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Sample records for differentially alter glucose

  1. Duodenal and ileal glucose infusions differentially alter gastrointestinal peptides, appetite response, and food intake: a tube feeding study.

    PubMed

    Poppitt, Sally D; Shin, Hyun Sang; McGill, Anne-Thea; Budgett, Stephanie C; Lo, Kim; Pahl, Malcolm; Duxfield, Janice; Lane, Mark; Ingram, John R

    2017-09-01

    Background: Activation of the ileal brake through the delivery of nutrients into the distal small intestine to promote satiety and suppress food intake provides a new target for weight loss. Evidence is limited, with support from naso-ileal lipid infusion studies.Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate whether glucose infused into the duodenum and ileum differentially alters appetite response, food intake, and secretion of satiety-related gastrointestinal peptides.Design: Fourteen healthy male participants were randomly assigned to a blinded 4-treatment crossover, with each treatment of single-day duration. On the day before the intervention (day 0), a 380-cm multilumen tube (1.75-mm diameter) with independent port access to the duodenum and ileum was inserted, and position was confirmed by X-ray. Subsequently (days 1-4), a standardized breakfast meal was followed midmorning by a 90-min infusion of isotonic glucose (15 g, 235 kJ) or saline to the duodenum or ileum. Appetite ratings were assessed with the use of visual analog scales (VASs), blood samples collected, and ad libitum energy intake (EI) measured at lunch, afternoon snack, and dinner.Results: Thirteen participants completed the 4 infusion days. There was a significant effect of nutrient infused and site (treatment × time, P < 0.05) such that glucose-to-ileum altered VAS-rated fullness, satisfaction, and thoughts of food compared with saline-to-ileum (Tukey's post hoc, P < 0.05); decreased ad libitum EI at lunch compared with glucose-to-duodenum [-22%, -988 ± 379 kJ (mean ± SEM), Tukey's post hoc, P < 0.05]; and increased glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) compared with all other treatments (Tukey's post hoc, P < 0.05).Conclusions: Macronutrient delivery to the proximal and distal small intestine elicits different outcomes. Glucose infusion to the ileum increased GLP-1 and PYY secretion, suppressed aspects of VAS-rated appetite, and decreased ad libitum EI at a

  2. High glucose alters the secretome of mechanically stimulated osteocyte-like cells affecting osteoclast precursor recruitment and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Maycas, Marta; Portolés, María Teresa; Matesanz, María Concepción; Buendía, Irene; Linares, Javier; Feito, María José; Arcos, Daniel; Vallet-Regí, María; Plotkin, Lilian I; Esbrit, Pedro; Gortázar, Arancha R

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) induces bone deterioration, while mechanical stimulation promotes osteocyte-driven bone formation. We aimed to evaluate the interaction of acute exposure (24 h) to high glucose (HG) with both the pro-survival effect conferred to osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells and osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells by mechanical stimulation and the interaction of these cells with osteoclast precursor RAW264.7 cells. We found that 24 h of HG (25 mM) pre-exposure prevented both cell survival and ERK and β-catenin nuclear translocation upon mechanical stimulation by fluid flow (FF) (10 min) in both MLO-Y4 and MC3T3-E1 cells. However, migration of RAW 264.7 cells was inhibited by MLO-Y4 cell-conditioned medium (CM), but not by MC3T3-E1 cell-CM, with HG or FF. This inhibitory effect was associated with consistent changes in VEGF, RANTES, MIP-1α, MIP-1β MCP-1, and GM-CSF in MLO-Y4 cell-CM. RAW264.7 proliferation was inhibited by MLO-Y4 CM under static or HG conditions, but it increased by FF-CM with or without HG. In addition, both FF and HG abrogated the capacity of RAW 264.7 cells to differentiate into osteoclasts, but in a different manner. Thus, HG-CM in static condition allowed formation of osteoclast-like cells, which were unable to resorb hydroxyapatite. In contrast, FF-CM prevented osteoclastogenesis even in HG condition. Moreover, HG did not affect basal RANKL or IL-6 secretion or their inhibition induced by FF in MLO-Y4 cells. In conclusion, this in vitro study demonstrates that HG exerts disparate effects on osteocyte mechanotransduction, and provides a novel mechanism by which DM disturbs skeletal metabolism through altered osteocyte-osteoclast communication. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Moderate amounts of fructose- or glucose-sweetened beverages do not differentially alter metabolic health in male and female adolescents123

    PubMed Central

    Heden, Timothy D; Liu, Ying; Park, Young-Min; Nyhoff, Lauryn M; Winn, Nathan C; Kanaley, Jill A

    2014-01-01

    .05). Conclusions: Moderate amounts of HF- or HG-sweetened beverages for 2 wk did not have differential effects on fasting or postprandial cholesterol, triacylglycerol, glucose, or hepatic insulin clearance in weight-stable, physically active adolescents. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02058914. PMID:25030782

  4. Diabetes and Altered Glucose Metabolism with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Egan, Josephine M.

    2013-01-01

    I. Synopsis Diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance affect a substantial proportion of older adults. While the aging process can be associated with alterations in glucose metabolism, including both relative insulin resistance and islet cell dysfunction, abnormal glucose metabolism is not a necessary component of aging. Instead, older adults with diabetes and altered glucose status likely represent a vulnerable subset of the population at high-risk for complications and adverse geriatric syndromes such as accelerated muscle loss, functional disability, frailty, and early mortality. Goals for treatment of diabetes in the elderly include control of hyperglycemia, prevention and treatment of diabetic complications, avoidance of hypoglycemia and preservation of quality of life. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population with regards to the presence of comorbidities, life expectancy, and functional status, an individualized approach to diabetes management is often appropriate. A growing area of research seeks to explore associations of dysglycemia and insulin resistance with the development of adverse outcomes in the elderly and may ultimately inform guidelines on the use of future glucose-lowering therapies in this population. PMID:23702405

  5. Green tea, black tea, and epigallocatechin modify body composition, improve glucose tolerance, and differentially alter metabolic gene expression in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nora; Bezzina, Rebecca; Hinch, Edward; Lewandowski, Paul A; Cameron-Smith, David; Mathai, Michael L; Jois, Markandeya; Sinclair, Andrew J; Begg, Denovan P; Wark, John D; Weisinger, Harrison S; Weisinger, Richard S

    2009-11-01

    The mechanisms of how tea and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) lower body fat are not completely understood. This study investigated long-term administration of green tea (GT), black tea (BT), or isolated EGCG (1 mg/kg per day) on body composition, glucose tolerance, and gene expression related to energy metabolism and lipid homeostasis; it was hypothesized that all treatments would improve the indicators of metabolic syndrome. Rats were fed a 15% fat diet for 6 months from 4 weeks of age and were supplied GT, BT, EGCG, or water. GT and BT reduced body fat, whereas GT and EGCG increased lean mass. At 16 weeks GT, BT, and EGCG improved glucose tolerance. In the liver, GT and BT increased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis (SREBP-1c, FAS, MCD, ACC) and oxidation (PPAR-alpha, CPT-1, ACO); however, EGCG had no effect. In perirenal fat, genes that mediate adipocyte differentiation were suppressed by GT (Pref-1, C/EBP-beta, and PPAR-gamma) and BT (C/EBP-beta), while decreasing LPL, HSL, and UCP-2 expression; EGCG increased expression of UCP-2 and PPAR-gamma genes. Liver triacylglycerol content was unchanged. The results suggest that GT and BT suppressed adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid uptake into adipose tissue, while increasing fat synthesis and oxidation by the liver, without inducing hepatic fat accumulation. In contrast, EGCG increased markers of thermogenesis and differentiation in adipose tissue, while having no effect on liver or muscle tissues at this dose. These results show novel and separate mechanisms by which tea and EGCG may improve glucose tolerance and support a role for these compounds in obesity prevention.

  6. Altered Brain Glucose Consumption in Cogan's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ruffini, Livia; Ghirardini, Stella; Scarlattei, Maura; Baldari, Giorgio; Cidda, Carla; Gandolfi, Stefano A.; Orsoni, Jelka G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Prospective, controlled cohort study to investigate possible alterations in brain glucose metabolism (CMRglc) in patients with Cogan's syndrome (CS). Patients and Methods. Functional mapping of the CMRglc was obtained by quantitative molecular imaging positron emission tomography, combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). The patients were divided into three clinical groups: typical CS; atypical CS (ACS); autoimmune inner ear disease (AIED). The unmatched control group (CG) consisted of subjects requiring FDG-PET/CT for an extracranial pathology. Statistical mapping searched areas of significant glucose hypometabolism in all the affected patients (DG) and in each clinical subgroup. The results were compared with those of the CG. Results. 44 patients were enrolled (DG) and assigned to the three study groups: 8 patients to the CS group; 21 patients to the ACS group; and 15 to the AIED group. Sixteen subjects formed the CG group. Areas of significant brain glucose hypometabolism were identified in all the study groups, with the largest number and extension in the DG and CS. Conclusions. This study revealed areas of significantly altered CMRglc in patients with CS (any subform) without neurologic complains and normal conventional neuroimaging. Our results suggest that FDG-PET/CT may represent a very useful tool for the global assessment of patients with Cogan's syndrome. PMID:28050276

  7. Proteins altered by elevated levels of palmitate or glucose implicated in impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sol, E-ri M; Hovsepyan, Meri; Bergsten, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by aberrant insulin secretory patterns, where elevated insulin levels at non-stimulatory basal conditions and reduced hormonal levels at stimulatory conditions are major components. To delineate mechanisms responsible for these alterations we cultured INS-1E cells for 48 hours at 20 mM glucose in absence or presence of 0.5 mM palmitate, when stimulatory secretion of insulin was reduced or basal secretion was elevated, respectively. Results After culture, cells were protein profiled by SELDI-TOF-MS and 2D-PAGE. Differentially expressed proteins were discovered and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Complimentary protein profiles were obtained by the two approaches with SELDI-TOF-MS being more efficient in separating proteins in the low molecular range and 2D-PAGE in the high molecular range. Identified proteins included alpha glucosidase, calmodulin, gars, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A3, lon peptidase, nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH) dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase, proteasome p45, rab2, pyruvate kinase and t-complex protein. The observed glucose-induced differential protein expression pattern indicates enhanced glucose metabolism, defense against reactive oxygen species, enhanced protein translation, folding and degradation and decreased insulin granular formation and trafficking. Palmitate-induced changes could be related to altered exocytosis. Conclusion The identified altered proteins indicate mechanism important for altered β-cell function in T2DM. PMID:19607692

  8. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-03-05

    Pentobarbital is a common anesthetic agent used in animal research that is known to alter sympathetic function and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. The in vivo effects of iv pentobarbital on glucose homeostasis were studied in chronically catheterized fasted rats. Whole body glucose kinetics, assessed by the constant iv infusion of (6-/sup 3/H)- and (U-/sup 14/C)-glucose, were determined in all rats in the conscious state. Thereafter, glucose metabolism was followed over the next 4 hr in 3 subgroups of rats; conscious, anesthetized with body temperature maintained, and anesthetized with body temperature not maintained. Hypothermia (a 5/sup 0/C decrease) developed spontaneously in anesthetized rats kept at ambient temperature (22/sup 0/C). No differences were seen in MABP and heart rate between conscious and normothermic anesthetized rats; however, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a decrease in MABP (20%) and heart rate (35%). Likewise, plasma glucose and lactate concentrations, the rate of glucose appearance (Ra), recycling and metabolic clearance (MCR) did not differ between conscious and normothermic anesthetized animals. In contrast, hypothermic anesthetized rats showed a 50% reduction in plasma lactate, a 40% drop in glucose Ra, and a 30-40% decrease in glucose recycling and MCR. Thus, pentobarbital does not appear to alter in vivo glucose kinetics, compared to unanesthetized controls, provided that body temperature is maintained.

