, Wolfgang; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2007-04-01

    We show both theoretically and experimentally that scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) images of semiconductor quantum dots may display clear signatures of electron-electron correlation. We apply many-body tunneling theory to a realistic model, which fully takes into account correlation effects and dot anisotropy. Comparing measured STS images of freestanding InAs quantum dots with those calculated by the full configuration interaction method, we explain the wave-function sequence in terms of images of one- and two-electron states. The STS map corresponding to double charging is significantly distorted by electron correlation with respect to the noninteracting case.

  14. Quantum Tunneling of Water in Beryl. A New State of the Water Molecule

    DOE PAGES

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Reiter, George F.; Choudhury, Narayani; ...

    2016-04-22

    When using neutron scattering and ab initio simulations, we document the discovery of a new “quantum tunneling state” of the water molecule confined in 5 Å channels in the mineral beryl, characterized by extended proton and electron delocalization. We observed a number of peaks in the inelastic neutron scattering spectra that were uniquely assigned to water quantum tunneling. Additionally, the water proton momentum distribution was measured with deep inelastic neutron scattering, which directly revealed coherent delocalization of the protons in the ground state.

  15. Entangled trajectory molecular dynamics in multidimensional systems: two-dimensional quantum tunneling through the Eckart barrier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifei; Martens, Craig C; Zheng, Yujun

    2012-07-21

    In this paper, we extend the entangled trajectory molecular dynamics (ETMD) method to multidimensional systems. The integrodifferential form of the evolution equation for the Wigner function is employed, allowing general potentials not represented as a polynomial to be treated. As the example, the method is applied to a two-dimensional model of scattering from an Eckart barrier. The results of ETMD are in good agreement with quantum hydrodynamics and exact quantum simulations. By comparing the quantum and classical trajectory in phase space, the quantum tunneling phenomenon is interpreted vividly.

  16. Tunneling in perfect-fluid (minisuperspace) quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.D. )

    1990-02-15

    A minisuperspace model of general relativity with a positive cosmological constant coupled to a perfect isentropic fluid is presented. The classical equations of motion are solved for a tunneling solution that consists of a Euclidean instanton of the wormhole type, connected to Lorentzian Robertson-Walker universes. The path integral is then defined as a sum over Lorentzian geometries and it is shown that the tunneling solution dominates the semiclassical evaluation of the path integral.

  17. Tunnel-injection GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai; Kandaswamy, Prem Kumar; Protasenko, Vladimir; Verma, Amit; Grace Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2013-01-28

    We demonstrate a GaN quantum dot ultraviolet light-emitting diode that uses tunnel injection of carriers through AlN barriers into the active region. The quantum dot heterostructure is grown by molecular beam epitaxy on AlN templates. The large lattice mismatch between GaN and AlN favors the formation of GaN quantum dots in the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Carrier injection by tunneling can mitigate losses incurred in hot-carrier injection in light emitting heterostructures. To achieve tunnel injection, relatively low composition AlGaN is used for n- and p-type layers to simultaneously take advantage of effective band alignment and efficient doping. The small height of the quantum dots results in short-wavelength emission and are simultaneously an effective tool to fight the reduction of oscillator strength from quantum-confined Stark effect due to polarization fields. The strong quantum confinement results in room-temperature electroluminescence peaks at 261 and 340 nm, well above the 365 nm bandgap of bulk GaN. The demonstration opens the doorway to exploit many varied features of quantum dot physics to realize high-efficiency short-wavelength light sources.

  18. Investigating how students think about and learn quantum physics: An example from tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey T.

    Much of physics education research (PER) has focused on introductory courses and topics, with less research done into how students learn physics in advanced courses. Members of The University of Maine Physics Education Research Laboratory (PERL) have begun studying how students in advanced physics courses reason about classical mechanics, thermal physics, and quantum physics. Here, we describe an investigation into how students reason about quantum mechanical tunneling, and detail how those findings informed a portion of a curriculum development project. Quantum mechanical tunneling is a standard topic discussed in most modern physics and quantum physics courses. Understanding tunneling is crucial to making sense of several topics in physics, including scanning tunneling microscopy and nuclear decay. To make sense of the standard presentation of tunneling, students must track total, potential, and kinetic energies. Additionally, they must distinguish between the ideas of energy, probability density, and the wave function. They need to understand the complex nature of the wave function, as well as understand what can and cannot be inferred from a solution to the time-independent Schrodinger equation. Our investigations into student understanding of these ideas consisted of a series of interviews, as well as a survey. Both centered around asking students to reason about energy, probability, and the wave function solutions for the standard square potential energy barrier scenario presented in most textbooks. We describe ideas that students seem to successfully learn following standard instruction, as well as common difficulties that remain. Additionally, we present multiple data points from a small population of physics majors over three years and describe how some of their reasoning about tunneling changed, while other portions seemed to remain unaffected by instruction. We used the results of these investigations to write tutorials on tunneling and applications of

  19. Probing the quantum tunneling limit of plasmonic enhancement by third harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Hajisalem, Ghazal; Nezami, Mohammedreza S; Gordon, Reuven

    2014-11-12

    Metal nanostructures provide extreme focusing of optical energy that is limited fundamentally by quantum tunneling. We directly probe the onset of the quantum tunneling regime observed by a sharp reduction in the local field intensity in subnanometer self-assembled monolayer gaps using third harmonic generation. Unlike past works that have inferred local limits from far-field spectra, this nonlinear measurement is sensitive to the near-field intensity as the third power. We calculate the local field intensity using a quantum corrected model and find good quantitative agreement with the measured third harmonic. The onset of the quantum regime occurs for double the gap size of past studies because of the reduced barrier height of the self-assembled monolayer, which will be critical for many applications of plasmonics, including nonlinear optics and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

  20. In-plane chiral tunneling and out-of-plane valley-polarized quantum tunneling in twisted graphene trilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2014-08-01

    Here we show that a twisted graphene trilayer made by misoriented stacking of a graphene monolayer on top of a Bernal graphene bilayer can exhibit rich and tailored electronic properties. For the case that the graphene monolayer and bilayer are strongly coupled, both the massless Dirac fermions and massive chiral fermions coexist in the twisted trilayer, leading to unique in-plane chiral tunneling. For a weak coupling between the two graphene systems, the distinct chiralities and pseudospin textures of quasiparticles in monolayer and bilayer enable vertical valley-polarized quantum tunneling between them. Intriguingly, the polarity of the valley polarization can be inverted simply by either controlling the rotational angles between the two systems or tuning the Fermi levels of the two systems. Our result implies that layered van der Waals structures assembled from individual atomic planes can create materials that harbor unusual properties and alternative functionalities depending on the stacking configuration of the crystalline layers.

  1. Tunneling dynamics with a mixed quantum-classical method: Quantum corrected propagator combined with frozen Gaussian wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2008-07-01

    The recently developed mixed quantum-classical propagation method is extended to treat tunneling effects in multidimensional systems. Formulated for systems consisting of a quantum primary part and a classical bath of heavier particles, the method employs a frozen Gaussian description for the bath degrees of freedom, while the dynamics of the quantum subsystem is governed by a corrected propagator. The corrections are defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth-order propagators. The method is applied to a model system of a double-well potential bilinearly coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The extension of the method, which includes nondiagonal elements of the correction propagator, enables an accurate treatment of tunneling in an antisymmetric double-well potential.

  2. Scaling analysis and instantons for thermally assisted tunneling and quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhang; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Isakov, Sergei V.; Boixo, Sergio; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias; Neven, Hartmut

    2017-01-01

    We develop an instantonic calculus to derive an analytical expression for the thermally assisted tunneling decay rate of a metastable state in a fully connected quantum spin model. The tunneling decay problem can be mapped onto the Kramers escape problem of a classical random dynamical field. This dynamical field is simulated efficiently by path-integral quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). We show analytically that the exponential scaling with the number of spins of the thermally assisted quantum tunneling rate and the escape rate of the QMC process are identical. We relate this effect to the existence of a dominant instantonic tunneling path. The instanton trajectory is described by nonlinear dynamical mean-field theory equations for a single-site magnetization vector, which we solve exactly. Finally, we derive scaling relations for the "spiky" barrier shape when the spin tunneling and QMC rates scale polynomially with the number of spins N while a purely classical over-the-barrier activation rate scales exponentially with N .

  3. Tunneling and Speedup in Quantum Optimization for Permutation-Symmetric Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnan, Siddharth; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-07-01

    Tunneling is often claimed to be the key mechanism underlying possible speedups in quantum optimization via quantum annealing (QA), especially for problems featuring a cost function with tall and thin barriers. We present and analyze several counterexamples from the class of perturbed Hamming weight optimization problems with qubit permutation symmetry. We first show that, for these problems, the adiabatic dynamics that make tunneling possible should be understood not in terms of the cost function but rather the semiclassical potential arising from the spin-coherent path-integral formalism. We then provide an example where the shape of the barrier in the final cost function is short and wide, which might suggest no quantum advantage for QA, yet where tunneling renders QA superior to simulated annealing in the adiabatic regime. However, the adiabatic dynamics turn out not be optimal. Instead, an evolution involving a sequence of diabatic transitions through many avoided-level crossings, involving no tunneling, is optimal and outperforms adiabatic QA. We show that this phenomenon of speedup by diabatic transitions is not unique to this example, and we provide an example where it provides an exponential speedup over adiabatic QA. In yet another twist, we show that a classical algorithm, spin-vector dynamics, is at least as efficient as diabatic QA. Finally, in a different example with a convex cost function, the diabatic transitions result in a speedup relative to both adiabatic QA with tunneling and classical spin-vector dynamics.

  4. Effect of pumping delay on the modulation bandwidth in double tunneling-injection quantum dot lasers.

    PubMed

    Asryan, Levon V

    2017-01-01

    The modulation bandwidth of double tunneling-injection (DTI) quantum dot (QD) lasers is studied, taking into account noninstantaneous pumping of QDs. In this advanced type of semiconductor lasers, carriers are first captured from the bulk waveguide region into two-dimensional regions (quantum wells [QWs]); then they tunnel from the QWs into zero-dimensional regions (QDs). The two processes are noninstantaneous and, thus, could delay the delivery of the carriers to the QDs. Here, the modulation bandwidth of DTI QD lasers is calculated as a function of two characteristic times (the capture time from the waveguide region into the QW and the tunneling time from the QW into the QD ensemble) and is shown to increase as either of these times is reduced. The capture and tunneling times of 1 and 0.1 ps, respectively, are shown to characterize fast capture and tunneling processes; as the capture and tunneling times are brought below 1 and 0.1 ps, the bandwidth remains almost unchanged and close to its upper limit.

  5. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker's theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  6. Quantum-limited detection of millimeter waves using superconducting tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.

    1991-09-01

    The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator- superconductor (SIS) tunnel junction is highly nonlinear. Such a nonlinearity can be used to mix two millimeter wave signals to produce a signal at a much lower intermediate frequency. We have constructed several millimeter and sub-millimeter wave SIS mixers in order to study high frequency response of the quasiparticle tunneling current and the physics of high frequency mixing. We have made the first measurement of the out-of-phase tunneling currents in an SIS tunnel junction. We have developed a method that allows us to determine the parameters of the high frequency embedding circuit by studying the details of the pumped I-V curve. We have constructed a 80--110 GHz waveguide-based mixer test apparatus that allows us to accurately measure the gain and added noise of the SIS mixer under test. Using extremely high quality tunnel junctions, we have measured an added mixer noise of 0.61 {plus_minus} 0.36 quanta, which is within 25 percent of the quantum limit imposed by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. This measured performance is in excellent agreement with that predicted by Tucker`s theory of quantum mixing. We have also studied quasioptically coupled millimeter- and submillimeter-wave mixers using several types of integrated tuning elements. 83 refs.

  7. Deeper Look at Student Learning of Quantum Mechanics: The Case of Tunneling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKagan, S. B.; Perkins, K. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2008-01-01

    We report on a large-scale study of student learning of quantum tunneling in four traditional and four transformed modern physics courses. In the transformed courses, which were designed to address student difficulties found in previous research, students still struggle with many of the same issues found in other courses. However, the reasons for…

  8. Re-Examining Gravitational Tunneling Radiation when taking into account Quantum Gravity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, John; Prescott, Trevor; Blado, Gardo

    2015-03-01

    Although shown to theoretically exist, Hawking Radiation has yet to be detected. The paper entitled ``Gravitational Tunneling Radiation'' by Mario Rabinowitz proposed a possible explanation by considering the gravitational tunneling effects in the presence of other bodies in the vicinity of the black hole. Rabinowitz showed that the power radiated (through gravitational radiation) by a black hole,PR, is related to the power generated by Hawking Radiation, PSH by PR/T ~PSH where T is the gravitational tunneling probability. The presence of other bodies lowers the gravitational barrier which in turn increases the gravitational tunneling probability thereby decreasing the Hawking radiation, PSH. In this paper, we examine the modification of T in the presence of quantum gravity effects by incorporating the Generalized Uncertainty Principle.

  9. Quantum tunneling of two coupled single-molecular magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianming; Chen, Zhide; Shen, Shunqing

    2003-03-01

    Jian-Ming Hu, Zhi-De Chen and Shun-Qing Shen Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong December 02, 2002 Very recently a supramolecular dimer of two single-molecule magnets (SMM) was reported to be synthesized successfully. Two single-molecule magnets are coupled antiferromagnetically to form a supramolecule dimer. We study the coupling effect and tunneling process by the numerical exact diagonalization method. The sweeping rate effect in the derivatives of hysteresis loops has been quantitatively investigated using the modified Landau-Zener model. In addiction we find that exchange coupling between the two SMMs provides a biased field to expel the tunneling between SMMs to two new resonant points via an intermediate state, and direct tunneling is prohibited. The model parameters are calculated for the dimer based on the tunneling process. The outcome indicates that the coupling effect will not change the parameters of each SMM too much at all. This work is supported by a CRCG grant of The University of Hong Kong.

  10. Time delay of wave packets during their tunnelling through a quantum diode

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, N A; Skalozub, V V

    2014-04-28

    A modified saddle-point method is used to investigate the process of propagation of a wave packet through a quantum diode. A scattering matrix is constructed for the structure in question. The case of tunnelling of a packet with a Gaussian envelope through the diode is considered in detail. The time delay and the shape of the wave packet transmitted are calculated. The dependence of the delay time on the characteristics of the input packet and the internal characteristics of the quantum diode is studied. Possible applications of the results obtained are discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  11. Control of coherence transfer via tunneling in quadruple and multiple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Si-Cong; Xing, En-Bo; Wan, Ren-Gang; Wang, Chun-Liang; Wang, Li-Jie; Shu, Shi-Li; Tong, Cun-Zhu; Wang, Li-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Transfer and manipulation of coherence among the ground state and indirect exciton states via tunneling in quadruple and multiple quantum dots is analyzed. By applying suitable amplitudes and sequences of the pump and tunneling pulses, a complete transfer of coherence or an arbitrary distribution of coherence of multiple states can be realized. The method, which is an adiabatic passage process, is different from previous works on quantum dot molecules in the way that the population can transfer from the ground state to the indirect exciton states without populating the direct exciton state, and thus no spontaneous emission occurs. This investigation can provide further insight to help the experimental development of coherence transfer in semiconductor structures, and may have potential applications in quantum information processing.

  12. Multi-color tunneling quantum dot infrared photodetectors operating at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyawansa, G.; Perera, A. G. U.; Su, X. H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2007-04-01

    Quantum dot structures designed for multi-color infrared detection and high temperature (or room temperature) operation are demonstrated. A novel approach, tunneling quantum dot (T-QD), was successfully demonstrated with a detector that can be operated at room temperature due to the reduction of the dark current by blocking barriers incorporated into the structure. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunneling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunneling barriers placed in the structure. A two-color tunneling-quantum dot infrared photodetector (T-QDIP) with photoresponse peaks at 6 μm and 17 μm operating at room temperature will be discussed. Furthermore, the idea can be used to develop terahertz T-QD detectors operating at high temperatures. Successful results obtained for a T-QDIP designed for THz operations are presented. Another approach, bi-layer quantum dot, uses two layers of InAs quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes separated by a thin GaAs layer. The detector response was observed at three distinct wavelengths in short-, mid-, and far-infrared regions (5.6, 8.0, and 23.0 μm). Based on theoretical calculations, photoluminescence and infrared spectral measurements, the 5.6 and 23.0 μm peaks are connected to the states in smaller QDs in the structure. The narrow peaks emphasize the uniform size distribution of QDs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. These detectors can be employed in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, spectroscopy, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  13. Extracting inter-dot tunnel couplings between few donor quantum dots in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, S. K.; Broome, M. A.; Keizer, J. G.; Watson, T. F.; Hile, S. J.; Baker, W. J.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The long term scaling prospects for solid-state quantum computing architectures relies heavily on the ability to simply and reliably measure and control the coherent electron interaction strength, known as the tunnel coupling, t c. Here, we describe a method to extract the t c between two quantum dots (QDs) utilising their different tunnel rates to a reservoir. We demonstrate the technique on a few donor triple QD tunnel coupled to a nearby single-electron transistor (SET) in silicon. The device was patterned using scanning tunneling microscopy-hydrogen lithography allowing for a direct measurement of the tunnel coupling for a given inter-dot distance. We extract {t}{{c}}=5.5+/- 1.8 {{GHz}} and {t}{{c}}=2.2+/- 1.3 {{GHz}} between each of the nearest-neighbour QDs which are separated by 14.5 nm and 14.0 nm, respectively. The technique allows for an accurate measurement of t c for nanoscale devices even when it is smaller than the electron temperature and is an ideal characterisation tool for multi-dot systems with a charge sensor.

  14. Time-dependent quantum transport through an interacting quantum dot beyond sequential tunneling: second-order quantum rate equations.

    PubMed

    Dong, B; Ding, G H; Lei, X L

    2015-05-27

    A general theoretical formulation for the effect of a strong on-site Coulomb interaction on the time-dependent electron transport through a quantum dot under the influence of arbitrary time-varying bias voltages and/or external fields is presented, based on slave bosons and the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (GF) techniques. To avoid the difficulties of computing double-time GFs, we generalize the propagation scheme recently developed by Croy and Saalmann to combine the auxiliary-mode expansion with the celebrated Lacroix's decoupling approximation in dealing with the second-order correlated GFs and then establish a closed set of coupled equations of motion, called second-order quantum rate equations (SOQREs), for an exact description of transient dynamics of electron correlated tunneling. We verify that the stationary solution of our SOQREs is able to correctly describe the Kondo effect on a qualitative level. Moreover, a comparison with other methods, such as the second-order von Neumann approach and Hubbard-I approximation, is performed. As illustrations, we investigate the transient current behaviors in response to a step voltage pulse and a harmonic driving voltage, and linear admittance as well, in the cotunneling regime.

  15. Size-dependent energy levels of InSb quantum dots measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Vaxenburg, Roman; Liu, Wenyong; Rupich, Sara M; Lifshitz, Efrat; Efros, Alexander L; Talapin, Dmitri V; Sibener, S J

    2015-01-27

    The electronic structure of single InSb quantum dots (QDs) with diameters between 3 and 7 nm was investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). In this size regime, InSb QDs show strong quantum confinement effects which lead to discrete energy levels on both valence and conduction band states. Decrease of the QD size increases the measured band gap and the spacing between energy levels. Multiplets of equally spaced resonance peaks are observed in the tunneling spectra. There, multiplets originate from degeneracy lifting induced by QD charging. The tunneling spectra of InSb QDs are qualitatively different from those observed in the STS of other III-V materials, for example, InAs QDs, with similar band gap energy. Theoretical calculations suggest the electron tunneling occurs through the states connected with L-valley of InSb QDs rather than through states of the Γ-valley. This observation calls for better understanding of the role of indirect valleys in strongly quantum-confined III-V nanomaterials.

  16. Subgap tunneling via a quantum interference effect: Insulators and charge density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhot, S.; Mélin, R.

    2007-11-01

    A quantum interference effect is discussed for subgap tunneling over a distance comparable to the coherence length, which is a consequence of “advanced-advanced” and “retarded-retarded” transmission modes [Altland and Zirnbauer, Phys. Rev. B 55, 1142 (1997)]. Effects typical of disorder are obtained from the interplay between multichannel averaging and higher order processes in the tunnel amplitudes. Quantum interference effects similar to those occurring in normal tunnel junctions explain magnetoresistance oscillations of a CDW pierced by nanoholes [Latyshev , Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 919 (1997)], having periodicity h/2e as a function of the flux enclosed in the nanohole. Subgap tunneling is coupled to the sliding motion by charge accumulation in the interrupted chains. The effect is within the same trend as random matrix theory for normal metal-CDW hybrids [Visscher , Phys. Rev. B 62, 6873 (2000)]. We suggest that the experiment by Latyshev probes weak localizationlike properties of evanescent quasiparticles, not an interference effect related to the quantum-mechanical ground state.

  17. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, Ryan H. Ward, Daniel R.; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Savage, D. E.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.; Prance, J. R.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Saraiva, A. L.

    2015-09-07

    Achieving controllable coupling of dopants in silicon is crucial for operating donor-based qubit devices, but it is difficult because of the small size of donor-bound electron wavefunctions. Here, we report the characterization of a quantum dot coupled to a localized electronic state and present evidence of controllable coupling between the quantum dot and the localized state. A set of measurements of transport through the device enable the determination that the most likely location of the localized state is consistent with a location in the quantum well near the edge of the quantum dot. Our results are consistent with a gate-voltage controllable tunnel coupling, which is an important building block for hybrid donor and gate-defined quantum dot devices.

  18. Which Is Better at Predicting Quantum-Tunneling Rates: Quantum Transition-State Theory or Free-Energy Instanton Theory?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanchuan; Stecher, Thomas; Cvitaš, Marko T; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2014-11-20

    Quantum transition-state theory (QTST) and free-energy instanton theory (FEIT) are two closely related methods for estimating the quantum rate coefficient from the free-energy at the reaction barrier. In calculations on one-dimensional models, FEIT typically gives closer agreement than QTST with the exact quantum results at all temperatures below the crossover to deep tunneling, suggesting that FEIT is a better approximation than QTST in this regime. Here we show that this simple trend does not hold for systems of greater dimensionality. We report tests on several collinear and three-dimensional reactions, in which QTST outperforms FEIT over a range of temperatures below crossover, which can extend down to half the crossover temperature (below which FEIT outperforms QTST). This suggests that QTST-based methods such as ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) may often give closer agreement with the exact quantum results than FEIT.

  19. The effects of two-dimensional bifurcations and quantum beats in a system of combined atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopes with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukovsky, V. Ch.; Krevchik, V. D.; Semenov, M. B.; Krevchik, P. V.; Zaytsev, R. V.; Egorov, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The field and temperature dependence of the probability of two-dimensional dissipative tunneling is studied in the framework of one-instanton approximation for a model double-well oscillator potential in an external electric field at finite temperature with account for the influence of two local phonon modes for quantum dots in a system of a combined atomic force and a scanning tunneling microscope. It is demonstrated that in the mode of synchronous parallel transfer of tunneling particles from the cantilever tip to the quantum dot the two local phonon modes result in the occurrence of two stable peaks in the curve of the 2D dissipative tunneling probability as a function of the field. Qualitative comparison of the theoretical curve in the limit of weak dissociation and the experimental current-voltage characteristic for quantum dots that grow from colloidal gold under a cantilever tip at the initial stage of quantum-dot formation when the quantum dot size does not exceed 10 nm is performed. It is established that one of the two stable peaks that correspond to interaction of tunneling particles with two local phonon modes in the temperature dependence of the 2D dissipative tunneling probability can be split in two, which corresponds to the tunneling channel interference mechanism. It is found that the theoretically predicted and experimentally observed mode of quantum beats occurs near the bifurcation point.

  20. Quantum Coherent Atomic Tunneling between Two Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Smerzi, A.; Fantoni, S.; Giovanazzi, S.

    1997-12-01

    We study the coherent atomic tunneling between two zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) confined in a double-well magnetic trap. Two Gross-Pitaevskii equations for the self-interacting BEC amplitudes, coupled by a transfer matrix element, describe the dynamics in terms of the interwell phase difference and population imbalance. In addition to the anharmonic generalization of the familiar ac Josephson effect and plasma oscillations occurring in superconductor junctions, the nonlinear BEC tunneling dynamics sustains a self-maintained population imbalance: a novel {open_quotes}macroscopic quantum self-trapping{close_quotes} effect. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Piezoelectric polarization and quantum size effects on the vertical transport in AlGaN/GaN resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H, Dakhlaoui; S, Almansour

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the electronic properties of resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) based on GaN-Al x Ga(1-x)N double barriers are investigated by using the non-equilibrium Green functions formalism (NEG). These materials each present a wide conduction band discontinuity and a strong internal piezoelectric field, which greatly affect the electronic transport properties. The electronic density, the transmission coefficient, and the current-voltage characteristics are computed with considering the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations. The influence of the quantum size on the transmission coefficient is analyzed by varying GaN quantum well thickness, Al x Ga(1-x)N width, and the aluminum concentration x Al. The results show that the transmission coefficient more strongly depends on the thickness of the quantum well than the barrier; it exhibits a series of resonant peaks and valleys as the quantum well width increases. In addition, it is found that the negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic strongly depends on aluminum concentration x Al. It is shown that the peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) increases with x Al value decreasing. These findings open the door for developing vertical transport nitrides-based ISB devices such as THz lasers and detectors. Project supported by the Deanship of Scientific Research of University of Dammam (Grant No. 2014137).

  2. The impact of disorder on charge transport in three dimensional quantum dot resonant tunneling structures

    SciTech Connect

    Puthen-Veettil, B. Patterson, R.; König, D.; Conibeer, G.; Green, M. A.

    2014-10-28

    Efficient iso-entropic energy filtering of electronic waves can be realized through nanostructures with three dimensional confinement, such as quantum dot resonant tunneling structures. Large-area deployment of such structures is useful for energy selective contacts but such configuration is susceptible to structural disorders. In this work, the transport properties of quantum-dot-based wide-area resonant tunneling structures, subject to realistic disorder mechanisms, are studied. Positional variations of the quantum dots are shown to reduce the resonant transmission peaks while size variations in the device are shown to reduce as well as broaden the peaks. Increased quantum dot size distribution also results in a peak shift to lower energy which is attributed to large dots dominating transmission. A decrease in barrier thickness reduces the relative peak height while the overall transmission increases dramatically due to lower “series resistance.” While any shift away from ideality can be intuitively expected to reduce the resonance peak, quantification allows better understanding of the tolerances required for fabricating structures based on resonant tunneling phenomena/.

  3. Negative differential resistance in GaN tunneling hot electron transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhichao; Nath, Digbijoy; Rajan, Siddharth

    2014-11-17

    Room temperature negative differential resistance is demonstrated in a unipolar GaN-based tunneling hot electron transistor. Such a device employs tunnel-injected electrons to vary the electron energy and change the fraction of reflected electrons, and shows repeatable negative differential resistance with a peak to valley current ratio of 7.2. The device was stable when biased in the negative resistance regime and tunable by changing collector bias. Good repeatability and double-sweep characteristics at room temperature show the potential of such device for high frequency oscillators based on quasi-ballistic transport.

  4. S-Matrix and Quantum Tunneling in Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciafaloni, Marcello; Colferai, Dimitri

    Using the recently introduced ACV reduced-action approach to transplanckian scattering of light particles, we show that the S-matrix in the region of classical gravitational collapse is related to a tunneling amplitude in an effective field space. The resulting model exhibits some non-unitary S-matrix eigenvalues for parameters b < bc, a critical value of the order of the gravitational radius R = 2G√ s, thus showing that some (inelastic)unitarity defect is generally present, and can be studied quantitatively.

  5. Nonlinear tunneling of Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical lattice: Signatures of quantum collapse and revival

    SciTech Connect

    Shchesnovich, V. S.; Konotop, V. V.

    2007-06-15

    Quantum theory of the intraband resonant tunneling of a Bose-Einstein condensate loaded in a two-dimensional optical lattice is considered. It is shown that the phenomena of quantum collapse and revival can be observed in the fully quantum problem. The mean-field limit of the theory is analyzed using the WKB approximation for discrete equations, establishing in this way a direct connection between the two approaches conventionally used in very different physical contexts. More specifically we show that there exist two different regimes of tunneling and study dependence of quantum collapse and revival on the number of condensed atoms.

  6. Zero-bias anomalies in narrow tunnel junctions in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P; Chien, C-C; Yang, I; Kang, W; Baldwin, K W; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2010-12-10

    We report on the study of cleaved-edge-overgrown line junctions with a serendipitously created narrow opening in an otherwise thin, precise line barrier. Two sets of zero-bias anomalies are observed with an enhanced conductance for filling factors ν>1 and a strongly suppressed conductance for ν<1. A transition between the two behaviors is found near ν≈1. The zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) line shapes find explanation in Luttinger liquid models of tunneling between quantum Hall edge states. The ZBA for ν<1 occurs from strong backscattering induced by suppression of quasiparticle tunneling between the edge channels for the n=0 Landau levels. The ZBA for ν>1 arises from weak tunneling of quasiparticles between the n=1 edge channels.

  7. Quantum Tunneling Rates of Gas-Phase Reactions from On-the-Fly Instanton Calculations.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Adrian N; Richardson, Jeremy O; Knowles, Peter J; Rommel, Judith; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-11-03

    The instanton method obtains approximate tunneling rates from the minimum-action path (known as the instanton) linking reactants to the products at a given temperature. An efficient way to find the instanton is to search for saddle-points on the ring-polymer potential surface, which is obtained by expressing the quantum Boltzmann operator as a discrete path-integral. Here we report a practical implementation of this ring-polymer form of instanton theory into the Molpro electronic-structure package, which allows the rates to be computed on-the-fly, without the need for a fitted analytic potential-energy surface. As a test case, we compute tunneling rates for the benchmark H + CH4 reaction, showing how the efficiency of the instanton method allows the user systematically to converge the tunneling rate with respect to the level of electronic-structure theory.

  8. Differential evolution for many-particle adaptive quantum metrology.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Neil B; Crosnier, Cécile; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Sanders, Barry C

    2013-05-31

    We devise powerful algorithms based on differential evolution for adaptive many-particle quantum metrology. Our new approach delivers adaptive quantum metrology policies for feedback control that are orders-of-magnitude more efficient and surpass the few-dozen-particle limitation arising in methods based on particle-swarm optimization. We apply our method to the binary-decision-tree model for quantum-enhanced phase estimation as well as to a new problem: a decision tree for adaptive estimation of the unknown bias of a quantum coin in a quantum walk and show how this latter case can be realized experimentally.

  9. Quasiparticle Tunneling in the Fractional Quantum Hall effect at filling fraction ν=5/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Iuliana P.

    2009-03-01

    In a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), in the fractional quantum Hall regime, the quasiparticles are predicted to have fractional charge and statistics, as well as modified Coulomb interactions. The state at filling fraction ν=5/2 is predicted by some theories to have non-abelian statistics, a property that might be exploited for topological quantum computing. However, alternative models with abelian properties have been proposed as well. Weak quasiparticle tunneling between counter-propagating edges is one of the methods that can be used to learn about the properties of the state and potentially distinguish between models describing it. We employ an electrostatically defined quantum point contact (QPC) fabricated on a high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEG to create a constriction where quasiparticles can tunnel between counter-propagating edges. We study the temperature and dc bias dependence of the tunneling conductance, while preserving the same filling fraction in the constriction and the bulk of the sample. The data show scaling of the bias-dependent tunneling over a range of temperatures, in agreement with the theory of weak quasiparticle tunneling, and we extract values for the effective charge and interaction parameter of the quasiparticles. The ranges of values obtained are consistent with those predicted by certain models describing the 5/2 state, indicating as more probable a non-abelian state. This work was done in collaboration with J. B. Miller, C. M. Marcus, M. A. Kastner, L. N. Pfeiffer and K. W. West. This work was supported in part by the Army Research Office (W911NF-05-1-0062), the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center program of NSF (PHY-0117795), NSF (DMR-0701386), the Center for Materials Science and Engineering program of NSF (DMR-0213282) at MIT, the Microsoft Corporation Project Q, and the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard University.

  10. Klein tunnelling and electron trapping in nanometre-scale graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Christopher; Brown, Lola; Kim, Cheol-Joo; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N.

    2016-11-01

    Relativistic fermions that are incident on a high potential barrier can pass through unimpeded, a striking phenomenon termed the `Klein paradox’ in quantum electrodynamics. Electrostatic potential barriers in graphene provide a solid-state analogue to realize this phenomenon. Here, we use scanning tunnelling microscopy to directly probe the transmission of electrons through sharp circular potential wells in graphene created by substrate engineering. We find that electrons in this geometry display quasi-bound states where the electron is trapped for a finite time before escaping via Klein tunnelling. We show that the continuum Dirac equation can be successfully used to model the energies and wavefunctions of these quasi-bound states down to atomic dimensions. We demonstrate that by tuning the geometry of the barrier it is possible to trap particular energies and angular momentum states with increased efficiency, showing that atomic-scale electrostatic potentials can be used to engineer quantum transport through graphene.

  11. Spin dynamics and magneto-optical response in charge-neutral tunnel-coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawełczyk, Michał; Machnikowski, Paweł

    2017-04-01

    We model the electron and hole spin dynamics in an undoped double quantum dot structure, considering the carrier tunneling between quantum dots. Taking the presence of an additional in-plane or tilted magnetic field into account, we enable the simulation of magneto-optical experiments, like the time-resolved Kerr rotation measurement, which are currently performed on such structures to probe the temporal spin dynamics. With our model, we reproduce the experimentally observed effect of the extension of the spin polarization lifetime caused by spatial charge separation, which may occur in structures of this type. Moreover, we provide a number of qualitative predictions concerning the necessary conditions for observation of this effect as well as about possible channels of its suppression, including the spin–orbit coupling, which leads to tunneling of carriers accompanied by a spin flip. We also consider the impact of the magnetic field tilting, which results in an interesting spin polarization dynamics.

  12. Tunneling-induced giant Goos-Hänchen shift in quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Xing; Liu, Shaopeng; Zhu, Zhonghu; Ziauddin; Lee, Ray-Kuang

    2015-07-01

    Tunneling-induced quantum interference experienced by an incident probe in the asymmetric double AlGaAs/GaAs quantum well (QW) structure can be modulated by means of an external control light beam and the tunable coupling strengths of resonant tunneling. These phenomena can be exploited to devise a novel intracavity medium to control Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts of a mid-infrared probe beam incident on a cavity. For a suitably designed QW structure, our results show that maximum negative shift of 2.62 mm and positive shift of 0.56 mm are achievable for GH shifts in the reflected and transmitted light.

  13. Conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage.

    PubMed

    Kano, Shinya; Fujii, Minoru

    2017-03-03

    We study the conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage. Heat leakage current from a hot electrode to a cold electrode is taken into account in the analysis of the harvester operation. Modeling of electrical output indicates that a maximum heat leakage current is not negligible because it is larger than that of the heat current harvested into electrical power. A reduction of heat leakage is required in this energy harvester in order to obtain efficient heat-to-electrical conversion. Multiple energy levels of a quantum dot can increase the output power of the harvester. Heavily doped colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are a possible candidate for a quantum-dot monolayer in the energy harvester to reduce heat leakage, scaling down device size, and increasing electrical output via multiple discrete energy levels.

  14. Conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shinya; Fujii, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    We study the conversion efficiency of an energy harvester based on resonant tunneling through quantum dots with heat leakage. Heat leakage current from a hot electrode to a cold electrode is taken into account in the analysis of the harvester operation. Modeling of electrical output indicates that a maximum heat leakage current is not negligible because it is larger than that of the heat current harvested into electrical power. A reduction of heat leakage is required in this energy harvester in order to obtain efficient heat-to-electrical conversion. Multiple energy levels of a quantum dot can increase the output power of the harvester. Heavily doped colloidal semiconductor quantum dots are a possible candidate for a quantum-dot monolayer in the energy harvester to reduce heat leakage, scaling down device size, and increasing electrical output via multiple discrete energy levels.

  15. Improved WKB approximation for quantum tunneling: Application to heavy-ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toubiana, A. J.; Canto, L. F.; Hussein, M. S.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we revisit the one-dimensional tunnelling problem. We consider Kemble's approximation for the transmission coefficient. We show how this approximation can be extended to above-barrier energies by performing the analytical continuation of the radial coordinate to the complex plane. We investigate the validity of this approximation by comparing their predictions for the cross section and for the barrier distribution with the corresponding quantum-mechanical results. We find that the extended Kemble's approximation reproduces the results of quantum mechanics with great accuracy.

