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Sample records for differential reflectance microscope

  1. Image inpainting for the differential confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lirong; Wang, Lei; Liu, Dali; Hou, Maosheng; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-02-01

    In the process of zero-crossing trigger measurement of differential confocal microscope, the sample surface features or tilt will cause the edges can't be triggered. Meanwhile, environment vibration can also cause false triggering. In order to restore the invalid information of sample, and realize high-precision surface topography measurement, Total Variation (TV) inpainting model is applied to restore the scanning images. Emulation analysis and experimental verification of this method are investigated. The image inpainting algorithm based on TV model solves the minimization of the energy equation by calculus of variations, and it can effectively restore the non-textured image with noises. Using this algorithm, the simulation confocal laser intensity curve and height curve of standard step sample are restored. After inpainting the intensity curve below the threshold is repaired, the maximum deviation from ideal situation is 0.0042, the corresponding edge contour of height curve is restored, the maximum deviation is 0.1920, which proves the algorithm is effective. Experiment of grating inpainting indicates that the TV algorithm can restore the lost information caused by failed triggering and eliminate the noise caused by false triggering in zero-crossing trigger measurement of differential confocal microscope. The restored image is consistent with the scanning result of OLYMPUS confocal microscope, which can satisfy the request of follow-up measurement analysis.

  2. Forensic applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tungol, Mary W.; Bartick, Edward G.; Reffner, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Applications of microscopical infrared internal reflection spectroscopy in forensic science are discussed. Internal reflection spectra of single fibers, hairs, paint chips, vehicle rubber bumpers, photocopy toners, carbon copies, writing ink on paper, lipstick on tissue, black electrical tape, and other types of forensic evidence have been obtained. The technique is convenient, non-destructive, and may permit smeared materials to be analyzed in situ.

  3. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Rosser, R.

    1993-01-05

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  4. Reflection soft X-ray microscope and method

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; Skinner, Charles H.; Rosser, Roy

    1993-01-01

    A reflection soft X-ray microscope is provided by generating soft X-ray beams, condensing the X-ray beams to strike a surface of an object at a predetermined angle, and focusing the X-ray beams reflected from the surface onto a detector, for recording an image of the surface or near surface features of the object under observation.

  5. Scanning differential polarization microscope: Its use to image linear and circular differential scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mickols, W.; Maestre, M.F.

    1988-06-01

    A differential polarization microscope that couples the sensitivity of single-beam measurement of circular dichroism and circular differential scattering with the simultaneous measurement of linear dichroism and linear differential scattering has been developed. The microscope uses a scanning microscope stage and single-point illumination to give the very shallow depth of field found in confocal microscopy. This microscope can operate in the confocal mode as well as in the near confocal condition that can allow one to program the coherence and spatial resolution of the microscope. This microscope has been used to study the change in the structure of chromatin during the development of sperm in Drosophila.

  6. An Erbium Quantum Gas Microscope with a Reflective Objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krahn, Aaron; Phelps, Gregory; Hebert, Anne; Dickerson, Susannah; Greiner, Markus; Erbium Lab Team

    2016-05-01

    Dipolar atoms present an exciting opportunity to extend previous quantum gas microscope (QGM) experiments to more complex systems influenced by long range, anisotropic interactions. We present on current progress toward the construction of a QGM for ultracold Erbium atoms in an optical lattice, including the development of a novel imaging system for single-site resolution. While most QGMs until now have typically utilized a high numerical aperture microscope objective, we discuss a reflective mirror alternative that offers an equally high NA (.9-.95), a comparable field of view (34 micrometers radial), and a larger working distance (25 millimeters) that keeps the atoms far from any surfaces. By operating in a Schmidt telescope configuration, this imaging system is well-suited both for collecting 401 nm imaging fluorescence and for the creation of an expandable lattice with a variety of associated lattice geometries.

  7. [Identification of pearl powder using microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Chao; Yan, Yan; Yang, Hai-Feng; Li, Jun-Fang; Bai, Hua; Xi, Guang-Cheng; Liao, Jie

    2014-09-01

    Pearl is a precious ornament and traditional Chinese medicine, which application history in China is more than 2000 years. It is well known that the chemical ingredients of shell and pearl are very similar, which all of them including calcium carbonate and various amino acids. Generally, shell powders also can be used as medicine; however, its medicinal value is much lower than that of pearl powders. Due to the feature similarity between pearl powders and shell powders, the distinguishment of them by detecting chemical composition and morphology is very difficult. It should be noted that shell powders have been often posing as pearl powders in markets, which seriously infringes the interests of consumers. Identification of pearl powder was investigated by microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy, and pearl powder as well as shell powder was calcined at different temperatures for different time before infrared reflectance spectroscopy analysis. The experimental results indicated that when calcined at 400 °C for 30 minutes under atmospheric pressure, aragonite in pearl powder partly transformed into calcite, while aragonite in shell powder completely transformed into calcite. At the same time, the difference in phase transition between the pearl powders 'and shell powders can be easily detected by using the microscopic infrared reflectance spectroscopy. Therefore, based on the difference in their phase transition process, infrared reflectance spectroscopy can be used to identify phase transformation differences between pearl powder and shell powder. It's more meaningfully that the proposed infrared reflectance spec- troscopy method was also investigated for the applicability to other common counterfeits, such as oyster shell powders and abalone shell powders, and the results show that the method can be a simple, efficiently and accurately method for identification of pearl powder. PMID:25532338

  8. Development and evaluation of an automated reflectance microscope system for the petrographic characterization of bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, D. S.; Davis, A.

    1980-10-01

    The development of automated coal petrographic techniques will lessen the demands on skilled personnel to do routine work. This project is concerned with the development and successful testing of an instrument which will meet these needs. The fundamental differences in reflectance of the three primary maceral groups should enable their differentiation in an automated-reflectance frequency histogram (reflectogram). Consequently, reflected light photometry was chosen as the method for automating coal petrographic analysis. Three generations of an automated system (called Rapid Scan Versions I, II and III) were developed and evaluated for petrographic analysis. Their basic design was that of a reflected-light microscope photometer with an automatic stage, interfaced with a minicomputer. The hardware elements used in the Rapid Scan Version I limited the system's flexibility and presented problems with signal digitization and measurement precision. Rapid Scan Version II was designed to incorporate a new microscope photometer and computer system. A digital stepping stage was incorporated into the Rapid Scan Version III system. The precision of reflectance determination of this system was found to be +- 0.02 percent reflectance. The limiting factor in quantitative interpretation of Rapid Scan reflectograms is the resolution of reflectance populations of the individual maceral groups. Statistical testing indicated that reflectograms were highly reproducible, and a new computer program, PETAN, was written to interpret the curves for vitrinite reflectance parameters ad petrographic.

  9. A combined apparatus of scanning reflection electron microscope and scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruno, S.; Nakahara, H.; Fujita, S.; Watanabe, H.; Kusumi, Y.; Ichikawa, M.

    1997-01-01

    A scanning reflection electron microscope (SREM) combined with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) has been developed for the purpose of nanoscale structure fabrication under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A STM unit consists of a piezoelectric tube scanner and an inch runner for coarse and fine approach of a STM tip. A sample holder and the STM unit have six drive axes relative to an electron gun for simultaneous observation by SREM and STM. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy equipment is also installed for surface sensitive elemental analysis. It has been demonstrated that on a Si(111)7×7 surface atomic steps and 7×7 unit, cells can be observed in the SREM and STM images, respectively, and that surface elements with less than 1 ML thickness are detectable.

  10. Differential phase acoustic microscope for micro-NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, David D.; Pusateri, T. L.; Huang, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A differential phase scanning acoustic microscope (DP-SAM) was developed, fabricated, and tested in this project. This includes the acoustic lens and transducers, driving and receiving electronics, scanning stage, scanning software, and display software. This DP-SAM can produce mechanically raster-scanned acoustic microscopic images of differential phase, differential amplitude, or amplitude of the time gated returned echoes of the samples. The differential phase and differential amplitude images provide better image contrast over the conventional amplitude images. A specially designed miniature dual beam lens was used to form two foci to obtain the differential phase and amplitude information of the echoes. High image resolution (1 micron) was achieved by applying high frequency (around 1 GHz) acoustic signals to the samples and placing two foci close to each other (1 micron). Tone burst was used in this system to obtain a good estimation of the phase differences between echoes from the two adjacent foci. The system can also be used to extract the V(z) acoustic signature. Since two acoustic beams and four receiving modes are available, there are 12 possible combinations to produce an image or a V(z) scan. This provides a unique feature of this system that none of the existing acoustic microscopic systems can provide for the micro-nondestructive evaluation applications. The entire system, including the lens, electronics, and scanning control software, has made a competitive industrial product for nondestructive material inspection and evaluation and has attracted interest from existing acoustic microscope manufacturers.

  11. Pupil engineering for a confocal reflectance line-scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Yogesh G.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2011-03-01

    Confocal reflectance microscopy may enable screening and diagnosis of skin cancers noninvasively and in real-time, as an adjunct to biopsy and pathology. Current confocal point-scanning systems are large, complex, and expensive. A confocal line-scanning microscope, utilizing a of linear array detector can be simpler, smaller, less expensive, and may accelerate the translation of confocal microscopy in clinical and surgical dermatology. A line scanner may be implemented with a divided-pupil, half used for transmission and half for detection, or with a full-pupil using a beamsplitter. The premise is that a confocal line-scanner with either a divided-pupil or a full-pupil will provide high resolution and optical sectioning that would be competitive to that of the standard confocal point-scanner. We have developed a confocal line-scanner that combines both divided-pupil and full-pupil configurations. This combined-pupil prototype is being evaluated to determine the advantages and limitations of each configuration for imaging skin, and comparison of performance to that of commercially available standard confocal point-scanning microscopes. With the combined configuration, experimental evaluation of line spread functions (LSFs), contrast, signal-to-noise ratio, and imaging performance is in progress under identical optical and skin conditions. Experimental comparisons between divided-pupil and full-pupil LSFs will be used to determine imaging performance. Both results will be compared to theoretical calculations using our previously reported Fourier analysis model and to the confocal point spread function (PSF). These results may lead to a simpler class of confocal reflectance scanning microscopes for clinical and surgical dermatology.

  12. Scanning reflection ion microscopy in a helium ion microscope

    PubMed Central

    Vyvenko, Oleg F

    2015-01-01

    Summary Reflection ion microscopy (RIM) is a technique that uses a low angle of incidence and scattered ions to form an image of the specimen surface. This paper reports on the development of the instrumentation and the analysis of the capabilities and limitations of the scanning RIM in a helium ion microscope (HIM). The reflected ions were detected by their “conversion” to secondary electrons on a platinum surface. An angle of incidence in the range 5–10° was used in the experimental setup. It was shown that the RIM image contrast was determined mostly by surface morphology but not by the atomic composition. A simple geometrical analysis of the reflection process was performed together with a Monte Carlo simulation of the angular dependence of the reflected ion yield. An interpretation of the RIM image formation and a quantification of the height of the surface steps were performed. The minimum detectable step height was found to be approximately 5 nm. RIM imaging of an insulator surface without the need for charge compensation was successfully demonstrated. PMID:26171289

  13. Soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Nkenke, Emeka; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre

    2009-07-01

    Laser surgery gives the possibility to work remotely which leads to high precision, little trauma and high level sterility. However these advantages are coming with the lack of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Therefore additional means are required to control tissue-specific ablation during laser surgery supporting the surgeon regardless of experience and skills. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from four various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the four tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerve as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating soft tissues as guidance for tissue-specific laser surgery by means of the diffuse reflectance.

  14. Design of reflectance confocal microscopes for clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavislan, James M.

    2009-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy provides real time, cellular resolution images of in-vivo and ex-vivo tissues and has been cleared by the FDA and international regulatory agencies for medical applications. Clinical applications of reflectance confocal microscopy are being tested in single- and multi-center clinical trials. In this paper I will review the design challenges of sub-surface imaging with confocal microscopy and techniques to compare the instruments performance between different sites.

  15. Microscopic structure of the Mach-type reflection of weak shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walenta, Z. A.

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the microscopic structure of the three-shock inter-action region generated in a low-density shock tube during the Mach-type reflection of a weak shock wave. The experimental conditions corresponded to the case when Von Neumann's theory fails to predict the existence of reflection while Guderley's theory predicts the presence of a rarefaction wave behind the reflected shock. The experiment shows that under such conditions the Mach-type reflection does exist, and no rarefaction wave is present. A possible reason for this disagreement is the influence of viscosity, neglected in Von Neumann's and Guderley's theories.

  16. Differential phase measurements of D-region partial reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiersma, D. J.; Sechrist, C. F., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Differential phase partial reflection measurements were used to deduce D region electron density profiles. The phase difference was measured by taking sums and differences of amplitudes received on an array of crossed dipoles. The reflection model used was derived from Fresnel reflection theory. Seven profiles obtained over the period from 13 October 1971 to 5 November 1971 are presented, along with the results from simultaneous measurements of differential absorption. Some possible sources of error and error propagation are discussed. A collision frequency profile was deduced from the electron concentration calculated from differential phase and differential absorption.

  17. Improved analysis of solar signals for differential reflectivity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huuskonen, Asko; Kurri, Mikko; Holleman, Iwan

    2016-07-01

    The method for the daily monitoring of the differential reflectivity bias for polarimetric weather radars is developed further. Improved quality control is applied to the solar signals detected during the operational scanning of the radar, which efficiently removes rain and clutter-contaminated gates occurring in the solar hits. The simultaneous reflectivity data are used as a proxy to determine which data points are to be removed. A number of analysis methods to determine the differential reflectivity bias are compared, and methods based on surface fitting are found superior to simple averaging. A separate fit to the reflectivity of the horizontal and vertical polarization channels is recommended because of stability. Separate fitting also provides, in addition to the differential reflectivity bias, the pointing difference of the polarization channels. Data from the Finnish weather radar network show that the pointing difference is less than 0.02° and that the differential reflectivity bias is stable and determined to better than 0.04 dB. The results are compared to those from measurements at vertical incidence, which allows us to determine the total differential reflectivity bias including the differential receiver bias and the transmitter bias.

  18. An Introduction to Differentials Based on Hyperreal Numbers and Infinite Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we propose to introduce the differential of a function through a non-classical way, lying on hyperreals and infinite microscopes. This approach is based on the developments of nonstandard analysis, wants to be more intuitive than the classical one and tries to emphasize the functional and geometric aspects of the differential. In…

  19. Microscopic Inner Retinal Hyper-Reflective Phenotypes in Retinal and Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Scoles, Drew; Higgins, Brian P.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Weinberg, David V.; Kim, Judy E.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We surveyed inner retinal microscopic features in retinal and neurologic disease using a reflectance confocal adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Methods. Inner retinal images from 101 subjects affected by one of 38 retinal or neurologic conditions and 11 subjects with no known eye disease were examined for the presence of hyper-reflective features other than vasculature, retinal nerve fiber layer, and foveal pit reflex. The hyper-reflective features in the AOSLO images were grouped based on size, location, and subjective texture. Clinical imaging, including optical coherence tomography (OCT), scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, and fundus photography was analyzed for comparison. Results. Seven categories of hyper-reflective inner retinal structures were identified, namely punctate reflectivity, nummular (disc-shaped) reflectivity, granular membrane, waxy membrane, vessel-associated membrane, microcysts, and striate reflectivity. Punctate and nummular reflectivity also was found commonly in normal volunteers, but the features in the remaining five categories were found only in subjects with retinal or neurologic disease. Some of the features were found to change substantially between follow up imaging months apart. Conclusions. Confocal reflectance AOSLO imaging revealed a diverse spectrum of normal and pathologic hyper-reflective inner and epiretinal features, some of which were previously unreported. Notably, these features were not disease-specific, suggesting that they might correspond to common mechanisms of degeneration or repair in pathologic states. Although prospective studies with larger and better characterized populations, along with imaging of more extensive retinal areas are needed, the hyper-reflective structures reported here could be used as disease biomarkers, provided their specificity is studied further. PMID:24894394

  20. Microscopic Theory for Negative Differential Mobility in Crowded Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénichou, O.; Illien, P.; Oshanin, G.; Sarracino, A.; Voituriez, R.

    2014-12-01

    We study the behavior of the stationary velocity of a driven particle in an environment of mobile hard-core obstacles. Based on a lattice gas model, we demonstrate analytically that the drift velocity can exhibit a nonmonotonic dependence on the applied force, and show quantitatively that such negative differential mobility (NDM), observed in various physical contexts, is controlled by both the density and diffusion time scale of the obstacles. Our study unifies recent numerical and analytical results obtained in specific regimes, and makes it possible to determine analytically the region of the full parameter space where NDM occurs. These results suggest that NDM could be a generic feature of biased (or active) transport in crowded environments.

  1. Evaluation of an Automated Reflectance Microscope system for coal characterization. Technical report 18

    SciTech Connect

    Liscinsky, D. S.; Vastola, F.

    1980-01-01

    The potential of an Automated Reflectance Microscope (ARM) system to determine the petrographic composition of a coal has been examined. The analysis involves the automatic scanning of a polished coal surface with a reflectance microscope. The reflectivity of consecutive 4-square-micrometer spots on the surface is measured by a photomultiplier tube and recorded by a microcomputer. This study was aimed at making the interpretation of a reflectogram more straightforward, that is, increasing the ability to discriminate among species. Although hardware improvements to decrease the spot size and the error associated with each reading would allow some increase in the ability to discriminate among species, the heterogeneous nature of the surface still limits the qualitative and quantitative information that can be derived from a reflectogram. Therefore a real-time data processing algorithm was implemented during data acquisition to study the effects that processing can have on a reflectogram. By measuring connectivity, it was found that edge readings could be indirectly eliminated. This greatly improved the ability to discriminate among species. Further investigation led to the conclusion that physical particle size has a major effect on a reflectogram. The concentration of coal in a pellet also has an effect on the ability to discriminate among species. A bonus of using processing to enhance the data was the ability to simultaneously gather information on particle size distributions. Based on the results the potential of an ARM system is improved by algorithm enhancement. The processing of the data allows some of the inherent limitations to be reduced.

  2. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are moremore » spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).« less

  3. Differential Microscopic Mobility of Components within a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Mamontov, Eugene

    2015-07-13

    From macroscopic measurements of deep eutectic solvents such as glyceline (1:2 molar ratio of choline chloride to glycerol), the long-range translational diffusion of the larger cation (choline) is known to be slower compared to that of the smaller hydrogen bond donor (glycerol). However, when the diffusion dynamics are analyzed on the subnanometer length scale, we discover that the displacements associated with the localized diffusive motions are actually larger for choline. This counterintuitive diffusive behavior can be understood as follows. The localized diffusive motions confined in the transient cage of neighbor particles, which precede the cage-breaking long-range diffusion jumps, are more spatially constrained for glycerol than for choline because of the stronger hydrogen bonds the former makes with chloride anions. The implications of differential localized mobility of the constituents should be especially important for applications where deep eutectic solvents are confined on the nanometer length scale and their long-range translational diffusion is strongly inhibited (e.g., within microporous media).

  4. A correlative microscopical analysis of differentiating ovarian follicles of mammals.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E; Wilkinson, R F; Lee, G; Meller, S

    1978-06-01

    The mammalian ovary has been studied by optical microscopy and by scanning and transmission electron microscopy with the purpose of presenting an integrated view of the differentiating mammalian follicle. During follicular development, changes in the granulosa cells are particularly noteworthy and include dramatic modifications in cell shape coincident with antrum formation. The cytoplasmic processes of those granulosa cells immediately surrounding the oocyte, as well as the more peripheral granulosa cells comprising a second and third layer, traverse the zona pellucida, infrequently interdigitate with the microvilli of the egg, and make both desmosomal and gap junction contacts with the oocyte. The zona pellucida is thus distinguished by numerous fenestrations of varying diameters. The membrana limitans (basal lamina) is a bipartite structure composed of (a) a homogenous stratum upon which the peripheral layer of granulosa cells rests, and (b) an outer region of collagen-like fibers. The specific advantages and limitations of the different methodologies utilized to study folliculo-genesis are discussed. PMID:671553

  5. Design and Construction of a Multi-wavelength, Micromirror Total Internal Reflectance Fluorescence Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Joshua; Kirk, Matt; Drier, Eric A.; O’Brien, William; MacKay, James F.; Friedman, Larry; Hoskins, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Colocalization Single Molecule Spectroscopy (CoSMoS) has proven to be a useful method for studying the composition, kinetics, and mechanisms of complex cellular machines. Key to the technique is the ability to simultaneously monitor multiple proteins and/or nucleic acids as they interact with one another. Here we describe a protocol for constructing a CoSMoS micromirror Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (mmTIRFM). Design and construction of a scientific microscope often requires a number of custom components and a significant time commitment. In our protocol, we have streamlined this process by implementation of a commercially available microscopy platform designed to accommodate the optical components necessary for a mmTIRFM. The mmTIRF system eliminates the need for machining custom parts by the end-user and facilitates optical alignment. Depending on the experience-level of the microscope builder, these time-savings and the following protocol can enable mmTIRF construction to be completed within two months. PMID:25188633

  6. Differential phase microscope and micro-tomography with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Hashizume, J.; Goto, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tsujimura, T.; Aoki, S.

    2013-10-01

    An x-ray differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter was set up at the bending magnet source BL3C, Photon Factory. A reconstructed phase profile from the differential phase image of an aluminium wire at 5.36 keV was fairly good agreement with the numerical simulation. Phase tomography of a biological specimen, such as an Artemia cyst, could be successfully demonstrated.

  7. A combined light sheet fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscope for live imaging of multicellular specimens.

    PubMed

    Baker, R P; Taormina, M J; Jemielita, M; Parthasarathy, R

    2015-05-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labelled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, whereas differential interference contrast microscopy reveals the unlabelled neighbourhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for differential interference contrast microscopy and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behaviour of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  8. A study of protein reactions with surface-bound molecular targets using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope

    PubMed Central

    Landry, J. P.; Sun, Y. S.; Zhu, X. D.

    2009-01-01

    We applied oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) microscopes (a form of polarization-modulated nulling ellipsometry) to detection of biomolecular microarrays without external labeling in a study of protein reactions with surface-immobilized targets. We show that the optical reflectivity difference signals can be quantitatively related to changes in surface mass density of molecular layers as a result of the reactions. Our experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscopes for high-throughput proteomics research such as screening unlabeled protein probes against libraries of surface-immobilized small-molecules. PMID:18566623

  9. Reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy and imaging for surface studies in transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z L; Bentley, J

    1992-02-15

    A review is given on the techniques and applications of high-energy reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) and reflection electron microscopy (REM) for surface studies in scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) and conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM). A diffraction method is introduced to identify a surface orientation in the geometry of REM. The surface dielectric response theory is presented and applied for studying alpha-alumina surfaces. Domains of the alpha-alumina (012) surface initially terminated with oxygen can be reduced by an intense electron beam to produce Al metal; the resistance to beam damage of surface domains initially terminated with Al+3 ions is attributed to the screening effect of adsorbed oxygen. Surface energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS), and microanalysis using REELS are illustrated based on the studies of TiO2 and MgO. Effects of surface resonances (or channeling) on the REELS signal-to-background ratio are described. The REELS detection of a monolayer of oxygen adsorption on diamond (111) surfaces is reported. It is shown that phase contrast REM image content can be significantly increased with the use of a field emission gun (FEG). Phase contrast effects close to the core of a screw dislocation are discussed and the associated Fresnel fringes around a surface step are observed. Finally, an in situ REM experiment is described for studying atomic desorption and diffusion processes on alpha-alumina surfaces at temperatures of 1,300-1,400 degrees C.

  10. Differential reflective fiber-optic angular displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Mingguang; Min, Rui; Zhong, Zhi; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yabin

    2015-05-01

    Using the characteristic that the distance apart between the emitting fiber and receiving fiber only shifts the angular-power curve, a differential reflective fiber-optic sensor for angular displacement measurement is presented through subtraction of two power signals from two receiving fibers placed on both sides of one emitting fiber. A theoretical model is established to characterize the performance of the differential reflective fiber-optic angular displacement sensor. The measurements made indicate that the general behavior of the experimental results agrees with that of the theoretical results, and the sensor can improve sensitivity by about 120%, resulting in the significant improvement of anti-interference capability, which will be more suitable for high accuracy bipolar absolute angular displacement measurement. Design guidelines are also suggested to achieve desired sensor performances.

  11. Numerical analysis of ultrasound propagation and reflection intensity for biological acoustic impedance microscope.

    PubMed

    Gunawan, Agus Indra; Hozumi, Naohiro; Yoshida, Sachiko; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a new method for microscopic acoustic imaging that utilizes the cross sectional acoustic impedance of biological soft tissues. In the system, a focused acoustic beam with a wide band frequency of 30-100 MHz is transmitted across a plastic substrate on the rear side of which a soft tissue object is placed. By scanning the focal point along the surface, a 2-D reflection intensity profile is obtained. In the paper, interpretation of the signal intensity into a characteristic acoustic impedance is discussed. Because the acoustic beam is strongly focused, interpretation assuming vertical incidence may lead to significant error. To determine an accurate calibration curve, a numerical sound field analysis was performed. In these calculations, the reflection intensity from a target with an assumed acoustic impedance was compared with that from water, which was used as a reference material. The calibration curve was determined by changing the assumed acoustic impedance of the target material. The calibration curve was verified experimentally using saline solution, of which the acoustic impedance was known, as the target material. Finally, the cerebellar tissue of a rat was observed to create an acoustic impedance micro profile. In the paper, details of the numerical analysis and verification of the observation results will be described.

  12. Microscopic description of intraband absorption in graphene: the occurrence of transient negative differential transmission.

    PubMed

    Kadi, Faris; Winzer, Torben; Malic, Ermin; Knorr, Andreas; Göttfert, F; Mittendorff, M; Winnerl, S; Helm, M

    2014-07-18

    We present a microscopic explanation of the controversially discussed transient negative differential transmission observed in degenerate optical pump-probe measurements in graphene. Our approach is based on the density matrix formalism allowing a time- and momentum-resolved study of carrier-light, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interaction on microscopic footing. We show that phonon-assisted optical intraband transitions give rise to transient absorption in the optically excited hot carrier system counteracting pure absorption bleaching of interband transitions. While interband transition bleaching is relevant in the first hundreds of fs after the excitation, intraband absorption sets in at later times. In particular, in the low excitation regime, these intraband absorption processes prevail over the absorption bleaching resulting in a zero crossing of the differential transmission. Our findings are in good qualitative agreement with recent experimental pump-probe studies. PMID:25083654

  13. An automatic detection software for differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuksel, Seniha Esen; Dubroca, Thierry; Hummel, Rolf E.; Gader, Paul D.

    2012-06-01

    Recent terrorist attacks have sprung a need for a large scale explosive detector. Our group has developed differential reflection spectroscopy which can detect explosive residue on surfaces such as parcel, cargo and luggage. In short, broad band ultra-violet and visible light is shone onto a material (such as a parcel) moving on a conveyor belt. Upon reflection off the surface, the light intensity is recorded with a spectrograph (spectrometer in combination with a CCD camera). This reflected light intensity is then subtracted and normalized with the next data point collected, resulting in differential reflection spectra in the 200-500 nm range. Explosives show spectral finger-prints at specific wavelengths, for example, the spectrum of 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) shows an absorption edge at 420 nm. Additionally, we have developed an automated software which detects the characteristic features of explosives. One of the biggest challenges for the algorithm is to reach a practical limit of detection. In this study, we introduce our automatic detection software which is a combination of principal component analysis and support vector machines. Finally we present the sensitivity and selectivity response of our algorithm as a function of the amount of explosive detected on a given surface.

  14. Quantitative bloodstain analysis: differentiation of contact transfer patterns versus spatter patterns on fabric via microscopic inspection.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yuen; Springer, Faye; Tulleners, Frederic A; Ristenpart, William D

    2015-04-01

    In crime scene reconstruction, it is often necessary to differentiate "contact transfer" and "spatter" bloodstain patterns found on clothing. Current methodologies, however, are qualitative and prone to context bias. In this work, we demonstrate that microscopic inspection of the stain orientations provides a quantitative differentiation of bloodstains resulting from spatter versus contact transfer. Specifically, common knitted fabrics are comprised of parallel rows of left loop legs, in an upward diagonal orientation (/), and right loop legs in a downward diagonal orientation (\\). Our microscopic examination of more than 65,000 individual stained loop legs shows that spatter stains are approximately evenly distributed between left and right loop legs, but contact transfer stains are unevenly distributed: depending on the type of surface contacted, as many as 82% of the stains were preferentially located on the left loop legs. We further show that in these fabrics the left loop legs protrude further out than the right loop legs by approximately 50 μm, indicating that the observation of left loop legs preferentially stained over right loop legs is associated with the topography of the fabric. These findings suggest that microscopic quantification of the relative loop leg stain distributions could provide an objective means of differentiating contact transfer versus spatter patterns in crime scene reconstruction. PMID:25723999

  15. Quantitative bloodstain analysis: differentiation of contact transfer patterns versus spatter patterns on fabric via microscopic inspection.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yuen; Springer, Faye; Tulleners, Frederic A; Ristenpart, William D

    2015-04-01

    In crime scene reconstruction, it is often necessary to differentiate "contact transfer" and "spatter" bloodstain patterns found on clothing. Current methodologies, however, are qualitative and prone to context bias. In this work, we demonstrate that microscopic inspection of the stain orientations provides a quantitative differentiation of bloodstains resulting from spatter versus contact transfer. Specifically, common knitted fabrics are comprised of parallel rows of left loop legs, in an upward diagonal orientation (/), and right loop legs in a downward diagonal orientation (\\). Our microscopic examination of more than 65,000 individual stained loop legs shows that spatter stains are approximately evenly distributed between left and right loop legs, but contact transfer stains are unevenly distributed: depending on the type of surface contacted, as many as 82% of the stains were preferentially located on the left loop legs. We further show that in these fabrics the left loop legs protrude further out than the right loop legs by approximately 50 μm, indicating that the observation of left loop legs preferentially stained over right loop legs is associated with the topography of the fabric. These findings suggest that microscopic quantification of the relative loop leg stain distributions could provide an objective means of differentiating contact transfer versus spatter patterns in crime scene reconstruction.

  16. Effect of differential spectral reflectance on DIAL measurements using topographic targets. [Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric gases and temperature made using topographic targets to provide the backscattered signal are subject to errors from the differential spectral reflectance of the target materials. The magnitude of this effect is estimated for a number of DIAL measurements reported in the literature. Calculations are presented for several topographic targets. In general the effect on a DIAL measurement increases directly with increasing wavelength and laser line separation, and inversely with differential absorption coefficient and distance to the target. The effect can be minimized by using tunable or isotope lasers to reduce the laser line separation or by using additional reference wavelengths to determine the surface differential spectral reflectance.

  17. Modeling ion channel dynamics through reflected stochastic differential equations.

    PubMed

    Dangerfield, Ciara E; Kay, David; Burrage, Kevin

    2012-05-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that open and close at random and play a vital role in the electrical dynamics of excitable cells. The stochastic nature of the conformational changes these proteins undergo can be significant, however current stochastic modeling methodologies limit the ability to study such systems. Discrete-state Markov chain models are seen as the "gold standard," but are computationally intensive, restricting investigation of stochastic effects to the single-cell level. Continuous stochastic methods that use stochastic differential equations (SDEs) to model the system are more efficient but can lead to simulations that have no biological meaning. In this paper we show that modeling the behavior of ion channel dynamics by a reflected SDE ensures biologically realistic simulations, and we argue that this model follows from the continuous approximation of the discrete-state Markov chain model. Open channel and action potential statistics from simulations of ion channel dynamics using the reflected SDE are compared with those of a discrete-state Markov chain method. Results show that the reflected SDE simulations are in good agreement with the discrete-state approach. The reflected SDE model therefore provides a computationally efficient method to simulate ion channel dynamics while preserving the distributional properties of the discrete-state Markov chain model and also ensuring biologically realistic solutions. This framework could easily be extended to other biochemical reaction networks.

  18. A Combined Light Sheet Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast Microscope for Live Imaging of Multicellular Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan P.; Taormina, Michael J.; Jemielita, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: LSFM provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labeled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, while DICM reveals the unlabeled neighborhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for DICM and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behavior of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  19. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach.

  20. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well.

  1. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well. PMID:27649199

  2. A Differential Reflective Intensity Optical Fiber Angular Displacement Sensor.

    PubMed

    Jia, Binghui; He, Lei; Yan, Guodong; Feng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel differential reflective intensity optical fiber angular displacement sensor was proposed. This sensor can directly measure the angular and axial linear displacement of a flat surface. The structure of the sensor probe is simple and its basic principle was first analyzed according to the intensity modulation mechanisms. Secondly, in order to trim the dark output voltage to zero, the photoelectric conversion circuit was developed to adjust the signals. Then, the sensor model including the photoelectric conversion circuit has been established, and the influence of design parameters on the sensor output characteristic has been simulated. Finally, the design parameters of the sensor structure were obtained based on the simulation results; and an experimental test system was built for the sensor calibration. Experimental results show that the linear angular range and the sensitivity of the sensor were 74.4 and 0.051 V/°, respectively. Its change rules confirm the operating principle of the sensor well. PMID:27649199

  3. Living Matter Observations with a Novel Hyperspectral Supercontinuum Confocal Microscope for VIS to Near-IR Reflectance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Francesca R.; Ferrari, Luisa; Mussi, Valentina; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio; Selci, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    A broad range hyper-spectroscopic microscope fed by a supercontinuum laser source and equipped with an almost achromatic optical layout is illustrated with detailed explanations of the design, implementation and data. The real novelty of this instrument, a confocal spectroscopic microscope capable of recording high resolution reflectance data in the VIS-IR spectral range from about 500 nm to 2.5 μm wavelengths, is the possibility of acquiring spectral data at every physical point as defined by lateral coordinates, X and Y, as well as at a depth coordinate, Z, as obtained by the confocal optical sectioning advantage. With this apparatus we collect each single scanning point as a whole spectrum by combining two linear spectral detector arrays, one CCD for the visible range, and one InGaAs infrared array, simultaneously available at the sensor output channel of the home made instrument. This microscope has been developed for biomedical analysis of human skin and other similar applications. Results are shown illustrating the technical performances of the instrument and the capability in extracting information about the composition and the structure of different parts or compartments in biological samples as well as in solid statematter. A complete spectroscopic fingerprinting of samples at microscopic level is shown possible by using statistical analysis on raw data or analytical reflectance models based on Abelés matrix transfer methods. PMID:24233077

  4. Correlation between optical and topographical images from an external reflection near-field microscope with shear force feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Keller, Ole

    1995-07-01

    An external reflection scanning near-field optical microscope with shear force regulation of the tip-surface distance is described. Near-field optical and shear force topographical images are compared for various samples. It is shown that the most important correlative relationships between these images can be deduced from symmetry considerations. The possibility of extracting additional information from the optical images is demonstrated on images of human blood cells.

  5. Angle of incidence averaging in reflectance measurements with optical microscopes for studying layered two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Nihit; Mukherjee, Amlan; Sugunakar, Vasam; Ghosh, Sandip

    2014-07-01

    Reflectance spectrum measured using an optical microscope with a large numerical aperture objective lens is shown to get modified. The change is most prominent when there are optical interference related features in the spectrum. This modification is shown to arise primarily due to the wide range of angles of incidence involved in the measurement and a simple formulation is provided to correct for this in simulations. The importance of such analysis is brought out through a reflectance contrast spectroscopy based study for identifying mono-layer and bi-layer graphene and MoS2.

  6. Reflection of resonant light from a plane surface of an ensemble of motionless point scatters: Quantum microscopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraptsev, A. S.; Sokolov, I. M.

    2015-05-01

    On the basis of general theoretical results developed previously in [JETP 112, 246 (2011), 10.1134/S106377611101016X], we analyze the reflection of quasiresonant light from a plane surface of dense and disordered ensemble of motionless point scatters. Angle distribution of the scattered light is calculated both for s and p polarizations of the probe radiation. The ratio between coherent and incoherent (diffuse) components of scattered light is calculated. We analyze the contributions of scatters located at different distances from the surface and determine on this background the thickness of surface layer responsible for reflected beam generation. The inhomogeneity of dipole-dipole interaction near the surface is discussed. We study also dependence of total reflected light power on the incidence angle and compare the results of the microscopic approach with predictions of the Fresnel reflection theory. The calculations are performed for different densities of scatters and different frequencies of a probe radiation.

  7. Forensic Hair Differentiation Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Jeremy; Doty, Kyle C; McLaughlin, Gregory; Lednev, Igor K

    2016-07-01

    Hair and fibers are common forms of trace evidence found at crime scenes. The current methodology of microscopic examination of potential hair evidence is absent of statistical measures of performance, and examiner results for identification can be subjective. Here, attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to analyze synthetic fibers and natural hairs of human, cat, and dog origin. Chemometric analysis was used to differentiate hair spectra from the three different species, and to predict unknown hairs to their proper species class, with a high degree of certainty. A species-specific partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) model was constructed to discriminate human hair from cat and dog hairs. This model was successful in distinguishing between the three classes and, more importantly, all human samples were correctly predicted as human. An external validation resulted in zero false positive and false negative assignments for the human class. From a forensic perspective, this technique would be complementary to microscopic hair examination, and in no way replace it. As such, this methodology is able to provide a statistical measure of confidence to the identification of a sample of human, cat, and dog hair, which was called for in the 2009 National Academy of Sciences report. More importantly, this approach is non-destructive, rapid, can provide reliable results, and requires no sample preparation, making it of ample importance to the field of forensic science. PMID:27412186

  8. A Combined Light Sheet Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast Microscope for Live Imaging of Multicellular Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ryan; Taormina, Michael; Jemielita, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2015-03-01

    We present a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: LSFM provides high speed three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labeled components of multicellular systems, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, while DICM reveals the unlabeled neighborhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one microscope. To demonstrate the instrument's utility, we provide several examples which focus on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish. We show that DICM can sometimes circumvent the need for fluorescent based techniques, augmenting the number of parameters obtainable per experiment when used alongside LSFM, and that DICM can be used to augment each experiment by imaging complementary features, such as non-fluorescent local environments near fluorescent samples (e.g. fluorescent enteric neurons imaged alongside the non-fluorescent gut wall), interactions between fluorescent and non-fluorescent samples (e.g. bacteria), and more. NSF Award 0922951, NIH Award 1P50 GM098911

  9. Mapping microscopic order in plant and mammalian cells and tissues: novel differential polarization attachment for new generation confocal microscopes (DP-LSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, G.; Pawlak, K.; Pomozi, I.; Tóth, E. A.; Molnár, A.; Matkó, J.; Garab, G.

    2014-03-01

    Elucidation of the molecular architecture of complex, highly organized molecular macro-assemblies is an important, basic task for biology. Differential polarization (DP) measurements, such as linear (LD) and circular dichroism (CD) or the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), which can be carried out in a dichrograph or spectrofluorimeter, respectively, carry unique, spatially averaged information about the molecular organization of the sample. For inhomogeneous samples—e.g. cells and tissues—measurements on macroscopic scale are not satisfactory, and in some cases not feasible, thus microscopic techniques must be applied. The microscopic DP-imaging technique, when based on confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM), allows the pixel by pixel mapping of anisotropy of a sample in 2D and 3D. The first DP-LSM configuration, which, in fluorescence mode, allowed confocal imaging of different DP quantities in real-time, without interfering with the ‘conventional’ imaging, was built on a Zeiss LSM410. It was demonstrated to be capable of determining non-confocally the linear birefringence (LB) or LD of a sample and, confocally, its FDLD (fluorescence detected LD), the degree of polarization (P) and the anisotropy of the fluorescence emission (r), following polarized and non-polarized excitation, respectively (Steinbach et al 2009 Acta Histochem.111 316-25). This DP-LSM configuration, however, cannot simply be adopted to new generation microscopes with considerably more compact structures. As shown here, for an Olympus FV500, we designed an easy-to-install DP attachment to determine LB, LD, FDLD and r, in new-generation confocal microscopes, which, in principle, can be complemented with a P-imaging unit, but specifically to the brand and type of LSM.

  10. Differential phase shift of partially reflected radio waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to differential absorption experiments is shown to be both feasible and desirable. The phase information can provide a more sensitive measurement of electron density above about 75 km. The differential phase shift is only weakly dependent on collision frequency in this range, and so an accurate collision frequency profile is not a prerequisite. The differential phase shift and differential absorption measurements taken together can provide both electron density and collision frequency data from about 70 to 90 km.

  11. Improvements to a Grating-Based Spectral Imaging Microscope and Its Application to Reflectance Analysis of Blue Pen Inks.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Leilani C; Miller, Kathleen P; Webb, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    A modified design of a chromatically resolved optical microscope (CROMoscope), a grating-based spectral imaging microscope, is described. By altering the geometry and adding a beam splitter, a twisting aberration that was present in the first version of the CROMoscope has been removed. Wavelength adjustment has been automated to decrease analysis time. Performance of the new design in transmission-absorption spectroscopy has been evaluated and found to be generally similar to the performance of the previous design. Spectral bandpass was found to be dependent on the sizes of apertures, and the smallest measured spectral bandpass was 1.8 nm with 1.0 mm diameter apertures. Wavelength was found to be very linear with the sine of the grating angle (R(2) = 0.9999995), and wavelength repeatability was found to be much better than the spectral bandpass. Reflectance spectral imaging with a CROMoscope is reported for the first time, and this reflectance spectral imaging was applied to blue ink samples on white paper. As a proof of concept, linear discriminant analysis was used to classify the inks by brand. In a leave-one-out cross-validation, 97.6% of samples were correctly classified. PMID:26162719

  12. Label-free detection of biomolecular interactions in microarray format using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yung-Shin

    Microarrays of biological molecules are useful tools for discovery and functionality characterization in fundamental and applied research of genomics, proteomics, glycomics and cytomics. They provide a high-throughput platform that enables parallel studies of hundreds to tens of thousands of distinct biomolecular reactions. Characterization of binding reactions between surface-immobilized targets and solutions-phase analytes routinely involves fluorescence-based detection methods. However, labeling analytes inevitably changes innate properties of the molecules and in turn modifies analyte-target interactions in an often uncharacterized way. As a result, label-free microarray detection is desirable. In this dissertation, optical microscopes based on oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) technique are developed and used to detect biomolecular interactions in microarray format. OI-RD, a most sensitive form of optical elliposometry, measures the difference in reflectivity change (both magnitude and phase) between p- and s-polarized components of an optical beam. Such a difference is related to the thickness and dielectric constant of surface-immobilized biomolecules. Specially, I use these OI-RD microscopes to study different biomolecular interactions including (1) Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand interactions; (2) Macromolecular scaffolds for immobilizing small molecule microarrays for detection of protein-ligand interactions; (3) Lectin-glyan and virus-glycan interactions; (4) Others applications such as protein-protein, DNA-DNA, DNA-protein, sugar-protein, and small molecule-protein interactions. These experimental results demonstrate that the OI-RD microscopes will serve as powerful tools in biosensing, high-throughput screening, and other applications in biophysics, biochemistry and biomedical engineering.