  9. Enhanced hypothalamic glucose sensing in obesity: alteration of redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Colombani, Anne-Laure; Carneiro, Lionel; Benani, Alexandre; Galinier, Anne; Jaillard, Tristan; Duparc, Thibaut; Offer, Géraldine; Lorsignol, Anne; Magnan, Christophe; Casteilla, Louis; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2009-10-01

    Recent data demonstrated that glucose sensing in different tissues is initiated by an intracellular redox signaling pathway in physiological conditions. However, the relevance of such a mechanism in metabolic disease is not known. The aim of the present study was to determine whether brain glucose hypersensitivity present in obese Zücker rats is related to an alteration in redox signaling. Brain glucose sensing alteration was investigated in vivo through the evaluation of electrical activity in arcuate nucleus, changes in reactive oxygen species levels, and hypothalamic glucose-induced insulin secretion. In basal conditions, modifications of redox state and mitochondrial functions were assessed through oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, aconitase activities, and mitochondrial respiration. Hypothalamic hypersensitivity to glucose was characterized by enhanced electrical activity of the arcuate nucleus and increased insulin secretion at a low glucose concentration, which does not produce such an effect in normal rats. It was associated with 1) increased reactive oxygen species levels in response to this low glucose load, 2) constitutive oxidized environment coupled with lower antioxidant enzyme activity at both the cellular and mitochondrial level, and 3) overexpression of several mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory chain coupled with a global dysfunction in mitochondrial activity. Moreover, pharmacological restoration of the glutathione hypothalamic redox state by reduced glutathione infusion in the third ventricle fully reversed the cerebral hypersensitivity to glucose. The data demonstrated that obese Zücker rats' impaired hypothalamic regulation in terms of glucose sensing is linked to an abnormal redox signaling, which originates from mitochondria dysfunction.

  10. O-GlcNAcylation: a bridge between glucose and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Shang, Jin; Yao, Yuan; Yin, Xiaohong; Liu, Minghan; Liu, Huan; Zhou, Yue

    2016-05-01

    Glucose is the major energy supply and a critical metabolite for most cells and is especially important when cell is differentiating. High or low concentrations of glucose enhances or inhibits the osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation of cell via the insulin, transforming growth factor-β and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ pathways, among others. New evidence implicates the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway as a mediator of crosstalk between glucose flux, cellular signalling and epigenetic regulation of cell differentiation. Extracellular glucose flux alters intracellular O-GlcNAcylation levels through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. Signalling molecules that are important for cell differentiation, including protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Runx2, CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins, are modified by O-GlcNAcylation. Thus, O-GlcNAcylation markedly alters cell fate during differentiation via the post-transcriptional modification of proteins. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation show complex interactions during cell differentiation: they can either non-competitively occupy different sites on a substrate or competitively occupy a single site or proximal sites. Therefore, the influence of glucose on cell differentiation via O-GlcNAcylation offers a potential target for controlling tissue homoeostasis and regeneration in ageing and disease. Here, we review recent progress establishing an emerging relationship among glucose concentration, O-GlcNAcylation levels and cell differentiation.

  11. A MEMS differential viscometric sensor for affinity glucose detection in continuous glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xian; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann; Cai, Haogang; Song, Bing; Li, Dachao; Accili, Domenico; Leibel, Rudolph; Wang, Qian; Lin, Qiao

    2013-05-01

    Micromachined viscometric affinity glucose sensors have been previously demonstrated using vibrational cantilever and diaphragm. These devices featured a single glucose detection module that determines glucose concentrations through viscosity changes of glucose-sensitive polymer solutions. However, fluctuations in temperature and other environmental parameters might potentially affect the stability and reliability of these devices, creating complexity in their applications in subcutaneously implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). To address these issues, we present a MEMS differential sensor that can effectively reject environmental disturbances while allowing accurate glucose detection. The sensor consists of two magnetically driven vibrating diaphragms situated inside microchambers filled with a boronic-acid based glucose-sensing solution and a reference solution insensitive to glucose. Glucose concentrations can be accurately determined by characteristics of the diaphragm vibration through differential capacitive detection. Our in vitro and preliminary in vivo experimental data demonstrate the potential of this sensor for highly stable subcutaneous CGM applications.

  12. Enhanced Hypothalamic Glucose Sensing in Obesity: Alteration of Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Colombani, Anne-Laure; Carneiro, Lionel; Benani, Alexandre; Galinier, Anne; Jaillard, Tristan; Duparc, Thibaut; Offer, Géraldine; Lorsignol, Anne; Magnan, Christophe; Casteilla, Louis; Pénicaud, Luc; Leloup, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent data demonstrated that glucose sensing in different tissues is initiated by an intracellular redox signaling pathway in physiological conditions. However, the relevance of such a mechanism in metabolic disease is not known. The aim of the present study was to determine whether brain glucose hypersensitivity present in obese Zücker rats is related to an alteration in redox signaling. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Brain glucose sensing alteration was investigated in vivo through the evaluation of electrical activity in arcuate nucleus, changes in reactive oxygen species levels, and hypothalamic glucose-induced insulin secretion. In basal conditions, modifications of redox state and mitochondrial functions were assessed through oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, aconitase activities, and mitochondrial respiration. RESULTS Hypothalamic hypersensitivity to glucose was characterized by enhanced electrical activity of the arcuate nucleus and increased insulin secretion at a low glucose concentration, which does not produce such an effect in normal rats. It was associated with 1) increased reactive oxygen species levels in response to this low glucose load, 2) constitutive oxidized environment coupled with lower antioxidant enzyme activity at both the cellular and mitochondrial level, and 3) overexpression of several mitochondrial subunits of the respiratory chain coupled with a global dysfunction in mitochondrial activity. Moreover, pharmacological restoration of the glutathione hypothalamic redox state by reduced glutathione infusion in the third ventricle fully reversed the cerebral hypersensitivity to glucose. CONCLUSIONS The data demonstrated that obese Zücker rats' impaired hypothalamic regulation in terms of glucose sensing is linked to an abnormal redox signaling, which originates from mitochondria dysfunction. PMID:19581415

  13. Alterations in glucose kinetics induced by pentobarbital anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Bagby, G.J.; Hargrove, D.M.; Hyde, P.M.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-12-01

    Because pentobarbital is often used in investigations related to carbohydrate metabolism, the in vivo effect of this drug on glucose homeostasis was studied. Glucose kinetics assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, were determined in three groups of catheterized fasted rats: conscious, anesthetized and body temperature maintained, and anesthetized but body temperature not maintained. After induction of anesthesia, marked hypothermia developed in rats not provided with external heat. Anesthetized rats that developed hypothermia showed a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (25%) and heart rate (40%). Likewise, the plasma lactate concentration and the rates of glucose appearance, recycling, and metabolic clearance were reduced by 30-50% in the hypothermic anesthetized rats. Changes in whole-body carbohydrate metabolism were prevented when body temperature was maintained. Because plasma pentobarbital levels were similar between the euthermic and hypothermic rats during the first 2 h of the experiment, the rapid reduction in glucose metabolism in this latter group appears related to the decrease in body temperature. The continuous infusion of epinephrine produced alterations in glucose kinetics that were not different between conscious animals and anesthetized rats with body temperature maintained. Thus pentobarbital-anesthetized rats became hypothermic when kept at room temperature and exhibited marked decreases in glucose metabolism. Such changes were absent when body temperature was maintained during anesthesia.

  14. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-09

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage.

  15. Altered glucose tolerance in women with deliberate self-harm.

    PubMed

    Westling, Sofie; Ahrén, Bo; Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Träskman-Bendz, Lil

    2009-07-01

    Disturbances in glucose metabolism are of importance for violent behaviour in men, but studies in women are lacking. We used the 5h-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in this study of 17 female psychiatric patients, selected for violent behaviour directed against themselves (deliberate self-harm) and 17 healthy controls matched for age and BMI. Following OGTT, patients had higher glucose levels at 30 min (p=0.007) and increased glucagon area under the curve (p=0.011). Since a co-morbid eating disorder might affect results, we as a post-hoc analysis subgrouped the patients and found that the increased glucagon levels only were present in patients with an eating disorder. In contrast, those without an eating disorder showed a significantly lower p-glucose nadir (p=0.015) and unaltered glucagon levels compared to controls. There were no significant differences in insulin and C-peptide levels between patients and controls. We conclude that deliberate self-harm in women may be associated with alterations in carbohydrate metabolism in certain groups. Eating disorder is a confounding factor.

  16. PROXIMITY TO DELIVERY ALTERS INSULIN SENSITIVITY AND GLUCOSE METABOLISM IN PREGNANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Musial, Barbara; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Vaughan, Owen R.; Ozanne, Susan E.; Voshol, Peter; Sferruzzi-Perri, Amanda N.; Fowden, Abigail L.

    2016-01-01

    In late pregnancy, maternal insulin resistance occurs to support fetal growth but little is known about insulin-glucose dynamics close to delivery. This study measured insulin sensitivity in mice in late pregnancy, day (D) 16, and near term, D19, (term 20.5D). Non-pregnant (NP) and pregnant mice were assessed for metabolite and hormone concentrations, body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, tissue insulin signalling protein abundance by Western blotting, glucose tolerance and utilisation, and insulin sensitivity using acute insulin administration and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps with 3H-glucose infusion. Whole body insulin resistance occurred in D16 pregnant dams in association with basal hyperinsulinaemia, insulin-resistant endogenous glucose production and downregulation of several proteins in hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin signalling pathways relative to NP and D19 values. Insulin resistance was less pronounced at D19 with restoration of NP insulin concentrations, improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and increased abundance of hepatic insulin signalling proteins. At D16, insulin resistance at whole body, tissue and molecular levels will favour fetal glucose acquisition while improved D19 hepatic insulin sensitivity will conserve glucose for maternal use in anticipation of lactation. Tissue sensitivity to insulin, therefore, alters differentially with proximity to delivery in pregnant mice with implications for human and other species. PMID:26740602

  17. Differential Mueller matrix polarimetry for low concentration of glucose sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Quoc-Hung; Lo, Yu-Lung

    2017-04-01

    A novel of glucose sensing method based on differential Mueller matrix polarimetry is proposed. An analytical model is derived for extracting the optical rotation angle (γ) and degree of depolarization properties (Δ) of glucose sample with scattering affects. The practical feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by the experimental results for the sensitivity of the γ and Δ with the glucose samples with 2% phantom particles. The results show that the extracted valued of γ and Δ vary linearly with the glucose concentration over the measured range of 0 to 100 mg/dl with lowest increment of 20 mg/dl. In general, the proposed technique provides a reliable and simple method for low concentration of glucose sensing.

  18. High glucose repatterns human podocyte energy metabolism during differentiation and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Imasawa, Toshiyuki; Obre, Emilie; Bellance, Nadège; Lavie, Julie; Imasawa, Tomoko; Rigothier, Claire; Delmas, Yahsou; Combe, Christian; Lacombe, Didier; Benard, Giovanni; Claverol, Stéphane; Bonneu, Marc; Rossignol, Rodrigue

    2017-01-01

    Podocytes play a key role in diabetic nephropathy pathogenesis, but alteration of their metabolism remains unknown in human kidney. By using a conditionally differentiating human podocyte cell line, we addressed the functional and molecular changes in podocyte energetics during in vitro development or under high glucose conditions. In 5 mM glucose medium, we observed a stepwise activation of oxidative metabolism during cell differentiation that was characterized by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α)–dependent stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, with concomitant reduction of the glycolytic enzyme content. Conversely, when podocytes were cultured in high glucose (20 mM), stepwise oxidative phosphorylation biogenesis was aborted, and a glycolytic switch occurred, with consecutive lactic acidosis. Expression of the master regulators of oxidative metabolism transcription factor A mitochondrial, PGC-1α, AMPK, and serine–threonine liver kinase B1 was altered by high glucose, as well as their downstream signaling networks. Focused transcriptomics revealed that myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and myogenic factor 5 (MYF5) expression was inhibited by high glucose levels, and endoribonuclease-prepared small interfering RNA–mediated combined inhibition of those transcription factors phenocopied the glycolytic shift that was observed in high glucose conditions. Accordingly, a reduced expression of MEF2C, MYF5, and PGC-1α was found in kidney tissue sections that were obtained from patients with diabetic nephropathy. These findings obtained in human samples demonstrate that MEF2C-MYF5–dependent bioenergetic dedifferentiation occurs in podocytes that are confronted with a high-glucose milieu.—Imasawa, T., Obre, E., Bellance, N., Lavie, J., Imasawa, T., Rigothier, C., Delmas, Y., Combe, C., Lacombe, D., Benard, G., Claverol, S., Bonneu, M., Rossignol, R. High glucose repatterns human podocyte energy

  19. Refeeding after caloric restriction reverses altered liver glucose release.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Rosângela F; Mariano, Isabela R; Stolarz, Isabela C; Pedrosa, Maria Montserrat D

    2017-08-30

    Caloric restriction increases liver glucose release (LGR), but it is not known if this is a permanent condition. To investigate if refeeding after caloric restriction reverses the high LGR. Rats were organised in six-pups litters (GC); 12-pups litters with either 50% caloric restriction from 21 to 80 days of age (GR) or fed at will from 50 to 80 days of age (GRL). Liver perfusion was made at the age of 80 days. LGR was higher in the GR both during basal and adrenaline-stimulated conditions. Refeeding after caloric restriction decreased it to values close to those of GC rats. The altered LGR of GR rats was reversed by refeeding (group GRL). The influence of hypothalamic neuropetides on these hepatic changes is suggested. Enhanced LGR under caloric restriction is not programmed by early feeding; instead, it is determined by the current nutritional conditions.