  16. Multi-Dimensional Quantum Tunneling and Transport Using the Density-Gradient Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Yu, Zhi-Ping; Ancona, Mario; Rafferty, Conor; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We show that quantum effects are likely to significantly degrade the performance of MOSFETs (metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor) as these devices are scaled below 100 nm channel length and 2 nm oxide thickness over the next decade. A general and computationally efficient electronic device model including quantum effects would allow us to monitor and mitigate these effects. Full quantum models are too expensive in multi-dimensions. Using a general but efficient PDE solver called PROPHET, we implemented the density-gradient (DG) quantum correction to the industry-dominant classical drift-diffusion (DD) model. The DG model efficiently includes quantum carrier profile smoothing and tunneling in multi-dimensions and for any electronic device structure. We show that the DG model reduces DD model error from as much as 50% down to a few percent in comparison to thin oxide MOS capacitance measurements. We also show the first DG simulations of gate oxide tunneling and transverse current flow in ultra-scaled MOSFETs. The advantages of rapid model implementation using the PDE solver approach will be demonstrated, as well as the applicability of the DG model to any electronic device structure.

  17. Quantum tunneling at zero temperature in the strong friction regime.

    PubMed

    Bolivar, A O

    2005-01-21

    In the large damping limit we derive a Fokker-Planck equation in configuration space (the so-called Smoluchowski equation) describing a Brownian particle immersed into a thermal environment and subjected to a nonlinear external force. We quantize this stochastic system and survey the problem of escape over a double-well potential barrier. Our finding is that the quantum Kramers rate does not depend on the friction coefficient at low temperatures; i.e., we predict a superfluidity phenomenon in overdamped open systems. Moreover, at zero temperature we show that the quantum escape rate does not vanish in the strong friction regime. This result, therefore, is in contrast with the work by Ankerhold et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 086802 (2001)

  18. Advanced-Retarded Differential Equations in Quantum Photonic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Perez-Leija, Armando; Egusquiza, Iñigo L.; Gräfe, Markus; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Szameit, Alexander; Solano, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    We propose the realization of photonic circuits whose dynamics is governed by advanced-retarded differential equations. Beyond their mathematical interest, these photonic configurations enable the implementation of quantum feedback and feedforward without requiring any intermediate measurement. We show how this protocol can be applied to implement interesting delay effects in the quantum regime, as well as in the classical limit. Our results elucidate the potential of the protocol as a promising route towards integrated quantum control systems on a chip.

  19. Advanced-Retarded Differential Equations in Quantum Photonic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Perez-Leija, Armando; Egusquiza, Iñigo L.; Gräfe, Markus; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Szameit, Alexander; Solano, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    We propose the realization of photonic circuits whose dynamics is governed by advanced-retarded differential equations. Beyond their mathematical interest, these photonic configurations enable the implementation of quantum feedback and feedforward without requiring any intermediate measurement. We show how this protocol can be applied to implement interesting delay effects in the quantum regime, as well as in the classical limit. Our results elucidate the potential of the protocol as a promising route towards integrated quantum control systems on a chip. PMID:28230090

  20. Elastic tunneling charge transport mechanisms in silicon quantum dots /SiO{sub 2} thin films and superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Illera, S. Prades, J. D.; Cirera, A.

    2015-05-07

    The role of different charge transport mechanisms in Si/SiO{sub 2} structures has been studied. A theoretical model based on the Transfer Hamiltonian Formalism has been developed to explain experimental current trends in terms of three different elastic tunneling processes: (1) trap assisted tunneling; (2) transport through an intermediate quantum dot; and (3) direct tunneling between leads. In general, at low fields carrier transport is dominated by the quantum dots whereas, for moderate and high fields, transport through deep traps inherent to the SiO{sub 2} is the most relevant process. Besides, current trends in Si/SiO{sub 2} superlattice structure have been properly reproduced.

  1. Student Understanding of Tunneling in Quantum Mechanics: Examining Interview and Survey Results for Clues to Student Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Jeffrey T.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Thompson, John R.

    2004-09-01

    Members of the University of Maine Physics Education Research Laboratory are studying student understanding of the phenomenon of quantum tunneling through a potential barrier, a standard topic in most introductory quantum physics courses. When a series of interviews revealed that many students believe energy is lost in the tunneling process, a survey was designed to investigate the prevalence of the energy-loss idea. This survey was administered to populations of physics majors at the sophomore and senior levels. Data indicate that interview results are shared by a somewhat larger population of students and give insight into additional models of reasoning (e.g. analogies to macroscopic tunnels) not found in the interviews.

  2. Quantum-Like Tunnelling and Levels of Arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haven, Emmanuel; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2013-11-01

    We apply methods of wave mechanics to financial modelling. We proceed by assigning a financial interpretation to wave numbers. This paper makes a plea for the use of the concept of ‘tunnelling’ (in the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics) in the modelling of financial arbitrage. Financial arbitrage is a delicate concept to model in social science (i.e. in this case economics and finance) as its presence affects the precision of benchmark financial asset prices. In this paper, we attempt to show how ‘tunnelling’ can be used to positive effect in the modelling of arbitrage in a financial asset pricing context.

  3. Quantum Tunneling of Charge-Density Waves in Quasi One-Dimensional Conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John Harris, Jr.

    The charge-density wave (CDW) dynamics of the linear chain compound orthorhombic TaS(,3) is characterized by extensive measurements of dc conductivity, ac admittance, direct mixing, harmonic mixing, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation as functions of dc bias voltage, applied frequencies, and, in some cases, the amplitude of an additional ac signal. Measurements of the direct and harmonic mixing responses of NbSe(,3) are also reported. The results are analyzed in terms of an extension of the tunneling theory of CDW depinning, proposed by John Bardeen, coupled to the theory of photon-assisted tunneling (PAT). Where possible, the results are also compared with predictions of the classical overdamped oscillator model of CDW transport. The tunneling model is shown to provide a complete and semiquantitative interpretation of the entire small -signal ac dynamics at megahertz frequencies, using only the measured dc I-V curve and an experimentally inferred frequency-voltage scaling parameter, and also accounts for much of the large-signal behavior studied thus far. The observation of both an induced ac harmonic mixing current and a third harmonic generation current whose amplitudes peak at output frequencies far below the measured "cross -over frequency" for ac conductivity agrees with the phenomenological tunneling model, but is in serious disagreement with the classical overdamped oscillator model of CDW motion. Furthermore, the absence of any observed quadrature component in the harmonic mixing response, even though the measured linear response at the applied frequencies has substantial frequency -dependent in-phase and quadrature components, is probably impossible to reconcile with any classical theory. The results reported here thus provide compelling evidence in favor of collective, coherent quantum tunneling as the mechanism of charge-density wave depinning, and indicate that macroscopic quantum effects are observed in the megahertz frequency

  4. Real-time Feynman path integral with Picard–Lefschetz theory and its applications to quantum tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Tanizaki, Yuya; Koike, Takayuki

    2014-12-15

    Picard–Lefschetz theory is applied to path integrals of quantum mechanics, in order to compute real-time dynamics directly. After discussing basic properties of real-time path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles, we demonstrate its computational method in a concrete way by solving three simple examples of quantum mechanics. It is applied to quantum mechanics of a double-well potential, and quantum tunneling is discussed. We identify all of the complex saddle points of the classical action, and their properties are discussed in detail. However a big theoretical difficulty turns out to appear in rewriting the original path integral into a sum of path integrals on Lefschetz thimbles. We discuss generality of that problem and mention its importance. Real-time tunneling processes are shown to be described by those complex saddle points, and thus semi-classical description of real-time quantum tunneling becomes possible on solid ground if we could solve that problem. - Highlights: • Real-time path integral is studied based on Picard–Lefschetz theory. • Lucid demonstration is given through simple examples of quantum mechanics. • This technique is applied to quantum mechanics of the double-well potential. • Difficulty for practical applications is revealed, and we discuss its generality. • Quantum tunneling is shown to be closely related to complex classical solutions.

  5. Spectral-gap analysis for efficient tunneling in quantum adiabatic optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Lucas T.; van Dam, Wim

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the efficiency of quantum adiabatic optimization when overcoming potential barriers to get from a local to a global minimum. Specifically we look at n qubit systems with symmetric cost functions f :{0,1 } n→R , where the ground state must tunnel through a potential barrier of width nα and height nβ. By the quantum adiabatic theorem the time delay sufficient to ensure tunneling grows quadratically with the inverse spectral gap during this tunneling process. We analyze barrier sizes with 1 /2 ≤α +β and α <1 /2 and show that the minimum gap scales polynomially as n1 /2 -α -β when 2 α +β ≤1 and exponentially as n-β /2exp(-C n(2 α +β -1 )/2) when 1 <2 α +β . Our proof uses elementary techniques and confirms and extends an unpublished folklore result by Goldstone from 2002, which used large spin and instanton methods. Parts of our result also refine recent results by Kong and Crosson [arXiv:1511.06991] and Jiang et al. [arXiv:1603.01293] about the exponential gap scaling.

  6. Spin Dynamics and Quantum Tunneling in Fe8 Nanomagnet and in AFM Rings by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ho-Baek, Seung

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, our main interest has been to investigate the spin dynamics and quantum tunneling in single molecule magnets (SMMs), For this we have selected two different classes of SMMs: a ferrimagnetic total high spin S = 10 cluster Fe8 and antiferromagnetic (AFM) ring-type clusters. For Fe8, our efforts have been devoted to the investigation of the quantum tunneling of magnetization in the very low temperature region. The most remarkable experimental finding in Fe8 is that the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (1/T{sub l}) at low temperatures takes place via strong collision mechanism, and thus it allows to measure directly the tunneling rate vs T and H for the first time. For AFM rings, we have shown that 1/T{sub l} probes the thermal fluctuations of the magnetization in the intermediate temperature range. We find that the fluctuations are dominated by a single characteristic frequency which has a power law T-dependence indicative of fluctuations due to electron-acoustic phonon interactions.

  7. Differential geometry on Hopf algebras and quantum groups

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, Paul

    1994-12-15

    The differential geometry on a Hopf algebra is constructed, by using the basic axioms of Hopf algebras and noncommutative differential geometry. The space of generalized derivations on a Hopf algebra of functions is presented via the smash product, and used to define and discuss quantum Lie algebras and their properties. The Cartan calculus of the exterior derivative, Lie derivative, and inner derivation is found for both the universal and general differential calculi of an arbitrary Hopf algebra, and, by restricting to the quasitriangular case and using the numerical R-matrix formalism, the aforementioned structures for quantum groups are determined.

  8. Inter-dot tunneling control of optical bistability in triple quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reza Hamedi, Hamid

    2014-09-01

    The behavior of optical bistability (OB) and optical multistability (OM) in a triple coupled quantum dot (QD) system is theoretically explored. It is found that the tunneling coupling between electronic levels has major effect on controlling the threshold and the hysteresis cycle shape of the optical bistability. The impact of incoherent pump field on the OB and OM behavior of such medium is then discussed. We realize that the threshold intensity reduces remarkably through increasing the rate of incoherent pumping. It is also demonstrated that the switch between OB and OM can be obtained just through proper adjusting the frequency detuning of probe field. It should be pointed that in this QD system we used tunneling instead of coupling lasers. These presented results may be applicable in real experiments for realizing an all-optical bistate switching or coding element in a solid-state platform.

  9. Shot noise in magnetic tunneling structures with two-level quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepański, T.; Dugaev, V. K.; Barnaś, J.; Martinez, I.; Cascales, J. P.; Hong, J.-Y.; Lin, M.-T.; Aliev, F. G.

    2016-12-01

    We analyze shot noise in a magnetic tunnel junction with a two-level quantum dot attached to the magnetic electrodes. The considerations are limited to the case when some transport channels are suppressed at low temperatures. Coupling of the two dot's levels to the electrodes are assumed to be generally different and also spin dependent. To calculate the shot noise we apply the approach based on the full counting statistics. The approach is used to account for experimental data obtained in magnetic tunnel junctions with organic barriers. The experimentally observed Fano factors correspond to the super-Poissonian statistics, and also depend on relative orientation of the electrodes' magnetic moments. We have also calculated the corresponding spin shot noise, which is associated with fluctuations of spin current.

  10. Improved dynamics of a tunnelling-injection quantum-dot laser under optical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Faezeh; Zarifkar, Abbas

    2016-10-01

    We report an investigation of the optical feedback effect on the dynamics of a tunnelling-injection quantum dot (TI QD) semiconductor laser. Assuming the external cavity to be short and using a small signal analysis, the modulation response of a TI QD laser is calculated under optical feedback conditions. The impact of the tunnelling probability, bias-current density, feedback ratio, external cavity length and linewidth enhancement factor on the modulation response of a TI laser is studied. With the optical feedback taken into account, the modulation responses of conventional and TI QD lasers are compared. The obtained results demonstrate that at an appropriate feedback ratio and external cavity length, the laser bandwidth and its relaxation frequency can be improved.

  11. Tunnel magnetoresistance and linear conductance of double quantum dots strongly coupled to ferromagnetic leads

    SciTech Connect

    Weymann, Ireneusz

    2015-05-07

    We analyze the spin-dependent linear-response transport properties of double quantum dots strongly coupled to external ferromagnetic leads. By using the numerical renormalization group method, we determine the dependence of the linear conductance and tunnel magnetoresistance on the degree of spin polarization of the leads and the position of the double dot levels. We focus on the transport regime where the system exhibits the SU(4) Kondo effect. It is shown that the presence of ferromagnets generally leads the suppression of the linear conductance due to the presence of an exchange field. Moreover, the exchange field gives rise to a transition from the SU(4) to the orbital SU(2) Kondo effect. We also analyze the dependence of the tunnel magnetoresistance on the double dot levels' positions and show that it exhibits a very nontrivial behavior.

  12. Can a man-made universe be achieved by quantum tunneling without an initial singularity?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guth, Alan H.; Haller, K. (Editor); Caldi, D. B. (Editor); Islam, M. M. (Editor); Mallett, R. L. (Editor); Mannheim, P. D. (Editor); Swanson, M. S. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Essentially all modern particle theories suggest the possible existence of a false vacuum state; a metastable state with an energy density that cannot be lowered except by means of a very slow phase transition. Inflationary cosmology makes use of such a state to drive the expansion of the big bang, allowing the entire observed universe to evolve from a very small initial mass. A sphere of false vacuum in the present universe, if larger than a certain critical mass, could inflate to form a new universe which would rapidly detach from its parent. A false vacuum bubble of this size, however, cannot be produced classically unless an initial singularity is present from the outset. The possibility is explored that a bubble of subcritical size, which classically would evolve to a maximum size and collapse, might instead tunnel through a barrier to produce a new universe. The tunneling rate using semiclassical quantum gravity is estimated, and some interesting ambiguities in the formulas are discovered.

  13. Quantum groups, non-commutative differential geometry and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schupp, Peter

    1993-12-09

    The topic of this thesis is the development of a versatile and geometrically motivated differential calculus on non-commutative or quantum spaces, providing powerful but easy-to-use mathematical tools for applications in physics and related sciences. A generalization of unitary time evolution is proposed and studied for a simple 2-level system, leading to non-conservation of microscopic entropy, a phenomenon new to quantum mechanics. A Cartan calculus that combines functions, forms, Lie derivatives and inner derivations along general vector fields into one big algebra is constructed for quantum groups and then extended to quantum planes. The construction of a tangent bundle on a quantum group manifold and an BRST type approach to quantum group gauge theory are given as further examples of applications. The material is organized in two parts: Part I studies vector fields on quantum groups, emphasizing Hopf algebraic structures, but also introducing a ``quantum geometric`` construction. Using a generalized semi-direct product construction we combine the dual Hopf algebras A of functions and U of left-invariant vector fields into one fully bicovariant algebra of differential operators. The pure braid group is introduced as the commutant of {Delta}(U). It provides invariant maps A {yields} U and thereby bicovariant vector fields, casimirs and metrics. This construction allows the translation of undeformed matrix expressions into their less obvious quantum algebraic counter parts. We study this in detail for quasitriangular Hopf algebras, giving the determinant and orthogonality relation for the ``reflection`` matrix. Part II considers the additional structures of differential forms and finitely generated quantum Lie algebras -- it is devoted to the construction of the Cartan calculus, based on an undeformed Cartan identity.

  14. Fractional quantum Hall bilayers at half filling: Tunneling-driven non-Abelian phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Liu, Zhao; Haldane, F. D. M.; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    Multicomponent quantum Hall systems with internal degrees of freedom provide a fertile ground for the emergence of exotic quantum liquids. Here, we investigate the possibility of non-Abelian topological order in the half-filled fractional quantum Hall (FQH) bilayer system driven by the tunneling effect between two layers. By means of the state-of-the-art density-matrix renormalization group, we unveil "fingerprint" evidence of the non-Abelian Moore-Read Pfaffian state emerging in the intermediate-tunneling regime, including the ground-state degeneracy on the torus geometry and the topological entanglement spectroscopy (entanglement spectrum and topological entanglement entropy) on the spherical geometry, respectively. Remarkably, the phase transition from the previously identified Abelian (331) Halperin state to the non-Abelian Moore-Read Pfaffian state is determined to be continuous, which is signaled by the continuous evolution of the universal part of the entanglement spectrum, and discontinuities in the excitation gap and the derivative of the ground-state energy. Our results not only provide a "proof-of-principle" demonstration of realizing a non-Abelian state through coupling different degrees of freedom, but also open up a possibility in FQH bilayer systems for detecting different chiral p -wave pairing states.

  15. Gate tunneling current and quantum capacitance in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices with graphene gate electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yanbin; Shekhawat, Aniruddh; Behnam, Ashkan; Pop, Eric; Ural, Ant

    2016-11-01

    Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices with graphene as the metal gate electrode, silicon dioxide with thicknesses ranging from 5 to 20 nm as the dielectric, and p-type silicon as the semiconductor are fabricated and characterized. It is found that Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling dominates the gate tunneling current in these devices for oxide thicknesses of 10 nm and larger, whereas for devices with 5 nm oxide, direct tunneling starts to play a role in determining the total gate current. Furthermore, the temperature dependences of the F-N tunneling current for the 10 nm devices are characterized in the temperature range 77-300 K. The F-N coefficients and the effective tunneling barrier height are extracted as a function of temperature. It is found that the effective barrier height decreases with increasing temperature, which is in agreement with the results previously reported for conventional MOS devices with polysilicon or metal gate electrodes. In addition, high frequency capacitance-voltage measurements of these MOS devices are performed, which depict a local capacitance minimum under accumulation for thin oxides. By analyzing the data using numerical calculations based on the modified density of states of graphene in the presence of charged impurities, it is shown that this local minimum is due to the contribution of the quantum capacitance of graphene. Finally, the workfunction of the graphene gate electrode is extracted by determining the flat-band voltage as a function of oxide thickness. These results show that graphene is a promising candidate as the gate electrode in metal-oxide-semiconductor devices.

  16. Assessment of field-induced quantum confinement in heterogate germanium electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, J. L. Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M.; Gámiz, F.

    2014-08-25

    The analysis of quantum mechanical confinement in recent germanium electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistors has been shown to substantially affect the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) mechanism between electron and hole inversion layers that constitutes the operating principle of these devices. The vertical electric field that appears across the intrinsic semiconductor to give rise to the bilayer configuration makes the formerly continuous conduction and valence bands become a discrete set of energy subbands, therefore increasing the effective bandgap close to the gates and reducing the BTBT probabilities. In this letter, we present a simulation approach that shows how the inclusion of quantum confinement and the subsequent modification of the band profile results in the appearance of lateral tunneling to the underlap regions that greatly degrades the subthreshold swing of these devices. To overcome this drawback imposed by confinement, we propose an heterogate configuration that proves to suppress this parasitic tunneling and enhances the device performance.

  17. Correlation Effects in Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Images of Molecules Revealed by Quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Barborini, Matteo; Sorella, Sandro; Rontani, Massimo; Corni, Stefano

    2016-11-08

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy probe the local density of states of single molecules electrically insulated from the substrate. The experimental images, although usually interpreted in terms of single-particle molecular orbitals, are associated with quasiparticle wave functions dressed by the whole electron-electron interaction. Here we propose an ab initio approach based on quantum Monte Carlo to calculate the quasiparticle wave functions of molecules. Through the comparison between Monte Carlo wave functions and their uncorrelated Hartree-Fock counterparts we visualize the electronic correlation embedded in the simulated STM images, highlighting the many-body features that might be observed.

  18. Metastable states and macroscopic quantum tunneling in a cold atom josephson ring

    SciTech Connect

    Solenov, Dmitry; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    We study macroscopic properties of a system of weakly interacting neutral bosons confined in a ring-shaped potential with a Josephson junction. We derive an effective low energy action for this system and evaluate its properties. In particular we find that the system possesses a set of metastable current-carrying states and evaluate the rates of transitions between these states due to macroscopic quantum tunneling. Finally we discuss signatures of different metastable states in the time-of-flight images and argue that the effect is observable within currently available experimental technique.

  19. Hybrid driven three-terminal thermoelectric refrigerators based on resonant tunneling quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhicheng; Qin, Weifeng; He, Jizhou

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a pair of symmetric three-terminal refrigerator models with a hot cavity connected to two colder reservoirs via ideal tunneling quantum dots. The cooling of the refrigerators is achieved by investing thermal power from a hot reservoir and electric power from an applied voltage. Based on the model proposed, we numerically analyze the performance of the refrigerators with different half width of energy levels, and particularly discuss the coefficient of performance for zero applied voltage in the limit of a small half level width. Finally, we optimize with half width of energy levels and get the optimal region of the refrigerators.

  20. Spin bottleneck in resonant tunneling through double quantum dots with different Zeeman splittings.

    PubMed

    Huang, S M; Tokura, Y; Akimoto, H; Kono, K; Lin, J J; Tarucha, S; Ono, K

    2010-04-02

    We investigated the electron transport property of the InGaAs/GaAs double quantum dots, the electron g factors of which are different from each other. We found that in a magnetic field, the resonant tunneling is suppressed even if one of the Zeeman sublevels is aligned. This is because the other misaligned Zeeman sublevels limit the total current. A finite broadening of the misaligned sublevel partially relieves this bottleneck effect, and the maximum current is reached when interdot detuning is half the Zeeman energy difference.

  1. Adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy combined with transport measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Masutomi, Ryuichi Okamoto, Tohru

    2015-06-22

    An adsorbate-induced quantum Hall system at the cleaved InSb surfaces is investigated in magnetic fields up to 14 T using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy combined with transport measurements. We show that an enhanced Zeeman splitting in the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations is explained by an exchange enhancement of spin splitting and potential disorder, both of which are obtained from the spatially averaged density of states (DOS). Moreover, the Altshuler–Aronov correlation gap is observed in the spatially averaged DOS at 0 T.

  2. Trap-assisted tunneling in InGaN/GaN single-quantum-well light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Auf der Maur, M. Di Carlo, A.; Galler, B.; Pietzonka, I.; Strassburg, M.; Lugauer, H.

    2014-09-29

    Based on numerical simulation and comparison with measured current characteristics, we show that the current in InGaN/GaN single-quantum-well light-emitting diodes at low forward bias can be accurately described by a standard trap-assisted tunneling model. The qualitative and quantitative differences in the current characteristics of devices with different emission wavelengths are demonstrated to be correlated in a physically consistent way with the tunneling model parameters.

  3. Dissipative Quantum Tunneling of a Single Defect in a Submicron Bismuth Wire Below 1 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Kookjin

    The quantum mechanical problem of a particle tunneling in a double-well potential is of great theoretical and experimental interest. Interaction of the tunneling system with a dissipative environment can have a striking effect on the tunneling dynamics. A very interesting case is that of ohmic dissipation, which occurs when an atom tunnels in a metal in the presence of conduction electrons. We have studied the electrical resistance of submicron Bi wires at low temperature. Due to quantum interference of the conduction electrons, the resistance is highly sensitive to the motion of even a single scattering center. We observe discrete switching of the resistance due to the motion of bistable defects in the sample. We have measured the tunneling rates of a particular defect over the temperature range 0.1-2 K and magnetic field range 0-7 T. The energy asymmetry, varepsilon, of this defect varied over the range 40-420 mK depending on the value of the magnetic field. The temperature dependence of the tunneling rates is qualitatively different for the cases k_{B}T << varepsilon and k_{B}T gg varepsilon . We observe that for k_{B }T << varepsilon, the fast rate (transition rate from upper state to lower state) is roughly temperature independent and the slow rate (transition from lower state to upper state) decreases exponentially, as expected from a simple picture of spontaneous emission and stimulated absorption. When k_{B }T gg varepsilon, however, both rates increase as the temperature is lowered, as predicted by dissipative quantum tunneling theory. We fit our data to the theory and discuss the defect-electron bath coupling parameter alpha, and the renormalized tunneling matrix element Delta_{ rm r}. We have also studied the effect of Joule heating on the dynamics of the defect in the same sample. The ratio of the fast and slow transition rates of a defect depends on temperature through the detailed balance relation, gamma_{f}/ gamma_{s} e^ {varepsilon / k_{B}T}. We

  4. Photon-Assisted Resonant Tunneling and 2-D Plasmon Modes in Double Quantum Wells in Intense Terahertz Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, X. G.; Allen, S. J.; Lin, S. Y.; Simmons, J. A.; Blount, M. A.; Baca, W. E.

    1998-03-01

    We explore photon-assisted resonant tunneling in double quantum well systems in intense terahertz electric fields that have separately- contacted wells. We have two goals in mind: 1) increase the basic understanding of photon assisted tunneling in semiconductors and 2) assess the potential of this structure as a detector. We can control the tunneling current by varying the electron density of each 2D electron gas or by changing the relative separation of the Fermi levels. This allows us to prepare the system in such a way that photons of the appropriate energy may induce resonant tunneling, which is monitored by a change in conductance. We also examine the possible enhancement of the resonant tunneling by resonant excitations of acoustic plasmon modes. This work is supported by ONR, the U. S. Dept. of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 and Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, México.

  5. Thermally activated tunneling in porous silicon nanowires with embedded Si quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezvani, S. J.; Pinto, N.; Enrico, E.; D'Ortenzi, L.; Chiodoni, A.; Boarino, L.

    2016-03-01

    Electronic transport properties of porous Si nanowires either with embedded Si quantum dots or with a percolative crystalline path are studied as a function of the temperature for the first time. We show that unlike bulk porous Si, the predesigned structure of the wires results in a single distinct conduction mechanism such as tunneling in the former case and variable range hopping in the latter case. We demonstrate that the geometry of the systems with a large internal surface area and high density of the Si quantum dots have a significant conduction enhancement compared to bulk porous silicon. These results can also improve the understanding of the basis of the different electronic transport mechanisms reported in bulk porous silicon.

  6. Magnetoresistance of One-Dimensional Subbands in Tunnel-Coupled Double Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, M.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1999-04-27

    We study the low-temperature in-plane magnetoresistance of tunnel-coupled quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires. The wires are defined by two pairs of mutually aligned split gates on opposite sides of a < 1 micron thick AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well heterostructure, allowing independent control of their widths. In the ballistic regime, when both wires are defined and the field is perpendicular to the current, a large resistance peak at ~6 Tesla is observed with a strong gate voltage dependence. The data is consistent with a counting model whereby the number of subbands crossing the Fermi level changes with field due to the formation of an anticrossing in each pair of 1D subbands.

  7. Terahertz time domain interferometry of a SIS tunnel junction and a quantum point contact

    SciTech Connect

    Karadi, Chandu

    1995-09-01

    The author has applied the Terahertz Time Domain Interferometric (THz-TDI) technique to probe the ultrafast dynamic response of a Superconducting-Insulating-Superconducting (SIS) tunnel junction and a Quantum Point Contact (QPC). The THz-TDI technique involves monitoring changes in the dc current induced by interfering two picosecond electrical pulses on the junction as a function of time delay between them. Measurements of the response of the Nb/AlOxNb SIS tunnel junction from 75--200 GHz are in full agreement with the linear theory for photon-assisted tunneling. Likewise, measurements of the induced current in a QPC as a function of source-drain voltage, gate voltage, frequency, and magnetic field also show strong evidence for photon-assisted transport. These experiments together demonstrate the general applicability of the THz-TDI technique to the characterization of the dynamic response of any micron or nanometer scale device that exhibits a non-linear I-V characteristic.

  8. Is it possible to create a universe in the laboratory by quantum tunneling?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhi, Edward; Guth, Alan H.; Guven, Jemal

    1990-01-01

    We explore the possibility that a new universe can be created by producing a small bubble of false vacuum. The initial bubble is small enough to be produced without an initial singularity, but classically it could not become a universe - instead it would reach a maximum radius and then collapse. We investigate the possibility that quantum effects allow the bubble to tunnel into a larger bubble, of the same mass, which would then classically evolve to become a new universe. The calculation of the tunneling amplitude is attempted, in lowest order semiclassical approximation (in the thin-wall limit), using both a canonical and a functional integral approach. The canonical approach is found to have flaws, attributable to our method of space-time slicing. The functional integral approach leads to a Euclidean interpolating solution that is not a manifold. To describe it, we define an object which we call a 'pseudomanifold', and give a prescription to define its action. We conjecture that the tunneling probability to produce a new universe can be approximated using this action, and we show that this leads to a plausible result.

  9. Theoretical simulation of negative differential transconductance in lateral quantum well nMOS devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, P. B.; Naquin, C.; Edwards, H.; Lee, M.; Vandenberghe, W. G.; Fischetti, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the negative differential transconductance (NDT) recently observed in the lateral-quantum-well Si n-channel field-effect transistors [J. Appl. Phys. 118, 124505 (2015)]. In these devices, p+ doping extensions are introduced at the source-channel and drain-channel junctions, thus creating two potential barriers that define the quantum well across whose quasi-bound states resonant/sequential tunneling may occur. Our study, based on the quantum transmitting boundary method, predicts the presence of a sharp NDT in devices with a nominal gate length of 10-to-20 nm at low temperatures ( ˜10 K). At higher temperatures, the NDT weakens and disappears altogether as a result of increasing thermionic emission over the p+ potential barriers. In larger devices (with a gate length of 30 nm or longer), the NDT cannot be observed because of the low transmission probability and small energetic spacing (smaller than kBT ) of the quasi-bound states in the quantum well. We speculate that the inability of the model to predict the NDT observed in 40 nm gate-length devices may be due to an insufficiently accurate knowledge of the actual doping profiles. On the other hand, our study shows that NDT suitable for novel logic applications may be obtained at room temperature in devices of the current or near-future generation (sub-10 nm node), provided an optimal design can be found that minimizes the thermionic emission (requiring high p+ potential-barriers) and punch-through (that meets the opposite requirement of potential-barriers low enough to favor the tunneling current).

  10. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies of charge transport in cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummon, Marissa Rachel

    2009-12-01

    This thesis examines charge transport in individual colloidal nanocrystals (quantum dots) using a scanning tunneling microscope. We observe coulomb blockade (CB) at room temperature and extract the charging energy of the quantum dot (QD). We analyze time-dependent CB measurements to determine the lifetime and energy of the trapped charge on the QD. A model of the lifetime is presented, furthering our analysis of the charge detrapping mechanism. We observe a hysteresis in the current-voltage (IV) tunneling spectra as the substrate bias is swept from empty to filled states and then back to empty states. This hysteresis is consistent with trapped charge(s) presenting an additional potential barrier to tunneling, a measure of CB. Traditional CB experiments measure a coulomb repulsion due to charge build-up on the island between two electrodes. We observe CB, hysteresis in successive IV sweeps, due to charge trapping/detrapping in a state other than the transport level. This trap state may be related to the dark state in blinking experiments. Optical and electrical measurements of QD trap states are often related to a puzzling physical phenomena observed universally in QDs: blinking. Blinking is the stochastic photoluminescence behavior of quantum dots, where, under constant excitation by a laser, a QD does not emit a continuous stream of photons. In fact, the QD will blink "on" and "off" for completely unpredictable durations that are thought to be related to the QD being in either a neutral or charged state. We measure a lifetime for the charged state of 15 +/- 7 s when Vsub ≤ 1.5 V and 170 +/- 140 ms when Vsub ≥ 1.6 V. The abrupt transition in lifetime between 1.5 and 1.6 V implies that this is the voltage necessary to lower the Au Fermi level equal to the trap state energy, thus allowing the trapped charge to tunnel out of the trap state. The voltage drop between the QD and substrate, determined from a self-consistent calculation of the relative capacitance

  11. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  12. Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Black, B.E. |

    1993-07-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

  13. Tunneling through stacked InAs/InGaAs/InP self-assembled quantum dots in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. G.; Lopez, F. E.; Guimarães, P. S. S.; Pires, M. P.; Souza, P. L.; Landi, S. M.; Villas-Bôas, J. M.; Vieira, G. S.; Vinck-Posada, H.; Rodriguez, B. A.

    2011-10-01

    We report results of an investigation of vertical transport in stacked InAs/InGaAs/InP self-assembled quantum dot multi-layers and show evidence of tunneling between quantum dot states in adjacent layers. In the presence of magnetic fields up to 12 T applied parallel to the current, tunneling through Zeeman-split quasi-zero dimensional states is observed. The difference in the g factor of two quantum dots in adjacent layers, which is due to the difference in confinement, is estimated from the data. The experimental value obtained for the difference in g factor is in good agreement with that obtained from a calculation of the quantum dots' energy levels in the presence of the magnetic field.

  14. Quantum tunneling of spin-1 particles from a 5D Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet black hole beyond semiclassical approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jusufi, K.

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper we study the Hawking radiation as a quantum tunneling effect of spin-1 particles from a five-dimensional, spherically symmetric, Einstein-Yang-Mills-Gauss-Bonnet (5D EYMGB) black hole. We solve the Proca equation (PE) by applying the WKB approximation and separation of variables via Hamilton-Jacobi (HJ) equation which results in a set of five differential equations, and reproduces, in this way, the Hawking temperature. In the second part of this paper, we extend our results beyond the semiclassical approximation. In particular, we derive the logarithmic correction to the entropy of the EYMGB black hole and show that the quantum corrected specific heat indicates the possible existence of a remnant.

  15. Asymmetric quantum-well structures for AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin'an; Li, Yue; Wang, Ying; Xu, Shengrui; Hao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    Asymmetric quantum-well (QW) structures including the asymmetric potential-barrier and the asymmetric potential-well are proposed for AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs). Theoretical investigation gives that an appropriate decrease in Al composition and thickness for emitter barrier as well as an appropriate increase of both for collector barrier can evidently improve the negative-differential-resistance characteristic of RTD. Numerical simulation shows that RTD with a 1.5-nm-thick GaN well sandwiched by a 1.3-nm-thick Al0.15Ga0.85N emitter barrier and a 1.7-nm-thick Al0.25Ga0.75N collector barrier can yield the I-V characteristic having the peak current (Ip) and the peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) of 0.39 A and 3.6, respectively, about double that of RTD with a 1.5-nm-thick Al0.2Ga0.8N for both barriers. It is also found that an introduction of InGaN sub-QW into the diode can change the tunneling mode and achieve higher transmission coefficient of electron. The simulation demonstrates that RTD with a 2.8-nm-thick In0.03Ga0.97N sub-well in front of a 2.0-nm-thick GaN main-well can exhibit the I-V characteristic having Ip and PVCR of 0.07 A and 11.6, about 7 times and double the value of RTD without sub-QW, respectively. The purpose of improving the structure of GaN-based QW is to solve apparent contradiction between the device structure and the device manufacturability of new generation RTDs for sub-millimeter and terahertz applications.

  16. Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics due to quantum tunneling of phase slips in superconducting Nb nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trezza, M.; Cirillo, C.; Sabatino, P.; Carapella, G.; Prischepa, S. L.; Attanasio, C.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the transport properties of an array of N ˜30 interconnected Nb nanowires, grown by sputtering on robust porous Si substrates. The analyzed system exhibits a broad resistive transition in zero magnetic field, H, and highly nonlinear V(I) characteristics as a function of H, which can be both consistently described by quantum tunneling of phase slips.

  17. Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics due to quantum tunneling of phase slips in superconducting Nb nanowire networks

    SciTech Connect

    Trezza, M.; Cirillo, C.; Sabatino, P.; Carapella, G.; Attanasio, C.; Prischepa, S. L.

    2013-12-16

    We report on the transport properties of an array of N∼30 interconnected Nb nanowires, grown by sputtering on robust porous Si substrates. The analyzed system exhibits a broad resistive transition in zero magnetic field, H, and highly nonlinear V(I) characteristics as a function of H, which can be both consistently described by quantum tunneling of phase slips.

  18. Transport through an impurity tunnel coupled to a Si/SiGe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Ryan H.; Ward, Daniel R.; Prance, J. R.; Gamble, John King; Nielsen, Erik; Thorgrimsson, Brandur; Savage, D. E.; Saraiva, A. L.; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S. N.; Eriksson, M. A.