  13. Measurement of anchoring coefficient of homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystal using a polarizing optical microscope in reflective mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Sang-In; Kim, Sung-Jo; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Although the homeotropic alignment of liquid crystals is widely used in LCD TVs, no easy method exists to measure its anchoring coefficient. In this study, we propose an easy and convenient measurement technique in which a polarizing optical microscope is used in the reflective mode with an objective lens having a low depth of focus. All measurements focus on the reflection of light near the interface between the liquid crystal and alignment layer. The change in the reflected light is measured by applying an electric field. We model the response of the director of the liquid crystal to the electric field and, thus, the change in reflectance. By adjusting the extrapolation length in the calculation, we match the experimental and calculated results and obtain the anchoring coefficient. In our experiment, the extrapolation lengths were 0.31 ± 0.04 μm, 0.32 ± 0.08 μm, and 0.23 ± 0.05 μm for lecithin, AL-64168, and SE-5662, respectively.

  14. Bronchoalveolar lavage cell differential on microscope glass cover. A simple and accurate technique

    SciTech Connect

    Laviolette, M.; Carreau, M.; Coulombe, R.

    1988-08-01

    We describe a quick and easy technique to perform cell differentials on bronchoalveolar lavage: the microscope glass cover. Lavage fluids of 72 subjects were analyzed by 3 techniques: glass cover, filter, and cytocentrifuge preparations. Seventy-seven other lavages were analyzed by glass cover and cytocentrifuge preparations alone. Data for the 72 subjects studied by all 3 techniques showed that the cell counts on glass cover and filter preparations were similar, e.g., lymphocytes, 19.2% (range, 0.5 to 94%) and 20.9% (range, 3 to 95%), respectively (Spearman's correlation coefficient, 0.98). However, on cytocentrifuge preparations, lymphocyte counts were lower (8.3%; range, zero to 87%) and macrophage counts were higher (p less than 0.005). Comparison of glass cover and cytocentrifuge preparation mixtures with varying amounts (20 to 80%) of purified blood leukocytes labeled with 51Cr (greater than or equal to 72% lymphocytes) showed that a significant amount of radioactive cells was lost during the cytocentrifuge technique in contrast to the glass cover technique. Because neutrophils represented a low proportion of lavage cells, we also evaluated cell suspensions with known neutrophil contents (10 to 70%); we found no difference in neutrophil counts obtained with the 3 techniques. Lavage data analysis of 40 young nonsmoking volunteers showed that glass cover lymphocyte count was also higher than counts on cytocentrifuge preparations: 16.5% (range, 3 to 45%) and 8.2% (range, 2.5 to 35%), respectively. In this group, the distribution of glass cover lymphocyte percentages was normal (p = 0.21, chi 2 test), and the one-tailed 95% confidence interval was 18.6 to 34.7% (mean plus 1.65 standard deviation).

  15. Effects of microscopic iron metal on the reflectance spectra of glass and minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Mckay, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Maturity, which is a measure of the time lunar soils have been in the upper approximately 1 mm of the surface, is correlated with changes in the soils' optical properties. Mature soil is darker and somewhat redder than immature soil of the same composition, and features in the reflectance spectrum become more subdued with increasing maturity. The maturation process also involves accumulation of agglutinitic glass and submicroscopic metallic iron particles. We have produced submicrometer iron metal blebs on the surface and within glass and mineral grains by the method of high-temperature reduction. This technique has permitted the determination of optical changes in samples much simpler than lunar soil, and offers a useful tool with which to investigate the maturation process.

  16. All-plastic, miniature, digital fluorescence microscope for three part white blood cell differential measurements at the point of care

    PubMed Central

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Majors, Catherine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2015-01-01

    Three-part differential white blood cell counts are used for disease diagnosis and monitoring at the point-of-care. A low-cost, miniature achromatic microscope was fabricated for identification of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in samples of whole blood stained with acridine orange. The microscope was manufactured using rapid prototyping techniques of diamond turning and 3D printing and is intended for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings. The custom-designed microscope requires no manual adjustment between samples and was successfully able to classify three white blood cell types (lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes) using samples of peripheral whole blood stained with acridine orange. PMID:26601006

  17. All-plastic, miniature, digital fluorescence microscope for three part white blood cell differential measurements at the point of care.

    PubMed

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal E; Majors, Catherine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2015-11-01

    Three-part differential white blood cell counts are used for disease diagnosis and monitoring at the point-of-care. A low-cost, miniature achromatic microscope was fabricated for identification of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in samples of whole blood stained with acridine orange. The microscope was manufactured using rapid prototyping techniques of diamond turning and 3D printing and is intended for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings. The custom-designed microscope requires no manual adjustment between samples and was successfully able to classify three white blood cell types (lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes) using samples of peripheral whole blood stained with acridine orange. PMID:26601006

  18. Label-free imaging of intracellular motility by low-coherent quantitative phase microscope in reflection geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Iwai, Hidenao; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate tomographic imaging of intracellular activity of living cells by a low-coherent quantitative phase microscope. The intracellular organelles, such as the nucleus, nucleolus, and mitochondria, are moving around inside living cells, driven by the cellular physiological activity. In order to visualize the intracellular motility in a label-free manner we have developed a reflection-type quantitative phase microscope which employs the phase shifting interferometric technique with a low-coherent light source. The phase shifting interferometry enables us to quantitatively measure the intensity and phase of the optical field, and the low-coherence interferometry makes it possible to selectively probe a specific sectioning plane in the cell volume. The results quantitatively revealed the depth-resolved fluctuations of intracellular surfaces so that the plasma membrane and the membranes of intracellular organelles were independently measured. The transversal and the vertical spatial resolutions were 0.56 μm and 0.93 μm, respectively, and the mechanical sensitivity of the phase measurement was 1.2 nanometers. The mean-squared displacement was applied as a statistical tool to analyze the temporal fluctuation of the intracellular organelles. To the best of our knowledge, our system visualized depth-resolved intracellular organelles motion for the first time in sub-micrometer resolution without contrast agents.

  19. Van Hove singularities of some icosahedral boron-rich solids by differential reflectivity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    Differential reflectivity spectra of some icosahedral boron rich solids, β-rhombohedral boron, boron carbide and YB66-type crystals, were measured. The derivatives yield the van Hove singularities, which are compared with results obtained by other experimental methods.

  20. Detection of explosive materials by differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Rolf E.; Fuller, Anna M.; Schöllhorn, Claus; Holloway, Paul H.

    2006-06-01

    It is shown that traces of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) display strong and distinct structures in differential reflectograms, near 420 and 250nm. These characteristic peaks are not observed from moth balls, nail polish, polyvinyl chloride, starch, soap, paper, epoxy, aspirin, polycarbonate, aspartame, polystyrene, polyester, fertilizer, or sugar, to mention a few substances which may be in or on a suitcase. The described technique for detection of TNT is fast, inexpensive, reliable, and portable and does not require contact with the surveyed substance. Moreover, we have developed a curve recognition program for field applications of the technique. The origin of the spectra is discussed.

  1. Differentiating characteristic microstructural features of cancerous tissues using Mueller matrix microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; Zeng, Nan; Liu, Shaoxiong; Li, Migao; Ma, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Polarized light imaging can provide rich microstructural information of samples, and has been applied to the detections of various abnormal tissues. In this paper, we report a polarized light microscope based on Mueller matrix imaging by adding the polarization state generator and analyzer (PSG and PSA) to a commercial transmission optical microscope. The maximum errors for the absolute values of Mueller matrix elements are reduced to 0.01 after calibration. This Mueller matrix microscope has been used to examine human cervical and liver cancerous tissues with fibrosis. Images of the transformed Mueller matrix parameters provide quantitative assessment on the characteristic features of the pathological tissues. Contrast mechanism of the experimental results are backed up by Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere-cylinder birefringence model, which reveal the relationship between the pathological features in the cancerous tissues at the cellular level and the polarization parameters. Both the experimental and simulated data indicate that the microscopic transformed Mueller matrix parameters can distinguish the breaking down of birefringent normal tissues for cervical cancer, or the formation of birefringent surrounding structures accompanying the inflammatory reaction for liver cancer. With its simple structure, fast measurement and high precision, polarized light microscope based on Mueller matrix shows a good diagnosis application prospect.

  2. Differentiating characteristic microstructural features of cancerous tissues using Mueller matrix microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ye; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; Zeng, Nan; Liu, Shaoxiong; Li, Migao; Ma, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Polarized light imaging can provide rich microstructural information of samples, and has been applied to the detections of various abnormal tissues. In this paper, we report a polarized light microscope based on Mueller matrix imaging by adding the polarization state generator and analyzer (PSG and PSA) to a commercial transmission optical microscope. The maximum errors for the absolute values of Mueller matrix elements are reduced to 0.01 after calibration. This Mueller matrix microscope has been used to examine human cervical and liver cancerous tissues with fibrosis. Images of the transformed Mueller matrix parameters provide quantitative assessment on the characteristic features of the pathological tissues. Contrast mechanism of the experimental results are backed up by Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere-cylinder birefringence model, which reveal the relationship between the pathological features in the cancerous tissues at the cellular level and the polarization parameters. Both the experimental and simulated data indicate that the microscopic transformed Mueller matrix parameters can distinguish the breaking down of birefringent normal tissues for cervical cancer, or the formation of birefringent surrounding structures accompanying the inflammatory reaction for liver cancer. With its simple structure, fast measurement and high precision, polarized light microscope based on Mueller matrix shows a good diagnosis application prospect. PMID:26280279

  3. Particle localization with total internal reflection illumination and differential detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ye; Kuang, Cuifang; Fang, Yue; Ge, Baoliang; Mao, Xinmin; Shen, Shuhao; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    A theoretical framework of an alternative to TIRFM for high-speed reconstruction of the axial information from a fluorescent sample is presented. Two detectors are applied to capture the sample intensity, and the differential signal from the two detectors is used to determine the axial location with decreased detected noise. The axial response is analyzed theoretically; for greater accuracy, the distance dependence of the radiation patterns of samples near the interface is considered. Depth measurements with improved axial resolution and robustness to noise were obtained. The method may provide a reliable tool for 3-D reconstruction and tracking of fluorescent particles for studies of the mechanisms of cellular and subcellular processes near the cell surface.

  4. Behavioral reactions reflecting differential reward expectations in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Cromwell, H C; Tremblay, L; Hollerman, J R; Hikosaka, K; Schultz, W

    2001-10-01

    Learning theory emphasizes the importance of expectations in the control of instrumental action. This study investigated the variation of behavioral reactions toward different rewards as an expression of differential expectations of outcomes in primates. We employed several versions of two basic behavioral paradigms, the spatial delayed response task and the delayed reaction task. These tasks are commonly used in neurobiological studies of working memory, movement preparation, and event expectation involving the frontal cortex and basal ganglia. An initial visual instruction stimulus indicated to the animal which one of several food or liquid rewards would be delivered after each correct behavioral response, or whether or not a reward could be obtained. We measured the reaction times of the operantly conditioned arm movement necessary for obtaining the reward, and the durations of anticipatory licking prior to liquid reward delivery as a Pavlovian conditioned response. The results showed that both measures varied depending on the reward predicted by the initial instruction. Arm movements were performed with significantly shorter reaction times for foods or liquids that were more preferred by the animal than for less preferred ones. Still larger differences were observed between rewarded and unrewarded trials. An interesting effect was found in unrewarded trials, in which reaction times were significantly shorter when a highly preferred reward was delivered in the alternative rewarded trials of the same trial block as compared to a less preferred reward. Anticipatory licks preceding the reward were significantly longer when highly preferred rather than less preferred rewards, or no rewards, were predicted. These results demonstrate that behavioral reactions preceding rewards may vary depending on the predicted future reward and suggest that monkeys differentially expect particular outcomes in the presently investigated tasks.

  5. Toward the development of a soft x-ray reflection imaging microscope in the Schwarzschild configuration using a soft x-ray laser at 18. 2 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Dicicco, D.; Rosser, R. ); Kim, D.; Suckewer, S. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1991-12-01

    We present the recent results obtained from a soft X-ray reflection imaging microscope in the Schwarzschild configuration. The microscope demonstrated a spatial resolution of 0.7 {mu}m with a magnification of 16 at 18.2 nm. The soft X-ray laser at 18.2 nm was used as an X-ray source. Mo/Si multilayers were coated on the Schwarzschild optics and the normal incidence reflectivity at 18.2 nm per surface was measured to be {approximately} 20 %. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Microscopic emission and reflectance thermal infrared spectroscopy: instrumentation for quantitative in situ mineralogy of complex planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C S; Christensen, P R

    2013-04-10

    The diversity of investigations of planetary surfaces, especially Mars, using in situ instrumentation over the last decade is unprecedented in the exploration history of our solar system. The style of instrumentation that landed spacecraft can support is dependent on several parameters, including mass, power consumption, instrument complexity, cost, and desired measurement type (e.g., chemistry, mineralogy, petrology, morphology, etc.), all of which must be evaluated when deciding an appropriate spacecraft payload. We present a laboratory technique for a microscopic emission and reflectance spectrometer for the analysis of martian analog materials as a strong candidate for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to definitively assess sample mineralogy and petrology while preserving geologic context. We discuss the instrument capabilities, signal and noise, and overall system performance. We evaluate the ability of this instrument to quantitatively determine sample mineralogy, including bulk mineral abundances. This capability is greatly enhanced. Whereas the number of mineral components observed from existing emission spectrometers is high (often >5 to 10 depending on the number of accessory and alteration phases present), the number of mineral components at any microscopic measurement spot is low (typically <2 to 3). Since this style of instrument is based on a long heritage of thermal infrared emission spectrometers sent to orbit (the thermal emission spectrometer), sent to planetary surfaces [the mini-thermal emission spectrometers (mini-TES)], and evaluated in laboratory environments (e.g., the Arizona State University emission spectrometer laboratory), direct comparisons to existing data are uniquely possible with this style of instrument. The ability to obtain bulk mineralogy and atmospheric data, much in the same manner as the mini-TESs, is of significant additional value and maintains the long history of atmospheric monitoring for Mars

  7. Microscopic emission and reflectance thermal infrared spectroscopy: instrumentation for quantitative in situ mineralogy of complex planetary surfaces.

    PubMed

    Edwards, C S; Christensen, P R

    2013-04-10

    The diversity of investigations of planetary surfaces, especially Mars, using in situ instrumentation over the last decade is unprecedented in the exploration history of our solar system. The style of instrumentation that landed spacecraft can support is dependent on several parameters, including mass, power consumption, instrument complexity, cost, and desired measurement type (e.g., chemistry, mineralogy, petrology, morphology, etc.), all of which must be evaluated when deciding an appropriate spacecraft payload. We present a laboratory technique for a microscopic emission and reflectance spectrometer for the analysis of martian analog materials as a strong candidate for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to definitively assess sample mineralogy and petrology while preserving geologic context. We discuss the instrument capabilities, signal and noise, and overall system performance. We evaluate the ability of this instrument to quantitatively determine sample mineralogy, including bulk mineral abundances. This capability is greatly enhanced. Whereas the number of mineral components observed from existing emission spectrometers is high (often >5 to 10 depending on the number of accessory and alteration phases present), the number of mineral components at any microscopic measurement spot is low (typically <2 to 3). Since this style of instrument is based on a long heritage of thermal infrared emission spectrometers sent to orbit (the thermal emission spectrometer), sent to planetary surfaces [the mini-thermal emission spectrometers (mini-TES)], and evaluated in laboratory environments (e.g., the Arizona State University emission spectrometer laboratory), direct comparisons to existing data are uniquely possible with this style of instrument. The ability to obtain bulk mineralogy and atmospheric data, much in the same manner as the mini-TESs, is of significant additional value and maintains the long history of atmospheric monitoring for Mars

  8. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection of biochemical reactions in a microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P.; Sun, Yung-Shin; Gregg, Jeff P.; Lam, Kit S.; Guo, Xiaowen

    2007-04-01

    We describe a recently developed oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) microscope, a form of polarization-modulated imaging ellipsometer, for label-free-high-throughput detection of biomolecular reactions on DNA and protein microarrays. We present examples of application of this technique to end-point and real-time investigations of DNA-DNA hybridization, antibody-antigen capture, and protein-small-molecule binding reactions. Compared to a conventional imaging ellipsometer based on the polarizer-compensator-sample-analyzer scheme and under the off-null condition, a polarization-modulated OI-RD microscope is inherently more sensitive by at least 1 order of magnitude to thickness changes on a solid surface. Compared with imaging surface plasmon resonance microscopes based on reflectance change on falling or rising slopes of the surface plasmon resonance, the OI-RD microscope (1) has a comparable sensitivity, (2) is applicable to conventional microscope glass slides, and (3) easily covers a field of view as large as the entire surface of a 1 in.×3 in. (2.54 cm×7.62 cm) microscope slide.

  9. Algorithms for differentiating between images of heterogeneous tissue across fluorescence microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Chitalia, Rhea; Mueller, Jenna; Fu, Henry L.; Whitley, Melodi Javid; Kirsch, David G.; Brown, J. Quincy; Willett, Rebecca; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy can be used to acquire real-time images of tissue morphology and with appropriate algorithms can rapidly quantify features associated with disease. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of various segmentation algorithms to isolate fluorescent positive features (FPFs) in heterogeneous images and identify an approach that can be used across multiple fluorescence microscopes with minimal tuning between systems. Specifically, we show a variety of image segmentation algorithms applied to images of stained tumor and muscle tissue acquired with 3 different fluorescence microscopes. Results indicate that a technique called maximally stable extremal regions followed by thresholding (MSER + Binary) yielded the greatest contrast in FPF density between tumor and muscle images across multiple microscopy systems. PMID:27699108

  10. Algorithms for differentiating between images of heterogeneous tissue across fluorescence microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Chitalia, Rhea; Mueller, Jenna; Fu, Henry L.; Whitley, Melodi Javid; Kirsch, David G.; Brown, J. Quincy; Willett, Rebecca; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy can be used to acquire real-time images of tissue morphology and with appropriate algorithms can rapidly quantify features associated with disease. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of various segmentation algorithms to isolate fluorescent positive features (FPFs) in heterogeneous images and identify an approach that can be used across multiple fluorescence microscopes with minimal tuning between systems. Specifically, we show a variety of image segmentation algorithms applied to images of stained tumor and muscle tissue acquired with 3 different fluorescence microscopes. Results indicate that a technique called maximally stable extremal regions followed by thresholding (MSER + Binary) yielded the greatest contrast in FPF density between tumor and muscle images across multiple microscopy systems.

  11. In-situ microscopic observation of GaAs surfaces during molecular beam epitaxy and metalorganic molecular beam epitaxy by scanning microprobe reflection high energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isu, Toshiro; Watanabe, Akiyoshi; Hata, Masayuki; Katayama, Yoshifumi

    1990-03-01

    Microscopic observations of epitaxial growth layers of GaAs were made with a scanning microprobe reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). A scanning microprobe electron gun has been combined with a specially designed molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system with both solid sources and gas sources. Scanning reflection electron microscope (SREM) images using the specular beam spot revealed granular features over the entire surfaces of MBE-grown GaAs layers, which were thought to come from undulation of the surface. Similar features of the surface were observed on the layers grown by gas-source MBE using trimethylgallium and arsine. A microscopic surface morphology was found to be fairly rough and the features depended on the species of the sources and growth conditions.

  12. Effect of differential spectral reflectance on DIAL measurements using topographic targets.

    PubMed

    Grant, W B

    1982-07-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric gases and temperature made using topographic targets to provide the backscattered signal are subject to errors from the differential spectral reflectance of the target materials. The magnitude of this effect is estimated for a number of DIAL measurements reported in the literature. Calculations are presented for several topographic targets. In general the effect on a DIAL measurement increases directly with increasing wavelength and laser line separation, and inversely with differential absorption coefficient and distance to the target. The effect can be minimized by using tunable or isotope lasers to reduce the laser line separation or by using additional reference wavelengths to determine the surface differential spectral reflectance. PMID:20396041

  13. Light diffuse reflectance for detection and differentiation of teeth caries lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Uzunov, Tz.; Valkanov, S.; Avramov, L.

    2007-05-01

    One of the goals of the contemporary dentistry is differentiation between carious stages that must be fast, non-invasive procedure, which will allow to the dentists to make reliable judgments. One suitable candidate for such method is reflectance spectroscopy. The objectives of current study are to determine the feasibility of applying the light reflectance spectroscopy technique for detection of different carious stages; therefore reflectance spectra of teeth illuminated at 450- 900 nm light were recorded. There are obtained reflectance signals from the healthy enamel, dentine and different lesion stages of the investigated teeth. These spectra are compared to that, obtained by non-carious tooth lesions - fluorosa and odontolithiasis, resembling on initial carious stages. There is observed a significant decrease of the intensity of the reflected light in blue region in the case of caries. Reflectance signals, obtained from non-carious lesions also have significantly different character and could be used for differentiation between them and initial carious stages. An algorithm for differentiation between carious stages is proposed with diagnostic accuracy achieved up to 86,1% between precarious stage and sound tooth and 100% for determination of deep cavitation. Some comments about role of teeth enamel structure and anisotropy factor of dental layers on the results obtained are also made.

  14. Electron microscopic study of the differentiation and development of trophocytes and oocytes in Gerris najas (Heteroptera).

    PubMed

    Choi, W C; Nagl, W

    1976-01-01

    The differentiation of oogonia and oocytes, and of trophocytes, from undifferentiated germ line cells has been studied in Gerris najas, a pond skater, from the fourth instar to the adult animal. For the first time criteria have been obtained which allow the distinction between poorly differentiated early oogonia and nurse cells. The most important criteria are the size, shape, and structure of nuclei and mucleoli. This is consistent with the different function of these cell types, which is primarily a different nuclear function: meiosis in the oocytes, and RNA synthesis to support the trophic core and the oocytes in the trophocytes.

  15. Scanning electron microscopic observations and differentiation of eggs of the Anopheles dirus complex.

    PubMed

    Damrongphol, P; Baimai, V

    1989-12-01

    Microscopic observations have revealed differences among the eggs of species A, B, C and D of the Anopheles dirus complex. The eggs of species A and C are similar in size and shape. They are intermediate in size between the eggs of species B, which is the largest, and that of species D, which is the smallest. The pattern of outer chorionic cells between the frill and the float is species specific. The pattern consists of rows of irregularly shaped cells in species D and different numbers of rows of regularly shaped cells in species A, B and C. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the deck tubercles are arranged in aggregates which are more widely spaced in species A than in species B. The aggregates are large in species C, of moderate size in species A and B, and small in species D. The egg characters may be useful in separating species A, B, C and D of the An. dirus complex.

  16. Optimising performance of a confocal fluorescence microscope with a differential pinhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, Rohan; Walker, John G.; Phillips, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-resolution trade-off is of great importance to bio-imaging applications where the aim is to image the sample using as little light as possible without significantly sacrificing image quality. In this paper the inherent SNR-resolution tradeoff in Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy (CFM) systems is presented by means of an effective tradeoff curve. A CFM system that employs a differential pinhole detection scheme has recently been shown to offer increased resolution, but at the expense of SNR. An optimum profile for the differential pinhole is identified in this paper that offers improved performance over a conventional (circular pinhole) system. The performance enhancement is illustrated through computer simulation.

  17. Quantitative zonal differentiation of articular cartilage by microscopic magnetic resonance imaging, polarized light microscopy, and Fourier-transform infrared imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Xia, Yang

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to synchronize the zonal differentiation of the full-thickness articular cartilage by three micro-imaging techniques, namely microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (µMRI), polarized light microscopy (PLM), and Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FTIRI). Eighteen cartilage-bone blocks from three canine humeral joints were imaged by: (a) µMRI T2 relaxation at 0° and 55° orientations in a 7 T magnetic field, (b) PLM optical retardation and azimuthal angle, and (c) FTIRI amide I and amide II anisotropies at 0° and 90° polarizations relative to the articular surface. In addition, µMRI T1 relaxation was imaged before and after the tissue being immersed in gadolinium (contrast agent) solution, to calculate the proteoglycan concentration. A set of previously established criteria in cartilage imaging was revised. The new criteria could simultaneously correlate the thicknesses of the three consecutive subtissue zones in articular cartilage among these imaging techniques.

  18. Implementation of the coupled-wave method for V-shaped groove characterization with a scanning differential heterodyne microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, I. M.; Baranov, D. V.; Zolotov, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    The image formation theory is presented for scanning differential heterodyne microscope respect to triangular-shaped grooves used for plasmon-polariton waveguiding. The scattering problem of the illuminating probe beams focused on the object surface is resolved with rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) for groove corrugated grating etched in a substrate with the finite conductivity. To adapt the RCWA method for SDHM the problems were considered associated with a discretization of the diffracted field and sampling the focused probe beams. The focused beams are expanded in terms of plane waves so that the each chosen incident wave is order of one another and then the diffraction problem is solved for every plane wave of TE polarization. The groove was decomposed into thin layers in which the permittivity and electromagnetic field are expanded in Fourier series. The diffraction of the probe beams by triangular groove was analyzed, at that the convergence of modulus and phase responses of SDHM in dependence of the number of the layers and the number of Fourier modes in optical field expansion was investigated. The elaborated algorithm was used for the simulation of differential responses from triangular grooves with various parameters.

  19. Microscopic Mapping of Subnanometric Motion with Multiple-Beam Differential Holographic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hungyi

    The measurement of ultrasmall displacement is usually performed by laser interferometry. In most cases, this method is specified for the surface measurement and requires a relatively smooth surface capable of reflecting light. In this research, a newly developed method, mutiple -beam microdifferential holography, is introduced to measure a small configuration change. This configuration change can happen on the surface of an object or inside a semitransparent object. In the experiment, two reference beams are used to record a pair of phase biased holographic images simultaneously. During the image reconstruction, the CCD image acquisition system is employed to record the pair of images one at a time and then process them digitally. The subtraction image intuitively shows that the deformation of tested object occurs between the double exposures applied during the holographic recording. A second object beam, usually a plane wave, is added to the imaging system for the purpose of image registration, which is required for the image processing. Several developments upgraded the system performance. The calibration was done with an extremely consistent moving object, a small air bubble drifting in a glycerine-filled capillary. Displacements as small as 0.4 nanometer are reported. In application, a living cell, a single frog muscle fiber, was under examination. This part of the research focused mainly on the crossbridge mechanism of striated muscle contraction. The images made at the plateau of tetanus suggest either that the cycling time constant is much longer than 10 msec, that the displacement for a power stroke is substantially less than 12 nanometer, or that the crossbridge is not cycling during the isometric force generation. The images made at the initial state of force development suggest that a large number of crossbridges shift toward the actin filament at the onset of the force development and stay there (at least without large scale rotation) even when the

  20. Multiple wall-reflection effect in adaptive-array differential-phase reflectometry on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, H.; Mishra, K.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hamasaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Onchi, T.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; QUEST Team

    2016-01-01

    A phased array antenna and Software-Defined Radio (SDR) heterodyne-detection systems have been developed for adaptive array approaches in reflectometry on the QUEST. In the QUEST device considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave (multiple wall-reflection) effect was significantly observed with distorted amplitude and phase evolution even if the adaptive array analyses were applied. The distorted fields were analyzed by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) in wavenumber domain to treat separately the components with and without wall reflections. The differential phase evolution was properly obtained from the distorted field evolution by the FFT procedures. A frequency derivative method has been proposed to overcome the multiple-wall reflection effect, and SDR super-heterodyned components with small frequency difference for the derivative method were correctly obtained using the FFT analysis.

  1. Reflecting microscope system with a 0.99 numerical aperture designed for three-dimensional fluorescence imaging of individual molecules at cryogenic temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Inagawa, H.; Toratani, Y.; Motohashi, K.; Nakamura, I.; Matsushita, M.; Fujiyoshi, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a cryogenic fluorescence microscope system, the core of which is a reflecting objective that consists of spherical and aspherical mirrors. The use of an aspherical mirror allows the reflecting objective to have a numerical aperture (NA) of up to 0.99, which is close to the maximum possible NA of 1.03 in superfluid helium. The performance of the system at a temperature of 1.7 K was tested by recording a three-dimensional fluorescence image of individual quantum dots using excitation wavelengths (λex) of 532 nm and 635 nm. At 1.7 K, the microscope worked with achromatic and nearly diffraction-limited performance. The 1/e2 radius (Γ) of the point spread function of the reflecting objective in the lateral (xy) direction was 0.212 ± 0.008 μm at λex = 532 nm and was less than 1.2 times the simulated value for a perfectly polished objective. The radius Γ in the axial (z) direction was 0.91 ± 0.04 μm at λex = 532 nm and was less than 1.4 times the simulated value of Γ. The chromatic aberrations between the two wavelengths were one order of magnitude smaller than Γ in each direction. PMID:26239746

  2. Dual/differential coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering module for multiphoton microscopes with a femtosecond Ti:sapphire oscillator.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    In the last decade, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has emerged as a powerful multiphoton imaging technique offering label-free chemical sensitivity and high three-dimensional resolution. However, its widespread application in the life sciences has been hampered by the use of costly pulsed lasers, the existence of a nonresonant background requiring involved technical solutions for its efficient suppression, and the limited acquisition speed of multiplex techniques addressing several vibrational resonances, if improved chemical specificity is needed. We have recently reported a differential CARS technique (D-CARS), which simultaneously measures two vibrational frequencies, enhancing the chemical selectivity and sensitivity without introducing costly hardware, while maintaining fast acquisition. In this study, we demonstrate a compact, fully automated, cost-effective module, which integrates on hardware and software level with a commercial multiphoton microscope based on a single 100 fs Ti:Sapphire oscillator and enables D-CARS microscopy in a user-friendly format for applications in the life sciences.

  3. Spectrophotometric Method for Differentiation of Human Skin Melanoma. I. Optical Diffuse Reflection Coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, V. G.; Ivanov, A. P.; Kvaternyuk, S. M.; Barun, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    We have designed an experimental setup, based on two integrating spheres, that lets us measure the optical diffuse reflectance spectra (diffuse reflection coefficient vs. wavelength) of human skin quickly under clinical conditions in vivo. For the wavelength interval 520-1100 nm, we give the values of the diffuse reflection coefficient for healthy tissue, skin with a benign nevus, and skin with a malignant melanoma for a large group of test subjects. We experimentally established a number of wavelengths in the red-near IR region of the spectrum which can be used for early differential diagnosis of nevi and melanoma in patient cancer screening. According to the Kramer-Welch test, the probability of the diffuse reflection coefficient for skin with melanoma and a nevus having different distributions is >0.94, and at many wavelengths it is >0.999. By solving the inverse problem, we estimated the changes in a number of structural and biophysical parameters of the tissue on going from healthy skin to nevus and melanoma. The results obtained can provide a basis for developing a clinical approach to identifying the risk of malignant transformation of the skin before surgery and histological analysis of the tissue.

  4. Differential impact of Limnoperna fortunei-herbicide interaction between Roundup Max® and glyphosate on freshwater microscopic communities.

    PubMed

    Gattás, F; Vinocur, A; Graziano, M; Dos Santos Afonso, M; Pizarro, H; Cataldo, D

    2016-09-01

    Multiple anthropogenic stressors act simultaneously on the environment, with consequences different from those caused by single-stressor exposure. We investigated how the combination of the invasive mussel Limnoperna fortunei and a widely applied herbicide, Roundup Max®, affected freshwater microscopic communities and water quality. Further, we compared these results with those induced by the combination of the mussel and technical-grade glyphosate. We carried out a 34-day experiment in outdoor mesocosms, applying the following six treatments: 6 mg L(-1) of technical-grade glyphosate (G), the equivalent concentration of glyphosate in Roundup Max® (R), 100 mussels (M), the combination of mussels and herbicide either in the technical-grade or formulated form (MG and MR, respectively), and control (C). Herbicides significantly increased total phosphorus in water; R and MR showed greater initial total nitrogen and ammonium. R increased picoplankton abundance and caused an eightfold increase in phytoplankton, with high turbidity values; G had a lower effect on these variables. Herbicide-mussel combination induced an accelerated dissipation of glyphosate in water (MG 6.36 ± 0.83 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1) and MR 5.16 ± 1.26 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1)). A synergistic effect on ammonium was observed in MR but not in MG. MR and MG had an antagonistic effect on phytoplankton, which showed a drastic reduction due to grazing, as revealed by M. We provide evidence of differential effects of Roundup Max® and technical-grade glyphosate over water quality and microscopic communities, and in combination with mussels. However, in the combination of mussels and herbicides, mussels seem to play a leading role. In the presence of L. fortunei, the effects of higher nutrient availability provided by herbicides addition were counteracted by the filtration activity of mussels, which released nutrients, grazed on picoplankton and phytoplankton, and boosted the development of other

  5. Differential impact of Limnoperna fortunei-herbicide interaction between Roundup Max® and glyphosate on freshwater microscopic communities.

    PubMed

    Gattás, F; Vinocur, A; Graziano, M; Dos Santos Afonso, M; Pizarro, H; Cataldo, D

    2016-09-01

    Multiple anthropogenic stressors act simultaneously on the environment, with consequences different from those caused by single-stressor exposure. We investigated how the combination of the invasive mussel Limnoperna fortunei and a widely applied herbicide, Roundup Max®, affected freshwater microscopic communities and water quality. Further, we compared these results with those induced by the combination of the mussel and technical-grade glyphosate. We carried out a 34-day experiment in outdoor mesocosms, applying the following six treatments: 6 mg L(-1) of technical-grade glyphosate (G), the equivalent concentration of glyphosate in Roundup Max® (R), 100 mussels (M), the combination of mussels and herbicide either in the technical-grade or formulated form (MG and MR, respectively), and control (C). Herbicides significantly increased total phosphorus in water; R and MR showed greater initial total nitrogen and ammonium. R increased picoplankton abundance and caused an eightfold increase in phytoplankton, with high turbidity values; G had a lower effect on these variables. Herbicide-mussel combination induced an accelerated dissipation of glyphosate in water (MG 6.36 ± 0.83 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1) and MR 5.16 ± 1.26 mg G g DW(-1) day(-1)). A synergistic effect on ammonium was observed in MR but not in MG. MR and MG had an antagonistic effect on phytoplankton, which showed a drastic reduction due to grazing, as revealed by M. We provide evidence of differential effects of Roundup Max® and technical-grade glyphosate over water quality and microscopic communities, and in combination with mussels. However, in the combination of mussels and herbicides, mussels seem to play a leading role. In the presence of L. fortunei, the effects of higher nutrient availability provided by herbicides addition were counteracted by the filtration activity of mussels, which released nutrients, grazed on picoplankton and phytoplankton, and boosted the development of other

  6. High accuracy subwavelength distance measurements: A variable-angle standing-wave total-internal-reflection optical microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Haynie, A.; Min, T.-J.; Luan, L.; Mu, W.; Ketterson, J. B.

    2009-04-15

    We describe an extension of the total-internal-reflection microscopy technique that permits direct in-plane distance measurements with high accuracy (<10 nm) over a wide range of separations. This high position accuracy arises from the creation of a standing evanescent wave and the ability to sweep the nodal positions (intensity minima of the standing wave) in a controlled manner via both the incident angle and the relative phase of the incoming laser beams. Some control over the vertical resolution is available through the ability to scan the incoming angle and with it the evanescent penetration depth.

  7. Geographical differentiation of dried lentil seed (Lens culinaris) samples using diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Kouvoutsakis, G; Mitsi, C; Tarantilis, P A; Polissiou, M G; Pappas, C S

    2014-02-15

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and discriminant analysis were used for the geographical differentiation of dried lentil seed (Lens culinaris) samples. Specifically, 18 Greek samples and nine samples imported from other countries were distinguished using the 2250-1720 and 1275-955 cm⁻¹ spectral regions. The differentiation is complete. The combination of DRIFTS and discriminant analysis enables simple, rapid, cheap and accurate differentiation of commercial lentil seeds in terms of geographical origin.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniber, M.; Schraml, K.; Regler, A.; Bartl, J.; Glashagen, G.; Flassig, F.; Wierzbowski, J.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities.

  9. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method.

    PubMed

    Kaniber, M; Schraml, K; Regler, A; Bartl, J; Glashagen, G; Flassig, F; Wierzbowski, J; Finley, J J

    2016-03-23

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities.

  10. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method

    PubMed Central

    Kaniber, M.; Schraml, K.; Regler, A.; Bartl, J.; Glashagen, G.; Flassig, F.; Wierzbowski, J.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  11. Echolocation signals reflect niche differentiation in five sympatric congeneric bat species.

    PubMed

    Siemers, Björn M; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-06-10

    Echolocating bats can be divided into guilds according to their preferred habitat and foraging behaviour, which coincide with distinct adaptations in wing morphology and structure of echolocation signals. Although coarse structuring of niche space between different guilds is generally accepted, it is not clear how niches differ within guilds, or whether there is fine-grained niche differentiation reflected in echolocation signal structure. Using a standardized performance test, here we show clutter-dependent differences in prey-capture success for bats from five species of European Myotis. These species are morphologically similar, sympatric, and all belong to the guild labelled "edge space aerial/trawling foragers". We further demonstrate a strong correlation between the prey-detection ability of the species and the respective search-call bandwidth. Our findings indicate that differences in echolocation signals contribute to within-guild niche differentiation. This is the first study relating sensory abilities of a set of potentially competing animal species to a direct measure of their respective foraging performance, suggesting an important role of sensory ecology in the structuring of animal communities.

  12. A Differential Interference Contrast-Based Light Microscopic System for Laser Microsurgery and Optical Trapping of Selected Chromosomes during Mitosis In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Richard W.; Khodjakov, Alexey; Wright, William H.; Rieder, Conly L.

    1995-10-01

    Laser microsurgery and laser-generated optical force traps (optical tweezers) are both valuable light microscopic-based approaches for studying intra- and extracellular motility processes, including chromosome segregation during mitosis. Here we describe a system in use in our laboratory that allows living cells to be followed by high-resolution differential interference contrast (DIC) video-enhanced time-lapse light microscopy while selected mitotic organelles and spindle components are subjected to laser microsurgery and/or manipulation with an optical force trap. This system couples the output from two different Neodymium-YAG lasers to the same inverted light microscope equipped with both phase-contrast and de Senarmont compensation DIC optics, a motorized stage, and a high-resolution low-light-level CCD camera. Unlike similar systems using phase-contrast optics, our DIC-based system can image living cells in thin optical sections without contamination due to phase halos or out-of-focus object information. These advantages greatly facilitate laser-based light microscopic studies on mitotic organelles and components, including spindle poles (centrosomes) and kinetochores, which are at or below the resolution limit of the light microscope and buried within a large complex structure. When used in conjunction with image processing and high-resolution object-tracking techniques, our system provides new information on the roles that kinetochores and spindle microtubules play during chromosome segregation in plant and animal cells.

  13. Tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for automated oral and maxillofacial laser surgery: ex vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael; Douplik, Alexandre

    2010-02-01

    Remote laser surgery lacks of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Hence, there is a risk of iatrogenic damage or destruction of anatomical structures like nerves or salivary glands. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from seven various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the seven tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerves and salivary glands as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating tissues as guidance for oral and maxillofacial laser surgery by means of diffuse reflectance.

  14. The bovine desmocollin family: a new gene and expression patterns reflecting epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have discovered a third bovine desmocollin gene, DSC3, and studied expression of all three desmocollin genes, DSC1, 2, and 3, by Northern blotting, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization. DSC1 is strongly expressed in epidermis and tongue papillae, showing a "skin"-type pattern resembling that previously described for keratins 1 and 10. Expression is absent from the epidermal basal layer but appears in the immediate suprabasal layers and continues uniformly to the lower granular layer. In tongue epithelium, expression is suprabasal and strictly localized to papillae, being absent from interpapillary regions. In other epithelial low level DSC1 expression is detectable only by RT-PCR. The distribution of Dsc1 glycoproteins, detected by an isoform-specific monoclonal antibody, closely reflects mRNA distribution in epidermis and tongue. DSC2 is ubiquitously expressed in epithelia and cardiac muscle. In stratified epithelia, expression appears immediately suprabasal, continuing weakly to the lower granular layer in epidermis and to just above half epithelial thickness in interpapillary tongue, oesophageal, and rumenal epithelia. DSC3 expression is restricted to the basal and immediately suprabasal layers in stratified epithelia. In deep rete ridges DSC expression strikingly resembles the distribution of stem, transit-amplifying, and terminally differentiating cells described by others. DSC3 expression is strongly basal, DSC2 is strong in 5-10 suprabasal layers, and then weakens to be superseded by strong DSC1. These results suggest that desmocollin isoform expression has important functional consequences in epithelial proliferation, stratification, and differentiation. The data also provide a standard for nomenclature of the desmocollins. PMID:8034749

  15. Maternal reflective functioning as a multidimensional construct: Differential associations with children's temperament and externalizing behavior.

    PubMed

    Smaling, H J A; Huijbregts, S C J; van der Heijden, K B; van Goozen, S H M; Swaab, H

    2016-08-01

    Maternal reflective functioning (RF) has been associated with children's behavioral development. This study examined maternal prenatal and postnatal RF, as measured by the Pregnancy Interview and Parent Development Interview, as multidimensional constructs. It was also examined whether the RF-dimensions were associated with children's temperament and externalizing behavior, as assessed by several questionnaires. The sample consisted of 123 first-time mothers (M age=22.85years, SD=2.21) and their children (M age=19.97months, SD=0.85, 56% male). Two related but distinct dimensions were found for prenatal RF, termed self-focused and child-focused mentalization. Three dimensions were observed for postnatal RF, termed self-focused, child-focused, and relation-focused mentalization. Results showed that prenatal RF negatively related to reported child physical aggression. Postnatal self-focused RF was positively linked to externalizing behavior and negative emotionality in offspring, while relation-focused RF scores were negatively associated with child physical aggression. Findings show that it is important to also look at the specific RF-dimensions when examining the effects of maternal RF on children's behavioral development, as differential associations with behavioral outcomes exist. Discussion further focuses on the importance of these findings in prevention and clinical practice, and suggestions are being made to further improve the measurement of maternal RF-dimensions. PMID:27522031

  16. Reflecting Solutions of High Order Elliptic Differential Equations in Two Independent Variables Across Analytic Arcs. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carleton, O.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration is given specifically to sixth order elliptic partial differential equations in two independent real variables x, y such that the coefficients of the highest order terms are real constants. It is assumed that the differential operator has distinct characteristics and that it can be factored as a product of second order operators. By analytically continuing into the complex domain and using the complex characteristic coordinates of the differential equation, it is shown that its solutions, u, may be reflected across analytic arcs on which u satisfies certain analytic boundary conditions. Moreover, a method is given whereby one can determine a region into which the solution is extensible. It is seen that this region of reflection is dependent on the original domain of difinition of the solution, the arc and the coefficients of the highest order terms of the equation and not on any sufficiently small quantities; i.e., the reflection is global in nature. The method employed may be applied to similar differential equations of order 2n.

  17. Valence band gaps and plasma energies for galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite natural minerals using differential optical reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, R.; Todoran, D.; Szakacs, Zs.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the determinations of the valence band gaps and plasma energies of the galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite natural minerals. The work was carried out using differential optical reflectance spectroscopy of the clean mineral surfaces. The determination of the optical properties such as refractive index, real part of the complex dielectric constant and the location of certain van Hove singularities, was carried out using the Kramers-Kronig formalism.

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE MICROSCOPE AND FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Olson, D.M.