  20. Fructose Alters Intermediary Metabolism of Glucose in Human Adipocytes and Diverts Glucose to Serine Oxidation in the One–Carbon Cycle Energy Producing Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Boros, László G.; Nolen, Greg T.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Wabitsch, Martin; Beger, Richard D.; Kaput, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Increased consumption of sugar and fructose as sweeteners has resulted in the utilization of fructose as an alternative metabolic fuel that may compete with glucose and alter its metabolism. To explore this, human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes in the presence of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM of fructose added to a medium containing 5 mM of glucose representing the normal blood glucose concentration. Targeted tracer [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose fate association approach was employed to examine the influence of fructose on the intermediary metabolism of glucose. Increasing concentrations of fructose robustly increased the oxidation of [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose to 13CO2 (p < 0.000001). However, glucose-derived 13CO2 negatively correlated with 13C labeled glutamate, 13C palmitate, and M+1 labeled lactate. These are strong markers of limited tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acid synthesis, pentose cycle fluxes, substrate turnover and NAD+/NADP+ or ATP production from glucose via complete oxidation, indicating diminished mitochondrial energy metabolism. Contrarily, a positive correlation was observed between glucose-derived 13CO2 formed and 13C oleate and doses of fructose which indicate the elongation and desaturation of palmitate to oleate for storage. Collectively, these results suggest that fructose preferentially drives glucose through serine oxidation glycine cleavage (SOGC pathway) one-carbon cycle for NAD+/NADP+ production that is utilized in fructose-induced lipogenesis and storage in adipocytes. PMID:26087138

  1. Fructose Alters Intermediary Metabolism of Glucose in Human Adipocytes and Diverts Glucose to Serine Oxidation in the One-Carbon Cycle Energy Producing Pathway.

    PubMed

    Varma, Vijayalakshmi; Boros, László G; Nolen, Greg T; Chang, Ching-Wei; Wabitsch, Martin; Beger, Richard D; Kaput, Jim

    2015-06-16

    Increased consumption of sugar and fructose as sweeteners has resulted in the utilization of fructose as an alternative metabolic fuel that may compete with glucose and alter its metabolism. To explore this, human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) preadipocytes were differentiated to adipocytes in the presence of 0, 1, 2.5, 5 or 10 mM of fructose added to a medium containing 5 mM of glucose representing the normal blood glucose concentration. Targeted tracer [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose fate association approach was employed to examine the influence of fructose on the intermediary metabolism of glucose. Increasing concentrations of fructose robustly increased the oxidation of [1,2-13C2]-d-glucose to 13CO2 (p < 0.000001). However, glucose-derived 13CO2 negatively correlated with 13C labeled glutamate, 13C palmitate, and M+1 labeled lactate. These are strong markers of limited tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, fatty acid synthesis, pentose cycle fluxes, substrate turnover and NAD+/NADP+ or ATP production from glucose via complete oxidation, indicating diminished mitochondrial energy metabolism. Contrarily, a positive correlation was observed between glucose-derived 13CO2 formed and 13C oleate and doses of fructose which indicate the elongation and desaturation of palmitate to oleate for storage. Collectively, these results suggest that fructose preferentially drives glucose through serine oxidation glycine cleavage (SOGC pathway) one-carbon cycle for NAD+/NADP+ production that is utilized in fructose-induced lipogenesis and storage in adipocytes.

  2. Chlorogenic acid differentially affects postprandial glucose and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide response in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A; Hittel, Dustin S; Shearer, Jane

    2011-10-01

    Regular coffee consumption significantly lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Coffee contains thousands of compounds; however, the specific component(s) responsible for this reduced risk is unknown. Chlorogenic acids (CGA) found in brewed coffee inhibit intestinal glucose uptake in vitro. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms by which CGA acts to mediate blood glucose response in vivo. Conscious, unrestrained, male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically catheterized and gavage-fed a standardized meal (59% carbohydrate, 25% fat, 12% protein), administered with or without CGA (120 mg·kg(-1)), in a randomized crossover design separated by a 3-day washout period. Acetaminophen was co-administered to assess the effects of CGA on gastric emptying. The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) were measured. GLP-1 response in the presence of glucose and CGA was further examined, using the human colon cell line NCI-H716. Total area under the curve (AUC) for blood glucose was significantly attenuated in rats fed CGA (p < 0.05). Despite this, no differences in plasma insulin or nonesterified fatty acids were observed, and gastric emptying was not altered. Plasma GIP response was blunted in rats fed CGA, with a lower peak concentration and AUC up to 180 min postprandially (p < 0.05). There were no changes in GLP-1 secretion in either the in vivo or in vitro study. In conclusion, CGA treatment resulted in beneficial effects on blood glucose response, with alterations seen in GIP concentrations. Given the widespread consumption and availability of coffee, CGA may be a viable prevention tool for T2D.

  3. Folic acid supplementation affects apoptosis and differentiation of embryonic neural stem cells exposed to high glucose.

    PubMed

    Jia, De-yong; Liu, Hui-juan; Wang, Fu-wu; Liu, Shang-ming; Ling, Eng-Ang; Liu, Kai; Hao, Ai-jun

    2008-07-25

    Folic acid (FA) supplementation has been shown to be extremely effective in reducing the occurrence of neural tube defects (NTDs), one of the most common birth defects associated with diabetic pregnancy. However, the antiteratogenic mechanism of FA in diabetes-induced NTDs is unclear. This study investigated the neuroprotective mechanism of FA in neural stem cells (NSCs) exposed to high glucose in vitro. The undifferentiated or differentiated NSCs were cultured in normal D-glucose concentration (NG) or high D-glucose concentration (HG) with or without FA. FA supplementation significantly decreased apoptosis induced by HG and lowered the expression of p53 in the nucleus of undifferentiated NSCs exposed to HG. Administration of FA in differentiated NSCs did not alter their precocious differentiation induced by HG. The increased mRNA expression levels of the basic helix-loop-helix factors including Neurog1, Neurog2, NeuroD2, Mash1, Id1, Id2, and Hes5 in the presence of HG were not significantly affected by FA. The present results provided a cellular mechanism by which FA supplementation may have a potential role in prevention of NTDs in diabetic pregnancies. On the other hand, FA increased the mRNA expression levels of the above transcription factors and accelerated the differentiation of NSCs in the NG medium, suggesting that it may adversely affect the normal differentiation of NSCs. Therefore, the timing and dose of FA would be critical factors in considering FA supplementation in normal maternal pregnancy.

  4. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  5. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed.

  6. Antidepressant phenelzine alters differentiation of cultured human and mouse preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chiche, Françoise; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Chétrite, Gérard; Lasnier, Françoise; Dugail, Isabelle; Carpéné, Christian; Moldes, Marthe; Fève, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    Change in body weight is a frequent side effect of antidepressants and is considered to be mediated by central effects on food intake and energy expenditure. The antidepressant phenelzine (Nardil) potently inhibits both monoamine oxidase and semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase activities, two enzymes that are highly expressed in adipose tissue, raising the possibility that it could directly alter adipocyte biology. Treatment with this compound is rather associated with weight gain. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of phenelzine on differentiation and metabolism of cultured human and mouse preadipocytes and to characterize the mechanisms involved in these effects. In all preadipocyte models, phenelzine induced a time- and dose-dependent reduction in differentiation and triglyceride accumulation. Modulation of lipolysis or glucose transport was not involved in phenelzine action. This effect was supported by the reduced expression in the key adipogenic transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-alpha, which was observed only at the highest drug concentrations (30-100 microM). The PPAR-gamma agonists thiazolidinediones did not reverse phenelzine effects. By contrast, the reduction in both cell triglycerides and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) was detectable at lower phenelzine concentrations (1-10 microM). Phenelzine effect on triglyceride content was prevented by providing free fatty acids to the cells and was partially reversed by overexpression of a dominant-positive form of SREBP-1c, showing the privileged targeting of the lipogenic pathway. When considered together, these findings demonstrate that an antidepressant directly and potently inhibits adipocyte lipid storage and differentiation, which could contribute to psychotropic drug side effects on energy homeostasis.

  7. Olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect glucose uptake and energy metabolism in human mononuclear blood cells.

    PubMed

    Stapel, Britta; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Scherr, Michaela; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge; Kahl, Kai G

    2017-05-01

    The use of antipsychotics carries the risk of metabolic side effects, such as weight gain and new onset type-2 diabetes mellitus. The mechanisms of the observed metabolic alterations are not fully understood. We compared the effects of two atypical antipsychotics, one known to favor weight gain (olanzapine), the other not (aripiprazole), on glucose metabolism. Primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated and stimulated with olanzapine or aripiprazole for 72 h. Cellular glucose uptake was analyzed in vitro by 18F-FDG uptake. Further measurements comprised mRNA expression of glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 and 3, GLUT1 protein expression, DNA methylation of GLUT1 promoter region, and proteins involved in downstream glucometabolic processes. We observed a 2-fold increase in glucose uptake after stimulation with aripiprazole. In contrast, olanzapine stimulation decreased glucose uptake by 40%, accompanied by downregulation of the cellular energy sensor AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK). GLUT1 protein expression increased, GLUT1 mRNA expression decreased, and GLUT1 promoter was hypermethylated with both antipsychotics. Pyruvat-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex activity decreased with olanzapine only. Our findings suggest that the atypical antipsychotics olanzapine and aripiprazole differentially affect energy metabolism in PBMC. The observed decrease in glucose uptake in olanzapine stimulated PBMC, accompanied by decreased PDH point to a worsening in cellular energy metabolism not compensated by AMKP upregulation. In contrast, aripiprazole stimulation lead to increased glucose uptake, while not affecting PDH complex expression. The observed differences may be involved in the different metabolic profiles observed in aripiprazole and olanzapine treated patients.