    Here we present measurements of transport through a gate-defined quantum dot formed in a Si/SiGe heterostructure, demonstrating controllable tunnel coupling between the quantum dot and a localized electronic state.1 Combining experimental stability diagram measurements with 3D capacitive modeling based on the expected electron density profiles, we determine the most likely location of the localized state in the quantum well. This work is supported in part by NSF (DMR-1206915, IIA-1132804), ARO (W911NF-12-1-0607) and the William F. Vilas Estate Trust. Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples supported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). This research utilized facilities supported by the NSF (DMR-0832760, DMR-1121288). The work of J.K.G. and E.N. was supported in part by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1Ryan H. Foote et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 103112 (2015)

  19. Quantum mechanical solver for confined heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Verreck, Devin Groeseneken, Guido; Van de Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Verhulst, Anne S.; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Vandenberghe, William G.

    2014-02-07

    Heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFET) are promising candidates for low-power applications in future technology nodes, as they are predicted to offer high on-currents, combined with a sub-60 mV/dec subthreshold swing. However, the effects of important quantum mechanical phenomena like size confinement at the heterojunction are not well understood, due to the theoretical and computational difficulties in modeling realistic heterostructures. We therefore present a ballistic quantum transport formalism, combining a novel envelope function approach for semiconductor heterostructures with the multiband quantum transmitting boundary method, which we extend to 2D potentials. We demonstrate an implementation of a 2-band version of the formalism and apply it to study confinement in realistic heterostructure diodes and p-n-i-n HTFETs. For the diodes, both transmission probabilities and current densities are found to decrease with stronger confinement. For the p-n-i-n HTFETs, the improved gate control is found to counteract the deterioration due to confinement.

  20. Photon assisted tunneling through three quantum dots with spin-orbit-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Han-Zhao; An, Xing-Tao; Wang, Ai-Kun; Liu, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-14

    The effect of an ac electric field on quantum transport properties in a system of three quantum dots, two of which are connected in parallel, while the third is coupled to one of the other two, is investigated theoretically. Based on the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function method, the spin-dependent current, occupation number, and spin accumulation can be obtained in our model. An external magnetic flux, Rashba spin-orbit-coupling (SOC), and intradot Coulomb interactions are considered. The magnitude of the spin-dependent average current and the positions of the photon assisted tunneling (PAT) peaks can be accurately controlled and manipulated by simply varying the strength of the coupling and the frequency of the ac field. A particularly interesting result is the observation of a new kind of PAT peak and a multiple-PAT effect that can be generated and controlled by the coupling between the quantum dots. In addition, the spin occupation number and spin accumulation can be well controlled by the Rashba SOC and the magnetic flux.

  1. Interaction-Assisted Quantum Tunneling of a Bose-Einstein Condensate Out of a Single Trapping Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potnis, Shreyas; Ramos, Ramon; Maeda, Kenji; Carr, Lincoln D.; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2017-02-01

    We experimentally study tunneling of Bose-condensed Rb 87 atoms prepared in a quasibound state and observe a nonexponential decay caused by interatomic interactions. A combination of a magnetic quadrupole trap and a thin 1.3 μ m barrier created using a blue-detuned sheet of light is used to tailor traps with controllable depth and tunneling rate. The escape dynamics strongly depend on the mean-field energy, which gives rise to three distinct regimes—classical spilling over the barrier, quantum tunneling, and decay dominated by background losses. We show that the tunneling rate depends exponentially on the chemical potential. Our results show good agreement with numerical solutions of the 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  2. Interaction-Assisted Quantum Tunneling of a Bose-Einstein Condensate Out of a Single Trapping Well.

    PubMed

    Potnis, Shreyas; Ramos, Ramon; Maeda, Kenji; Carr, Lincoln D; Steinberg, Aephraim M

    2017-02-10

    We experimentally study tunneling of Bose-condensed ^{87}Rb atoms prepared in a quasibound state and observe a nonexponential decay caused by interatomic interactions. A combination of a magnetic quadrupole trap and a thin 1.3  μm barrier created using a blue-detuned sheet of light is used to tailor traps with controllable depth and tunneling rate. The escape dynamics strongly depend on the mean-field energy, which gives rise to three distinct regimes-classical spilling over the barrier, quantum tunneling, and decay dominated by background losses. We show that the tunneling rate depends exponentially on the chemical potential. Our results show good agreement with numerical solutions of the 3D Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  3. Simulation of quantum dynamics based on the quantum stochastic differential equation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The quantum stochastic differential equation derived from the Lindblad form quantum master equation is investigated. The general formulation in terms of environment operators representing the quantum state diffusion is given. The numerical simulation algorithm of stochastic process of direct photodetection of a driven two-level system for the predictions of the dynamical behavior is proposed. The effectiveness and superiority of the algorithm are verified by the performance analysis of the accuracy and the computational cost in comparison with the classical Runge-Kutta algorithm.

  4. Simulation of Quantum Dynamics Based on the Quantum Stochastic Differential Equation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The quantum stochastic differential equation derived from the Lindblad form quantum master equation is investigated. The general formulation in terms of environment operators representing the quantum state diffusion is given. The numerical simulation algorithm of stochastic process of direct photodetection of a driven two-level system for the predictions of the dynamical behavior is proposed. The effectiveness and superiority of the algorithm are verified by the performance analysis of the accuracy and the computational cost in comparison with the classical Runge-Kutta algorithm. PMID:23781156

  5. A Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argüelles Delgado, Carlos A.; Salvado, Jordi; Weaver, Christopher N.

    2015-11-01

    Simple Quantum Integro-Differential Solver (SQuIDS) is a C++ code designed to solve semi-analytically the evolution of a set of density matrices and scalar functions. This is done efficiently by expressing all operators in an SU(N) basis. SQuIDS provides a base class from which users can derive new classes to include new non-trivial terms from the right hand sides of density matrix equations. The code was designed in the context of solving neutrino oscillation problems, but can be applied to any problem that involves solving the quantum evolution of a collection of particles with Hilbert space of dimension up to six.

  6. Tunnelling of the 3rd kind: A test of the effective non-locality of quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Simon A.; Gies, Holger; Jaeckel, Joerg; Wallace, Chris J.

    2013-03-01

    Integrating out virtual quantum fluctuations in an originally local quantum field theory results in an effective theory which is non-local. In this letter we argue that tunnelling of the 3rd kind —where particles traverse a barrier by splitting into a pair of virtual particles which recombine only after a finite distance— provides a direct test of this non-locality. We sketch a quantum-optical setup to test this effect, and investigate observable effects in a simple toy model.

  7. Quantum light emission of two lateral tunnel-coupled (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots controlled by a tunable static electric field.

    PubMed

    Beirne, G J; Hermannstädter, C; Wang, L; Rastelli, A; Schmidt, O G; Michler, P

    2006-04-07

    Lateral quantum coupling between two self-assembled (In,Ga)As quantum dots has been observed. Photon statistics measurements between the various excitonic and biexcitonic transitions of these lateral quantum dot molecules display strong antibunching confirming the presence of coupling. Furthermore, we observe an anomalous exciton Stark shift with respect to static electric field. A simple model indicates that the lateral coupling is due to electron tunneling between the dots when the ground states are in resonance. The electron probability can then be shifted to either dot and the system can be used to create a wavelength-tunable single-photon emitter by simply applying a voltage.

  8. Concerted hydrogen-bond breaking by quantum tunneling in the water hexamer prism.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Pérez, Cristóbal; Lobsiger, Simon; Reid, Adam A; Temelso, Berhane; Shields, George C; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Wales, David J; Pate, Brooks H; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-18

    The nature of the intermolecular forces between water molecules is the same in small hydrogen-bonded clusters as in the bulk. The rotational spectra of the clusters therefore give insight into the intermolecular forces present in liquid water and ice. The water hexamer is the smallest water cluster to support low-energy structures with branched three-dimensional hydrogen-bond networks, rather than cyclic two-dimensional topologies. Here we report measurements of splitting patterns in rotational transitions of the water hexamer prism, and we used quantum simulations to show that they result from geared and antigeared rotations of a pair of water molecules. Unlike previously reported tunneling motions in water clusters, the geared motion involves the concerted breaking of two hydrogen bonds. Similar types of motion may be feasible in interfacial and confined water.

  9. Universality of the edge-tunneling exponent of fractional quantum Hall liquids.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xin; Evers, F; Rezayi, E H

    2005-04-29

    In a microscopic model of fractional quantum Hall liquids with electron-electron interactions and confinement, we calculate the edge Green's function via exact diagonalization. Our results for nu=1/3 and 2/3 suggest that, in the presence of Coulomb interaction, "external" parameters such as the sharpness of the edge and the strength of the edge confining potential, which can lead to edge reconstruction, may cause deviations from universality in the edge-tunneling I-V exponent. In particular, we do not find any direct dependence of this exponent on the range of the interaction potential as suggested by recent calculations in contradiction to the topological nature of the edge.

  10. Nonresonant tunneling phonon depopulated GaN based terahertz quantum cascade structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Will; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2013-04-01

    GaN based terahertz quantum cascade structures are theoretically studied. Since the Fröhlich interaction is ˜15 times higher in GaN than in GaAs, level broadening makes obtaining appreciable optical gain difficult even with a large population inversion. A density matrix Monte Carlo method is used to calculate the broadening of the optical gain spectra as a function of lattice temperature. We find by using a proposed method of nonresonant tunneling and electron-longitudinal-optical phonon scattering for depopulation of the lower lasing state, that it is possible to sufficiently isolate the upper lasing state and control the lower lasing state lifetime to obtain high optical gain in GaN. The results predict lasing out to 300 K which is significantly higher than for GaAs based structures.

  11. Atomic-Scale Visualization of Quantum Interference on a Weyl Semimetal Surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Xu, Su-Yang; Bian, Guang; Guo, Cheng; Chang, Guoqing; Sanchez, Daniel S; Belopolski, Ilya; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Zhang, Xiao; Sankar, Raman; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Fan; Neupert, Titus; Chou, Fangcheng; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Yao, Nan; Bansil, Arun; Jia, Shuang; Lin, Hsin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-01-26

    Weyl semimetals may open a new era in condensed matter physics, materials science, and nanotechnology after graphene and topological insulators. We report the first atomic scale view of the surface states of a Weyl semimetal (NbP) using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy. We observe coherent quantum interference patterns that arise from the scattering of quasiparticles near point defects on the surface. The measurements reveal the surface electronic structure both below and above the chemical potential in both real and reciprocal spaces. Moreover, the interference maps uncover the scattering processes of NbP's exotic surface states. Through comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations, we further discover that the orbital and/or spin texture of the surface bands may suppress certain scattering channels on NbP. These results provide a comprehensive understanding of electronic properties on Weyl semimetal surfaces.

  12. Spin Texture of Bi2Se3 Thin Films in the Quantum Tunneling Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landolt, Gabriel; Schreyeck, Steffen; Eremeev, Sergey V.; Slomski, Bartosz; Muff, Stefan; Osterwalder, Jürg; Chulkov, Evgueni V.; Gould, Charles; Karczewski, Grzegorz; Brunner, Karl; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; Dil, J. Hugo

    2014-02-01

    By means of spin- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy we studied the spin structure of thin films of the topological insulator Bi2Se3 grown on InP(111). For thicknesses below six quintuple layers the spin-polarized metallic topological surface states interact with each other via quantum tunneling and a gap opens. Our measurements show that the resulting surface states can be described by massive Dirac cones which are split in a Rashba-like manner due to the substrate induced inversion asymmetry. The inner and the outer Rashba branches have distinct localization in the top and the bottom part of the film, whereas the band apices are delocalized throughout the entire film. Supported by ab initio calculations, our observations help in the understanding of the evolution of the surface states at the topological phase transition and provide the groundwork for the realization of two-dimensional spintronic devices based on topological semiconductors.

  13. InGaAs tunnel diodes for the calibration of semi-classical and quantum mechanical band-to-band tunneling models

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, Quentin; Verreck, Devin; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Groeseneken, Guido; Heyns, Marc M.; Verhulst, Anne S.; Rooyackers, Rita; Merckling, Clément; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Voon Y.; Van De Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart

    2014-05-14

    Promising predictions are made for III-V tunnel-field-effect transistor (FET), but there is still uncertainty on the parameters used in the band-to-band tunneling models. Therefore, two simulators are calibrated in this paper; the first one uses a semi-classical tunneling model based on Kane's formalism, and the second one is a quantum mechanical simulator implemented with an envelope function formalism. The calibration is done for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As using several p+/intrinsic/n+ diodes with different intrinsic region thicknesses. The dopant profile is determined by SIMS and capacitance-voltage measurements. Error bars are used based on statistical and systematic uncertainties in the measurement techniques. The obtained parameters are in close agreement with theoretically predicted values and validate the semi-classical and quantum mechanical models. Finally, the models are applied to predict the input characteristics of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As n- and p-lineTFET, with the n-lineTFET showing competitive performance compared to MOSFET.

  14. Investigation of quantum confinement within the tunneling-percolation transition for ultrathin bismuth films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oller, Declan; Fernandes, Gustavo E.; Kim, Jin Ho; Xu, Jimmy

    2015-10-01

    We investigate conduction phenomena in ultrathin bismuth (Bi) films that are thermally evaporated onto flat quartz. Critical points in the conductance as a function of deposition time are identified and used to scale the data from time dependence to coverage dependence. The resulting nonlinear coverage scaling equation is verified independently via analysis done on transmission electron microscope images of the evaporated films. The scaled data yields critical exponents in very good agreement with classical percolation theory, and clearly shows the transition from the tunneling regime into percolation. Surprisingly, no noticeable signatures of size-quantization effects in the nucleation sites as a function of deposition time is observed in either regime. We discuss our findings in light of Boltzmann transport modeling of 1D conduction as an approximation to the narrow percolative paths that form at the onset of percolation. Our results suggest that lack of a preferred crystallite orientation in the nucleation process may indeed cause quantum-confinement to be too smeared out to be observable in the tunneling to percolation transition.

  15. Single-electron tunneling and Coulomb blockade in carbon-based quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2009-09-01

    Single-electron tunneling (SET) and Coulomb blockade (CB) phenomena have been widely observed in nanoscaled electronics and have received intense attention around the world. In the past few years, we have studied SET in carbon nanotube fragments and fullerenes by applying the so-called “Orthodox” theory [28]. As outlined in this review article, we investigated the single-electron charging and discharging process via current-voltage characteristics, gate effect, and electronic structure-related factors. Because the investigated geometric structures are three-dimensionally confined, resulting in a discrete spectrum of energy levels resembling the property of quantum dots, we evidenced the CB and Coulomb staircases in these structures. These nanostructures are sufficiently small that introducing even a single electron is sufficient to dramatically change the transport properties as a result of the charging energy associated with this extra electron. We found that the Coulomb staircases occur in the I-V characteristics only when the width of the left barrier junction is smaller than that of the right barrier junction. In this case, the transmission coefficient of the emitter junction is larger than that of the collector junction; also, occupied levels enter the bias window, thereby enhancing the tunneling extensively.

  16. Experimental determination of quantum-well lifetime effect on large-signal resonant tunneling diode switching time

    SciTech Connect

    Growden, Tyler A.; Berger, Paul R.; Brown, E. R.; Zhang, Weidong; Droopad, Ravi

    2015-10-12

    An experimental determination is presented of the effect the quantum-well lifetime has on a large-signal resonant tunneling diode (RTD) switching time. Traditional vertical In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As/AlAs RTDs were grown, fabricated, and characterized. The switching time was measured with a high-speed oscilloscope and found to be close to the sum of the calculated RC-limited 10%–90% switching time and the quantum-well quasibound-state lifetime. This method displays experimental evidence that the two intrinsic resonant-tunneling characteristic times act independently, and that the quasibound-state lifetime then serves as a quantum-limit on the large-signal speed of RTDs.

  17. Separation of noncommutative differential calculus on quantum Minkowski space

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmaier, Fabian; Blohmann, Christian

    2006-02-15

    Noncommutative differential calculus on quantum Minkowski space is not separated with respect to the standard generators, in the sense that partial derivatives of functions of a single generator can depend on all other generators. It is shown that this problem can be overcome by a separation of variables. We study the action of the universal L-matrix, appearing in the coproduct of partial derivatives, on generators. Powers of the resulting quantum Minkowski algebra valued matrices are calculated. This leads to a nonlinear coordinate transformation which essentially separates the calculus. A compact formula for general derivatives is obtained in form of a chain rule with partial Jackson derivatives. It is applied to the massive quantum Klein-Gordon equation by reducing it to an ordinary q-difference equation. The rest state solution can be expressed in terms of a product of q-exponential functions in the separated variables.

  18. Differentiating amino acid residues and side chain orientations in peptides using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Claridge, Shelley A; Thomas, John C; Silverman, Miles A; Schwartz, Jeffrey J; Yang, Yanlian; Wang, Chen; Weiss, Paul S

    2013-12-11

    Single-molecule measurements of complex biological structures such as proteins are an attractive route for determining structures of the large number of important biomolecules that have proved refractory to analysis through standard techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance. We use a custom-built low-current scanning tunneling microscope to image peptide structures at the single-molecule scale in a model peptide that forms β sheets, a structural motif common in protein misfolding diseases. We successfully differentiate between histidine and alanine amino acid residues, and further differentiate side chain orientations in individual histidine residues, by correlating features in scanning tunneling microscope images with those in energy-optimized models. Beta sheets containing histidine residues are used as a model system due to the role histidine plays in transition metal binding associated with amyloid oligomerization in Alzheimer's and other diseases. Such measurements are a first step toward analyzing peptide and protein structures at the single-molecule level.

  19. Bilayer Graphene-Hexagonal Boron Nitride Heterostructure Negative Differential Resistance Interlayer Tunnel FETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sangwoo; Fallahazad, Babak; Lee, Kayoung; Movva, Hema; Kim, Kyounghwan; Corbet, Chris; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Colombo, Luigi; Register, Leonard; Tutuc, Emanuel; Banerjee, Sanjay

    2015-03-01

    We present the operation of a vertical tunneling field effect transistor using a stacked double bilayer graphene (BLG) and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructure. The device is fabricated with the so-called Van der Waals transfer method with the edges of the top and bottom BLG flakes being rotationally aligned to roughly 60°. The device shows multiple negative differential resistance (NDR) peaks which can be adjusted through the gate bias. Temperature dependent measurements show that the peak width of the differential conductance broadens and the height lowered when the temperature is increased, which is indicative of resonant tunneling. Through electrostatic calculations, it is shown that the multiple peaks occur when the two conduction bands at the K-point of the top and bottom bilayer graphene become aligned at certain bias conditions. It is also shown that by adjusting the rotational alignment of the bands of the top and bottom BLG through an in-plane magnetic field, the conductance peaks can be broadened. In addition, utilizing the NDR characteristic of the device, one-transistor latch or SRAM operation is demonstrated.

  20. Carrier-tunneling-induced photovoltaic effect of InAs/GaAs quantum-dot solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jong Su; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the observation of the carrier-tunneling-induced photovoltaic (PV) effect in an InAs/GaAs quantum-dot solar cell (QDSC). The illuminated current-voltage (J-V) characteristics and the applied-bias-dependent electroreflectance (ER) were measured at 12 K by using an excitation laser with a wavelength of 975 nm (1.27 eV), which excites only the quantum-dot (QD) states below the GaAs band gap. The J-V results showed a peculiar current curve in the reverse bias region caused by carrier tunneling. The ER results showed that the junction electric field ( F) decreased with increasing intensity of the excitation laser ( I ex ) at different applied-bias-voltages ( V a ) due to the tunneling-induced PV effect. The PV effect was enhanced by improved tunneling with increasing reverse bias voltage. We also evaluated the tunneling carrier density ( σ pv ) as a function of V a in the QDSC.

  1. Large-amplitude dynamics in vinyl radical: the role of quantum tunneling as an isomerization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Nesbitt, David J

    2012-01-21

    We report tunneling splittings associated with the large amplitude 1,2 H-atom migration to the global minima in the vinyl radical. These are obtained using a recent full-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface (PES) [A. R. Sharma, B. J. Braams, S. Carter, B. C. Shepler, and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys. 130(17), 174301 (2009)] and independently, directly calculated "reaction paths." The PES is a multidimensional fit to coupled cluster single and double and perturbative treatment of triple excitations coupled-cluster single double triple (CCSD(T)) with the augmented correlation consistent triple zeta basis set (aug-cc-pVTZ). The reaction path potentials are obtained from a series of CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVnTZ calculations extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Approximate 1D calculations of the tunneling splitting for these 1,2-H atom migrations are obtained using each of these potentials as well as quite different 1D Hamiltonians. The splittings are calculated over a large energy ranges, with results from the two sets of calculations in excellent agreement. Though negligibly slow (>1 s) for the vibrational ground state, this work predicts tunneling-promoted 1,2 hydride shift dynamics in vinyl to exhibit exponential growth with internal vibrational excitation, specifically achieving rates on the sub-μs time scale at energies above E ≈ 7500 cm(-1). Most importantly, these results begin to elucidate the possible role of quantum isomerization through barriers without dissociation, in competition with the more conventional picture of classical roaming permitted over a much narrower window of energies immediately below the bond dissociation limit. Furthermore, when integrated over a Boltzmann distribution of thermal energies, these microcanonical tunneling rates are consistent with sub-μs time scales for 1,2 hydride shift dynamics at T > 1400 K. These results have potential relevance for combustion modeling of low-pressure flames, as well as recent

  2. Interplay between Switching Driven by the Tunneling Current and Atomic Force of a Bistable Four-Atom Si Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shiro; Maeda, Keisuke; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Abe, Masayuki; Zobač, Vladimír; Pou, Pablo; Rodrigo, Lucia; Mutombo, Pingo; Pérez, Ruben; Jelínek, Pavel; Morita, Seizo

    2015-07-08

    We assemble bistable silicon quantum dots consisting of four buckled atoms (Si4-QD) using atom manipulation. We demonstrate two competing atom switching mechanisms, downward switching induced by tunneling current of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and opposite upward switching induced by atomic force of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Simultaneous application of competing current and force allows us to tune switching direction continuously. Assembly of the few-atom Si-QDs and controlling their states using versatile combined AFM/STM will contribute to further miniaturization of nanodevices.

  3. Electrochemical quantum tunneling for electronic detection and characterization of biological toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Chaitanya; Walker, Ross M.; Gharpuray, Rishi; Shulaker, Max M.; Zhang, Zhiyong; Javanmard, Mehdi; Davis, Ronald W.; Murmann, Boris; Howe, Roger T.

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces a label-free, electronic biomolecular sensing platform for the detection and characterization of trace amounts of biological toxins within a complex background matrix. The mechanism for signal transduction is the electrostatic coupling of molecule bond vibrations to charge transport across an insulated electrode-electrolyte interface. The current resulting from the interface charge flow has long been regarded as an experimental artifact of little interest in the development of traditional charge based biosensors like the ISFET, and has been referred to in the literature as a "leakage current". However, we demonstrate by experimental measurements and theoretical modeling that this current has a component that arises from the rate-limiting transition of a quantum mechanical electronic relaxation event, wherein the electronic tunneling process between a hydrated proton in the electrolyte and the metallic electrode is closely coupled to the bond vibrations of molecular species in the electrolyte. Different strategies to minimize the effect of quantum decoherence in the quantized exchange of energy between the molecular vibrations and electron energy will be discussed, as well as the experimental implications of such strategies. Since the mechanism for the transduction of chemical information is purely electronic and does not require labels or tags or optical transduction, the proposed platform is scalable. Furthermore, it can achieve the chemical specificity typically associated with traditional micro-array or mass spectrometry-based platforms that are used currently to analyze complex biological fluids for trace levels of toxins or pathogen markers.

  4. Arrhenius-kinetics evidence for quantum tunneling in microbial “social” decision rates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    . Nonlinear Arrhenius kinetics in ciliate decision making suggest transitions from one signaling strategy to another result from a computational analogue of quantum tunneling in social information processing. PMID:21331234

  5. Quantum Tunneling of the Non-stationary Kerr-Newman Black Hole via a New Type of General Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhong-Wen; Deng, Juan; Li, Guo-Ping; Yang, Shu-Zheng

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, the quantum tunneling of the non-stationary Kerr-Newman black hole is investigated via Hamilton-Jacobi equation and two types of general tortoise coordinate transformations. The tunneling rates, the Hawking temperatures and radiation spectrums are derived respectively. Our result shows that the new type of general tortoise coordinate transformation is more reasonable.

  6. Effects of electron-phonon interactions on the electron tunneling spectrum of PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Lhuillier, E.; Yu, Q.; Mottaghizadeh, A.; Ulysse, C.; Zimmers, A.; Descamps-Mandine, A.; Dubertret, B.; Aubin, H.

    2015-07-01

    We present a tunnel spectroscopy study of single PbS quantum dots (QDs) as a function of temperature and gate voltage. Three distinct signatures of strong electron-phonon coupling are observed in the electron tunneling spectrum (ETS) of these QDs. In the shell-filling regime, the 8 × degeneracy of the electronic levels is lifted by the Coulomb interactions and allows the observation of phonon subbands that result from the emission of optical phonons. At low bias, a gap is observed in the ETS that cannot be closed with the gate voltage, which is a distinguishing feature of the Franck-Condon blockade. From the data, a Huang-Rhys factor in the range S ˜1.7 -2.5 is obtained. Finally, in the shell-tunneling regime, the optical phonons appear in the inelastic ETS d2I /d V2 .

  7. Tunneling into a quantum confinement created by a single-step nanolithography of conducting oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniv, E.; Ron, A.; Goldstein, M.; Palevski, A.; Dagan, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanolithography technique compatible with conducting oxide interfaces, which requires a single lithographic step with no additional amorphous deposition or etching, is presented. It is demonstrated on a SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface where a constriction is patterned in the electron liquid. We find that an additional backgating can further confine the electron liquid into an isolated island. Conductance and differential conductance measurements show resonant tunneling through the island. The data at various temperatures and magnetic fields are analyzed and the effective island size is found to be of the order of 10 nm. The magnetic field dependence suggests the absence of spin degeneracy in the island. Our method is suitable for creating superconducting and oxide-interface-based electronic devices.

  8. Tuning inter-dot tunnel coupling of an etched graphene double quantum dot by adjacent metal gates

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Da; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Luo, Gang; Zheng, Zhi-Xiong; Tu, Tao; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Graphene double quantum dots (DQDs) open to use charge or spin degrees of freedom for storing and manipulating quantum information in this new electronic material. However, impurities and edge disorders in etched graphene nano-structures hinder the ability to control the inter-dot tunnel coupling, tC, the most important property of the artificial molecule. Here we report measurements of tC in an all-metal-side-gated graphene DQD. We find that tC can be controlled continuously about a factor of four by employing a single gate. Furthermore, tC, can be changed monotonically about another factor of four as electrons are gate-pumped into the dot one by one. The results suggest that the strength of tunnel coupling in etched graphene DQDs can be varied in a rather broad range and in a controllable manner, which improves the outlook to use graphene as a base material for qubit applications. PMID:24213723

  9. Electron-tunneling modulation in percolating network of graphene quantum dots: fabrication, phenomenological understanding, and humidity/pressure sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Sreeprasad, T S; Rodriguez, Alfredo Alexander; Colston, Jonathan; Graham, Augustus; Shishkin, Evgeniy; Pallem, Vasanta; Berry, Vikas

    2013-04-10

    The two-dimensional (2D) electron cloud, flexible carbon-carbon bonds, chemical modifiability, and size-dependent quantum-confinement and capacitance makes graphene nanostructures (GN) a widely tunable material for electronics. Here we report the oxidation-led edge-roughening and cleavage of long graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) (150 nm wide) synthesized via nanotomy (nanoscale cutting) of graphite (with 2 nm edged diamond knife) to produce graphene quantum dots (GQD). These GQDs (~100-200 nm) selectively interfaced with polyelectrolyte microfiber (diameter = 2-20 μm) form an electrically percolating-network exhibiting a characteristic Coulomb blockade signature with a dry tunneling distance of 0.58 nm and conduction activation energy of 3 meV. We implement this construct to demonstrate the functioning of humidity and pressure sensors and outline their governing model. Here, a 0.36 nm decrease in the average tunneling-barrier-width between GQDs (tunneling barrier = 5.11 eV) increases the conductivity of the device by 43-fold. These devices leverage the modulation in electron tunneling distances caused by pressure and humidity induced water transport across the hygroscopic polymer microfiber (Henry's constant = 0.215 Torr(-1)). This is the foremost example of GQD-based electronic sensors. We envision that this polymer-interfaced GQD percolating network will evolve a new class of sensors leveraging the low mass, low capacitance, high conductivity, and high sensitivity of GQD and the interfacial or dielectric properties of the polymer fiber.

  10. Theory of two-dimensional macroscopic quantum tunneling in a Josephson junction coupled with an LC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Kato, Takeo; Bauch, Thilo

    2009-03-01

    We investigate classical thermal activation (TA) and macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) for a Josephson junction coupled with an LC circuit theoretically. The TA and MQT escape rate are calculated analytically by taking into account the two-dimensional nature of the classical and quantum phase dynamics. We find that the MQT escape rate is largely suppressed by the coupling to the LC circuit. On the other hand, this coupling gives rise to slight reduction of the TA escape rate. These results are relevant for the interpretation of a recent experiment on the MQT and TA phenomena in grain boundary YBCO Josephson junctions.

  11. Localized phase structures growing out of quantum fluctuations in a quench of tunnel-coupled atomic condensates.

    PubMed

    Neuenhahn, Clemens; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Marquardt, Florian

    2012-08-24

    We investigate the relative phase between two weakly interacting 1D condensates of bosonic atoms after suddenly switching on the tunnel coupling. The following phase dynamics is governed by the quantum sine-Gordon equation. In the semiclassical limit of weak interactions, we observe the parametric amplification of quantum fluctuations leading to the formation of breathers with a finite lifetime. The typical lifetime and density of these "quasibreathers" are derived employing exact solutions of the classical sine-Gordon equation. Both depend on the initial relative phase between the condensates, which is considered as a tunable parameter.

  12. Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1990-01-01

    A Method and apparatus for differential spectroscopic atomic-imaging is disclosed for spatial resolution and imaging for display not only individual atoms on a sample surface, but also bonding and the specific atomic species in such bond. The apparatus includes a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) that is modified to include photon biasing, preferably a tuneable laser, modulating electronic surface biasing for the sample, and temperature biasing, preferably a vibration-free refrigerated sample mounting stage. Computer control and data processing and visual display components are also included. The method includes modulating the electronic bias voltage with and without selected photon wavelengths and frequency biasing under a stabilizing (usually cold) bias temperature to detect bonding and specific atomic species in the bonds as the STM rasters the sample. This data is processed along with atomic spatial topography data obtained from the STM raster scan to create a real-time visual image of the atoms on the sample surface.

  13. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Ready, W. Jud; Vogel, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  14. Band structure effects on resonant tunneling in III-V quantum wells versus two-dimensional vertical heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Philip M.; Tarasov, Alexey; Joiner, Corey A.; Vogel, Eric M.; Ready, W. Jud

    2016-01-14

    Since the invention of the Esaki diode, resonant tunneling devices have been of interest for applications including multi-valued logic and communication systems. These devices are characterized by the presence of negative differential resistance in the current-voltage characteristic, resulting from lateral momentum conservation during the tunneling process. While a large amount of research has focused on III-V material systems, such as the GaAs/AlGaAs system, for resonant tunneling devices, poor device performance and device-to-device variability have limited widespread adoption. Recently, the symmetric field-effect transistor (symFET) was proposed as a resonant tunneling device incorporating symmetric 2-D materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), separated by an interlayer barrier, such as hexagonal boron-nitride. The achievable peak-to-valley ratio for TMD symFETs has been predicted to be higher than has been observed for III-V resonant tunneling devices. This work examines the effect that band structure differences between III-V devices and TMDs has on device performance. It is shown that tunneling between the quantized subbands in III-V devices increases the valley current and decreases device performance, while the interlayer barrier height has a negligible impact on performance for barrier heights greater than approximately 0.5 eV.

  15. The ground state tunneling splitting and the zero point energy of malonaldehyde: a quantum Monte Carlo determination.

    PubMed

    Viel, Alexandra; Coutinho-Neto, Maurício D; Manthe, Uwe

    2007-01-14

    Quantum dynamics calculations of the ground state tunneling splitting and of the zero point energy of malonaldehyde on the full dimensional potential energy surface proposed by Yagi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 1154, 10647 (2001)] are reported. The exact diffusion Monte Carlo and the projection operator imaginary time spectral evolution methods are used to compute accurate benchmark results for this 21-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface. A tunneling splitting of 25.7+/-0.3 cm-1 is obtained, and the vibrational ground state energy is found to be 15 122+/-4 cm-1. Isotopic substitution of the tunneling hydrogen modifies the tunneling splitting down to 3.21+/-0.09 cm-1 and the vibrational ground state energy to 14 385+/-2 cm-1. The computed tunneling splittings are slightly higher than the experimental values as expected from the potential energy surface which slightly underestimates the barrier height, and they are slightly lower than the results from the instanton theory obtained using the same potential energy surface.

  16. Differential cohomology and locally covariant quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Christian; Schenkel, Alexander; Szabo, Richard J.

    We study differential cohomology on categories of globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds. The Lorentzian metric allows us to define a natural transformation whose kernel generalizes Maxwell's equations and fits into a restriction of the fundamental exact sequences of differential cohomology. We consider smooth Pontryagin duals of differential cohomology groups, which are subgroups of the character groups. We prove that these groups fit into smooth duals of the fundamental exact sequences of differential cohomology and equip them with a natural presymplectic structure derived from a generalized Maxwell Lagrangian. The resulting presymplectic Abelian groups are quantized using the CCR-functor, which yields a covariant functor from our categories of globally hyperbolic Lorentzian manifolds to the category of C∗-algebras. We prove that this functor satisfies the causality and time-slice axioms of locally covariant quantum field theory, but that it violates the locality axiom. We show that this violation is precisely due to the fact that our functor has topological subfunctors describing the Pontryagin duals of certain singular cohomology groups. As a byproduct, we develop a Fréchet-Lie group structure on differential cohomology groups.

  17. Negative Differential Resistance of CaF 2/CdF 2 Triple-Barrier Resonant-Tunneling Diode on Si(111) Grown by Partially Ionized Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Aoki, Yuichi; Saito, Wataru; Tsuganezawa, Mika

    1999-02-01

    Room-temperature negative differential resistance (NDR) of triple-barrier cadmium di-fluoride (CdF2)/calcium di-fluoride (CaF2) heterostructure resonant-tunneling diode (RTD) on a Si(111) substrate has been demonstrated. CdF2/CaF2 multilayered heterostructures were grown on a Si(111) substrate using partially ionized beam epitaxy to obtain atomically flat interfaces. The RTD structures, which consist of triple CaF2 energy barriers and double CdF2 quantum wells, were fabricated by electron beam (EB) lithography and dry etching to avoid thermal and chemical damage to the CdF2 layers. In the current-voltage characteristics of the RTD, NDR was clearly observed even at room temperature and the maximum peak-to-valley (P/V) ratio was about 6.

  18. Suppression of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in 2D superconductors by macroscopic quantum tunneling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Nelson, J; Goldman, A M

    2012-07-06

    The evolution with thickness of the properties of quench-deposited homogeneous amorphous bismuth (a-Bi) thin films with a 14.67 Å amorphous antimony (a-Sb) underlayer has been studied. In contrast with the results of previous investigations on similar systems the transition between the insulating and superconducting regimes is not direct, but involves an intervening metallic regime over a range of thicknesses. For these metallic films the temperature dependencies of the resistances at temperatures above the metallic regime can be described by the Halperin-Nelson form suggesting the occurrence of a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition at lower temperatures. However, this transition never occurs as curves of R(T) flatten out as temperature is reduced. We suggest that this phenomenon is evidence of a crossover between a classical regime of thermal vortex unbinding at high temperatures and a regime of macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. The latter prevents the BKT transition from occurring.

  19. A complete description of tunnelling using direct quantum dynamics simulation: Salicylaldimine proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Polyak, Iakov; Allan, Charlotte S. M.; Worth, Graham A.