    1961-01-31

    A high-temperature microscope is offered. It has a reflecting optic situated above a molten specimen in a furnace and reflecting the image of the same downward through an inert optic member in the floor of the furnace, a plurality of spaced reflecting plane mirrors defining a reflecting path around the furnace, a standard microscope supported in the path of and forming the end terminus of the light path.

  19. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    PubMed Central

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  20. Dielectric multilayer beam splitter with differential phase shift on transmission and reflection for division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenjia; Shen, Weidong; Zhang, Yueguang; Liu, Xu

    2014-05-01

    Dielectric multilayer beam splitter with differential phase shift on transmission and reflection for division-of-amplitude photopolarimeter (DOAP) was presented for the first time to our knowledge. The optimal parameters for the beam splitter are Tp = 78.9%, Ts = 21.1% and Δr - Δt = π/2 at 532nm at an angle of incidence of 45°. Multilayer anti-reflection coating with low phase shift was applied to reduce the backside reflection. Different design strategies that can achieve all optimal targets at the wavelength were tested. Two design methods were presented to optimize the differential phase shift. The samples were prepared by ion beam sputtering (IBS). The experimental results show good agreement with those of the design. The ellipsometric parameters of samples were measured in reflection (ψr, Δr) = (26.5°, 135.1°) and (28.2°, 133.5°), as well as in transmission (ψt, Δt) = (62.5°, 46.1°) and (63.5°, 46°) at 532.6nm. The normalized determinant of instrument matrix to evaluate the performance of samples is respectively 0.998 and 0.991 at 532.6nm.

  1. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  2. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Douglas H.; Petrin, Roger R.; MacKerrow, Edward P.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Quick, Charles R., Jr.; Zardecki, Andrew; Porch, William M.; Whitehead, Michael C.; Walters, Donald L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO2 differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We will address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO2 DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  3. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Zardecki, A.; Porch, W.M.; Whitehead, M.; Walters, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  4. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, Steven E.; Caunt, James W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface.

  5. Infrared microscope inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Forman, S.E.; Caunt, J.W.

    1985-02-26

    Apparatus and system for inspecting infrared transparents, such as an array of photovoltaic modules containing silicon solar cells, includes an infrared microscope, at least three sources of infrared light placed around and having their axes intersect the center of the object field and means for sending the reflected light through the microscope. The apparatus is adapted to be mounted on an X-Y translator positioned adjacent the object surface. 4 figs.

  6. In vivo soft tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Schmidt, Michael; Douplik, Alexandre

    Remote laser surgery does not provide haptic feedback to operate layer by layer and preserve vulnerable anatomical structures like nerve tissue or blood vessels. The aim of this study is identification of soft tissue in vivo by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to set the base for a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Various soft tissues can be identified by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo. The results may set the base for a feedback system to prevent nerve damage during oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  7. Case Report: melanoma and melanocytic nevus differentiation with reflectance confocal microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Łudzik, Joanna; Witkowski, Alexander M; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Historically, melanoma has been typically diagnosed by naked-eye examination and confirmed with invasive biopsy. However, recently the use of reflectance confocal microscopy enables non-invasive bedside diagnosis of clinically equivocal lesions. We present a case in which reflectance confocal microscopy was used to evaluate two skin lesions in the same patient confirming the diagnosis of a melanoma and potentially avoiding invasive biopsy in the second benign melanocytic lesion.  Clinicians should be aware of the availability of new non-invasive technologies that can aid in early diagnosis of malignant skin tumors and potentially reduce the number of benign lesion excisions. PMID:26236471

  8. Community Agricultural Processing Services: A Reflection of Urban Differentiation or County Agricultural Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Robert L.; Calloway, Michael O.

    Questionnaire data from 81 North Carolina communities were analyzed in 1981 to test the hypothesis that 5 institutional subcategories (education, general community services, transportation, agricultural services, and health and sanitation) exhibit the underlying characteristic of unidimensionality and that they reflect comparable levels of…

  9. Two Configurations for Accessing Classroom Computers: Differential Impact on Students' Critical Reflections and Their Empowerment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solhaug, T.

    2009-01-01

    The context of this article is the new technological environment and the struggle to use meaningful teaching practices in Norwegian schools. Students' critical reflections in two different technological learning environments in six upper secondary schools are compared. Three of these schools offer Internet-connected computers in special computer…

  10. Differentiating cancerous tissues from noncancerous tissues using single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy with different fiber diameters.

    PubMed

    Sircan-Kuçuksayan, Aslinur; Denkceken, Tuba; Canpolat, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Elastic light-scattering spectra acquired with single-fiber optical probes with diameters of 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200, and 1500 μm were used to differentiate cancerous from noncancerous prostate tissues. The spectra were acquired ex vivo on 24 excised prostate tissue samples collected from four patients. For each probe, the spectra and histopathology results were compared in order to investigate the correlation between the core diameters of the single-fiber optical probe and successful differentiation between cancerous and noncancerous prostate tissues. The spectra acquired using probes with a fiber core diameter of 400 μm or smaller successfully differentiated cancerous from noncancerous prostate tissues. Next, the spectra were acquired from monosized polystyrene microspheres with a diameter of 5.00±0.01 μm to investigate the correlation between the core diameters of the probes and the Mie oscillations on the spectra. Monte Carlo simulations of the light distribution of the tissue phantoms were run to interrogate whether the light detected by the probes with different fiber core diameters was in the ballistic or diffusive regime. If the single-fiber optical probes detect light in the ballistic regime, the spectra can be used to differentiate between cancerous and noncancerous tissues.

  11. Testing leaf multispectral reflectance data as input into random forest to differentiate velvetleaf from soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic.) infestations negatively impact row crop production throughout the United States and Canada’s eastern provinces. To implement management strategies to control velvetleaf, managers need tools for differentiating it from crop plants. 5Band, 7Band, 8Band, and ...

  12. Differentiating cancerous tissues from noncancerous tissues using single-fiber reflectance spectroscopy with different fiber diameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sircan-Kuçuksayan, Aslinur; Denkceken, Tuba; Canpolat, Murat

    2015-11-01

    Elastic light-scattering spectra acquired with single-fiber optical probes with diameters of 100, 200, 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200, and 1500 μm were used to differentiate cancerous from noncancerous prostate tissues. The spectra were acquired ex vivo on 24 excised prostate tissue samples collected from four patients. For each probe, the spectra and histopathology results were compared in order to investigate the correlation between the core diameters of the single-fiber optical probe and successful differentiation between cancerous and noncancerous prostate tissues. The spectra acquired using probes with a fiber core diameter of 400 μm or smaller successfully differentiated cancerous from noncancerous prostate tissues. Next, the spectra were acquired from monosized polystyrene microspheres with a diameter of 5.00±0.01 μm to investigate the correlation between the core diameters of the probes and the Mie oscillations on the spectra. Monte Carlo simulations of the light distribution of the tissue phantoms were run to interrogate whether the light detected by the probes with different fiber core diameters was in the ballistic or diffusive regime. If the single-fiber optical probes detect light in the ballistic regime, the spectra can be used to differentiate between cancerous and noncancerous tissues.

  13. ERPs Differentially Reflect Automatic and Deliberate Processing of the Functional Manipulability of Objects.

    PubMed

    Madan, Christopher R; Chen, Yvonne Y; Singhal, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the functional properties of an object can interact with perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes. Previously we have found that a between-subjects manipulation of judgment instructions resulted in different manipulability-related memory biases in an incidental memory test. To better understand this effect we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) while participants made judgments about images of objects that were either high or low in functional manipulability (e.g., hammer vs. ladder). Using a between-subjects design, participants judged whether they had seen the object recently (Personal Experience), or could manipulate the object using their hand (Functionality). We focused on the P300 and slow-wave event-related potentials (ERPs) as reflections of attentional allocation. In both groups, we observed higher P300 and slow wave amplitudes for high-manipulability objects at electrodes Pz and C3. As P300 is thought to reflect bottom-up attentional processes, this may suggest that the processing of high-manipulability objects recruited more attentional resources. Additionally, the P300 effect was greater in the Functionality group. A more complex pattern was observed at electrode C3 during slow wave: processing the high-manipulability objects in the Functionality instruction evoked a more positive slow wave than in the other three conditions, likely related to motor simulation processes. These data provide neural evidence that effects of manipulability on stimulus processing are further mediated by automatic vs. deliberate motor-related processing. PMID:27536224

  14. ERPs Differentially Reflect Automatic and Deliberate Processing of the Functional Manipulability of Objects

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Christopher R.; Chen, Yvonne Y.; Singhal, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    It is known that the functional properties of an object can interact with perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes. Previously we have found that a between-subjects manipulation of judgment instructions resulted in different manipulability-related memory biases in an incidental memory test. To better understand this effect we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) while participants made judgments about images of objects that were either high or low in functional manipulability (e.g., hammer vs. ladder). Using a between-subjects design, participants judged whether they had seen the object recently (Personal Experience), or could manipulate the object using their hand (Functionality). We focused on the P300 and slow-wave event-related potentials (ERPs) as reflections of attentional allocation. In both groups, we observed higher P300 and slow wave amplitudes for high-manipulability objects at electrodes Pz and C3. As P300 is thought to reflect bottom-up attentional processes, this may suggest that the processing of high-manipulability objects recruited more attentional resources. Additionally, the P300 effect was greater in the Functionality group. A more complex pattern was observed at electrode C3 during slow wave: processing the high-manipulability objects in the Functionality instruction evoked a more positive slow wave than in the other three conditions, likely related to motor simulation processes. These data provide neural evidence that effects of manipulability on stimulus processing are further mediated by automatic vs. deliberate motor-related processing. PMID:27536224

  15. Frontoparietal EEG alpha-phase synchrony reflects differential attentional demands during word recall and oculomotor dual-tasks.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gusang; Kim, Min-Young; Lim, Sanghyun; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Suh, Minah

    2015-12-16

    To study the relationship between the varying degrees of cognitive load and long-range synchronization among neural networks, we utilized a dual-task paradigm combining concurrent word recall working memory tasks and oculomotor tasks that differentially activate the common frontoparietal (FP) network. We hypothesized that each dual-task combination would generate differential neuronal activation patterns among long-range connection during word retention period. Given that the FP alpha-phase synchronization is involved in attentional top-down processes, one would expect that the long-range synchronization pattern is affected by the degrees of dual-task demand. We measured a single-trial phase locking value in the alpha frequency (8-12 Hz) with electroencephalography in healthy participants. Single-trial phase locking value characterized the synchronization between two brain signals. Our results revealed that different amounts of FP alpha-phase synchronization were produced by different dual-task combinations, particularly during the early phase of the word retention period. These differences were dependent on the individual's working memory capacity and memory load. Our study shows that during dual-task, each oculomotor task, which is subserved by distinct neural network, generates different modulation patterns on long-range neuronal activation and FP alpha-phase synchronization seems to reflect these differential cognitive loads.

  16. Frontoparietal EEG alpha-phase synchrony reflects differential attentional demands during word recall and oculomotor dual-tasks.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gusang; Kim, Min-Young; Lim, Sanghyun; Kwon, Hyukchan; Lee, Yong-Ho; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Eun-Ju; Suh, Minah

    2015-12-16

    To study the relationship between the varying degrees of cognitive load and long-range synchronization among neural networks, we utilized a dual-task paradigm combining concurrent word recall working memory tasks and oculomotor tasks that differentially activate the common frontoparietal (FP) network. We hypothesized that each dual-task combination would generate differential neuronal activation patterns among long-range connection during word retention period. Given that the FP alpha-phase synchronization is involved in attentional top-down processes, one would expect that the long-range synchronization pattern is affected by the degrees of dual-task demand. We measured a single-trial phase locking value in the alpha frequency (8-12 Hz) with electroencephalography in healthy participants. Single-trial phase locking value characterized the synchronization between two brain signals. Our results revealed that different amounts of FP alpha-phase synchronization were produced by different dual-task combinations, particularly during the early phase of the word retention period. These differences were dependent on the individual's working memory capacity and memory load. Our study shows that during dual-task, each oculomotor task, which is subserved by distinct neural network, generates different modulation patterns on long-range neuronal activation and FP alpha-phase synchronization seems to reflect these differential cognitive loads. PMID:26559729

  17. Interference Confocal Microscope Integrated with Spatial Phase Shifter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weibo; Gu, Kang; You, Xiaoyu; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We present an interference confocal microscope (ICM) with a new single-body four-step simultaneous phase-shifter device designed to obtain high immunity to vibration. The proposed ICM combines the respective advantages of simultaneous phase shifting interferometry and bipolar differential confocal microscopy to obtain high axis resolution, large dynamic range, and reduce the sensitivity to vibration and reflectance disturbance seamlessly. A compact single body spatial phase shifter is added to capture four phase-shifted interference signals simultaneously without time delay and construct a stable and space-saving simplified interference confocal microscope system. The test result can be obtained by combining the interference phase response and the bipolar property of differential confocal microscopy without phase unwrapping. Experiments prove that the proposed microscope is capable of providing stable measurements with 1 nm of axial depth resolution for either low- or high-numerical aperture objective lenses. PMID:27563909

  18. Interference Confocal Microscope Integrated with Spatial Phase Shifter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibo; Gu, Kang; You, Xiaoyu; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Jian

    2016-08-24

    We present an interference confocal microscope (ICM) with a new single-body four-step simultaneous phase-shifter device designed to obtain high immunity to vibration. The proposed ICM combines the respective advantages of simultaneous phase shifting interferometry and bipolar differential confocal microscopy to obtain high axis resolution, large dynamic range, and reduce the sensitivity to vibration and reflectance disturbance seamlessly. A compact single body spatial phase shifter is added to capture four phase-shifted interference signals simultaneously without time delay and construct a stable and space-saving simplified interference confocal microscope system. The test result can be obtained by combining the interference phase response and the bipolar property of differential confocal microscopy without phase unwrapping. Experiments prove that the proposed microscope is capable of providing stable measurements with 1 nm of axial depth resolution for either low- or high-numerical aperture objective lenses.

  19. Interference Confocal Microscope Integrated with Spatial Phase Shifter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibo; Gu, Kang; You, Xiaoyu; Tan, Jiubin; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We present an interference confocal microscope (ICM) with a new single-body four-step simultaneous phase-shifter device designed to obtain high immunity to vibration. The proposed ICM combines the respective advantages of simultaneous phase shifting interferometry and bipolar differential confocal microscopy to obtain high axis resolution, large dynamic range, and reduce the sensitivity to vibration and reflectance disturbance seamlessly. A compact single body spatial phase shifter is added to capture four phase-shifted interference signals simultaneously without time delay and construct a stable and space-saving simplified interference confocal microscope system. The test result can be obtained by combining the interference phase response and the bipolar property of differential confocal microscopy without phase unwrapping. Experiments prove that the proposed microscope is capable of providing stable measurements with 1 nm of axial depth resolution for either low- or high-numerical aperture objective lenses. PMID:27563909

  20. Does Late Miocene Exhumation Along the Western Slope of the Colorado Rockies Reflect Differential Rock Uplift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, R. H.; Kirby, E.; Aslan, A.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Heizler, M. T.; Kelley, S. A.; Piotraschke, R. E.; Furlong, K. P.

    2011-12-01

    of the Rockies. Additionally, new cosmogenic burial ages from fan-terrace complexes near Rifle, Colorado show that Colorado River incision occurred at similar rates over both 10 Ma and 2 Ma timescales. Fluvial incision in response to relative base level fall or to changes in regional climate cannot easily explain the history of differential incision along the western slope. Given the correspondence of steep channels, large magnitude incision and regions of low seismic velocity mantle, we suggest that differential rock uplift, driven, in part, by differences in the buoyancy and/or convective flow of the mantle beneath western Colorado is the likely driver for Neogene incision.

  1. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... include purplish bumps and spots pictured below (palpable purpura). These areas range in size from several millimeters ... Syndrome (EGPA) Cryoglobulinemia Giant Cell Arteritis Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Microscopic Polyangiitis Polyarteritis Nodosa Rheumatoid Vasculitis Takayasu’s Arteritis ...

  2. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy method to differentiate between normal and cancerous breast cells.

    PubMed

    Lane, Randy; See, Seong S

    2012-09-01

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is used to find the structural differences between cancerous breast cells (MCF-7 line) and normal breast cells (MCF-12F line). Gold nanoparticles were prepared and the hydrodynamic diameter of the gold nanoparticles found to be 38.45 nm. The Gold nanoparticles were exposed to both MCF-7 and MCF-12F cells from lower to higher concentrations. Spectroscopic studies founds nanoparticles were within the cells, and increasing the nanoparticles concentration inside the cells also resulted in sharper IR peaks as a result of localized surface Plasmon resonance. Asymmetric and symmetric stretching and bending vibrations between phosphate, COO-, CH2 groups were found to give negative shifts in wavenumbers and a decrease in peak intensities when going from noncancerous to cancerous cells. Cellular proteins produced peak assignments at the 1542 and 1644 cm(-1) wavenumbers which were attributed to the amide I and amide II bands of the polypeptide bond of proteins. Significant changes were found in the peak intensities between the cell lines in the spectrum range from 2854-2956 cm(-1). Results show that the concentration range of gold nanoparticles used in this research showed no significant changes in cell viability in either cell line. Therefore, we believe ATR-FTIR and gold nanotechnology can be at the forefront of cancer diagnosis for some time to come.

  3. Digital FDIRC: A focused differential internal reflection Cherenkov imaged by SiPM arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocchesi, P. S.; Bagliesi, M. G.; Basti, A.; Bigongiari, G.; Bonechi, S.; Brogi, P.; Checchia, C.; Collazuol, G.; Maestro, P.; Morsani, F.; Piemonte, C.; Stolzi, F.; Suh, J. E.; Sulaj, A.

    2016-07-01

    A prototype of an Internal Reflection Cherenkov, equipped with a SiO2 (fused silica) radiator bar optically connected to a cylindrical mirror, was tested at CERN SPS in March 2015 with a beam of relativistic ions obtained from fragmentation of primary argon nuclei at energies 13, 19 and 30 GeV/n. The detector, designed to identify cosmic nuclei, features an imaging focal plane of dimensions ~ 4 cm × 3 cm equipped with 16 arrays of NUV-SiPM (near-ultraviolet sensitive silicon photon avalanche detector) for a total of 1024 sensitive elements. The outstanding performance of the photodetectors (with negligible background in between adjacent photopeaks) allowed us to apply the technique of photon counting to the Cherenkov light collected on the focal plane. Thanks to the fine granularity of the array elements, the Cherenkov pattern was recorded together with the total number of detected photoelectrons increasing as Z2 as a function of the atomic number Z. In this paper, we report the performance of the SiPM arrays and the excellent resolution achieved by the digital Cherenkov prototype in the charge identification of the elements present in the beam.

  4. Differential investment in visual and olfactory brain areas reflects behavioural choices in hawk moths

    PubMed Central

    Stöckl, Anna; Heinze, Stanley; Charalabidis, Alice; el Jundi, Basil; Warrant, Eric; Kelber, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Nervous tissue is one of the most metabolically expensive animal tissues, thus evolutionary investments that result in enlarged brain regions should also result in improved behavioural performance. Indeed, large-scale comparative studies in vertebrates and invertebrates have successfully linked differences in brain anatomy to differences in ecology and behaviour, but their precision can be limited by the detail of the anatomical measurements, or by only measuring behaviour indirectly. Therefore, detailed case studies are valuable complements to these investigations, and have provided important evidence linking brain structure to function in a range of higher-order behavioural traits, such as foraging experience or aggressive behaviour. Here, we show that differences in the size of both lower and higher-order sensory brain areas reflect differences in the relative importance of these senses in the foraging choices of hawk moths, as suggested by previous anatomical work in Lepidopterans. To this end we combined anatomical and behavioural quantifications of the relative importance of vision and olfaction in two closely related hawk moth species. We conclude that differences in sensory brain volume in these hawk moths can indeed be interpreted as differences in the importance of these senses for the animal’s behaviour. PMID:27185464

  5. Differential Gene Expression Profiles Reflecting Macrophage Polarization in Aging and Periodontitis Gingival Tissues.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, O A; Novak, M J; Kirakodu, S; Stromberg, A; Nagarajan, R; Huang, C B; Chen, K C; Orraca, L; Martinez-Gonzalez, J; Ebersole, J L

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has determined a phenotypic and functional heterogeneity for macrophage populations. This plasticity of macrophage function has been related to specific properties of subsets (M1 and M2) of these cells in inflammation, adaptive immune responses and resolution of tissue destructive processes. This investigation hypothesized that targeted alterations in the distribution of macrophage phenotypes in aged individuals, and with periodontitis would be skewed towards M1 inflammatory macrophages in gingival tissues. The study used a non-human primate model to evaluate gene expression profiles as footprints of macrophage variation in healthy and periodontitis gingival tissues from animals 3-23 years of age and in periodontitis tissues in adult and aged animals. Significant increases in multiple genes reflecting overall increases in macrophage activities were observed in healthy aged tissues, and were significantly increased in periodontitis tissues from both adults and aged animals. Generally, gene expression patterns for M2 macrophages were similar in healthy young, adolescent and adult tissues. However, modest increases were noted in healthy aged tissues, similar to those seen in periodontitis tissues from both age groups. M1 macrophage gene transcription patterns increased significantly over the age range in healthy tissues, with multiple genes (e.g. CCL13, CCL19, CCR7 and TLR4) significantly increased in aged animals. Additionally, gene expression patterns for M1 macrophages were significantly increased in adult health versus periodontitis and aged healthy versus periodontitis. The findings supported a significant increase in macrophages with aging and in periodontitis. The primary increases in both healthy aged tissues and, particularly periodontitis tissues appeared in the M1 phenotype.

  6. Martian Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  7. Correction of terrestrial LiDAR intensity channel using Oren-Nayar reflectance model: An application to lithological differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellan, Antonio; Humair, Florian; Matasci, Battista; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Ground-based LiDAR has been traditionally used for surveying purposes via 3D point clouds. In addition to XYZ coordinates, an intensity value is also recorded by LiDAR devices. The intensity of the backscattered signal can be a significant source of information for various applications in geosciences. Previous attempts to account for the scattering of the laser signal are usually modelled using a perfect diffuse reflection. Nevertheless, experience on natural outcrops shows that rock surfaces do not behave as perfect diffuse reflectors. The geometry (or relief) of the scanned surfaces plays a major role in the recorded intensity values. Our study proposes a new terrestrial LiDAR intensity correction, which takes into consideration the range, the incidence angle and the geometry of the scanned surfaces. The proposed correction equation combines the classical radar equation for LiDAR with the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of the Oren-Nayar model. It is based on the idea that the surface geometry can be modelled by a relief of multiple micro-facets. This model is constrained by only one tuning parameter: the standard deviation of the slope angle distribution (σslope) of micro-facets. Firstly, a series of tests have been carried out in laboratory conditions on a 2 m2 board covered by black/white matte paper (perfect diffuse reflector) and scanned at different ranges and incidence angles. Secondly, other tests were carried out on rock blocks of different lithologies and surface conditions. Those tests demonstrated that the non-perfect diffuse reflectance of rock surfaces can be practically handled by the proposed correction method. Finally, the intensity correction method was applied to a real case study, with two scans of the carbonate rock outcrop of the Dents-du-Midi (Swiss Alps), to improve the lithological identification for geological mapping purposes. After correction, the intensity values are proportional to the intrinsic material reflectance

  8. Ex vivo diffusion tensor MRI reflects microscopic structural remodeling associated with aging and disease progression in normal and cardiomyopathic Syrian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Lu, Ming; Banerjee, Suhanti; Zhong, Jia; Ye, Allen; Molter, Joseph; Yu, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in cardiac patients. Aging is often an ignored etiology of pathological conditions. Quantification of DCM and aging associated cardiac structural remodeling is important in guiding and evaluating therapeutic interventions. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI) has recently been used for nondestructive characterization of three-dimensional myofiber structure. In this study, we explored the potential of DTMRI in delineating microscopic structural remodeling in aging and DCM hearts. Six month (n = 10) and nine month old (n = 11) DCM (TO-2) hamsters and their age-matched controls (F1β) were characterized. Both aging and DCM hearts showed increased diffusivity and decreased diffusion anisotropy. DTMRI images of DCM hearts also revealed a subgroup of imaging pixels characterized by decreased radial diffusivity and increased FA. The location of these pixels showed qualitative agreement with regions of calcium deposition determined by X-ray CT imaging. Histological analysis confirmed expanded extracellular space in aging and DCM hearts as well as substantial calcium deposition in DCM hearts. These results suggest that DTMRI may provide a noninvasive technique to delineate structural remodeling associated with aging and DCM progression at the tissue and cellular level without the use of an exogenous contrast agent. PMID:19434665

  9. Low frequency acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    1986-11-04

    A scanning acoustic microscope is disclosed for the detection and location of near surface flaws, inclusions or voids in a solid sample material. A focused beam of acoustic energy is directed at the sample with its focal plane at the subsurface flaw, inclusion or void location. The sample is scanned with the beam. Detected acoustic energy specularly reflected and mode converted at the surface of the sample and acoustic energy reflected by subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids at the focal plane are used for generating an interference signal which is processed and forms a signal indicative of the subsurface flaws, inclusions or voids.

  10. Effect of polyglycerol esters additive on palm oil crystallization using focused beam reflectance measurement and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Saw, M H; Hishamuddin, E; Chong, C L; Yeoh, C B; Lim, W H

    2017-01-01

    The effect of 0.1-0.7% (w/w) of polyglycerol esters (PGEmix-8) on palm oil crystallization was studied using focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) to analyze the in-line changes of crystal size distribution during the crystallization. FBRM results show that 0.1-0.5% (w/w) of PGEmix-8 did not significantly affect nucleation but slightly retarded crystal growth. The use of 0.7% (w/w) additive showed greater heterogeneous nucleation compared to those with lower dosages of additive. Crystal growth was also greatly reduced when using 0.7% (w/w) dosage. The morphological study indicated that the palm oil crystals were smaller and more even in size than when more additive was added. Isothermal crystallization studies using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed increased inhibitory effects on palm oil crystal growth with increasing concentration of PGEmix-8. These results imply that PGEmix-8 is a nucleation enhancing and crystal growth retarding additive in palm oil crystallization at 0.7% (w/w) dosage.

  11. Differential association of microRNAs with polysomes reflects distinct strengths of interactions with their mRNA targets.

    PubMed

    Molotski, Natali; Soen, Yoav

    2012-09-01

    While microRNAs have been shown to copurify with polysomes, their relative fraction in the translation pool (polysome occupancy) has not yet been measured. Here, we introduce a high-throughput method for quantifying polysome occupancies of hundreds of microRNAs and use it to investigate factors affecting these occupancies. Analysis in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and foreskin fibroblasts (hFFs) revealed microRNA-specific preferences for low, medium, or high polysome occupancy. Bioinformatics and functional analysis based on overexpression of endogenous and chimeric microRNAs showed that the polysome occupancy of microRNAs is specified by its mature sequence and depends on the choice of seed. Nuclease treatment further suggested that the differential occupancy of the microRNAs reflects interactions with their mRNA targets. Indeed, analysis of microNRA•mRNA duplexes showed that pairs involving high occupancy microRNAs exhibit significantly higher binding energy compared to pairs with low occupancy microRNAs. Since mRNAs reside primarily in polysomes, strong interactions lead to high association of microRNAs with polysomes and vice versa for weak interactions. Comparison between hESCs and hFFs data revealed that hESCs tend to express lower occupancy microRNAs, suggesting that cell type-dependent translational features may be affected by expression of a particular set of microRNAs.

  12. Effect of polyglycerol esters additive on palm oil crystallization using focused beam reflectance measurement and differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Saw, M H; Hishamuddin, E; Chong, C L; Yeoh, C B; Lim, W H

    2017-01-01

    The effect of 0.1-0.7% (w/w) of polyglycerol esters (PGEmix-8) on palm oil crystallization was studied using focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) to analyze the in-line changes of crystal size distribution during the crystallization. FBRM results show that 0.1-0.5% (w/w) of PGEmix-8 did not significantly affect nucleation but slightly retarded crystal growth. The use of 0.7% (w/w) additive showed greater heterogeneous nucleation compared to those with lower dosages of additive. Crystal growth was also greatly reduced when using 0.7% (w/w) dosage. The morphological study indicated that the palm oil crystals were smaller and more even in size than when more additive was added. Isothermal crystallization studies using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed increased inhibitory effects on palm oil crystal growth with increasing concentration of PGEmix-8. These results imply that PGEmix-8 is a nucleation enhancing and crystal growth retarding additive in palm oil crystallization at 0.7% (w/w) dosage. PMID:27507476

  13. Molecular and iridescent feather reflectance data reveal recent genetic diversification and phenotypic differentiation in a cloud forest hummingbird.

    PubMed

    Ornelas, Juan Francisco; González, Clementina; Hernández-Baños, Blanca E; García-Moreno, Jaime

    2016-02-01

    The present day distribution and spatial genetic diversity of Mesoamerican biota reflects a long history of responses to habitat change. The hummingbird Lampornis amethystinus is distributed in northern Mesoamerica, with geographically disjunct populations. Based on sampling across the species range using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and nuclear microsatellites jointly analysed with phenotypic and climatic data, we (1) test whether the fragmented distribution is correlated with main evolutionary lineages, (2) assess body size and plumage color differentiation of populations in geographic isolation, and (3) evaluate a set of divergence scenarios and demographic patterns of the hummingbird populations. Analysis of genetic variation revealed four main groups: blue-throated populations (Sierra Madre del Sur); two groups of amethyst-throated populations (Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and Sierra Madre Oriental); and populations east of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (IT) with males showing an amethyst throat. The most basal split is estimated to have originated in the Pleistocene, 2.39-0.57 million years ago (MYA), and corresponded to groups of populations separated by the IT. However, the estimated recent divergence time between blue- and amethyst-throated populations does not correspond to the 2-MY needed to be in isolation for substantial plumage divergence, likely because structurally iridescent colors are more malleable than others. Results of species distribution modeling and Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis fit a model of lineage divergence west of the Isthmus after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and that the species' suitable habitat was disjunct during past and current conditions. These results challenge the generality of the contraction/expansion glacial model to cloud forest-interior species and urges management of cloud forest, a highly vulnerable ecosystem to climate change and currently facing destruction, to prevent further loss of genetic

  14. Calibration of MICROSCOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiu, E.; Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.; Pradels, G.

    The MICROSCOPE mission is planned for launch in early 2009. It aims to verify the Equivalence Principle to an accuracy of 10-15, which is currently difficult to obtain on Earth because of the intrinsic limitations of the torsion pendulum and disturbing phenomena, like seismic activity. In space the experiment can take advantage of the quiet environment provided by a drag-free satellite. The instrument used for the test is a differential electrostatic accelerometer composed of two inertial sensors with test-masses made of different materials: one in Platinum Rhodium alloy, the other in Titanium alloy. The space experiment will also benefit from a second differential accelerometer with both test-masses of the same material, which will be used as a reference instrument to characterise the disturbing signals and sensitivities. The in-orbit calibration of the instrument is mandatory to validate the space test and several procedures have been previously proposed, taking advantage of the satellite propulsion system or the a priori knowledge of natural in-orbit applied accelerations. Due to the actual configuration of the MICROSCOPE propulsion system, the possibility of accurate satellite manoeuvres is limited but sufficient. This paper presents the necessary compromise between the knowledge of satellite and instrument parameters and the calibration procedures. The scenario of the MICROSCOPE in-orbit calibration phase is finely defined in agreement with the required performances for the EP test accuracy.

  15. Acoustic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-10-17

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  16. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M.; Peterson, B.; Kesteron, J.

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  17. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  18. Microscopic colitis: pathologic considerations, changing dogma.

    PubMed

    Robert, Marie E

    2004-01-01

    Microscopic colitis as an entity was first recognized in 1976, and has become one of the most frequent diseases to exclude on colonic mucosal biopsies. In some pathology practices, up to 30% of colonic biopsies received are from patients in whom microscopic colitis is the clinical question. In this review, the evolution of the terminology and early studies describing the pathology of microscopic colitis are discussed. The pathology of lymphocytic and collagenous colitis is reviewed in detail, including common diagnostic pitfalls, and what is currently known about the pathogenesis of these diseases. The differential diagnosis of microscopic colitis includes other idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn's and ulcerative colitis), infections, and drug reactions. The distinction between these entities and microscopic colitis is discussed in detail. Finally, recent studies have revealed new histopathologic changes in microscopic colitis that challenge the currently held concepts of how microscopic colitis fits into the spectrum of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  19. Liquid Helium Acoustic Microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steer, Andrew Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. In an acoustic microscope, images are generated by monitoring the intensity of the ultrasonic reflection, or echo, from the surface of a sample. In order to achieve this a pulse of acoustic energy is produced by the excitation of a thin film transducer. The pulse thus generated propagates through a crystal and is incident upon the acoustic lens surface, which is the boundary between the crystal and an acoustic coupling liquid. The acoustic lens is a converging element, and brings the ultrasonic beam to a focus within the liquid. A sample, placed at the focus, can act as a reflector, and the returned pulse then contains information regarding the acoustic reflectivity of this specimen. Acoustic pulses are repeatedly launched and detected while the acoustic lens is scanned over the surface of the sample. In this manner an acoustic image is constructed. Acoustic losses in room temperature liquid coupling media represent a considerable source of difficulty in the recovery of acoustic echo signals. At the frequencies of operation required in a microscope which is capable of high resolution, the ultrasonic attenuation is not only large but increases with the square of frequency. In superfluid liquid helium at temperatures below 0.1 K, however, the ultrasonic attenuation becomes negligible. Furthermore, the low sound velocity in liquid helium results in an increase in resolution, since the acoustic wavelength is proportional to velocity. A liquid helium acoustic microscope has been designed and constructed. Details of the various possible detection methods are given, and comparisons are made between them. Measurements of the performance of the system that was adopted are reported. The development of a cooled preamplifier is also described. The variation of reflected signal with object distance has been measured and compared with theoretical predictions. This variation is important in the analysis of acoustic

  20. Huygens-Fresnel Wave-Optics Simulation of Atmosphere Optical Turbulence and Reflective Speckle in CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Foy, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; McVey, B.D.; Quick, C.R.; Porch, W.M.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.; Archuleta, F.A.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1999-03-23

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these process: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. In this work, we briefly review a description of our model including the limitations along with previous simulation s of individual effects. The performance of our modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements and show good agreement. In addition, advanced studies have been performed to demonstrate the utility of our model in assessing the effects for different lidar geometries on RMS noise and correlation ''size'' in the receiver plane.

  1. Huygens-Fresnel wave-optics simulation of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle in CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.; Petrin, R.; MacKerrow, E.; Schmitt, M.; Foy, B.; Koskelo, A.; McVey, B.; Quick, C.; Porch, W.; Fite, C.; Archuleta, F.; Whitehead, M.; Tiee, J.; Walters, D.

    1999-04-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these processes: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. The performance of the modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements. The limitations of the model are also discussed. In addition, studies have been performed to determine the importance of key parameters in the simulation. The results of these studies and their impact on the overall results will be presented.

  2. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  3. Embryos, microscopes, and society.

    PubMed

    Maienschein, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Embryos have different meanings for different people and in different contexts. Seen under the microscope, the biological embryo starts out as one cell and then becomes a bunch of cells. Gradually these divide and differentiate to make up the embryo, which in humans becomes a fetus at eight weeks, and then eventually a baby. At least, that happens in those cases that carry through normally and successfully. Yet a popular public perception imagines the embryo as already a little person in the very earliest stages of development, as if it were predictably to become an adult. In actuality, cells can combine, pull apart, and recombine in a variety of ways and still produce embryos, whereas most embryos never develop into adults at all. Biological embryos and popular imaginations of embryos diverge. This paper looks at some of the historical reasons for and social implications of that divergence.

  4. Imaging Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Baker, Phillip C.; Shealy, David L.; Core, David B.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Kerstetter, Ted

    1993-01-01

    We have designed, analyzed, fabricated, and tested Schwarzschild multilayer X-ray microscopes. These instruments use flow-polished Zerodur mirror substrates which have been coated with multilayers optimized for maximum reflectivity at normal incidence at 135 A. They are being developed as prototypes for the Water Window Imaging X-Ray Microscope. Ultrasmooth mirror sets of hemlite grade sapphire have been fabricated and they are now being coated with multilayers to reflect soft X-rays at 38 A, within the biologically important 'water window'. In this paper, we discuss the fabrication of the microscope optics and structural components as well as the mounting of the optics and assembly of the microscopes. We also describe the optical alignment, interferometric and visible light testing of the microscopes, present interferometrically measured performance data, and provide the first results of optical imaging tests.

  5. Differentiation of Body Fluid Stains on Fabrics Using External Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Félix; de la Ossa, Ma Ángeles Fernández; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Body fluids are evidence of great forensic interest due to the DNA extracted from them, which allows genetic identification of people. This study focuses on the discrimination among semen, vaginal fluid, and urine stains (main fluids in sexual crimes) placed on different colored cotton fabrics by external reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with chemometrics. Semen-vaginal fluid mixtures and potential false positive substances commonly found in daily life such as soaps, milk, juices, and lotions were also studied. Results demonstrated that the IR spectral signature obtained for each body fluid allowed its identification and the correct classification of unknown stains by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA). Interestingly, results proved that these IR spectra did not show any bands due to the color of the fabric and no substance of those present in daily life which were analyzed, provided a false positive. PMID:26896150

  6. Differential effects of early postinjury treatment with neuroprotective drugs in a mouse model using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shochat, Ariel; Abookasis, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The time required for the arrival of an ambulance crew and administration of first aid is critical to clinical outcome, particularly in the case of head injury victims requiring neuroprotective drugs following a car accident, falls, and assaults. Short response times of the medical team, together with proper treatment, can limit injury severity and even save a life before transportation to the nearest medical center. We present a comparative evaluation of five different neuroprotective drugs frequently used in intensive care and operating units in the early phase following traumatic brain injury (TBI): hypertonic saline (HTS), mannitol, morphine, melatonin, and minocycline. The effectiveness of these drugs in terms of changes in brain tissue morphology (cell organelle size, density, distribution, etc.) and biochemical tissue properties (chromophores’ content) was experimentally evaluated through analysis of the spectral reduced scattering and optical absorption coefficient parameters in the near-infrared (NIR) optical range (650 to 1000 nm). Experiments were conducted on anesthetized male mice subjected to a noninvasive closed head weight-drop model of focal TBI (n=50 and n=10 control) and monitored using an NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system utilizing independent source–detector separation and location. After 10 min of baseline measurement, focal TBI was induced and measurements were conducted for 20 min. Subsequently, a neuroprotective drug was administrated and measurements were recorded for another 30 min. This work’s major findings are threefold: first, minocycline was found to improve hemodynamic outcome at the earliest time postinjury. Second, HTS decreased brain water content and inhibited the increase in intracranial pressure. Third, the efficacy of neuroprotective drugs can be monitored noninvasively with diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The demonstrated ability to noninvasively detect cerebral physiological properties

  7. X ray microscope assembly and alignment support and advanced x ray microscope design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable efforts have been devoted recently to the design, analysis, fabrication, and testing of spherical Schwarzschild microscopes for soft x ray application in microscopy and projection lithography. The spherical Schwarzschild microscope consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for x ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. In order to reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles have been considered in this investigation. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function (MTF) calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical head reflecting two mirror microscope configurations.

  8. Suicide attempters with Borderline Personality Disorder show differential orbitofrontal and parietal recruitment when reflecting on aversive memories.

    PubMed

    Silvers, Jennifer A; Hubbard, Alexa D; Chaudhury, Sadia; Biggs, Emily; Shu, Jocelyn; Grunebaum, Michael F; Fertuck, Eric; Weber, Jochen; Kober, Hedy; Carson-Wong, Amanda; Brodsky, Beth S; Chesin, Megan; Ochsner, Kevin N; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Suicidal behavior and difficulty regulating emotions are hallmarks of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). This study examined neural links between emotion regulation and suicide risk in BPD. 60 individuals with BPD (all female, mean age = 28.9 years), 46 of whom had attempted suicide, completed a fMRI task involving recalling aversive personal memories. Distance trials assessed the ability to regulate emotion by recalling memories from a third-person, objective viewpoint. Immerse trials assessed emotional reactivity and involved recalling memories from a first-person perspective. Behaviorally, both groups reported less negative affect on Distance as compared to Immerse trials. Neurally, two sets of findings were obtained. The first reflected differences between attempters and non-attempters. When immersing and distancing, attempters showed elevated recruitment of lateral orbitofrontal cortex, a brain region implicated in using negative cues to guide behavior. When distancing, attempters showed diminished recruitment of the precuneus, a region implicated in memory recall and perspective taking. The second set of findings related to individual differences in regulation success - the degree to which individuals used distancing to reduce negative affect. Here, we observed that attempters who successfully regulated exhibited precuneus recruitment that was more similar to non-attempters. These data provide insight into mechanisms underlying suicide attempts in BPD. Future work may examine if these findings generalize to other diagnoses and also whether prior findings in BPD differ across attempters and non-attempters. PMID:27392071

  9. Suicide attempters with Borderline Personality Disorder show differential orbitofrontal and parietal recruitment when reflecting on aversive memories.

    PubMed

    Silvers, Jennifer A; Hubbard, Alexa D; Chaudhury, Sadia; Biggs, Emily; Shu, Jocelyn; Grunebaum, Michael F; Fertuck, Eric; Weber, Jochen; Kober, Hedy; Carson-Wong, Amanda; Brodsky, Beth S; Chesin, Megan; Ochsner, Kevin N; Stanley, Barbara

    2016-10-01

    Suicidal behavior and difficulty regulating emotions are hallmarks of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). This study examined neural links between emotion regulation and suicide risk in BPD. 60 individuals with BPD (all female, mean age = 28.9 years), 46 of whom had attempted suicide, completed a fMRI task involving recalling aversive personal memories. Distance trials assessed the ability to regulate emotion by recalling memories from a third-person, objective viewpoint. Immerse trials assessed emotional reactivity and involved recalling memories from a first-person perspective. Behaviorally, both groups reported less negative affect on Distance as compared to Immerse trials. Neurally, two sets of findings were obtained. The first reflected differences between attempters and non-attempters. When immersing and distancing, attempters showed elevated recruitment of lateral orbitofrontal cortex, a brain region implicated in using negative cues to guide behavior. When distancing, attempters showed diminished recruitment of the precuneus, a region implicated in memory recall and perspective taking. The second set of findings related to individual differences in regulation success - the degree to which individuals used distancing to reduce negative affect. Here, we observed that attempters who successfully regulated exhibited precuneus recruitment that was more similar to non-attempters. These data provide insight into mechanisms underlying suicide attempts in BPD. Future work may examine if these findings generalize to other diagnoses and also whether prior findings in BPD differ across attempters and non-attempters.