  8. Molecules Implicated in Glucose Homeostasis are Differentially Expressed in the Trachea of Lean and Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Merigo, F.; Boschi, F.; Lasconi, C.; Benati, D.; Sbarbati, A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the processes mediated by the (T1R2/T1R3) glucose/sugar receptor of gustatory cells in the tongue, and hormones like leptin and ghrelin contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Altered plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin are associated with obesity both in humans and rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the ultrastructure of the mucosa, and the expression of molecules implicated in the regulation of glucose homeostasis (GLUT2, SGLT1, T1R3, ghrelin and its receptor) in the trachea of an animal model of obesity (Zucker rats). We found that the tracheal epithelium of obese animals was characterized by the presence of poorly differentiated cells. Ciliated and secretory cells were the cell lineages with greatest loss of differentiation. Severe epithelial alterations were associated with marked deposit of extracellular matrix in the lamina propria. The expression pattern of GLUT2 and SGLT1 glucose transporters was similar in the trachea of both the Zucker rat genotypes, whereas that of T1R3 was reduced in ciliated cells of obese rats. A different immunolocalization for ghrelin was also found in the trachea of obese rats. In conclusion, the tracheal morphological alterations in obese animals seem to compromise the expression of molecules involved in the homeostasis of glucose. PMID:26972710

  9. Molecules implicated in glucose homeostasis are differentially expressed in the trachea of lean and obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Merigo, F; Boschi, F; Lasconi, C; Benati, D; Sbarbati, A

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies indicate that the processes mediated by the (T1R2/T1R3) glucose/sugar receptor of gustatory cells in the tongue, and hormones like leptin and ghrelin contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Altered plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin are associated with obesity both in humans and rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the ultrastructure of the mucosa, and the expression of molecules implicated in the regulation of glucose homeostasis (GLUT2, SGLT1, T1R3, ghrelin and its receptor) in the trachea of an animal model of obesity (Zucker rats). We found that the tracheal epithelium of obese animals was characterized by the presence of poorly differentiated cells. Ciliated and secretory cells were the cell lineages with greatest loss of differentiation. Severe epithelial alterations were associated with marked deposit of extracellular matrix in the lamina propria. The expression pattern of GLUT2 and SGLT1 glucose transporters was similar in the trachea of both the Zucker rat genotypes, whereas that of T1R3 was reduced in ciliated cells of obese rats. A different immunolocalization for ghrelin was also found in the trachea of obese rats. In conclusion, the tracheal morphological alterations in obese animals seem to compromise the expression of molecules involved in the homeostasis of glucose.

  10. Reactive oxygen species in the presence of high glucose alter ureteric bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chen, Yun-Wen; Tran, Stella; Chenier, Isabelle; Hébert, Marie-Josée; Ingelfinger, Julie R

    2007-07-01

    Renal malformations are a major cause of childhood renal failure. During the development of the kidney, ureteric bud (UB) branching morphogenesis is critical for normal nephrogenesis. These studies investigated whether renal UB branching morphogenesis is altered by a high ambient glucose environment and studied underlying mechanism(s). Kidney explants that were isolated from different periods of gestation (embryonic days 12 to 18) from Hoxb7-green fluorescence protein mice were cultured for 24 h in either normal d-glucose (5 mM) or high d-glucose (25 mM) medium with or without various inhibitors. Alterations in renal morphogenesis were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. Paired-homeobox 2 (Pax-2) gene expression was determined by real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistology. The results revealed that high d-glucose (25 mM) specifically stimulates UB branching morphogenesis via Pax-2 gene expression, whereas other glucose analogs, such as d-mannitol, l-glucose, and 2-deoxy-d-glucose, had no effect. The stimulatory effect of high glucose on UB branching was blocked in the presence of catalase and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I, and Akt signaling. Moreover, in in vivo studies, it seems that high glucose induces, via Pax-2 (mainly localized in UB), acceleration of UB branching but not nephron formation. Taken together, these data demonstrate that high glucose alters UB branching morphogenesis. This occurs, at least in part, via reactive oxygen species generation, activation of Akt signaling, and upregulation of Pax-2 gene expression.

  11. Altered glucose kinetics in diabetic rats during Gram-negative infection

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-08-01

    The present study examined the purported exacerbating effect of sepsis on glucose metabolism in diabetes. Diabetes was induced in rats by an intravenous injection of 70 or 45 mg/kg streptozotocin. The higher dose produced severe diabetes, whereas the lower dose of streptozotocin produced a miler, latent diabetes. After a chronic diabetic state had developed for 4 wk, rats had catheters implanted and sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injections of live Escherichia coli. After 24 h of sepsis the blood glucose concentration was unchanged in nondiabetics and latent diabetics, but glucose decreased from 15 to 8 mM in the septic severe diabetic group. This decrease in blood glucose was not accompanied by alterations in the plasma insulin concentration. Glucose turnover, assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, was elevated in the severe diabetic group, compared with either latent diabetics or nondiabetics. Sepsis increased the rate of glucose disappearance in nondiabetic rats but had no effect in either group of diabetic animals. Sepsis also failed to alter the insulinogenic index, used to estimate the insulin secretory capacity, in diabetic rats. Thus the present study suggests that the imposition of nonlethal Gram-negative sepsis on severe diabetic animals does not further impair glucose homeostasis and that the milder latent diabetes was not converted to a more severe diabetic state by the septic challenge.

  12. Altered DNA methylation of glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 4 in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Kai G; Georgi, Karsten; Bleich, Stefan; Muschler, Marc; Hillemacher, Thomas; Hilfiker-Kleinert, Denise; Schweiger, Ulrich; Ding, Xiaoqi; Kotsiari, Alexandra; Frieling, Helge

    2016-05-01

    Alterations in brain glucose metabolism and in peripheral glucose metabolism have frequently been observed in major depressive disorder (MDD). The insulin independent glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) plays a key role in brain metabolism while the insulin-dependent GLUT4 is the major glucose transporter for skeletal and cardiac muscle. We therefore examined methylation of GLUT1 and GLUT4 in fifty-two depressed inpatients and compared data to eighteen healthy comparison subjects. DNA methylation of the core promoter regions of GLUT1 and GLUT4 was assessed by bisulfite sequencing. Further factors determined were fasting glucose, cortisol, insulin, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We found significantly increased methylation of the GLUT1 in depressed inpatients compared to healthy comparison subjects (CG). Further findings comprise increased concentrations of fasting cortisol, glucose, insulin, and increased IL-6 and TNF-α. After six weeks of inpatient treatment, significantly lower GLUT1 methylation was observed in remitted patients compared to non-remitters. GLUT4 methylation was not different between depressed patients and CG, and did not differ between remitted and non-remitted patients. Although preliminary we conclude from our results that the acute phase of major depressive disorder is associated with increased GLUT1 methylation and mild insulin resistance. The successful treatment of depression is associated with normalization of GLUT1 methylation in remitters, indicating that this condition may be reversible. Failure of normalization of GLUT1 methylation in non-remitters may point to a possible role of impeded brain glucose metabolism in the maintenance of MDD.

  13. Differential effect of glucose ingestion on the neural processing of food stimuli in lean and overweight adults.

    PubMed

    Heni, Martin; Kullmann, Stephanie; Ketterer, Caroline; Guthoff, Martina; Bayer, Margarete; Staiger, Harald; Machicao, Fausto; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Preissl, Hubert; Veit, Ralf; Fritsche, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Eating behavior is crucial in the development of obesity and Type 2 diabetes. To further investigate its regulation, we studied the effects of glucose versus water ingestion on the neural processing of visual high and low caloric food cues in 12 lean and 12 overweight subjects by functional magnetic resonance imaging. We found body weight to substantially impact the brain's response to visual food cues after glucose versus water ingestion. Specifically, there was a significant interaction between body weight, condition (water versus glucose), and caloric content of food cues. Although overweight subjects showed a generalized reduced response to food objects in the fusiform gyrus and precuneus, the lean group showed a differential pattern to high versus low caloric foods depending on glucose versus water ingestion. Furthermore, we observed plasma insulin and glucose associated effects. The hypothalamic response to high caloric food cues negatively correlated with changes in blood glucose 30 min after glucose ingestion, while especially brain regions in the prefrontal cortex showed a significant negative relationship with increases in plasma insulin 120 min after glucose ingestion. We conclude that the postprandial neural processing of food cues is highly influenced by body weight especially in visual areas, potentially altering visual attention to food. Furthermore, our results underline that insulin markedly influences prefrontal activity to high caloric food cues after a meal, indicating that postprandial hormones may be potential players in modulating executive control.

  14. High glucose suppresses embryonic stem cell differentiation into neural lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Penghua; Shen, Wei-bin; Reece, E Albert; Chen, Xi; Yang, Peixin

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal neurogenesis occurs during embryonic development in human diabetic pregnancies and in animal models of diabetic embryopathy. Our previous studies in a mouse model of diabetic embryopathy have implicated that high glucose of maternal diabetes delays neurogenesis in the developing neuroepithelium leading to neural tube defects. However, the underlying process in high glucose-impaired neurogenesis is uncharacterized. Neurogenesis from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a valuable model for understanding the abnormal neural lineage development under high glucose conditions. ES cells are commonly generated and maintained in high glucose (approximately 25 mM glucose). Here, the mouse ES cell line, E14, was gradually adapted to and maintained in low glucose (5 mM), and became a glucose responsive E14 (GR-E14) line. High glucose induced the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, CHOP, in GR-E14 cells. Under low glucose conditions, the GR-E14 cells retained their pluripotency and capability to differentiate into neural lineage cells. GR-E14 cell differentiation into neural stem cells (Sox1 and nestin positive cells) was inhibited by high glucose. Neuron (Tuj1 positive cells) and glia (GFAP positive cells) differentiation from GR-E14 cells was also suppressed by high glucose. In addition, high glucose delayed GR-E14 differentiation into neural crest cells by decreasing neural crest markers, paired box 3 (Pax3) and paired box 7 (Pax7). Thus, high glucose impairs ES cell differentiation into neural lineage cells. The low glucose adapted and high glucose responsive GR-E14 cell line is a useful in vitro model for assessing the adverse effect of high glucose on the development of the central nervous system.

  15. GLP-1-induced alterations in the glucose-stimulated insulin secretory dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Brandt, A; Katschinski, M; Arnold, R; Polonsky, K S; Göke, B; Byrne, M M

    2001-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish in normal volunteers the alterations in beta-cell responsiveness to glucose associated with a constant infusion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or a pretreatment infusion for 60 min. A high-dose graded glucose infusion protocol was used to explore the dose-response relationship between glucose and insulin secretion. Studies were performed in 10 normal volunteers, and insulin secretion rates (ISR) were calculated by deconvolution of peripheral C-peptide levels by use of a two-compartmental model that utilized mean kinetic parameters. During the saline study, from 5 to 15 mM glucose, the relationship between glucose and ISR was linear. Constant GLP-1 infusion (0.4 pmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) shifted the dose-response curve to the left, with an increase in the slope of this curve from 5 to 9 mM glucose from 71.0 +/- 12.4 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the saline study to 241.7 +/- 36.6 pmol x min(-1) x mM(-1) during the constant GLP-1 infusion (P < 0.0001). GLP-1 consistently stimulated a >200% increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, maintaining plasma glucose at <10 mM (P < 0.0007). Pretreatment with GLP-1 for 60 min resulted in no significant priming of the beta-cell response to glucose (P = 0.2). Insulin clearance rates were similar in all three studies at corresponding insulin levels. These studies demonstrate that physiological levels of GLP-1 stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion in a linear manner, with a consistent increase in ISR at each 1 mM glucose interval, and that they have no independent effect on insulin clearance and no priming effect on subsequent insulin secretory response to glucose.

  16. Epidemiological evidence of altered cardiac autonomic function in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance but not isolated impaired fasting glucose.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Lin, Thy-Sheng; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Jia-Jin; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2007-10-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is present in diabetes mellitus (DM), but no study is available on alteration in cardiac autonomic function (CAF) across different glycemic statuses including normal glucose tolerance (NGT), isolated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and DM. Our objective was to examine whether CAF is altered in subjects with IGT and isolated IFG. The study was a stratified systematic cluster sampling design within the general community. A total of 1440 subjects were classified as NGT (n = 983), isolated IFG (n = 163), IGT (n = 188), and DM (n = 106). CAF was determined by 1) standard deviation of normal-to-normal (SDNN) or RR interval, power spectrum in low and high frequency (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz; HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz), and LF/HF ratio in supine position for 5 min; 2) ratio between 30th and 15th RR interval after standing from supine position (30/15 ratio); and 3) average heart rate change during breathing of six deep breaths for 1 min (HR(DB)). Univariate analysis showed significant differences in SDNN, 30/15 ratio, HR(DB), HF power, and LF/HF ratio among subjects with NGT, isolated IFG, IGT, and DM. In multivariate analysis, none of the indices of CAF was related to isolated IFG in the reference group of NGT. IGT and DM were negatively associated with 30/15 ratio and HF power but positively associated with LF/HF ratio. In addition, DM was also related to a lower SDNN. DM and IGT subjects had an impaired CAF independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. The risk of altered CAF is not apparent in subjects with isolated IFG.