    2015-08-28

    We demonstrate here conclusively that the variational multiconfiguration Gaussian (vMCG) method converges to the grid based full quantum dynamics multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree result for a tunnelling problem in many dimensions, using the intramolecular proton transfer in salicylaldimine as a model system. The 13-dimensional model potential energy surface was obtained from Hartree Fock energies with the 6-31G* basis set and the expectation value of the flux operator along the transition mode was used as a benchmark characteristic. As well as showing excellent convergence of the vMCG method on the model surface using a local harmonic approximation and a moderate number of basis functions, we show that the direct dynamics version of the vMCG also performs very well, usually needs the same number of Gaussians to converge, and converges to exact results if those are obtained on an accurately fitted surface. Finally, we make an important observation that the width of the Gaussian basis functions must be chosen very carefully to obtain accurate results with the use of the frozen-width approximation.

  20. Photoconduction in tunnel-coupled Ge/Si quantum dot arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Stepina, N. P. Yakimov, A. I.; Nenashev, A. V.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Sobolev, N. A.; Leitao, J. P.; Kirienko, V. V.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Koptev, E. S.; Pereira, L.; Carmo, M. C.

    2006-08-15

    The photoconduction in a tunnel-coupled Ge/Si quantum dot (QD) array has been studied. The photoconductance (PC) sign can be either positive or negative, depending on the initial filling of QDs with holes. The PC kinetics has a long-term character (10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} s at T = 4.2 K) and is accompanied by persistent photoconduction (PPC), whereby the PC value is not restored on the initial level even after relaxation for several hours. These phenomena are observed upon illumination by light with photon energies both greater and smaller than the silicon bandgap. A threshold light wavelength corresponding to a long-term PC kinetics depends on the QD filling with holes. A model describing the observed PC kinetics is proposed, according to which the main contribution to the PC is related to the degree of QD filling with holes. By applying the proposed model to the analysis of PC kinetics at various excitation levels, it is possible to determine the dependence of the hopping conductance on the number of holes per QD. The rate of the charge carrier density relaxation exponentially depends on the carrier density.

  1. Phase transitions in two tunnel-coupled HgTe quantum wells: Bilayer graphene analogy and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Knap, W.; Teppe, F.

    2016-08-01

    HgTe quantum wells possess remarkable physical properties as for instance the quantum spin Hall state and the “single-valley” analog of graphene, depending on their layer thicknesses and barrier composition. However, double HgTe quantum wells yet contain more fascinating and still unrevealed features. Here we report on the study of the quantum phase transitions in tunnel-coupled HgTe layers separated by CdTe barrier. We demonstrate that this system has a 3/2 pseudo spin degree of freedom, which features a number of particular properties associated with the spin-dependent coupling between HgTe layers. We discover a specific metal phase arising in a wide range of HgTe and CdTe layer thicknesses, in which a gapless bulk and a pair of helical edge states coexist. This phase holds some properties of bilayer graphene such as an unconventional quantum Hall effect and an electrically-tunable band gap. In this “bilayer graphene” phase, electric field opens the band gap and drives the system into the quantum spin Hall state. Furthermore, we discover a new type of quantum phase transition arising from a mutual inversion between second electron- and hole-like subbands. This work paves the way towards novel materials based on multi-layered topological insulators.

  2. Phase transitions in two tunnel-coupled HgTe quantum wells: Bilayer graphene analogy and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Knap, W.; Teppe, F.

    2016-01-01

    HgTe quantum wells possess remarkable physical properties as for instance the quantum spin Hall state and the “single-valley” analog of graphene, depending on their layer thicknesses and barrier composition. However, double HgTe quantum wells yet contain more fascinating and still unrevealed features. Here we report on the study of the quantum phase transitions in tunnel-coupled HgTe layers separated by CdTe barrier. We demonstrate that this system has a 3/2 pseudo spin degree of freedom, which features a number of particular properties associated with the spin-dependent coupling between HgTe layers. We discover a specific metal phase arising in a wide range of HgTe and CdTe layer thicknesses, in which a gapless bulk and a pair of helical edge states coexist. This phase holds some properties of bilayer graphene such as an unconventional quantum Hall effect and an electrically-tunable band gap. In this “bilayer graphene” phase, electric field opens the band gap and drives the system into the quantum spin Hall state. Furthermore, we discover a new type of quantum phase transition arising from a mutual inversion between second electron- and hole-like subbands. This work paves the way towards novel materials based on multi-layered topological insulators. PMID:27476745

  3. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet–triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    House, M. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Weber, B.; Hile, S. J.; Watson, T. F.; van der Heijden, J.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet–triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 μeV to 8 meV. We measure dot–lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon. PMID:26548556

  4. Eigenvalue estimation of differential operators with a quantum algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szkopek, Thomas; Roychowdhury, Vwani; Yablonovitch, Eli; Abrams, Daniel S.

    2005-12-01

    We demonstrate how linear differential operators could be emulated by a quantum processor, should one ever be built, using the Abrams-Lloyd algorithm. Given a linear differential operator of order 2S , acting on functions ψ(x1,x2,…,xD) with D arguments, the computational cost required to estimate a low order eigenvalue to accuracy Θ(1/N2) is Θ((2(S+1)(1+1/ν)+D)lnN) qubits and O(N2(S+1)(1+1/ν)lncND) gate operations, where N is the number of points to which each argument is discretized, ν and c are implementation dependent constants of O(1) . Optimal classical methods require Θ(ND) bits and Ω(ND) gate operations to perform the same eigenvalue estimation. The Abrams-Lloyd algorithm thereby leads to exponential reduction in memory and polynomial reduction in gate operations, provided the domain has sufficiently large dimension D>2(S+1)(1+1/ν) . In the case of Schrödinger’s equation, ground state energy estimation of two or more particles can in principle be performed with fewer quantum mechanical gates than classical gates.

  5. A classical treatment of optical tunneling in plasmonic gaps: extending the quantum corrected model to practical situations.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Rubén; Zugarramurdi, Asier; Zhang, Pu; Nordlander, Peter; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Borisov, Andrei G; Aizpurua, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The optical response of plasmonic nanogaps is challenging to address when the separation between the two nanoparticles forming the gap is reduced to a few nanometers or even subnanometer distances. We have compared results of the plasmon response within different levels of approximation, and identified a classical local regime, a nonlocal regime and a quantum regime of interaction. For separations of a few Ångstroms, in the quantum regime, optical tunneling can occur, strongly modifying the optics of the nanogap. We have considered a classical effective model, so called Quantum Corrected Model (QCM), that has been introduced to correctly describe the main features of optical transport in plasmonic nanogaps. The basics of this model are explained in detail, and its implementation is extended to include nonlocal effects and address practical situations involving different materials and temperatures of operation.

  6. Simulation of quantum dot floating gate MOSFET memory performance using various high-k material as tunnel oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Adha Sukma; Darma, Yudi

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, performance of quantum dot floating gate MOSFET memory is simulated by replacing the SiO2 tunnel oxide with high-Κ material. There are three high-k material simulated in this paper, HfO2, ZrO2, and Y2O3. As we know that high-Κ material is used nowadays to reduce leakage current, so this paper demonstrates the application of high-Κ material to reduce leakage current in non-volatile memory quantum dot based floating gate MOSFET. Simulation results of this paper show the leakage current can be suppressed by using high-Κ material as tunnel oxide up to 10 times. Furthermore, this paper also shows that the memory performance can be properly sustained. The writing and erasing time are depend on tunneling current probability which calculated using transfer matrix method. The writing time and erasing time for HfO2 and ZrO2 are 150 nanosecond and 15 nanosecond.

  7. Instantons and scaling of the transitions rates in Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of thermally-assisted quantum tunneling in spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Jiang, Zhang; Boixo, Sergio; Issakov, Sergei; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias; Neven, Hartmut

    We study analytically and numerically the dynamics of the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm to simulate thermally-assisted tunneling in mean-field spin models without conservation of total spin. We use Kramers escape rate theory to calculate the scaling of the QMC time with the problem size to simulate the tunneling transitions. We develop path-integral instanton approach in coherent state and Suzuki-Trotter representations to calculate the escape rate and most probable escape path in QMC dynamics. Analtytical results are in a good agreement with numerical studies. We identify the class of models where the exponent in the scaling of the QMC time is the same as that in physical tunneling but the pre-factor depends very significantly on the QMC path representation. We propose the classes of problems where QMC can fail to simulate tunneling efficiently. The work of GM and MT has been supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation through the National Competence Center in Research QSIT and by ODNI, IARPA via MIT Lincoln Laboratory Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  8. Simulation of Leakage Current in Si/Ge/Si Quantum Dot Floating Gate MOSFET Using High-K Material as Tunnel Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, Adha Sukma; Nugraha, Mohamad Insan; Yudhistira; Rahayu, Fitria; Darma, Yudi

    2011-12-01

    Leakage current in nano-scale MOSFET has been calculated using variety of tunnel oxides. Firstly, this paper evaluates the leakage current in MOSFET devices when using SiO2 as tunnel oxide. When the thickness of tunnel oxide decreases into 1,4 nm, the leakage current will raise and cause power dissipation about 40 percent. Leakage current can be reduced by using high-K materials as tunnel oxides. Thicker high-K materials as tunnel oxides are easier to fabricate than SiO2 tunnel oxides with the thickness down to 1,4 nm. In term of Equivalent Oxide Thickness (EOT), using high-K materials for tunnel oxides could give the better performance as 1,4nm SiO2 which is also more simple in the fabrication. Here, we also evaluates the leakage current as the function of temperature, channel length, and oxide thickness. Computational result shows that using HfO2 to replace SiO2 as tunnel oxides can make leakage current decrease up to seven times. For practically use, HfO2 were suiTable as tunnel oxide in memory devices, particularly in quantum dot (QD) floating gate memory. In this case we use heterostructure QD consisting Si/Ge/Si as electronic storage node. The results demonstrated that the memory operation using HfO2 as tunnel oxide has a better performance rather than SiO2.

  9. Differential geometry based solvation model. III. Quantum formulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-11-21

    Solvation is of fundamental importance to biomolecular systems. Implicit solvent models, particularly those based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for electrostatic analysis, are established approaches for solvation analysis. However, ad hoc solvent-solute interfaces are commonly used in the implicit solvent theory. Recently, we have introduced differential geometry based solvation models which allow the solvent-solute interface to be determined by the variation of a total free energy functional. Atomic fixed partial charges (point charges) are used in our earlier models, which depends on existing molecular mechanical force field software packages for partial charge assignments. As most force field models are parameterized for a certain class of molecules or materials, the use of partial charges limits the accuracy and applicability of our earlier models. Moreover, fixed partial charges do not account for the charge rearrangement during the solvation process. The present work proposes a differential geometry based multiscale solvation model which makes use of the electron density computed directly from the quantum mechanical principle. To this end, we construct a new multiscale total energy functional which consists of not only polar and nonpolar solvation contributions, but also the electronic kinetic and potential energies. By using the Euler-Lagrange variation, we derive a system of three coupled governing equations, i.e., the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrostatic potential, the generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation for the solvent-solute boundary, and the Kohn-Sham equations for the electronic structure. We develop an iterative procedure to solve three coupled equations and to minimize the solvation free energy. The present multiscale model is numerically validated for its stability, consistency and accuracy, and is applied to a few sets of molecules, including a case which is difficult for existing solvation models. Comparison is made

  10. Photons and evolution: quantum mechanical processes modulate sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2009-09-01

    This paper will show that the fractional difference in the human gender ratio (GR) between the GR(at death) for those born in solar cycle peak years (maxima) and the GR(at death) in those born in solar cycle non-peak years (minima), e.g., 0.023, divided by Pi, yields a reasonable approximation of the quantum mechanical constant, alpha, or the fine structure constant (FSC) approximately 0.007297... or approximately 1/137. This finding is based on a sample of approximately 50 million cases using common, readily available demographic data, e.g., state of birth, birth date, death date, and gender. Physicists Nair, Geim et al. had found precisely the same fractional difference, 0.023, in the absorption of white light (sunlight) by a single-atom thick layer of graphene, a carbon skeleton resembling chicken wire fencing. This absorption fraction, when divided by Pi, yielded the FSC and was the first time this constant could "so directly be assessed practically by the naked eye". As the GR is a reflection of sexual differentiation, this paper reveals that a quantum mechanical process, as manifested by the FSC, is playing a role in the primordial process of replication, a necessary requirement of life. Successful replication is the primary engine driving evolution, which at a biochemical level, is a quantum mechanical process dependent upon photonic energy from the Sun. We propose that a quantum-mechanical, photon-driven chemical evolution preceded natural selection in biology and the mechanisms of mitosis and meiosis are manifestations of this chemical evolution in ancient seas over 3 billion years ago. Evolutionary processes became extant first in self-replicating molecules forced to adapt to high energy photons, mostly likely in the ultraviolet spectrum. These events led to evolution by natural selection as complex mixing of genetic material within species creating the variety needed to match changing environments reflecting the same process initiated at the dawn of life

  11. The fractional acoustoelectric current plateau induced by the energy-dependent tunnelling from dynamic quantum dots into an impurity dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. W.; Song, L.

    2016-08-01

    The fractional acoustoelectric (AE) current plateau in surface-acoustic-waves (SAW) single-electron transport devices is studied by measuring the current plateau as a function of the SAW power and gate bias as well as a function of perpendicular magnetic filed. Our investigation indicates that the fractional plateau is induced by the tunnelling effect from the dynamic quantum dots (QDs) into a static impurity dot. Rate equations are used to extract the tunnelling rates, which change a lot with the number of electrons in the dynamic QDs, the SAW power and gate bias. In addition, the current plateau evolves into a fractional structure, when a strong perpendicular magnetic field is applied to the system.

  12. Multiple Andreev reflections in s -wave superconductor-quantum dot-topological superconductor tunnel junctions and Majorana bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Anatoly

    2015-05-01

    We calculate the current as a function of applied voltage in a nontopological s -wave superconductor-quantum dot-topological superconductor (TS) tunnel junction. We consider the type of TS which hosts two Majorana bound states (MBSs) at the ends of a semiconductor quantum wire or of a chain of magnetic atoms in the proximity with an s -wave superconductor. We find that the I -V characteristic of such a system in the regime of big voltages has a typical two-dot shape and is ornamented by peaks of multiple Andreev reflections. We also consider the other options when the zero-energy states are created by disorder (hereby Shiba states) or by Andreev zero-energy bound states at the surface of a quantum dot and a superconductor. The later are obtained by tuning the magnetic field to a specific value. Unlike the last two cases the MBS I -V curves are robust to change the magnetic field. Therefore, the magnetic-field dependence of the tunneling current can serve as a unique signature for the presence of a MBS.

  13. Electron-Electron and Electron-Phonon interactions effects on the tunnel electronic spectrum of PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongyue; Lhuillier, Emmanuel; Yu, Qian; Mottaghizadeh, Alireza; Ulysse, Christian; Zimmers, Alexandre; Dubertret, Benoit; Aubin, Herve

    2015-03-01

    We present a tunnel spectroscopy study of the electronic spectrum of single PbS Quantum Dots (QDs) trapped between nanometer-spaced electrodes, measured at low temperature T=5 K. The carrier filling of the QD can be controlled either by the drain voltage in the shell filling regime or by a gate voltage. In the empty QD, the tunnel spectrum presents the expected signature of the 8x degenerated excited levels. In the drain controlled shell filling regime, the levels degeneracies are lifted by the global electrostatic Coulomb energy of the QD; in the gate controlled shell filling regime, the levels degeneracies are lifted by the intra-Coulomb interactions. In the charged quantum dot, electron-phonons interactions lead to the apparition of Franck-Condon side bands on the single excited levels and possibly Franck Condon blockade at low energy. The sharpening of excited levels at higher gate voltage suggests that the magnitude of electron-phonon interactions is decreased upon increasing the electron filling in the quantum dot. This work was supported by the French ANR Grants 10-BLAN-0409-01, 09-BLAN-0388-01, by the Region Ile-de-France in the framework of DIM Nano-K and by China Scholarship Council.

  14. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-10-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  15. Approximation of Quantum Stochastic Differential Equations for Input-Output Model Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-25

    Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: " Algorithms and software for quantum engineering," H. Mabuchi and R. Balu, Review Management Board...Approximation of Quantum Stochastic Differential Equations for Input-Output Model Reduction We have completed a short program of theoretical research...on dimensional reduction and approximation of models based on quantum stochastic differential equations. Our primary results lie in the area of

  16. Perturbative calculations of quantum spin tunneling in effective spin systems with a transversal magnetic field and transversal anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizanac, M.; Vedmedenko, E. Y.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2017-01-01

    We present a perturbative approach for the resonant tunnel splittings of an arbitrary effective single spin system. The Hamiltonian of such a system contains a uniaxial anisotropy, a transversal magnetic field and a second-order transversal anisotropy. Further, we investigate the influence of the transversal magnetic field on the energy splittings for higher integer quantum spins and we introduce an exact formula, which defines values of the transversal magnetic field, the transversal anisotropy and the uniaxial anisotropy where the contribution of the transversal magnetic field to the energy splitting is at least equal to the contribution of the transversal anisotropy.

  17. Unipolar Complementary Circuits Using Double Electron Layer Tunneling Tansistors

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, M.A.; Hafich, M.J.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.

    1998-10-19

    We demonstrate unipolar complementary circuits consisting of a pair of resonant tunneling transistors based on the gate control of 2D-2D interlayer tunneling, where a single transistor - in addition to exhibiting a welldefined negative-differential-resistance can be operated with either positive or negative transconductance. Details of the device operation are analyzed in terms of the quantum capacitance effect and band-bending in a double quantum well structure, and show good agreement with experiment. Application of resonant tunneling complementary logic is discussed by demonstrating complementary static random access memory using two devices connected in series.

  18. Nonequilibrium noise in transport across a tunneling contact between ν =2/3 fractional quantum Hall edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtanko, O.; Snizhko, K.; Cheianov, V.

    2014-03-01

    In a recent experimental paper [Bid et al., Nature 466, 585 (2010), 10.1038/nature09277] a qualitative confirmation of the existence of upstream neutral modes at the ν =2/3 quantum Hall edge was reported. Using the chiral Luttinger liquid theory of the quantum Hall edge we develop a quantitative model of the experiment of Bid et al. A good quantitative agreement of our theory with the experimental data reinforces the conclusion of the existence of the upstream neutral mode. Our model also enables us to extract important quantitative information about nonequilibrium processes in Ohmic and tunneling contacts from the experimental data. In particular, for ν =2/3, we find a power-law dependence of the neutral mode temperature on the charge current injected from the Ohmic contact.

  19. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector (CBIRD) with Double Tunnel Junction Contact and Quantum Dot Barrier Infrared Detector (QD-BIRD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.-Y; Soibel, Alexander; Khoshakhlagh, Arezou; Keo, Sam A.; Nguyen, Jean; Hoglund, Linda; Mumolo, Jason M.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2012-01-01

    The InAs/GaSb type-II superlattice based complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) has already demonstrated very good performance in long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) detection. In this work, we describe results on a modified CBIRD device that incorporates a double tunnel junction contact designed for robust device and focal plane array processing. The new device also exhibited reduced turn-on voltage. We also report results on the quantum dot barrier infrared detector (QD-BIRD). By incorporating self-assembled InSb quantum dots into the InAsSb absorber of the standard nBn detector structure, the QD-BIRD extend the detector cutoff wavelength from approximately 4.2 micrometers to 6 micrometers, allowing the coverage of the mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) transmission window. The device has been observed to show infrared response at 225 K.

  20. Enhancing efficiency and power of quantum-dots resonant tunneling thermoelectrics in three-terminal geometry by cooperative effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jian-Hua

    2014-11-21

    We propose a scheme of multilayer thermoelectric engine where one electric current is coupled to two temperature gradients in three-terminal geometry. This is realized by resonant tunneling through quantum dots embedded in two thermal and electrical resisting polymer matrix layers between highly conducting semiconductor layers. There are two thermoelectric effects, one of which is pertaining to inelastic transport processes (if energies of quantum dots in the two layers are different), while the other exists also for elastic transport processes. These two correspond to the transverse and longitudinal thermoelectric effects, respectively, and are associated with different temperature gradients. We show that cooperation between the two thermoelectric effects leads to markedly improved figure of merit and power factor, which is confirmed by numerical calculation using material parameters. Such enhancement is robust against phonon heat conduction and energy level broadening. Therefore, we demonstrated cooperative effect as an additional way to effectively improve performance of thermoelectrics in three-terminal geometry.

  1. Investigations of quantum effect semiconductor devices: The tunnel switch diode and the velocity modulation transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Erik Stephen

    In this thesis we present the results of experimental and theoretical studies of two quantum effect devices--the Tunnel Switch Diode (TSD) and the Velocity Modulation Transistor (VMT). We show that TSD devices can be fabricated such that they behave (semi-quantitatively) as predicted by simple analytical models and more advanced drift-diffusion simulations. These devices possess characteristics, such as on-state currents which range over nearly five orders of magnitude, and on/off current ratios which are even larger, which may allow for a practical implementation of a very dense transistorless SRAM architecture and possibly other novel circuit designs. We demonstrate that many TSD properties can be explained by analogy to a thyristor. In particular, we show that the thin oxide layer in the TSD plays a critical role, and that this can be understood in terms of current injection through the oxide, analogous to transport through the "current limiting" layer in a thyristor. As this oxide layer can be subjected to extreme stress during device operation, we have studied the effect of this stress on device behavior. We demonstrate many significant stress-dependent effects, and identify structures and operation modes which minimize these effects. We propose an InAs/GaSb/AlSb VMT which may allow for larger conductance modulation and higher temperature operation than has been demonstrated in similar GaAs/AlAs structures. Fundamental differences in device operation in the two materials systems and unusual transport mechanisms in the InAs/GaSb/AlSb system are identified as a result of the band lineups in the two systems. Boltzmann transport simulations are developed and presented, allowing a qualitative description of the transport in the InAs/GaSb/AlSb structure. Band structure calculations are carried out, allowing for device design. While no working VMT devices were produced, this is believed to be due to processing and crystal growth problems. We present methods used to

  2. Effects of electron-phonon interactions on the electron tunneling spectrum of PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmers, A.; Wang, H.; Lhuillier, E.; Yu, Q.; Mottaghizadeh, A.; Ulysse, C.; Descamps-Mandine, A.; Dubertret, B.; Aubin, H.

    We present a tunnel spectroscopy study of single PbS and HgSe quantum dots (QDs) as a function of temperature and gate voltage. The samples are fabricated through high-vacuum projection of the QDs on the chip circuit. For PbS, three distinct signatures of strong electron-phonon coupling are observed in the electron tunneling spectrum (ETS) of these QDs. In the shell-filling regime, the 8x degeneracy of the electronic levels is lifted by the Coulomb interactions and allows the observation of phonon subbands that result from the emission of optical phonons. At low bias, a gap is observed in the ETS that cannot be closed with the gate voltage, which is a distinguishing feature of the Franck-Condon blockade. From the data, a Huang-Rhys factor in the range S similar to 1.7-2.5 is obtained. Finally, in the shell-tunneling regime, the optical phonons appear in the inelastic ETS d(2)I/dV(2). For HgSe, the data show that the inter-band and intra-band gap can be clearly identified in the ETS.

  3. Asymmetric tunneling rates for electrons and holes at CdSe quantum dot/carbon nanotube interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Jiang, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Decorating carbon nanotubes with CdSe quantum dots (QDs) is one potential approach for creating high efficiency photovoltaics. Our collaborators at Yale recently produced a ligand-free covalent attachment of CdSe QDs to carbon nanotubes through an organic ligand exchange mechanism. Our prior first principles work described the energetics of the various binding processes and rationalized the experimental growth methodology. After a brief review of the system, we will describe our intriguing finding that excited electrons and holes tunnel with different rates out of the QD and into the carbon nanotubes. The asymmetric tunneling rate itself can, in principle, boost the separation of photo-excited charge at the interface even if there are insufficient band energy differences across the interface. We describe our results for the tunneling rates computed using (i) a brute force approach with increasing simulation cell size to remove periodic effects, and (ii) a Green's function method that directly connects the QD to a thermodynamically large electron reservoir (e.g., a very long pristine nanotube). Supported by NSF SOLAR DMR 0934520.

  4. Observation of quantum-tunnelling-modulated spin texture in ultrathin topological insulator Bi2Se3 films.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Madhab; Richardella, Anthony; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime; Xu, SuYang; Alidoust, Nasser; Belopolski, Ilya; Liu, Chang; Bian, Guang; Zhang, Duming; Marchenko, Dmitry; Varykhalov, Andrei; Rader, Oliver; Leandersson, Mats; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Basak, Susmita; Lin, Hsin; Bansil, Arun; Samarth, Nitin; Hasan, M Zahid

    2014-05-12

    Understanding the spin-texture behaviour of boundary modes in ultrathin topological insulator films is critically essential for the design and fabrication of functional nanodevices. Here, by using spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with p-polarized light in topological insulator Bi2Se3 thin films, we report tunnelling-dependent evolution of spin configuration in topological insulator thin films across the metal-to-insulator transition. We report a systematic binding energy- and wavevector-dependent spin polarization for the topological surface electrons in the ultrathin gapped-Dirac-cone limit. The polarization decreases significantly with enhanced tunnelling realized systematically in thin insulating films, whereas magnitude of the polarization saturates to the bulk limit faster at larger wavevectors in thicker metallic films. We present a theoretical model that captures this delicate relationship between quantum tunnelling and Fermi surface spin polarization. Our high-resolution spin-based spectroscopic results suggest that the polarization current can be tuned to zero in thin insulating films forming the basis for a future spin-switch nanodevice.

  5. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, J.A.; Sherwin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Weckwerth, M.V.

    1998-10-20

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation. 43 figs.

  6. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Weckwerth, Mark V.

    1998-01-01

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation.

  7. Tunnel determinants from spectral zeta functions. Instanton effects in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Izquierdo, A. Alonso; Guilarte, J. Mateos

    2014-07-23

    In this paper we develop an spectral zeta function regularization procedure on the determinants of instanton fluctuation operators that describe the semi-classical order of tunnel effects between degenerate vacua.

  8. Non-equilibrium quantum transport of spin-polarized electrons and back action on molecular magnet tunnel-junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Yao, Hui; Nie, Yi-Hang; Liang, J.-Q.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the non-equilibrium quantum transport through a single-molecule magnet embedded in a tunnel junction with ferromagnetic electrodes, which generate spin-polarized electrons. The lead magnetization direction is non-collinear with the uniaxial anisotropy easy-axis of molecule-magnet. Based on the Pauli rate-equation approach we demonstrate the magnetization reversion of molecule-magnet induced by the back action of spin-polarized current in the sequential tunnel regime. The asymptotic magnetization of molecular magnet and spin-polarization of transport current are obtained as functions of time by means of time-dependent solution of the rate equation. It is found that the antiparallel configuration of the ferromagnetic electrodes and molecular anisotropy easy-axis is an effective structure to reverse both the magnetization of molecule-magnet and spin-polarization of the transport current. Particularly the non-collinear angle dependence provides useful knowledge for the quantum manipulation of molecule-magnet and spin polarized electron-transport.

  9. Solving the quantum brachistochrone equation through differential geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chenglong; Wilde, Mark; Dowling, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaoting

    2016-05-01

    The ability of generating a particular quantum state, or model a physical quantum device by exploring quantum state transfer, is important in many applications such as quantum chemistry, quantum information processing, quantum metrology and cooling. Due to the environmental noise, a quantum device suffers from decoherence causing information loss. Hence, completing the state-generation task in a time-optimal way can be considered as a straightforward method to reduce decoherence. For a quantum system whose Hamiltonian has a fixed type and a finite energy bandwidth, it has been found that the time-optimal quantum evolution can be characterized by the quantum brachistochrone equation. In addition, the brachistochrone curve is found to have a geometric interpretation: it is the limit of a one-parameter family of geodesics on a sub-Riemannian model. Such geodesic-brachistochrone connection provides an efficient numerical method to solve the quantum brachistochrone equation. In this work, we will demonstrate this numerical method by studying the time-optimal state-generating problem on a given quantum spin system. We also find that the Pareto weighted-sum optimization turns out to be a simple but efficient method in solving the quantum time-optimal problems. We would like to acknowledge support from NSF under Award No. CCF-1350397.

  10. Graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites decorated with quantum tunneling junctions: preparation strategies, microstructures and formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingxiu; Wu, Xianzheng; Wang, Lijun; Chen, Zhiwen; Wang, Shilong

    2014-09-28

    Tin dioxide (SnO2) and graphene are versatile materials that are vitally important for creating new functional and smart materials. A facile, simple and efficient ultrasonic-assisted hydrothermal synthesis approach has been developed to prepare graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites (GSNCs), including three samples with graphene/Sn weight ratios = 1 : 2 (GSNC-2), 1 : 1 (GSNC-1), and graphene oxide/Sn weight ratio = 1 : 1 (GOSNC-1). Low-magnification electron microscopy analysis indicated that graphene was exfoliated and adorned with SnO2 nanoparticles, which were dispersed uniformly on both the sides of the graphene nanosheets. High-magnification electron microscopy analysis confirmed that the graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites presented network tunneling frameworks, which were decorated with the SnO2 quantum tunneling junctions. The size distribution of SnO2 nanoparticles was estimated to range from 3 to 5.5 nm. Comparing GSNC-2, GSNC-1, and GOSNC-1, GOSNC-1 was found to exhibit a significantly better the homogeneous distribution and a considerably smaller size distribution of SnO2 nanoparticles, which indicated that it was better to use graphene oxide as a supporting material and SnCl4·5H2O as a precursor to synthesize hybrid graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites. Experimental results suggest that the graphene-SnO2 nanocomposites with interesting SnO2 quantum tunneling junctions may be a promising material to facilitate the improvement of the future design of micro/nanodevices.

  11. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: From deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  12. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: from deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  13. Negative differential resistance of metal (CoSi2)/insulator (CaF2) triple-barrier resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Suemasu, Takashi; Muratake, Shigeki; Asada, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    The electron transport and negative differential resistance in metal-insulator nanometer-thick heterostructures are reported for the first time. The structure of the samples is a resonant tunneling diode with three-barriers of 0.9-nm-thick CaF2 layers and two wells of 1.9- and 2.8-nm-thick CoSi2 layers. These layers were grown by means of partially ionized beam epitaxy for CaF2 and a two step growth technique for CoSi2. In the current-voltage characteristics at 77 K, negative differential resistance was observed in the significant number of samples and the typical peak-to-valley ratio was as high as 2. The negative differential resistance observed here can be attributed to the electron transport through the resonant levels in metal/insulator multilayered heterostructures.

  14. On a differential geometric viewpoint of Jaynes' MaxEnt method and its quantum extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S. A.; Cafaro, C.; Giffin, A.; Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.

    2012-05-01

    We present a differential geometric viewpoint of the quantum MaxEnt estimate of a density operator when only incomplete knowledge encoded in the expectation values of a set of quantum observables is available. Finally, the additional possibility of considering some prior bias towards a certain density operator (the prior) is taken into account and the unsolved issues with its quantum relative entropic inference criterion are pointed out.

  15. Investigating Quantum Mechanical Tunneling at the Nanoscale via Analogy: Development and Assessment of a Teaching Tool for Upper-Division Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniz, Marc N.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel educational activity designed to teach quantum mechanical tunneling to upper-division undergraduate students in the context of nanochemistry. The activity is based on a theoretical framework for analogy and is split into three parts that are linked pedagogically through the framework: classical ball-and-ramp system, tunneling…

  16. Covariant differential calculi on quantum symplectic superspace S Pq 1 | 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Salih

    2017-02-01

    A unitary orthosymplectic quantum supergroup is introduced. Two covariant differential calculi on the quantum superspace S Pq 1 | 2 are presented. The h-deformed symplectic superspaces via a contraction of the q-deformed symplectic superspaces are obtained. A new h-deformation of the Heisenberg superalgebra is given.

  17. Existence of mild solution of impulsive quantum stochastic differential equation with nonlocal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S. A.; Ayoola, E. O.; Oghonyon, G. J.

    2016-08-01

    New results on existence and uniqueness of solution of impulsive quantum stochastic differential equation with nonlocal conditions are established. The nonlocal conditions are completely continuous. The methods applied here are simple extension of the methods applied in the classical case to this noncummutative quantum setting.

  18. Quantum Tunneling in Testosterone 6β-Hydroxylation by Cytochrome P450: Reaction Dynamics Calculations Employing Multiconfiguration Molecular-Mechanical Potential Energy Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Lin, Hai

    2009-05-01

    Testosterone hydroxylation is a prototypical reaction of human cytochrome P450 3A4, which metabolizes about 50% of oral drugs on the market. Reaction dynamics calculations were carried out for the testosterone 6β-hydrogen abstraction and the 6β-d1-testosterone 6β-duterium abstraction employing a model that consists of the substrate and the active oxidant compound I. The calculations were performed at the level of canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling and were based on a semiglobal full-dimensional potential energy surface generated by the multiconfiguration molecular mechanics technique. The tunneling coefficients were found to be around 3, indicating substantial contributions by quantum tunneling. However, the tunneling made only modest contributions to the kinetic isotope effects. The kinetic isotope effects were computed to be about 2 in the doublet spin state and about 5 in the quartet spin state.

  19. Optical properties and effect of carrier tunnelling in CdSe colloidal quantum dots: A comparative study with different ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Syamanta Kumar; Kim, Tae Soo; Oh, Eunsoon; Challa, Kiran Kumar; Kim, Eui-Tae

    2012-09-01

    We studied both cw and time-resolved photoluminescence of colloidal CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots capped with chemical ligands. For the trioctylphosphine oxide capped CdSe/ZnS QDs, both the luminescence intensity and lifetime were found to be increased with increasing temperatures, which can be explained by the thermal activation of the carriers trapped at shallow trapping centers. After the ligand exchange into 3-mercaptopropionic acid, the non-radiative recombination rate was increased and the luminescence efficiency was decreased at room temperature. When the QDs were employed in photovoltaic devices, photocurrent was found to be increased after the ligand exchange. The improved photocurrents observed in photovoltaic devices can be explained by the improved tunnelling probability between the neighbouring QDs.

  20. Quantum-tunneling dynamics of a spin-polarized Fermi gas in a double-well potential

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, L.; Mazzarella, G.; Toigo, F.; Salerno, M.

    2010-02-15

    We study the exact dynamics of a one-dimensional spin-polarized gas of fermions in a double-well potential at zero and finite temperature. Despite the system being made of noninteracting fermions, its dynamics can be quite complex, showing strongly aperiodic spatio-temporal patterns during the tunneling. The extension of these results to the case of mixtures of spin-polarized fermions interacting with self-trapped Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) at zero temperature is considered as well. In this case we show that the fermionic dynamics remains qualitatively similar to that observed in the absence of BEC but with the Rabi frequencies of fermionic excited states explicitly depending on the number of bosons and on the boson-fermion interaction strength. From this, the possibility of controlling quantum fermionic dynamics by means of Feshbach resonances is suggested.

  1. Hyperfine-Interaction-Driven Suppression of Quantum Tunneling at Zero Field in a Holmium(III) Single-Ion Magnet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Cong; Liu, Jun-Liang; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Liu, Dan; Chibotaru, Liviu F; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Tong, Ming-Liang

    2017-03-15

    An extremely rare non-Kramers holmium(III) single-ion magnet (SIM) is reported to be stabilized in the pentagonal-bipyramidal geometry by a phosphine oxide with a high energy barrier of 237(4) cm(-1) . The suppression of the quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) at zero field and the hyperfine structures originating from field-induced QTMs can be observed even from the field-dependent alternating-current magnetic susceptibility in addition to single-crystal hysteresis loops. These dramatic dynamics were attributed to the combination of the favorable crystal-field environment and the hyperfine interactions arising from (165) Ho (I=7/2) with a natural abundance of 100 %.

  2. Using tunnel junctions to grow monolithically integrated optically pumped semipolar III-nitride yellow quantum wells on top of electrically injected blue quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Kowsz, Stacy J; Young, Erin C; Yonkee, Benjamin P; Pynn, Christopher D; Farrell, Robert M; Speck, James S; DenBaars, Steven P; Nakamura, Shuji

    2017-02-20

    We report a device that monolithically integrates optically pumped (20-21) III-nitride quantum wells (QWs) with 560 nm emission on top of electrically injected QWs with 450 nm emission. The higher temperature growth of the blue light-emitting diode (LED) was performed first, which prevented thermal damage to the higher indium content InGaN of the optically pumped QWs. A tunnel junction (TJ) was incorporated between the optically pumped and electrically injected QWs; this TJ enabled current spreading in the buried LED. Metalorganic chemical vapor deposition enabled the growth of InGaN QWs with high radiative efficiency, while molecular beam epitaxy was leveraged to achieve activated buried p-type GaN and the TJ. This initial device exhibited dichromatic optically polarized emission with a polarization ratio of 0.28. Future improvements in spectral distribution should enable phosphor-free polarized white light emission.