  10. Differential Gene Expression Reflects Morphological Characteristics and Physiological Processes in Rice Immunity against Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Parisa; Rafii, Mohd Y; Mahmood, Maziah; Abdullah, Siti N A; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Nejat, Naghmeh; Latif, Muhammad A; Sahebi, Mahbod

    2015-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious pathogen that jeopardises the world's most important food-security crop. Ten common Malaysian rice varieties were examined for their morphological, physiological and genomic responses to this rice blast pathogen. qPCR quantification was used to assess the growth of the pathogen population in resistant and susceptible rice varieties. The chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were also measured to further understand the disruptive effects that M. oryzae has on infected plants of these varieties. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of eight blast resistance genes among the ten local varieties. Blast disease has destructive effects on the growth of rice, and the findings of our study provide evidence that the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes are involved in defence responses in the leaves of Malaysian rice at 31 h after inoculation with M. oryzae pathotype P7.2. Both the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were reduced, but the levels of Pikh gene expression remained constant in susceptible varieties, with a developed pathogen population and mild or severe symptoms. The Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes, however, were simultaneously upregulated in infected rice plants. Therefore, the presence of the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes in the germplasm is useful for improving the resistance of rice varieties. PMID:26001124

  11. Differential Gene Expression Reflects Morphological Characteristics and Physiological Processes in Rice Immunity against Blast Pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Maziah; Abdullah, Siti N. A.; Hanafi, Mohamed M.; Nejat, Naghmeh; Latif, Muhammad A.

    2015-01-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is a serious pathogen that jeopardises the world’s most important food-security crop. Ten common Malaysian rice varieties were examined for their morphological, physiological and genomic responses to this rice blast pathogen. qPCR quantification was used to assess the growth of the pathogen population in resistant and susceptible rice varieties. The chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were also measured to further understand the disruptive effects that M. oryzae has on infected plants of these varieties. Real-time PCR was used to explore the differential expression of eight blast resistance genes among the ten local varieties. Blast disease has destructive effects on the growth of rice, and the findings of our study provide evidence that the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes are involved in defence responses in the leaves of Malaysian rice at 31 h after inoculation with M. oryzae pathotype P7.2. Both the chlorophyll content and photosynthesis were reduced, but the levels of Pikh gene expression remained constant in susceptible varieties, with a developed pathogen population and mild or severe symptoms. The Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes, however, were simultaneously upregulated in infected rice plants. Therefore, the presence of the Pikh, Pi9, Pi21, and Osw45 genes in the germplasm is useful for improving the resistance of rice varieties. PMID:26001124

  12. Metrological scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhovets, N.; Hausotte, T.; Manske, E.; Jäger, G.; Hofmann, N.

    2006-04-01

    Today's technological progress calls for metrologically accurate object measurement, positioning and scanning with nanometre precision and over large measuring ranges. In order to meet that requirement a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine (NPM machine) was developed at the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology of the Technische Universitaet Ilmenau. This device is capable of highly exact long-range positioning and measurement of objects with a resolution of less than 0.1 nm. Due to the structure of the machine many different probe systems can be installed, including scanning probe microscopes (SPMs). A few SPMs have outstanding metrological characteristics and many commercial microscopes only perform as image acquisition tools. Commercial SPMs use piezoelectric actuators in order to move either the sample or the probe. The position measurement sometimes results from the applied voltage to the piezoelectric actuators or from the strain gauge or capacitive displacement sensor data. This means that they suffer from hysteresis, creep, nonlinear characteristics and Abbe offsets. For an accurate measurement the position of the cantilever must be measured in addition to the torsion and bending. The best solution is a combined detection system with a single laser beam. This system has been realized with a special interferometer system, in which the measuring beam is focused on the cantilever backside using a lens. The reflected beam is split with a part being detected by a quadrant photo-diode and the other part being fed back into the interferometer for position measurement. The quadrant photo-diode is used to detect the cantilever torsion and bending.

  13. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  14. Present spatial diversity patterns of Theobroma cacao L. in the neotropics reflect genetic differentiation in pleistocene refugia followed by human-influenced dispersal.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Evert; van Zonneveld, Maarten; Loo, Judy; Hodgkin, Toby; Galluzzi, Gea; van Etten, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is indigenous to the Amazon basin, but is generally believed to have been domesticated in Mesoamerica for the production of chocolate beverage. However, cacao's distribution of genetic diversity in South America is also likely to reflect pre-Columbian human influences that were superimposed on natural processes of genetic differentiation. Here we present the results of a spatial analysis of the intra-specific diversity of cacao in Latin America, drawing on a dataset of 939 cacao trees genotypically characterized by means of 96 SSR markers. To assess continental diversity patterns we performed grid-based calculations of allelic richness, Shannon diversity and Nei gene diversity, and distinguished different spatially coherent genetic groups by means of cluster analysis. The highest levels of genetic diversity were observed in the Upper Amazon areas from southern Peru to the Ecuadorian Amazon and the border areas between Colombia, Peru and Brazil. On the assumption that the last glaciation (22,000-13,000 BP) had the greatest pre-human impact on the current distribution and diversity of cacao, we modeled the species' Pleistocene niche suitability and overlaid this with present-day diversity maps. The results suggest that cacao was already widely distributed in the Western Amazon before the onset of glaciation. During glaciations, cacao populations were likely to have been restricted to several refugia where they probably underwent genetic differentiation, resulting in a number of genetic clusters which are representative for, or closest related to, the original wild cacao populations. The analyses also suggested that genetic differentiation and geographical distribution of a number of other clusters seem to have been significantly affected by processes of human management and accompanying genetic bottlenecks. We discuss the implications of these results for future germplasm collection and in situ, on farm and ex situ conservation of cacao.

  15. Present Spatial Diversity Patterns of Theobroma cacao L. in the Neotropics Reflect Genetic Differentiation in Pleistocene Refugia Followed by Human-Influenced Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Evert; van Zonneveld, Maarten; Loo, Judy; Hodgkin, Toby; Galluzzi, Gea; van Etten, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is indigenous to the Amazon basin, but is generally believed to have been domesticated in Mesoamerica for the production of chocolate beverage. However, cacao’s distribution of genetic diversity in South America is also likely to reflect pre-Columbian human influences that were superimposed on natural processes of genetic differentiation. Here we present the results of a spatial analysis of the intra-specific diversity of cacao in Latin America, drawing on a dataset of 939 cacao trees genotypically characterized by means of 96 SSR markers. To assess continental diversity patterns we performed grid-based calculations of allelic richness, Shannon diversity and Nei gene diversity, and distinguished different spatially coherent genetic groups by means of cluster analysis. The highest levels of genetic diversity were observed in the Upper Amazon areas from southern Peru to the Ecuadorian Amazon and the border areas between Colombia, Peru and Brazil. On the assumption that the last glaciation (22,000–13,000 BP) had the greatest pre-human impact on the current distribution and diversity of cacao, we modeled the species’ Pleistocene niche suitability and overlaid this with present-day diversity maps. The results suggest that cacao was already widely distributed in the Western Amazon before the onset of glaciation. During glaciations, cacao populations were likely to have been restricted to several refugia where they probably underwent genetic differentiation, resulting in a number of genetic clusters which are representative for, or closest related to, the original wild cacao populations. The analyses also suggested that genetic differentiation and geographical distribution of a number of other clusters seem to have been significantly affected by processes of human management and accompanying genetic bottlenecks. We discuss the implications of these results for future germplasm collection and in situ, on farm and ex situ conservation of

  16. TEAM Electron Microscope Animation

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    The TEAM Electron Microscope, a device that enables atomic-scale imaging in 3-D, has a rotating stage that can hold and position samples inside electron microscopes with unprecedented stability, position-control accuracy, and range of motion.The TEAM Stage makes one of the world's most powerful electron microscopes even better, and enables previously impossible experiments.

  17. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  18. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R.; Russell, Aidan N.; Wheeler, Richard J.; Nord, Ashley L.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy. PMID:26853732

  19. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R.; Russell, Aidan N.; Wheeler, Richard J.; Nord, Ashley L.; Berry, Richard M.

    2016-02-01

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy.

  20. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R; Russell, Aidan N; Wheeler, Richard J; Nord, Ashley L; Berry, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy. PMID:26853732

  1. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes.

    PubMed

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R; Russell, Aidan N; Wheeler, Richard J; Nord, Ashley L; Berry, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy.

  2. Scanning Microscopes Using X Rays and Microchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Scanning microscopes that would be based on microchannel filters and advanced electronic image sensors and that utilize x-ray illumination have been proposed. Because the finest resolution attainable in a microscope is determined by the wavelength of the illumination, the xray illumination in the proposed microscopes would make it possible, in principle, to achieve resolutions of the order of nanometers about a thousand times as fine as the resolution of a visible-light microscope. Heretofore, it has been necessary to use scanning electron microscopes to obtain such fine resolution. In comparison with scanning electron microscopes, the proposed microscopes would likely be smaller, less massive, and less expensive. Moreover, unlike in scanning electron microscopes, it would not be necessary to place specimens under vacuum. The proposed microscopes are closely related to the ones described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles; namely, Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43; and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 2002) page 6a. In all of these microscopes, the basic principle of design and operation is the same: The focusing optics of a conventional visible-light microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. A microchannel plate containing parallel, microscopic-cross-section holes much longer than they are wide is placed between a specimen and an image sensor, which is typically the CCD. The microchannel plate must be made of a material that absorbs the illuminating radiation reflected or scattered from the specimen. The microchannels must be positioned and dimensioned so that each one is registered with a pixel on the image sensor. Because most of the radiation incident on the microchannel walls becomes absorbed, the radiation that reaches the

  3. Water window imaging x ray microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A high resolution x ray microscope for imaging microscopic structures within biological specimens has an optical system including a highly polished primary and secondary mirror coated with identical multilayer coatings, the mirrors acting at normal incidence. The coatings have a high reflectivity in the narrow wave bandpass between 23.3 and 43.7 angstroms and have low reflectivity outside of this range. The primary mirror has a spherical concave surface and the secondary mirror has a spherical convex surface. The radii of the mirrors are concentric about a common center of curvature on the optical axis of the microscope extending from the object focal plane to the image focal plane. The primary mirror has an annular configuration with a central aperture and the secondary mirror is positioned between the primary mirror and the center of curvature for reflecting radiation through the aperture to a detector. An x ray filter is mounted at the stage end of the microscope, and film sensitive to x rays in the desired band width is mounted in a camera at the image plane of the optical system. The microscope is mounted within a vacuum chamber for minimizing the absorption of x rays in air from a source through the microscope.

  4. Water window imaging x ray microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1990-10-01

    A high resolution x ray microscope for imaging microscopic structures within biological specimens has an optical system including a highly polished primary and secondary mirror coated with identical multilayer coatings, the mirrors acting at normal incidence. The coatings have a high reflectivity in the narrow wave bandpass between 23.3 and 43.7 angstroms and have low reflectivity outside of this range. The primary mirror has a spherical concave surface and the secondary mirror has a spherical convex surface. The radii of the mirrors are concentric about a common center of curvature on the optical axis of the microscope extending from the object focal plane to the image focal plane. The primary mirror has an annular configuration with a central aperture and the secondary mirror is positioned between the primary mirror and the center of curvature for reflecting radiation through the aperture to a detector. An x ray filter is mounted at the stage end of the microscope, and film sensitive to x rays in the desired band width is mounted in a camera at the image plane of the optical system. The microscope is mounted within a vacuum chamber for minimizing the absorption of x rays in air from a source through the microscope.

  5. Reflecting Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galea, Simone

    2012-01-01

    This paper demystifies reflective practice on teaching by focusing on the idea of reflection itself and how it has been conceived by two philosophers, Plato and Irigaray. It argues that reflective practice has become a standardized method of defining the teacher in teacher education and teacher accreditation systems. It explores how practices of…

  6. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  7. Thermal-Wave Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.; Gilbert, Percy

    1989-01-01

    Computer-controlled thermal-wave microscope developed to investigate III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. Is nondestructive technique providing information on subsurface thermal features of solid samples. Furthermore, because this is subsurface technique, three-dimensional imaging also possible. Microscope uses intensity-modulated electron beam of modified scanning electron microscope to generate thermal waves in sample. Acoustic waves generated by thermal waves received by transducer and processed in computer to form images displayed on video display of microscope or recorded on magnetic disk.

  8. Photography through the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Describes how to illuminate and optically stain slides for microscope use and how to interface a 35mm camera with a microscope using an adaptor. Provides equipment descriptions and sources, details about illumination, image formation, darkfield adaptors, centerable filter adaptors, darkfield stops, rheinburg filters, and choosing specimens to…

  9. Mailing microscope slides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  10. The Homemade Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Roger C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Directions for the building of a pocket microscope that will make visible the details of insect structure and living bacteria are described. Background information on the history of microscopes and lenses is provided. The procedures for producing various types of lenses are included. (KR)

  11. Surface imaging microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogala, Eric W.; Bankman, Isaac N.

    2008-04-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of microscopic objects are becoming increasingly important for battlespace CBRNE sensing. Potential applications of microscopic 3D shape observations include characterization of biological weapon particles and manufacturing of micromechanical components. Aerosol signatures of stand-off lidar systems, using elastic backscatter or polarization, are dictated by the aerosol particle shapes and sizes that must be well characterized in the lab. A low-cost, fast instrument for 3D surface shape microscopy will be a valuable point sensor for biological particle sensing applications. Both the cost and imaging durations of traditional techniques such as confocal microscopes, atomic force microscopes, and electron scanning microscopes are too high. We investigated the feasibility of a low-cost, fast interferometric technique for imaging the 3D surface shape of microscopic objects at frame rates limited only by the camera in the system. The system operates at two laser wavelengths producing two fringe images collected simultaneously by a digital camera, and a specialized algorithm we developed reconstructs the surface map of the microscopic object. The current implementation assembled to test the concept and develop the new 3D reconstruction algorithm has 0.25 micron resolution in the x and y directions, and about 0.1 micron accuracy in the z direction, as tested on a microscopic glass test object manufactured with etching techniques. We describe the interferometric instrument, present the reconstruction algorithm, and discuss further development.

  12. Stereoscopic Video Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterfield, James F.

    1980-11-01

    The new electronic technology of three-dimensional video combined with the established. science of microscopy has created. a new instrument. the Stereoscopic Video Microscope. The specimen is illuminated so the stereoscopic objective lens focuses the stereo-pair of images side-by-side on the video camera's pick-up, tube. The resulting electronic signal can be enhanced, digitized, colorized, quantified, its polarity reverse., and its gray scale expanJed non-linearally. The signal can be transmitted over distances and can be stored on video. tape for later playback. The electronic signal is converted to a stereo-pair of visual images on the video monitor's cathode-ray-tube. A stereo-hood is used to fuse the two images for three-dimensional viewing. The conventional optical microscope has definite limitations, many of which can be eliminated by converting the optical image to an electronic signal in the video microscope. The principal aHvantages of the Stereoscopic Video Microscope compared to the conventional optical microscope are: great ease of viewing; group viewing; ability to easily recohd; and, the capability of processing the electronic signal for video. enhancement. The applications cover nearly all fields of microscopy. These include: microelectronics assembly, inspection, and research; biological, metallurgical, and che.illical research; and other industrial and medical uses. The Stereo-scopic Video Microscope is particularly useful for instructional and recordkeeping purposes. The video microscope can be monoscopic or three dimensional.

  13. UV-visible microscope spectrophotometric polarization and dichroism with increased discrimination power in forensic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Dale Kevin

    Microanalysis of transfer (Trace) evidence is the application of a microscope and microscopical techniques for the collection, observation, documentation, examination, identification, and discrimination of micrometer sized particles or domains. Microscope spectrophotometry is the union of microscopy and spectroscopy for microanalysis. Analytical microspectroscopy is the science of studying the emission, reflection, transmission, and absorption of electromagnetic radiation to determine the structure or chemical composition of microscopic-size materials. Microscope spectrophotometry instrument designs have evolved from monochromatic illumination which transmitted through the microscope and sample and then is detected by a photometer detector (photomultiplier tube) to systems in which broad-band (white light) illumination falls incident upon a sample followed by a non-scanning grating spectrometer equipped with a solid-state multi-element detector. Most of these small modern spectrometers are configured with either silicon based charged-couple device detectors (200-950 nm) or InGaAs based diode array detectors (850-2300 nm) with computerized data acquisition and signal processing being common. A focus of this research was to evaluate the performance characteristics of various modern forensic (UV-Vis) microscope photometer systems as well as review early model instrumental designs. An important focus of this research was to efficiently measure ultraviolet-visible spectra of microscopically small specimens for classification, differentiation, and possibly individualization. The first stage of the project consisted of the preparation of microscope slides containing neutral density filter reference materials, molecular fluorescence reference materials, and dichroic reference materials. Upon completion of these standard slide preparations analysis began with measurements in order to evaluate figures of merit for comparison of the instruments investigated. The figures of

  14. Hyperspectral confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael B; Haaland, David M; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Jones, Howland D T

    2006-08-20

    We have developed a new, high performance, hyperspectral microscope for biological and other applications. For each voxel within a three-dimensional specimen, the microscope simultaneously records the emission spectrum from 500 nm to 800 nm, with better than 3 nm spectral resolution. The microscope features a fully confocal design to ensure high spatial resolution and high quality optical sectioning. Optical throughput and detection efficiency are maximized through the use of a custom prism spectrometer and a backside thinned electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) array. A custom readout mode and synchronization scheme enable 512-point spectra to be recorded at a rate of 8300 spectra per second. In addition, the EMCCD readout mode eliminates curvature and keystone artifacts that often plague spectral imaging systems. The architecture of the new microscope is described in detail, and hyperspectral images from several specimens are presented.

  15. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  16. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  17. Hyperspectral confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Haaland, David M.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed a new, high performance, hyperspectral microscope for biological and other applications. For each voxel within a three-dimensional specimen, the microscope simultaneously records the emission spectrum from 500 nm to 800 nm, with better than 3 nm spectral resolution. The microscope features a fully confocal design to ensure high spatial resolution and high quality optical sectioning. Optical throughput and detection efficiency are maximized through the use of a custom prism spectrometer and a backside thinned electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) array. A custom readout mode and synchronization scheme enable 512-point spectra to be recorded at a rate of 8300 spectra per second. In addition, the EMCCD readout mode eliminates curvature and keystone artifacts that often plague spectral imaging systems. The architecture of the new microscope is described in detail, and hyperspectral images from several specimens are presented.

  18. Hyperspectral confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Michael B; Haaland, David M; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Jones, Howland D T

    2006-08-20

    We have developed a new, high performance, hyperspectral microscope for biological and other applications. For each voxel within a three-dimensional specimen, the microscope simultaneously records the emission spectrum from 500 nm to 800 nm, with better than 3 nm spectral resolution. The microscope features a fully confocal design to ensure high spatial resolution and high quality optical sectioning. Optical throughput and detection efficiency are maximized through the use of a custom prism spectrometer and a backside thinned electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) array. A custom readout mode and synchronization scheme enable 512-point spectra to be recorded at a rate of 8300 spectra per second. In addition, the EMCCD readout mode eliminates curvature and keystone artifacts that often plague spectral imaging systems. The architecture of the new microscope is described in detail, and hyperspectral images from several specimens are presented. PMID:16892134

  19. Operating microscopes: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Uluç, Kutluay; Kujoth, Gregory C; Başkaya, Mustafa K

    2009-09-01

    The operating microscope is a fixture of modern surgical facilities, and it is a critically important factor in the success of many of the most complex and difficult surgical interventions used in medicine today. The rise of this key surgical tool reflects advances in understanding the principles of optics and vision that have occurred over centuries. The development of reading spectacles in the late 13th century led to the construction of early compound microscopes in the 16th and 17th centuries by Lippershey, Janssen, Galileo, Hooke, and others. Perhaps surprisingly, Leeuwenhoek's simple microscopes of this era offered improved performance over his contemporaries' designs. The intervening years saw improvements that reduced the spherical and chromatic aberrations present in compound microscopes. By the late 19th century, Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe ushered the compound microscope into the beginnings of the modern era of commercial design and production. The introduction of the microscope into the operating room by Nylén in 1921 initiated a revolution in surgical practice that gained momentum throughout the 1950s with multiple refinements, the introduction of the Zeiss OPMI series, and Kurze's application of the microscope to neurosurgery in 1957. Many of the refinements of the last 50 years have greatly improved the handling and practical operation of the surgical microscope, considerations which are equally important to its optical performance. Today's sophisticated operating microscopes allow for advanced real-time angiographic and tumor imaging. In this paper the authors discuss what might be found in the operating rooms of tomorrow. PMID:19722819

  20. Reflection and reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Schutz, Sue

    2007-09-01

    Reflection is an approach to the generation of understanding about practice that has become a largely accepted part of nursing education at both undergraduate and post-qualifying levels. It is also increasingly common now for healthcare professionals to use reflection in their practice communities as a part of their daily professional work. The literature is replete with accounts of the possible benefits to practitioners and clients of using reflection in practice, yet this amounts to a rather scant evidence base. For community nurses there are several challenges in the practical application of reflective practice, but these are not insurmountable. Issues such as lone-working and geographical distance may be a challenge. There are some key skills that will help public health and community practitioners get started in reflection and some important issues that should be addressed before beginning. Reflective practice has, however, the potential to help practitioners in all fields unlock the tacit knowledge and understanding that they have of their practice and use this to generate knowledge for future practice.

  1. The virtual microscope.

    PubMed

    Catalyürek, Umit; Beynon, Michael D; Chang, Chialin; Kurc, Tahsin; Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel

    2003-12-01

    We present the design and implementation of the Virtual Microscope, a software system employing a client/server architecture to provide a realistic emulation of a high power light microscope. The system provides a form of completely digital telepathology, allowing simultaneous access to archived digital slide images by multiple clients. The main problem the system targets is storing and processing the extremely large quantities of data required to represent a collection of slides. The Virtual Microscope client software runs on the end user's PC or workstation, while database software for storing, retrieving and processing the microscope image data runs on a parallel computer or on a set of workstations at one or more potentially remote sites. We have designed and implemented two versions of the data server software. One implementation is a customization of a database system framework that is optimized for a tightly coupled parallel machine with attached local disks. The second implementation is component-based, and has been designed to accommodate access to and processing of data in a distributed, heterogeneous environment. We also have developed caching client software, implemented in Java, to achieve good response time and portability across different computer platforms. The performance results presented show that the Virtual Microscope systems scales well, so that many clients can be adequately serviced by an appropriately configured data server.

  2. A MEMS based handheld confocal microscope with Raman spectroscopy for in-vivo skin cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrasmith, Christopher L.; Patil, Chetan A.; Dickensheets, David L.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2009-02-01

    Both Confocal Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy have shown potential for diagnosis and differentiation of cancerous and normal skin. Many current studies utilizing these techniques use large bench-top microscopes, and are not suited for in-vivo diagnosis in a clinical setting. We have developed a microscope which combines confocal reflectance imaging with Raman spectroscopy into a compact handheld probe, allowing images and Raman spectra to be taken in-vivo. The compact design of this handheld unit is largely due to the use of a MEMS mirror which scans the illumination laser light in two dimensions to produce the confocal reflectance image of the skin. An integrated CCD camera provides a large area view of the skin surface which helps to guide the location of the confocal reflectance image area. Using this probe, in-vivo confocal reflectance images and Raman spectra of normal skin have been obtained with axial resolutions of 4 μm for the confocal channel and 10 μm for the Raman channel. This paper presents the instrument design and optical characteristics, including representative in-vivo images and Raman data from normal skin tissue.

  3. Integrated elastic microscope device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. M.; Wright, D.; Watkins, R.; Cen, Zi

    2015-03-01

    The growing power of imaging and computing power of smartphones is creating the possibility of converting your smartphone into a high power pocket microscopy system. High quality miniature microscopy lenses attached to smartphone are typically made with glass or plastics that can only be produce at low cost with high volume. To revise the paradigm of microscope lenses, we devised a simple droplet lens fabrication technique that which produces low cost and high performance lens. Each lens is integrated into thin 3-D printed holder with complimentary light emitted diode (LEDs) that clips onto majority of smartphones. The integrated device converts a smartphone into a high power optical microscope/dermatoscope at around $2. This low cost device has wide application in a multitude of practical uses such as material inspection, dermascope and educational microscope.

  4. Microscopic overdiagnosis of intestinal amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Rayan, Hanan Z E

    2005-12-01

    To determine the misdiagnosis of intestinal amoebiasis associated to microscopic examination of faeces, 50 stool samples of patients infected with Entamoeba histolytica were collected from different Primary Health Care Centers, hospitals and private laboratories in Ismailia G. The samples were examined using Wheatley's trichrome staining technique to differrentiate E. histolytica E. dispar complex from other non-pathogenic intestinal amoebae and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR differentiated between the two morphologic identical species (E. histolytica and E. dispar) and had the advantage to save time and resources. E. histolytica was detected in only 5 (10%) samples and in association with E. dispar in 8 (16%) samples. On the other hand, 20 samples (40%) were E. dispar. The other 17 samples were negative. E. coli, E. hartmanni and polymorphs were commonly misdiagnosed as E. histolytica. PMID:16333901

  5. Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Thomas Farrell's "Reflective Teaching" outlines four principles that take teachers from just doing reflection to making it a way of being. Using the four principles, Reflective Practice Is Evidence Based, Reflective Practice Involves Dialogue, Reflective Practice Links Beliefs and Practices, and Reflective Practice Is a Way of Life,…

  6. Electron microscope studies

    SciTech Connect

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  7. Microscope on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  8. Microscopes and ocular infections.

    PubMed

    Olcerst, R B

    1987-05-01

    Environmental microbial assays of industrial microscope eyepieces were conducted following reports of multiple intershift ocular infections. Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus was identified among the microorganisms cultured. This paper suggests that direct contact with industrial microscope eyepieces provides a potentially significant route of transmission of both bacterial and viral ocular infections. An industrial hygiene ocular health questionnaire was distributed to a first and second shift manufacturing operation to assess the incidence of ocular infections. These data were compared to the questionnaire responses of 122 control manufacturing workers who did not use microscopes. Based on self-reporting by employees, those who used microscopes were found to have statistically significant incidence of sites and conjunctivitis that was 8.3 times that of the control group. Sterilization of eyepieces by ethylene oxide, formaldehyde and isopropyl alcohol were considered, but ultimately rejected. These biocides were found respectively to damage ocular lens coatings, contribute to volatile organic emissions, or be ineffective against spore-forming bacteria. This article presents a detailed evaluation of a commercially available ultraviolet sanitization unit (manufactured by the King Bactostat Corp., 7115 Armistad Street, El Paso, TX 79912). This ultraviolet disinfection process proved to be rapid and emission free; it also yielded eyepieces free of residual chemical biocides that have the potential for ocular irritation. Field tests involving 60 eyepieces demonstrated effective disinfection by a Chi-Square statistical comparison, at values greater than 95% confidence level, as compared to unirradiated eyepieces.

  9. Microscopic plasma Hamiltonian

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Y.-K. M.

    1974-01-01

    A Hamiltonian for the microscopic plasma model is derived from the Low Lagrangian after the dual roles of the generalized variables are taken into account. The resulting Hamilton equations are shown to agree with the Euler-Lagrange equations of the Low Lagrangian.

  10. Making Art with Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedis-Grab, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teaching is a great way to focus on overarching concepts and help students make connections across disciplines. Historically, art and science have been connected disciplines. The botanical prints of the 18th and 19th centuries and early work with microscopes are two examples of a need for strong artistic skills in the science…

  11. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  13. Biofilm Formation in Microscopic Double Emulsion Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    In natural, medical, and industrial settings, there exist surface-associated communities of bacteria known as biofilms. These highly structured films are composed of bacterial cells embedded within self-produced extracellular matrix, usually composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids; this matrix serves to protect the bacterial community from antibiotics and environmental stressors. Here, we form biofilms encapsulated within monodisperse, microscopically-sized double emulsion droplets using microfluidics. The bacteria self-organize at the inner liquid-liquid droplet interfaces, multiply, and differentiate into extracellular matrix-producing cells, forming manifold three-dimensional shell-within-a-shell structures of biofilms, templated upon the inner core of spherical liquid droplets. By using microfluidics to encapsulate bacterial cells, we have the ability to view individual cells multiplying in microscopically-sized droplets, which allows for high-throughput analysis in studying the genetic program leading to biofilm development, or cell signaling that induces differentiation.

  14. Design and analysis of multilayer x ray/XUV microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The design and analysis of a large number of normal incidence multilayer x ray microscopes based on the spherical mirror Schwarzschild configuration is examined. Design equations for the spherical mirror Schwarzschild microscopes are summarized and used to evaluate mirror parameters for microscopes with magnifications ranging from 2 to 50x. Ray tracing and diffraction analyses are carried out for many microscope configurations to determine image resolution as a function of system parameters. The results are summarized in three publication included herein. A preliminary study of advanced reflecting microscope configurations, where aspherics are used in place of the spherical microscope mirror elements, has indicated that the aspherical elements will improve off-axis image resolution and increase the effective field of view.

  15. Reflection Coefficients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses and provides an example of reflectivity approximation to determine whether reflection will occur. Provides a method to show thin-film interference on a projection screen. Also applies the reflectivity concepts to electromagnetic wave systems. (MVL)

  16. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  17. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy. PMID:25759526

  18. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5th International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy. PMID:25759526

  19. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  20. Thermal Lens Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  1. Q: How do Microscopes Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimov, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Microscopes allow scientists to examine everyday objects in extraordinary ways. They provide high-resolution images that show objects in fine detail. This brief article describes the many types of microscopes and how they are used in different scientific venues.

  2. No departure to "Pandora"? Using critical phenomenology to differentiate "naive" from "reflective" experience in psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine (A comment on Schwartz and Wiggins, 2010)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The mind-body problem lies at the heart of the clinical practice of both psychiatry and psychosomatic medicine. In their recent publication, Schwartz and Wiggins address the question of how to understand life as central to the mind-body problem. Drawing on their own use of the phenomenological method, we propose that the mind-body problem is not resolved by a general, evocative appeal to an all encompassing life-concept, but rather falters precisely at the insurmountable difference between "natural" and a "reflective" experience built into phenomenological method itself. Drawing on the works of phenomenologically oriented thinkers, we describe life as inherently "teleological" without collapsing life with our subjective perspective, or stepping over our epistemological limits. From the phenomenology it can be demonstrated that the hypothetical teleological qualities are a reflective reconstruction modelled on human behavioural structure. PMID:21040525

  3. High sensitive reflection type long period fiber grating biosensor for real time detection of thyroglobulin, a differentiated thyroid cancer biomarker: the Smart Health project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quero, G.; Severino, R.; Vaiano, P.; Consales, M.; Ruvo, M.; Sandomenico, A.; Borriello, A.; Giordano, M.; Zuppolini, S.; Diodato, L.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2015-09-01

    We report the development of a reflection-type long period fiber grating (LPG) biosensor able to perform the real time detection of thyroid cancer markers in the needle washout of fine-needle aspiration biopsy. A standard LPG is first transformed in a practical probe working in reflection mode, then it is coated by an atactic-polystyrene overlay in order to increase its surrounding refractive index sensitivity and to provide, at the same time, the desired interfacial properties for a stable bioreceptor immobilization. The results provide a clear demonstration of the effectiveness and sensitivity of the developed biosensing platform, allowing the in vitro detection of human Thyroglobulin at sub-nanomolar concentrations.

  4. Atomic Force Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  5. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  6. Solid state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1983-08-09

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal. 2 figs.

  7. Adirondack Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image was taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit front hazard-identification camera after the rover's first post-egress drive on Mars Sunday, Jan. 15, 2004. Engineers drove the rover approximately 3 meters (10 feet) from the Columbia Memorial Station toward the first rock target, seen in the foreground. The football-sized rock was dubbed Adirondack because of its mountain-shaped appearance. Scientists have begun using the microscopic imager instrument at the end of the rover's robotic arm to examine the rock and understand how it formed.

  8. [Microscopic infrared spectral imaging of oily core].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiao-Song; Yu, Zhao-Xian; Li, Jing; Chen, Chen

    2009-02-01

    In the present paper, the authors examined some oily core by microscopic infrared spectral imaging methods. Those methods can be classified in three modes, referred to as "transmission mode", "reflection mode" and "attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode". The observed oily core samples belong to siltstone. The samples were made of quartz (-20%), feldspar(-50%) and other rock (igneous rock 25%, metamorphic rocks 1%, sedimentary rock 4%); a little recrystallized calcite (-1%) was in the pore, and the argillaceous matter was distributed along the edge of a pore. The experimental work has been accomplished using SHIMADZU Model IRPrestige-21 Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer plus AIM8800 infrared microscope. For IRPrestige-21, the spectral range is 7 800-350 cm(-1) spectral resolution is 1 cm(-1), and AIM8800 microscope with motorized stages has a resolution of 1 micrometer. The experiment was preformed at room temperature. In "transmission mode" infrared spectral imaging method, the spectral range was limited in wavenumbers greater than 2 000 cm(-1) because the base glass piece has strong light absorption. In contrast with "transmission mode", in "attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode", the depth of penetration into sample is very small (1-2 micrometer), then the absorbance value has nothing to do with base glass piece light absorption. In microscopic infrared transmission spectra, the experimental result shows that there are some strong absorption peaks at 2 866, 2 928, 3 618 and 2 515 cm(-1) respectively. The former two peaks correspond to methyl(methylene) symmetrical and unsymmetrical stretch vibration mode, respectively. The latter two peaks correspond to hydroxyl-stretch vibration mode and S-H, P-H chemical bond stretch vibration mode, respectively. In microscopic longwave infrared ATR spectra, there are other stronger absorption peaks at 1 400, 1 038 and 783 cm(i1)respectively, corresponding to methyl(methylene) widing vibration mode and optical mode

  9. [Microscopic infrared spectral imaging of oily core].

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiao-Song; Yu, Zhao-Xian; Li, Jing; Chen, Chen

    2009-02-01

    In the present paper, the authors examined some oily core by microscopic infrared spectral imaging methods. Those methods can be classified in three modes, referred to as "transmission mode", "reflection mode" and "attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode". The observed oily core samples belong to siltstone. The samples were made of quartz (-20%), feldspar(-50%) and other rock (igneous rock 25%, metamorphic rocks 1%, sedimentary rock 4%); a little recrystallized calcite (-1%) was in the pore, and the argillaceous matter was distributed along the edge of a pore. The experimental work has been accomplished using SHIMADZU Model IRPrestige-21 Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer plus AIM8800 infrared microscope. For IRPrestige-21, the spectral range is 7 800-350 cm(-1) spectral resolution is 1 cm(-1), and AIM8800 microscope with motorized stages has a resolution of 1 micrometer. The experiment was preformed at room temperature. In "transmission mode" infrared spectral imaging method, the spectral range was limited in wavenumbers greater than 2 000 cm(-1) because the base glass piece has strong light absorption. In contrast with "transmission mode", in "attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode", the depth of penetration into sample is very small (1-2 micrometer), then the absorbance value has nothing to do with base glass piece light absorption. In microscopic infrared transmission spectra, the experimental result shows that there are some strong absorption peaks at 2 866, 2 928, 3 618 and 2 515 cm(-1) respectively. The former two peaks correspond to methyl(methylene) symmetrical and unsymmetrical stretch vibration mode, respectively. The latter two peaks correspond to hydroxyl-stretch vibration mode and S-H, P-H chemical bond stretch vibration mode, respectively. In microscopic longwave infrared ATR spectra, there are other stronger absorption peaks at 1 400, 1 038 and 783 cm(i1)respectively, corresponding to methyl(methylene) widing vibration mode and optical mode

  10. Microscopic Tribotactic Walkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steimel, Joshua; Aragones, Juan; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    The translational motion of a rotating object near a surface is strongly dependent on the friction between the object and the surface. The process of friction is inherently directional and the friction coefficient can be anisotropic even in the absence of a net friction coefficient gradient. This is macroscopically observed in the ordering motif of some animal hair or scales and a microscopic analog can be imagined where the friction coefficient is determined by the strength and density of reversible bonds between a rotating object and the substrate. For high friction coefficients most of the rotational motion is converted into translational motion; conversely for low friction coefficients the object primarily rotates in place. We exploited this property to design and test a new class of motile system that displays tribotaxis, which is the process by which an object detects differences in the local friction coefficient and moves accordingly either to regions of higher or lower friction. These synthetic tribotactic microscopic walkers, composed of a pair of functionalized superparamagnetic beads, detect gradients in the spatial friction coefficient and migrate towards high friction areas when actuated in a random fashion. The effective friction between the walkers and the substrate is controlled by the local density of active receptors in the substrate. The tribotactic walkers also displayed trapping in high friction areas where the density of free receptors is higher.

  11. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  12. Microscopic Rayleigh Droplet Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doak, R. B.

    2005-11-01

    A periodically triggered Rayleigh Droplet Beam (RDB) delivers a perfectly linear and periodic stream of identical, monoenergetic droplets that are phase-locked to the trigger signal. The droplet diameter and spacing are easily adjusted of choice of nozzle diameter and trigger frequency. Any liquid of low viscosity may be emloyed as the beam fluid. Although the field of nanofluidics is expanding rapidly, little effort has yet been devoted to ``external flows'' such as RDB's. At ASU we have generated RDB's of water and methanol down to 2 microns in droplet diameter. Nozzle clogging is the sole impediment to smaller droplets. Microscopic Rayleigh droplet beams offer tremendous potential for fundamental physical measurements, fluid dynamics research, and nanofabrication. This talk will describe the apparatus and techniques used at ASU to generate RDB's (surprisingly simple and inexpensive), discuss the triboelectric phenomena that play a role (surprisingly significant), present some initial experimental fluid dynamics measurements, and briefly survey RDB applications. Our particular interest in RDB's is as microscopic transport systems to deliver hydrated, undenatured proteins into vacuum for structure determination via serial diffraction of x-rays or electrons. This may offer the first general method for structure determination of non-crystallizable proteins.

  13. The Reflective Learning Continuum: Reflecting on Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Hay, Amanda; Drago, William

    2005-01-01

    The importance of reflection to marketing educators is increasingly recognized. However, there is a lack of empirical research that considers reflection within the context of both the marketing and general business education literature. This article describes the use of an instrument that can be used to measure four identified levels of a…

  14. Quantification of the Information Limit of Transmission Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2008-11-14

    The resolving power of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes is characterized by the information limit, which reflects the size of the smallest object detail observable with a particular instrument. We introduce a highly accurate measurement method for the information limit, which is suitable for modern aberration-corrected electron microscopes. An experimental comparison with the traditionally applied Young's fringe method yields severe discrepancies and confirms theoretical considerations according to which the Young's fringe method does not reveal the information limit.

  15. Interference reflection microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barr, Valarie A; Bunnell, Stephen C

    2009-12-01

    Interference reflection microscopy (IRM) is an optical technique used to study cell adhesion or cell mobility on a glass coverslip. The interference of reflected light waves generates images with high contrast and definition. IRM can be used to examine almost any cell that will rest upon a glass surface, although it is most useful in examining sites of close contact between a cell and substratum. This unit presents methods for obtaining IRM images of cells with particular emphasis on IRM imaging with a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), as most LSCM are already capable of recording these images without any modification of the instrument. Techniques are presented for imaging fixed and live cells, as well as simultaneous multi-channel capture of fluorescence and reflection images.

  16. Design of an anastigmat two-mirror microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shao-Hua; Shealy, David L.

    1995-09-01

    The generalized Coddington equations from caustic theory, the Abbe sine condition, and the constant optical path length condition have been used to design two-mirror microscope systems. These two-microscope systems are free of two of the three aberrations -- spherical aberration, coma, or astigmatism, depending on which two of the three design conditions are used. The optical performance of the resulting two-microscope systems has been compared to that of the Schwarzschild microscope and the Head microscope. The goal of this study is to identify design methods for reflective systems which will yield diffraction limited performance for large numerical apertures and fields of view. Also, these design methods are being extended to a three-mirror telescope.

  17. Hyperspectral unmixing using macroscopic and microscopic mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Ryan; Gader, Paul; Wilson, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic mixture models and algorithms for hyperspectral unmixing are presented. Unmixing algorithms are derived from an objective function. The objective function incorporates the linear mixture model for macroscopic unmixing and a nonlinear mixture model for microscopic unmixing. The nonlinear mixture model is derived from a bidirectional reflectance distribution function for microscopic mixtures. The algorithm is designed to unmix hyperspectral images composed of macroscopic or microscopic mixtures. The mixture types and abundances at each pixel can be estimated directly from the data without prior knowledge of mixture types. Endmembers can also be estimated. Results are presented using synthetic data sets of macroscopic and microscopic mixtures and using well-known, well-characterized laboratory data sets. The unmixing accuracy of this new physics-based algorithm is compared to linear methods and to results published for other nonlinear models. The proposed method achieves the best unmixing accuracy.

  18. Estimation of semiconductor-like pigment concentrations in paint mixtures and their differentiation from paint layers using first-derivative reflectance spectra.

    PubMed

    Pallipurath, Anuradha R; Skelton, Jonathan M; Ricciardi, Paola; Elliott, Stephen R

    2016-07-01

    Identification of the techniques employed by artists, e.g. mixing and layering of paints, if used together with information about their colour palette and style, can help to attribute works of art with more confidence. In this study, we show how the pigment composition in binary paint mixtures can be quantified using optical-reflectance spectroscopy, by analysis of the peak features corresponding to colour-transition edges in the first-derivative spectra. This technique is found to be more robust than a number of other spectral-analysis methods, which can suffer due to shifts in the transition edges in mixed paints compared to those observed in spectra of pure ones. Our method also provides a means of distinguishing paint mixtures from layering in some cases. The spectroscopy also shows the presence of multiple electronic transitions, accessible within a narrow energy range, to be a common feature of many coloured pigments, which electronic-structure calculations attribute to shallow band edges. We also demonstrate the successful application of the reflectance-analysis technique to painted areas on a selection of medieval illuminated manuscripts.

  19. Estimation of semiconductor-like pigment concentrations in paint mixtures and their differentiation from paint layers using first-derivative reflectance spectra.

    PubMed

    Pallipurath, Anuradha R; Skelton, Jonathan M; Ricciardi, Paola; Elliott, Stephen R

    2016-07-01

    Identification of the techniques employed by artists, e.g. mixing and layering of paints, if used together with information about their colour palette and style, can help to attribute works of art with more confidence. In this study, we show how the pigment composition in binary paint mixtures can be quantified using optical-reflectance spectroscopy, by analysis of the peak features corresponding to colour-transition edges in the first-derivative spectra. This technique is found to be more robust than a number of other spectral-analysis methods, which can suffer due to shifts in the transition edges in mixed paints compared to those observed in spectra of pure ones. Our method also provides a means of distinguishing paint mixtures from layering in some cases. The spectroscopy also shows the presence of multiple electronic transitions, accessible within a narrow energy range, to be a common feature of many coloured pigments, which electronic-structure calculations attribute to shallow band edges. We also demonstrate the successful application of the reflectance-analysis technique to painted areas on a selection of medieval illuminated manuscripts. PMID:27154649

  20. Design and analysis of soft X-ray imaging microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Cheng, Wang; Wu, Jiang; Hoover, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    The spherical Schwarzschild microscope for soft X-ray applications in microscopy and projection lithography consists of two concentric spherical mirrors configured such that the third-order spherical aberration and coma are zero. Since multilayers are used on the mirror substrates for X-ray applications, it is desirable to have only two reflecting surfaces in a microscope. To reduce microscope aberrations and increase the field of view, generalized mirror surface profiles are here considered. Based on incoherent and sine wave modulation transfer function calculations, the object plane resolution of a microscope has been analyzed as a function of the object height and numerical aperture (NA) of the primary for several spherical Schwarzschild, conic, and aspherical Head reflecting two-mirror microscope configurations. The Head microscope with a NA of 0.4 achieves diffraction limited performance for objects with a diameter of 40 microns. Thus, it seems possible to record images with a feature size less than 100 A with a 40x microscope when using 40 A radiation.