  17. Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver D.B. Johnson, 1 W.O. Ward, 2 V.L. Bass, 2 M.C.J. Schladweiler, 2A.D. Ledbetter, 2 D. Andrews, and U.P. Kodavanti 2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, Cha...

  18. Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver D.B. Johnson, 1 W.O. Ward, 2 V.L. Bass, 2 M.C.J. Schladweiler, 2A.D. Ledbetter, 2 D. Andrews, and U.P. Kodavanti 2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, Cha...

  19. Chromium supplementation alters the glucose and lipid metabolism of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crossbreed steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brand Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (C...

  20. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 +/- 4 kg) were fed 53 days during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0...

  1. The salivary microbiome is altered in the presence of a high salivary glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Mor-Li; Shi, Ping; Hasturk, Hatice; Yaskell, Tina; Vargas, Jorel; Song, Xiaoqing; Cugini, Maryann; Barake, Roula; Alsmadi, Osama; Al-Mutawa, Sabiha; Ariga, Jitendra; Soparkar, Pramod; Behbehani, Jawad; Behbehani, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    Background Type II diabetes (T2D) has been associated with changes in oral bacterial diversity and frequency. It is not known whether these changes are part of the etiology of T2D, or one of its effects. Methods We measured the glucose concentration, bacterial counts, and relative frequencies of 42 bacterial species in whole saliva samples from 8,173 Kuwaiti adolescents (mean age 10.00 ± 0.67 years) using DNA probe analysis. In addition, clinical data related to obesity, dental caries, and gingivitis were collected. Data were compared between adolescents with high salivary glucose (HSG; glucose concentration ≥ 1.0 mg/d, n = 175) and those with low salivary glucose (LSG, glucose concentration < 0.1 mg/dL n = 2,537). Results HSG was associated with dental caries and gingivitis in the study population. The overall salivary bacterial load in saliva decreased with increasing salivary glucose concentration. Under HSG conditions, the bacterial count for 35 (83%) of 42 species was significantly reduced, and relative bacterial frequencies in 27 species (64%) were altered, as compared with LSG conditions. These alterations were stronger predictors of high salivary glucose than measures of oral disease, obesity, sleep or fitness. Conclusions HSG was associated with a reduction in overall bacterial load and alterations to many relative bacterial frequencies in saliva when compared with LSG in samples from adolescents. We propose that hyperglycemia due to obesity and/or T2D results in HSG and subsequent acidification of the oral environment, leading to a generalized perturbation in the oral microbiome. This suggests a basis for the observation that hyperglycemia is associated with an increased risk of dental erosion, dental caries, and gingivitis. We conclude that HSG in adolescents may be predicted from salivary microbial diversity or frequency, and that the changes in the oral microbial composition seen in adolescents with developing metabolic disease may the consequence

  2. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 knockdown enhances glucose uptake and alters glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Huang, Huijing; Huang, Yi; Wang, Jinli; Yan, Jinhua; Ding, Ling; Zhang, Cuntai; Zhang, Le

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to induce the expression of a variety of antioxidant and detoxification genes. Recently, increasing evidence has revealed roles for Nrf2 in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism; however, the exact functions of Nrf2 in hepatocyte biology are largely unclear. In the current study, the transient knockdown of Nrf2 via siRNA transfection enhanced the glucose uptake of fasting AML12 hepatocytes to 325.3 ± 11.1% ( P < 0.05) of that of untransfected control cells. The impacts of Nrf2 knockdown (NK) on the antioxidant system, inflammatory response, and glucose metabolism were then examined in AML12 cells under both high-glucose (33 mmol/L) and low-glucose (4.5 mmol/L) conditions. NK lowered the gene and protein expression of the anti-oxidases heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 and increased p-eukaryotic initiation factor-2α(S51), p-nuclear factor-κB p65(S276), and its downstream proinflammatory factors, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, at the protein level. NK also altered the protein expression of fibroblast growth factor 21, glucose transporter type 4, insulin-like growth factor 1, forkhead box protein O1, p-AKT(S473), and p-GSK3α/β(Y279/Y216), which are involved in glucose uptake, glycogenesis, and gluconeogenesis in AML12 cells. Our results provide a comprehensive understanding of the central role of Nrf2 in the regulation of glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes, in addition to its classical roles in the regulation of redox signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proinflammatory responses, and support the potential of Nrf2 as a therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and other associated metabolic syndromes. Impact statement Increasing evidence supports the complexity of Nrf2 functions beyond the antioxidant and detoxification response. Previous in

  3. Metabolic alterations in the human erythrocyte produced by increases in glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Susan F.; Morrison, Anthony D.; Clements, Rex S.; Winegrad, Albert I.; Oski, Frank A.

    1971-01-01

    Human erythrocytes incubated in medium containing 50 mM glucose have increased intracellular sorbitol and fructose concentrations as compared with samples incubated with 5 mM glucose. Increased medium glucose concentration did not significantly alter total glucose consumption or lactate production. However, the intracellular lactate:pyruvate ratio rose, the concentrations of fructose diphosphate, and triose phosphates increased, and the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration fell. [14C]O2 production from glucose-1-14C also increased with increased medium glucose concentration. These changes are believed to reflect changes in the redox states of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide/reduced form of diphosphopyridine nucleotide (NAD/NADH) and nicotinamide—adenine dinucleotide phosphate/reduced form of nicotinamide—adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP/NADPH) couples resulting from increased activity of the polyol pathway. Addition of pyruvate to the incubation media prevented these changes. These studies illustrate that an increase in the red cell's normal substrate, glucose, can produce changes in red cell metabolism. PMID:4398937

  4. Altered Brain Response to Drinking Glucose and Fructose in Obese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jastreboff, Ania M; Sinha, Rajita; Arora, Jagriti; Giannini, Cosimo; Kubat, Jessica; Malik, Saima; Van Name, Michelle A; Santoro, Nicola; Savoye, Mary; Duran, Elvira J; Pierpont, Bridget; Cline, Gary; Constable, R Todd; Sherwin, Robert S; Caprio, Sonia

    2016-07-01

    Increased sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has been linked to higher rates of obesity. Using functional MRI, we assessed brain perfusion responses to drinking two commonly consumed monosaccharides, glucose and fructose, in obese and lean adolescents. Marked differences were observed. In response to drinking glucose, obese adolescents exhibited decreased brain perfusion in brain regions involved in executive function (prefrontal cortex [PFC]) and increased perfusion in homeostatic appetite regions of the brain (hypothalamus). Conversely, in response to drinking glucose, lean adolescents demonstrated increased PFC brain perfusion and no change in perfusion in the hypothalamus. In addition, obese adolescents demonstrated attenuated suppression of serum acyl-ghrelin and increased circulating insulin level after glucose ingestion; furthermore, the change in acyl-ghrelin and insulin levels after both glucose and fructose ingestion was associated with increased hypothalamic, thalamic, and hippocampal blood flow in obese relative to lean adolescents. Additionally, in all subjects there was greater perfusion in the ventral striatum with fructose relative to glucose ingestion. Finally, reduced connectivity between executive, homeostatic, and hedonic brain regions was observed in obese adolescents. These data demonstrate that obese adolescents have impaired prefrontal executive control responses to drinking glucose and fructose, while their homeostatic and hedonic responses appear to be heightened. Thus, obesity-related brain adaptations to glucose and fructose consumption in obese adolescents may contribute to excessive consumption of glucose and fructose, thereby promoting further weight gain. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Genetic Alterations in Poorly Differentiated and Undifferentiated Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Paula; Lima, Jorge; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patricia; Vinagre, João; Celestino, Ricardo; Couto, Joana P; Prazeres, Hugo; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2011-01-01

    Thyroid gland presents a wide spectrum of tumours derived from follicular cells that range from well differentiated, papillary and follicular carcinoma (PTC and FTC, respectively), usually carrying a good prognosis, to the clinically aggressive, poorly differentiated (PDTC) and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC). It is usually accepted that PDTC and UTC occur either de novo or progress from a pre-existing well differentiated carcinoma through a multistep process of genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to clonal expansion and neoplastic development. Mutations and epigenetic alterations in PDTC and UTC are far from being totally clarified. Assuming that PDTC and UTC may derive from well differentiated thyroid carcinomas (WDTC), it is expected that some PDTC and UTC would harbour genetic alterations that are typical of PTC and FTC. This is the case for some molecular markers (BRAF and NRAS) that are present in WDTC, PDTC and UTC. Other genes, namely P53, are almost exclusively detected in less differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumours, supporting a diagnosis of PDTC or, much more often, UTC. Thyroid-specific rearrangements RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARγ, on the other hand, are rarely found in PDTC and UTC, suggesting that these genetic alterations do not predispose cells to dedifferentiation. In the present review we have summarized the molecular changes associated with the two most aggressive types of thyroid cancer. PMID:22654560

  6. Experimental type II diabetes and related models of impaired glucose metabolism differentially regulate glucose transporters at the proximal tubule brush border membrane.

    PubMed

    Chichger, Havovi; Cleasby, Mark E; Srai, Surjit K; Unwin, Robert J; Debnam, Edward S; Marks, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? Although SGLT2 inhibitors represent a promising treatment for patients suffering from diabetic nephropathy, the influence of metabolic disruption on the expression and function of glucose transporters is largely unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? In vivo models of metabolic disruption (Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rat and junk-food diet) demonstrate increased expression of SGLT1, SGLT2 and GLUT2 in the proximal tubule brush border. In the type II diabetic model, this is accompanied by increased SGLT- and GLUT-mediated glucose uptake. A fasted model of metabolic disruption (high-fat diet) demonstrated increased GLUT2 expression only. The differential alterations of glucose transporters in response to varying metabolic stress offer insight into the therapeutic value of inhibitors. SGLT2 inhibitors are now in clinical use to reduce hyperglycaemia in type II diabetes. However, renal glucose reabsorption across the brush border membrane (BBM) is not completely understood in diabetes. Increased consumption of a Western diet is strongly linked to type II diabetes. This study aimed to investigate the adaptations that occur in renal glucose transporters in response to experimental models of diet-induced insulin resistance. The study used Goto-Kakizaki type II diabetic rats and normal rats rendered insulin resistant using junk-food or high-fat diets. Levels of protein kinase C-βI (PKC-βI), GLUT2, SGLT1 and SGLT2 were determined by Western blotting of purified renal BBM. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated d-[(3) H]glucose uptake by BBM vesicles was measured in the presence and absence of the SGLT inhibitor phlorizin. GLUT- and SGLT-mediated glucose transport was elevated in type II diabetic rats, accompanied by increased expression of GLUT2, its upstream regulator PKC-βI and SGLT1 protein. Junk-food and high-fat diet feeding also caused higher membrane expression of GLUT2 and its upstream regulator PKC

  7. Opium can differently alter blood glucose, sodium and potassium in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Karam, Gholamreza Asadi; Rashidinejad, Hamid Reza; Aghaee, Mohammad Mehdi; Ahmadi, Jafar; Rahmani, Mohammad Reza; Mahmoodi, Mehdi; Azin, Hosein; Mirzaee, Mohammad Reza; Khaksari, Mohammad

    2008-04-01

    To determine the effects of opium on serum glucose, potassium and sodium in male and female Wistar rat, opium solution (60 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally and the same volume of distilled water was used as control (7 rats in each group). Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 360 minutes after injection from orbit cavity and the values of serum glucose, sodium (Na(+)) and potassium (K(+)) were measured. The data were then analyzed by the repeated measure ANOVA based on sex and case-control group. P < 0.05 considered as significant difference. Serum glucose increased significantly at 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes after opium solution injection, in female rats compared to a control group. However, the male rats had this rise at 30, 60 and 120 minutes after opium solution injection compared to control group. While serum glucose in male rats was significantly higher than females at 30, 60 and 120 minutes, this value was higher in the female rats at 360 minutes. Therefore, serum glucose alterations following opium injection was significantly different in groups and in the sexes at different times. Sodium (Na(+)) rose at 60, 240 and 360 minutes significantly in all rats compared to control group. However, sodium alteration following opium injection was significantly different only between treated and control groups but sex-independent at all times. Potassium (K(+)) increased significantly at 60, 120, 240 and 360 minutes in male rats, compared to a control group. In female rats K(+) significantly raised at 30, 120, 240 and 360 minutes. Therefore, the alteration of K(+) in male and female rats was found time dependent and sex independent. According to our results, opium increased serum glucose in male and female rats differently, and it interferes with metabolic pathways differently on a gender dependent basis. Opium raised serum Na(+) and K(+), thus it interfere with water regulation and blood pressure via different mechanism.