  3. Quantum Interference between Energy Absorption Processes of Molecular Exciton and Interface Plasmons on Luminescence Induced by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Kuniyuki; Imasa, Hiroshi; Sakaue, Mamoru; Kasai, Hideaki; Kim, Yousoo

    2015-03-01

    Luminescence induced by the tunneling current of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) from molecule-covered metal surfaces is attributed to radiative decays of molecules and interface plasmons localized near the tip-substrate gap region. Since the dynamics of molecule and interface plasmons strongly influence each other, the interplay between these dynamics gives rise to peculiar phenomena originating from quantum many-body effects. In this study, we develop the effective model of the system and investigate the luminescence properties using the nonequilibrium Green's function method. The results show that, in addition to the dynamics of molecule, energy reabsorption by interface plasmons have a critical role in determining the luminescence spectral profile of interface plasmons. The additional peak structure arises owing to the interference between these energy absorption processes. Origin of prominent peak and dip structures observed in recent experiments are identified by the developed theory. The details of the interference effects on the luminescence properties will be discussed. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26886013.

  4. Two-particle quantum interference in tunnel-coupled optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, A M; Lester, B J; Reynolds, C M; Wall, M L; Foss-Feig, M; Hazzard, K R A; Rey, A M; Regal, C A

    2014-07-18

    The quantum statistics of atoms is typically observed in the behavior of an ensemble via macroscopic observables. However, quantum statistics modifies the behavior of even two particles. Here, we demonstrate near-complete control over all the internal and external degrees of freedom of two laser-cooled (87)Rb atoms trapped in two optical tweezers. This controllability allows us to observe signatures of indistinguishability via two-particle interference. Our work establishes laser-cooled atoms in optical tweezers as a promising route to bottom-up engineering of scalable, low-entropy quantum systems.

  5. Stress Test for Quantum Dynamics Approximations: Deep Tunneling in the Muonium Exchange Reaction D + HMu → DMu + H.

    PubMed

    Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Suleimanov, Yury V; Richardson, Jeremy O; Sáez Rábanos, Vicente; Green, William H; Aoiz, F J

    2014-12-04

    Quantum effects play a crucial role in chemical reactions involving light atoms at low temperatures, especially when a light particle is exchanged between two heavier partners. Different theoretical methodologies have been developed in the last decades attempting to describe zero-point energy and tunneling effects without abandoning a classical or semiclassical framework. In this work, we have chosen the D + HMu → DMu + H reaction as a stress test system for three well-established methods: two representative versions of transition state theory (TST), canonical variational theory and semiclassical instanton, and ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). These calculations will be compared with accurate quantum mechanical results. Despite its apparent simplicity, the exchange of the extremely light muonium atom (0.114 u) becomes a most challenging reaction for conventional methods. The main result of this work is that RPMD provides an overall better performance than TST-based methods for such a demanding reaction. RPMD might well turn out to be a useful tool beyond TST applicability.

  6. Differential and integral cross sections of the N(2D)+H2-->NH+H reaction from exact quantum and quasi-classical trajectory calculations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi Ying; Bañares, Luis; Guo, Hua

    2007-03-29

    Exact quantum mechanical state-to-state differential and integral cross sections and their energy dependence have been calculated on an accurate NH2 potential energy surface (PES), using a newly proposed Chebyshev wave packet method. The NH product is found to have a monotonically decaying vibrational distribution and an inverted rotational distribution. The product angular distributions peak in both forward and backward directions, but with a backward bias. This backward bias is more pronounced than that observed previously on a less accurate PES. Both the differential and integral cross sections oscillate mildly with collision energy, indicating the dominance of short-lived resonances. The quantum mechanical results are compared with those obtained from quasi-classical trajectories. The agreement is generally reasonable and the discrepancies can be attributed to the neglect of quantum effects such as tunneling. Detailed analysis of the trajectories revealed that the backward bias in the differential cross section stems overwhelmingly from the fast insertion component of the reaction, augmented with some flux from the abstraction channel, particularly at high collision energies.

  7. Chiral glycine formation on cold interstellar grains by quantum tunneling hydrogen-deuterium substitution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Kouchi, Akira

    2015-08-01

    We report experimental evidence that chiral glycine (NH2CHDCOOH) is formed by the surface reaction of normal glycine (NH2CH2COOH) solid with deuterium (D) atom at 12 K under the simulative conditions of interstellar molecular clouds. Chiral glycine formation is most likely initiated by the tunneling abstraction reaction of H atom by D atom followed by the addition of D atom to the glycine radical (NH2CHCOOH). Given that chiral glycine can form in such a primordial low-temperature environment, it might source molecular chirality as molecular clouds evolve into planetary systems.

  8. Matter waves and quantum tunneling engineered by time-dependent interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bludov, Yu. V.; Konotop, V. V.; Salerno, M.

    2010-05-15

    We report the possibility of steering gap solitons in Bose-Einstein condensates loaded in optical lattices by means of time-dependent nonlinearities, which allow one to control in a nondestructive manner both Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling (i.e., Rabi oscillations) across band gaps. As an example we show how to move a matter-wave soliton in real and in reciprocal space from a lower to higher bands, avoiding dynamical instabilities. This opens the possibility of experimental access to gap solitons of higher bands and forcing of soliton motion through a lattice via the Feshbach resonance technique.

  9. The Particle inside a Ring: A Two-Dimensional Quantum Problem Visualized by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The one-dimensional particle-in-a-box model used to introduce quantum mechanics to students suffers from a tenuous connection to a real physical system. This article presents a two-dimensional model, the particle confined within a ring, that directly corresponds to observations of surface electrons in a metal trapped inside a circular barrier.…

  10. Model of tunnelling through periodic array of quantum dots in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu. Popov, I.; A. Osipov, S.

    2012-11-01

    A two-dimensional periodic array of quantum dots with two laterally coupled leads in a magnetic field is considered. The model of electron transport through the system based on the theory of self-adjoint extensions of symmetric operators is suggested. We obtain the formula for the transmission coefficient and investigate its dependence on the magnetic field.

  11. Peltier Coefficient and Photon-Assisted Tunnelling in Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. Aly, Arafa

    2008-12-01

    We present the Peltier coefficient and thermal transport in quantum point contact (QPC), under the influence of external fields and different temperatures. Also we obtain the oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in external fields. Numerical calculations of the Peltier coefficient are performed at different applied voltages, amplitudes and temperatures. The obtained results are consistent with the experimental data in the literature.

  12. Significant negative differential resistance predicted in scanning tunneling spectroscopy for a C60 monolayer on a metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X. Q.; Pai, Woei Wu; Xiao, X. D.; Cerdá, J. I.; Zhang, R. Q.; Minot, C.; van Hove, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    We theoretically predict the occurrence of negative differential resistance (NDR) in scanning tunneling spectroscopy for a pure C60 monolayer deposited on a metal surface using metal tips, namely, on a Cu(111) surface and using various W tips. It is proposed that the likely reason why NDR has not been observed under such conditions is that NDR can be reduced if an oxidized or Cu-terminated tip is used. A detailed decomposition of the total tunneling current into its contributions from individual molecular orbitals reveals that only some of the orbitals on the tip and on the C60 can be “matched up” to give a contribution to the current and that the NDR is a consequence of the mismatch between these specific orbitals within particular ranges of bias voltage. Moreover, the NDR characteristics, including the peak positions and the peak-to-valley ratios, are found to depend on the tip material, tip geometry, and tip-to-molecule position.

  13. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  14. Practical Quantum Private Database Queries Based on Passive Round-Robin Differential Phase-shift Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Yang, Yu-Guang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-08-01

    A novel quantum private database query protocol is proposed, based on passive round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution. Compared with previous quantum private database query protocols, the present protocol has the following unique merits: (i) the user Alice can obtain one and only one key bit so that both the efficiency and security of the present protocol can be ensured, and (ii) it does not require to change the length difference of the two arms in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and just chooses two pulses passively to interfere with so that it is much simpler and more practical. The present protocol is also proved to be secure in terms of the user security and database security.

  15. Practical Quantum Private Database Queries Based on Passive Round-Robin Differential Phase-shift Quantum Key Distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Yang, Yu-Guang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-08-19

    A novel quantum private database query protocol is proposed, based on passive round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution. Compared with previous quantum private database query protocols, the present protocol has the following unique merits: (i) the user Alice can obtain one and only one key bit so that both the efficiency and security of the present protocol can be ensured, and (ii) it does not require to change the length difference of the two arms in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and just chooses two pulses passively to interfere with so that it is much simpler and more practical. The present protocol is also proved to be secure in terms of the user security and database security.

  16. Practical Quantum Private Database Queries Based on Passive Round-Robin Differential Phase-shift Quantum Key Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Yang, Yu-Guang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    A novel quantum private database query protocol is proposed, based on passive round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution. Compared with previous quantum private database query protocols, the present protocol has the following unique merits: (i) the user Alice can obtain one and only one key bit so that both the efficiency and security of the present protocol can be ensured, and (ii) it does not require to change the length difference of the two arms in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and just chooses two pulses passively to interfere with so that it is much simpler and more practical. The present protocol is also proved to be secure in terms of the user security and database security. PMID:27539654

  17. Spin Polarization of Carriers in InGaAs Self-Assembled Quantum Rings Inserted in GaAs-AlGaAs Resonant Tunneling Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsi Gordo, V.; Gobato, Y. Galvão; Galeti, H. V. A.; Brasil, M. J. S. P.; Taylor, D.; Henini, M.

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated transport and polarization resolved photoluminescence (PL) of n-type GaAs-AlGaAs resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) containing a layer of InGaAs self-assembled quantum rings (QRs) in the quantum well (QW). All measurements were performed under applied voltage, magnetic fields up to 15 T and using linearly polarized laser excitation. It was observed that the QRs' PL intensity and the circular polarization degree (CPD) oscillate periodically with applied voltage under high magnetic fields at 2 K. Our results demonstrate an effective voltage control of the optical and spin properties of InGaAs QRs inserted into RTDs.

  18. Effect of transverse electric field and temperature on light absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel-coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya. Balagula, R. M.; Kulagina, M. M.; Vasil’iev, A. P.

    2015-11-15

    The photoluminescence and intersubband absorption spectra are studied in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel- coupled quantum well structures. The peak positions in the photoluminescence and absorption spectra are consistent with the theoretically calculated energies of optical carrier transitions. The effect of a transverse electric field and temperature on intersubband light absorption is studied. It is caused by electron redistribution between the size-quantization levels and a variation in the energy spectrum of quantum wells. The variation in the refractive index in the energy region of observed intersubband transitions is estimated using Kramers–Kronig relations.

  19. Negative differential gain in quantum dot systems: Interplay of structural properties and many-body effects

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, E. Jahnke, F.; Lorke, M.; Frauenheim, T.

    2014-06-16

    The saturation behaviour of optical gain with increasing excitation density is an important factor for laser device performance. For active materials based on self-organized InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, we study the interplay between structural properties of the quantum dots and many-body effects of excited carriers in the optical properties via a combination of tight-binding and quantum-kinetic calculations. We identify regimes where either phase-space filling or excitation-induced dephasing dominates the saturation behavior of the optical gain. The latter can lead to the emergence of a negative differential material gain.

  20. Algorithmic differentiation and the calculation of forces by quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Sorella, Sandro; Capriotti, Luca

    2010-12-21

    We describe an efficient algorithm to compute forces in quantum Monte Carlo using adjoint algorithmic differentiation. This allows us to apply the space warp coordinate transformation in differential form, and compute all the 3M force components of a system with M atoms with a computational effort comparable with the one to obtain the total energy. Few examples illustrating the method for an electronic system containing several water molecules are presented. With the present technique, the calculation of finite-temperature thermodynamic properties of materials with quantum Monte Carlo will be feasible in the near future.

  1. Deciphering the origin of giant magnetic anisotropy and fast quantum tunnelling in Rhenium(IV) single-molecule magnets

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule magnets represent a promising route to achieve potential applications such as high-density information storage and spintronics devices. Among others, 4d/5d elements such as Re(IV) ion are found to exhibit very large magnetic anisotropy, and inclusion of this ion-aggregated clusters yields several attractive molecular magnets. Here, using ab intio calculations, we unravel the source of giant magnetic anisotropy associated with the Re(IV) ions by studying a series of mononuclear Re(IV) six coordinate complexes. The low-lying doublet states are found to be responsible for large magnetic anisotropy and the sign of the axial zero-field splitting parameter (D) can be categorically predicted based on the position of the ligand coordination. Large transverse anisotropy along with large hyperfine interactions opens up multiple relaxation channels leading to a fast quantum tunnelling of the magnetization (QTM) process. Enhancing the Re-ligand covalency is found to significantly quench the QTM process. PMID:26883278

  2. The Photovoltaic Effect of CdS Quantum Dots Synthesized in Inverse Micelles and R-Phycoerythrin Tunnel Cavities.

    PubMed

    Bekasova, Olga D; Revina, Alexandra A; Kornienko, Ekaterina S; Kurganov, Boris I

    2015-06-01

    CdS quantum dots (CdS QDs) 4.3 nm in diameter synthesized in an AOT/isooctane/water microemulsion and in R-phycoerythrin tunnel cavities (3.5 × 6.0 nm) were analyzed for photoelectrochemical properties. The CdS QDs preparations were applied onto a platinum electrode to obtain solid films. Experiments were performed in a two-section vessel, with one section filled with ethanol and the other, with 3 M KCl. The sections were connected through an agar stopper. It was found that illumination of the films resulted in a change of the electrode potential. The magnitude of this change and the kinetics of the appearance and disappearance of the photopotential, i.e., the difference between the electrode potential on the light and in dark, depended on the nature of the QD shell. The photovoltaic effect of CdS QDs in R-phycoerythrin, compared to that of CdS QDs in AOT/isooctane micelles, is three to four times greater due to the photosensitizing action of R-phycoerythrin. The photosensitized effect was markedly higher than the photoelectric sensitivity of R-phycoerythrin and had the opposite polarity. Changes in the potential upon turning the light on and off could be observed repeatedly.

  3. Photon-assisted resonant tunneling through variably spaced superlattice energy filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsson, A.; Borenstain, S. I.; Jonsson, B.; Andersson, I.; Westin, J.

    1991-01-01

    The observation of photon-assisted resonant tunneling in a multiple quantum well structure composed of doped quantum wells separated by variably space superlattice energy filters is reported. Electrons confined in the quantum wells are excited to the second quantized state by intersubband absorption of incident infrared radiation and are subsequently emitted through the filters under appropriate bias conditions. This is manifested by a distinct peak, with an associated negative differential photoconductance, in the photocurrent versus bias voltage characteristic at low temperatures.

  4. Quantum decay of the supercurrent and intrinsic capacitance of Josephson junctions beyond the tunnel limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonenko, Daniil S.; Skvortsov, Mikhail A.

    2015-12-01

    A nondissipative supercurrent state of a Josephson junction is metastable with respect to the formation of a finite-resistance state. This transition is driven by fluctuations, thermal at high temperatures and quantum at low temperatures. We evaluate the lifetime of such a state due to quantum fluctuations in the limit when the supercurrent is approaching the critical current. The decay probability is determined by the instanton action for the superconducting phase difference across the junction. At low temperatures, the dynamics of the phase is massive and is determined by the effective capacitance, which is a sum of the geometric and intrinsic capacitance of the junction. We model the central part of the Josephson junction either by an arbitrary short mesoscopic conductor described by the set of its transmission coefficients, or by a diffusive wire of an arbitrary length. The intrinsic capacitance can generally be estimated as C*˜G /Eg , where G is the normal-state conductance of the junction and Eg is the proximity minigap in its normal part. The obtained capacitance is sufficiently large to qualitatively explain the hysteretic behavior of the current-voltage characteristic even in the absence of overheating.

  5. Differential identity of Filopodia and Tunneling Nanotubes revealed by the opposite functions of actin regulatory complexes

    PubMed Central

    Delage, Elise; Cervantes, Diégo Cordero; Pénard, Esthel; Schmitt, Christine; Syan, Sylvie; Disanza, Andrea; Scita, Giorgio; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling Nanotubes (TNTs) are actin enriched filopodia-like protrusions that play a pivotal role in long-range intercellular communication. Different pathogens use TNT-like structures as “freeways” to propagate across cells. TNTs are also implicated in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, making them promising therapeutic targets. Understanding the mechanism of their formation, and their relation with filopodia is of fundamental importance to uncover their physiological function, particularly since filopodia, differently from TNTs, are not able to mediate transfer of cargo between distant cells. Here we studied different regulatory complexes of actin, which play a role in the formation of both these structures. We demonstrate that the filopodia-promoting CDC42/IRSp53/VASP network negatively regulates TNT formation and impairs TNT-mediated intercellular vesicle transfer. Conversely, elevation of Eps8, an actin regulatory protein that inhibits the extension of filopodia in neurons, increases TNT formation. Notably, Eps8-mediated TNT induction requires Eps8 bundling but not its capping activity. Thus, despite their structural similarities, filopodia and TNTs form through distinct molecular mechanisms. Our results further suggest that a switch in the molecular composition in common actin regulatory complexes is critical in driving the formation of either type of membrane protrusion. PMID:28008977

  6. Normal metal tunnel junction-based superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, Sophie Meissner, Martin; Blanc, Christophe; Ronzani, Alberto; Giazotto, Francesco

    2015-09-14

    We report the fabrication and characterization of an alternative design for a superconducting quantum interference proximity transistor (SQUIPT) based on a normal metal (N) probe. The absence of direct Josephson coupling between the proximized metal nanowire and the N probe allows us to observe the full modulation of the wire density of states around zero voltage and current via the application of an external magnetic field. This results into a drastic suppression of power dissipation which can be as low as a few ∼10{sup −17} W. In this context, the interferometer allows an improvement of up to four orders of magnitude with respect to earlier SQUIPT designs and makes it ideal for extra-low power cryogenic applications. In addition, the N-SQUIPT has been recently predicted to be the enabling candidate for the implementation of coherent caloritronic devices based on proximity effect.

  7. Phonon assisted resonant tunneling and its phonons control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmartsev, F. V.; Krevchik, V. D.; Semenov, M. B.; Filatov, D. O.; Shorokhov, A. V.; Bukharaev, A. A.; Dakhnovsky, Y.; Nikolaev, A. V.; Pyataev, N. A.; Zaytsev, R. V.; Krevchik, P. V.; Egorov, I. A.; Yamamoto, K.; Aringazin, A. K.

    2016-09-01

    We observe a series of sharp resonant features in the tunneling differential conductance of InAs quantum dots. We found that dissipative quantum tunneling has a strong influence on the operation of nanodevices. Because of such tunneling the current-voltage characteristics of tunnel contact created between atomic force microscope tip and a surface of InAs/GaAs quantum dots display many interesting peaks. We found that the number, position, and heights of these peaks are associated with the phonon modes involved. To describe the found effect we use a quasi-classical approximation. There the tunneling current is related to a creation of a dilute instanton-anti-instanton gas. Our experimental data are well described with exactly solvable model where one charged particle is weakly interacting with two promoting phonon modes associated with external medium. We conclude that the characteristics of the tunnel nanoelectronic devices can thus be controlled by a proper choice of phonons existing in materials, which are involved.

  8. Disorder-enhanced transmission of a quantum mechanical particle through a disordered tunneling barrier in one dimension: Exact calculation based on the invariant imbedding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kihong; Rotermund, F.; Lim, H.

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the problem of disorder-enhanced tunneling transmission of a quantum mechanical particle through a disordered tunneling barrier in one dimension. Using the invariant imbedding theory of wave propagation generalized to randomly stratified media, we calculate the disorder-averaged logarithmic transmittance in the thick barrier limit and the disorder-averaged transmittance in a numerically exact manner. We confirm that the tunneling decay length obtained from the mean logarithmic transmittance behaves nonmonotonically as a function of the disorder strength and takes its maximum value at some finite value of the disorder parameter. We find that this nonmonotonic dependence persists in the presence of weak inelastic scattering inside the tunneling barrier. When the system size is larger than some critical value, which is somewhat smaller than the wavelength of the incident matter wave, we observe that the disorder-averaged transmittance also shows a similar nonmonotonic dependence on the disorder strength. In other words, weak disorder enhances the transmission, while strong disorder suppresses it. When the system size is smaller than the critical value, the disorder-averaged transmittance decreases monotonically as the disorder strength increases.

  9. Systematic modulation of quantum (electron) tunneling behavior by atomic layer deposition on nanoparticulate SnO2 and TiO2 photoanodes.

    PubMed

    Prasittichai, Chaiya; Avila, Jason R; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-11-06

    Ultrathin films of TiO2, ZrO2, and Al2O3 were conformally created on SnO2 and TiO2 photoelectrodes via atomic layer deposition (ALD) to examine their influence upon electron transfer (ET) from the electrodes to a representative molecular receptor, I3(-). Films thicker than 2 Å engender an exponential decrease in ET time with increasing film thickness, consistent with tunneling theory. Increasing the height of the barrier, as measured by the energy difference between the transferring electron and the bottom of the conduction band of the barrier material, results in steeper exponential drops in tunneling rate or probability. The variations are quantitatively consistent with a simple model of quantum tunneling of electrons through square barriers (i.e., barriers of individually uniform energy height) that are characterized by individually uniform physical thickness. The findings demonstrate that ALD is a remarkably uniform and precise method for modifying electrode surfaces and imply that standard tunneling theory can be used as a quantitative guide to intentionally and predictively modulating rates of ET between molecules and electrodes.

  10. Tunneling above the crossover temperature.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Flores, Jesús R; Kästner, Johannes

    2014-01-09

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms plays a significant role in many chemical reactions. The crossover temperature between classical and quantum movement is a convenient preliminary indication of the importance of tunneling for a particular reaction. Here we show, using instanton theory, that quantum tunneling is possible significantly above this crossover temperature for specific forms of the potential energy surface. We demonstrate the effect on an analytic potential as well as a chemical system. While protons move asynchronously along a Grotthuss chain in the classical high-temperature range, the onset of tunneling results in a synchronization of their movement.

  11. Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution using heralded narrow-band single photons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Zhang, Shanchao; Zhao, Luwei; Chen, Peng; Fung, C-H F; Chau, H F; Loy, M M T; Du, Shengwang

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the first proof of principle differential phase shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) using narrow-band heralded single photons with amplitude-phase modulations. In the 3-pulse case, we obtain a quantum bit error rate (QBER) as low as 3.06% which meets the unconditional security requirement. As we increase the pulse number up to 15, the key creation efficiency approaches 93.4%, but with a cost of increasing the QBER. Our result suggests that narrow-band single photons maybe a promising source for the DPS-QKD protocol.

  12. Anomalies in quantum field theory and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    Anomalies in field theory appeared first in perturbative computations involving Feynman diagrams. It is only recently that differential geometric techniques have been used to obtain the form of gauge and gravitational anomalies in a direct and simple way. This is possible because of the topological nature of the anomaly. In the first chapter of this thesis the gauged Wess-Zumino action is constructed by differential geometry methods. After reviewing the relevant techniques, an expression for the action valid in any (even) number of space-time dimensions is obtained. This expression is compared with Witten's result in four dimensions. The link between topology and the anomaly is provided by the appropriate index theorem. The index density is a supersymmetric invariant polynomial from which the anomaly and other related objects can be obtained through the use of the ''descent equations.'' A new proof of the Atiyah-Singer index theorem for the Dirac operator is presented. This proof is based on the use of a WKB approximation to evaluate the supertrace of the kernel for a supersymmetric hamiltonian. The necessary WKB techniques are developed and mechanical systems with bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom are discussed.

  13. Anomalies in quantum field theory and differential geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Anomalies in field theory appeared first in perturbative computations involving Feynman diagrams. It is only recently that differential geometric techniques have been used to obtain the form of gauge and gravitational anomalies in a direct and simple way. This is possible because of the topological nature of the anomaly. In the first chapter of this thesis the gauged Wess-Zumino action is constructed by differential geometry methods. After reviewing the relevant techniques, an expression for the action valid in any (even) number of space-time dimensions is obtained. This expression is compared with Witten's result in four dimensions. The link between topology and the anomaly is provided by the appropriate index theorem. The index density is a supersymmetric invariant polynomial from which the anomaly and other related objects can be obtained through the use of the descent equations. A new proof of the Atiyah-Singer index theorem for he Dirac operator is presented in chapter 3. This proof is based on the use of a WKB approximation to evaluate the supertrace of the kernel for a supersymmetric hamiltonian. Chapter 2, which is dedicated to the development of the necessary WKB techniques, contains also a discussion of mechanical systems with bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom.

  14. On the construction of unitary quantum group differential calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatov, Pavel

    2016-10-01

    We develop a construction of the unitary type anti-involution for the quantized differential calculus over {{GL}}q(n) in the case | q| =1. To this end, we consider a joint associative algebra of quantized functions, differential forms and Lie derivatives over {{GL}}q(n)/{{SL}}q(n), which is bicovariant with respect to {{GL}}q(n)/{{SL}}q(n) coactions. We define a specific non-central spectral extension of this algebra by the spectral variables of three matrices of the algebra generators. In the spectrally expended algebra, we construct a three-parametric family of its inner automorphisms. These automorphisms are used for the construction of the unitary anti-involution for the (spectrally extended) calculus over {{GL}}q(n). This work has been funded by the Russian Academic Excellence Project ‘5-100’. The results of section 5 (propositions 5.2, 5.3 and theorem 5.5) have been obtained under support of the RSF grant No.16-11-10160.

  15. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Varade, Vaibhav Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R.; Anjaneyulu, P.

    2015-06-07

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (Φ{sub B} ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed.

  16. Quantum size effects on spin-transfer torque in a double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (semiconductor) spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqiq, Reza; Ghobadi, Nader

    2016-07-01

    We study the quantum size effects of an MgO-based double barrier magnetic tunnel junction with a nonmagnetic-metal (DBMTJ-NM) (semiconductor (DBMTJ-SC)) spacer on the charge current and the spin-transfer torque (STT) components using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The results show oscillatory behavior due to the resonant tunneling effect depending on the structure parameters. We find that the charge current and the STT components in the DBMTJ-SC demonstrate the magnitude enhancement in comparison with the DBMTJ-NM. The bias dependence of the STT components in a DBMTJ-NM shows different behavior in comparison with spin valves and conventional MTJs. Therefore, by choosing a specific SC spacer with suitable thickness in a DBMTJ the charge current and the STT components significantly increase so that one can design a device with high STT and faster magnetization switching.

  17. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR) Sensors in Differential Configuration.

    PubMed

    Lei, Huaming; Wang, Kan; Ji, Xiaojun; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-12-14

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs). The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line) while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction.

  18. Contactless Measurement of Magnetic Nanoparticles on Lateral Flow Strips Using Tunneling Magnetoresistance (TMR) Sensors in Differential Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Huaming; Wang, Kan; Ji, Xiaojun; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are commonly used in biomedical detection due to their capability to bind with some specific antibodies. Quantification of biological entities could be realized by measuring the magnetic response of MNPs after the binding process. This paper presents a contactless scanning prototype based on tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors for quantification of MNPs present in lateral flow strips (LFSs). The sensing unit of the prototype composes of two active TMR elements, which are parallel and closely arranged to form a differential sensing configuration in a perpendicular magnetic field. Geometrical parameters of the configuration are optimized according to theoretical analysis of the stray magnetic field produced by the test line (T-line) while strips being scanned. A brief description of our prototype and the sample preparation is presented. Experimental results show that the prototype exhibits the performance of high sensitivity and strong anti-interference ability. Meanwhile, the detection speed has been improved compared with existing similar techniques. The proposed prototype demonstrates a good sensitivity for detecting samples containing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) at a concentration of 25 mIU/mL. The T-line produced by the sample with low concentration is almost beyond the visual limit and produces a maximum stray magnetic field some 0.247 mOe at the sensor in the x direction. PMID:27983659

  19. Negative differential conductivity and quantum statistical effects in a three-site Bose-Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. K.; Corney, J. F.

    2016-09-01

    The use of an electron beam to remove ultracold atoms from selected sites in an optical lattice has opened up new opportunities to study transport in quantum systems [R. Labouvie et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 050601 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.050601]. Inspired by this experimental result, we examine the effects of number difference, dephasing, and initial quantum statistics on the filling of an initially depleted middle well in the three-well inline Bose-Hubbard model. We find that the well-known phenomenon of macroscopic self-trapping is the main contributor to oscillatory negative differential conductivity in our model, with phase diffusion being a secondary effect. However, we find that phase diffusion is required for the production of direct atomic current, with the coherent process showing damped oscillatory currents. We also find that our results are highly dependent on the initial quantum states of the atoms in the system.

  20. A New General Tortoise Coordinate Transformation and Quantum Tunneling Effect of the Non-Stationary Higher Dimensional Vaidya-de Sitter Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhong-wen; Li, Guo-ping; Zhang, Yan; Zu, Xiao-tao

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we combine the Hamilton-Jacobi equation with a new general tortoise coordinate transformation to study quantum tunneling of scalar particles and fermions from the non-stationary higher dimensional Vaidya-de Sitter black hole. The results show that Hamilton-Jacobi equation is a semi-classical foundation equation which can easily derived from the particles' dynamic equations, it can helps us understand the origin of Hawking radiation. Besides, based on the dimensional analysis, we believed that the new general tortoise coordinate transformation is more reasonable than old ones.

  1. Power spectra and auto correlation analysis of hyperfine-induced long period oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Harack, B.; Leary, A.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline power spectra and auto correlation analysis performed on temporal oscillations in the tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots. The current is monitored for ∼2325 s blocks as the magnetic field is stepped through a high bias feature displaying hysteresis and switching: hallmarks of the hyperfine interaction. Quasi-periodic oscillations of ∼2 pA amplitude and of ∼100 s period are observed in the current inside the hysteretic feature. Compared to the baseline current outside the hysteretic feature the power spectral density is enhanced by up to three orders of magnitude and the auto correlation displays clear long lived oscillations about zero.

  2. On topological properties of solution sets of non Lipschitzian quantum stochastic differential inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, S. A.; Ayoola, E. O.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we establish results on continuous mappings of the space of the matrix elements of an arbitrary nonempty set of pseudo solutions of non Lipschitz quantum Stochastic differential inclusion (QSDI) into the space of the matrix elements of its solutions. we show that under the non Lipschitz condition, the space of the matrix elements of solutions is still an absolute retract, contractible, locally and integrally connected in an arbitrary dimension. The results here generalize existing results in the literature.

  3. Low-energy spectra of differential conductivity and shot noise in tunnel junctions based on superconductors with suppression of the order parameter at the S-N interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Egorov, O.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of an anomalous structure in the differential conductivity of tunnel junctions based on high-temperature superconductors as a result of degradation of their surface layer is analyzed. This feature is in the form of two peaks near an energy gap separated by a region of suppressed conductivity. One peak is usually high and sharp, while the other is much more spread out. Differential conductivity and shot noise spectra in contacts of a normal injector with s- and d-type superconductors are calculated and compared. It is shown that combined measurements of these two characteristics can provide new information on the kinetics of transport processes in these structures.

  4. Room temperature observation of single electron tunneling effect in self-assembled metal quantum dots on a semiconductor substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kang-Ho; Ha, Jeong Sook; Yun, Wan Soo; Shin, Mincheol; Park, Kyoung-Wan; Lee, El-Hang

    1997-09-01

    We report on the observation of room-temperature single electron tunneling phenomena in a metal-insulator-metal-semiconductor double-junction structure. The nanosized Ag dots were self-assembled on a Sb-terminated Si(100) surface, and the Coulomb gap and staircases were observed in the local current-voltage (I-V) measurements using scanning tunneling microscopy. The I-V characteristics exhibiting the single electron tunneling behavior vary significantly with the variation of the measurement position within the same Ag droplet. These phenomena are well described by the tip-dot(Ag)-Si double-junction picture.

  5. Exploration of the Memory Effect on the Photon-Assisted Tunneling via a Single Quantum Dot:. a Generalized Floquet Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Ho, Tak-San; Chu, Shih-I.

    The generalized Floquet approach is developed to study memory effect on electron transport phenomena through a periodically driven single quantum dot in an electrode-multi-level dot-electrode nanoscale quantum device. The memory effect is treated using a multi-function Lorentzian spectral density (LSD) model that mimics the spectral density of each electrode in terms of multiple Lorentzian functions. For the symmetric single-function LSD model involving a single-level dot, the underlying single-particle propagator is shown to be related to a 2×2 effective time-dependent Hamiltonian that includes both the periodic external field and the electrode memory effect. By invoking the generalized Van Vleck (GVV) nearly degenerate perturbation theory, an analytical Tien-Gordon-like expression is derived for arbitrary order multi-photon resonance d.c. tunneling current. Numerically converged simulations and the GVV analytical results are in good agreement, revealing the origin of multi-photon coherent destruction of tunneling and accounting for the suppression of the staircase jumps of d.c. current due to the memory effect. Specially, a novel blockade phenomenon is observed, showing distinctive oscillations in the field-induced current in the large bias voltage limit.

  6. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  7. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  8. Round-robin differential quadrature phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chun; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Hong-Wei; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Mu-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a round-robin differential phase-shift (RRDPS) protocol was proposed [Nature 509, 475 (2014)], in which the amount of leakage is bounded without monitoring the signal disturbance. Introducing states of the phase-encoded Bennett–Brassard 1984 protocol (PE-BB84) to the RRDPS, this paper presents another quantum key distribution protocol called round-robin differential quadrature phase-shift (RRDQPS) quantum key distribution. Regarding a train of many pulses as a single packet, the sender modulates the phase of each pulse by one of {0, π/2, π, 3π/2}, then the receiver measures each packet with a Mach–Zehnder interferometer having a phase basis of 0 or π/2. The RRDQPS protocol can be implemented with essential similar hardware to the PE-BB84, so it has great compatibility with the current quantum system. Here we analyze the security of the RRDQPS protocol against the intercept-resend attack and the beam-splitting attack. Results show that the proposed protocol inherits the advantages arising from the simplicity of the RRDPS protocol and is more robust against these attacks than the original protocol. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61505261 and 11304397) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB338002)

  9. Experimental transmission of quantum digital signatures over 90 km of installed optical fiber using a differential phase shift quantum key distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Robert J.; Amiri, Ryan; Fujiwara, Mikio; Honjo, Toshimori; Shimizu, Kaoru; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Takeoka, Masahiro; Andersson, Erika; Buller, Gerald S.; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-11-01

    Quantum digital signatures apply quantum mechanics to the problem of guaranteeing message integrity and non-repudiation with information-theoretical security, which are complementary to the confidentiality realized by quantum key distribution. Previous experimental demonstrations have been limited to transmission distances of less than 5-km of optical fiber in a laboratory setting. Here we report the first demonstration of quantum digital signatures over installed optical fiber as well as the longest transmission link reported to date. This demonstration used a 90-km long differential phase shift quantum key distribution system to achieve approximately one signed bit per second - an increase in the signature generation rate of several orders of magnitude over previous optical fiber demonstrations.

  10. Trustworthiness of measurement devices in round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhu; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-02-01

    Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution (RRDPS QKD) has been proposed to raise the noise tolerability of the channel. However, in practice, the measurement device in RRDPS QKD may be imperfect. Here, we show that, with these imperfections, the security of RRDPS may be damaged by proposing two attacks for RRDPS systems with uncharacterized measurement devices. One is valid even for a system with unit total efficiency, while the other is valid even when a single-photon state is sent. To prevent these attacks, either security arguments need to be fundamentally revised or further practical assumptions on the measurement device should be put.

  11. Sb-mediated Ge quantum dots in Ti-oxide-Si diode: negative differential capacitance.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio; Tonkikh, Alexander; Werner, Peter; Jantsch, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    The negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect is observed on a titanium-oxide-silicon structure, formed on n-type silicon with embedded germanium quantum dots (QDs). The Ge QDs were grown by an Sb-mediated technique. The NDC effect was observed for temperatures below 200 K. We found that approximately six to eight electrons can be trapped in the valence band states of Ge QDs. We explain the NDC effect in terms of the emission of electrons from valence band states in the very narrow QD layer under reverse bias.

  12. Practical round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2017-03-01

    The security of quantum key distribution (QKD) relies on the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, with which legitimate users are able to estimate information leakage by monitoring the disturbance of the transmitted quantum signals. Normally, the disturbance is reflected as bit flip errors in the sifted key; thus, privacy amplification, which removes any leaked information from the key, generally depends on the bit error rate. Recently, a round-robin differential-phase-shift QKD protocol for which privacy amplification does not rely on the bit error rate (Sasaki et al 2014 Nature 509 475) was proposed. The amount of leaked information can be bounded by the sender during the state-preparation stage and hence, is independent of the behavior of the unreliable quantum channel. In our work, we apply the tagging technique to the protocol and present a tight bound on the key rate and employ a decoy-state method. The effects of background noise and misalignment are taken into account under practical conditions. Our simulation results show that the protocol can tolerate channel error rates close to 50% within a typical experiment setting. That is, there is a negligible restriction on the error rate in practice.