  1. Mars Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured by the rover's microscopic imager on the 10th day, or sol, of its mission. Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

  2. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  3. Ultra high frequency imaging acoustic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    2006-05-23

    An imaging system includes: an object wavefront source and an optical microscope objective all positioned to direct an object wavefront onto an area of a vibrating subject surface encompassed by a field of view of the microscope objective, and to direct a modulated object wavefront reflected from the encompassed surface area through a photorefractive material; and a reference wavefront source and at least one phase modulator all positioned to direct a reference wavefront through the phase modulator and to direct a modulated reference wavefront from the phase modulator through the photorefractive material to interfere with the modulated object wavefront. The photorefractive material has a composition and a position such that interference of the modulated object wavefront and modulated reference wavefront occurs within the photorefractive material, providing a full-field, real-time image signal of the encompassed surface area.

  4. Atomic Force Microscope Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation (large file)

    This animation is a scientific illustration of the operation of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Atomic Force Microscope, or AFM. The AFM is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA.

    The AFM is used to image the smallest Martian particles using a very sharp tip at the end of one of eight beams.

    The beam of the AFM is set into vibration and brought up to the surface of a micromachined silicon substrate. The substrate has etched in it a series of pits, 5 micrometers deep, designed to hold the Martian dust particles.

    The microscope then maps the shape of particles in three dimensions by scanning them with the tip.

    At the end of the animation is a 3D representation of the AFM image of a particle that was part of a sample informally called 'Sorceress.' The sample was delivered to the AFM on the 38th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (July 2, 2008).

    The image shows four round pits, only 5 microns in depth, that were micromachined into the silicon substrate.

    A Martian particle only one micrometer, or one millionth of a meter, across is held in the upper left pit.

    The rounded particle shown at the highest magnification ever seen from another world is a particle of the dust that cloaks Mars. Such dust particles color the Martian sky pink, feed storms that regularly envelop the planet and produce Mars' distinctive red soil.

    The AFM was developed by a Swiss-led consortium, with Imperial College London producing the silicon substrate that holds sampled particles.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Reflectance confocal microscopy for inflammatory skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, M; Prow, T; Agozzino, M; Soyer, P; Berardesca, E

    2015-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy evaluation of inflammatory skin diseases represents a relatively new indication that, during the last 5 years, has shown an increasing interest with consequent progressive increment of publications in literature. The success of RCM in this filed of dermatology is directly related to the high needing of non-invasive techniques able to reduce the number of skin biopsies and support the clinical diagnosis and patient's management. RCM demonstrated to visualize microscopic descriptors of inflammatory and pigmentary skin conditions with good reproducibility between observer and high grade of correspondence with optical histology. Moreover, RCM has shown to provide sufficient data to support clinical diagnosis and differential diagnosis of inflammatory and pigmentary skin diseases. Recently, several works published in literature have opened the prospective to use RCM also for therapeutic follow-up in order to monitor the improvement of the microscopic parameters and help to prevent treatment side effects. In this review article we present some examples of RCM application in inflammatory and pigmentary diseases. PMID:26333554

  6. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, Toma; Hofer, Christoph; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T.; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C.; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-10-01

    The Ångström-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either 12C or 13C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method may be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials.

  7. Surface Detection in a STXM Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Behyan, S.; Haines, B.; Urquhart, S. G.; Karanukaran, C.; Wang, J.; Obst, M.; Tyliszczak, T.

    2011-09-09

    We have modified scanning transmission x-ray microscopes (STXM) at the Canadian Light Source and the Advanced Light Source with total electron yield (TEY) detection (TEY-STXM). This provides improved surface-sensitive detection, simultaneous with existing bulk-sensitive transmission detection in the STXM microscopes. We have explored sample-current and channeltron-based electron yield detection. Both approaches provide improved surface sensitive imaging and spectroscopy, although channeltron-based detection is superior. TEY-STXM provides surface sensitive imaging of ultrathin films such as phase-separated Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer films, as well as differentiation of surface and bulk oxides of patterned metallic thin films. This paper will outline the experimental challenges of this method and the opportunities for correlative surface and bulk measurements of complex samples.

  8. Servo-controlled intravital microscope system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, M. N.; Wayland, H. J.; Chapman, C. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A microscope system is described for viewing an area of a living body tissue that is rapidly moving, by maintaining the same area in the field-of-view and in focus. A focus sensing portion of the system includes two video cameras at which the viewed image is projected, one camera being slightly in front of the image plane and the other slightly behind it. A focus sensing circuit for each camera differentiates certain high frequency components of the video signal and then detects them and passes them through a low pass filter, to provide dc focus signal whose magnitudes represent the degree of focus. An error signal equal to the difference between the focus signals, drives a servo that moves the microscope objective so that an in-focus view is delivered to an image viewing/recording camera.

  9. Approximating the detection limit of an infrared spectroscopic imaging microscope operating in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) modality: theoretical and empirical results for an instrument using a linear array detector and a 1.5 millimeter germanium hemisphere internal reflection element.

    PubMed

    Lanzarotta, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical detection limits have been estimated for aripiprazole (analyte) in alpha lactose monohydrate (matrix model pharmaceutical formulation) using a micro-attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging instrument equipped with a linear array detector and a 1.5 mm germanium hemisphere internal reflection element (IRE). The instrument yielded a theoretical detection limit of 0.0035% (35 parts per million (ppm)) when operating under diffraction-limited conditions, which was 49 times lower than what was achieved with a traditional macro-ATR instrument operating under practical conditions (0.17%, 1700 ppm). However, these results may not be achievable for most analyses because the detection limits will be particle size limited, rather than diffraction limited, for mixtures with average particle diameters greater than 8.3 μm (most pharmaceutical samples). For example, a theoretical detection limit of 0.028% (280 ppm) was calculated for an experiment operating under particle size-limited conditions where the average particle size was 23.4 μm. These conditions yielded a detection limit of 0.022% (220 ppm) when measured empirically, which was close to the theoretical value and only eight times lower than that of a faster, more simplistic macro-ATR instrument. Considering the longer data acquisition and processing times characteristic of the micro-ATR imaging approach (minutes or even hours versus seconds), the cost-benefit ratio may not often be favorable for the analysis of analytes in matrices that exhibit only a few overlapping absorptions (low-interfering matrices such as alpha lactose monohydrate) using this technique compared to what can be achieved using macro-ATR. However, the advantage was significant for detecting analytes in more complex matrices (those that exhibited several overlapping absorptions with the analyte) because the detection limit of the macro-ATR approach was highly formulation

  10. Approximating the detection limit of an infrared spectroscopic imaging microscope operating in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) modality: theoretical and empirical results for an instrument using a linear array detector and a 1.5 millimeter germanium hemisphere internal reflection element.

    PubMed

    Lanzarotta, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical detection limits have been estimated for aripiprazole (analyte) in alpha lactose monohydrate (matrix model pharmaceutical formulation) using a micro-attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging instrument equipped with a linear array detector and a 1.5 mm germanium hemisphere internal reflection element (IRE). The instrument yielded a theoretical detection limit of 0.0035% (35 parts per million (ppm)) when operating under diffraction-limited conditions, which was 49 times lower than what was achieved with a traditional macro-ATR instrument operating under practical conditions (0.17%, 1700 ppm). However, these results may not be achievable for most analyses because the detection limits will be particle size limited, rather than diffraction limited, for mixtures with average particle diameters greater than 8.3 μm (most pharmaceutical samples). For example, a theoretical detection limit of 0.028% (280 ppm) was calculated for an experiment operating under particle size-limited conditions where the average particle size was 23.4 μm. These conditions yielded a detection limit of 0.022% (220 ppm) when measured empirically, which was close to the theoretical value and only eight times lower than that of a faster, more simplistic macro-ATR instrument. Considering the longer data acquisition and processing times characteristic of the micro-ATR imaging approach (minutes or even hours versus seconds), the cost-benefit ratio may not often be favorable for the analysis of analytes in matrices that exhibit only a few overlapping absorptions (low-interfering matrices such as alpha lactose monohydrate) using this technique compared to what can be achieved using macro-ATR. However, the advantage was significant for detecting analytes in more complex matrices (those that exhibited several overlapping absorptions with the analyte) because the detection limit of the macro-ATR approach was highly formulation

  11. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-10-15

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect.

  12. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  13. Are species shade and drought tolerance reflected in leaf-level structural and functional differentiation in Northern Hemisphere temperate woody flora?

    PubMed

    Hallik, Lea; Niinemets, Ulo; Wright, Ian J

    2009-01-01

    Leaf-level determinants of species environmental stress tolerance are still poorly understood. Here, we explored dependencies of species shade (T(shade)) and drought (T(drought)) tolerance scores on key leaf structural and functional traits in 339 Northern Hemisphere temperate woody species. In general, T(shade) was positively associated with leaf life-span (L(L)), and negatively with leaf dry mass (M(A)), nitrogen content (N(A)), and photosynthetic capacity (A(A)) per area, while opposite relationships were observed with drought tolerance. Different trait combinations responsible for T(shade) and T(drought) were observed among the key plant functional types: deciduous and evergreen broadleaves and evergreen conifers. According to principal component analysis, resource-conserving species with low N content and photosynthetic capacity, and high L(L) and M(A), had higher T(drought), consistent with the general stress tolerance strategy, whereas variation in T(shade) did not concur with the postulated stress tolerance strategy. As drought and shade often interact in natural communities, reverse effects of foliar traits on these key environmental stress tolerances demonstrate that species niche differentiation is inherently constrained in temperate woody species. Different combinations of traits among key plant functional types further explain the contrasting bivariate correlations often observed in studies seeking functional explanation of variation in species environmental tolerances. PMID:19674334

  14. Erythropoiesis-driven regulation of hepcidin in human red cell disorders is better reflected through concentrations of soluble transferrin receptor rather than growth differentiation factor 15.

    PubMed

    Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Lanaro, Carolina; Franco-Penteado, Carla Fernanda; de Albuquerque, Dulcinéia Martins; de Mello, Mariana Rezende Bandeira; Pallis, Flávia Rubia; Bezerra, Marcos André Cavalcanti; Hatzlhofer, Betania Lucena Domingues; Olbina, Gordana; Saad, Sara Terezinha Olalla; da Silva Araújo, Aderson; Westerman, Mark; Costa, Fernando Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) is a bone marrow-derived cytokine whose ability to suppress iron regulator hepcidin in vitro and increased concentrations found in patients with ineffective erythropoiesis (IE)suggest that hepcidin deficiency mediated by GDF-15 may be the pathophysiological explanation for nontransfusional iron overload. We aimed to compare GDF-15 production in anemic states with different types of erythropoietic dysfunction. Complete blood counts, biochemical markers of iron status, plasma hepcidin, GDF-15, and known hepcidin regulators [interleukin-6 and erythropoietin (EPO)] were measured in 87 patients with red cell disorders comprising IE and hemolytic states: thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and cobalamin deficiency. Healthy volunteers were also evaluated for comparison. Neither overall increased EPO,nor variable GDF-15 concentrations correlated with circulating hepcidin concentrations (P = 0.265 and P = 0.872). Relative hepcidin deficiency was found in disorders presenting with concurrent elevation of GDF-15 and soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), a biomarker of erythropoiesis, and sTfR had the strongest correlation with hepcidin (r(s) = 0.584, P < 0.0001). Our data show that high concentrations of GDF-15 in vivo are not necessarily associated with pathological hepcidin reduction, and hepcidin deficiency was only found when associated with sTfR overproduction. sTfR elevation may be a necessary common denominator of erythropoiesis-driven mechanisms to favor iron absorption in anemic states and appears a suitable target for investigative approaches to iron disorders. PMID:24860871

  15. Twisted bi-layer graphene: microscopic rainbows.

    PubMed

    Campos-Delgado, J; Algara-Siller, G; Santos, C N; Kaiser, U; Raskin, J-P

    2013-10-11

    Blue, pink, and yellow colorations appear from twisted bi-layer graphene (tBLG) when transferred to a SiO2 /Si substrate (SiO2 = 100 nm-thick). Raman and electron microscope studies reveal that these colorations appear for twist angles in the 9-15° range. Optical contrast simulations confirm that the observed colorations are related to the angle-dependent electronic properties of tBLG combined with the reflection that results from the layered structure tBLG/100 nm-thick SiO2 /Si. PMID:23606323

  16. [THE MICROSCOPIC ALGAE AS HUMAN PATHOGENS].

    PubMed

    Roman, Manuel Casal

    2014-01-01

    Some microscopic algae can cause different infectious diseases in humans, including skin, bone, and disseminated. These little-known emerging disease are more severe in immunocompromised patients. The confirmatory microbiological diagnosis must be done differential with yeast-like fungi that can be confused. Anti-fungal drugs and surgery, being quite frequent treatment failure have been used in the treatment. Given the increase of immunosuppression in the current medicine and new possibilities of microbiological diagnostics, it is logical that these diseases tend to increase, by which all physician should know them. PMID:27386675

  17. [THE MICROSCOPIC ALGAE AS HUMAN PATHOGENS].

    PubMed

    Roman, Manuel Casal

    2014-01-01

    Some microscopic algae can cause different infectious diseases in humans, including skin, bone, and disseminated. These little-known emerging disease are more severe in immunocompromised patients. The confirmatory microbiological diagnosis must be done differential with yeast-like fungi that can be confused. Anti-fungal drugs and surgery, being quite frequent treatment failure have been used in the treatment. Given the increase of immunosuppression in the current medicine and new possibilities of microbiological diagnostics, it is logical that these diseases tend to increase, by which all physician should know them.

  18. LOCAL MAGNETIC BEHAVIOR OF 54Fe in EuFe2As2 AND Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2: MICROSCOPIC STUDY USING TIME DIFFERENTIAL PERTURBED ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION (TDPAD) SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Mishra, S. N.; Davane, S. M.; Layek, S.; Hossain, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the time differential perturbed angular distribution measurements of 54Fe on a polycrystalline EuFe2As2 and Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2. The hyperfine field and nuclear spin-relaxation rate are strongly temperature dependent in the paramagnetic state suggesting strong spin fluctuation in the parent compound. The local susceptibility show Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence and Korringa-like relaxation in the tetragonal phase indicating the presence of local moment. In the orthorhombic phase, the hyperfine field behavior suggesting quasi two-dimensional magnetic ordering. The experimental results are in a good agreement with first-principle calculations based on density functional theory.

  19. Athena microscopic Imager investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Bell, J.F.; Maki, J.N.; Arneson, H.M.; Bertelsen, P.; Brown, D.I.; Collins, S.A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliott, S.T.; Goetz, W.; Hagerott, E.C.; Hayes, A.G.; Johnson, M.J.; Kirk, R.L.; McLennan, S.; Morris, R.V.; Scherr, L.M.; Schwochert, M.A.; Shiraishi, L.R.; Smith, G.H.; Soderblom, L.A.; Sohl-Dickstein, J. N.; Wadsworth, M.V.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI). The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD). The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400-700 nm). The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 ?? 31 mm across a 1024 ?? 1024 pixel CCD image. The MI acquires images using only solar or skylight illumination of the target surface. A contact sensor is used to place the MI slightly closer to the target surface than its best focus distance (about 66 mm), allowing concave surfaces to be imaged in good focus. Coarse focusing (???2 mm precision) is achieved by moving the IDD away from a rock target after the contact sensor has been activated. The MI optics are protected from the Martian environment by a retractable dust cover. The dust cover includes a Kapton window that is tinted orange to restrict the spectral bandpass to 500-700 nm, allowing color information to be obtained by taking images with the dust cover open and closed. MI data will be used to place other MER instrument data in context and to aid in petrologic and geologic interpretations of rocks and soils on Mars. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. [Peritoneal biofilms: microscopic features].

    PubMed

    Maloman, E; Lepadatu, C; Ciornâi, A; Sainsus, Natalia; Balica, I; Gladun, N

    2007-01-01

    Antibiotherapy remains one of the basic clinical tools, which can influence the evolution of severe peritonitis. Peritoneal biofilm formation may minimize the antibiotic effects due to dramatic growth of Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentrations (MBC) for matrix-enclosed bacteria. In this paper we demonstrate the presence and evolution of bacterial biofilms on the peritoneal surface during the course of severe secondary peritonitis using an experimental model and clinical material. Cecal Ligation Puncture was performed in 20 mice Swiss Webster. Peritoneal samples were studied at optic and electronic microscope at 10, 24, 48 and 72 hours postoperative. Clinical samples were taken from 10 patients with diffuse peritonitis. At 24 hours after the onset of the peritonitis bacterial colonies were detected on the peritoneal surface. The formation of mature multilayer polymicrobial biofilms with deep penetration in abdominal wall by 48-72 hours was documented. The bacterial biofilms appear in first 24 hours in the course of experimental generalized peritonitis. Our experimental and clinical data demonstrate formation of the mature polymicrobial biofilm in 48-72 hours after the onset of peritonitis. The possibility of resistant biofilm formation in secondary diffuse peritonitis should be taken into consideration in elaboration of treatment schemes.

  1. Spatial genetic structure of bristle-thighed curlews (Numenius tahitiensis): breeding area differentiation not reflected on the non-breeding grounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Tibbitts, T. Lee; Gill, Robert E.; Williams, Ian S.; Talbot, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory birds occupy geographically and ecologically disparate areas during their annual cycle with conditions on breeding and non-breeding grounds playing separate and important roles in population dynamics. We used data from nuclear microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA control region loci to assess the breeding and non-breeding spatial genetic structure of a transoceanic migrant shorebird, the bristle-thighed curlew. We found spatial variance in the distribution of allelic and haplotypic frequencies between the curlew's two breeding areas in Alaska but did not observe this spatial structure throughout its non-breeding range on low-lying tropical and subtropical islands in the Central Pacific (Oceania). This suggests that the two breeding populations do not spatially segregate during the non-breeding season. Lack of migratory connectivity is likely attributable to the species' behavior, as bristle-thighed curlews exhibit differential timing of migration and some individuals move among islands during non-breeding months. Given the detrimental impact of many past and current human activities on island ecosystems, admixture of breeding populations in Oceania may render the bristle-thighed curlew less vulnerable to perturbations there, as neither breeding population will be disproportionally affected by local habitat losses or by stochastic events. Furthermore, lack of migratory connectivity may enable bristle-thighed curlews to respond to changing island ecosystems by altering their non-breeding distribution. However, availability of suitable non-breeding habitat for curlews in Oceania is increasingly limited on both low-lying and high islands by habitat loss, sea level rise, and invasive mammalian predators that pose a threat to flightless and flight-compromised curlews during the molting period.

  2. Scientists View Battery Under Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    2015-04-10

    PNNL researchers use a special microscope setup that shows the inside of a battery as it charges and discharges. This battery-watching microscope is located at EMSL, DOE's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory that resides at PNNL. Researchers the world over can visit EMSL and use special instruments like this, many of which are the only one of their kind available to scientists.

  3. The Latest in Handheld Microscopes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wighting, Mervyn J.; Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    Around 1590, Zacharias Jansenn of Holland invented the microscope. Jansenn, an eyeglass maker by trade, experimented with lenses and discovered that things appeared closer with combinations of lenses. Over the past 400 years, several refinements to microscopes have occurred, making it possible to magnify objects between 200 and 1,500 times their…

  4. Reflected Glory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Colin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific model of how people see things is far removed from children's real-world experience. They know that light is needed in order to see an object, but may not know that light is reflected off the object and some of that light enters the eyes. In this article, the author explores children's understanding of reflection and how to develop…

  5. Structure investigation of Cellobiohydrolase I from Trichoderma pseudokoningii S38 with a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Liu, J.; Gao, P. J.; Ma, L. P.; Shi, D. X.; Pang, S. J.

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) was isolated from a cellulolytic fungal strain Trichoderma pseudokoningii S38, and its ultrastructure was investigated with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The STM images showed that the shape of intact CBH I was tadpole-like, consisting of a big head and a long tail. It could be deduced that the head domain was the core protein for the catalytic function, and the long tail was the cellulose binding domain for substrate binding. Thus, for this enzyme molecule, functional differentiation is reflected in the structure peculiarities. This is the first direct observation of the three-dimensional structure of intact CBH I from real space at nanometer scale. The functional mechanism is also discussed.

  6. Imaging Microscope For "Water-Window" X Rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed microscope operates in "water-window" part of x-ray spectrum. Contains spherical-mirror substrates coated with multiple thin layers of material exhibiting Bragg reflection at wavelength at which water transparent. Suited for making high-resolution, high-contrast images for microbiological research.

  7. A microscopic model of interface related to the Burgers equation

    SciTech Connect

    De Masi, A.; Ferrari, P.A.; Vares, M.E. )

    1989-05-01

    A microscopic model for a solid-on-solid type of interface under the influence of an external field is introduced. It is proven that in equilibrium the macroscopic profile satisfies a partial differential equation which is (up to a transformation) the stationary Burgers equation. The study is based on the structure of the invariant measures for a related asymmetric simple exclusion process.

  8. Reflecting on Reflecting on Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Arthur L.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses three broad themes--reflection, power, and negotiation--that are evidenced in all of the articles in this issue. In this article, the author tries to transgress the articles at some middling altitude to seek some broader thematics. His observations about reflection, power, and negotiation do transcend individual efforts,…

  9. Radar reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-07-01

    This TOP describes a method for measuring the radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft. It uses a rotating platform and various radar systems to obtain calibrated radar Automatic Gain Control values for each degree of aspect angle for the aircraft. The purpose of this test is to provide comparable values of radar reflectivity for Army aircraft at various radar frequencies and parameter for fixed positions and aspect angles on the aircraft. Data collected on each specific aircraft can be used to evaluate radar reflectivity characteristics of aircraft skin material, paint, and structural changes such as flat versus curved surfaces.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z.; Suh, B.J.; Roukes, M.L.; Midzor, M.; Wigen, P.E.; Childress, J.R.

    1999-06-03

    Our objectives were to develop the Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) into an instrument capable of scientific studies of buried structures in technologically and scientifically important electronic materials such as magnetic multilayer materials. This work resulted in the successful demonstration of MRFM-detected ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) as a microscopic characterization tool for thin magnetic films. Strong FMR spectra obtained from microscopic Co thin films (500 and 1000 angstroms thick and 40 x 200 microns in lateral extent) allowed us to observe variations in sample inhomogeneity and magnetic anisotropy field. We demonstrated lateral imaging in microscopic FMR for the first time using a novel approach employing a spatially selective local field generated by a small magnetically polarized spherical crystallite of yttrium iron garnet. These successful applications of the MRFM in materials studies provided the basis for our successful proposal to DOE/BES to employ the MRF M in studies of buried interfaces in magnetic materials.

  11. (Center of excellence: Microlaser microscope)

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1992-01-01

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: development of an imaging system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In these first 8 months we have set up the Microlaser Microscope using small microlaser arrays. We have emphasized the basics of microlaser handling and electronic addressing and the optics of the microscope. Details of electronics and optics given here will be used in the larger arrays which should be available soon. After a description of the central Microlaser Microscope project, we touch briefly on the other projects of the Center, which have been outstandingly fruitful this year. Publications are necessarily concerned with the smaller projects, since the Microlaser Microscope is in its early stages.

  12. Microscopic Procedures for Plant Meiosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braselton, James P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes laboratory techniques designed to familiarize students with meiosis and how microscopic preparations of meiosis are made. These techniques require the use of fresh or fixed flowers. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  13. Adirondack Under the Microscope-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This overhead look at the martian rock dubbed Adirondack was captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's panoramic camera. It shows the approximate region where the rover's microscopic imager began its first close-up inspection.

  14. Vise holds specimens for microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greule, W. N.

    1980-01-01

    Convenient, miniature, spring-loaded clamp holds specimens for scanning electron microscope. Clamp is made out of nesting sections of studded angle-aluminum. Specimens are easier to mount and dismount with vise than with conductive adhesive or paint.

  15. Shape quantification of single red blood cells based on their scattering patterns from microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gert; Artmann, Gerhard

    1995-02-01

    The differentiation between discocytic and stomatocytic red blood cell (RBC) shape using conventional microscopic imaging and image analysis tools is still on a very poor level. A procedure to differentiate the degree of stomatocytic shape changes was developed. We obtained multiple microscopic images of the same RBCs settled on a human albumin coated cover slip. The images were acquired when the microscope objective was subsequently focused through the cell layer. At equidistant horizontal planes (z-axis) below, within, and above the microscopic focal plane the light intensity distribution was considered. Using a model based on light refraction, we calculated the intensity distribution of the planes which are out of focus. Using this tool we are able to differentiate RBC shapes precisely. On the other hand, using this model from and the light intensity distributions of different focal planes, we are able to reconstruct the shape of one single RBC located in the optical axis of the microscope.

  16. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  17. 13.2 nm Table-Top Inspection Microscope for Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography Mask Defect Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, F.; Wang, Y.; Brewer, C.; Pedaci, F.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E.; Liu, Y.; Goldberg, K.; Naulleau, P.; Wachulak, P.; Marconi, M.; Attwood, D.; Rocca, J.; Menoni, C.

    2009-04-07

    We report on a reflection microscope that operates at 13.2-nm wavelength with a spatial resolution of 55{+-}3 nm. The microscope uses a table-top EUV laser to acquire images of photolithography masks in 20 seconds.

  18. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  19. Phase resolved and coherence gated en face reflection imaging of multilayered embryonal carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Fukami, Tadashi; Iwai, Hidenao; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2012-03-01

    Embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells, which are cell lines derived from teratocarcinomas, have characteristics in common with stem cells and differentiate into many kinds of functional cells. Similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, undifferentiated EC cells form multi-layered spheroids. In order to visualize the three-dimensional structure of multilayered EC cells without labeling, we employed full-field interference microscopy with the aid of a low-coherence quantitative phase microscope, which is a reflection-type interference microscope employing the digital holographic technique with a low-coherent light source. Owing to the low-coherency of the light-source (halogen lamp), only the light reflected from reflective surface at a specific sectioning height generates an interference image on the CCD camera. P19CL6 EC cells, derived from mouse teratocarcinomas, formed spheroids that are about 50 to 200 micrometers in diameter. Since the height of each cell is around 10 micrometers, it is assumed that each spheroid has 5 to 20 cell layers. The P19CL6 spheroids were imaged in an upright configuration and the horizontally sectioned reflection images of the sample were obtained by sequentially and vertically scanning the zero-path-length height. Our results show the threedimensional structure of the spheroids, in which plasma and nuclear membranes were distinguishably imaged. The results imply that our technique is further capable of imaging induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for the assessment of cell properties including their pluripotency.

  20. Inclined selective plane illumination microscopy adaptor for conventional microscopes.

    PubMed

    Cutrale, Francesco; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-11-01

    Driven by the biological sciences, there is an increased need for imaging modalities capable of live cell imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution. To achieve this goal in a comprehensive manner, three-dimensional acquisitions are necessary. Ideal features of a modern microscope system should include high imaging speed, high contrast ratio, low photo-bleaching and photo-toxicity, good resolution in a 3D context, and mosaic acquisition for large samples. Given the importance of collecting data in live sample further increases the technical challenges required to solve these issues. This work presents a practical version of a microscopy method, Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy re-introduced by Huisken et al. (Science2004,305,1007-1009). This method is gaining importance in the biomedical field, but its use is limited by difficulties associated with unconventional microscope design which employs two objectives and a particular kind of sample preparation needed to insert the sample between the objectives. Based on the selective plane illumination principle but with a design similar to the Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence microscope, Dunsby (Dunsby, Opt Express 2008,16,20306-20316) demonstrated the oblique plane microscope (OPM) using a single objective which uses conventional sample preparation protocols. However, the Dunsby instrument was not intended to be part of a commercial microscope. In this work, we describe a system with the advantages of OPM and that can be used as an adaptor to commonly used microscopes, such as IX-71 Olympus, simplifying the construction of the OPM and increasing performance of a conventional microscope. We named our design inclined selective plane illumination microscope (iSPIM).

  1. Macroscopic-microscopic mass models

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, J.R.; Moller, P.

    1995-07-01

    We discuss recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models, including the 1992 finite-range droplet model, the 1992 extended- Thomas-Fermi Strutinsky-integral model, and the 1994 Thomas-Fermi model, with particular emphasis on how well they extrapolate to new regions of nuclei. We also address what recent developments in macroscopic-microscopic mass models are teaching us about such physically relevant issues as the nuclear curvature energy, a new congruence energy arising from a greater-than-average overlap of neutron and proton wave functions, the nuclear incompressibility coefficient, and the coulomb redistribution energy arising from a central density depression. We conclude with a brief discussion of the recently discovered rock of metastable superheavy nuclei near {sup 272}110 that had been correctly predicted by macroscopic-microscopic models, along with a possible new tack for reaching an island near {sup 290}110 beyond our present horizon.

  2. Microscope and method of use

    SciTech Connect

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1981-08-18

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  3. Microscope and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  4. Sample holder support for microscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Anthony (Inventor); Nerren, Billy H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A sample filter holder is disclosed for use with a microscope for holding the filter in a planar condition on the stage of the microscope so that automatic focusing of the microscope can be performed on particle samples dispersed on the filter. The holder includes a base having a well that communicates with an inlet port which is connected to a suction pump. A screen assembly is positioned within the well. The screen assembly includes a disk having a screen positioned on its top surface and secured to the disk at the peripheral edge of the screen. Small bores allow the outer surface of the screen to communicate with the well. The filter is placed on the screen and is held in a flat disposition by the suction forces.

  5. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  6. Mosaic of Commemorative Microscope Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Written by electron beam lithography in the Microdevices Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, this Optical Microscope substrate helps the Phoenix Mars Mission science team learn how to assemble individual microscope images into a mosaic by aligning rows of text.

    Each line is about 0.1 millimeter tall, the average thickness of a human hair. Except for the Mogensen twins, the names are of babies born and team members lost during the original development of MECA (the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer) for the canceled 2001 Mars lander mission. The plaque also acknowledges the MECA 2001 principal investigator, now retired.

    This image was taken by the MECA Optical Microscope on Sol 111, or the 111th day of the Phoenix mission (Sept. 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  7. Microscope and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Bongianni, W.L.

    1984-04-17

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers. 7 figs.

  8. Long working distance interference microscope

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; DeBoer, Maarten P.; Smith, Norman F.

    2004-04-13

    Disclosed is a long working distance interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. The long working distance of 10-30 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-D height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer. A well-matched pair of reference/sample objectives is not required, significantly reducing the cost of this microscope, as compared to a Linnik microinterferometer.

  9. Microscopic Materials on a Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images show a comparison of the weak magnet OM7 from the Optical Microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander before (left) and after (right) soil deposition.

    The microscope took the left image during Phoenix's Sol 15 (June 10, 2008) and the right image during Sol 21 (Jun 16, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Teaching Optics to Biology Students Through Constructing a Light Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2015-03-01

    The microscope is familiar to many disciplines, including physics, materials science, chemistry, and the life sciences. It demonstrates fundamental aspects of ray and wave optics, making it an ideal system to help educate students in the basic concepts of optics and in measurement principles and techniques. We present an experimental system developed to teach students the basics of ray and wave optics. The students design, build, and test a light microscope made from optics components. We describe the equipment and the basic measurements that students can perform to develop experimental techniques to understand optics principles. Students measure the magnification and test the resolution of the microscope. The system is open and versatile to allow advanced projects such as epi-fluorescence, total internal reflection fluorescence, and optical trapping. We have used this equipment in an optics course, an advanced laboratory course, and graduate-level training modules.

  11. Compressive microscopic imaging with "positive-negative" light modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Yao, Xu-Ri; Liu, Xue-Feng; Lan, Ruo-Ming; Wu, Ling-An; Zhai, Guang-Jie; Zhao, Qing

    2016-07-01

    An experiment on compressive microscopic imaging with single-pixel detector and single-arm has been performed on the basis of "positive-negative" (differential) light modulation of a digital micromirror device (DMD). A magnified image of micron-sized objects illuminated by the microscope's own incandescent lamp has been successfully acquired. The image quality is improved by one more orders of magnitude compared with that obtained by conventional single-pixel imaging scheme with normal modulation using the same sampling rate, and moreover, the system is robust against the instability of light source and may be applied to very weak light condition. Its nature and the analysis of noise sources is discussed deeply. The realization of this technique represents a big step to the practical applications of compressive microscopic imaging in the fields of biology and materials science.

  12. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  13. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  14. Nature Study with the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sollberger, Dwight E.

    1991-01-01

    Identifies specific instruction difficulties, potential problems, solutions, and activities for successful use of microscopes in the classroom. Procedures are outlined for guiding students in creating their own slides with monocotyledon and dicotyledon stems, fern spores, stomata, lichens, and red onions. (MCO)

  15. The microscope in the hatchery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fish, F.F.

    1935-01-01

    Without the aid of the microscope, it is safe to assume that fish Culture would now stand exactly where it did seventy-five years ago when methods of artificial fertilization were first applied. It is also safe to assume that the results from fish culture would be as unsatisfactory as they were at that time when the fishery resources were steadily declining in spite of the increased liberation of advanced fry from the hatcheries. During the past few years the microscope has saved millions of fish in our hatcheries which otherwise would have been sacrificed to disease. Moreover, the microscope has permitted all of the recent work in selective breeding, nutritional requirements, and disease control. This work marks most of the progress fish culture has made during the past twenty-five years. This progress forms the first definite step away from the old system of hatching and distributing fish, a system which was founded by the ancient Chinese. The microscope has been the key which enabled the fish culturist to solve the riddle of success which has stood, unanswered, for 2,500 years.

  16. Switch on Micro*scope!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roland, Sarah; Bahr, Michele; Olendzenski, Lorraine; Patterson, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have created micro*scope, a free, searchable knowledge environment for exploring the microbial world. Microbiology can easily be incorporated into the curriculum, because microbial communities are easy to access. Organisms grow quickly, making certain arrays of…

  17. Chasing Meteors With a Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes types of meteors and micrometeorites that enter the Earth's atmosphere. Presents an activity where students collect micrometeorites with a strip of tape in an undisturbed outdoor area. After 24 hours, they examine the tape by sandwiching it between 2 glass slides and view through a microscope at 100X. (PR)

  18. Terahertz transmission vs reflection imaging and model-based characterization for excised breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas K.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents experimental and analytical comparison of terahertz transmission and reflection imaging modes for assessing breast carcinoma in excised paraffin-embedded human breast tissue. Modeling for both transmission and reflection imaging is developed. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of the tissue samples are obtained. The reflection measurements taken at the system’s fixed oblique angle of 30° are shown to be a hybridization of TE and TM modes. The models are validated with transmission spectroscopy at fixed points on fresh bovine muscle and fat tissues. Images based on the calculated absorption coefficient and index of refraction of bovine tissue are successfully compared with the terahertz magnitude and phase measured in the reflection mode. The validated techniques are extended to 20 and 30 μm slices of fixed human lobular carcinoma and infiltrating ductal carcinoma mounted on polystyrene microscope slides in order to investigate the terahertz differentiation of the carcinoma with non-cancerous tissue. Both transmission and reflection imaging show clear differentiation in carcinoma versus healthy tissue. However, when using the reflection mode, in the calculation of the thin tissue properties, the absorption is shown to be sensitive to small phase variations that arise due to deviations in slide and tissue thickness and non-ideal tissue adhesion. On the other hand, the results show that the transmission mode is much less sensitive to these phase variations. The results also demonstrate that reflection imaging provides higher resolution and more clear margins between cancerous and fibroglandular regions, cancerous and fatty regions, and fibroglandular and fatty tissue regions. In addition, more features consistent with high power pathology images are exhibited in the reflection mode images.

  19. Terahertz transmission vs reflection imaging and model-based characterization for excised breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Tyler; El-Shenawee, Magda; Campbell, Lucas K.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents experimental and analytical comparison of terahertz transmission and reflection imaging modes for assessing breast carcinoma in excised paraffin-embedded human breast tissue. Modeling for both transmission and reflection imaging is developed. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of the tissue samples are obtained. The reflection measurements taken at the system’s fixed oblique angle of 30° are shown to be a hybridization of TE and TM modes. The models are validated with transmission spectroscopy at fixed points on fresh bovine muscle and fat tissues. Images based on the calculated absorption coefficient and index of refraction of bovine tissue are successfully compared with the terahertz magnitude and phase measured in the reflection mode. The validated techniques are extended to 20 and 30 μm slices of fixed human lobular carcinoma and infiltrating ductal carcinoma mounted on polystyrene microscope slides in order to investigate the terahertz differentiation of the carcinoma with non-cancerous tissue. Both transmission and reflection imaging show clear differentiation in carcinoma versus healthy tissue. However, when using the reflection mode, in the calculation of the thin tissue properties, the absorption is shown to be sensitive to small phase variations that arise due to deviations in slide and tissue thickness and non-ideal tissue adhesion. On the other hand, the results show that the transmission mode is much less sensitive to these phase variations. The results also demonstrate that reflection imaging provides higher resolution and more clear margins between cancerous and fibroglandular regions, cancerous and fatty regions, and fibroglandular and fatty tissue regions. In addition, more features consistent with high power pathology images are exhibited in the reflection mode images. PMID:27699136

  20. Expression of homing receptors on IgA1 and IgA2 plasmablasts in blood reflects differential distribution of IgA1 and IgA2 in various body fluids.

    PubMed

    Pakkanen, Sari H; Kantele, Jussi M; Moldoveanu, Zina; Hedges, Spencer; Häkkinen, Miikka; Mestecky, Jiri; Kantele, Anu

    2010-03-01

    Although secretory IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig isotype, the mechanisms underlying the differential distribution of IgA subclasses in various body fluids remain unclear. To explore these mechanisms, we examined the distribution of IgA subclasses, the influence of the nature and sites of encounters with antigens, and the correlation between IgA subclass distribution and homing potentials of circulating IgA plasmablasts. IgA1 predominated in serum, tears, nasal wash fluid, and saliva; the levels of IgA1 and IgA2 were comparable in vaginal wash fluid; and IgA2 predominated in intestinal lavage fluids. Seventy-one percent of circulating IgA plasmablasts secreted IgA1. The intestinal homing receptor (HR), alpha4beta7, was expressed more frequently on IgA2 than on IgA1 plasmablasts, with no differences in the expression of other HRs. IgA subclass distribution among circulating antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) was dependent on the nature of the antigen: following vaccination with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, unconjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide, or Haemophilus influenzae polysaccharide-diphtheria toxoid conjugate, the proportions of specific IgA1 ASC were 74%, 47%, 56%, and 80%, respectively. HR expression depended on the route of administration: expression of HRs was different after oral than after parenteral vaccination, while no difference was seen between HR expression of antigen-specific IgA1 and IgA2 ASC induced via the same route. The key factors determining IgA subclass distribution in a given secretion are the nature of the antigens encountered at a particular site and the site-specific homing instructions given to lymphocytes at that site. These two factors are reflected as differences in the homing profiles of the total populations of circulating IgA1 and IgA2 plasmablasts.

  1. Haitian reflections.

    PubMed

    Docrat, Fathima

    2010-08-01

    Natural disasters and acts of terrorism demonstrate a similar critical need for national preparedness. As one of a team of volunteers with a local South African NGO who recently went on a medical mission, I would like to share glimpses of our experience and reflect on the mistakes - and also to state the obvious: that we do not learn from our mistakes. A simple literature search has shown that the same mistakes happen repeatedly. 'Humanitarian disasters occur with frightening regularity, yet international responses remain fragmented, with organizations and responders being forced to "reinvent the wheel" with every new event'. This is the result of an obvious lack of preparedness.

  2. Reflective Packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The aluminized polymer film used in spacecraft as a radiation barrier to protect both astronauts and delicate instruments has led to a number of spinoff applications. Among them are aluminized shipping bags, food cart covers and medical bags. Radiant Technologies purchases component materials and assembles a barrier made of layers of aluminized foil. The packaging reflects outside heat away from the product inside the container. The company is developing new aluminized lines, express mailers, large shipping bags, gel packs and insulated panels for the building industry.

  3. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  4. Versatile multispectral microscope based on light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Jayaweera, Hiran; Ålebring, Jens; Svanberg, Sune

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of a novel multispectral microscope, based on light-emitting diodes, capable of acquiring megapixel images in thirteen spectral bands from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The system captures images and spectra in transmittance, reflectance, and scattering modes. We present as examples of applications ground truth measurements for remote sensing and parasitology diagnostics. The system is a general purpose scientific instrument that could be used to develop dedicated simplified instruments with optimal bands and mode selection.

  5. Hyperbaric Hydrothermal Atomic Force Microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2003-07-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  6. Hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Knauss, Kevin G.; Boro, Carl O.; Higgins, Steven R.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2002-01-01

    A hyperbaric hydrothermal atomic force microscope (AFM) is provided to image solid surfaces in fluids, either liquid or gas, at pressures greater than normal atmospheric pressure. The sample can be heated and its surface imaged in aqueous solution at temperatures greater than 100.degree. C. with less than 1 nm vertical resolution. A gas pressurized microscope base chamber houses the stepper motor and piezoelectric scanner. A chemically inert, flexible membrane separates this base chamber from the sample cell environment and constrains a high temperature, pressurized liquid or gas in the sample cell while allowing movement of the scanner. The sample cell is designed for continuous flow of liquid or gas through the sample environment.

  7. Nanocarpets for Trapping Microscopic Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noca, Flavio; Chen, Fei; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Michael; Hoenk, Michael; Kowalczyk, Robert; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Nanocarpets that is, carpets of carbon nanotubes are undergoing development as means of trapping microscopic particles for scientific analysis. Examples of such particles include inorganic particles, pollen, bacteria, and spores. Nanocarpets can be characterized as scaled-down versions of ordinary macroscopic floor carpets, which trap dust and other particulate matter, albeit not purposefully. Nanocarpets can also be characterized as mimicking both the structure and the particle-trapping behavior of ciliated lung epithelia, the carbon nanotubes being analogous to cilia. Carbon nanotubes can easily be chemically functionalized for selective trapping of specific particles of interest. One could, alternatively, use such other three-dimensionally-structured materials as aerogels and activated carbon for the purposeful trapping of microscopic particles. However, nanocarpets offer important advantages over these alternative materials: (1) Nanocarpets are amenable to nonintrusive probing by optical means; and (2) Nanocarpets offer greater surface-to-volume ratios.

  8. Optical Analysis of Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Jonathan R.

    Microscope images were analyzed with coherent and incoherent light using analog optical techniques. These techniques were found to be useful for analyzing large numbers of nonsymbolic, statistical microscope images. In the first part phase coherent transparencies having 20-100 human multiple myeloma nuclei were simultaneously photographed at 100 power magnification using high resolution holographic film developed to high contrast. An optical transform was obtained by focussing the laser onto each nuclear image and allowing the diffracted light to propagate onto a one dimensional photosensor array. This method reduced the data to the position of the first two intensity minima and the intensity of successive maxima. These values were utilized to estimate the four most important cancer detection clues of nuclear size, shape, darkness, and chromatin texture. In the second part, the geometric and holographic methods of phase incoherent optical processing were investigated for pattern recognition of real-time, diffuse microscope images. The theory and implementation of these processors was discussed in view of their mutual problems of dimness, image bias, and detector resolution. The dimness problem was solved by either using a holographic correlator or a speckle free laser microscope. The latter was built using a spinning tilted mirror which caused the speckle to change so quickly that it averaged out during the exposure. To solve the bias problem low image bias templates were generated by four techniques: microphotography of samples, creation of typical shapes by computer graphics editor, transmission holography of photoplates of samples, and by spatially coherent color image bias removal. The first of these templates was used to perform correlations with bacteria images. The aperture bias was successfully removed from the correlation with a video frame subtractor. To overcome the limited detector resolution it is necessary to discover some analog nonlinear intensity

  9. Microscopic Description of Scission Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Dubray, N.; Goutte, H.; Berger, J. F.