  8. Lipid remodelling and an altered membrane proteome may drive the effects of EPA and DHA treatment on skeletal muscle glucose uptake and protein accretion.

    PubMed

    Jeromson, Stewart; Mackenzie, Ivor; Doherty, Mary K; Whitfield, Phillip D; Bell, Gordon; Dick, James; Shaw, Andy; Rao, Francesco; Ashcroft, Stephen; Philp, Andrew; Galloway, Stuart; Gallagher, Iain; Hamilton, D Lee

    2017-06-27

    In striated muscle, EPA and DHA have differential effects on the metabolism of glucose and differential effects on the metabolism of protein. We have shown that, despite similar incorporation, treatment of C2C12 myotubes (CM) with EPA but not DHA improves glucose uptake and protein accretion. We hypothesized that these differential effects of EPA and DHA may be due to divergent shifts in lipidomic profiles leading to altered proteomic profiles. We therefore carried out an assessment on the impact of treating CM with EPA and DHA on lipidomic and proteomic profiles. FAME analysis revealed that both EPA and DHA led to similar but substantial changes in fatty acid profiles. Global lipidomic analysis showed that EPA and DHA induced large alterations in the cellular lipid profiles and in particular, the phospholipid classes. Subsequent targeted analysis confirmed that the most differentially regulated species were phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines containing long chain fatty acids with 5 (EPA treatment) or 6 (DHA treatment) double bonds. As these are typically membrane associated lipid species we hypothesized that these treatments differentially altered the membrane-associated proteome. SILAC based proteomics of the membrane fraction revealed significant divergence in the effects of EPA and DHA on the membrane associated proteome. We conclude that the EPA specific increase in polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction is associated with an altered membrane associated proteome and these may be critical events in the metabolic remodelling induced by EPA treatment. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism.

  9. The Effects of High Glucose on Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Gestational Tissue-Derived MSCs.

    PubMed

    Hankamolsiri, Weerawan; Manochantr, Sirikul; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Tantikanlayaporn, Duangrat; Tapanadechopone, Pairath; Kheolamai, Pakpoom

    2016-01-01

    Most type 2 diabetic patients are obese who have increased number of visceral adipocytes. Those visceral adipocytes release several factors that enhance insulin resistance making diabetic treatment ineffective. It is known that significant percentages of visceral adipocytes are derived from mesenchymal stem cells and high glucose enhances adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). However, the effect of high glucose on adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow and gestational tissue-derived MSCs is still poorly characterized. This study aims to investigate the effects of high glucose on proliferation as well as adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs derived from bone marrow and several gestational tissues including chorion, placenta, and umbilical cord. We found that high glucose reduced proliferation but enhanced adipogenic differentiation of all MSCs examined. The expression levels of some adipogenic genes were also upregulated when MSCs were cultured in high glucose. Although high glucose transiently downregulated the expression levels of some osteogenic genes examined, its effect on the osteogenic differentiation levels of the MSCs is not clearly demonstrated. The knowledge gained from this study will increase our understanding about the effect of high glucose on adipogenic differentiation of MSCs and might lead to an improvement in the diabetic treatment in the future.

  10. Continuous Monitoring of Glucose in Subcutaneous Tissue Using Microfabricated Differential Affinity Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xian; Leduc, Charles; Ravussin, Yann; Li, Siqi; Davis, Erin; Song, Bing; Wang, Qian; Accili, Domenico; Leibel, Rudolph; Lin, Qiao

    2012-01-01

    Objective We describe miniaturized differential glucose sensors based on affinity binding between glucose and a synthetic polymer. The sensors possess excellent resistance to environmental disturbances and can potentially allow wireless measurements of glucose concentrations within interstitial fluid in subcutaneous tissue for long-term, stable continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Methods The sensors are constructed using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and exploit poly(N-hydroxy-ethyl acrylamide-ran-3-acrylamidophenylboronic acid) (PHEAA-ran-PAAPBA), a glucose-binding polymer with excellent specificity, reversibility, and stability. Two sensing approaches have been investigated, which respectively, use a pair of magnetically actuated diaphragms and perforated electrodes to differentially measure the glucose-binding-induced changes in the viscosity and permittivity of the PHEAA-ran-PAAPBA solution with respect to a reference, glucose-unresponsive polymer solution. Results In vivo characterization of the MEMS affinity sensors were performed by controlling blood glucose concentrations of laboratory mice by exogenous glucose and insulin administration. The sensors experienced an 8–30 min initialization period after implantation and then closely tracked commercial capillary glucose meter readings with time lags ranging from 0–15 min during rapid glucose concentration changes. Clarke error grid plots obtained from sensor calibration suggest that, for the viscometric and dielectric sensors, respectively, approximately 95% (in the hyperglycemic range) and 84% (ranging from hypoglycemic to hyperglycemic glucose concentrations) of measurement points were clinically accurate, while 5% and 16% of the points were clinically acceptable. Conclusions The miniaturized MEMS sensors explore differential measurements of affinity glucose recognition. In vivo testing demonstrated excellent accuracy and stability, suggesting that the devices hold the potential to

  11. Increased maternal nighttime cortisol concentrations in late gestation alter glucose and insulin in the neonatal lamb

    PubMed Central

    Antolic, Andrew; Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E; Richards, Elaine M; Keller-Wood, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that a modest chronic increase in maternal cortisol concentrations impairs maternal glucose metabolism and increases the incidence of perinatal stillbirth. The dramatic outcomes prevented our ability to study the effects of maternal hypercortisolemia on neonatal growth, glucose metabolism, and hypothalamo–pituitary–adrenal axis response. Therefore, we developed a model in which pregnant ewes are infused for 12 h/day at 0.5 mg·kg–1·day–1 from day 115 of gestation until delivery (˜145), elevating nighttime plasma cortisol concentrations. This pattern of elevation of cortisol mimics that in patients with elevated evening cortisol concentrations, as in Cushing’s syndrome or chronic depression. Plasma cortisol, glucose, insulin, and electrolytes were measured during pregnancy and postpartum in control and cortisol-infused ewes and their postnatal lambs for the first 14 days after delivery. Neonatal growth and plasma ACTH, aldosterone, renin activity, and electrolytes, and organ weights at 14 days of age were also measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal plasma cortisol during pregnancy but not postpartum, and did not alter neonatal ACTH or cortisol. Although maternal glucose and insulin concentrations were not changed by the maternal infusion of cortisol, neonatal plasma glucose was increased and plasma insulin was decreased compared to those in the control group. Neonatal ponderal index and kidney weight were reduced, left ventricular wall thickness was increased, and plasma sodium and creatinine were increased after maternal cortisol infusion. These results suggest that excess maternal cortisol concentrations in late gestation alter growth, glucose and insulin regulation, and organ maturation in the neonate. PMID:26371232

  12. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H; Moors, Chantalle C M; Jocken, Johan W E; van der Zijl, Nynke J; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E

    2016-03-14

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [²H₂]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-(13)C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects.

  13. Altered Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Handling in Subjects with Impaired Glucose Tolerance as Compared to Impaired Fasting Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Gijs H.; Moors, Chantalle C. M.; Jocken, Johan W. E.; van der Zijl, Nynke J.; Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Diamant, Michaela; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2016-01-01

    Altered skeletal muscle fatty acid (FA) metabolism contributes to insulin resistance. Here, we compared skeletal muscle FA handling between subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG; n = 12 (7 males)) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT; n = 14 (7 males)) by measuring arterio-venous concentration differences across forearm muscle. [2H2]-palmitate was infused intravenously, labeling circulating endogenous triacylglycerol (TAG) and free fatty acids (FFA), whereas [U-13C]-palmitate was incorporated in a high-fat mixed-meal, labeling chylomicron-TAG. Skeletal muscle biopsies were taken to determine muscle TAG, diacylglycerol (DAG), FFA, and phospholipid content, their fractional synthetic rate (FSR) and degree of saturation, and gene expression. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Net skeletal muscle glucose uptake was lower (p = 0.018) and peripheral insulin sensitivity tended to be reduced (p = 0.064) in IGT as compared to IFG subjects. Furthermore, IGT showed higher skeletal muscle extraction of VLDL-TAG (p = 0.043), higher muscle TAG content (p = 0.025), higher saturation of FFA (p = 0.004), lower saturation of TAG (p = 0.017) and a tendency towards a lower TAG FSR (p = 0.073) and a lower saturation of DAG (p = 0.059) versus IFG individuals. Muscle oxidative gene expression was lower in IGT subjects. In conclusion, increased liver-derived TAG extraction and reduced lipid turnover of saturated FA, rather than DAG content, in skeletal muscle accompany the more pronounced insulin resistance in IGT versus IFG subjects. PMID:26985905

  14. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, B C; Burdick, N C; Rathmann, R J; Carroll, J A; Finck, D N; Jennings, M A; Young, T R; Johnson, B J

    2012-12-01

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed for 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries, Des Moines, IA) would alter glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (Con) or 0.2 mg/kg of Cr to the total diet on a DM basis. Cattle were fitted with jugular catheters on d 52. A glucose tolerance test (GTT) and an insulin sensitivity test (IST) were conducted on d 53. Blood samples were collected from -60 to 150 min relative to each infusion. Serum was isolated to determine glucose, insulin, and NEFA concentrations. Throughout GTT, no differences were detected in glucose concentrations, glucose clearance rates (k), or preinfusion insulin concentrations (P > 0.50), but insulin concentrations postinfusion tended (P = 0.06) to be greater for the Cr-supplemented steers. This caused an increase in the insulin to glucose ratio (I:G) from 0 to 150 min postinfusion for the Cr-supplemented steers (P = 0.03). In addition, NEFA concentrations during GTT were lower (P ≤ 0.01) for Cr-supplemented steers both preinfusion and postinfusion. During IST, there was no treatment effect on glucose concentrations preinfusion (P = 0.38), but postinfusion glucose concentrations were greater (P< 0.01) in the Cr-supplemented steers. The k of Cr-supplemented steers tended (P = 0.06) to be faster than Con steers from 30 to 45 min postinfusion. During the same test, there was no treatment effect detected for insulin concentrations (P > 0.33). The I:G were not affected by treatment (P > 0.40).Concentrations of NEFA were reduced (P < 0.01) both preinfusion and postinfusion during IST for Cr-supplemented steers. Results of this study indicate that supplementation of Cr can significantly alter lipid metabolism. This suggests that these steers had less dependence on lipid metabolism for energy or sensitivity of adipose tissue to antilipolytic signals was

  15. Corticosterone alters materno-fetal glucose partitioning and insulin signalling in pregnant mice.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, O R; Fisher, H M; Dionelis, K N; Jefferies, E C; Higgins, J S; Musial, B; Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Fowden, A L

    2015-03-01

    Glucocorticoids affect glucose metabolism in adults and fetuses, although their effects on materno-fetal glucose partitioning remain unknown. The present study measured maternal hepatic glucose handling and placental glucose transport together with insulin signalling in these tissues in mice drinking corticosterone either from day (D) 11 to D16 or D14 to D19 of pregnancy (term = D21). On the final day of administration, corticosterone-treated mice were hyperinsulinaemic (P < 0.05) but normoglycaemic compared to untreated controls. In maternal liver, there was no change in glycogen content or glucose 6-phosphatase activity but increased Slc2a2 glucose transporter expression in corticosterone-treated mice, on D16 only (P < 0.05). On D19, but not D16, transplacental (3) H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was reduced by 33% in corticosterone-treated dams (P < 0.05). However, when corticosterone-treated animals were pair-fed to control intake, aiming to prevent the corticosterone-induced increase in food consumption, (3) H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was similar to the controls. Depending upon gestational age, corticosterone treatment increased phosphorylation of the insulin-signalling proteins, protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase-kinase 3β, in maternal liver (P < 0.05) but not placenta (P > 0.05). Insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor abundance did not differ with treatment in either tissue. Corticosterone upregulated the stress-inducible mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) suppressor, Redd1, in liver (D16 and D19) and placenta (D19), in ad libitum fed animals (P < 0.05). Concomitantly, hepatic protein content and placental weight were reduced on D19 (P < 0.05), in association with altered abundance and/or phosphorylation of signalling proteins downstream of mTOR. Taken together, the data indicate that maternal glucocorticoid excess reduces fetal growth partially by altering placental glucose transport and mTOR signalling.