  13. Oscillations in a Forward-Facing Cavity Measured Using Laser-Differential Interferometry in a Hypersonic Quiet Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-11

    Feedback Stabilization System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 4 Results...a) induced vibration profile, b) induced vibration power spectrum . . . . 49 3.21 Schematic of feedback -stabilized LDI...Boeing/AFOSR Mach-6 Quiet Tunnel BFL Back Focal Length xvi CCA Constant Current Anemometer EFL Effective Focal Length FFC Forward Facing Cavity LDI Laser

  14. Quantum transport modeling of the symmetric Fe/FeO0.5/MgO magnetic tunnel junction: the effects of correlations in the buffer layer.

    PubMed

    Timoshevskii, Vladimir; Hu, Yibin; Marcotte, Étienne; Guo, Hong

    2014-01-08

    We report ab initio simulations of quantum transport properties of Fe/MgO/Fe trilayer structures with FeO0.5 buffer iron oxide layer, where on-site Coulomb interaction is explicitly taken into account by local density approximation + Hubbard U approach. We show that on-site Coulomb repulsion in the iron-oxygen layer can cause a dramatic drop of the tunnel magnetoresistance of the system. We present an understanding of microscopic details of this phenomenon, connecting it to localization of electronic states of particular symmetry, which takes place in the buffer Fe-O layer, when on-site Coulomb repulsion is introduced. We further study the possible influence of the symmetry reduction in the buffer Fe-O layer on the transport properties of the Fe/MgO/Fe interface.

  15. Characterizations and Electrical Modelling of Sensory Samples Formed from Synthesized Vanadium (V) Oxide and Copper Oxide Graphene Quantum Tunneling Composites (GQTC) Applied in Electrotribology.

    PubMed

    Habdank-Wojewódzki, Tadeusz; Habdank, Josef; Cwik, Przemyslaw; Zimowski, Slawomir

    2016-01-05

    CuO and V₂O₅ graphene quantum tunneling composites (GQTC) presented in this article were produced and their sensory properties were analyzed. The composites were synthesised using two stage high-power milling process, which resulted in materials that have good temeprature and pressure sensory properties. Described production process defines internal structure of materials such that when used as sensor in the desired range, it exhibits a strong percolation effect. The experiment, with controlled changing physical conditions during electrotribological measurement, enabled analyzing of the composites' conductivity as a function of the sensory properties: applied temperature, pressure, tangential force and wear. The sensory characteristic was successfully modelled by invertible generalized equations, and used to create sensor capable of estimating temperature or pressure in the real time. The developed materials have the potential to be applied in the areas where miniaturization is essential, due to the materials exhibiting good sensory properties in mini and micro scale.

  16. The formation and transformation of the spatial weak-light bright and dark solitons in a quantum dot molecule with the interdot tunneling coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Kuanhong; Wang, Denglong; She, Yanchao; Luo, Xiaoqin

    2013-11-01

    We study analytically the properties of the optical absorption and the spatial weak-light solitons in a quantum dot molecule system with the interdot tunneling coupling (ITC). It is shown that, for the linear case, there exists tunneling induced transparency (TIT) in the context of a weak ITC, while the TIT can be replaced by Autler-Townes splitting in the presence of a strong ITC. For the nonlinear case, it is probable to realize the spatial optical solitons even under weak light intensity. Interestingly, we find that there appears transformation behavior between the bright and dark solitons by properly turning both the ITC strength and the detuning of the probe field. Meanwhile, the transformation condition of the bright and dark solitons is obtained. Additionally it is also found that the amplitude of the solitons first descends and then rises with the increasing of ITC strength. Our results may have potential applications for nonlinear optical experiments and optical telecommunication engineering in solid systems.

  17. Effects of Graphene Quantum Dots on the Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Deshuai; Mou, Xiaoning; Li, Jianhua; Guo, Weibo; Wang, Shu; Yu, Xin; Ma, Baojin; Zhang, Shan; Tang, Wei; Sang, Yuanhua; Gil, Pilar Rivera; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The influence of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) on key characteristics of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) phenotype (i.e., self-renewal, differentiation potential, and pluripotency) is systematically investigated in this work. First, the viability and impact of GQDs on the self-renewal potential of MSCs is evaluated in order to determine a threshold for the exposing dose. Second, GQDs uptake by MSCs is confirmed due to the excellent fluorescent properties of the particles. They exhibit a homogenous cytoplasmatic distribution that increases with the time and concentration. Third, the impact of GQDs on the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs is deeply characterized. An enhanced activity of alkaline phosphatase promoted by GQDs indicates early activation of osteogenesis. This is also confirmed upon GQD-induced up-regulation of phenotypically related osteogenic genes (Runx2, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) and specific biomarkers expression (osteopontin and osteocalcin). GQDs also effectively enhance the formation of calcium-rich deposits characteristics of osteoblasts. Furthermore, genes microarray results indicate that the enhanced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by GQDs is in progress through a bone morphogenetic protein and transforming growth factor-β relative signaling pathways. Finally, intracytoplasmatic lipid detection shows that GQDs can also promote the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs, thus confirming the prevalence of their pluripotency potential.

  18. Visualizing Atomic-Scale Negative Differential Resistance in Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keun Su; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Walter, Andrew L.; Seyller, Thomas; Yeom, Han Woong; Rotenberg, Eli; Bostwick, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the atomic-scale tunneling characteristics of bilayer graphene on silicon carbide using the scanning tunneling microscopy. The high-resolution tunneling spectroscopy reveals an unexpected negative differential resistance (NDR) at the Dirac energy, which spatially varies within the single unit cell of bilayer graphene. The origin of NDR is explained by two near-gap van Hove singularities emerging in the electronic spectrum of bilayer graphene under a transverse electric field, which are strongly localized on two sublattices in different layers. Furthermore, defects near the tunneling contact are found to strongly impact on NDR through the electron interference. Our result provides an atomic-level understanding of quantum tunneling in bilayer graphene, and constitutes a useful step towards graphene-based tunneling devices.

  19. Ground-state cooling of a suspended nanowire through inelastic macroscopic quantum tunneling in a current-biased Josephson junction.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Gustav; Gorelik, Leonid Y

    2011-04-22

    We demonstrate that a suspended nanowire forming a weak link between two superconductors can be cooled to its motional ground state by a supercurrent flow. The predicted cooling mechanism has its origins in magnetic field induced inelastic tunneling of the macroscopic superconducting phase associated with the junction. Furthermore, we show that the voltage drop over the junction is proportional to the average population of the vibrational modes in the stationary regime, a phenomenon which can be used to probe the level of cooling.

  20. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert's Variational Perturbation Theory.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2008-09-09

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H(3) reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H(2), HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property

  1. A Systematic Approach for Computing Zero-Point Energy, Quantum Partition Function, and Tunneling Effect Based on Kleinert’s Variational Perturbation Theory

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Gao, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an automated integration-free path-integral (AIF-PI) method, based on Kleinert’s variational perturbation (KP) theory, to treat internuclear quantum-statistical effects in molecular systems. We have developed an analytical method to obtain the centroid potential as a function of the variational parameter in the KP theory, which avoids numerical difficulties in path-integral Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics simulations, especially at the limit of zero-temperature. Consequently, the variational calculations using the KP theory can be efficiently carried out beyond the first order, i.e., the Giachetti-Tognetti-Feynman-Kleinert variational approach, for realistic chemical applications. By making use of the approximation of independent instantaneous normal modes (INM), the AIF-PI method can readily be applied to many-body systems. Previously, we have shown that in the INM approximation, the AIF-PI method is accurate for computing the quantum partition function of a water molecule (3 degrees of freedom) and the quantum correction factor for the collinear H3 reaction rate (2 degrees of freedom). In this work, the accuracy and properties of the KP theory are further investigated by using the first three order perturbations on an asymmetric double-well potential, the bond vibrations of H2, HF, and HCl represented by the Morse potential, and a proton-transfer barrier modeled by the Eckart potential. The zero-point energy, quantum partition function, and tunneling factor for these systems have been determined and are found to be in excellent agreement with the exact quantum results. Using our new analytical results at the zero-temperature limit, we show that the minimum value of the computed centroid potential in the KP theory is in excellent agreement with the ground state energy (zero-point energy) and the position of the centroid potential minimum is the expectation value of particle position in wave mechanics. The fast convergent property of

  2. Tunnel-injection quantum dot deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with polarization-induced doping in III-nitride heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jai Islam, S. M.; Protasenko, Vladimir; Kumar Kandaswamy, Prem; Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep

    2014-01-13

    Efficient semiconductor optical emitters in the deep-ultraviolet spectral window are encountering some of the most deep rooted problems of semiconductor physics. In III-Nitride heterostructures, obtaining short-wavelength photon emission requires the use of wide bandgap high Al composition AlGaN active regions. High conductivity electron (n-) and hole (p-) injection layers of even higher bandgaps are necessary for electrical carrier injection. This approach requires the activation of very deep dopants in very wide bandgap semiconductors, which is a difficult task. In this work, an approach is proposed and experimentally demonstrated to counter the challenges. The active region of the heterostructure light emitting diode uses ultrasmall epitaxially grown GaN quantum dots. Remarkably, the optical emission energy from GaN is pushed from 365 nm (3.4 eV, the bulk bandgap) to below 240 nm (>5.2 eV) because of extreme quantum confinement in the dots. This is possible because of the peculiar bandstructure and band alignments in the GaN/AlN system. This active region design crucially enables two further innovations for efficient carrier injection: Tunnel injection of carriers and polarization-induced p-type doping. The combination of these three advances results in major boosts in electroluminescence in deep-ultraviolet light emitting diodes and lays the groundwork for electrically pumped short-wavelength lasers.

  3. Theory of two-dimensional macroscopic quantum tunneling in YBa2Cu3O7-δ Josephson junctions coupled to an LC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Bauch, Thilo; Kato, Takeo

    2009-11-01

    We investigate classical thermal activation (TA) and macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) for a YBa2Cu3O7-δ (YBCO) Josephson junction coupled to an LC circuit theoretically. Due to the coupling between the junction and the LC circuit, the macroscopic phase dynamics can be described as the escape process of a fictitious particle with an anisotropic mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. We analytically calculate the escape rate including both the TA and MQT regime by taking into account the peculiar dynamical nature of the system. In addtion to large suppression of the MQT rate at zero temperature, we study details of the temperature dependence of the escape rate across a crossover region. These results are in an excellent agreement with recent experimental data for the MQT and TA rate in a YBCO biepitaxial Josephson junction. Therefore the coupling to the LC circuit is essential in understanding the macroscopic quantum dynamics and the qubit operation based on the YBCO biepitaxial Josephson junctions.

  4. Influence of the technological parameters of growth on the characteristics of double tunnel-coupled InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Khazanova, S. V. Degtyarev, V. E.; Malekhonova, N. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Baidus, N. V.

    2015-01-15

    A comprehensive analysis of double tunnel-coupled InGaAs/GaAs quantum well heterostructures is carried out. The real composition profiles of the structures are obtained by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry. The resultant profiles are compared with the profile obtained by computer simulation. By solving the Schrödinger equation in combination with the Poisson equation, the energy states for quantum-confined heterostructures with initially specified and real composition profiles are calculated. The influence of a number of factors, such as the well width, barrier thickness, and the background doping level on the properties of the heterostructure is thoroughly analyzed. In this manner, the optical characteristics and their dependence on the growth technology and geometric parameters of the structures are studied. Such an approach makes it possible to refine the real geometric parameters of wells and barriers and to correct the parameters of the structure and growth technology in order to improve the optical characteristics.

  5. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  6. Experimental passive round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Cao, Zhu; Liu, Yang; Shen-Tu, Guo-Liang; Pelc, Jason S; Fejer, M M; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-05-08

    In quantum key distribution (QKD), the bit error rate is used to estimate the information leakage and hence determines the amount of privacy amplification-making the final key private by shortening the key. In general, there exists a threshold of the error rate for each scheme, above which no secure key can be generated. This threshold puts a restriction on the environment noises. For example, a widely used QKD protocol, the Bennett-Brassard protocol, cannot tolerate error rates beyond 25%. A new protocol, round-robin differential phase-shifted (RRDPS) QKD, essentially removes this restriction and can in principle tolerate more environment disturbance. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a passive RRDPS QKD scheme. In particular, our 500 MHz passive RRDPS QKD system is able to generate a secure key over 50 km with a bit error rate as high as 29%. This scheme should find its applications in noisy environment conditions.

  7. Practical round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Bao, Wan-Su; Zhou, Chun; Li, Hong-Wei; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Mu-Sheng

    2016-09-05

    Recently, a novel protocol named round-robin differential phase-shift (RRDPS) quantum key distribution [Nature 509, 475(2014)] has been proposed. It can estimate information leakage without monitoring bit error rate. In this paper, we study the performance of RRDPS using heralded single photon source (HSPS) without and with decoy-state method, then compare it with the performance of weak coherent pulses (WCPs). From numerical simulation, we can see that HSPS performs better especially for shorter packet and higher bit error rate. Moreover, we propose a general theory of decoy-state method for RRDPS protocol based on only three decoy states and one signal state. Taking WCPs as an example, the three-intensity decoy-state protocol can distribute secret keys over a distance of 128 km when the length of pulses packet is 32, which confirms great practical interest of our method.

  8. Experimental Passive Round-Robin Differential Phase-Shift Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Cao, Zhu; Liu, Yang; Shen-Tu, Guo-Liang; Pelc, Jason S.; Fejer, M. M.; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-05-01

    In quantum key distribution (QKD), the bit error rate is used to estimate the information leakage and hence determines the amount of privacy amplification—making the final key private by shortening the key. In general, there exists a threshold of the error rate for each scheme, above which no secure key can be generated. This threshold puts a restriction on the environment noises. For example, a widely used QKD protocol, the Bennett-Brassard protocol, cannot tolerate error rates beyond 25%. A new protocol, round-robin differential phase-shifted (RRDPS) QKD, essentially removes this restriction and can in principle tolerate more environment disturbance. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a passive RRDPS QKD scheme. In particular, our 500 MHz passive RRDPS QKD system is able to generate a secure key over 50 km with a bit error rate as high as 29%. This scheme should find its applications in noisy environment conditions.

  9. Practical round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Bao, Wan-Su; Zhou, Chun; Li, Hong-Wei; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Mu-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the signal disturbance from the transmission process, recently, a new type of protocol named round-robin differential-phase-shift(RRDPS) quantum key distribution[Nature 509, 475(2014)] is proposed. It can estimate how much information has leaked to eavesdropper without monitoring bit error rates. In this paper, we compare the performance of RRDPS using different sources without and with decoy-state method, such as weak coherent pulses(WCPs) and heralded single photon source(HSPS). For practical implementations, we propose finite decoy-state method for RRDPS, the performance of which is close to the infinite one. Taking WCPs as an example, the three-intensity decoystate protocol can distribute secret keys over a distance of 128 km when the length of pulses packet is 32, which confirms the great practical interest of our method.

  10. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: differential cross sections and product rotational alignment.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Gordon, S D S; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Stolte, S

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm(-1) for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  11. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: Differential cross sections and product rotational alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brouard, M. Chadwick, H.; Gordon, S. D. S.; Hornung, B.; Nichols, B.; Kłos, J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Stolte, S.

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm{sup −1} for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  12. Electrical measurement of the linewidth of a quantum well bound state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobos, Z. A.; Noonan, A.; Reed, M. A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate electron tunneling spectroscopy in the presence of a bound state within a double quantum barrier, single quantum well structure. We demonstrate a new technique to directly measure the intrinsic linewidth of the bound state within the quantum well from the current-voltage signature of the resonant tunneling phenomena and contrast our results with the standing approach in the literature. We then examine the signal behavior for the influence of device temperature and find support for electron-electron interactions within the well. The measured intrinsic bound-state width, ΓE , in the negative differential conductance regime is 1.11 ± 0.01 meV.

  13. High frequency properties of resonant tunneling diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, H. Y.; Sinkkonen, J.

    The small signal analysis for the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) is carried out by using a semiclassical transport theory. Multiple scattering effects are accounted for in an optical approximation by using a complex mean free path. An analytical expression for the conduction current is given. The results show that the negative differential conductance prevails up to the frequency f0 limited by the quantum well transit time. The imaginary part of the admittance can be presented by a series inductance as has been recently found experimentally. In addition, the equivalent circuit has a capacitor in parallel with the conductance-inductance branch. Above f0 the admittance shows an oscillatory behaviour. The oscillations are associated with the quantum well transit time resonances.

  14. Security of the differential-quadrature-phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Shun; Sasaki, Toshihiko; Koashi, Masato

    2016-08-01

    One of the simplest methods for implementing quantum key distribution over fiber-optic communication is the Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol with phase encoding (PE-BB84 protocol), in which the sender uses phase modulation over double pulses from a laser and the receiver uses a passive delayed interferometer. Using essentially the same setup and by regarding a train of many pulses as a single block, one can carry out the so-called differential-quadrature-phase-shift (DQPS) protocol, which is a variant of differential-phase-shift (DPS) protocols. Here we prove the security of the DQPS protocol based on an adaptation of proof techniques for the BB84 protocol, which inherits the advantages arising from the simplicity of the protocol, such as accommodating the use of threshold detectors and simple off-line calibration methods for the light source. We show that the secure key rate of the DQPS protocol in the proof is eight-thirds as high as the rate of the PE-BB84 protocol.

  15. Observing remnants by fermions' tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.Y.; Wu, H.W.; Yang, H. E-mail: iverwu@uestc.edu.cn

    2014-03-01

    The standard Hawking formula predicts the complete evaporation of black holes. In this paper, we introduce effects of quantum gravity into fermions' tunneling from Reissner-Nordstrom and Kerr black holes. The quantum gravity effects slow down the increase of Hawking temperatures. This property naturally leads to a residue mass in black hole evaporation. The corrected temperatures are affected by the quantum numbers of emitted fermions. Meanwhile, the temperature of the Kerr black hole is a function of θ due to the rotation.

  16. Application of Quantum-Dot Conjugates for Detection and Subspecies Differentiation of Vibrio cholerae by Optical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erohin, P. S.; Utkin, D. V.; Kouklev, V. E.; Ossina, N. A.; Miheeva, E. A.; Alenkina, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    The application of bioconjugates of specific antibodies and CdSe quantum dots to identify two serovariants of Vibrio cholerae using fluorescence microscopy and optical spectroscopy is considered. It is found that a mixture of different bioconjugates with different emission maxima can be used without affecting the specificity of the method. Different V. cholerae serovariants are colored differently in fl uorescence microscopy (bright green and bright yellow), thereby allowing subspecies differentiation. The absorption spectrum of the bacterial suspension changed with homologous antigens in the sample and did not change with heterologous antigens. It is shown that the quantum-dot bioconjugates can serve as an alternative to the traditional fluorescence and agglutination diagnostics.

  17. Mn Doping Effects on the Electronic Band Structure of PbS Quantum Dot Thin Films: A Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, Andrew J.; Rimal, Gaurab; Tang, Jinke; Chien, Teyu

    A thorough understanding of the phenomena associated with doping of transition metals in semiconductors is important for the development of semiconducting electronic technologies such as semiconducting quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSC). Manganese doping is of particular interest in a PbS QD as it is potentially capable of increasing overall QDSSC performance. Here we present scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies about the effects of Manganese doping on the energy band structures of PbS semiconducting QD thin films, grown using pulsed laser deposition. As a result of Manganese doping in the PbS QD thin films, a widening of the electronic band gap was observed, which is responsible for the observed increase in resistivity. Furthermore, a loss of long range periodicity observed by XRD, upon incorporation of Manganese, indicates that the Manganese dopants also induce a large amount of grain boundaries. This work was supported by the following: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, DEFG02-10ER46728 and the National Science Foundation Grant #0948027.

  18. Tandem Solar Cells from Solution-Processed CdTe and PbS Quantum Dots Using a ZnTe-ZnO Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Crisp, Ryan W; Pach, Gregory F; Kurley, J Matthew; France, Ryan M; Reese, Matthew O; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U; MacLeod, Bradley A; Talapin, Dmitri V; Beard, Matthew C; Luther, Joseph M

    2017-02-08

    We developed a monolithic CdTe-PbS tandem solar cell architecture in which both the CdTe and PbS absorber layers are solution-processed from nanocrystal inks. Due to their tunable nature, PbS quantum dots (QDs), with a controllable band gap between 0.4 and ∼1.6 eV, are a promising candidate for a bottom absorber layer in tandem photovoltaics. In the detailed balance limit, the ideal configuration of a CdTe (Eg = 1.5 eV)-PbS tandem structure assumes infinite thickness of the absorber layers and requires the PbS band gap to be 0.75 eV to theoretically achieve a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 45%. However, modeling shows that by allowing the thickness of the CdTe layer to vary, a tandem with efficiency over 40% is achievable using bottom cell band gaps ranging from 0.68 and 1.16 eV. In a first step toward developing this technology, we explore CdTe-PbS tandem devices by developing a ZnTe-ZnO tunnel junction, which appropriately combines the two subcells in series. We examine the basic characteristics of the solar cells as a function of layer thickness and bottom-cell band gap and demonstrate open-circuit voltages in excess of 1.1 V with matched short circuit current density of 10 mA/cm(2) in prototype devices.

  19. Electrical spin injection into InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells: A comparison between MgO tunnel barriers grown by sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy methods

    SciTech Connect

    Barate, P.; Zhang, T. T.; Vidal, M.; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.; Amand, T.; Liang, S.; Devaux, X.; Hehn, M.; Mangin, S.; Lu, Y.; Frougier, J.; Jaffrès, H.; George, J. M.; Zheng, Y.; Tao, B.; Han, X. F.

    2014-07-07

    An efficient electrical spin injection into an InGaAs/GaAs quantum well light emitting diode is demonstrated thanks to a CoFeB/MgO spin injector. The textured MgO tunnel barrier is fabricated by two different techniques: sputtering and molecular beam epitaxy. The maximal spin injection efficiency is comparable for both methods. Additionally, the effect of annealing is also investigated for the two types of samples. Both samples show the same trend: an increase of the electroluminescence circular polarization (P{sub c}) with the increase of annealing temperature, followed by a saturation of P{sub c} beyond 350 °C annealing. Since the increase of P{sub c} starts well below the crystallization temperature of the full CoFeB bulk layer, this trend could be mainly due to an improvement of chemical structure at the top CoFeB/MgO interface. This study reveals that the control of CoFeB/MgO interface is essential for an optimal spin injection into semiconductor.

  20. Hyperfine-induced hysteretic funnel structure in spin blockaded tunneling current of coupled vertical quantum dots at low magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Leary, A.; Wicha, A.; Harack, B.; Coish, W. A.; Hilke, M.; Yu, G.; Gupta, J. A.; Payette, C.; Austing, D. G.

    2013-12-04

    We outline the properties of the hyperfine-induced funnel structure observed in the two-electron spin blockade region of a weakly coupled vertical double quantum dot device. Hysteretic steps in the leakage current occur due to dynamic nuclear polarization when either the bias voltage or the magnetic field is swept up and down. When the bias voltage is swept, an intriguing ∼3 mT wide cusp near 0 T appears in the down-sweep position, and when the magnetic field is swept, the current at 0 T can be switched from 'low' to 'high' as the bias is increased.

  1. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations changed by indirect interdot tunneling via electrodes in parallel-coupled vertical double quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Hatano, T; Kubo, T; Tokura, Y; Amaha, S; Teraoka, S; Tarucha, S

    2011-02-18

    Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations are studied for a parallel-coupled vertical double quantum dot with a common source and drain electrode. We observe AB oscillations of current via a one-electron bonding state as the ground state and an antibonding state as the excited state. As the center gate voltage becomes more negative, the oscillation period is clearly halved for both the bonding and antibonding states, and the phase changes by half a period for the antibonding state. This result can be explained by a calculation that takes account of the indirect interdot coupling via the two electrodes.

  2. Resonant Zener tunnelling via zero-dimensional states in a narrow gap diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Paola, D. M.; Kesaria, M.; Makarovsky, O.; Velichko, A.; Eaves, L.; Mori, N.; Krier, A.; Patanè, A.

    2016-08-01

    Interband tunnelling of carriers through a forbidden energy gap, known as Zener tunnelling, is a phenomenon of fundamental and technological interest. Its experimental observation in the Esaki p-n semiconductor diode has led to the first demonstration and exploitation of quantum tunnelling in a condensed matter system. Here we demonstrate a new type of Zener tunnelling that involves the resonant transmission of electrons through zero-dimensional (0D) states. In our devices, a narrow quantum well of the mid-infrared (MIR) alloy In(AsN) is placed in the intrinsic (i) layer of a p-i-n diode. The incorporation of nitrogen in the quantum well creates 0D states that are localized on nanometer lengthscales. These levels provide intermediate states that act as “stepping stones” for electrons tunnelling across the diode and give rise to a negative differential resistance (NDR) that is weakly dependent on temperature. These electron transport properties have potential for the development of nanometre-scale non-linear components for electronics and MIR photonics.

  3. Resonant Zener tunnelling via zero-dimensional states in a narrow gap diode

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, D. M.; Kesaria, M.; Makarovsky, O.; Velichko, A.; Eaves, L.; Mori, N.; Krier, A.; Patanè, A.

    2016-01-01

    Interband tunnelling of carriers through a forbidden energy gap, known as Zener tunnelling, is a phenomenon of fundamental and technological interest. Its experimental observation in the Esaki p-n semiconductor diode has led to the first demonstration and exploitation of quantum tunnelling in a condensed matter system. Here we demonstrate a new type of Zener tunnelling that involves the resonant transmission of electrons through zero-dimensional (0D) states. In our devices, a narrow quantum well of the mid-infrared (MIR) alloy In(AsN) is placed in the intrinsic (i) layer of a p-i-n diode. The incorporation of nitrogen in the quantum well creates 0D states that are localized on nanometer lengthscales. These levels provide intermediate states that act as “stepping stones” for electrons tunnelling across the diode and give rise to a negative differential resistance (NDR) that is weakly dependent on temperature. These electron transport properties have potential for the development of nanometre-scale non-linear components for electronics and MIR photonics. PMID:27535896

  4. Tunneling induced absorption with competing Nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yang; Guo, Hongju; Ren, Tingqi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate tunneling induced nonlinear absorption phenomena in a coupled quantum-dot system. Resonant tunneling causes constructive interference in the nonlinear absorption that leads to an increase of more than an order of magnitude over the maximum absorption in a coupled quantum dot system without tunneling. Resonant tunneling also leads to a narrowing of the linewidth of the absorption peak to a sublinewidth level. Analytical expressions show that the enhanced nonlinear absorption is largely due to the fifth-order nonlinear term. Competition between third- and fifth-order nonlinearities leads to an anomalous dispersion of the total susceptibility. PMID:27958303

  5. Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with a passive decoy state method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Guo, Fen-Zhuo; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a new type of protocol named Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution (RRDPS QKD) was proposed, where the security can be guaranteed without monitoring conventional signal disturbances. The active decoy state method can be used in this protocol to overcome the imperfections of the source. But, it may lead to side channel attacks and break the security of QKD systems. In this paper, we apply the passive decoy state method to the RRDPS QKD protocol. Not only can the more environment disturbance be tolerated, but in addition it can overcome side channel attacks on the sources. Importantly, we derive a new key generation rate formula for our RRDPS protocol using passive decoy states and enhance the key generation rate. We also compare the performance of our RRDPS QKD to that using the active decoy state method and the original RRDPS QKD without any decoy states. From numerical simulations, the performance improvement of the RRDPS QKD by our new method can be seen.

  6. Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with a passive decoy state method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Guo, Fen-Zhuo; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2017-02-13

    Recently, a new type of protocol named Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution (RRDPS QKD) was proposed, where the security can be guaranteed without monitoring conventional signal disturbances. The active decoy state method can be used in this protocol to overcome the imperfections of the source. But, it may lead to side channel attacks and break the security of QKD systems. In this paper, we apply the passive decoy state method to the RRDPS QKD protocol. Not only can the more environment disturbance be tolerated, but in addition it can overcome side channel attacks on the sources. Importantly, we derive a new key generation rate formula for our RRDPS protocol using passive decoy states and enhance the key generation rate. We also compare the performance of our RRDPS QKD to that using the active decoy state method and the original RRDPS QKD without any decoy states. From numerical simulations, the performance improvement of the RRDPS QKD by our new method can be seen.

  7. Experimental round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Huai; Cao, Yuan; Dai, Hui; Lin, Jin; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yu; Guan, Jian-Yu; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Yin, Juan; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiongfeng; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-03-01

    In conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, security is guaranteed by estimating the amount of leaked information. Such estimation tends to overrate, leading to a fundamental threshold of the bit error rate, which becomes a bottleneck of practical QKD development. This bottleneck is broken through by the recent work of round-robin differential phase-shift (RRDPS) protocol, which eliminates the fundamental threshold of the bit error rate. The key challenge for the implementation of the RRDPS scheme lies in the realization of a variable-delay Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which requires active and random choice of many delays. By designing an optical system with multiple switches and employing an active phase stabilization technology, we successfully construct a variable-delay interferometer with 127 actively selectable delays. With this measurement, we experimentally demonstrate the RRDPS protocol and obtain a final key rate of 15.54 bps with a total loss of 18 dB and an error rate of 8.9%.

  8. Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with a passive decoy state method

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Guo, Fen-Zhuo; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a new type of protocol named Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution (RRDPS QKD) was proposed, where the security can be guaranteed without monitoring conventional signal disturbances. The active decoy state method can be used in this protocol to overcome the imperfections of the source. But, it may lead to side channel attacks and break the security of QKD systems. In this paper, we apply the passive decoy state method to the RRDPS QKD protocol. Not only can the more environment disturbance be tolerated, but in addition it can overcome side channel attacks on the sources. Importantly, we derive a new key generation rate formula for our RRDPS protocol using passive decoy states and enhance the key generation rate. We also compare the performance of our RRDPS QKD to that using the active decoy state method and the original RRDPS QKD without any decoy states. From numerical simulations, the performance improvement of the RRDPS QKD by our new method can be seen. PMID:28198808

  9. Room temperature negative differential resistance in terahertz quantum cascade laser structures

    DOE PAGES

    Albo, Asaf; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2016-08-24

    The mechanisms that limit the temperature performance of GaAs/Al0.15GaAs-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs) have been identified as thermally activated LO-phonon scattering and leakage of charge carriers into the continuum. Consequently, the combination of highly diagonal optical transition and higher barriers should significantly reduce the adverse effects of both mechanisms and lead to improved temperature performance. Here, we study the temperature performance of highly diagonal THz-QCLs with high barriers. Our analysis uncovers an additional leakage channel which is the thermal excitation of carriers into bounded higher energy levels, rather than the escape into the continuum. Based on this understanding, wemore » have designed a structure with an increased intersubband spacing between the upper lasing level and excited states in a highly diagonal THz-QCL, which exhibits negative differential resistance even at room temperature. Furthermore, this result is a strong evidence for the effective suppression of the aforementioned leakage channel.« less

  10. Room temperature negative differential resistance in terahertz quantum cascade laser structures

    SciTech Connect

    Albo, Asaf; Hu, Qing; Reno, John L.

    2016-08-24

    The mechanisms that limit the temperature performance of GaAs/Al0.15GaAs-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs) have been identified as thermally activated LO-phonon scattering and leakage of charge carriers into the continuum. Consequently, the combination of highly diagonal optical transition and higher barriers should significantly reduce the adverse effects of both mechanisms and lead to improved temperature performance. Here, we study the temperature performance of highly diagonal THz-QCLs with high barriers. Our analysis uncovers an additional leakage channel which is the thermal excitation of carriers into bounded higher energy levels, rather than the escape into the continuum. Based on this understanding, we have designed a structure with an increased intersubband spacing between the upper lasing level and excited states in a highly diagonal THz-QCL, which exhibits negative differential resistance even at room temperature. Furthermore, this result is a strong evidence for the effective suppression of the aforementioned leakage channel.

  11. Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with heralded pair-coherent sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Shengmei

    2017-04-01

    Round-robin differential-phase-shift (RRDPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme provides an effective way to overcome the signal disturbance from the transmission process. However, most RRDPS-QKD schemes use weak coherent pulses (WCPs) as the replacement of the perfect single-photon source. Considering the heralded pair-coherent source (HPCS) can efficiently remove the shortcomings of WCPs, we propose a RRDPS-QKD scheme with HPCS in this paper. Both infinite-intensity decoy-state method and practical three-intensity decoy-state method are adopted to discuss the tight bound of the key rate of the proposed scheme. The results show that HPCS is a better candidate for the replacement of the perfect single-photon source, and both the key rate and the transmission distance are greatly increased in comparison with those results with WCPs when the length of the pulse trains is small. Simultaneously, the performance of the proposed scheme using three-intensity decoy states is close to that result using infinite-intensity decoy states when the length of pulse trains is small.

  12. Electrically stimulated high-frequency replicas of a resonant current in GaAs/AlAs resonant-tunneling double-barrier THz nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksanyan, A. A.; Karuzskii, A. L.; Kazakov, I. P.; Mityagin, Yu. A.; Murzin, V. N.; Perestoronin, A. V.; Shmelev, S. S.; Tskhovrebov, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The periodical-in-voltage features of the negative differential conductance (NDC) region in the current-voltage characteristics of a high-quality GaAs/AlAs terahertz resonant-tunneling diode have been detected. The found oscillations are considered taking account of the LO-phonon excitation stimulated by tunneling of electrons through the quantum active region in the resonance nanostructure where an undoped quantum well layer is sandwiched between two undoped barrier layers. Rearrangements in the I-V characteristics of the resonant-tunneling diode as a consequence of the topological transformation of a measurement circuit from the circuit with the series resistance Rs to the circuit with the shunt Rp have been experimentally studied and analyzed. The revealed substantial changes in the current-voltage characteristics of the resonant-tunneling diode are discussed schematically using Kirchhoff's voltage law.

  13. Dirac particle tunneling from black rings

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Qingquan

    2008-08-15

    Recent research shows that Hawking radiation can be treated as a quantum tunneling process, and Hawking temperatures of Dirac particles across the horizon of a black hole can be correctly recovered via the fermion tunneling method. In this paper, motivated by the fermion tunneling method, we attempt to apply the analysis to derive Hawking radiation of Dirac particles via tunneling from black ring solutions of 5-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity theory. Finally, it is interesting to find that, as in the black hole case, fermion tunneling can also result in correct Hawking temperatures for the rotating neutral, dipole, and charged black rings.

  14. Single Electron Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-07-25

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  15. Ferroelectric modulation on resonant tunneling through perovskite double-barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Ruifang; Qiu, Xiangbiao; Li, Aidong; Wu, Di

    2014-04-07

    The negative differential resistance (NDR) due to resonance tunneling is achieved at room temperature in perovskite double-barrier heterostructures composed of a 10 unit-cell-thick SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well sandwiched in two 10 unit-cell-thick LaAlO{sub 3} barriers. The NDR occurs at 1.2 V and does not change with voltage cycling. When the paraelectric SrTiO{sub 3} quantum well is replaced by a ferroelectric BaTiO{sub 3}, the onset of the NDR can be modulated by polarization switching in the ultrathin BaTiO{sub 3}. A polarization pointing to the collector lowers the NDR voltage but a polarization pointing to the emitter increases it. The shift of the NDR voltage is ascribed to reversal of the extra electric field in the quantum well due to the polarization switching.

  16. Resonance tunneling spectroscopy of heteropoly compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Dalidchik, F. I. Budanov, B. A.; Kolchenko, N. N.; Balashov, E. M.; Kovalevskii, S. A.

    2012-12-15

    The electron tunneling spectra of phosphomolybdic and phosphomolybdovanadic acids have been measured using a scanning tunneling microscope. A new mechanism of negative differential resistance (NDR) formation in tunneling nanocontacts is established, which is general for all systems featuring the Wannier-Stark localization effect. A two-center inelastic resonance tunneling model is constructed, which allows the values of both electron and vibrational energy parameters to be determined from the measured spectra.