    2007-02-26

    Properties of 226Th, 256Fm, 258Fm and 260Fm nuclei in the scission region are described using a full-microscopic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach with the effective Gogny nucleon-nucleon interaction. In a first step, the Potential Energy Surfaces are computed in the (q 20, q30) plane, the scission lines are found, fulfilling a given criterion on the density in the nuclear neck. Finally a few properties of the fragments along this line are presented.

  10. Apparatus Would Stain Microscope Slides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breeding, James D.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed apparatus meters specific amounts of fluid out of containers at specific times to stain microscope slides. Intended specifically for semiautomated staining of microbiological and hematological samples in microgravity, leakproof apparatus used in other environments in which technicians have little time to allocate to staining procedures and/or exposure to toxic staining agents or to micro-organisms to be stained hazardous. Apparatus adapted to perform almost any staining procedure and accommodates multiple staining reagents, useful for small or remote clinical laboratories.

  11. Reflection contrast microscopy within chrome-alum haematoxylin stained thick tissue-sections.

    PubMed

    Filler, T J; Rickert, C H; Fassnacht, U K; Pera, F

    1994-06-01

    This paper introduces two innovations in reflection contrast microscopy (RCM): (1) an extended application for qualitative light microscopic investigations; and (2) a novel method for quantification in cytochemistry. (1) We found out that RCM cannot only be used for surface characterizations and in thin sections but also within thick tissue-sections. The use of the RCM technique is demonstrated on slides of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the rat stained with chrome-alum haematoxylin: Among all the stained structures only neurosecretory granules are found to cause reflections. The visualization of the neurosecretion and its distribution is more distinct and of sharper contrast than in bright field microscopy. (2) The improved differentiation allows the quantification of neurosecretion in tissue-sections by combining RCM with grey-scale image analysis.

  12. Microscope Image of Scavenged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Optical Microscope shows a strongly magnetic surface which has scavenged particles from within the microscope enclosure before a sample delivery from the lander's Robotic Arm. The particles correspond to the larger grains seen in fine orange material that makes up most of the soil at the Phoenix site. They vary in color, but are of similar size, about one-tenth of a millimeter.

    As the microscope's sample wheel moved during operation, these particles also shifted, clearing a thin layer of the finer orange particles that have also been collected. Together with the previous image, this shows that the larger grains are much more magnetic than the fine orange particles with a much larger volume of the grains being collected by the magnet. The image is 2 milimeters across.

    It is speculated that the orange material particles are a weathering product from the larger grains, with the weathering process both causing a color change and a loss of magnetism.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  14. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  15. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  16. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  17. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  18. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of...

  19. Reflected Glory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  20. Reflected Glory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    The nebula Messier 78 takes centre stage in this image taken with the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, while the stars powering the bright display take a backseat. The brilliant starlight ricochets off dust particles in the nebula, illuminating it with scattered blue light. Igor Chekalin was the overall winner of ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition with his image of this stunning object. Messier 78 is a fine example of a reflection nebula. The ultraviolet radiation from the stars that illuminate it is not intense enough to ionise the gas to make it glow - its dust particles simply reflect the starlight that falls on them. Despite this, Messier 78 can easily be observed with a small telescope, being one of the brightest reflection nebulae in the sky. It lies about 1350 light-years away in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter) and can be found northeast of the easternmost star of Orion's belt. This new image of Messier 78 from the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory is based on data selected by Igor Chekalin in his winning entry to the Hidden Treasures competition [1]. The pale blue tint seen in the nebula in this picture is an accurate representation of its dominant colour. Blue hues are commonly seen in reflection nebulae because of the way the starlight is scattered by the tiny dust particles that they contain: the shorter wavelength of blue light is scattered more efficiently than the longer wavelength red light. This image contains many other striking features apart from the glowing nebula. A thick band of obscuring dust stretches across the image from the upper left to the lower right, blocking the light from background stars. In the bottom right corner, many curious pink structures are also visible, which are created by jets of material being ejected from stars that have recently formed and are still buried deep in dust clouds. Two bright stars, HD 38563A and

  1. Quantitative determination of two polymorphic forms of imatinib mesylate in a drug substance and tablet formulation by X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bellur Atici, Esen; Karlığa, Bekir

    2015-10-10

    Imatinib has been identified as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits the Abl tyrosine kinases, including Bcr-Abl. The active substance used in drug product is the mesylate salt form of imatinib, a phenylaminopyrimidine derivative and chemically named as N-(3-(4-(pyridin-3-yl) pyrimidin-2-ylamino)-4-methylphenyl)-4-((4-methylpiperazin-1-yl) methyl)-benzamide methanesulfonic acid salt. It exhibits many polymorphic forms and most stable and commercialized polymorphs are known as α and β forms. Molecules in α and β polymorphic forms exhibit significant conformational differences due to their different intra- and intermolecular interactions, which stabilize their molecular conformations and affect their physicochemical properties such as bulk density, melting point, solubility, stability, and processability. The manufacturing process of a drug tablet included granulation, compression, coating, and drying may cause polymorphic conversions. Therefore, polymorphic content of the drug substance should be controlled during quality control and stability testing. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) methods were evaluated for determination of the polymorphic content of the drug substance and drug product; and PXRD was the most accurate technique and selected as preferred method and validated. Prior to development of a quantification method, pure α and β polymorphs were characterized and used throughout the method development and validation studies. Mixtures with different ratios of α and β forms were scanned using X-ray diffractometer with a scan rate of 0.250°/min over an angular range of 19.5-21.0° 2θ and the peak heights for characteristic peak of β form at 20.5 ± 0.2° 2θ diffraction angle were used to generate a calibration curve. The detection limit of β polymorph in α form imatinib mesylate tablets was found as 4% and

  2. An auto-focusing system for white light microscopic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming; Deka, Juti Rani; Chen, Pei Jung; Chen, Yu Kuan; Cui, Changcai

    2008-12-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology the demand for high resolution measuring system is evolving at an ever-increasing pace. Microscope was initially used to detect the defect by connecting charge couple device (CCD) as an auxiliary device. In general, for microscopic measurement human eyes are used to focus on the sample. The adjustment depends on the operator's astute measurement ability, which affected the repeatability and accuracy of the readings. There is a need of high-speed microscope auto focusing system for industrial applications. The present investigation describes about the development of an autofocus system to carry out microscopic measurement more precisely and accurately with less time. The measurement system consists of a light source, two beam splitters, a movable sample stage and a Mirau's interferometer, a photo-detector and 8051 microcontroller (MCU89C51). The light reflected from the sample surface interferes with the light reflected from the reference and produce an interference pattern, which is imaged onto a CCD array. In the setup developed for the autofocus one extra beam splitter is placed in the path of interfered beam to the CCD. The beam splitter is placed at equal distances from the CCD and the photodetector. The focus position is determined from the voltage developed in the photo-detector due to the movement of sample stage of the microscope. The maximum voltage that obtained at the focus position is confirmed with the CCD image. Microcontroller is used to stop the controller at the focus position immediately once the sample stage reaches it. Software is developed to locate the maximum intensity position. The design may autofocus the interferometer within 4mm distance in 1 second. The auto-focusing not only provides enhanced repeatability and accuracy of the results at a faster rate but also minimizes operator involvement.

  3. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  4. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  5. Stimulated Parametric Emission Microscope Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Isobe, Keisuke

    2006-10-01

    We present a novel microscopy technique based on the fourwave mixing (FWM) process that is enhanced by two-photon electronic resonance induced by a pump pulse along with stimulated emission induced by a dump pulse. A Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator are used as light sources for the pump and dump pulses, respectively. We demonstrate that our FWM technique can be used to obtain two-dimensional microscopic images of an unstained leaf of Camellia sinensis and an unlabeled tobacco BY2 Cell.

  6. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Microscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ballmann, Charles W.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional stimulated Brillouin scattering microscopy is demonstrated for the first time using low power continuous-wave lasers tunable around 780 nm. Spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy has much potential for probing viscoelastic properties remotely and non-invasively on a microscopic scale. Nonlinear Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and microscopy may provide a way to tremendously accelerate the data aquisition and improve spatial resolution. This general imaging setup can be easily adapted for specific applications in biology and material science. The low power and optical wavelengths in the water transparency window used in this setup provide a powerful bioimaging technique for probing the mechanical properties of hard and soft tissue. PMID:26691398

  7. Microscopic tubes in igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, D.; Simmons, G.

    1977-01-01

    Microscopic tubes have been observed in several igneous rocks and may be quite common. They occur in single crystals and have either elliptical or circular cross-sections 1 to 5 microns in diameter and are ten to hundreds of microns long. Microtubes may be hollow or partially or completely filled with another phase, but are distinct from acicular crystals of accessory minerals such as rutile. Microtubes can form by at least three processes: (1) the partial annealing of microcracks, (2) the natural etching of dislocations, or (3) the primary inclusion of fluid material during crystal growth.

  8. Solid-state optical microscope

    DOEpatents

    Young, I.T.

    1981-01-07

    A solid state optical microscope is described wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. Means for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions are provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  9. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Microscopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Charles W; Thompson, Jonathan V; Traverso, Andrew J; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional stimulated Brillouin scattering microscopy is demonstrated for the first time using low power continuous-wave lasers tunable around 780 nm. Spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy has much potential for probing viscoelastic properties remotely and non-invasively on a microscopic scale. Nonlinear Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and microscopy may provide a way to tremendously accelerate the data aquisition and improve spatial resolution. This general imaging setup can be easily adapted for specific applications in biology and material science. The low power and optical wavelengths in the water transparency window used in this setup provide a powerful bioimaging technique for probing the mechanical properties of hard and soft tissue.

  10. Stimulated Brillouin Scattering Microscopic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmann, Charles W.; Thompson, Jonathan V.; Traverso, Andrew J.; Meng, Zhaokai; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional stimulated Brillouin scattering microscopy is demonstrated for the first time using low power continuous-wave lasers tunable around 780 nm. Spontaneous Brillouin spectroscopy has much potential for probing viscoelastic properties remotely and non-invasively on a microscopic scale. Nonlinear Brillouin scattering spectroscopy and microscopy may provide a way to tremendously accelerate the data aquisition and improve spatial resolution. This general imaging setup can be easily adapted for specific applications in biology and material science. The low power and optical wavelengths in the water transparency window used in this setup provide a powerful bioimaging technique for probing the mechanical properties of hard and soft tissue.

  11. Paleomagnetism with the SQUID Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. P.; Baudenbacher, F. J.; Wikswo, J. P.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2002-05-01

    Rocks should preserve stable remanent magnetizations with useful directional and intensity information at levels down to ~10-15 Am2, about 1000 times below that of the noise level on today's best superconducting moment magnetometers. As a result, a more sensitive magnetometer could dramatically expand the range and variety of rock types amenable to paleomagnetic analysis. Just such an instrument is now on the horizon: the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) Microscope, designed by F. Baudenbacher and J. Wikswo of Vanderbilt University. The SQUID Microscope makes a map of the vertical component of the magnetic field above the surface of a sample held at room temperature and pressure. It achieves this with a spatial resolution of 250 μ m and a moment sensitivity 10,000 times that of the most recent 2G Enterprises Superconducting Rock Magnetometer (2G SRM). It can therefore provide data with a resolution comparable with that of other common petrographic techniques such as optical and electron microscopy. A major reason that the SQUID Microscope has such high sensitivity and resolution compared to the 2G SRM is that it has a much smaller pickup coil. Smaller coils are more sensitive to dipoles because they encompass less of the sample's fringing fields oriented in the opposite sense to its magnetization. Smaller coils also encompass a smaller area above the sample and so also provide higher spatial resolution. Our initial collaborative work on 30-μ m thin sections of Martian meteorite ALH84001 has already demonstrated that SQUID Microscopy will enable a whole a new class of paleomagnetic analyses. Conglomerate, baked contact, and fold tests can be performed on extremely small spatial scales, vastly expanding the utility of these critical geological field tests of magnetic stability. A suite of rock-magnetic and paleomagnetic experiments can be done on individual grains in standard petrographic thin sections at very high rates, allowing the observed

  12. Ballistic-Electron-Emission Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Bell, L. Douglas

    1990-01-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscope (BEEM) employs scanning tunneling-microscopy (STM) methods for nondestructive, direct electrical investigation of buried interfaces, such as interface between semiconductor and thin metal film. In BEEM, there are at least three electrodes: emitting tip, biasing electrode, and collecting electrode, receiving current crossing interface under investigation. Signal-processing device amplifies electrode signals and converts them into form usable by computer. Produces spatial images of surface by scanning tip; in addition, provides high-resolution images of buried interface under investigation. Spectroscopic information extracted by measuring collecting-electrode current as function of one of interelectrode voltages.

  13. High-speed atomic force microscope combined with single-molecule fluorescence microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Iino, Ryota; Okazaki, Yasutaka; Yoshida, Masato; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Ando, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) have mutually complementary capabilities. Here, we report techniques to combine these microscopy systems so that both microscopy capabilities can be simultaneously used in the full extent. To combine the two systems, we have developed a tip-scan type HS-AFM instrument equipped with a device by which the laser beam from the optical lever detector can track the cantilever motion in the X- and Y-directions. This stand-alone HS-AFM system is mounted on an inverted optical microscope stage with a wide-area scanner. The capability of this combined system is demonstrated by simultaneous HS-AFM/TIRFM imaging of chitinase A moving on a chitin crystalline fiber and myosin V walking on an actin filament.

  14. Improved Spatial Resolution for Reflection Mode Infrared Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; May, T.E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-10-09

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the umerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using two different microscopes apable of diffraction-limited resolution: the first microscope is coupled to a synchrotron source and utilizes a single point detector, whereas the second microscope has a standard blackbody source and uses a focal planetarray (FPA) detector.

  15. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2006-08-22

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  16. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V. C.; Wang, Chengpu

    2003-01-01

    An atomic force microscope utilizes a pulse release system and improved method of operation to minimize contact forces between a probe tip affixed to a flexible cantilever and a specimen being measured. The pulse release system includes a magnetic particle affixed proximate the probe tip and an electromagnetic coil. When energized, the electromagnetic coil generates a magnetic field which applies a driving force on the magnetic particle sufficient to overcome adhesive forces exhibited between the probe tip and specimen. The atomic force microscope includes two independently displaceable piezo elements operable along a Z-axis. A controller drives the first Z-axis piezo element to provide a controlled approach between the probe tip and specimen up to a point of contact between the probe tip and specimen. The controller then drives the first Z-axis piezo element to withdraw the cantilever from the specimen. The controller also activates the pulse release system which drives the probe tip away from the specimen during withdrawal. Following withdrawal, the controller adjusts the height of the second Z-axis piezo element to maintain a substantially constant approach distance between successive samples.

  17. Sensing mode atomic force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Hough, Paul V.; Wang, Chengpu

    2004-11-16

    An atomic force microscope is described having a cantilever comprising a base and a probe tip on an end opposite the base; a cantilever drive device connected to the base; a magnetic material coupled to the probe tip, such that when an incrementally increasing magnetic field is applied to the magnetic material an incrementally increasing force will be applied to the probe tip; a moveable specimen base; and a controller constructed to obtain a profile height of a specimen at a point based upon a contact between the probe tip and a specimen, and measure an adhesion force between the probe tip and the specimen by, under control of a program, incrementally increasing an amount of a magnetic field until a release force, sufficient to break the contact, is applied. An imaging method for atomic force microscopy involving measuring a specimen profile height and adhesion force at multiple points within an area and concurrently displaying the profile and adhesion force for each of the points is also described. A microscope controller is also described and is constructed to, for a group of points, calculate a specimen height at a point based upon a cantilever deflection, a cantilever base position and a specimen piezo position; calculate an adhesion force between a probe tip and a specimen at the point by causing an incrementally increasing force to be applied to the probe tip until the probe tip separates from a specimen; and move the probe tip to a new point in the group.

  18. Inspection with Robotic Microscopic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedersen, Liam; Deans, Matthew; Kunz, Clay; Sargent, Randy; Chen, Alan; Mungas, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Future Mars rover missions will require more advanced onboard autonomy for increased scientific productivity and reduced mission operations cost. One such form of autonomy can be achieved by targeting precise science measurements to be made in a single command uplink cycle. In this paper we present an overview of our solution to the subproblems of navigating a rover into place for microscopic imaging, mapping an instrument target point selected by an operator using far away science camera images to close up hazard camera images, verifying the safety of placing a contact instrument on a sample or finding nearby safe points, and analyzing the data that comes back from the rover. The system developed includes portions used in the Multiple Target Single Cycle Instrument Placement demonstration at NASA Ames in October 2004, and portions of the MI Toolkit delivered to the Athena Microscopic Imager Instrument Team for the MER mission still operating on Mars today. Some of the component technologies are also under consideration for MSL mission infusion.

  19. Martian Magnets Under the Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit acquired this microscopic imager view of its capture magnet on sol 92 (April 6, 2004). Both Spirit and the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity are equipped with a number of magnets. The capture magnet, as seen here, has a stronger charge than its sidekick, the filter magnet. The lower-powered filter magnet captures only the most magnetic airborne dust with the strongest charges, while the capture magnet picks up all magnetic airborne dust.

    The magnets' primary purpose is to collect the martian magnetic dust so that scientists can analyze it with the rovers' Moessbauer spectrometers. While there is plenty of dust on the surface of Mars, it is difficult to confirm where it came from, and when it was last airborne. Because scientists are interested in learning about the properties of the dust in the atmosphere, they devised this dust-collection experiment.

    The capture magnet is about 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) in diameter and is constructed with a central cylinder and three rings, each with alternating orientations of magnetization. Scientists have been monitoring the continual accumulation of dust since the beginning of the mission with panoramic camera and microscopic imager images. They had to wait until enough dust accumulated before they could get a Moessbauer spectrometer analysis. The results of that analysis, performed on sol 92, have not been sent back to Earth yet.

  20. Cancer systems biology and modeling: microscopic scale and multiscale approaches.

    PubMed

    Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Hosseini Ashtiani, Saman; Najafi, Ali; Bozorgmehr, Joseph H; Wang, Edwin

    2015-02-01

    Cancer has become known as a complex and systematic disease on macroscopic, mesoscopic and microscopic scales. Systems biology employs state-of-the-art computational theories and high-throughput experimental data to model and simulate complex biological procedures such as cancer, which involves genetic and epigenetic, in addition to intracellular and extracellular complex interaction networks. In this paper, different systems biology modeling techniques such as systems of differential equations, stochastic methods, Boolean networks, Petri nets, cellular automata methods and agent-based systems are concisely discussed. We have compared the mentioned formalisms and tried to address the span of applicability they can bear on emerging cancer modeling and simulation approaches. Different scales of cancer modeling, namely, microscopic, mesoscopic and macroscopic scales are explained followed by an illustration of angiogenesis in microscopic scale of the cancer modeling. Then, the modeling of cancer cell proliferation and survival are examined on a microscopic scale and the modeling of multiscale tumor growth is explained along with its advantages.

  1. Precise autofocusing microscope with rapid response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chien-Sheng; Jiang, Sheng-Hong

    2015-03-01

    The rapid on-line or off-line automated vision inspection is a critical operation in the manufacturing fields. Accordingly, this present study designs and characterizes a novel precise optics-based autofocusing microscope with a rapid response and no reduction in the focusing accuracy. In contrast to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes with centroid method, the proposed microscope comprises a high-speed rotating optical diffuser in which the variation of the image centroid position is reduced and consequently the focusing response is improved. The proposed microscope is characterized and verified experimentally using a laboratory-built prototype. The experimental results show that compared to conventional optics-based autofocusing microscopes, the proposed microscope achieves a more rapid response with no reduction in the focusing accuracy. Consequently, the proposed microscope represents another solution for both existing and emerging industrial applications of automated vision inspection.

  2. Inspection 13.2 nm table-top full-field microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Brizuela, F.; Wang, Y.; Brewer, C. A.; Pedaci, F.; Chao, W.; Anderson, E. H.; Liu, Y.; Goldberg, K. A.; Naulleau, P.; Wachulak, P.; Marconi, M. C.; Attwood, D. T.; Rocca, J. J.; Menoni, C. S.

    2009-02-23

    We present results on a table-top microscope that uses an EUV stepper geometry to capture full-field images with a halfpitch spatial resolution of 55 nm. This microscope uses a 13.2 nm wavelength table-top laser for illumination and acquires images of reflective masks with exposures of 20 seconds. These experiments open the path to the realization of high resolution table-top imaging systems for actinic defect characterization.

  3. Microscopic artifact found during examination of the skin: plant hair of Viburnum dentatum.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, A B; Stonecipher, M; Kron, K A; Jaffe, M J

    1994-07-01

    Examination of skin specimens with microscopic techniques requires differentiation of pathogenic structures from artifact. While preparing potassium hydroxide preparations for fungal identification or immersion oil preparations for scabies identification, we have recently seen several examples of a bizarre stellate or cruciform plant structure. These artifactual particles were identified as plant hairs from Viburnum dentatum, or arrowwood. Clinicians and laboratory technicians should be aware of this artifact in order to interpret microscopic skin specimens appropriately.

  4. A Reflective Look at Reflecting Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pender, Rebecca L.; Stinchfield, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed existing literature and research on the reflecting team process. There is a dearth of empirical research that explores the reflecting team process and the outcome of counseling that uses reflecting teams. Implications of using reflecting teams for counselors, counselor educators, and clients will be discussed. A call for…

  5. Atomic force microscope: Enhanced sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are a recent development representing the state of the art in measuring ultrafine surface features. Applications are found in such fields of research as biology, microfabrication, material studies, and surface chemistry. Fiber-optic interferometer techniques developed at LLNL offer the potential of improving the vertical resolution of these instruments by up to 2 orders of magnitude. We are attempting to replace the current AFM measurement scheme, which consists of an optical beam deflection approach, with our fiber-optic interferometer scheme, a much more sensitive displacement measurement technique. In performing this research, we hope to accomplish two important goals; (1) to enhance the sensitivity of the AFM, and (2) to achieve important improvements in our fiber-optic interferometer technology.

  6. A novel digital scanning microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hong-Chou; Yu, Hsing-Cheng; Cheng, Kuen-Chiuan; Lee, Yuan-Chin; Ju, Jau-Jiu

    2011-06-01

    A novel digital scanning microscope (DSM) for observing cellular fluorescent micro-images is proposed and manufactured in this study. DSM applied in the biomedical field has been designed based on a concept of fast access time of an optical pick-up head (PUH) in optical disc devices; hence, DSM has been developed based on a blue-ray PUH module with a triaxial scanning actuator (TSA) system. High-resolution and high-speed scanning is effectively realized by TSA system instead of utilizing high-precision transpose stage mechanism. In consequent, a PUH module can work with a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module and serve as DSM for detecting fluorescent signals on samples.

  7. Automated dimensional analysis using a light-sectioning microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, J.; Lightman, A.; Poe, A.; Caldwell, R.

    1988-12-31

    A computer vision system has been integrated with a modified light-sectioning microscope for quality control and inspection of a machined part whose critical dimensions are 30 to 300 {mu}m. Height measurements were determined by analysis of the projected light-section line. Transverse measurements were made using the microscope in a traditional configuration with illumination from selected elements of an external LED ring array. The light section irradiance was under computer control to accommodate the spatial variations in surface reflectance whose dynamic range exceeded that of the vision system. Part features are located by the vision system. Edges and line centers are then measured to sub-pixel resolution with a gray-level analysis algorithm. This paper describes the design and operation of this system. Details of the measurement process and analysis algorithms are provided.

  8. The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton

    2011-01-01

    A wide selection of lenses is very useful to the thermographer working in a research environment, where applications can vary from week to week. Both wide angle and telephoto infrared lenses are widely used alternatives to the standard lenses typically supplied by IR camera manufacturers. However, in some extreme applications the need arises for additional image magnification. In these cases, the thermographer must rely on an IR microscope for close-up work with a field of view on the order of 1.3 to 15.8 mm, or a telescope for working at a distance on the order of meters or kilometers. The advantages of using an IR microscope and reflecting telescope will be discussed, as well as the challenges and characteristics of using these instruments.

  9. X-ray microscope assemblies. Final report and metrology report

    SciTech Connect

    Zehnpfennig, T.F.

    1981-04-13

    This is the Final Report and Metrology Report prepared under Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Subcontract 9936205, X-ray Microscope Assemblies. The purpose of this program was to design, fabricate, and perform detailed metrology on an axisymmetric grazing-incidence x-ray microscope (XRMS) to be used as a diagnostic instrument in the Lawrence Livermore Laser Fusion Program. The optical configuration chosen for this device consists of two internally polished surfaces of revolution: an hyperboloid facing the object; and a confocal, co-axial elliposid facing the image. This arrangement is known as the Wolter Type-I configuration. The grazing angle of reflection for both surfaces is approximately 1/sup 0/. The general optical performance goals under this program were to achieve a spatial resolution in the object plane in the soft x-ray region of approximately 1 micron, and to achieve an effective solid collecting angle which is an appreciable fraction of the geometric solid collecting angle.

  10. Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2009; Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2009; Reflected Ceiling Plan/Reflected Deck Plan 2010 - Gilpin's Falls Covered Bridge, Spanning North East Creek at Former (Bypassed) Section of North East Road (SR 272), North East, Cecil County, MD

  11. Improved Spatial Resolution For Reflection Mode Infrared Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C.; May, T. E.; Lerch, Philippe

    2009-08-13

    Standard commercial infrared microscopes operating in reflection mode use a mirror to direct the reflected light from the sample to the detector. This mirror blocks about half of the incident light, however, and thus degrades the spatial resolution by reducing the numerical aperture of the objective. Here, we replace the mirror with a 50% beamsplitter to allow full illumination of the objective and retain a way to direct the reflected light to the detector. The improved spatial resolution is demonstrated using a microscope coupled to a synchrotron source.

  12. Low-price optical microscope for school science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshimiya, Tsutomu; Kumagai, Masaaki

    2007-06-01

    In schools, scientific education with an optical microscope is popularly used. However, scanning apparatus for the microscope is very expensive such that the price is several times higher than the microscope itself. In order to activate children's interest in science, a low-price scanning and imaging function unit compatible to conventional optical microscopes used in schools was designed and manufactured using a personal computer (PC) used in all elementally and middle school education. The designing of imaging apparatus includes two choices: (i) using imaging device (reflection-type), or (ii) using photo-sensor and scanning device (transmission-type). In this paper, the latter method is adopted, considering the educational effect using "Lambert-Beer's law". This apparatus measures optical transmittance of modulated visible light with a photo-detector, and uses audio-input unit of PC as an A/D converter. Scanning unit with a pair of pulse motor drives was also used. Control software was built on Knoppix (an operating system based on freeware Linux), however it is very easy to rewrite to Windows application. By these reasons, this apparatus is low-price (less than microscope price) so that it is one of the best candidates for science education application in schools. As a biological specimen, a wing of spider wasp (Pompilidae) was used. Measured region was 10mm×10mm and the resolution was 100×100 pixels. The photograph of original specimen and the obtained image were shown in Figures (a) and (b), respectively. The obtained image showed a well-resolved detailed structure of the wing. Scanning was done by an external scanning apparatus. However, feeding of scanning pulses through printer port to stepping motor will be available based on the same method.

  13. High contrast, depth-resolved thermoreflectance imaging using a Nipkow disk confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Summers, J A; Yang, T; Tuominen, M T; Hudgings, J A

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a depth-resolved confocal thermal imaging technique that is capable of measuring the temperature distribution of an encapsulated or semi-obstructed device. The technique employs lock-in charge coupled device-based thermoreflectance imaging via a Nipkow disk confocal microscope, which is used to eliminate extraneous reflections from above or below the imaging plane. We use the confocal microscope to predict the decrease in contrast and dynamic range due to an obstruction for widefield thermoreflectance, and we demonstrate the ability of confocal thermoreflectance to maintain a high contrast and thermal sensitivity in the presence of large reflecting obstructions in the optical path.

  14. Learning about reflection.

    PubMed

    Smith, A

    1998-10-01

    An understanding of the nature and function of reflection in recognizing and developing nursing knowledge is a key concern. This paper describes a longitudinal study investigating the ways in which undergraduate student nurses reflected about practice as they progressed through a 3-year programme in adult nursing. The method was qualitative, with data gained from written critical incidents based on practice experiences and classroom discussions, and analysed using the constant comparative method. Findings revealed the range of issues students perceived as most important, and to some extent, changes in levels of thinking. A strong theme occurring throughout related to the complexity of learning what it means to be a professional and, in consequence, what they learn about themselves. Students' preoccupation with emotional aspects of learning and nursing care was evident. They had difficulty in disentangling 'personal' and 'professional' involvement but later data indicates that they had begun to learn to differentiate between involvement as a general characteristic of nursing practice and a overwhelming personal attachment. They generally use their own and each others' experiences to examine meaning, in preference to formal theoretical explanations although there is evidence students moved from acceptance of information to the questioning and critiquing of arguments and professional assumptions, particularly concerning their relevance and appropriateness for practice.

  15. The Athena Microscopic Imager Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Aquyres, S. W.; Bell, J. F., III; Maki, J. N.; Arneson, H. M.; Brown, D. I.; Collins, S. A.; Dingizian, A.; Elliot, S. T.; Geotz, W.

    2003-01-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI) [1]. The MI is a fixed-focus camera mounted on the end of an extendable instrument arm, the Instrument Deployment Device (IDD; see Figure 1).The MI was designed to acquire images at a spatial resolution of 30 microns/pixel over a broad spectral range (400 - 700 nm; see Table 1). Technically, the microscopic imager is not a microscope: it has a fixed magnification of 0.4 and is intended to produce images that simulate a geologist s view through a common hand lens. In photographers parlance, the system makes use of a macro lens. The MI uses the same electronics design as the other MER cameras [2, 3] but has optics that yield a field of view of 31 31 mm across a 1024 1024 pixel CCD image (Figure 2). The MI acquires images using only solar or skylightillumination of the target surface. A contact sensor is used to place the MI slightly closer to the target surface than its best focus distance (about 66 mm), allowing concave surfaces to be imaged in good focus. Because the MI has a relatively small depth of field (3 mm), a single MI image of a rough surface will contain both focused and unfocused areas. Coarse focusing will be achieved by moving the IDD away from a rock target after the contact sensor is activated. Multiple images taken at various distances will be acquired to ensure good focus on all parts of rough surfaces. By combining a set of images acquired in this way, a completely focused image can be assembled. Stereoscopic observations can be obtained by moving the MI laterally relative to its boresight. Estimates of the position and orientation of the MI for each acquired image will be stored in the rover computer and returned to Earth with the image data. The MI optics will be protected from the Martian environment by a retractable dust cover. The dust cover includes a Kapton window that is tinted orange to restrict the spectral bandpass to 500-700 nm

  16. Robot-assisted microscope for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, C; Eisenberg, H; Costi, G; Gallo, E; Garibotto, G; Casolino, D S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a robotic arm connected to a neurosurgical operative microscope. A force feedback sensor drives the motors of the arm in response to the positioning of the microscope by the surgeon. Computer graphic techniques allow tracking of the current position of the microscope within the volumetric reconstruction of the brain. The integration of the prototype into the neurosurgical operating room is currently being evaluated. Preliminary comments on this experimental phase are offered.

  17. Robot-assisted microscope for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, C; Eisenberg, H; Costi, G; Gallo, E; Garibotto, G; Casolino, D S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a robotic arm connected to a neurosurgical operative microscope. A force feedback sensor drives the motors of the arm in response to the positioning of the microscope by the surgeon. Computer graphic techniques allow tracking of the current position of the microscope within the volumetric reconstruction of the brain. The integration of the prototype into the neurosurgical operating room is currently being evaluated. Preliminary comments on this experimental phase are offered. PMID:9079441

  18. Foldscope: Origami-Based Paper Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, James S.; Clements, James; Prakash, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education. PMID:24940755

  19. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen; Schultz, Peter G.; Wei, Tao

    2003-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  20. Scanning evanescent electro-magnetic microscope

    DOEpatents

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Chen

    2001-01-01

    A novel scanning microscope is described that uses near-field evanescent electromagnetic waves to probe sample properties. The novel microscope is capable of high resolution imaging and quantitative measurements of the electrical properties of the sample. The inventive scanning evanescent wave electromagnetic microscope (SEMM) can map dielectric constant, tangent loss, conductivity, complex electrical impedance, and other electrical parameters of materials. The quantitative map corresponds to the imaged detail. The novel microscope can be used to measure electrical properties of both dielectric and electrically conducting materials.

  1. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma. Electron microscopic and immunologic studies.

    PubMed

    Guccion, J G; Rohatgi, P K; Saini, N

    1984-04-01

    We present a case of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG). On light microscopy, the pulmonary nodular lesions consisted of extracellular, eosinophilic hyaline lamellae. Histochemical stains of the hyaline lamellae for amyloid were focally positive and the diagnosis of amyloidosis was seriously considered; however, on electron microscopic examination, the hyaline lamellae consisted of electrondense, compact, amorphous material quite unlike fibrillar amyloid. Although circulating immune complexes containing IgA were detected in our patient, immunoperoxidase stains did not reveal immunoglobulins in the hyaline lamellae. This case illustrates the value of electron microscopy in differentiating PHG from amyloidosis and supports the hypothesis that PHG represents an exaggerated immune response. PMID:6200274

  2. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  3. Hamiltonian mechanics limits microscopic engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglin, James; Gilz, Lukas; Thesing, Eike

    2015-05-01

    We propose a definition of fully microscopic engines (micro-engines) in terms of pure mechanics, without reference to thermodynamics, equilibrium, or cycles imposed by external control, and without invoking ergodic theory. This definition is pragmatically based on the observation that what makes engines useful is energy transport across a large ratio of dynamical time scales. We then prove that classical and quantum mechanics set non-trivial limits-of different kinds-on how much of the energy that a micro-engine extracts from its fuel can be converted into work. Our results are not merely formal; they imply manageable design constraints on micro-engines. They also suggest the novel possibility that thermodynamics does not emerge from mechanics in macroscopic regimes, but rather represents the macroscopic limit of a generalized theory, valid on all scales, which governs the important phenomenon of energy transport across large time scale ratios. We propose experimental realizations of the dynamical mechanisms we identify, with trapped ions and in Bose-Einstein condensates (``motorized bright solitons'').

  4. Mars Under the Microscope (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured by the rover's microscopic imager on the 10th day, or sol, of its mission and roughly approximates the color a human eye would see. Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover in both its open and closed positions. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  5. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  6. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential. PMID:27649932

  7. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  8. Quality Self-Reflection through Reflection Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gun, Bahar

    2011-01-01

    This research study discusses the importance of "reflection training" in teacher education programmes. The main premise of the study is that although teachers are constantly encouraged to "reflect" on their teaching, they are unable to do so effectively unless they are specifically trained in how to reflect (they tend to "react" rather than…

  9. Reflections on Reflective Learning in Professional Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warhurst, Russell

    2008-01-01

    Reflective learning is a standard and largely unquestioned pedagogy of initial in-service professional education. This case study problematises the processes of reflective learning and examines the constraints on beginning professionals' reflection. The paper outlines a theoretical framework to enable understanding of the nature of reflective…

  10. Development of the interferometrical scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorozhovets, N.; Hausotte, T.; Hofmann, N.; Manske, E.; Jäger, G.

    2006-08-01

    Many scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) are used as image acquisition tools in such industries as microelectronics, micromechanics, lithography and biotechnology. Conventional SPMs use piezoelectric actuators in order to move either the sample or the probe. The voltage across the piezos is taken as a position indicator. However, it is known that piezos suffer from hysteresis, and from time- and temperature-dependent creep. A solution to this problem is provided by accurate, traceable measurement of the cantilever position. An exact dimensional measurement can only take place via direct comparison with a well-known reference. The traceability of the SPM can be achieved using an interferometer, traceable to the 633 nm wavelength of the He-Ne laser. For accurate measurements the position of the cantilever must be measured in addition to the torsion and bending. This article shows the basic SPM principle as well as the addition of a cantilever position detection system. This system has been realized with a special interferometer with a quadrant diode to detect the cantilever torsion and bending. The measuring beam is focused on the cantilever backside using a lens. The reflected laser beam is split and evaluated; one part of the beam is used for the interferometrical position measurement with the other part focused onto a quadrant diode. Due to the structure of the interferometrical SPM, it can be installed in many different positioning systems with large measuring ranges, including a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine (NPM machine), developed at the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology of the Technische Universitaet Ilmenau.

  11. Scanning optical microscope with long working distance objective

    DOEpatents

    Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2010-10-19

    A scanning optical microscope, including: a light source to generate a beam of probe light; collimation optics to substantially collimate the probe beam; a probe-result beamsplitter; a long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective; scanning means to scan a beam spot of the focused probe beam on or within a sample; relay optics; and a detector. The collimation optics are disposed in the probe beam. The probe-result beamsplitter is arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light from the sample. The beamsplitter reflects the probe beam into the objective and transmits resultant light. The long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective is also arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light. It focuses the reflected probe beam onto the sample, and collects and substantially collimates the resultant light. The relay optics are arranged to relay the transmitted resultant light from the beamsplitter to the detector.

  12. Alignment microscope for rotating laser scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maciel, A., Jr.; Beck, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Microscopic assembly for alignment of rotary laser focuses on small film area along scan line at oblique angle. Suitable choice of angle and location of optical components project laser beam line as X coordinate reticle. Coordination with horizontal recticle line included microscope facilitates Y coordinate position indexing.

  13. Electron Microscope Center Opens at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Arthur L.

    1981-01-01

    A 1.5-MeV High Voltage Electron Microscope has been installed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory which will help materials scientists and biologists study samples in more true-to-life situations. A 1-MeV Atomic Resolution Microscope will be installed at the same location in two years which will allow scientists to distinguish atoms. (DS)

  14. Robotic CCD microscope for enhanced crystal recognition

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Toppani, Dominique

    2007-11-06

    A robotic CCD microscope and procedures to automate crystal recognition. The robotic CCD microscope and procedures enables more accurate crystal recognition, leading to fewer false negative and fewer false positives, and enable detection of smaller crystals compared to other methods available today.

  15. [VISUALIZATION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELIEF STRUCTURES OF SEROUS MEMBRANES WITH A LIGHT MICROSCOPE].

    PubMed

    Minigazimov, R S; Vagapova, V Sh; Mukhametshina, G R

    2015-01-01

    Methods for three-dimensional visualization of histological film preparations were developed using traditional flat-field microscopes. Preliminarily, the structures examined acquired the light reflecting ability by the reduction of silver nitrate impregnating them. Microscopy of preparations is carried out in reflected incident tenebrous illumination. The methods of processing of preparations for the study of cell surface relief, limiting membrane of the mesothelium and subsurface collagen fibers. Preparations are stored and examined in the wet state.

  16. Observation of surfaces by reflection electron holography.

    PubMed

    Osakabe, N

    1992-02-15

    Reflection electron holography is described as a method to observe sub-A surface morphology. Phase shift of a Bragg-reflected electron wave was measured by means of holographic interferometry using an electron microscope equipped with a field emission electron gun and an electron biprism. A short wavelength of high energy electrons is the essential key to the high vertical sensitivity of this method, since geometrical path differences produced by the surface topography are measured in units of wavelengths in interferometrical measuring. Phase shift at a monoatomic step and the displacement field around a dislocation emerging on the surface were observed.

  17. Quantitative Analyses of Planetary Reflectance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    The development of a set of quantitative models to analyze planetary reflectance spectra as a function of microscopic and macroscopic mineral mixtures, particle size, and illumination geometry is considered. The approach has been to simplify more sophisticated algorithms to include the smallest number of parameters possible, consistent with being able to use them to produce useful results. This means that they should be able to model the data to within the accuracy obtainable by laboratory, telescopic, and space instrumentation (roughly 1%). The algorithms are ideally given in terms of parameters that are directly measureable (such as spectral reflectance or particle size).

  18. Proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in a three- dimensional culture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S.; Hu, J.; Long, M.; Tao, Z.

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have multi-differentiation potential and retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro, which in turn holds the promise of being able to repair or replace damaged cells or tissues. Since MSCs are rare in amount in vivo, abundant cells usually need be obtained in time in clinic. T herefore, proliferation and differentiation of MSCs in vitro are necessary and important for future applications. Most current studies o MSCs are focused on the cellular andn molecular biology using a two-dimension (2-D) static culture system at unit gravity. The gravity-induced 2D culture of MSCs could potentially not reflect cell-cell- contacts important for proliferation and differentiation of MSCs in vivo. Here we developed a method to proliferate MSCs by using the rotating three-dimensional (3- D) culture system, which can provide low shear, 3-D environment with simulated microgravity. MSCs from human bone marrow were prepared on microcarrier beads and then were seeded in the 3-D culture system. Various rotation conditions were tested to screen out the most suitable one for proliferation of MSCs. 2-D cultures were prepared in routine cell culture dishes as a control. All cultures were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Results were compared with microscopic and immunochemistrical techniques. The differentiation capacity of proliferated MSCs were also tested through induced differentiation experiments. It is found that simulated microgravity and three-dimensional culture condition is an active factor for proliferation of MSCs.

  19. Orientations to Reflective Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellington, Bud; Austin, Patricia

    1996-01-01

    Delineates five orientations to reflective practice: immediate, technical, deliberative, dialectic, and transpersonal, each reflecting different social science bases and beliefs and values about education. Views them as interactive, interdependent, noncompeting, aspects of reflective practice. (SK)

  20. Multispectral assessment of skin malformations using a modified video-microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekina, A.; Diebele, I.; Rubins, U.; Zaharans, J.; Derjabo, A.; Spigulis, J.

    2012-10-01

    A simplified method is proposed for alternative clinical diagnostics of skin malformations. A modified digital microscope, additionally equipped with a fourcolour LED (450 nm, 545 nm, 660 nm and 940 nm) subsequent illumination system, was applied for assessment of skin cancerous lesions and cutaneous inflammations. Multispectral image analysis was performed to map distributions of skin erythema index, bilirubin index, melanoma/nevus differentiation parameter, and fluorescence indicator. The skin malformation monitoring has shown that it is possible to differentiate melanoma from other pathologies.

  1. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  2. Calibration of the instrument of the MICROSCOPE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiu, E.; Pradels, G.; Rodrigues, M.; Touboul, P.

    The MICROSOPE mission is planned for launch in 2007. It aims to verify the Equivalence Principle with an accuracy of 10-15, which is not reachable on Earth because of disturbing phenomena, like seismic activity. In space the experiment can take advantage of the quiet environment provided by a drag free satellite. The instrument used for the test is a differential electrostatic accelerometer composed of two inertial sensors, with proof-masses made of different materials: one in Platinum-Rhodium alloy, the other in Titanium alloy. The space experiment will also benefit from a second differential accelerometer with both proof-masses of the same material as a reference instrument to characterise the disturbing signals and sensitivities. The in-orbit calibration of the instrument is mandatory to validate the space test and several procedures have been previously proposed taking advantage of the satellite propulsion system or the a priori knowledge of natural, in-orbit, applied accelerations. Due to the actual configuration of the MICROSCOPE propulsion system, the possibility of accurate satellite manoeuvres is limited but sufficient. This paper presents the necessary compromise between the satellite parameters, the instrument ones and the calibration procedures. The scenario of the MICROSCOPE in-orbit calibration phase is finely defined in agreement with the required performances for the EP test accuracy.