  16. Persistent organic pollutants alter DNA methylation during human adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    van den Dungen, Myrthe W; Murk, Albertinka J; Kok, Dieuwertje E; Steegenga, Wilma T

    2017-04-01

    Ubiquitous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) can accumulate in humans where they might influence differentiation of adipocytes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation is one of the underlying mechanisms by which POPs affect adipocyte differentiation, and to what extent DNA methylation can be related to gene transcription. Adipocyte differentiation was induced in two human cell models with continuous exposure to different POPs throughout differentiation. From the seven tested POPs, perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) decreased lipid accumulation, while tributyltin (TBT) increased lipid accumulation. In human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), TCDD and TBT induced opposite gene expression profiles, whereas after PFOS exposure gene expression remained relatively stable. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis showed that all three POPs affected DNA methylation patterns in adipogenic and other genes, possibly related to the phenotypic outcome, but without concomitant gene expression changes. Differential methylation was predominantly detected in intergenic regions, where the biological relevance of alterations in DNA methylation is unclear. This study demonstrates that POPs, at environmentally relevant levels, are able to induce differential DNA methylation in human differentiating adipocytes. Copyright © 2017 Wageningen University. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Alterations of hippocampal glucose metabolism by even versus uneven medium chain triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Tanya S; Tan, Kah Ni; Hodson, Mark P; Borges, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) are used to treat neurologic disorders with metabolic impairments, including childhood epilepsy and early Alzheimer's disease. However, the metabolic effects of MCTs in the brain are still unclear. Here, we studied the effects of feeding even and uneven MCTs on brain glucose metabolism in the mouse. Adult mice were fed 35% (calories) of trioctanoin or triheptanoin (the triglycerides of octanoate or heptanoate, respectively) or a matching control diet for 3 weeks. Enzymatic assays and targeted metabolomics by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry were used to quantify metabolites in extracts from the hippocampal formations (HFs). Both oils increased the levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, but no other significant metabolic alterations were observed after triheptanoin feeding. The levels of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate were increased in the HF of mice fed trioctanoin, whereas levels of metabolites further downstream in the glycolytic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway were reduced. This indicates that trioctanoin reduces glucose utilization because of a decrease in phosphofructokinase activity. Trioctanoin and triheptanoin showed similar anticonvulsant effects in the 6 Hz seizure model, but it remains unknown to what extent the anticonvulsant mechanism(s) are shared. In conclusion, triheptanoin unlike trioctanoin appears to not alter glucose metabolism in the healthy brain. PMID:24169853

  18. High glucose alters tendon homeostasis through downregulation of the AMPK/Egr1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu-Fu; Wang, Hsing-Kuo; Chang, Hong-Wei; Sun, Jingyu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Chao, Yuan-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with higher risk of tendinopathy, which reduces tolerance to exercise and functional activities and affects lifestyle and glycemic control. Expression of tendon-related genes and matrix metabolism in tenocytes are essential for maintaining physiological functions of tendon. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in diabetic tendinopathy remain unclear. We hypothesized that high glucose (HG) alters the characteristics of tenocyte. Using in vitro 2-week culture of tenocytes, we found that expression of tendon-related genes, including Egr1, Mkx, TGF-β1, Col1a2, and Bgn, was significantly decreased in HG culture and that higher glucose consumption occurred. Down-regulation of Egr1 by siRNA decreased Scx, Mkx, TGF-β1, Col1a1, Col1a2, and Bgn expression. Blocking AMPK activation with Compound C reduced the expression of Egr1, Scx, TGF-β1, Col1a1, Col1a2, and Bgn in the low glucose condition. In addition, histological examination of tendons from diabetic mice displayed larger interfibrillar space and uneven glycoprotein deposition. Thus, we concluded that high glucose alters tendon homeostasis through downregulation of the AMPK/Egr1 pathway and the expression of downstream tendon-related genes in tenocytes. The findings render a molecular basis of the mechanism of diabetic tendinopathy and may help develop preventive and therapeutic strategies for the pathology. PMID:28266660

  19. Corticosterone alters materno-fetal glucose partitioning and insulin signalling in pregnant mice

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, O R; Fisher, H M; Dionelis, K N; Jefferies, E C; Higgins, J S; Musial, B; Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Fowden, A L

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids affect glucose metabolism in adults and fetuses, although their effects on materno-fetal glucose partitioning remain unknown. The present study measured maternal hepatic glucose handling and placental glucose transport together with insulin signalling in these tissues in mice drinking corticosterone either from day (D) 11 to D16 or D14 to D19 of pregnancy (term = D21). On the final day of administration, corticosterone-treated mice were hyperinsulinaemic (P < 0.05) but normoglycaemic compared to untreated controls. In maternal liver, there was no change in glycogen content or glucose 6-phosphatase activity but increased Slc2a2 glucose transporter expression in corticosterone-treated mice, on D16 only (P < 0.05). On D19, but not D16, transplacental 3H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was reduced by 33% in corticosterone-treated dams (P < 0.05). However, when corticosterone-treated animals were pair-fed to control intake, aiming to prevent the corticosterone-induced increase in food consumption, 3H-methyl-d-glucose clearance was similar to the controls. Depending upon gestational age, corticosterone treatment increased phosphorylation of the insulin-signalling proteins, protein kinase B (Akt) and glycogen synthase-kinase 3β, in maternal liver (P < 0.05) but not placenta (P > 0.05). Insulin receptor and insulin-like growth factor type I receptor abundance did not differ with treatment in either tissue. Corticosterone upregulated the stress-inducible mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) suppressor, Redd1, in liver (D16 and D19) and placenta (D19), in ad libitum fed animals (P < 0.05). Concomitantly, hepatic protein content and placental weight were reduced on D19 (P < 0.05), in association with altered abundance and/or phosphorylation of signalling proteins downstream of mTOR. Taken together, the data indicate that maternal glucocorticoid excess reduces fetal growth partially by altering placental glucose transport and mTOR signalling. Key

  20. Sortilin 1 knockout alters basal adipose glucose metabolism but not diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jibiao; Matye, David J; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Tiangang

    2017-04-01

    Sortilin 1 (Sort1) is a trafficking receptor that has been implicated in the regulation of plasma cholesterol in humans and mice. Here, we use metabolomics and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp approaches to obtain further understanding of the in vivo effects of Sort1 deletion on diet-induced obesity as well as on adipose lipid and glucose metabolism. Results show that Sort1 knockout (KO) does not affect Western diet-induced obesity nor adipose fatty acid and ceramide concentrations. Under the basal fasting state, chow-fed Sort1 KO mice have decreased adipose glycolytic metabolites, but Sort1 deletion does not affect insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake during the insulin clamp. These results suggest that Sort1 loss-of-function in vivo does not affect obesity development, but differentially modulates adipose glucose metabolism under fasting and insulin-stimulated states. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. Glucose Limitation Alters Glutamine Metabolism in MUC1-Overexpressing Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Gebregiworgis, Teklab; Purohit, Vinee; Shukla, Surendra K; Tadros, Saber; Chaika, Nina V; Abrego, Jaime; Mulder, Scott E; Gunda, Venugopal; Singh, Pankaj K; Powers, Robert

    2017-10-06

    Pancreatic cancer cells overexpressing Mucin 1 (MUC1) rely on aerobic glycolysis and, correspondingly, are dependent on glucose for survival. Our NMR metabolomics comparative analysis of control (S2-013.Neo) and MUC1-overexpressing (S2-013.MUC1) cells demonstrates that MUC1 reprograms glutamine metabolism upon glucose limitation. The observed alteration in glutamine metabolism under glucose limitation was accompanied by a relative decrease in the proliferation of MUC1-overexpressing cells compared with steady-state conditions. Moreover, glucose limitation induces G1 phase arrest where S2-013.MUC1 cells fail to enter S phase and synthesize DNA because of a significant disruption in pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. Our metabolomics analysis indicates that glutamine is the major source of oxaloacetate in S2-013.Neo and S2-013.MUC1 cells, where oxaloacetate is converted to aspartate, an important metabolite for pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. However, glucose limitation impedes the flow of glutamine carbons into the pyrimidine nucleotide rings and instead leads to a significant accumulation of glutamine-derived aspartate in S2-013.MUC1 cells.

  2. Differential expression of the glucose transporters in mouse gustatory papillae.

    PubMed

    Toyono, Takashi; Seta, Yuji; Kataoka, Shinji; Oda, Masafumi; Toyoshima, Kuniaki

    2011-08-01

    Taste receptors and their downstream signaling molecules are activated by sugars and sweeteners in the gut and participate in the regulation of glucose transport into enterocytes. The glucose transporter families GLUT and SGLT are responsible for the absorption of glucose, GLUT4 and SGLT1 being expressed preferentially in T1R3-positive taste cells. However, the expression patterns of the other glucose transporters in mouse gustatory tissues have not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we have examined the expression patterns of the glucose transporters (GLUT1-4 and SGLT1-3) in mouse gustatory tissues. Reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction assays have revealed that GLUT1, 3, and 4 and SGLT1 mRNAs are expressed in the circumvallate papillae. Immunohistochemical analysis has shown that SGLT1 is expressed in a subset of the epithelial cells: from the basal cell layer to the prickle cell layer and in intragemmal and extragemmal epithelium cells in the circumvallate, foliate, and fungiform papillae. GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 are expressed in the prickle cell layers and/or basal cell layers in these papillae. Moreover, GLUT1, but not GLUT3 or GLUT4, is expressed in a subset of intragemmal and extragemmal epithelium cells in these papillae. Double-labeling experiments have demonstrated that GLUT1-positive taste bud cells coexpress gustducin and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type III. These results suggest that SGLT1 and GLUT1 play a role in glucose-sensing and/or transport in mouse taste buds.

  3. Wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry: Theory and experimental applications to glucose detection in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2011-10-01

    A differential photothermal radiometry method, wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR), has been developed theoretically and experimentally for noninvasive, noncontact biological analyte detection, such as blood glucose monitoring. WM-DPTR features analyte specificity and sensitivity by combining laser excitation by two out-of-phase modulated beams at wavelengths near the peak and the base line of a prominent and isolated mid-IR analyte absorption band (here the carbon-oxygen-carbon bond in the pyran ring of the glucose molecule). A theoretical photothermal model of WM-DPTR signal generation and detection has been developed. Simulation results on water-glucose phantoms with the human blood range (0-300 mg/dl) glucose concentration demonstrated high sensitivity and resolution to meet wide clinical detection requirements. The model has also been validated by experimental data of the glucose-water system obtained using WM-DPTR.