  17. Chemically differentiating ascorbate-mediated dissolution of quantum dots in cell culture media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Cheng-Kuan; Sun, Yuh-Chang

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the dynamic dissolution of quantum dots (QDs) in cell culture media, in this study we constructed an online automatic analytical system comprising a sequential in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) device and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometer. By means of selectively extracting QDs and cadmium ions (Cd2+) onto the interior surface of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube, this novel SPE device could be used to determine the degree of QD dissolution through a simple adjustment of sample acidity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to exploit PTFE tubing as a selective SPE adsorbent for the online chemical differentiation of QDs and Cd2+ ions with the goal of monitoring the phenomenon of QD dissolution in complicated biological matrices. We confirmed the analytical reliability of this system through comparison of the measured Cd-to-QD ratios to the expected values. When analyzing QDs and Cd2+ ions at picomolar levels, a temporal resolution of 8 min was required to load sufficient amounts of the analytes to meet the sensitivity requirements of the ICP mass spectrometer. To demonstrate the practicability of this developed method, we measured the dynamic variations in the Cd-to-QD705 ratio in the presence of ascorbate as a physiological stimulant to generate reactive oxygen species in cell culture media and trigger the dissolution of QDs; our results suggest that the ascorbate-induced QD dissolution was dependent on the time, treatment concentration, and nature of the biomolecule.To investigate the dynamic dissolution of quantum dots (QDs) in cell culture media, in this study we constructed an online automatic analytical system comprising a sequential in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) device and an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometer. By means of selectively extracting QDs and cadmium ions (Cd2+) onto the interior surface of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube, this novel SPE device could be

  18. Traceable quantum sensing and metrology relied up a quantum electrical triangle principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yan; Wang, Hengliang; Yang, Xinju; Wei, Jingsong

    2016-11-01

    Hybrid quantum state engineering in quantum communication and imaging1-2 needs traceable quantum sensing and metrology, which are especially critical to quantum internet3 and precision measurements4 that are important across all fields of science and technology-. We aim to set up a mode of traceable quantum sensing and metrology. We developed a method by specially transforming an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) into a conducting atomic force microscopy (C-AFM) with a feedback control loop, wherein quantum entanglement enabling higher precision was relied upon a set-point, a visible light laser beam-controlled an interferometer with a surface standard at z axis, diffractometers with lateral standards at x-y axes, four-quadrant photodiode detectors, a scanner and its image software, a phase-locked pre-amplifier, a cantilever with a kHz Pt/Au conducting tip, a double barrier tunneling junction model, a STM circuit by frequency modulation and a quantum electrical triangle principle involving single electron tunneling effect, quantum Hall effect and Josephson effect5. The average and standard deviation result of repeated measurements on a 1 nm height local micro-region of nanomedicine crystal hybrid quantum state engineering surface and its differential pA level current and voltage (dI/dV) in time domains by using C-AFM was converted into an international system of units: Siemens (S), an indicated value 0.86×10-12 S (n=6) of a relative standard uncertainty was superior over a relative standard uncertainty reference value 2.3×10-10 S of 2012 CODADA quantized conductance6. It is concluded that traceable quantum sensing and metrology is emerging.

  19. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  20. Tunneling path toward spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guo-Xing; Münzenberg, Markus; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2011-03-01

    The phenomenon of quantum tunneling, which was discovered almost a century ago, has led to many subsequent discoveries. One such discovery, spin polarized tunneling, was made 40 years ago by Robert Meservey and Paul Tedrow (Tedrow and Meservey 1971 Phys. Rev. Lett. 26 192), and it has resulted in many fundamental observations and opened up an entirely new field of study. Until the mid-1990s, this field developed at a steady, low rate, after which a huge increase in activity suddenly occurred as a result of the unraveling of successful spin tunneling between two ferromagnets. In the past 15 years, several thousands of papers related to spin polarized tunneling and transport have been published, making this topic one of the hottest areas in condensed matter physics from both fundamental science and applications viewpoints. Many review papers and book chapters have been written in the past decade on this subject. This paper is not exhaustive by any means; rather, the emphases are on recent progress, technological developments and informing the reader about the current direction in which this topic is moving.

  1. Robustness of the round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum-key-distribution protocol against source flaws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Akihiro; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new type of quantum key distribution, called the round-robin differential-phase-shift (RRDPS) protocol [T. Sasaki et al., Nature (London) 509, 475 (2014), 10.1038/nature13303], was proposed, where the security can be guaranteed without monitoring any statistics. In this Rapid Communication, we investigate source imperfections and side-channel attacks on the source of this protocol. We show that only three assumptions are needed for the security, and no detailed characterizations of the source or the side-channel attacks are needed. This high robustness is another striking advantage of the RRDPS protocol over other protocols.

  2. Influence of intramolecular f-f interactions on nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetizations in quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes containing two terbium or dysprosium magnetic centers.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takamitsu; Matsumura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Naoto

    2013-10-10

    Nuclear spin driven quantum tunneling of magnetization (QTM) phenomena, which arise from admixture of more than two orthogonal electronic spin wave functions through the couplings with those of the nuclear spins, are one of the important magnetic relaxation processes in lanthanide single molecule magnets (SMMs) in the low temperature range. Although recent experimental studies have indicated that the presence of the intramolecular f-f interactions affects their magnetic relaxation processes, little attention has been given to their mechanisms and, to the best of our knowledge, no rational theoretical models have been proposed for the interpretations of how the nuclear spin driven QTMs are influenced by the f-f interactions. Since quadruple-decker phthalocyanine complexes with two terbium or dysprosium ions as the magnetic centers show moderate f-f interactions, these are appropriate to investigate the influence of the f-f interactions on the dynamic magnetic relaxation processes. In the present paper, a theoretical model including ligand field (LF) potentials, hyperfine, nuclear quadrupole, magnetic dipolar, and the Zeeman interactions has been constructed to understand the roles of the nuclear spins for the QTM processes, and the resultant Zeeman plots are obtained. The ac susceptibility measurements of the magnetically diluted quadruple-decker monoterbium and diterbium phthalocyanine complexes, [Tb-Y] and [Tb-Tb], have indicated that the presence of the f-f interactions suppresses the QTMs in the absence of the external magnetic field (H(dc)) being consistent with previous reports. On the contrary, the faster magnetic relaxation processes are observed for [Tb-Tb] than [Tb-Y] at H(dc) = 1000 Oe, clearly demonstrating that the QTMs are rather enhanced in the presence of the external magnetic field. Based on the calculated Zeeman diagrams, these observations can be attributed to the enhanced nuclear spin driven QTMs for [Tb-Tb]. At the H(dc) higher than 2000 Oe, the

  3. Dual-Side Wafer Processing and Resonant Tunneling Transistor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, J.S.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.; Hietala, V.M.; Reno, J.L.; Baca, W.E.; Blount, M.A.

    1999-07-20

    We describe dual-side wafer processing and its application to resonant tunneling transistors in a planar configuration. The fabrication technique utilizes a novel flip-chip, wafer thinning process called epoxy-bond and stop-etch (EBASE) process, where the substrate material is removed by selective wet etching and stopped at an etch-stop layer. This EBASE method results in a semiconductor epitaxial layer that is typically less than a micron thick and has a mirror-finish, allowing backside gates to be placed in close proximity to frontside gates. Utilizing this technique, a resonant tunneling transistor--the double electron layer tunneling transistor (DELTT)--can be fabricated in a fully planar configuration, where the tunneling between two selectively-contacted 2DEGs in GaAs or InGaAs quantum wells is modulated by surface Schottky gate. Low temperature electrical characterization yields source-drain I-V curves with a gate-tunable negative differential resistance.

  4. Predicting pressure-dependent unimolecular rate constants using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling combined with system-specific quantum RRK theory: a definitive test for fluoroform dissociation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-06-22

    Understanding the falloff in rate constants of gas-phase unimolecular reaction rate constants as the pressure is lowered is a fundamental problem in chemical kinetics, with practical importance for combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and essentially all gas-phase reaction mechanisms. In the present work, we use our recently developed system-specific quantum RRK theory, calibrated by canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling, combined with the Lindemann-Hinshelwood mechanism, to model the dissociation reaction of fluoroform (CHF3), which provides a definitive test for falloff modeling. Our predicted pressure-dependent thermal rate constants are in excellent agreement with experimental values over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The present validation of our methodology, which is able to include variational transition state effects, multidimensional tunneling based on the directly calculated potential energy surface along the tunneling path, and torsional and other vibrational anharmonicity, together with state-of-the-art reaction-path-based direct dynamics calculations, is important because the method is less empirical than models routinely used for generating full mechanisms, while also being simpler in key respects than full master equation treatments and the full reduced falloff curve and modified strong collision methods of Troe.

  5. Electron tunneling in proteins program.

    PubMed

    Hagras, Muhammad A; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2016-06-05

    We developed a unique integrated software package (called Electron Tunneling in Proteins Program or ETP) which provides an environment with different capabilities such as tunneling current calculation, semi-empirical quantum mechanical calculation, and molecular modeling simulation for calculation and analysis of electron transfer reactions in proteins. ETP program is developed as a cross-platform client-server program in which all the different calculations are conducted at the server side while only the client terminal displays the resulting calculation outputs in the different supported representations. ETP program is integrated with a set of well-known computational software packages including Gaussian, BALLVIEW, Dowser, pKip, and APBS. In addition, ETP program supports various visualization methods for the tunneling calculation results that assist in a more comprehensive understanding of the tunneling process. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Resonant tunneling diode based on band gap engineered graphene antidot structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Penchalaiah; Ethiraj, Anita S.; Raina, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    The present work demonstrates the operation and performance of double barrier Graphene Antidot Resonant Tunnel Diode (DBGA-RTD). Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) frame work with tight-binding Hamiltonian and 2-D Poisson equations were solved self-consistently for device study. The interesting feature in this device is that it is an all graphene RTD with band gap engineered graphene antidot tunnel barriers. Another interesting new finding is that it shows negative differential resistance (NDR), which involves the resonant tunneling in the graphene quantum well through both the electron and hole bound states. The Graphene Antidot Lattice (GAL) barriers in this device efficiently improved the Peak to Valley Ratio to approximately 20 even at room temperature. A new fitting model is developed for the number of antidots and their corresponding effective barrier width, which will help in determining effective barrier width of any size of actual antidot geometry.

  7. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  8. Quantum theory of open systems based on stochastic differential equations of generalized Langevin (non-Wiener) type

    SciTech Connect

    Basharov, A. M.

    2012-09-15

    It is shown that the effective Hamiltonian representation, as it is formulated in author's papers, serves as a basis for distinguishing, in a broadband environment of an open quantum system, independent noise sources that determine, in terms of the stationary quantum Wiener and Poisson processes in the Markov approximation, the effective Hamiltonian and the equation for the evolution operator of the open system and its environment. General stochastic differential equations of generalized Langevin (non-Wiener) type for the evolution operator and the kinetic equation for the density matrix of an open system are obtained, which allow one to analyze the dynamics of a wide class of localized open systems in the Markov approximation. The main distinctive features of the dynamics of open quantum systems described in this way are the stabilization of excited states with respect to collective processes and an additional frequency shift of the spectrum of the open system. As an illustration of the general approach developed, the photon dynamics in a single-mode cavity without losses on the mirrors is considered, which contains identical intracavity atoms coupled to the external vacuum electromagnetic field. For some atomic densities, the photons of the cavity mode are 'locked' inside the cavity, thus exhibiting a new phenomenon of radiation trapping and non-Wiener dynamics.

  9. The impact of UVB exposure and differentiation state of primary keratinocytes on their interaction with quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Ravichandran, Supriya; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we utilised an in vitro model system to gain insight into the potential cellular interactions that quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles may experience while transiting the viable skin epidermis, and we consider the effects of UVB exposure. UVB skin exposure is known to induce a skin barrier defect that facilitates QD stratum corneum penetration. Primary human keratinocytes were cultured in low and high calcium to induce basal and differentiated phenotypes, respectively. Results suggest that differentiation state plays a role in keratinocyte response to UVB exposure and exposure to negatively charged CdSe/ZnS core/shell QD. QD cell uptake increased with QD dose but association with differentiated cells was significantly lower than the basal keratinocyte phenotype. Differentiated keratinocytes were also less sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of UVB exposure. We did not observe an effect of UVB preexposure on QD cytotoxicity level despite the fact that fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry data suggest that UVB may slightly increase QD uptake in the basal cell phenotype. The implications of these findings for assessing potential risk of human skin exposure are discussed. PMID:22998293

  10. Quantum phenomena in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, J.

    1987-08-01

    This paper contains remarks by the author on aspects of macroscopic quantum phenomena in superconductors. Some topics discussed are: Superconducting low-inductance undulatory galvanometer (SLUGS), charge imbalance, cylindrical dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUIDS), Geophysics, noise theory, magnetic resonance with SQUIDS, and macroscopic quantum tunneling. 23 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  11. Quantum dot SOA input power dynamic range improvement for differential-phase encoded signals.

    PubMed

    Vallaitis, T; Bonk, R; Guetlein, J; Hillerkuss, D; Li, J; Brenot, R; Lelarge, F; Duan, G H; Freude, W; Leuthold, J

    2010-03-15

    Experimentally we find a 10 dB input power dynamic range advantage for amplification of phase encoded signals with quantum dot SOA as compared to low-confinement bulk SOA. An analysis of amplitude and phase effects shows that this improvement can be attributed to the lower alpha-factor found in QD SOA.

  12. Tunneling Calculations for Gallium-Arsenide - ALUMINUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE Graded Band-Gap Sawtooth Superlattices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, Kathrine Arlene

    1989-03-01

    Quantum mechanical tunneling calculations for sawtooth and step-barrier AlGaAs superlattices are performed by means of a transfer matrix method, within the framework of the effective mass approximation. The transmission coefficient and tunneling current are computed for several representative structures. The Stark shift of bound states of single quantum wells is also calculated in order to clarify the effects of the spatial extent of applied electric fields on tunneling calculations. Sawtooth and step-barrier superlattices are found to share some tunneling characteristics. Both structures can exhibit resonant tunneling, manifested by the correlation of peaks and regions of negative differential resistance in current-voltage curves with peaks in transmission resonance spectra. The shift of the resonances of step-barrier superlattices is a linear function of the field however, while in sawtooth superlattices the shift is not a simple function of the field. This is a consequence of the different ways in which the two structures deform under uniform electric fields: the sawtooth deforms into a staircase, at which field strength all barriers to tunneling are eradicated. The step-barrier superlattice always presents some barrier to tunneling no matter how high the electric field strength. Effective mass variations in semiconductor heterostructures should not be neglected in tunneling calculations. Conventional wave function boundary conditions at interfaces must be modified to conserve the probability current density when the mass is discontinuous. The range of effective mass in AlGaAs heterostructures is found to affect the outcome of tunneling calculations significantly. The applied electric field must be realistically modeled if the results of tunneling calculations are to apply to real superlattices. If the applied field is limited in extent to the area in and around a single quantum well, the Stark shift is linear in the field. If the field is assumed infinite in

  13. Enhanced tunneling through nonstationary barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Palomares-Baez, J. P.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. L.; Ivlev, B.

    2007-11-15

    Quantum tunneling through a nonstationary barrier is studied analytically and by a direct numerical solution of Schroedinger equation. Both methods are in agreement and say that the main features of the phenomenon can be described in terms of classical trajectories which are solutions of Newton's equation in complex time. The probability of tunneling is governed by analytical properties of a time-dependent perturbation and the classical trajectory in the plane of complex time. Some preliminary numerical calculations of Euclidean resonance (an easy penetration through a classical nonstationary barrier due to an underbarrier interference) are presented.

  14. Differential elevon effectiveness lateral control optimization and elevon hinge moment investigation on a 0.015 scale space shuttle orbiter model 49-0 (140A/B/C modified) in the AECD VKF wind tunnel A (0A115)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Von Karman Facility Tunnel A on a scale model of the space shuttle orbiter. The objectives of this test were: (1) determine supersonic differential elevon/aileron lateral control optimization, (2) determine supersonic elevon hinge moments, (3) determine the supersonic effects of the new baseline 6-inch elevon/elevon and elevon/fuselage gaps, and 4) determine the supersonic effects of the new short (VL70-008410) OMS pods. Six-component aerodynamic force, moment, and elevon hinge moment data were recorded.

  15. Transient carrier transfer in tunnel injection structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talalaev, V. G.; Tomm, J. W.; Zakharov, N. D.; Werner, P.; Gösele, U.; Novikov, B. V.; Sokolov, A. S.; Samsonenko, Y. B.; Egorov, V. A.; Cirlin, G. E.

    2008-07-01

    InGaAs tunnel injection nanostructures consisting of a single quantum well as injector and a quantum dot layer as emitter are studied by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The quantum dot photoluminescence undergoes substantial changes when proceeding from direct quantum dot excitation to quantum well excitation, which causes an indirect population of the dot ground states. This results in a lowered effective carrier temperature within the dots. Results on the carrier transfer versus barrier thickness are discussed within the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. Deviations for barrier thicknesses <5nm are assigned to the formation of nanobridges that are actually detected by transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Theory of scanning tunneling spectroscopy: from Kondo impurities to heavy fermion materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morr, Dirk K.

    2017-01-01

    Kondo systems ranging from the single Kondo impurity to heavy fermion materials present us with a plethora of unconventional properties whose theoretical understanding is still one of the major open problems in condensed matter physics. Over the last few years, groundbreaking scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) experiments have provided unprecedented new insight into the electronic structure of Kondo systems. Interpreting the results of these experiments—the differential conductance and the quasi-particle interference spectrum—however, has been complicated by the fact that electrons tunneling from the STS tip into the system can tunnel either into the heavy magnetic moment or the light conduction band states. In this article, we briefly review the theoretical progress made in understanding how quantum interference between these two tunneling paths affects the experimental STS results. We show how this theoretical insight has allowed us to interpret the results of STS experiments on a series of heavy fermion materials providing detailed knowledge of their complex electronic structure. It is this knowledge that is a conditio sine qua non for developing a deeper understanding of the fascinating properties exhibited by heavy fermion materials, ranging from unconventional superconductivity to non-Fermi-liquid behavior in the vicinity of quantum critical points.

  17. Theory of scanning tunneling spectroscopy: from Kondo impurities to heavy fermion materials.

    PubMed

    Morr, Dirk K

    2017-01-01

    Kondo systems ranging from the single Kondo impurity to heavy fermion materials present us with a plethora of unconventional properties whose theoretical understanding is still one of the major open problems in condensed matter physics. Over the last few years, groundbreaking scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) experiments have provided unprecedented new insight into the electronic structure of Kondo systems. Interpreting the results of these experiments-the differential conductance and the quasi-particle interference spectrum-however, has been complicated by the fact that electrons tunneling from the STS tip into the system can tunnel either into the heavy magnetic moment or the light conduction band states. In this article, we briefly review the theoretical progress made in understanding how quantum interference between these two tunneling paths affects the experimental STS results. We show how this theoretical insight has allowed us to interpret the results of STS experiments on a series of heavy fermion materials providing detailed knowledge of their complex electronic structure. It is this knowledge that is a conditio sine qua non for developing a deeper understanding of the fascinating properties exhibited by heavy fermion materials, ranging from unconventional superconductivity to non-Fermi-liquid behavior in the vicinity of quantum critical points.

  18. Quantum transport with two interacting conduction channels.

    PubMed

    White, Alexander J; Migliore, Agostino; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2013-05-07

    The transport properties of a conduction junction model characterized by two mutually coupled channels that strongly differ in their couplings to the leads are investigated. Models of this type describe molecular redox junctions (where a level that is weakly coupled to the leads controls the molecular charge, while a strongly coupled one dominates the molecular conduction), and electron counting devices in which the current in a point contact is sensitive to the charging state of a nearby quantum dot. Here we consider the case where transport in the strongly coupled channel has to be described quantum mechanically (covering the full range between sequential tunneling and co-tunneling), while conduction through the weakly coupled channel is a sequential process that could by itself be described by a simple master equation. We compare the result of a full quantum calculation based on the pseudoparticle non-equilibrium Green function method to that obtained from an approximate mixed quantum-classical calculation, where correlations between the channels are taken into account through either the averaged rates or the averaged energy. We find, for the steady state current, that the approximation based on the averaged rates works well in most of the voltage regime, with marked deviations from the full quantum results only at the threshold for charging the weekly coupled level. These deviations are important for accurate description of the negative differential conduction behavior that often characterizes redox molecular junctions in the neighborhood of this threshold.

  19. 25 Gbit/s differential phase-shift-keying signal generation using directly modulated quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeghuzi, A. Schmeckebier, H.; Stubenrauch, M.; Bimberg, D.; Meuer, C.; Schubert, C.; Bunge, C.-A.

    2015-05-25

    Error-free generation of 25-Gbit/s differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) signals via direct modulation of InAs quantum-dot (QD) based semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) is experimentally demonstrated with an input power level of −5 dBm. The QD SOAs emit in the 1.3-μm wavelength range and provide a small-signal fiber-to-fiber gain of 8 dB. Furthermore, error-free DPSK modulation is achieved for constant optical input power levels from 3 dBm down to only −11 dBm for a bit rate of 20 Gbit/s. Direct phase modulation of QD SOAs via current changes is thus demonstrated to be much faster than direct gain modulation.

  20. Quantum Photonics BioLaser Transducer for Ultrasensitive Detection and Differential Analysis of Anthrax Endospore Simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Chen, Peter; Guild Copeland, R.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Barrett, Keith E.

    2003-03-01

    We are investigating novel optical transduction methods for high-speed sensing of cells, organelles, virus particles, and biomolecules using semiconductor light sources integrated with microfluidics into laser microcavities. These new tools have potential for ultrasensitive detection of submicron particles using quantum photonic effects. We have recorded lasing spectra for a variety of bioparticles ranging over 2 orders of magnitude in size from 30 microns to 300 nm. The laser light is spatially/temporally resolved, recorded by high-speed digital video imaging, and analyzed within seconds using efficient pattern recognition algorithms. These laser hyperspectra are sensitive to scattering from the distribution of protein molecules in organelles and cells. As the diameter decreases, we observe the number of quantized photon modes to decrease from the order of 100 to 1 as the particle approaches submicron dimensions. Surprisingly, the intensity of the emitted light remains high, despite nearly 10^6 decrease in particle volume. We attribute this enhanced light emission to quantum squeezing of light into a limited number of photon modes. We have used this technique to distinguish anthrax endospore simulants from other powders and to distinguish one spore type from another. This analysis could be very useful for rapid, front-end screen of suspected pathogenic bacteria.

  1. Influence of classical resonances on chaotic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Mouchet, Amaury; Eltschka, Christopher; Schlagheck, Peter

    2006-08-15

    Dynamical tunneling between symmetry-related stable modes is studied in the periodically driven pendulum. We present strong evidence that the tunneling process is governed by nonlinear resonances that manifest within the regular phase-space islands on which the stable modes are localized. By means of a quantitative numerical study of the corresponding Floquet problem, we identify the trace of such resonances not only in the level splittings between near-degenerate quantum states, where they lead to prominent plateau structures, but also in overlap matrix elements of the Floquet eigenstates, which reveal characteristic sequences of avoided crossings in the Floquet spectrum. The semiclassical theory of resonance-assisted tunneling yields good overall agreement with the quantum-tunneling rates, and indicates that partial barriers within the chaos might play a prominent role.

  2. Imaging of localized electronic states at a nonconducting surface by single-electron tunneling force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bussmann, Ezra B; Zheng, Ning; Williams, Clayton C

    2006-11-01

    Localized electronic states near a nonconducting SiO(2) surface are imaged on a approximately 1 nm scale by single-electron tunneling between the states and a scanning probe tip. Each tunneling electron is detected by electrostatic force. The images represent the number of tunneling electrons at each spatial location. The spatial resolution of the single electron tunneling force microscope is determined by quantum mechanical tunneling, providing new atomic-scale access to electronic states in dielectric surfaces and nonconducting nanostructures.

  3. Phosphorescent Differential Sensing of Physiological Phosphates with Lanthanide Ions-Modified Mn-Doped ZnCdS Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    He, Hengwei; Li, Chenghui; Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Peng; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-06-07

    Phosphates, both inorganic and organic, play fundamental roles in numerous biological and chemical processes. The biological functions of phosphates connect with each other, analysis of single phosphate-containing biomolecule therefore cannot reveal the exact biological significance of phosphates. Sensor array is therefore the best choice for differentiation analysis of physiological phosphates. Lanthanide ions possess high affinity toward physiological phosphates, while lanthanide ions can also efficiently quench the luminescence of quantum dots (QDs). Taking lanthanide ions as cartridges, here we proposed a sensor array for sensing of physiological phosphates based on lanthanide ions-modified Mn-doped ZnCdS phosphorescent QDs in the manner of indicator-displacement assay. A series of lanthanide ions were selected as quencher for phosphorescent QDs. Physiological phosphates could subsequently displace the quencher and recover the phosphorescence. Depending on their varied phosphorescence restoration, a sensor array was thus developed. The photophysics of phosphorescence quenching and restoration were studied in detail for better understanding the mechanism of the sensor array. The exact contribution of each sensor element to the sensor array was evaluated. Those sensor elements with little contribution to the differentiation analysis were removed for narrowing the size of the array. The proposed sensor array was successfully explored for probing nucleotide phosphates-involved enzymatic processes and their metabolites, simulated energy charge changes, and analysis of physiological phosphates in biological samples.

  4. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  5. Tunnelling without barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution in flat and curved space-time of quantum fields in theories with relative flat potential and its consequences are considered. It is shown that bubble nucleation, a quantum mechanical tunnelling process, may occur in flat space-time, having a bounce solution, even if V(phi) has no barrier. It is shown that bubble nucleation can also occur in curved space-time even though there is no bounce solution in the standard formalism for the bubble nucleation rate in curved space-time. Additionally, bubbles can nucleate during the slow rolling period on the potential in flat and curved space-time, in this case also there is no bounce solution. It is known in the new inflationary scenario that energy density perturbations caused by quantum fluctuations of the scalar field can satisfy the presently observed bounds on density perturbations. Bubble nucleation during the slow rolling period also gives rise to density perturbations. For a model potential density perturbations by bubbles are calculated at the horizon reentering. By applying the bound from the almost isotropic microwave black body radiation on these density perturbations, a constraint on the model potential is obtained. Finally, some further implications on the galaxy formation and applications in more realistic potential are discussed.

  6. Tunnel-to-tunnel correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Flow quality is discussed. Incremental comparisons of: (1) the angle of attack, (2) the axial force coefficient, and (3) the base cavity axial force coefficient against the normal force coefficient are presented. Relative blockage determination, relative buoyancy corrections, and boundary layer transition length are discussed. Blockage buoyancy caused by tunnel model wall dynamic interaction is discussed in terms of adaptive walls. The effect of 'transonic turbulence factor' is considered.

  7. Growth, Characterization, and Simulation of Novel Semiconductor Tunnel Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, David Hsingkuo

    This thesis presents investigations of novel semiconductor heterostructure devices based on quantum mechanical tunneling. Due to their small characteristic dimensions, these devices have extremely fast charge transport properties. Thus, it is expected that tunnel structure devices will be well -suited to high frequency and optoelectronic applications. In chapter 2, a theoretical model is developed to simulate tunneling currents in single barrier heterostructures. The model includes band bending effects and a two band treatment of electron attenuation coefficients in the barrier. It is proposed that certain material systems have the appropriate band alignments to realize a novel single barrier negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism. A thorough theoretical analysis of these single barrier NDR structures is presented. The first experimental demonstration of the single barrier NDR mechanism is reported in chapter 3. The HgTe/CdTe material system was selected for the demonstration. In this material system, low temperatures (<20 K) are needed to observe the NDR effect. High temperature (190-300 K) current-voltage curves from the single barrier Hg_{1-x}Cd_ {x}Te heterostructures have also been investigated, leading to a direct electrical measurement of the controversial HgTe/CdTe valence band offset. In chapter 4, results are presented from several studies of III-V heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. A measurement of the GaAs/AlAs valence band offset by x-ray photoemmision spectroscopy yields a value of 0.46 +/- 0.07 eV, independent of growth sequence. Optical measurements of electron tunneling times in GaAs/AlAs double barrier heterostructures are performed by growing structures with very thin cap layers. Tunneling times as short as ~12 ps are measured. Triple barrier GaAs/AlAs tunnel structures are found to display strong NDR, indicating that the tunneling process is coherent (as opposed to sequential) in nature. Finally, a technique for

  8. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones ... from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms ...

  9. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  10. Differential realization of pseudo-Hermiticity: A quantum mechanical analog of Einstein's field equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafazadeh, Ali

    2006-07-01

    For a given pseudo-Hermitian Hamiltonian of the standard form: H =p2/2m+v (x), we reduce the problem of finding the most general (pseudo-)metric operator η satisfying H†=ηHη-1 to the solution of a differential equation. If the configuration space is R, this is a Klein-Gordon equation with a nonconstant mass term. We obtain a general series solution of this equation that involves a pair of arbitrary functions. These characterize the arbitrariness in the choice of η. We apply our general results to calculate η for the PT-symmetric square well, an imaginary scattering potential, and a class of imaginary delta-function potentials. For the first two systems, our method reproduces the known results in a straightforward and extremely efficient manner. For all these systems we obtain the most general η up to second-order terms in the coupling constants.

  11. Simulations of Resonant Intraband and Interband Tunneling Spin Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David; Cartoixa-Soler, Xavier; McGill, T. C.; Smith, Darryl L.; Schulman, Joel N.

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews resonant intraband and interband tunneling spin filters It explores the possibility of building a zero-magnetic-field spin polarizer using nonmagnetic III-V semiconductor heterostructures. It reviews the extensive simulations of quantum transport in asymmetric InAs/GaSb/AlSb resonant tunneling structures with Rashba spin splitting and proposes a. new device concept: side-gated asymmetric Resonant Interband Tunneling Diode (a-RITD).

  12. Controlling tunnelling in methane loss from acetone ions by deuteration.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Andras; Baer, Tomas; Wells, Nancy K; Fakhoury, Daniel; Klecyngier, David; Kercher, James P

    2015-11-21

    Energetic acetone cations decay by methane or methyl radical loss. Although the methane-loss barrier to form the ketene cation is higher and the activation entropy is lower, it has a significant branching ratio at low energies thanks to quantum tunnelling. H-atom tunnelling can be selectively quenched and the methane-loss channel suppressed quantitatively by deuteration.

  13. Experimental studies on the NDR of Si 1- xGe x/Si triple barrier resonant tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, D. X.; Shen, G. D.; Willander, M.; Schäffler, F.; Luy, J. F.

    1992-05-01

    Negative differential resistance, caused by hole resonant tunneling (RT) in Si 1- xGe x/Si triple-barrier/double-quantum-well structures (TBSs), are studied in an attempt to explore new possibilities for device design optimization and new means to study RT mechanism. The current-voltage characteristics show mainly two resonances, and some small features are observed in the first order differential curve. The current-voltage curves also show strong asymmetry between two opposite bias polarities. The temperature dependences of the RT characteristics are investigated. Calculations on the tunneling transmission probability Tp of the TBSs are carried out to assist the analyses. The experimental results are compared with the measurements on the double barrier structures with similar device parameters.

  14. Correlation of Conductance Measurements from a Quantum Dot with Three Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, Ryan; Prada, Marta; Qin, Hua; Huettel, Andreas; Goswami, Srijit; Blick, Robert; Eberl, Karl

    2005-03-01

    We have measured the differential conductance of a quantum dot coupled by three tunable tunneling barriers to three terminals. The quantum dot is formed by laterally constricting a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in an AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructure with Schottky split-gates. The advantage to performing conductance measurements on a quantum dot with three leads is that we are able to directly measure information about the individual tunneling barriers and determine how the states interact with the leads. At a base temperature of 250mK, we have observed new phenomena not previously reported from three-terminal, mesoscopic experiments. These effects include conductance peak suppression in the nonlinear bias regime and the simultaneous coupling of two different states to two separate leads.

  15. Photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot single-photon detector based on resonant tunneling effect with near-infrared response

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Q. C.; An, Z. H. E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Xiong, D. Y.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhang, B.; Chen, P. P.; Li, T. X.; Lu, W. E-mail: luwei@mail.sitp.ac.cn

    2014-07-21

    We present the photocurrent spectrum study of a quantum dot (QD) single-photon detector using a reset technique which eliminates the QD's “memory effect.” By applying a proper reset frequency and keeping the detector in linear-response region, the detector's responses to different monochromatic light are resolved which reflects different detection efficiencies. We find the reset photocurrent tails up to 1.3 μm wavelength and near-infrared (∼1100 nm) single-photon sensitivity is demonstrated due to interband transition of electrons in QDs, indicating the device a promising candidate both in quantum information applications and highly sensitive imaging applications operating in relative high temperatures (>80 K).

  16. Spin transfer in a ferromagnet-quantum dot and tunnel-barrier-coupled Aharonov-Bohm ring system with Rashba spin-orbit interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zheng, Qing-Rong; Su, Gang

    2010-05-12

    The spin transfer effect in a ferromagnet-quantum dot (insulator)-ferromagnet Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ring system with Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interactions is investigated by means of the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green function method. It is found that both the magnitude and direction of the spin transfer torque (STT) acting on the right ferromagnet electrode can be effectively controlled by changing the magnetic flux threading the AB ring or the gate voltage on the quantum dot. The STT can be greatly augmented by matching a proper magnetic flux and an SO interaction at a cost of low electrical current. The STT, electrical current and spin current are uncovered to oscillate with the magnetic flux. The present results are expected to be useful for information storage in nanospintronics.

  17. Strain-enhanced tunneling magnetoresistance in MgO magnetic tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Loong, Li Ming; Qiu, Xuepeng; Neo, Zhi Peng; Deorani, Praveen; Wu, Yang; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Saeys, Mark; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2014-01-01

    While the effects of lattice mismatch-induced strain, mechanical strain, as well as the intrinsic strain of thin films are sometimes detrimental, resulting in mechanical deformation and failure, strain can also be usefully harnessed for applications such as data storage, transistors, solar cells, and strain gauges, among other things. Here, we demonstrate that quantum transport across magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be significantly affected by the introduction of controllable mechanical strain, achieving an enhancement factor of ~2 in the experimental tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio. We further correlate this strain-enhanced TMR with coherent spin tunneling through the MgO barrier. Moreover, the strain-enhanced TMR is analyzed using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) quantum transport calculations. Our results help elucidate the TMR mechanism at the atomic level and can provide a new way to enhance, as well as tune, the quantum properties in nanoscale materials and devices. PMID:25266219

  18. Simulation of tunneling in enzyme catalysis by combining a biased propagation approach and the quantum classical path method: application to lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Mavri, Janez; Liu, Hanbin; Olsson, Mats H M; Warshel, Arieh

    2008-05-15

    The ability of using wave function propagation approaches to simulate isotope effects in enzymes is explored, focusing on the large H/D kinetic isotope effect of soybean lipoxygenase-1 (SLO-1). The H/D kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is calculated as the ratio of the rate constants for hydrogen and deuterium transfer. The rate constants are calculated from the time course of the H and D nuclear wave functions. The propagations are done using one-dimensional proton potentials generated as sections from the full multidimensional surface of the reacting system in the protein. The sections are obtained during a classical empirical valence bond (EVB) molecular dynamics simulation of SLO-1. Since the propagations require an extremely long time for treating realistic activation barriers, it is essential to use an effective biasing approach. Thus, we develop here an approach that uses the classical quantum path (QCP) method to evaluate the quantum free energy change associated with the biasing potential. This approach provides an interesting alternative to full QCP simulations and to other current approaches for simulating isotope effects in proteins. In particular, this approach can be used to evaluate the quantum mechanical transmission factor or other dynamical effects, while still obtaining reliable quantized activation free energies due to the QCP correction.

  19. First resonant tunneling via a light-hole ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampin, J. F.; Mollot, F.

    1998-07-01

    We report the demonstration of resonant tunneling of light-holes through an AlAs/GaAs 0.7P 0.3 double-barrier heterostructure. The tensile strain in the quantum well reverses the order of the light- and heavy-hole levels, the first light-hole level becoming the ground state. The I( V) characteristics are measured at different temperatures and compared to those of a standard AlAs/GaAs unstrained structure. The peak current density of the first light-hole resonance and its peak-to-valley current ratio are enhanced. They reach 28 A/cm 2 and 3.4 : 1 at 15 K. A negative differential resistance is observed up to 250 K.

  20. Optimization Via Open System Quantum Annealing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-07

    mapping between the Ising spin glass partition function and circuit model decision problems, discovered in a previous ARO Quantum Algorithms funded...of tunneling in providing quantum annealing speedup over classical algorithms • Characterized the effects of classical hardness on the performance...15 Annual APS March meeting, Tutorial on Quantum Annealing 12/14 Quantum Sensing, Metrology, and Algorithms Workshop, Northrop Grumman, Los

  1. Tunneling and the Emergent Universe Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labraña, Pedro

    We present an alternative scheme for an Emergent Universe scenario, developed previously in Phys. Rev. D 86, 083524 (2012), where the universe is initially in a static state supported by a scalar field located in a false vacuum. The universe begins to evolve when, by quantum tunneling, the scalar field decays into a state of true vacuum.