  3. Volumetric retinal fluorescence microscopic imaging with extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zengzhuo; Fischer, Andrew; Li, Wei; Li, Guoqiang

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront-engineered microscope with greatly extended depth of field (EDoF) is designed and demonstrated for volumetric imaging with near-diffraction limited optical performance. A bright field infinity-corrected transmissive/reflective light microscope is built with Kohler illumination. A home-made phase mask is placed in between the objective lens and the tube lens for ease of use. General polynomial function is adopted in the design of the phase plate for robustness and custom merit function is used in Zemax for optimization. The resulting EDoF system achieves an engineered point spread function (PSF) that is much less sensitive to object depth variation than conventional systems and therefore 3D volumetric information can be acquired in a single frame with expanded tolerance of defocus. In Zemax simulation for a setup using 32X objective (NA = 0.6), the EDoF is 20μm whereas a conventional one has a DoF of 1.5μm, indicating a 13 times increase. In experiment, a 20X objective lens with NA = 0.4 was used and the corresponding phase plate was designed and fabricated. Retinal fluorescence images of the EDoF microscope using passive adaptive optical phase element illustrate a DoF around 100μm and it is able to recover the volumetric fluorescence images that are almost identical to in-focus images after post processing. The image obtained from the EDoF microscope is also better in resolution and contrast, and the retinal structure is better defined. Hence, due to its high tolerance of defocus and fine restored image quality, EDoF optical systems have promising potential in consumer portable medical imaging devices where user's ability to achieve focus is not optimal, and other medical imaging equipment where achieving best focus is not a necessary.

  4. Fast and Adaptive Auto-focusing Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Takeshi; Igarashi, Yasunobu; Hashimoto, Koichi

    Optical microscopes are widely used in biological and medical researches. By using the microscope, we can observe cellular movements including intracellular ions and molecules tagged with fluorescent dyes at a high magnification. However, a freely motile cell easily escapes from a 3D field of view of the typical microscope. Therefore, we propose a novel auto-focusing algorithm and develop a auto-focusing and tracking microscope. XYZ positions of a microscopic stage are feedback controlled to focus and track the cell automatically. A bright-field image is used to estimate a cellular position. XY centroids are used to estimate XY positions of the tracked cell. To estimate Z position, we use a diffraction pattern around the cell membrane. This estimation method is so-called Depth from Diffraction (DFDi). However, this method is not robust for individual differences between cells because the diffraction pattern depends on each cellular shape. Therefore, in this study, we propose a real-time correction of DFDi by using 2D Laplacian of an intracellular area as a goodness of the focus. To evaluate the performance of our developed algorithm and microscope, we auto-focus and track a freely moving paramecium. In this experimental result, the paramecium is auto-focused and kept inside the scope of the microscope during 45s. The evaluated focal error is within 5µm, while a length and a thickness of the paramecium are about 200µm and 50µm, respectively.

  5. Automatic Focus Adjustment of a Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2005-01-01

    AUTOFOCUS is a computer program for use in a control system that automatically adjusts the position of an instrument arm that carries a microscope equipped with an electronic camera. In the original intended application of AUTOFOCUS, the imaging microscope would be carried by an exploratory robotic vehicle on a remote planet, but AUTOFOCUS could also be adapted to similar applications on Earth. Initially control software other than AUTOFOCUS brings the microscope to a position above a target to be imaged. Then the instrument arm is moved to lower the microscope toward the target: nominally, the target is approached from a starting distance of 3 cm in 10 steps of 3 mm each. After each step, the image in the camera is subjected to a wavelet transform, which is used to evaluate the texture in the image at multiple scales to determine whether and by how much the microscope is approaching focus. A focus measure is derived from the transform and used to guide the arm to bring the microscope to the focal height. When the analysis reveals that the microscope is in focus, image data are recorded and transmitted.

  6. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke's tabulated data.

  7. The microscopes of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek.

    PubMed

    van Zuylen, J

    1981-03-01

    The seventeenth-century Dutch microscopist, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, was the first man to make a protracted study of microscopical objects, and, unlike his contemporary Robert Hooke, he viewed by transmitted light. Leeuwenhoek made over 500 of his own, curious, simple microscopes, but now only nine are known to exist. The exact nature of the lenses Leeuwenhoek made, has for long been a puzzle. The existing microscopes have now been examined in detail, and their optical characteristics measured and tabulated. It is proposed that the lens of highest magnification, x 266, was made using a special blown bubble technique. PMID:7012367

  8. Microscopes for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    One part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer instrument for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is a pair of telescopes with a special wheel (on the right in this photograph) for presenting samples to be inspected with the microscopes. A horizontally mounted optical microscope (on the left in this photograph) and an atomic force microscope will examine soil particles and possibly ice particles.

    The shapes and the size distributions of soil particles may tell scientists about environmental conditions the material has experienced. Tumbling rounds the edges. Repeated wetting and freezing causes cracking. Clay minerals formed during long exposure to water have distinctive, platy particles shapes.

  9. The microscopes of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek.

    PubMed

    van Zuylen, J

    1981-03-01

    The seventeenth-century Dutch microscopist, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, was the first man to make a protracted study of microscopical objects, and, unlike his contemporary Robert Hooke, he viewed by transmitted light. Leeuwenhoek made over 500 of his own, curious, simple microscopes, but now only nine are known to exist. The exact nature of the lenses Leeuwenhoek made, has for long been a puzzle. The existing microscopes have now been examined in detail, and their optical characteristics measured and tabulated. It is proposed that the lens of highest magnification, x 266, was made using a special blown bubble technique.

  10. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity arrived at exposures of Endeavour crater rim rocks in August 2011, on a hill dubbed 'Cape York.' These rocks have been the goal of exploration by Opportunity for the past few years because spectral evidence for phyllosilicates was observed at this location in orbital remote sensing data. As Opportunity circum¬navigated Cape York, the Microscopic Imager (MI) was used to examine the fine-scale textures of various soils and rocky outcrops. As reported previously, Opportunity discovered multiple bright linear features along the western periphery of Cape York that have been interpreted as veins of Ca sulfate deposited in fractures within the bedrock of Cape York. Opportunity then explored the northern and eastern sides of Cape York, including the area around 'Matijevic Hill' that shows evidence for phyllosilicates in CRISM data acquired from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. One of the first outcrops examined near Matijevic Hill, dubbed 'Kirkwood,' is dominated by millimeter-size spherules. Unlike the hematite-rich concretions observed by Opportunity on Meridiani Planum, the aggregated 'newberries' in the Kirkwood exposure display internal structure and resistant rims. Compositionally, the spherule-rich rock is very similar to a nearby spherule-poor outcrop dubbed 'Whitewater Lake.' Thus these spherules have a more basalt-like composition compared to the hematite-rich concretions of the Burns Formation. The origin of the Kirkwood outcrop is uncertain, but the setting on the rim of the 22-km diameter Endeavour crater suggests that perhaps impact melting was involved in lapilli formation, possibly followed by mobilization and sorting in the ejecta blanket. Alternatively, the newberries may be diagenetic iron oxide concretions that are less well cemented than the 'blueberries' of the younger sulfate-rich Burns Formation. The Whitewater Lake outcrops contain the phyllosilicate phases observed from orbit, and are the oldest materials yet investigated by

  11. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    DOEpatents

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  12. Marcello Malpighi: the father of microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    DiDio, L J

    1995-01-01

    Biographical data of Malpighi to justify naming him "the father of microscopic anatomy", as he used the microscope, soon after its invention, to study and discover and accurately describe many biological, particularly anatomical, structures. Although he utilized the microscope as a scientific instrument, his ideas, innovations and discoveries caused such an opposition that the microscope could be considered as Malpighi's weapon to start a scientific revolution. He was a naturalist for whom the "natural world, known and experienced scientifically, was all that existed". He was also a "cardiocentrist", who opposed Galen's "hepatocentrism". Several anatomical structures known eponymically to honor Malpighi are listed followed by their synonyms. Malpighi is another example of a genius as an extraordinary man who stood on the shoulders of giants, such as Galilei, Hans and Zacharias Janssen, Borelli, Harvey, B. Massari, among others.

  13. Microscopic instability in recurrent neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Yuzuru; Amari, Shun-ichi; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2015-03-01

    In a manner similar to the molecular chaos that underlies the stable thermodynamics of gases, a neuronal system may exhibit microscopic instability in individual neuronal dynamics while a macroscopic order of the entire population possibly remains stable. In this study, we analyze the microscopic stability of a network of neurons whose macroscopic activity obeys stable dynamics, expressing either monostable, bistable, or periodic state. We reveal that the network exhibits a variety of dynamical states for microscopic instability residing in a given stable macroscopic dynamics. The presence of a variety of dynamical states in such a simple random network implies more abundant microscopic fluctuations in real neural networks which consist of more complex and hierarchically structured interactions.

  14. Marcello Malpighi: the father of microscopic anatomy.

    PubMed

    DiDio, L J

    1995-01-01

    Biographical data of Malpighi to justify naming him "the father of microscopic anatomy", as he used the microscope, soon after its invention, to study and discover and accurately describe many biological, particularly anatomical, structures. Although he utilized the microscope as a scientific instrument, his ideas, innovations and discoveries caused such an opposition that the microscope could be considered as Malpighi's weapon to start a scientific revolution. He was a naturalist for whom the "natural world, known and experienced scientifically, was all that existed". He was also a "cardiocentrist", who opposed Galen's "hepatocentrism". Several anatomical structures known eponymically to honor Malpighi are listed followed by their synonyms. Malpighi is another example of a genius as an extraordinary man who stood on the shoulders of giants, such as Galilei, Hans and Zacharias Janssen, Borelli, Harvey, B. Massari, among others. PMID:11322304

  15. A Live Specimen Cell for the Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, D. W.

    1991-01-01

    Provides background and instructions for the assembly of a microaquarium, or specimen cell, in which the dynamic world of living microorganisms can be viewed through a microscope overextended periods of time utilizing the simplest of materials in the process. (JJK)

  16. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  17. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists.

    PubMed

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs.

  18. Feedback regulation of microscopes by image processing.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Yuki; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2013-05-01

    Computational microscope systems are becoming a major part of imaging biological phenomena, and the development of such systems requires the design of automated regulation of microscopes. An important aspect of automated regulation is feedback regulation, which is the focus of this review. As modern microscope systems become more complex, often with many independent components that must work together, computer control is inevitable since the exact orchestration of parameters and timings for these multiple components is critical to acquire proper images. A number of techniques have been developed for biological imaging to accomplish this. Here, we summarize the basics of computational microscopy for the purpose of building automatically regulated microscopes focus on feedback regulation by image processing. These techniques allow high throughput data acquisition while monitoring both short- and long-term dynamic phenomena, which cannot be achieved without an automated system.

  19. Special Microscopy Using a Standard Student Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundberg, Marshall D.

    1984-01-01

    Explains the procedures used in a general botany course to obtain polarization, fluorescence, and dark field images using a standard student microscope. Provides sources for materials and references. (JM)

  20. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  1. Constraints on modern microscopic equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranto, G.; Baldo, M.; Burgio, G. F.

    2016-01-01

    We compare a set of equations of state derived within microscopic many-body approaches, and study their predictions as far as phenomenological data on nuclei from heavy ion collisions, and astrophysical observations on neutron stars are concerned. All the data, taken together, put strong constraints not easy to be fulfilled accurately. However the results provide an estimate of the uncertainty on the theoretical prediction at a microscopic level of the nuclear equation of state.

  2. Microscopic aspects implied by the Second Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondepudi, D. K.

    1987-07-01

    It is conventional to try to arrive at the Boltzmann principle and the Second Law starting with the laws of dynamics at the microscopic level. In this article the opposite view is presented: Starting with the Second Law, microscopic properties are derived. A classical result of Wien is developed into a general theorem, and the possibility of deriving the Boltzmann principle as a consequence of Carnot's theorem is discussed.

  3. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, D.A.; Turner, B.; Kipling, K.

    1999-05-11

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible is disclosed. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture. 20 figs.

  4. Lamp method and apparatus using multiple reflections

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian; Kipling, Kent

    1999-01-01

    A method wherein the light in a sulfur or selenium lamp is reflected through the fill a multiplicity of times to convert ultraviolet radiation to visible. A light emitting device comprised of an electrodeless envelope which bears a light reflecting covering around a first portion which does not crack due to differential thermal expansion and which has a second portion which comprises a light transmissive aperture.

  5. X-ray laser microscope apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Suckewer, Szymon; DiCicco, Darrell S.; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Sathre, Robert; Skinner, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    A microscope consisting of an x-ray contact microscope and an optical microscope. The optical, phase contrast, microscope is used to align a target with respect to a source of soft x-rays. The source of soft x-rays preferably comprises an x-ray laser but could comprise a synchrotron or other pulse source of x-rays. Transparent resist material is used to support the target. The optical microscope is located on the opposite side of the transparent resist material from the target and is employed to align the target with respect to the anticipated soft x-ray laser beam. After alignment with the use of the optical microscope, the target is exposed to the soft x-ray laser beam. The x-ray sensitive transparent resist material whose chemical bonds are altered by the x-ray beam passing through the target mater GOVERNMENT LICENSE RIGHTS This invention was made with government support under Contract No. De-FG02-86ER13609 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  6. Soft x-ray laser microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, P.I.

    1990-10-01

    The program consisted of two phases (Phase I and Phase II). The goal of the Phase I (first year program) was to design and construct the Soft X-ray Laser Contact Microscope. Such microscope was constructed and adapted to PPL's 18.2nm soft X-ray Laser (SXL), which in turn was modified and prepared for microscopy experiments. Investigation of the photoresist response to 18.2nm laser radiation and transmissivity of 0.1m thick silicion-nitride (Si[sub 3]N[sub 4]) windows were important initial works. The goal of the first year of Phase II was to construct X-ray contact microscope in combination with existing optical phase microscope, already used by biologists. In the second year of Phase II study of dehydrated Horeseshoe Crab and Hela cancer cells were performed with COXRALM. Also during Phase II, the Imaging X-Ray Laser Microscope (IXRALM) was designed and constructed. This paper describes the development of each of the microscopes and their application for research.

  7. IMIS: An intelligence microscope imaging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caputo, Michael; Hunter, Norwood; Taylor, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Until recently microscope users in space relied on traditional microscopy techniques that required manual operation of the microscope and recording of observations in the form of written notes, drawings, or photographs. This method was time consuming and required the return of film and drawings from space for analysis. No real-time data analysis was possible. Advances in digital and video technologies along with recent developments in article intelligence will allow future space microscopists to have a choice of three additional modes of microscopy: remote coaching, remote control, and automation. Remote coaching requires manual operations of the microscope with instructions given by two-way audio/video transmission during critical phases of the experiment. When using the remote mode of microscopy, the Principal Investigator controls the microscope from the ground. The automated mode employs artificial intelligence to control microscope functions and is the only mode that can be operated in the other three modes as well. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the four modes of of microscopy and how the IMIS, a proposed intelligent microscope imaging system, can be used as a model for developing and testing concepts, operating procedures, and equipment design of specifications required to provide a comprehensive microscopy/imaging capability onboard Space Station Freedom.

  8. Reflections in art

    PubMed Central

    CAVANAGH, PATRICK; CHAO, JESSICA; WANG, DINA

    2009-01-01

    When artists depict a mirror in a painting, it necessarily lacks the most obvious property of a mirror: as we move around the painting of the mirror, the reflections we see in it do not change. And yet representations of mirrors and other reflecting surfaces can be quite convincing in paintings. Here, we will examine the rules of reflection, the many ways that painters can break those rules without losing the impression of reflection and the rules that cannot be broken. The rules that govern the perception of reflection are a small subset of the physical rules of reflection. PMID:18534102

  9. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope.

  10. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. PMID:26998703

  11. First Atomic Force Microscope Image from Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This calibration image presents three-dimensional data from the atomic force microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, showing surface details of a substrate on the microscope station's sample wheel. It will be used as an aid for interpreting later images that will show shapes of minuscule Martian soil particles.

    The area imaged by the microscope is 40 microns by 40 microns, small enough to fit on an eyelash. The grooves in this substrate are 14 microns (0.00055 inch) apart, from center to center. The vertical dimension is exaggerated in the image to make surface details more visible. The grooves are 300 nanometers (0.00001 inch) deep.

    This is the first atomic force microscope image recorded on another planet. It was taken on July 9, 2008, during the 44th Martian day, or sol, of the Phoenix mission since landing.

    Phoenix's Swiss-made atomic force microscope builds an image of the surface shape of a particle by sensing it with a sharp tip at the end of a spring, all microfabricated out of a silicon wafer. A strain gauge records how far the spring flexes to follow the contour of the surface. It can provide details of soil-particle shapes smaller than one-hundredth the width of a human hair. This is about 20 times smaller than what can be resolved with Phoenix's optical microscope, which has provided much higher-magnification imaging than anything seen on Mars previously. Both microscopes are part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer.

  12. All-plastic miniature fluorescence microscope for point-of-care readout of bead-based bioassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal Emanuel; Crannell, Zachary; Pavlova, Ina; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2015-10-01

    A number of new platforms have been developed for multiplexed bioassays that rely on imaging targeted fluorescent beads labeled with different fluorescent dyes. We developed a compact, low-cost three-dimensional printed fluorescence microscope that can be used as a detector for mutiplexed, bead-based assays to support point-of-care applications. Images obtained with the microscope were analyzed to differentiate multiple analytes in a single sample with a comparable limit of detection to commercially available macroscopic assay platforms.

  13. Design and operation of a versatile, ultrahigh vacuum, low temperature scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhani, A. M.; Kelly, S. J.; Pearl, T. P.

    2006-04-01

    The design and operation of an ultrahigh vacuum, liquid nitrogen or helium cooled scanning probe microscope system are presented. Key construction features that reflect crucial experimental criteria will be highlighted. Following from a recently devised approach to low temperature microscopy, cooling of the Besocke-style [Surf. Sci. 181, 145 (1987)] microscope assembly is performed by housing the microscope assembly in cryogenic shields which are coupled to a low vibration flow cryostat. The microscope, however, has been designed to accommodate different types of probes including tunneling and force sensors, and this functionality offers significant flexibility. As a demonstration of temperature and microscope stability, scanning tunneling microscopy measurements at 83K, using liquid nitrogen as the cryogen, will be shown on a flat metallic Ag(111) surface. In this temperature range, we measure a drift rate of 0.34Å/h in the distance between the tip and sample as a result of ˜2mK/h temperature drift at the microscope base, and we enumerate the procedure for establishing this stability.

  14. Experimental approach to the microscopic phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonglei; Wang, Rong; Min, Changjun; Zhu, Siwei; Yuan, X.-C.

    2013-01-01

    We designed and proposed a microscopic configuration of wide-dynamic-range phase-sensitive surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on differential interferometry between focused radially polarized and azimuthally polarized cylindrical vector beams recently (R. Wang et al., Opt. Lett. 37, 2091 (2012)). In this Letter, we follow the simulation results up with experimental verifications with a sensitivity of 7.385 × 10-7refractive index unit (RIU)/0.1°. It is also verified that the dynamic range of this system could be as large as 0.35 RIU in principle, which is only confined by numerical aperture of the microscopic objective lens.

  15. Reflection Positivity for Parafermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Arthur; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2015-07-01

    We establish reflection positivity for Gibbs trace states for a class of gauge-invariant, reflection-invariant Hamiltonians describing parafermion interactions on a lattice. We relate these results to recent work in the condensed-matter physics literature.

  16. Microscopic features of moving traffic jams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Hiller, Andreas; Rehborn, Hubert

    2006-04-01

    Empirical and numerical microscopic features of moving traffic jams are presented. Based on a single vehicle data analysis, it is found that within wide moving jams, i.e., between the upstream and downstream jam fronts there is a complex microscopic spatiotemporal structure. This jam structure consists of alternations of regions in which traffic flow is interrupted and flow states of low speeds associated with “moving blanks” within the jam. Moving blanks within a wide moving jam resemble electron holes in the valence band of semiconductors: As the moving blanks that propagate upstream appear due to downstream vehicle motion within the jam, so appearance of electron holes moving with the electric field results from electron motion against the electric field in the valence band of semiconductors. Empirical features of moving blanks are found. Based on microscopic models in the context of the Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory, physical reasons for moving blanks emergence within wide moving jams are disclosed. Microscopic nonlinear effects of moving jam emergence, propagation, and dissolution as well as a diverse variety of hysteresis effects in freeway traffic associated with phase transitions and congested traffic propagation are numerically investigated. Microscopic structure of moving jam fronts is numerically studied and compared with empirical results.

  17. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Friets, E.M.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Hatch, J.F. ); Roberts, D.W. )

    1989-06-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given.

  18. Miniaturized integration of a fluorescence microscope

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Kunal K.; Burns, Laurie D.; Cocker, Eric D.; Nimmerjahn, Axel; Ziv, Yaniv; Gamal, Abbas El; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is traditionally an instrument of substantial size and expense. Its miniaturized integration would enable many new applications based on mass-producible, tiny microscopes. Key prospective usages include brain imaging in behaving animals towards relating cellular dynamics to animal behavior. Here we introduce a miniature (1.9 g) integrated fluorescence microscope made from mass-producible parts, including semiconductor light source and sensor. This device enables high-speed cellular-level imaging across ∼0.5 mm2 areas in active mice. This capability allowed concurrent tracking of Ca2+ spiking in >200 Purkinje neurons across nine cerebellar microzones. During mouse locomotion, individual microzones exhibited large-scale, synchronized Ca2+ spiking. This is a mesoscopic neural dynamic missed by prior techniques for studying the brain at other length scales. Overall, the integrated microscope is a potentially transformative technology that permits distribution to many animals and enables diverse usages, such as portable diagnostics or microscope arrays for large-scale screens. PMID:21909102

  19. Microscopic acute lesions after caustic exposure.

    PubMed

    Advenier, A-S; Dorandeu, A; Charlier, P; Lorin de la Grandmaison, G

    2014-01-01

    Although lesions related to chemical burns have been studied through case reports, clinical analyses and autopsy series, microscopic lesions have not yet been precisely described. Our study analyses the microscopic lesions recorded after caustic exposure in fourteen lethal and four non-lethal cases. We find that microscopic lesions after caustic exposure are various and non-specific. Moreover, the distribution of gastrointestinal lesions is inconsistent. Histological changes affect the digestive mucosa first, with the entire wall suffering damage in some cases. Multiple factors influence the pattern of lesions, including the nature of the caustic substance, the duration of contact, the amount of the substance encountering the tissue and the length of postingestion survival. The assessment of microscopic lesions, especially necrosis, can be limited by post-mortem autolysis, which quickly affects the digestive tract. Chemical pneumonia due to caustic burns is rare and, when present, typically secondary to aspiration. According to the presented findings, macroscopic examination at autopsy under- or overestimates the nature and degree of lesions. Significant complications of caustic ingestion such as chemical pneumonitis can also be found by histological analysis. Microscopic examination can be useful to rule out oesophagitis or other digestive pathologies that can mimic chemical burns.

  20. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  1. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-04-06

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes rou tinely used in the synchrotron community.

  2. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  3. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Friets, E M; Strohbehn, J W; Hatch, J F; Roberts, D W

    1989-06-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given. PMID:2659493

  4. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, J.L.

    1992-12-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. 2 figs.

  5. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources.

  6. Differentiated Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Robert W.; And Others

    This report describes school operation changes in scheduling, curriculum, decisionmaking powers, and individualization of instruction that are concurrent with the adoption of differentiated staffing. The author defines differentiated staffing, explains where and at what levels it has been utilized, provides descriptions of results achieved, gives…

  7. Differential games.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaiya, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    General discussion of the theory of differential games with two players and zero sum. Games starting at a fixed initial state and ending at a fixed final time are analyzed. Strategies for the games are defined. The existence of saddle values and saddle points is considered. A stochastic version of a differential game is used to examine the synthesis problem.

  8. Reflective Learning in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockbank, Anne, Ed.; McGill, Ian, Ed.; Beech, Nic, Ed.

    This book contains 22 papers on reflective learning in practice. The following papers are included: "Our Purpose" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "The Nature and Context of Learning" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "Reflective Learning and Organizations" (Ann Brockbank, Ian McGill, Nic Beech); "Reflective Learning in Practice" (Ann…

  9. Liberating Moral Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horell, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    The author argues that if we are to foster life-giving and liberating moral reflection, we must first liberate moral reflection from distortions; specifically, from the distorting effects of moral insensitivity, destructive moral relativism, and confusions resulting from a failure to understand the dynamics of moral reflection. The author proposes…

  10. Teaching Critical Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Despite long-standing commitment to the notion of critical reflection across the healthcare professions it is unusual for critical theory and practice to be taught as explicit subjects in healthcare higher education. There is evidence to show that reflective techniques such as critical portfolios and reflective diaries can help students to…

  11. Observing secretory granules with a multiangle evanescent wave microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbach, A

    2000-01-01

    In total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM), fluorophores near a surface can be excited with evanescent waves, which decay exponentially with distance from the interface. Penetration depths of evanescent waves from 60 nm to 300 nm were generated by varying the angle of incidence of a laser beam. With a novel telecentric multiangle evanescent wave microscope, we monitored and investigated both single secretory granules and pools of granules in bovine chromaffin cells. By measuring the fluorescence intensity as a function of penetration depth, it is possible through a Laplace transform to obtain the fluorophore distribution as a function of axial position. We discuss the extent to which it is possible to determine distances and diameters of granules with this microscopy technique by modeling the fluorescent volumes of spheres in evanescent fields. The anisotropic near-field detection of fluorophores and the influence of the detection point-spread function are considered. The diameters of isolated granules between 70 nm and 300 nm have been reconstructed, which is clearly beyond the resolution limit of a confocal microscope. Furthermore, the paper demonstrates how evanescent waves propagate along surfaces and scatter at objects with a higher refractive index. TIRFM will have a limited applicability for quantitative measurements when the parameters used to define evanescent waves are not optimally selected. PMID:10777760

  12. Light- and electron-microscopic histochemistry of Fabry's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Faraggiana, T.; Churg, J.; Grishman, E.; Strauss, L.; Prado, A.; Bishop, D. F.; Schuchman, E.; Desnick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A histochemical study was performed on light- and electron-microscopic level in a case of Fabry's disease. The patient underwent kidney transplantation for renal failure and died of heart failure 6 months later. Patient's tissues were studied at the light- and electron-microscopic levels with various embedding and staining techniques for lipids and carbohydrates. Two peroxidase-labeled lectins (from Ricinus communis and from Bandeiraea simplicifolia) known to have affinity for alpha- and beta-D-galactose, were strongly reactive with the storage material on frozen sections. The ultrahistochemical and extraction tests showed that the typical granules had a variable reactivity and morphologic characteristics in different cells, probably reflecting different composition. A small number of typical deposits were also observed in the transplanted kidney. This is the first reported case of recurrence of the storage disease in the allograft. Of interest was also the fact that the patient's blood inhibited normal alpha-galactosidase activity, suggesting a possible inhibitor-related mechanism in the pathogenesis of the recurrence. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 PMID:6786101

  13. Performance evaluation of a quasi-microscope for planetary landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, E. E.; Huck, F. O.; Wall, S. D.; Woehrle, S. B.

    1977-01-01

    Spatial resolutions achieved with cameras on lunar and planetary landers have been limited to about 1 mm, whereas microscopes of the type proposed for such landers could have obtained resolutions of about 1 um but were never accepted because of their complexity and weight. The quasi-microscope evaluated in this paper could provide intermediate resolutions of about 10 um with relatively simple optics that would augment a camera, such as the Viking lander camera, without imposing special design requirements on the camera of limiting its field of view of the terrain. Images of natural particulate samples taken in black and white and in color show that grain size, shape, and texture are made visible for unconsolidated materials in a 50- to 500-um size range. Such information may provide broad outlines of planetary surface mineralogy and allow inferences to be made of grain origin and evolution. The mineralogical descriptions of single grains would be aided by the reflectance spectra that could, for example, be estimated from the six-channel multispectral data of the Viking lander camera.

  14. Microscopic dynamics of synchronization in driven colloids

    PubMed Central

    Juniper, Michael P.N.; Straube, Arthur V.; Besseling, Rut; Aarts, Dirk G.A.L.; Dullens, Roel P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of coupled oscillators has been scrutinized for over three centuries, from Huygens' pendulum clocks to physiological rhythms. One such synchronization phenomenon, dynamic mode locking, occurs when naturally oscillating processes are driven by an externally imposed modulation. Typically only averaged or integrated properties are accessible, leaving underlying mechanisms unseen. Here, we visualize the microscopic dynamics underlying mode locking in a colloidal model system, by using particle trajectories to produce phase portraits. Furthermore, we use this approach to examine the enhancement of mode locking in a flexible chain of magnetically coupled particles, which we ascribe to breathing modes caused by mode-locked density waves. Finally, we demonstrate that an emergent density wave in a static colloidal chain mode locks as a quasi-particle, with microscopic dynamics analogous to those seen for a single particle. Our results indicate that understanding the intricate link between emergent behaviour and microscopic dynamics is key to controlling synchronization. PMID:25994921

  15. Macroscopic model of scanning force microscope

    DOEpatents

    Guerra-Vela, Claudio; Zypman, Fredy R.

    2004-10-05

    A macroscopic version of the Scanning Force Microscope is described. It consists of a cantilever under the influence of external forces, which mimic the tip-sample interactions. The use of this piece of equipment is threefold. First, it serves as direct way to understand the parts and functions of the Scanning Force Microscope, and thus it is effectively used as an instructional tool. Second, due to its large size, it allows for simple measurements of applied forces and parameters that define the state of motion of the system. This information, in turn, serves to compare the interaction forces with the reconstructed ones, which cannot be done directly with the standard microscopic set up. Third, it provides a kinematics method to non-destructively measure elastic constants of materials, such as Young's and shear modules, with special application for brittle materials.

  16. CHAMP (Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Boynton, John E.; Balzer, Mark A.; Beegle, Luther; Sobel, Harold R.; Fisher, Ted; Klein, Dan; Deans, Matthew; Lee, Pascal; Sepulveda, Cesar A.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe)is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As a robotic arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision rangefinding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. CHAMP was originally developed through the Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP) in support of robotic field investigations, but may also find application in new areas such as robotic in-orbit servicing and maintenance operations associated with spacecraft and human operations. We overview CHAMP'S instrument performance and basic design considerations below.

  17. CHAMP - Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mungas, G. S.; Beegle, L. W.; Boynton, J.; Sepulveda, C. A.; Balzer, M. A.; Sobel, H. R.; Fisher, T. A.; Deans, M.; Lee, P.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe) is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As an arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo-imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision range-finding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. Currently designed with a filter wheel with 4 different filters, so that color and black and white images can be obtained over the entire Field-of-View, future designs will increase the number of filter positions to include 8 different filters. Finally, CHAMP incorporates controlled white and UV illumination so that images can be obtained regardless of sun position, and any potential fluorescent species can be identified so the most astrobiologically interesting samples can be identified.

  18. Microscopic imaging techniques for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Bullen, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Microscopic imaging can enhance the drug discovery process by helping to describe how disease processes unfold and how potential therapies might intervene. Recently introduced technologies, and enhancements to existing techniques, are addressing technical issues that have limited the usefulness of microscopic imaging in the past. In particular, these innovations are improving spatial resolution, increasing tissue penetration, overcoming physical access issues and enhancing experimental throughput. Notable recent trends, which are discussed in this article, include the development of super-resolution microscopes, the incorporation of multiphoton techniques into intravital and fibre-optic microscopy and the automation of microscopy and image analysis for high-content screening. Together, these developments are augmenting the existing assays and disease models that are used in early drug discovery and, in some cases, enabling new ones.

  19. Automated recognition of urinary microscopic solid particles.

    PubMed

    Almadhoun, Mohamed D; El-Halees, Alaa

    2014-03-01

    Urine analysis reveals the presence of many problems and diseases in the human body. Manual microscopic urine analysis is time-consuming, subjective to human observation and causes mistakes. Computer aided automatic microscopic analysis can help to overcome these problems. This paper introduces a comprehensive approach for automating procedures for detecting and recognition of microscopic urine particles. Samples of red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), calcium oxalate, triple phosphate and other undefined images were used in experiments. Image processing functions and segmentation were applied, shape and textural features were extracted and five classifiers were tested to get the best results. Repeated experiments were done for adjusting factors to produce the best evaluation results. A good performance was achieved compared with many related works. PMID:24392883

  20. Statistical approach for subwavelength measurements with a conventional light microscope

    PubMed Central

    Palanker, Daniel; Lewis, Aaron

    1991-01-01

    A method is developed theoretically that will permit subwavelength measurements of objects that differ from the surroundings by any contrast enhancing parameter, such as fluorescence, second harmonic generation, reflection et cetera, using a statistical analysis of a picture obtained with a conventional light microscope through a set of subwavelength apertures or by repeated scanning of a laser beam over a defined area. It is demonstrated that with this methodology information can be obtained on microdomains that are thirty times less than the diameter of the aperture. For example, for apertures that are 0.3 μm in diameter it is possible to measure the dimension of objects that are ∼10 nm. A technology is described by which it is possible to produce masks with the appropriate apertures. Instrumentation is described that would allow for the realization of these statistical methodologies with either apertures or scanning laser beams. ImagesFIGURE 2FIGURE 6FIGURE 7 PMID:19431808

  1. A scanning acoustic microscope based on picosecond ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Che, S; Guduru, P R; Nurmikko, A V; Maris, H J

    2015-02-01

    We report on the development of a new type of scanning acoustic microscope. We use a femtosecond light pulse to generate a short sound pulse, and then focus this sound onto the sample by means of a specially designed and microfabricated acoustic lens of radius a few microns. The sound travels to the sample through a thin layer of water. The sound reflected from the sample is collected by the lens and then passes through a monolithically integrated optical resonant cavity. The induced change in the properties of this cavity are measured using a time-delayed probe light pulse. We describe some of the challenges involved in the construction and operation of this high-precision metrology apparatus and present some preliminary results.

  2. Compact Microscope Imaging System with Intelligent Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The figure presents selected views of a compact microscope imaging system (CMIS) that includes a miniature video microscope, a Cartesian robot (a computer- controlled three-dimensional translation stage), and machine-vision and control subsystems. The CMIS was built from commercial off-the-shelf instrumentation, computer hardware and software, and custom machine-vision software. The machine-vision and control subsystems include adaptive neural networks that afford a measure of artificial intelligence. The CMIS can perform several automated tasks with accuracy and repeatability . tasks that, heretofore, have required the full attention of human technicians using relatively bulky conventional microscopes. In addition, the automation and control capabilities of the system inherently include a capability for remote control. Unlike human technicians, the CMIS is not at risk of becoming fatigued or distracted: theoretically, it can perform continuously at the level of the best human technicians. In its capabilities for remote control and for relieving human technicians of tedious routine tasks, the CMIS is expected to be especially useful in biomedical research, materials science, inspection of parts on industrial production lines, and space science. The CMIS can automatically focus on and scan a microscope sample, find areas of interest, record the resulting images, and analyze images from multiple samples simultaneously. Automatic focusing is an iterative process: The translation stage is used to move the microscope along its optical axis in a succession of coarse, medium, and fine steps. A fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the image is computed at each step, and the FFT is analyzed for its spatial-frequency content. The microscope position that results in the greatest dispersal of FFT content toward high spatial frequencies (indicating that the image shows the greatest amount of detail) is deemed to be the focal position.

  3. Microscopic Colitis (Lymphocytic and Collagenous), Eosinophilic Colitis, and Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, M. Sophia; Alimi, Yewande

    2015-01-01

    Multiple tests are needed to diagnose a patient with noninfectious diarrhea. Some patients will be mistakenly labeled as diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) because of nonspecific computed tomographic scans and grossly normal endoscopic findings. It is crucial to understand other less common pathologies to avoid these instances of misdiagnosis. This article focuses on microscopic colitis (MC), eosinophilic colitis (EC), and celiac disease. MC is an inflammatory condition of the colon that presents with two subtypes, only to be differentiated by histology. EC is a rare chronic inflammatory process. Depending on the extent of the disease, it can present with mild diarrhea, malabsorption, or at its worst, cause obstruction and perforation. Celiac disease affects the small bowel, but interestingly can present similarly to colitis. Both MC and EC respond to oral budesonide. Patients with celiac disease improve on gluten-free diets. These treatments are distinctly different from typical IBS-D care plans. PMID:26034409

  4. Multiphoton cryo microscope with sample temperature control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, H. G.; Uchugonova, A.; König, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present a multiphoton microscope system which combines the advantages of multiphoton imaging with precise control of the sample temperature. The microscope provides online insight in temperature-induced changes and effects in plant tissue and animal cells with subcellular resolution during cooling and thawing processes. Image contrast is based on multiphoton fluorescence intensity or fluorescence lifetime in the range from liquid nitrogen temperature up to +600°C. In addition, micro spectra from the imaged regions can be recorded. We present measurement results from plant leaf samples as well as Chinese hamster ovary cells.

  5. Biological imaging with a neutron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cremer, J.T.; Piestrup, M.A.; Gary, C.K.; Pantell, R.H.; Glinka, C.J.

    2004-07-19

    A simple microscope employing a compound refractive lens (CRL) composed of 100 biconcave lenses was used to image a biological sample with a 9.4x magnification using 10 A ring cold neutrons. The microscope's resolution, 0.5 mm, was primarily determined by the neutron detector 5.0 mm pixel size. Unlike previous work the CRL's field of view was large (44 mm) and increased as the distance between the exit of neutron-waveguide and the specimen decreased. Short source-to-specimen distances allowed the 1.2-cm-diam CRL to view a biological sample with this field of view.

  6. An innovative approach in microscopic endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sunandan; Kumar, Tarun; Sharma, Jyotika; Mittal, Shifali

    2014-05-01

    The introduction of the dental operating microscope was a turning point in the history of dentistry. It triggered a rapid transition from the conventional world of macro-dentistry to the precise, detailed world of micro-dentistry. However, working at these higher-power magnifications brings the clinician into the realm where even slight hand movements are disruptive. Physiologic hand tremor is a problem resulting in difficulty in mouth mirror placement. Hence, in this paper, a new instrument was designed to overcome the drawback of hand tremors during microscopic endodontics. PMID:24944459

  7. Evaluating EUV mask pattern imaging with two EUV microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Takase, Kei; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Han, Hakseung; Barty, Anton; Kinoshita, Hiroo; Hamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-02-26

    Aerial image measurement plays a key role in the development of patterned reticles for each generation of lithography. Studying the field transmitted (reflected) from EUV masks provides detailed information about potential disruptions caused by mask defects, and the performance of defect repair strategies, without the complications of photoresist imaging. Furthermore, by measuring the continuously varying intensity distribution instead of a thresholded, binary resist image, aerial image measurement can be used as feedback to improve mask and lithography system modeling methods. Interest in EUV, at-wavelength, aerial image measurement lead to the creation of several research tools worldwide. These tools are used in advanced mask development work, and in the evaluation of the need for commercial at-wavelength inspection tools. They describe performance measurements of two such tools, inspecting the same EUV mask in a series of benchmarking tests that includes brightfield and darkfield patterns. One tool is the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) operating on a bending magnet beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. The AIT features an EUV Fresnel zoneplate microscope that emulates the numerical aperture of a 0.25-NA stepper, and projects the aerial image directly onto a CCD camera, with 700x magnification. The second tool is an EUV microscope (EUVM) operating at the NewSUBARU synchrotron in Hyogo, Japan. The NewSUBARU tool projects the aerial image using a reflective, 30x Schwarzschild objective lens, followed by a 10-200x x-ray zooming tube. The illumination conditions and the imaging etendue are different for the two tools. The benchmarking measurements were used to determine many imaging and performance properties of the tools, including resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), aberration magnitude, aberration field-dependence (including focal-plane tilt), illumination uniformity, line-edge roughness, and flare

  8. Science 101: How Does an Electron Microscope Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion, electron microscopes are not used to look at electrons. They are used to look for structure in things that are too small to observe with an optical microscope, or to obtain images that are magnified much more than is obtainable with an optical microscope. To understand how electron microscopes work, it will help to go…

  9. Miniature self-contained vacuum compatible electronic imaging microscope

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Batson, Phillip J.; Denham, Paul E.; Jones, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    A vacuum compatible CCD-based microscopic camera with an integrated illuminator. The camera can provide video or still feed from the microscope contained within a vacuum chamber. Activation of an optional integral illuminator can provide light to illuminate the microscope subject. The microscope camera comprises a housing with a objective port, modified objective, beam-splitter, CCD camera, and LED illuminator.

  10. Microscopic derivation of particle-based coarse-grained dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Sergei

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we revisit the derivation of equations of motion for coarse-grained (CG) particles from the microscopic Hamiltonian dynamics of the underlying atomistic system in equilibrium. The derivation is based on the projection operator method and time-convolution equation. We demonstrate that due to the energy exchange between CG and intraparticle phase space coordinates in the microscopic system, the choice of projection operator is not unique, leading to different CG equations of motion that have the form of the nonlinear generalized Langevin equation (GLE). We derive the idempotence properties for the projection operators along the system trajectories and show that these properties result in streaming terms of the respective GLEs that are conservative forces and allow the expression of the non-conservative forces explicitly through thermodynamic averages, which can be measured from the microscopic simulations. The difference between GLEs that are presented herein lies in how the non-conservative forces are partitioned into dissipative and projected contributions. We compute the projected force and analyze conditions under which the projected (stochastic) force is orthogonal to (uncorrelated with) the momenta of CG particles, therefore justifying a transition to a framework of stochastic differential equations. We show that a position- and momentum-independent memory function appears only if the projected force is fully decoupled from the past CG positions and momenta, respectively. In the case of non-vanishing correlations between the projected force and the CG coordinates in past times, we derive explicitly the position- and momentum-dependent memory function in a form of projection onto a space spanned by N-order Hermite polynomials. The expressions presented herein can be used to construct a hierarchy of thermodynamically consistent CG models with momentum-dependent memory functions. They can also be used to design computational schemes for obtaining the

  11. Microscopic derivation of particle-based coarse-grained dynamics.

    PubMed

    Izvekov, Sergei

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we revisit the derivation of equations of motion for coarse-grained (CG) particles from the microscopic Hamiltonian dynamics of the underlying atomistic system in equilibrium. The derivation is based on the projection operator method and time-convolution equation. We demonstrate that due to the energy exchange between CG and intraparticle phase space coordinates in the microscopic system, the choice of projection operator is not unique, leading to different CG equations of motion that have the form of the nonlinear generalized Langevin equation (GLE). We derive the idempotence properties for the projection operators along the system trajectories and show that these properties result in streaming terms of the respective GLEs that are conservative forces and allow the expression of the non-conservative forces explicitly through thermodynamic averages, which can be measured from the microscopic simulations. The difference between GLEs that are presented herein lies in how the non-conservative forces are partitioned into dissipative and projected contributions. We compute the projected force and analyze conditions under which the projected (stochastic) force is orthogonal to (uncorrelated with) the momenta of CG particles, therefore justifying a transition to a framework of stochastic differential equations. We show that a position- and momentum-independent memory function appears only if the projected force is fully decoupled from the past CG positions and momenta, respectively. In the case of non-vanishing correlations between the projected force and the CG coordinates in past times, we derive explicitly the position- and momentum-dependent memory function in a form of projection onto a space spanned by N-order Hermite polynomials. The expressions presented herein can be used to construct a hierarchy of thermodynamically consistent CG models with momentum-dependent memory functions. They can also be used to design computational schemes for obtaining the

  12. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    ScienceCinema

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2016-07-12

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  13. Schematic Animation of Phoenix's Microscope Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation

    This animation shows the workings of the microscope station of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    Samples are delivered to the horizontal portion of the sample wheel (yellow) that pokes outside an opening in the box enclosure. The wheel rotates to present the sample to the microscopes. The Optical Microscope (red) can see particles a little smaller than one-tenth the diameter of a human hair. The Atomic Force Microscope (pink) can see particles forty time smaller. The samples are on a variety of substrate surfaces, the small circles on the beveled edge of the sample wheel. For scale, the diameter of the wheel is about 14 centimeters (5.5 inches). Each substrate is a circle 3 millimeters (0.1 inch) in diameter.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOEpatents

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  15. Formative Assessment Probes: Representing Microscopic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    This column focuses on promoting learning through assessment. The author discusses the formative assessment probe "Pond Water," which reveals how elementary children will often apply what they know about animal structures to newly discovered microscopic organisms, connecting their knowledge of the familiar to the unfamiliar through…

  16. Making a Microscope with Readily Available Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Buah-Bassuah, Paul K.; Molesini, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    The making of microscope devices using inexpensive or recovered materials is demonstrated. Examples of images illustrating the performance of such devices are presented. As a project at the undergraduate level, the task is effective in acquiring familiarity with optical imaging concepts and their practical implementation in the laboratory.…

  17. Towards a Microscopic Understanding of Nucleon Polarizabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot

    2016-07-01

    We outline a microscopic framework to calculate nucleon Compton scattering from the level of quarks and gluons within the covariant Faddeev approach. We explain the connection with hadronic expansions of the Compton scattering amplitude and discuss the obstacles in maintaining electromagnetic gauge invariance. Finally we give preliminary results for the nucleon polarizabilities.