  2. Capacitance Property of a Resonant Tunneling Diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Hanyu; Chua, Soo-Jin; Sinkkonen, Juha

    A simple capacitance formula based on a semiclassical electron transport theory is given. The results show that the charges stored in the quantum well of a resonant tunneling diode have a considerable effect on the capacitance in the resonant region. The calculated capacitance is consistent with the experimental results.

  3. Aorta-Right Atrial Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Cheemalapati Sai; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta–right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary–cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure. The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass. Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2). PMID:20844628

  4. Aorta-right atrial tunnel.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, Cheemalapati; Baruah, Dibya Kumar; Reddy, Gangireddy Venkateswara; Panigrahi, Nanda Kishore; Suman, Kalagara; Kumar, Palli Venkata Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Aorta-right atrial tunnel is a vascular channel that originates from one of the sinuses of Valsalva and terminates in either the superior vena cava or the right atrium. The tunnel is classified as anterior or posterior, depending upon its course in relation to the ascending aorta. An origin above the sinotubular ridge differentiates the tunnel from an aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, and the absence of myocardial branches differentiates it from a coronary-cameral fistula. Clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic precordial murmur to congestive heart failure. The embryologic background and pathogenesis of this lesion are attributable either to an aneurysmal dilation of the sinus nodal artery or to a congenital weakness of the aortic media. In either circumstance, progressive enlargement of the tunnel and ultimate rupture into the low-pressure right atrium could occur under the influence of the systemic pressure.The lesion is diagnosed by use of 2-dimensional echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Computed tomographic angiography is an additional noninvasive diagnostic tool. The possibility of complications necessitates early therapy, even in asymptomatic patients or those with a hemodynamically insignificant shunt. Available treatments are catheter-based intervention, external ligation under controlled hypotension, or surgical closure with the patient under cardiopulmonary bypass.Herein, we discuss the cases of 2 patients who had this unusual anomaly. We highlight the outcome on follow-up imaging (patient 1) and the identification and safe reimplantation of the coronary artery (patient 2).

  5. Resonant tunnelling assisted electrical switching in amorphous-carbon multilayer-superlattice structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Silva, S. R. P.

    2007-03-01

    Negative differential resistance (NDR) in an amorphous carbon (a-C) double barrier resonant tunnel diode (DB-RTD) with an estimated cut-off frequency well into the gigahertz regime is reported [1]. Presently we extend this work in carbon multi-layer superlattice structures by showing room temperature resonant tunnelling and establish a high value of the phase coherence length of ˜10 nm for low-dimensional amorphous materials. By applying a high bias, these structures are modified with reversible current switching of up to four orders of magnitude with a NDR signature and multiple peaks representative of resonant tunnelling in the ON state. In addition to the formation of filamentary channels by applying high bias, all these features are also explained using concepts based on tunnelling through the interface of the carbon layers, quantum-dot heterostructures and the presence of a confined two dimensional electron gas. This switching behavior and its tunability have been tested by applying a microwave signal up to 100 GHz which suggest the potential for novel high-speed memory devices. [1] S. Bhattacharyya, S.J. Henley, E. Mendoza, L.G-Rojas, J. Allam and S.R.P. Silva, Nature Mater. 5, 19 (2006).

  6. Tunneling and delocalization effects in hydrogen bonded systems: a study in position and momentum space.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Joseph A; Lin, Lin; Car, Roberto

    2009-05-28

    Novel experimental and computational studies have uncovered the proton momentum distribution in hydrogen bonded systems. In this work, we utilize recently developed open path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics methodology in order to study the momentum distribution in phases of high pressure ice. Some of these phases exhibit symmetric hydrogen bonds and quantum tunneling. We find that the symmetric hydrogen bonded phase possesses a narrowed momentum distribution as compared with a covalently bonded phase, in agreement with recent experimental findings. The signatures of tunneling that we observe are a narrowed distribution in the low-to-intermediate momentum region, with a tail that extends to match the result of the covalently bonded state. The transition to tunneling behavior shows similarity to features observed in recent experiments performed on confined water. We corroborate our ice simulations with a study of a particle in a model one-dimensional double well potential that mimics some of the effects observed in bulk simulations. The temperature dependence of the momentum distribution in the one-dimensional model allows for the differentiation between ground state and mixed state tunneling effects.

  7. Measurement of nitrogen dioxide in cigarette smoke using quantum cascade tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, Joanne H.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Parrish, Milton E.; Crawford, Danielle R.; Gee, Diane L.

    2006-04-01

    Although nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) has been previously reported to be present in cigarette smoke, the concentration estimates were derived from kinetic calculations or from measurements of aged smoke, where NO 2 was formed some time after the puff was taken. The objective of this work was to use tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) equipped with a quantum cascade (QC) laser to determine if NO 2 could be detected and quantified in a fresh puff of cigarette smoke. A temporal resolution of ˜0.16 s allowed measurements to be taken directly as the NO 2 was formed during the puff. Sidestream cigarette smoke was sampled to determine if NO 2 could be detected using TILDAS. Experiments were conducted using 2R4F Kentucky Reference cigarettes with and without a Cambridge filter pad. NO 2 was detected only in the lighting puff of whole mainstream smoke (without a Cambridge filter pad), with no NO 2 detected in the subsequent puffs. The measurement precision was ˜1.0 ppbV Hz -1/2, which allows a detection limit of ˜0.2 ng in a 35 ml puff volume. More NO 2 was generated in the lighting puff using a match or blue flame lighter (29 ± 21 ng) than when using an electric lighter (9 ± 3 ng). In the presence of a Cambridge filter pad, NO 2 was observed in the gas phase mainstream smoke for every puff (total of 200 ± 30 ng/cigarette) and is most likely due to smoke chemistry taking place on the Cambridge filter pad during the smoke collection process. Nitrogen dioxide was observed continuously in the sidestream smoke starting with the lighting puff.

  8. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, E.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green’s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  9. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  10. Band-to-band tunneling distance analysis in the heterogate electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, J. L.; Gámiz, F.

    2016-01-28

    In this work, we analyze the behavior of the band-to-band tunneling distance between electron and hole subbands resulting from field-induced quantum confinement in the heterogate electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor. We show that, analogously to the explicit formula for the tunneling distance that can be easily obtained in the semiclassical framework where the conduction and valence band edges are allowed states, an equivalent analytical expression can be derived in the presence of field-induced quantum confinement for describing the dependence of the tunneling distance on the body thickness and material properties of the channel. This explicit expression accounting for quantum confinement holds valid provided that the potential wells for electrons and holes at the top and bottom of the channel can be approximated by triangular profiles. Analytical predictions are compared to simulation results showing very accurate agreement.

  11. Tunneling control using classical non-linear oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, Susmita; Bhattacharyya, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    A quantum particle is placed in symmetric double well potential which is coupled to a classical non-linear oscillator via a coupling function. With different spatial symmetry of the coupling and under various controlling fashions, the tunneling of the quantum particle can be enhanced or suppressed, or totally destroyed.

  12. Fermion tunneling beyond semiclassical approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Majhi, Bibhas Ranjan

    2009-02-15

    Applying the Hamilton-Jacobi method beyond the semiclassical approximation prescribed in R. Banerjee and B. R. Majhi, J. High Energy Phys. 06 (2008) 095 for the scalar particle, Hawking radiation as tunneling of the Dirac particle through an event horizon is analyzed. We show that, as before, all quantum corrections in the single particle action are proportional to the usual semiclassical contribution. We also compute the modifications to the Hawking temperature and Bekenstein-Hawking entropy for the Schwarzschild black hole. Finally, the coefficient of the logarithmic correction to entropy is shown to be related with the trace anomaly.

  13. Planar Tunneling Spectroscopy of Graphene Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Joel I.-Jan; Bretheau, Landry; Pisoni, Riccardo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo

    2-D Van-der-Waals mesoscopic physics have seen a rapid development in the last 10 years, with new materials each year added to the toolbox. Stacking them like Lego enables the combination of their individual electronic properties. In particular, hexagonal boron nitride, which is an insulator, gives the possibility to perform planar (2-D to 2-D) tunneling spectroscopy within this type of heterostructures. Unlike standard transport measurements, tunneling spectroscopy enables to probe the electronic properties in the energy domain. Moreover, since planar tunneling probes a large area of the system, global quantum features such as quantum Hall effect, superconducting proximity effect or quantum confinement can be investigated. In this talk, we will present implementation of heterostructures consisting of graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, and graphite, fabricated for planar tunneling spectroscopy. In order to reveal the intrinsic properties of materials, the fabrication scheme aims at preserving the pristine nature of the 2-DEGS as well as minimizing the doping introduced by external probes. As a demonstration, measurements of these devices in normal states, high magnetic field environment, and induced superconducting state will be presented.

  14. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  15. Spin excitations and correlations in scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ternes, Markus

    2015-06-01

    In recent years inelastic spin-flip spectroscopy using a low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope has been a very successful tool for studying not only individual spins but also complex coupled systems. When these systems interact with the electrons of the supporting substrate correlated many-particle states can emerge, making them ideal prototypical quantum systems. The spin systems, which can be constructed by arranging individual atoms on appropriate surfaces or embedded in synthesized molecular structures, can reveal very rich spectral features. Up to now the spectral complexity has only been partly described. This manuscript shows that perturbation theory enables one to describe the tunneling transport, reproducing the differential conductance with surprisingly high accuracy. Well established scattering models, which include Kondo-like spin-spin and potential interactions, are expanded to enable calculation of arbitrary complex spin systems in reasonable time scale and the extraction of important physical properties. The emergence of correlations between spins and, in particular, between the localized spins and the supporting bath electrons are discussed and related to experimentally tunable parameters. These results might stimulate new experiments by providing experimentalists with an easily applicable modeling tool.

  16. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  17. Microwave and millimeter-wave resonant-tunneling devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollner, T. C. L. Gerhard; Le, Han Quang; Brown, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Resonant-tunneling devices in microelectronic component form, whose structure is the electron analog of a Fabry-Perot resonator, encompass oscillators, self-oscillating mixers, and harmonic multipliers. The negative differential resistance characteristic of these devices has been obtained at room temperature, and resonant-tunneling transistors capable of operation in the THz-frequency range appear to be feasible. Three-terminal resonant-tunneling device development is in its infancy, as is that of devices for digital applications.

  18. Carpal tunnel repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100078.htm Carpal tunnel repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... in the wrist and the wrist bones (carpal tunnel). Review Date 5/9/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  19. InGaN/GaN self-organized quantum dot lasers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Animesh; Frost, Thomas; Jahangir, Shafat; Stark, Ethan; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2013-09-01

    Blue-and green-emitting quantum dots have been characterized and ridge waveguide lasers incorporating such quantum dots into the active region have been realized. The laser heteroscturctures were grown by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Injected carrier lifetimes in the quantum dots have also been measured by temperature dependent and time resolved photoluminescence. A threshold current density of 930 A/cm2 in the blue-emitting lasers was measured under pulsed bias. A tunnel injection scheme to inject holes has been incorporated in the design of the green quantum dot lasers, and a threshold current density of 945 A/cm2 in the green-emitting lasers has been measured under pulsed bias. Slope efficiencies of 0.41 W/A and 0.25 W/A have been measured, corresponding to differential quantum efficiencies of 13.9% and 11.3%, in the blue and green lasers, respectively.

  20. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemiktarak, U; Ndukum, T; Schwab, K C; Ekinci, K L

    2007-11-01

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) relies on localized electron tunnelling between a sharp probe tip and a conducting sample to attain atomic-scale spatial resolution. In the 25-year period since its invention, the STM has helped uncover a wealth of phenomena in diverse physical systems--ranging from semiconductors to superconductors to atomic and molecular nanosystems. A severe limitation in scanning tunnelling microscopy is the low temporal resolution, originating from the diminished high-frequency response of the tunnel current readout circuitry. Here we overcome this limitation by measuring the reflection from a resonant inductor-capacitor circuit in which the tunnel junction is embedded, and demonstrate electronic bandwidths as high as 10 MHz. This approximately 100-fold bandwidth improvement on the state of the art translates into fast surface topography as well as delicate measurements in mesoscopic electronics and mechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM have allowed us to perform thermometry at the nanometre scale. Furthermore, we have detected high-frequency mechanical motion with a sensitivity approaching approximately 15 fm Hz(-1/2). This sensitivity is on par with the highest available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection techniques, and the radio-frequency STM is expected to be capable of quantum-limited position measurements.

  1. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  2. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  3. Anomalous Tunnel Magnetoresistance and Spin Transfer Torque in Magnetic Tunnel Junctions with Embedded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Useinov, Arthur; Ye, Lin-Xiu; Useinov, Niazbeck; Wu, Te-Ho; Lai, Chih-Huang

    2015-01-01

    The tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) in the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with embedded nanoparticles (NPs) was calculated in range of the quantum-ballistic model. The simulation was performed for electron tunneling through the insulating layer with embedded magnetic and non-magnetic NPs within the approach of the double barrier subsystem connected in parallel to the single barrier one. This model can be applied for both MTJs with in-plane magnetization and perpendicular one. We also calculated the in-plane component of the spin transfer torque (STT) versus the applied voltage in MTJs with magnetic NPs and determined that its value can be much larger than in single barrier system (SBS) for the same tunneling thickness. The reported simulation reproduces experimental data of the TMR suppression and peak-like TMR anomalies at low voltages available in leterature. PMID:26681336

  4. Small-signal modulation and differential gain of red-emitting (λ = 630 nm) InGaN/GaN quantum dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Thomas; Banerjee, Animesh; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2013-11-18

    We report small-signal modulation bandwidth and differential gain measurements of a ridge waveguide In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}N/GaN quantum dot laser grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The laser peak emission is at λ = 630 nm. The −3 dB bandwidth of an 800 μm long device was measured to be 2.4 GHz at 250 mA under pulsed biasing, demonstrating the possibility of high-speed operation of these devices. The differential gain was measured to be 5.3 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2}, and a gain compression factor of 2.87 × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 3} is also derived from the small-signal modulation response.

  5. Coherent Dynamics of Open Quantum System in the Presence of Majorana Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assuncao, Maryzaura O.; Diniz, Ginetom S.; Vernek, Edson; Souza, Fabricio M.

    In recent years the research on quantum coherent dynamics of open systems has attracted great attention due to its relevance for future implementation of quantum computers. In the present study we apply the Kadanoff-Baym formalism to simulate the population dynamics of a double-dot molecular system attached to both a superconductor and fermionic reservoirs. We solve both analytically and numerically a set of coupled differential equations that account for crossed Andreev reflection (CAR), intramolecular hopping and tunneling. We pay particular attention on how Majorana bound states can affect the population dynamics of the molecule. We investigate on how initial state configuration affects the dynamics. For instance, if one dot is occupied and the other one is empty, the dynamics is dictated by the inter dot tunneling. On the other hand, for initially empty dots, the CAR dominates. We also investigate how the source and drain currents evolve in time. This work was supporte by FAPEMIG, CNPq and CAPES.

  6. Gate length and temperature dependence of negative differential transconductance in silicon quantum well metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Naquin, Clint; Lee, Mark; Edwards, Hal; Mathur, Guru; Chatterjee, Tathagata; Maggio, Ken

    2015-09-28

    Introducing quantum transport into silicon transistors in a manner compatible with industrial fabrication has the potential to transform the performance horizons of large scale integrated silicon devices and circuits. Explicit quantum transport as evidenced by negative differential transconductances (NDTCs) has been observed in a set of quantum well (QW) transistors fabricated using industrial silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processing. Detailed gate length and temperature dependence characteristics of the NDTCs in these devices have been measured. The QW potential was formed via lateral ion implantation doping on a commercial 45 nm technology node process line, and measurements of the transfer characteristics show NDTCs up to room temperature. Gate length dependence of NDTCs shows a correlation of the interface channel length with the number of NDTCs formed as well as with the gate voltage (V{sub G}) spacing between NDTCs. The V{sub G} spacing between multiple NDTCs suggests a quasi-parabolic QW potential profile. The temperature dependence is consistent with partial freeze-out of carrier concentration against a degenerately doped background.

  7. Gate length and temperature dependence of negative differential transconductance in silicon quantum well metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naquin, Clint; Lee, Mark; Edwards, Hal; Mathur, Guru; Chatterjee, Tathagata; Maggio, Ken

    2015-09-01

    Introducing quantum transport into silicon transistors in a manner compatible with industrial fabrication has the potential to transform the performance horizons of large scale integrated silicon devices and circuits. Explicit quantum transport as evidenced by negative differential transconductances (NDTCs) has been observed in a set of quantum well (QW) transistors fabricated using industrial silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor processing. Detailed gate length and temperature dependence characteristics of the NDTCs in these devices have been measured. The QW potential was formed via lateral ion implantation doping on a commercial 45 nm technology node process line, and measurements of the transfer characteristics show NDTCs up to room temperature. Gate length dependence of NDTCs shows a correlation of the interface channel length with the number of NDTCs formed as well as with the gate voltage (VG) spacing between NDTCs. The VG spacing between multiple NDTCs suggests a quasi-parabolic QW potential profile. The temperature dependence is consistent with partial freeze-out of carrier concentration against a degenerately doped background.

  8. Aorta-right atrial tunnel: an interesting type of a congenital coronary artery anomaly.

    PubMed

    Iyisoy, Atila; Celik, Turgay; Celik, Murat; Sag, Cemal

    2014-05-01

    An 18-year-old girl with an aortico-right atrial tunnel originating from the left sinus of Valsalva, in which the left anterior descending and circumflex coronary arteries arose independently from the different parts of the tunnel, was reported. In the differential diagnosis of continuous murmur, this type of tunnel should be taken into consideration. Surgical approach should be offered.

  9. Aorta-Right Atrial Tunnel: An Interesting Type of a Congenital Coronary Artery Anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Iyisoy, Atila; Celik, Turgay; Sag, Cemal

    2014-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl with an aortico-right atrial tunnel originating from the left sinus of Valsalva, in which the left anterior descending and circumflex coronary arteries arose independently from the different parts of the tunnel, was reported. In the differential diagnosis of continuous murmur, this type of tunnel should be taken into consideration. Surgical approach should be offered. PMID:24876862

  10. Isotope effects of hydrogen and atom tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchachenko, A. L.; Pliss, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    The abnormally high mass-dependent isotope effects in liquid-phase hydrogen (deuterium) atom transfer reactions, which are customarily regarded as quantum effects, are actually the products of two classical effects, namely, kinetic and thermodynamic ones. The former is determined by the rate constants for atom transfer and the latter is caused by nonbonded (or noncovalent) isotope effects in the solvation of protiated and deuterated reacting molecules. This product can mimic the large isotope effects that are usually attributed to tunnelling. In enzymatic reactions, tunnelling is of particular interest; its existence characterizes an enzyme as a rigid molecular machine in which the residence time of reactants on the reaction coordinate exceeds the waiting time for the tunnelling event. The magnitude of isotope effect becomes a characteristic parameter of the internal dynamics of the enzyme catalytic site. The bibliography includes 61 references.

  11. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Salmilehto, J.; Deppe, F.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system. PMID:28195193

  12. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmilehto, J.; Deppe, F.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-02-01

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system.

  13. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits.

    PubMed

    Salmilehto, J; Deppe, F; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2017-02-14

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system.

  14. The Emergent Universe scheme and tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labraña, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    We present an alternative scheme for an Emergent Universe scenario, developed previously in Phys. Rev. D 86, 083524 (2012), where the universe is initially in a static state supported by a scalar field located in a false vacuum. The universe begins to evolve when, by quantum tunneling, the scalar field decays into a state of true vacuum. The Emergent Universe models are interesting since they provide specific examples of non-singular inflationary universes.

  15. The Emergent Universe scheme and tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Labraña, Pedro

    2014-07-23

    We present an alternative scheme for an Emergent Universe scenario, developed previously in Phys. Rev. D 86, 083524 (2012), where the universe is initially in a static state supported by a scalar field located in a false vacuum. The universe begins to evolve when, by quantum tunneling, the scalar field decays into a state of true vacuum. The Emergent Universe models are interesting since they provide specific examples of non-singular inflationary universes.

  16. Quenching the Quantum Tunneling of Magnetization in Heterometallic Octanuclear {TM(III)4 Dy(III)4 } (TM=Co and Cr) Single-Molecule Magnets by Modification of the Bridging Ligands and Enhancing the Magnetic Exchange Coupling.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, Kuduva R; Langley, Stuart K; Murray, Keith S; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2017-01-31

    We report the synthesis, structural characterisation, magnetic properties and provide an ab initio analysis of the magnetic behaviour of two new heterometallic octanuclear coordination complexes containing Co(III) and Dy(III) ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed molecular formulae of [Co(III)4 Dy(III)4 (μ-OH)4 (μ3 -OMe)4 {O2 CC(CH3 )3 }4 (tea)4 (H2 O)4 ]⋅4 H2 O (1) and [Co(III)4 Dy(III)4 (μ-F)4 (μ3 -OH)4 (o-tol)8 (mdea)4 ]⋅ 3 H2 O⋅EtOH⋅MeOH (2; tea(3-) =triply deprotonated triethanolamine; mdea(2-) =doubly deprotonated N-methyldiethanolamine; o-tol=o-toluate), and both complexes display an identical metallic core topology. Furthermore, the theoretical, magnetic and SMM properties of the isostructural complex, [Cr(III)4 Dy(III)4 (μ-F4 )(μ3 -OMe)1.25 (μ3 -OH)2.75 (O2 CPh)8 (mdea)4 ] (3), are discussed and compared with a structurally similar complex, [Cr(III)4 Dy(III)4 (μ3 -OH)4 (μ-N3 )4 (mdea)4 (O2 CC(CH3 )3 )4 ] (4). DC and AC magnetic susceptibility data revealed single-molecule magnet (SMM) behaviour for 1-4. Each complex displays dynamic behaviour, highlighting the effect of ligand and transition metal ion replacement on SMM properties. Complexes 2, 3 and 4 exhibited slow magnetic relaxation with barrier heights (Ueff ) of 39.0, 55.0 and 10.4 cm(-1) respectively. Complex 1, conversely, did not exhibit slow relaxation of magnetisation above 2 K. To probe the variance in the observed Ueff  values, calculations by using CASSCF, RASSI-SO and POLY_ANISO routine were performed on these complexes to estimate the nature of the magnetic coupling and elucidate the mechanism of magnetic relaxation. Calculations gave values of JDy-Dy as -1.6, 1.6 and 2.8 cm(-1) for complexes 1, 2 and 3, respectively, whereas the JDy-Cr interaction was estimated to be -1.8 cm(-1) for complex 3. The developed mechanism for magnetic relaxation revealed that replacement of the hydroxide ion by fluoride quenched the quantum tunnelling of

  17. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.

  18. Calibration of a Larmor clock for tunneling time experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Jesus; Potnis, Shreyas; Spierings, David; Ebadi, Sapehr; Steinberg, Aephraim

    2016-05-01

    How much time does it take for a particle to tunnel? This has been a controversial question since the early times of quantum mechanics. The debate stems mainly from the inability to measure time directly. One proposal to measure the tunnelling time is the Larmor clock, in which the spin degree of freedom of the tunneling particle is used as a clock. This clock only ``ticks'' inside the forbidden region due to the precession of the spin about a magnetic field localized within the barrier. Here, we report the calibration of a Larmor clock to measure tunneling times of a 87 Rb Bose Einstein condensate. We use the Zeeman sublevels of the ground-state F = 2 manifold and Raman beams for the implementation of a Larmor clock. Experimental progress towards measuring the tunneling time and the challenges involved in this measurement will also be discussed.

  19. Modeling direct interband tunneling. II. Lower-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Andrew; Chui, Chi On

    2014-08-07

    We investigate the applicability of the two-band Hamiltonian and the widely used Kane analytical formula to interband tunneling along unconfined directions in nanostructures. Through comparisons with k·p and tight-binding calculations and quantum transport simulations, we find that the primary correction is the change in effective band gap. For both constant fields and realistic tunnel field-effect transistors, dimensionally consistent band gap scaling of the Kane formula allows analytical and numerical device simulations to approximate non-equilibrium Green's function current characteristics without arbitrary fitting. This allows efficient first-order calibration of semiclassical models for interband tunneling in nanodevices.

  20. Quantum shuttle in phase space.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Tomás; Donarini, Andrea; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2003-06-27

    We present a quantum theory of the shuttle instability in electronic transport through a nanostructure with a mechanical degree of freedom. A phase space formulation in terms of the Wigner function allows us to identify a crossover from the tunneling to the shuttling regime, thus extending the previously found classical results to the quantum domain. Further, a new dynamical regime is discovered, where the shuttling is driven exclusively by the quantum noise.

  1. Tunneling ionization of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Aleksei S.; Zon, Boris A.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization of molecular nitrogen plays an important role in the process of light-filament formation in air. In the present paper we theoretically investigated tunneling ionization of the valence 3 σg and 1 πu shells in a N2 molecule using a strong near-infrared laser field. This research is based on our previously proposed theory of anti-Stokes-enhanced tunneling ionization with quantum accounting for the vibrationally excited states of the molecules [A. S. Kornev and B. A. Zon, Phys. Rev. A 86, 043401 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.043401]. We demonstrated that if the N2 molecule is ionized from the ground vibrational state, then the contribution of the 1 πu orbital is 0.5%. In contrast, for vibrationally excited states with a certain angle between the light polarization vector and the molecule axis, both shells can compete and even reverse their contributions due to the anti-Stokes mechanism. The structure constants of molecular orbitals are extracted from numerical solutions to the Hartree-Fock equations. This approach correctly takes into account the exchange interaction. Quantum consideration of vibrational motion results in the occurrence of the critical vibrational state, the tunneling ionization from which has the maximum rate. The numbers of the critical vibrational states are different for different valence shells. In addition, quantum description of vibrations changes the rate of ionization from the ground vibrational state by 20%-40% in comparison with the quasiclassical results.

  2. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  3. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  4. Quantum Ice : Experimental Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Nic; Benton, Owen; Sikora, Olga; Penc, Karlo; McClarty, Paul; Pollmann, Frank; Moessner, Roderich; Fulde, Peter

    2012-02-01

    ``Quantum Spin Ice'' materials have attracted considerable attention as three-dimensional examples of quantum spin liquids. Recently, we have used zero-temperature Quantum Monte Carlo simulation to explore one possible scenario for these materials, confirming the possibility of a ``quantum ice'' state driven by quantum tunnelling between an extensive number of different spin-ice configurations [1]. Here we address the simple question : what would such a quantum ice look like in experiment ? We focus in particular on the fate of ``pinch point'' singularities seen in neutron scattering experiments on spin ice materials, showing how these are suppressed and ultimately eliminated as the system is cooled to its ground state [1,2]. [4pt] [1] N. Shannon et al., arXiv:1105.4196[0pt] [2] O. Benton et al., in preparation.

  5. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Model for Semiconductor Devices: Theory and Computations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Quantum transport effects including electron or hole tunneling through potential barriers and buildup in quantum wells are important in predicting...semiconductor device. A new extension of the classical hydrodynamic model to include quantum transport effects was derived. This "smooth" quantum

  6. Diagnosis of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keith, Michael Warren; Masear, Victoria; Chung, Kevin; Maupin, Kent; Andary, Michael; Amadio, Peter C.; Barth, Richard W.; Watters, William C.; Goldberg, Michael J.; Haralson, Robert H.; Turkelson, Charles M.; Wies, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    This clinical practice guideline was created to improve patient care by outlining the appropriate information-gathering and decision-making processes involved in managing the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. The methods used to develop this clinical practice guideline were designed to combat bias, enhance transparency, and promote reproducibility. The guideline’s recommendations are as follows: The physician should obtain an accurate patient history. The physician should perform a physical examination of the patient that may include personal characteristics as well as performing a sensory examination, manual muscle testing of the upper extremity, and provocative and/or discriminatory tests for alternative diagnoses. The physician may obtain electrodiagnostic tests to differentiate among diagnoses. This may be done in the presence of thenar atrophy and/or persistent numbness. The physician should obtain electrodiagnostic tests when clinical and/or provocative tests are positive and surgical management is being considered. If the physician orders electrodiagnostic tests, the testing protocol should follow the American Academy of Neurology/American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine/American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation guidelines for diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. In addition, the physician should not routinely evaluate patients suspected of having carpal tunnel syndrome with new technology, such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and pressure-specified sensorimotor devices in the wrist and hand. This decision was based on an additional nonsystematic literature review following the face-to-face meeting of the work group. PMID:19474448

  7. A new family of 1D exchange biased heterometal single-molecule magnets: observation of pronounced quantum tunneling steps in the hysteresis loops of quasi-linear {Mn2Ni3} clusters.

    PubMed

    Das, Animesh; Gieb, Klaus; Krupskaya, Yulia; Demeshko, Serhiy; Dechert, Sebastian; Klingeler, Rüdiger; Kataev, Vladislav; Büchner, Bernd; Müller, Paul; Meyer, Franc

    2011-03-16

    First members of a new family of heterometallic Mn/Ni complexes [Mn(2)Ni(3)X(2)L(4)(LH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] (X = Cl: 1; X = Br: 2) with the new ligand 2-{3-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl}ethanol (H(2)L) have been synthesized, and single crystals obtained from CH(2)Cl(2) solutions have been characterized crystallographically. The molecular structures feature a quasi-linear Mn(III)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Ni(II)-Mn(III) core with six-coordinate metal ions, where elongated axes of all the distorted octahedral coordination polyhedra are aligned parallel and are fixed with respect to each other by intramolecular hydrogen bonds. 1 and 2 exhibit quite strong ferromagnetic exchange interactions throughout (J(Mn-Ni) ≈ 40 K (1) or 42 K (2); J(Ni-Ni) ≈ 22 K (1) or 18 K (2)) that lead to an S(tot) = 7 ground state, and a sizable uniaxial magnetoanisotropy with D(mol) values -0.55 K (1) and -0.45 K (2). These values are directly derived also from frequency- and temperature-dependent high-field EPR spectra. Slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperatures and single-molecule magnet (SMM) behavior are evident from frequency-dependent peaks in the out-of-phase ac susceptibilities and magnetization versus dc field measurements, with significant energy barriers to spin reversal U(eff) = 27 K (1) and 22 K (2). Pronounced quantum tunnelling steps are observed in the hysteresis loops of the temperature- and scan rate-dependent magnetization data, but with the first relaxation step shifted above (1) or below (2) the zero crossing of the magnetic field, despite the very similar molecular structures. The different behavior of 1 and 2 is interpreted in terms of antiferromagnetic (1) or ferromagnetic (2) intermolecular interactions, which are discussed in view of the subtle differences of intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice.

  8. Pipetron Tunnel Construction Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friant, James E.; Bauer, Robert A.; Gross, David L.; May, Michael; Lach, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    This report examines issues involved in the civil construction aspects of the tunneling that could be done in the region of Fermilab to support the Pipetron along, moderately deep, tunnel loop. Cost, technical and political aspects of tunneling are addressed in this preliminary guide for further study. At Snowmass 96, in a series of informal, but comprehensive discussions, several guidelines were developed to frame this report.

  9. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  10. Fermi-edge singularity at tunneling and anisotropic magneto-tunneling in low-dimensional semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkin, Ivan A.; Vdovin, E. E.; Khanin, Yu N.; Ujevic, Sebastian; Henini, M.

    2010-09-01

    We consider many-body enhanced electron tunneling through an InAs quantum dot in a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the tunneling direction. The critical exponent of the Fermi-edge singularity in the tunneling current is calculated as a function of the magnetic field. We use lowest Landau level approximation for the electrons in the emitter and perform scattering matrix calculations using the Born approximation. We examine in detail the anisotropic behavior of the amplitude and shape of the resonant peaks.

  11. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  12. Nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling in Majorana's stellar representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiuyi; Liu, Haodi; Zhou, Tianji; Chen, Xu-Zong; Wu, Biao

    2016-06-01

    By representing the evolution of a quantum state with the trajectories of the stars on a Bloch sphere, the Majorana's stellar representation provides an intuitive way to understand quantum motion in a high dimensional projective Hilbert space. In this work we show that the Majorana's representation offers a very interesting and intuitive way to understand the nonlinear Landau-Zener tunneling. In particular, the breakdown of adiabaticity in this tunneling phenomenon can be understood as some of the stars never reaching the south pole. We also establish a connection between the Majorana stars in the second quantized model and the single star in the mean field model by using the reduced density matrix.

  13. Quantum walks of interacting fermions on a cycle graph

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Alexey A.; Fedichkin, Leonid E.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum walks have been employed widely to develop new tools for quantum information processing recently. A natural quantum walk dynamics of interacting particles can be used to implement efficiently the universal quantum computation. In this work quantum walks of electrons on a graph are studied. The graph is composed of semiconductor quantum dots arranged in a circle. Electrons can tunnel between adjacent dots and interact via Coulomb repulsion, which leads to entanglement. Fermionic entanglement dynamics is obtained and evaluated. PMID:27681057

  14. Quantum Detection and Invisibility in Coherent Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Fransson, J.

    2010-04-28

    We address quantum invisibility in the context of electronics in nanoscale quantum structures. In analogy with metamaterials, we use the freedom of design that quantum corrals provide and show that quantum mechanical objects can be hidden inside the corral, with respect to inelastic electron scattering spectroscopy in combination with scanning tunneling microscopy, and we propose a design strategy. A simple illustration of the invisibility is given in terms of an elliptic quantum corral containing a molecule, with a local vibrational mode, at one of the foci. Our work has implications to quantum information technology and presents new tools for nonlocal quantum detection and distinguishing between different molecules.

  15. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  16. Relaxation in quantum glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona Torres, Carlos E.

    The Ising model in transverse field provides the simplest description of a quantum glass. I study two systems that are realizations of the Ising model in transverse field, LiHoxY1-- xF4 and Rb1-- x(NH4)xH2PO 4. In the spin glass LiHoxY1-- xF4, applying a magnetic field Ht transverse to the Ising direction introduces tunneling between the bare Ising eigenstates. In addition, the coupling between the transverse dipolar interaction and the transverse field introduces entanglement or tunable random fields depending on the concentration. By comparing the classical and quantum transitions in LiHo0.198Y0.802F4 and LiHo 0.167Y0.833F4, I characterize the crossover from random field dominated behavior in the 19.8% sample to entanglement dominated behavior in the 16.7% sample. The quantum transition in the 19.8% sample is dominated by the limit on its correlation length caused by the random fields, while the dominant effect in the 16.7% sample is the enhanced tunneling rate introduced by entanglement. The proton glass Rb1--x(NH 4)xH2PO4 relaxes through tunneling of protons in the hydrogen bonds of the crystal, yielding an effective Ising model in transverse field. Since this field cannot be tuned directly, I combine bulk dielectric susceptibility measurements with neutron Compton scattering measurements of the local tunneling potential in two different concentrations, x = 35% and 72%. I find that tunneling drives the fastest relaxation processes at temperatures as high as 20 K and explicitly calculate the tunneling rate from the tunneling potential of the hydrogen bond. Moreover, the structural mechanism for the glassy relaxation allows a real-space picture of the relaxation dynamics to be correlated to the free energy description of aging. I find that the glassy relaxation is driven by the sequential diffusion of defects called Takagi configurations with a classical to quantum crossover in the relaxation at 3 K. I relate the relaxation rate to the quantum action of tunneling

  17. Semiconductor Quantum Dot Resonant Tunnelling Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    by more than 0268-1242/92/030612 + 03 $04.50 0 1992 IOP Publishing Ltd F ~~~~~ ,, scanning electrOn micrograph of a n array of anisotropically...resonances can be observed at sufficiently low 46.02 E.09 2 . 6 7 5 5 . 0 0 2 /el" ,2876 I d , " - 3 . 0 0 2 2 0 0 . D .oooo Y F 2O.ao1~1...and A E Wetsel. We thank R T Bate for constant encouragement and support, and R K Aldert, E D Pijan, D A Schultz, D L Smith, P F Stickney and J R

  18. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  20. Quantum state-resolved differential cross sections for complex-forming chemical reactions: Asymmetry is the rule, symmetry the exception

    SciTech Connect

    Larrégaray, Pascal Bonnet, Laurent

    2015-10-14

    We argue that statistical theories are generally unable to accurately predict state-resolved differential cross sections for triatomic bimolecular reactions studied in beam experiments, even in the idealized limit where the dynamics are fully chaotic. The basic reason is that quenching of interferences between partial waves is less efficient than intuitively expected, especially around the poles.