  18. Morphology of Microscopic Thin Rubber Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard

    2014-03-01

    Microscopic thin rubber films have been prepared using photolithographic methods. Thin films of low molecular weight polybutadiene have been spun cast on positive photoresists, and transferred to various substrates upon UV exposure for crosslinking and defining the lateral dimension. The morphological scaling of thin rubber films as a function of film dimension and temperature is discussed.

  19. Separation of the Microscopic and Macroscopic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Zandt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the possibility of observing interference in quantum magnification experiments such as the celebrated "Schroedinger cat". Uses the possibility of observing interference for separating the realm of microscopic from macroscopic dynamics; estimates the dividing line to fall at system sizes of about 100 Daltons. (MLH)

  20. Acquisition speed comparison of microscope software programs.

    PubMed

    Biehlmaier, Oliver; Hehl, Joachim; Csucs, Gabor

    2011-06-01

    Reliable software is a prerequisite for successful operation of a modern wide field fluorescence microscope. When used for live cell imaging, acquisition speed is of particular interest. This is both because biological processes can be highly-dynamic, and to avoid unnecessary photobleaching and phototoxicity of living samples. This article shows that besides the hardware (microscope) components themselves, the acquisition control software is an important influencing factor of speed performance. We tested and compared the speed performance of five different generic applications (Image-Pro Plus, MetaMorph, Micro-Manager, SlideBook, and Volocity) using typical experimental setups involving a single specific state-of-the-art fluorescence microscope configuration. The test measurements included multichannel experiments, z-stacking, burst acquisition, as well as combinations of these measurements with time-lapse acquisitions. The measured data provided values for guiding the testing and analysis of other microscope systems with similar configurations. Despite the identical hardware settings, significant and surprisingly large speed differences were evident among the various software applications. Additionally, no application was identifiable as the fastest in all tests. Our work pinpoints the importance of the control software in determining a system's "real" maximal imaging speed. The study could serve as basis for further tests, eventually influencing the system selection criteria for speed-sensitive applications. PMID:21604324

  1. Microscopic Description of Le Chatelier's Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    A simple approach that "demystifies" Le Chatelier's principle (LCP) and simulates students to think about fundamental physical background behind the well-known principles is presented. The approach uses microscopic descriptors of matter like energy levels and populations and does not require any assumption about the fixed amount of substance being…

  2. Reasoning about Magnetism at the Microscopic Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Meng-Fei; Cheng, Yufang; Hung, Shuo-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Based on our experience of teaching physics in middle and senior secondary school, we have found that students have difficulty in reasoning at the microscopic level. Their reasoning is limited to the observational level so they have problems in developing scientific models of magnetism. Here, we suggest several practical activities and the use of…

  3. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  4. SLAC All Access: X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Johanna; Liu, Yijin

    2012-08-14

    SLAC physicists Johanna Nelson and Yijin Liu give a brief overview of the X-ray microscope at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) that is helping improve rechargeable-battery technology by letting researchers peek into the inner workings of batteries as they operate.

  5. The Nucleus and the Simple Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Brian J.

    1982-01-01

    The 150th anniversary of the naming of the nucleus by Robert Brown in 1831 was commemorated by re-creating some of his most important observations using two of his microscopes. Comments on Brown's career and the microtechnique employed during his time are provided. (Author/JN)

  6. The Microscope and Nineteenth Century Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milacek, Barbara Roads

    Studied were (1) the evolving use of the microscope in science education, and (2) its relationship to the changing teaching methods, content, and emphases of science courses and to the prevailing philosophies of education of nineteenth century American colleges. To establish the necessary background, the evolution and availability of the…

  7. Thinking Differentially: A Response to Issues in Differential Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fluke, John D.; Merkel-Holguin, Lisa; Schene, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This is a response to the document by Hughes et al. in this issue that offers a critique of the status of differential response (DR). We find the document to be helpful in intent, but do not find that it reflects scientifically sound methods, and contains many mischaracterizations of the status, impetus, research, and evaluation of DR to date. We…

  8. DIFFERENTIAL ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Sorensen, E.G.; Gordon, C.M.

    1959-02-10

    Improvements in analog eomputing machines of the class capable of evaluating differential equations, commonly termed differential analyzers, are described. In general form, the analyzer embodies a plurality of basic computer mechanisms for performing integration, multiplication, and addition, and means for directing the result of any one operation to another computer mechanism performing a further operation. In the device, numerical quantities are represented by the rotation of shafts, or the electrical equivalent of shafts.

  9. Sexual differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sinisi, A A; Pasquali, D; Notaro, A; Bellastella, A

    2003-01-01

    In humans, like as in other mammals, the gonads, the internal genital ducts, and the external genital structures all develop from bipotential embryologic tissues. Male or female phenotype develops through a cascade of processes which initiate with sex determination and follow with sex differentiation. The karyotype (46, XY or 46, XX) of the embryo (genetic sex) determines whether primordial gonad differentiates into a testis or an ovary, respectively (gonadal differentiation). A Y-related gene, SRY, acts as a switch signal for testis differentiation. Testis development process involves several steps controlled by other non-OY-linked genes, such as Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1), EMX2, LIM1, steroidogenic factor 1(SF-1), SRY box-related gene 9 (SOX9). Since other genes, such as Wnt-4 and DAX-1, are necessary for the initiation of female pathway in sex determination, female development cannot be considered a default process. Hormonal production of differentiated gonads is relevant for differentiation of the internal and external genitalia during fetal life, and for the development of secondary sex characteristics at puberty. Antimullerian hormone (AMH) secreted by Sertoli cells inhibits the development of female internal genitalia (tube, uterus, upper part of vagina); testosterone secreted by Leydig cells induces stabilization of wolffian ducts and development of internal male genitalia. Differentiation of external male genitalia requires the transformation of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone by 5alpha reductase type 2 expressed in genital skin and urogenital sinus. The effects of androgens occur in presence of functional androgen receptor (AR) protein. Mutations of genes coding for steroidogenic enzymes, AMH, AMH receptor, AR and 5alpha reductase are all associated with impairment of sex differentiation and result in genital ambiguity. PMID:12834017

  10. Differential Spectroscopic Imaging of Particulate Explosives Residue

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Ho, Nicolas

    2008-04-01

    We present experimental results showing transmission and reflection imaging of approximately 100 microgram quantities of particulate explosives residue using a commercial uncooled microbolometer infrared camera and CO2 laser differential wavelength illumination.

  11. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  12. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-06-29

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  13. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  14. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-10-27

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  15. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-11-10

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  16. Reflections on Reflective Abstractions in Creative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Leonora Marx

    This report proposes a modification of Jean Piaget's concept of "creative abstraction," the mechanism of creative thought, which develops both intelligence and creative ideas. By reflecting on one's actions and the coordinations of actions, the individual constructs new relationships, links, rules, or correspondences between and among them.…

  17. Local detailed balance: a microscopic derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, M.; Cornu, F.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal contact is the archetype of non-equilibrium processes driven by constant non-equilibrium constraints when the latter are enforced by reservoirs exchanging conserved microscopic quantities. At a mesoscopic scale only the energies of the macroscopic bodies are accessible together with the configurations of the contact system. We consider a class of models where the contact system, as well as macroscopic bodies, have a finite number of possible configurations. The global system, with only discrete degrees of freedom, has no microscopic Hamiltonian dynamics, but it is shown that, if the microscopic dynamics is assumed to be deterministic and ergodic and to conserve energy according to some specific pattern, and if the mesoscopic evolution of the global system is approximated by a Markov process as closely as possible, then the mesoscopic transition rates obey three constraints. In the limit where macroscopic bodies can be considered as reservoirs at thermodynamic equilibrium (but with different intensive parameters), the mesoscopic transition rates turn into transition rates for the contact system and the third constraint becomes local detailed balance; the latter is generically expressed in terms of the microscopic exchange entropy variation, namely the opposite of the variation of the thermodynamic entropy of the reservoir involved in a given microscopic jump of the contact system configuration. For a finite-time evolution after contact has been switched on, we derive a fluctuation relation for the joint probability of the heat amounts received from the various reservoirs. The generalization to systems exchanging energy, volume and matter with several reservoirs, with a possible conservative external force acting on the contact system, is given explicitly.

  18. Ergodicity reflected in macroscopic and microscopic field-dependent behavior of BNT-based relaxors

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Robert; Jo, Wook Rödel, Jürgen; Gobeljic, Danka; Shvartsman, Vladimir V.; Lupascu, Doru C.; Jones, Jacob L.

    2014-02-28

    The effect of heterovalent B-site doping on ergodicity of relaxor ferroelectrics is studied using (1 − y)(0.81Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}-0.19Bi{sub 1/2}K{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3})-yBiZn{sub 1/2}Ti{sub 1/2}O{sub 3} (BNT-BKT-BZT) with y = (0.02;0.03;0.04) as a model system. Both the large- and small-signal parameters are studied as a function of electric field. The crystal structure is assessed by means of neutron diffraction in the initial state and after exposure to a high electric field. In order to measure ferroelastic domain textures, diffraction patterns of the poled samples are collected as a function of sample rotation angle. Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is employed to probe the microstructure for polar regions at a nanoscopic scale. For low electric fields E < 2 kV·mm{sup −1}, large- and small-signal constitutive behavior do not change with composition. At high electric fields, however, drastic differences are observed due to a field-induced phase transition into a long-range ordered state. It is hypothesized that increasing BZT content decreases the degree of non-ergodicity; thus, the formation of long-range order is impeded. It is suggested that frozen and dynamic polar nano regions exist to a different degree, depending on the BZT content. This image is supported by PFM measurements. Moreover, PFM measurements suggest that the relaxation mechanism after removal of the bias field is influenced by surface charges.

  19. Ergodicity reflected in macroscopic and microscopic field-dependent behavior of BNT-based relaxors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmer, Robert; Gobeljic, Danka; Jo, Wook; Shvartsman, Vladimir V.; Lupascu, Doru C.; Jones, Jacob L.; Rödel, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The effect of heterovalent B-site doping on ergodicity of relaxor ferroelectrics is studied using (1 - y)(0.81Bi1/2Na1/2TiO3-0.19Bi1/2K1/2TiO3)-yBiZn1/2Ti1/2O3 (BNT-BKT-BZT) with y = {0.02;0.03;0.04} as a model system. Both the large- and small-signal parameters are studied as a function of electric field. The crystal structure is assessed by means of neutron diffraction in the initial state and after exposure to a high electric field. In order to measure ferroelastic domain textures, diffraction patterns of the poled samples are collected as a function of sample rotation angle. Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is employed to probe the microstructure for polar regions at a nanoscopic scale. For low electric fields E < 2 kV.mm-1, large- and small-signal constitutive behavior do not change with composition. At high electric fields, however, drastic differences are observed due to a field-induced phase transition into a long-range ordered state. It is hypothesized that increasing BZT content decreases the degree of non-ergodicity; thus, the formation of long-range order is impeded. It is suggested that frozen and dynamic polar nano regions exist to a different degree, depending on the BZT content. This image is supported by PFM measurements. Moreover, PFM measurements suggest that the relaxation mechanism after removal of the bias field is influenced by surface charges.

  20. Optimal detection pinhole for lowering speckle noise while maintaining adequate optical sectioning in confocal reflectance microscopes.

    PubMed

    Glazowski, Christopher; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-08-01

    Coherent speckle influences the resulting image when narrow spectral line-width and single spatial mode illumination are used, though these are the same light-source properties that provide the best radiance-to-cost ratio. However, a suitable size of the detection pinhole can be chosen to maintain adequate optical sectioning while making the probability density of the speckle noise more normal and reducing its effect. The result is a qualitatively better image with improved contrast, which is easier to read. With theoretical statistics and experimental results, we show that the detection pinhole size is a fundamental parameter for designing imaging systems for use in turbid media.

  1. Dual-mode optical microscope based on single-pixel imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate an inverted microscope that can image specimens in both reflection and transmission modes simultaneously with a single light source. The microscope utilizes a digital micromirror device (DMD) for patterned illumination altogether with two single-pixel photosensors for efficient light detection. The system, a scan-less device with no moving parts, works by sequential projection of a set of binary intensity patterns onto the sample that are codified onto a modified commercial DMD. Data to be displayed are geometrically transformed before written into a memory cell to cancel optical artifacts coming from the diamond-like shaped structure of the micromirror array. The 24-bit color depth of the display is fully exploited to increase the frame rate by a factor of 24, which makes the technique practicable for real samples. Our commercial DMD-based LED-illumination is cost effective and can be easily coupled as an add-on module for already existing inverted microscopes. The reflection and transmission information provided by our dual microscope complement each other and can be useful for imaging non-uniform samples and to prevent self-shadowing effects.

  2. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, I.J.; Wendt, J.R.

    1994-09-06

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors. 8 figs.

  3. Tandem resonator reflectance modulator

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, Ian J.; Wendt, Joel R.

    1994-01-01

    A wide band optical modulator is grown on a substrate as tandem Fabry-Perot resonators including three mirrors spaced by two cavities. The absorption of one cavity is changed relative to the absorption of the other cavity by an applied electric field, to cause a change in total reflected light, as light reflecting from the outer mirrors is in phase and light reflecting from the inner mirror is out of phase with light from the outer mirrors.

  4. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  5. Neutron reflecting supermirror structure

    DOEpatents

    Wood, James L.

    1992-01-01

    An improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure comprising a plurality of stacked sets of bilayers of neutron reflecting materials. The improved neutron reflecting supermirror structure is adapted to provide extremely good performance at high incidence angles, i.e. up to four time the critical angle of standard neutron mirror structures. The reflection of neutrons striking the supermirror structure at a high critical angle provides enhanced neutron throughput, and hence more efficient and economical use of neutron sources. One layer of each set of bilayers consist of titanium, and the second layer of each set of bilayers consist of an alloy of nickel with carbon interstitially present in the nickel alloy.

  6. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system.

    PubMed

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-02-21

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions. PMID:24357901

  7. Dynamic phase imaging utilizing a 4-dimensional microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creath, Katherine

    2011-03-01

    This paper describes a new, novel interference Linnik microscope system and presents images and data of live biological samples. The specially designed optical system enables instantaneous 4-dimensional video measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without the need for contrast agents. This "label-free", vibration insensitive imaging system enables measurement of biological objects in reflection using harmless light levels with a variety of magnifications and wavelengths with fields of view from several hundred microns up to a millimeter. At the core of the instrument is a phase measurement camera (PMC) enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns utilizing a pixelated phase mask taking advantage of the polarization properties of light. Utilizing this technology enables the creation of phase image movies in real time at video rates so that dynamic motions and volumetric changes can be tracked. Objects are placed on a reflective surface in liquid under a coverslip. Phase values are converted to optical thickness data enabling volumetric, motion and morphological studies. Data from a number of different organisms such as flagellates and rotifers will be presented, as will measurements of human breast cancer cells with the addition of various agents that break down the cells. These data highlight examples of monitoring different biological processes and motions.

  8. Microscopic anthropogenic litter in terrestrial birds from Shanghai, China: Not only plastics but also natural fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiye; Zhu, Lixin; Li, Daoji

    2016-04-15

    The level of contamination by microscopic anthropogenic litter (0.5-5mm) in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood. After chemical digestion in 10% KOH, microscopic anthropogenic litter from the gastrointestinal tracts of 17 terrestrial birds was identified and categorized under a stereomicroscope based on its physical properties and melting tests. In total, 364 items from 16 birds were identified as microscopic anthropogenic litter, ranging in size from 0.5 to 8.5mm. No relationship between plastic load and body condition was found. Natural fibers, plastic fibers and fragmented plastics represented, respectively, 37.4% (136 items), 54.9% (200 items) and 7.7% (28 items) of total litter items. Small sample sizes limited our ability to draw strong conclusions about the metabolism of natural fibers, but the decline in the proportion of natural fibers from the esophagus to stomach to intestine suggested that they may be digestible. Particles smaller than 5mm represented more than 90% of the total number of pollutant items. Particles with colors in the mid-tones and fibrous shapes were overwhelmingly common particles. The results reflect pollution by microscopic anthropogenic litter in the terrestrial ecosystem of the study area. Microscopic natural fibers, which may disperse and adsorb chemical pollutants differently from microplastic and may pose an even greater risk, are in urgent need of further research.

  9. Microscopic anthropogenic litter in terrestrial birds from Shanghai, China: Not only plastics but also natural fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiye; Zhu, Lixin; Li, Daoji

    2016-04-15

    The level of contamination by microscopic anthropogenic litter (0.5-5mm) in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood. After chemical digestion in 10% KOH, microscopic anthropogenic litter from the gastrointestinal tracts of 17 terrestrial birds was identified and categorized under a stereomicroscope based on its physical properties and melting tests. In total, 364 items from 16 birds were identified as microscopic anthropogenic litter, ranging in size from 0.5 to 8.5mm. No relationship between plastic load and body condition was found. Natural fibers, plastic fibers and fragmented plastics represented, respectively, 37.4% (136 items), 54.9% (200 items) and 7.7% (28 items) of total litter items. Small sample sizes limited our ability to draw strong conclusions about the metabolism of natural fibers, but the decline in the proportion of natural fibers from the esophagus to stomach to intestine suggested that they may be digestible. Particles smaller than 5mm represented more than 90% of the total number of pollutant items. Particles with colors in the mid-tones and fibrous shapes were overwhelmingly common particles. The results reflect pollution by microscopic anthropogenic litter in the terrestrial ecosystem of the study area. Microscopic natural fibers, which may disperse and adsorb chemical pollutants differently from microplastic and may pose an even greater risk, are in urgent need of further research. PMID:26874248

  10. Optical Analysis of an Ultra-High resolution Two-Mirror Soft X-Ray Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shealy, David L.; Wang, Cheng; Hoover, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    This work has summarized for a Schwarzschild microscope some relationships between numerical aperture (NA), magnification, diameter of the primary mirror, radius of curvature of the secondary mirror, and the total length of the microscope. To achieve resolutions better than a spherical Schwarzschild microscope of 3.3 Lambda for a perfectly aligned and fabricated system. it is necessary to use aspherical surfaces to control higher-order aberrations. For an NA of 0.35, the aspherical Head microscope provides diffraction limited resolution of 1.4 Lambda where the aspherical surfaces differ from the best fit spherical surface by approximately 1 micrometer. However, the angle of incidence varies significantly over the primary and the secondary mirrors, which will require graded multilayer coatings to operate near peak reflectivities. For higher numerical apertures, the variation of the angle of incidence over the secondary mirror surface becomes a serious problem which must be solved before multilayer coatings can be used for this application. Tolerance analysis of the spherical Schwarzschild microscope has shown that water window operations will require 2-3 times tighter tolerances to achieve a similar performance for operations with 130 A radiation. Surface contour errors have been shown to have a significant impact on the MTF and must be controlled to a peak-to-valley variation of 50-100 A and a frequency of 8 periods over the surface of a mirror.

  11. A scanning acoustic microscope discriminates cancer cells in fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Katsutoshi; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) discriminates lesions in sections by assessing the speed of sound (SOS) or attenuation of sound (AOS) through tissues within a few minutes without staining; however, its clinical use in cytological diagnosis is unknown. We applied a thin layer preparation method to observe benign and malignant effusions using SAM. Although SAM is inferior in detecting nuclear features than light microscopy, it can differentiate malignant from benign cells using the higher SOS and AOS values and large irregular cell clusters that are typical features of carcinomas. Moreover, each single malignant cell exhibits characteristic cytoplasmic features such as a large size, irregular borders and secretory or cytoskeletal content. By adjusting the observation range, malignant cells are differentiated from benign cells easily using SAM. Subtle changes in the functional and structural heterogeneity of tumour cells were pursuable with a different digital data of SAM. SAM can be a useful tool for screening malignant cells in effusions before light microscopic observation. Higher AOS values in malignant cells compared with those of benign cells support the feasibility of a novel sonodynamic therapy for malignant effusions.

  12. Brewster Angle Microscope Investigations of Two Dimensional Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuman, Adam William

    The liquid-liquid interface is investigated by microscopic and thermodynamic means to image and measure interfacial properties when the system undergoes a two-dimensional (2D) phase transition of a Gibbs monolayer by varying the sample temperature. An in-house Brewster angle microscope (BAM) is constructed to visualize the interface during this transition while a quasi-elastic light scattering technique is used to determine the interfacial tension. These results complement x-ray investigations of the same systems. Evidence of interfacial micro-separated structure, microphases, comes from observations across a hexane-water interface with the inclusion of a long-chain fluorinated alcohol surfactant into the bulk hexane. Microphases take the form of spatially modulated structure to the density of the surfactant as it spans laterally across the interface. The surfactant monolayer exhibits microphase morphology over a range of a couple degrees as the temperature of the system is scanned through the 2D gas-solid phase transition. Microphase structure was observed for heating and cooling the hexane-water system and structural comparisons are given when the temperature step and quench depth of the cooling process is varied. A complete sequence of morphological structure was observed from 2D gas to cluster to labyrinthine stripe to a 2D solid mosaic pattern. Two characteristic length scales emerge giving rise to speculation of an elastic contribution to the standard repulsive and attractive competitive forces stabilizing the microphase. The benefit of BAM to laterally image very thin films across the surface of an interface on the micrometer length scale nicely complements x-ray reflectivity methods that average structural data transverse to the liquid interface on a molecular scale. To properly analyze x-ray reflectivity data, the interface is required to be laterally homogeneous. BAM can sufficiently characterize the interface for this purpose as is done for a Langmuir

  13. Framed, 16-Image, Kirkpatrick-Baez Microscope for Laser-Plasma X-Ray Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, F.J.; Oertel, J.A.; Walsh, P.J.

    2004-10-19

    A framed, 16-image Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) type x-ray microscope has been designed for use in imaging laser-plasma x-ray emission. The reflecting elements are 16 pairs of concave mirrors arranged to reflect and focus x rays emanating from a laser-produced plasma. The resolution of the elements is 3 mm at best focus and is better than 5 mm within a 500-mm diam region. A framing camera will be used in combination with the KB optic to produce 16 gated images over a typical interval of 1.5 ns. The system is designed for use on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser facility.

  14. Massive Particle Reflection from Moving Mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sfarti, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the reflection of massive particles from moving mirrors. The adoption of the formalism based on the energy-momentum allowed us to derive the most general set of formulas, valid for massive and, in the limit, also for massless particles. We show that the momentum change of the reflecting particle always lies along the normal to the mirror, independent of the mirror speed. The subject is interesting not only to physicists designing concentrators for fascicles of massive particles and electron microscopes but also to computer scientists working in raytracing operating in the photon sector. The paper, far from being only theoretical, has profound and novel practical applications in both domains of engineering design and computer science.

  15. Methyl green and nitrotetrazolium blue chloride co-expression in colon tissue: A hyperspectral microscopic imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingli; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Sun, Zhen; Guo, Fangmin; Zhu, Jianzhong

    2014-12-01

    Histological observation of dual-stained colon sections is usually performed by visual observation under a light microscope, or by viewing on a computer screen with the assistance of image processing software in both research and clinical settings. These traditional methods are usually not sufficient to reliably differentiate spatially overlapping chromogens generated by different dyes. Hyperspectral microscopic imaging technology offers a solution for these constraints as the hyperspectral microscopic images contain information that allows differentiation between spatially co-located chromogens with similar but different spectra. In this paper, a hyperspectral microscopic imaging (HMI) system is used to identify methyl green and nitrotetrazolium blue chloride in dual-stained colon sections. Hyperspectral microscopic images are captured and the normalized score algorithm is proposed to identify the stains and generate the co-expression results. Experimental results show that the proposed normalized score algorithm can generate more accurate co-localization results than the spectral angle mapper algorithm. The hyperspectral microscopic imaging technology can enhance the visualization of dual-stained colon sections, improve the contrast and legibility of each stain using their spectral signatures, which is helpful for pathologist performing histological analyses.

  16. Transparencies and Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of perspective, or showing things as the human eye sees them, when creating reflections and transparencies in works of art. Provides examples of artwork using transparency, reflection, and refraction by M. C. Escher, Richard Estes, and Janet Fish to give students an opportunity to learn about these three art techniques. (CMK)

  17. Earth's Reflection: Albedo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillette, Brandon; Hamilton, Cheri

    2011-01-01

    When viewing objects of different colors, you might notice that some appear brighter than others. This is because light is reflected differently from various surfaces, depending on their physical properties. The word "albedo" is used to describe how reflective a surface is. The Earth-atmosphere has a combined albedo of about 30%, a number that is…

  18. Renewable liquid reflection grating

    DOEpatents

    Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Toor, Arthur

    2003-10-07

    A renewable liquid reflection grating. Electrodes are operatively connected to a conducting liquid in an arrangement that produces a reflection grating and driven by a current with a resonance frequency. In another embodiment, the electrodes create the grating by a resonant electrostatic force acting on a dielectric liquid.

  19. Atomic force microscopy of Precambrian microscopic fossils.

    PubMed

    Kempe, André; Schopf, J William; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Heckl, Wolfgang M

    2002-07-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique used routinely in material science to image substances at a submicron (including nm) scale. We apply this technique to analysis of the fine structure of organic-walled Precambrian fossils, microscopic sphaeromorph acritarchs (cysts of planktonic unicellular protists) permineralized in approximately 650-million-year-old cherts of the Chichkan Formation of southern Kazakhstan. AFM images, backed by laser-Raman spectroscopic analysis of individual specimens, demonstrate that the walls of these petrified fossils are composed of stacked arrays of approximately 200-nm-sized angular platelets of polycyclic aromatic kerogen. Together, AFM and laser-Raman spectroscopy provide means by which to elucidate the submicron-scale structure of individual microscopic fossils, investigate the geochemical maturation of ancient organic matter, and, potentially, distinguish true fossils from pseudofossils and probe the mechanisms of fossil preservation by silica permineralization.

  20. Microscopic computation in human brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R

    1995-04-01

    When human psychological performance is viewed in terms of cognitive modules, our species displays remarkable differences in computational power. Algorithmically simple computations are generally difficult to perform, whereas optimal routing or "Traveling Salesman" Problems (TSP) of far greater complexity are solved on an everyday basis. It is argued that even "simple" instances of TSP are not purely Euclidian problems in human computations, but involve emotional, autonomic, and cognitive constraints. They therefore require a level of parallel processing not possible in a macroscopic system to complete the algorithm within a brief period of time. A microscopic neurobiological model emphasizing the computational power of excited atoms within the neuronal membrane is presented as an alternative to classical connectionist approaches. The evolution of the system is viewed in terms of specific natural selection pressures driving satisfying computations toward global optimization. The relationship of microscopic computation to the nature of consciousness is examined, and possible mathematical models as a basis for simulation studies are briefly discussed.

  1. Hardware for digitally controlled scanned probe microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. M.; Baselt, D. R.; Spence, C. F.; Youngquist, M. G.; Baldeschwieler, J. D.

    1992-10-01

    The design and implementation of a flexible and modular digital control and data acquisition system for scanned probe microscopes (SPMs) is presented. The measured performance of the system shows it to be capable of 14-bit data acquisition at a 100-kHz rate and a full 18-bit output resolution resulting in less than 0.02-Å rms position noise while maintaining a scan range in excess of 1 μm in both the X and Y dimensions. This level of performance achieves the goal of making the noise of the microscope control system an insignificant factor for most experiments. The adaptation of the system to various types of SPM experiments is discussed. Advances in audio electronics and digital signal processors have made the construction of such high performance systems possible at low cost.

  2. Salient region detection for phytoplankton microscopic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jingjing; Ji, Guangrong; Zheng, Haiyong; Yu, Kun; Lu, Hongguang

    2013-07-01

    IG method is an excellent salient region detection method as its good generality and well-defined boundaries. In this paper, an improved method based on IG method is proposed to generate saliency map for phytoplankton microscopic images. This method utilizes the characteristics of phytoplankton microscopic images, through Gaussian low-pass filter to reduce high frequency components corresponding to water stains and dust specks. On the basis of luminance and color used in IG method, saturation is added to determine saliency due to that the saturation of background is lower than that of cells. The experimental results show that the proposed method can not only improve visual quality significantly, but also obtain higher precision and better recall rates compared with IG method.

  3. A review of the NRL CARS microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M. D.; Reintjes, J.; Manuccia, T. J.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes a technique that permits molecular specificity in microscopy while retaining good spatial resolution. Specificity is achieved using Raman scattering from characteristic molecular vibrations, and high resolution is obtained by imaging the distribution of visible anti-Stokes radiation. Images have been obtained from a variety of pure organic liquids, from deuterated water in onion-skin cells, deuterated liposomes and other samples. Thermal and dielectric breakdown damage to even fragile biological materials is made negligible by choice of duty cycle and average power. Sample fluorescence is avoided by the choice of anti-Stokes imaging. Imaging through (usually astigmatic) spectrometers is not needed. Deuterium substitution can be used as a general purpose and artifact-free ``stain''. The combination of high spatial resolution, excellent molecular discrimination, and digital image processing (background subtraction) provide the CARS microscope with capabilities not found in any other current microscopic imaging technique.

  4. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; Barnes, C. W.; Bogdanov, A.; Danly, C. R.; Efimov, S.; Endres, M.; Fertman, A.; Golubev, A. A.; et al

    2016-02-18

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5–4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This study describes the PRIOR setup as well asmore » the results of the first static and dynamic protonradiography experiments performed at GSI.« less

  5. Development of a transmission positron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuya, M.; Jinno, S.; Ootsuka, T.; Inoue, M.; Kurihara, T.; Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Fujinami, M.

    2011-07-01

    A practical transmission positron microscope (TPM) JEM-1011B has been developed to survey differences in the interaction of positron and electron beams with materials, and is installed in the Slow Positron Facility of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The TPM can share positron and electron beams, and can also be used as a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Positron transmission images up to magnification 10,000× (resolution: 50 nm) and positron diffraction patterns up to 044 family were successfully obtained by the TPM comparing them with those of electrons. The differences in material transmittances for both beams have been measured, and can be explained by the calculated results of the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE-2008.

  6. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope.

    PubMed

    Varentsov, D; Antonov, O; Bakhmutova, A; Barnes, C W; Bogdanov, A; Danly, C R; Efimov, S; Endres, M; Fertman, A; Golubev, A A; Hoffmann, D H H; Ionita, B; Kantsyrev, A; Krasik, Ya E; Lang, P M; Lomonosov, I; Mariam, F G; Markov, N; Merrill, F E; Mintsev, V B; Nikolaev, D; Panyushkin, V; Rodionova, M; Schanz, M; Schoenberg, K; Semennikov, A; Shestov, L; Skachkov, V S; Turtikov, V; Udrea, S; Vasylyev, O; Weyrich, K; Wilde, C; Zubareva, A

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5-4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This paper describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic proton radiography experiments performed at GSI. PMID:26931841

  7. Commissioning of the PRIOR proton microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varentsov, D.; Antonov, O.; Bakhmutova, A.; Barnes, C. W.; Bogdanov, A.; Danly, C. R.; Efimov, S.; Endres, M.; Fertman, A.; Golubev, A. A.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Ionita, B.; Kantsyrev, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Lang, P. M.; Lomonosov, I.; Mariam, F. G.; Markov, N.; Merrill, F. E.; Mintsev, V. B.; Nikolaev, D.; Panyushkin, V.; Rodionova, M.; Schanz, M.; Schoenberg, K.; Semennikov, A.; Shestov, L.; Skachkov, V. S.; Turtikov, V.; Udrea, S.; Vasylyev, O.; Weyrich, K.; Wilde, C.; Zubareva, A.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a new high energy proton microscopy facility PRIOR (Proton Microscope for FAIR Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) has been designed, constructed, and successfully commissioned at GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (Darmstadt, Germany). As a result of the experiments with 3.5-4.5 GeV proton beams delivered by the heavy ion synchrotron SIS-18 of GSI, 30 μm spatial and 10 ns temporal resolutions of the proton microscope have been demonstrated. A new pulsed power setup for studying properties of matter under extremes has been developed for the dynamic commissioning of the PRIOR facility. This paper describes the PRIOR setup as well as the results of the first static and dynamic proton radiography experiments performed at GSI.

  8. Microscopic analysis of pear-shaped nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, K.

    2015-10-01

    We analyze the quadrupole-octupole collective states based on the microscopic energy density functional framework. By mapping the deformation constrained self-consistent axially symmetric mean-field energy surfaces onto the equivalent Hamiltonian of the sd f interacting boson model (IBM), that is, onto the energy expectation value in the boson coherent state, the Hamiltonian parameters are determined. The resulting IBM Hamiltonian is used to calculate excitation spectra and transition rates for the positive- and negative-parity collective states in nuclei characteristic for octupole deformation and collectivity. Consistently with the empirical trend, the microscopic calculation based on the systematics of β2 - β3 energy maps, the resulting low-lying negative-parity bands and transition rates show evidence of a shape transition between stable octupole deformation and octupole vibrations characteristic for β3-soft potentials.

  9. A Quantum Gas Microscope for Fermionic Potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheuk, Lawrence; Nichols, Matthew; Okan, Melih; Lawrence, Katherine; Zhang, Hao; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices have enabled experimental studies of quantum many-body physics in Hubbard-type lattice systems in a clean and well-controlled environment. In particular, the advent of quantum gas microscopes has made available new experimental probes ideally suited for observing magnetic order and spatial correlations. In the past year, several groups, including ours, first realized quantum gas microscopes for fermionic atoms. In this talk, we describe our experimental setup, which combines high-resolution imaging with Raman sideband cooling to achieve single-site-resolved fluorescent imaging of fermionic 40 K atoms. We also report on recent progress towards observing quantum phases of the Fermi-Hubbard model with single-site resolution.

  10. Automatic setae segmentation from Chaetoceros microscopic images.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyong; Zhao, Hongmiao; Sun, Xue; Gao, Huihui; Ji, Guangrong

    2014-09-01

    A novel image processing model Grayscale Surface Direction Angle Model (GSDAM) is presented and the algorithm based on GSDAM is developed to segment setae from Chaetoceros microscopic images. The proposed model combines the setae characteristics of the microscopic images with the spatial analysis of image grayscale surface to detect and segment the direction thin and long setae from the low contrast background as well as noise which may make the commonly used segmentation methods invalid. The experimental results show that our algorithm based on GSDAM outperforms the boundary-based and region-based segmentation methods Canny edge detector, iterative threshold selection, Otsu's thresholding, minimum error thresholding, K-means clustering, and marker-controlled watershed on the setae segmentation more accurately and completely. PMID:24913015

  11. Scanning tunneling microscope assembly, reactor, and system

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Feng; Salmeron, Miquel; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-11-18

    An embodiment of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) reactor includes a pressure vessel, an STM assembly, and three spring coupling objects. The pressure vessel includes a sealable port, an interior, and an exterior. An embodiment of an STM system includes a vacuum chamber, an STM reactor, and three springs. The three springs couple the STM reactor to the vacuum chamber and are operable to suspend the scanning tunneling microscope reactor within the interior of the vacuum chamber during operation of the STM reactor. An embodiment of an STM assembly includes a coarse displacement arrangement, a piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement, and a receiver. The piezoelectric fine displacement scanning tube is coupled to the coarse displacement arrangement. The receiver is coupled to the piezoelectric scanning tube and is operable to receive a tip holder, and the tip holder is operable to receive a tip.

  12. Surface conservation laws at microscopically diffuse interfaces.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kevin T; Bazant, Martin Z

    2007-11-01

    In studies of interfaces with dynamic chemical composition, bulk and interfacial quantities are often coupled via surface conservation laws of excess surface quantities. While this approach is easily justified for microscopically sharp interfaces, its applicability in the context of microscopically diffuse interfaces is less theoretically well-established. Furthermore, surface conservation laws (and interfacial models in general) are often derived phenomenologically rather than systematically. In this article, we first provide a mathematically rigorous justification for surface conservation laws at diffuse interfaces based on an asymptotic analysis of transport processes in the boundary layer and derive general formulae for the surface and normal fluxes that appear in surface conservation laws. Next, we use nonequilibrium thermodynamics to formulate surface conservation laws in terms of chemical potentials and provide a method for systematically deriving the structure of the interfacial layer. Finally, we derive surface conservation laws for a few examples from diffusive and electrochemical transport.

  13. Carbon nanotube electron sources for electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Electron sources were made from individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes with closed caps and thoroughly cleaned surfaces. Nanotubes from both chemical vapor deposition growth and arc discharge growth were investigated. These emitters provide a highly stable emission current up to a threshold current of a few microamperes. At too large currents several processes take place such as splitting, breaking and cap closing. The emission process is field emission for a workfunction of 5 eV. The electron optical per-formance is highly beneficial for their use as high-brightness point sources in electron microscopes and advantageous with respect to state-of-the-art electron sources. The life-time is at least two years. We have tested the source successfully in a scanning electron microscope.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of microscopic colitis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Negi, Mariko; Tomii, Syohei; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) designates two types of chronic diarrhea diseases, which are lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The prevalence of microscopic colitis is increasing in both Western and Eastern countries, possibly due to the high incidence of colonoscopic survey in chronic diarrhea patients. Although the overall prognosis of MC patients is mostly good, it should be noted that appropriate diagnosis and choice of treatment is required to assure a good clinical outcome for MC patients. Also, a certain population of MC patients may take a severe and refractory clinical course, and thus require advanced clinical care using medications supported by less evidence. In this review, we would like to feature the essential points regarding the diagnosis of MC, and also describe the current standard of treatments for MC patients. In addition, we would like to add some findings from the national survey and research carried out in Japan, to compare those data with the western countries. PMID:27271790

  15. Scanning electron microscopic autoradiography of lung

    SciTech Connect

    Lauhala, K.E.; Sanders, C.L.; McDonald, K.E.

    1988-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) autoradiography of the lung is being used to determine the distribution of inhaled, alpha particle-emitting, plutonium dioxide particles. SEM autoradiography provides high visual impact views of alpha activity. Particles irradiating the bronchiolar epithelium were detected both on the bronchiolar surface and in peribronchiolar alveoli. The technique is being used to obtain quantitative data on the clearance rates of plutonium particles from bronchi and bronchioles.

  16. Dental anatomy portrayed with microscopic volume investigations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, M A; Schwebel, T; Kriete, A

    1993-01-01

    The clinical treatment of the root canal of teeth--called endodontics--assumes a precise idea of the spatial arrangement of the anatomy of teeth and their inner structure. By using computer-assisted data acquisition from filmed sequences of histologic serial sections and a special kind of magnetic resonance microscope--the Stray Field Imaging (STRAFI)--volume investigations were carried out using special functions of a newly developed 3D software. Possible applications and future perspectives are discussed.

  17. Seamless stitching of tile scan microscope images.

    PubMed

    Legesse, F B; Chernavskaia, O; Heuke, S; Bocklitz, T; Meyer, T; Popp, J; Heintzmann, R

    2015-06-01

    For diagnostic purposes, optical imaging techniques need to obtain high-resolution images of extended biological specimens in reasonable time. The field of view of an objective lens, however, is often smaller than the sample size. To image the whole sample, laser scanning microscopes acquire tile scans that are stitched into larger mosaics. The appearance of such image mosaics is affected by visible edge artefacts that arise from various optical aberrations which manifest in grey level jumps across tile boundaries. In this contribution, a technique for stitching tiles into a seamless mosaic is presented. The stitching algorithm operates by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at corners to a common value. The corrected image mosaics appear to be free from stitching artefacts and are, therefore, suited for further image analysis procedures. The contribution presents a novel method to seamlessly stitch tiles captured by a laser scanning microscope into a large mosaic. The motivation for the work is the failure of currently existing methods for stitching nonlinear, multimodal images captured by our microscopic setups. Our method eliminates the visible edge artefacts that appear between neighbouring tiles by taking into account the overall illumination differences among tiles in such mosaics. The algorithm first corrects the nonuniform brightness that exists within each of the tiles. It then compensates for grey level differences across tile boundaries by equilibrating neighbouring edges and forcing the brightness at the corners to a common value. After these artefacts have been removed further image analysis procedures can be applied on the microscopic images. Even though the solution presented here is tailored for the aforementioned specific case, it could be easily adapted to other contexts where image tiles are assembled into mosaics such as in astronomical or satellite photos.

  18. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  19. Investigation of Fretting by Microscopic Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Douglas

    1951-01-01

    An experimental investigation, using microscopic observation and color motion photomicrographs of the action, was conducted to determine the cause of fretting. Glass and other noncorrosive materials, as well as metals, were used as specimens. A very simple apparatus vibrated convex surfaces in contact with stationary flat surfaces at frequencies of 120 cycles or less than l cycle per second, an amplitude of 0.0001 inch, and load of 0.2 pound.

  20. Microscopic Description of Nuclear Quantum Phase Transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Niksic, T.; Vretenar, D.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Ring, P.

    2007-08-31

    The relativistic mean-field framework, extended to include correlations related to restoration of broken symmetries and to fluctuations of the quadrupole deformation, is applied to a study of shape transitions in Nd isotopes. It is demonstrated that the microscopic self-consistent approach, based on global effective interactions, can describe not only general features of transitions between spherical and deformed nuclei, but also the singular properties of excitation spectra and transition rates at the critical point of quantum shape phase transition.