  4. Fluoride Alteration of [(3)H]Glucose Uptake in Wistar Rat Brain and Peripheral Tissues.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Anna; Kuter, Katarzyna; Żelazko, Aleksandra; Głogowska-Gruszka, Anna; Świętochowska, Elżbieta; Nowak, Przemysław

    2017-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of postnatal fluoride intake on [3H]glucose uptake and transport in rat brain and peripheral tissues. Sodium fluoride (NaF) in a concentration of 10 or 50 ppm was added to the drinking water of adult Wistar rats. The control group received distilled water. After 4 weeks, respective plasma fluoride levels were 0.0541 ± 0.0135 μg/ml (control), 0.0596 ± 0.0202 μg/ml (10 ppm), and 0.0823 ± 0.0199 μg/ml (50 ppm). Although plasma glucose levels were not altered in any group, the plasma insulin level in the fluoride (50 ppm) group was elevated (0.72 ± 0.13 μg/ml) versus the control group (0.48 ± 0.24 μg/ml) and fluoride (10 ppm) group. In rats receiving fluoride for 4 weeks at 10 ppm in drinking water, [3H]glucose uptake was unaltered in all tested parts of the brain. However, in rats receiving fluoride at 50 ppm, [3H]glucose uptake in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus with hypothalamus was elevated, versus the saline group. Fluoride intake had a negligible effect on [3H]glucose uptake by peripheral tissues (liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, atrium, aorta, kidney, visceral tissue, lung, skin, oral mucosa, tongue, salivary gland, incisor, molars, and jawbone). In neither fluoride group was glucose transporter proteins 1 (GLUT 1) or 3 (GLUT 3) altered in frontal cortex and striatum versus control. On the assumption that increased glucose uptake (by neural tissue) reasonably reflects neuronal activity, it appears that fluoride damage to the brain results in a compensatory increase in glucose uptake and utilization without changes in GLUT 1 and GLUT 3 expression.

  5. Systemic response to thermal injury in rats. Accelerated protein degradation and altered glucose utilization in muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A S; Kelly, R A; Mitch, W E

    1984-01-01

    Negative nitrogen balance and increased oxygen consumption after thermal injury in humans and experimental animals is related to the extent of the burn. To determine whether defective muscle metabolism is restricted to the region of injury, we studied protein and glucose metabolism in forelimb muscles of rats 48 h after a scalding injury of their hindquarters. This injury increased muscle protein degradation (PD) from 140 +/- 5 to 225 +/- 5 nmol tyrosine/g per h, but did not alter protein synthesis. Muscle lactate release was increased greater than 70%, even though plasma catecholamines and muscle cyclic AMP were not increased. Insulin dose-response studies revealed that the burn decreased the responsiveness of muscle glycogen synthesis to insulin but did not alter its sensitivity to insulin. Rates of net glycolysis and glucose oxidation were increased and substrate cycling of fructose-6-phosphate was decreased at all levels of insulin. The burn-induced increase in protein and glucose catabolism was not mediated by adrenal hormones, since they persisted despite adrenalectomy. Muscle PGE2 production was not increased by the burn and inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by indomethacin did not inhibit proteolysis. The increase in PD required lysosomal proteolysis, since inhibition of cathepsin B with EP475 reduced PD. Insulin reduced PD 20% and the effects of EP475 and insulin were additive, reducing PD 41%. An inhibitor of muscle PD, alpha-ketoisocaproate, reduced burn-induced proteolysis 28% and lactate release 56%. The rate of PD in muscle of burned and unburned rats was correlated with the percentage of glucose uptake that was directed into lactate production (r = +0.82, P less than 0.01). Thus, a major thermal injury causes hypercatabolism of protein and glucose in muscle that is distant from the injury, and these responses may be linked to a single metabolic defect. PMID:6470144

  6. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Early advancing age alters plasma glucose and glucoregulatory hormones in response to supramaximal exercise.

    PubMed

    Zouhal, Hassane; Vincent, Sophie; Moussa, Elie; Botcazou, Maïtel; Delamarche, Paul; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette

    2009-11-01

    After the age of 60, the decrease in physical activity and the increase in fat mass (FM) are two essential factors contributing to the alteration of glucose, insulin, and catecholamines responses induced by exercise. To discard these two factors, we compared the glucoregulatory responses in three different groups of men between the ages 21 and 34, and matched pairs: trained groups (T34 and T21) were matched for training level; T21 and U21 (U for untrained) were matched for age; T34 and U21 were matched for FM. The glucoregulatory responses were determined by venous plasma concentrations of glucose ([GLU]), insulin ([INS]), and catecholamines (adrenaline: [A], noradrenaline: [NA]) before and after a Wingate test. [GLU], [INS], and [A] did not differ between T21 and U21, indicating that high-level training had no effects on these parameters. On the other hand, T34 compared to T21 and U21, had higher GLU associated with lower INS post-exercise concentrations. Moreover, [A(max)] was significantly lower in this group. Consequently, T34 only exhibited a significant alteration in glucose and glucoregulatory responses after a Wingate test, which could not be explained by the usual decrease in physical activity and/or the increase in FM. Therefore, aging alone seems to be one main factor of this deterioration.

  8. Overexpression of SIRT1 in Rat Skeletal Muscle Does Not Alter Glucose Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Amanda E.; Tid-Ang, Jennifer; Wright, Lauren E.; Stuart, Ella; Suryana, Eurwin; Bentley, Nicholas; Turner, Nigel; Cooney, Gregory J.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Kraegen, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    SIRT1 is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase thought to regulate cellular metabolic pathways in response to alterations in nutrient flux. In the current study we investigated whether acute changes in SIRT1 expression affect markers of muscle mitochondrial content and also determined whether SIRT1 influenced muscle insulin resistance induced by acute glucose oversupply. In male Wistar rats either SIRT1 or a deacetylase inactive mutant form (H363Y) was electroprated into the tibialis cranialis (TC) muscle. The other leg was electroporated with an empty control vector. One week later, glucose was infused and hyperglycaemia was maintained at ~11mM. After 5 hours, 11mM glucose induced significant insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Interestingly, overexpression of either SIRT1 or SIRT1 (H363Y) for 1 week did not change markers of mitochondrial content or function. SIRT1 or SIRT1 (H363Y) overexpression had no effect on the reduction in glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscle in response to hyperglycemia. Therefore we conclude that acute increases in SIRT1 protein have little impact on mitochondrial content and that overexpressing SIRT1 does not prevent the development of insulin resistance during hyperglycaemia. PMID:25798922

  9. High glucose-induced proteome alterations in hepatocytes and its possible relevance to diabetic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Chen, You-Hsuan; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Hyperglycemia can cause several abnormalities in liver cells, including diabetic liver disease. Previous research has shown that high blood glucose levels can damage liver cells through glycoxidation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of high blood glucose on the development of diabetic liver disease have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we cultured a liver cell line (Chang liver cell) in mannitol-balanced 5.5 mM, 25 mM and 100 mM d-glucose media and evaluated protein expression and redox regulation. We identified 141 proteins that showed significant changes in protein expression and 29 proteins that showed significant changes in thiol reactivity, in response to high glucose concentration. Several proteins involved in transcription-control, signal transduction, redox regulation and cytoskeleton regulation showed significant changes in expression, whereas proteins involved in protein folding and gene regulation displayed changes in thiol reactivity. Further analyses of clinical plasma specimens confirmed that the proteins AKAP8L, galectin-3, PGK 1, syntenin-1, Abin 2, aldose reductase, CD63, GRP-78, GST-pi, RXR-gamma, TPI and vimentin showed type 2 diabetic liver disease-dependent alterations. In summary, in this study we used a comprehensive hepatocyte-based proteomic approach to identify changes in protein expression and to identify redox-associated diabetic liver disease markers induced by high glucose concentration. Some of the identified proteins were validated with clinical samples and are presented as potential targets for the prognosis and diagnosis of diabetic liver disease.

  10. Methylglyoxal alters glucose metabolism and increases AGEs content in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Silveira, Simone da Luz; Hoefel, Ana Lúcia; Fontoura, Júlia Bijoldo; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Leite, Marina Concli; Perry, Marcos Luiz Santos; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Methylglyoxal is a dicarbonyl compound that is physiologically produced by enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions. It can lead to cytotoxicity, which is mainly related to Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) formation. Methylglyoxal and AGEs are involved in the pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Diseases (ND) and, in these situations, can cause the impairment of energetic metabolism. Astroglial cells play critical roles in brain metabolism and the appropriate functioning of astrocytes is essential for the survival and function of neurons. However, there are only a few studies evaluating the effect of methylglyoxal on astroglial cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of methylglyoxal exposure, over short (1 and 3 h) and long term (24 h) periods, on glucose, glycine and lactate metabolism in C6 glioma cells, as well as investigate the glyoxalase system and AGEs formation. Glucose uptake and glucose oxidation to CO(2) increased in 1 h and the conversion of glucose to lipids increased at 3 h. In addition, glycine oxidation to CO(2) and conversion of glycine to lipids increased at 1 h, whereas the incorporation of glycine in proteins decreased at 1 and 3 h. Methylglyoxal decreased glyoxalase I and II activities and increased AGEs content within 24 h. Lactate oxidation and lactate levels were not modified by methylglyoxal exposure. These data provide evidence that methylglyoxal may impair glucose metabolism and can affect glyoxalase activity. In periods of increased methylglyoxal exposure, such alterations could be exacerbated, leading to further increases in intracellular methylglyoxal and AGEs, and therefore triggering and/or worsening ND.

  11. Differential Response to High Glucose in Skin Fibroblasts of Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Caramori, M Luiza; Kim, Youngki; Natarajan, Rama; Moore, Jason H; Rich, Stephen S; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Kuriyama, Ryoko; Kirkpatrick, David; Mauer, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Most epigenetic studies in diabetes compare normal cells in "high glucose" (HG) to cells in "normal glucose" (NG) and cells returned from HG to NG. Here we challenge this approach. The objective was to determine whether there were differences in gene expression in skin fibroblasts of monozygotic twins (MZT) discordant for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Skin fibroblasts were grown in NG (5.5 mmol/L) and HG (25 mmol/L) for multiple passages. This study was conducted at the University of Minnesota. Patients were nine MZT pairs discordant for T1D. Gene expression was assessed by mRNA-Seq, using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 instrument. Pathway analysis tested directionally consistent group differences within the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. A total of 3308 genes were differentially expressed between NG and HG in T1D MZT vs 889 in non-T1D twins. DNA replication, proteasome, cell cycle, base excision repair, homologous recombination, pyrimidine metabolism, and spliceosome pathways had overrepresented genes with increased expression in T1D twins with P values ranging from 7.21 × 10(-10) to 1.39 × 10(-4). In a companion article, we demonstrate that these pathway changes are related to diabetic nephropathy risk. There were no pathways statistically significant differently expressed in nondiabetic twins in HG vs NG. In vivo exposure to diabetes alters cells in a manner that markedly changes their in vitro responses to HG. These results highlight the importance of using cells directly derived from diabetic patients for studies examining the effects of HG in diabetes.

  12. Differential Mueller matrix polarimetry technique for non-invasive measurement of glucose concentration on human fingertip.

    PubMed

    Phan, Quoc-Hung; Lo, Yu-Lung

    2017-06-26

    A differential Mueller matrix polarimetry technique is proposed for obtaining non-invasive (NI) measurements of the glucose concentration on the human fingertip. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by detecting the optical rotation angle and depolarization index of tissue phantom samples containing de-ionized water (DI), glucose solutions with concentrations ranging from 0~500 mg/dL and 2% lipofundin. The results show that the extracted optical rotation angle increases linearly with an increasing glucose concentration, while the depolarization index decreases. The practical applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by measuring the optical rotation angle and depolarization index properties of the human fingertips of healthy volunteers.

  13. Triphenyl phosphate enhances adipogenic differentiation, glucose uptake and lipolysis via endocrine and noradrenergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cano-Sancho, German; Smith, Anna; La Merrill, Michele A

    2017-04-01

    The use of triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) as a flame retardant or plasticizer has increased during the last decade, resulting in widespread human exposure without commensurate toxicity assessment. The main objectives of this study were to assess the in vitro effect of TPhP and its metabolite diphenyl phosphate (DPhP) on the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, as well as glucose uptake and lipolysis in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. TPhP increased pre-adipocyte proliferation and subsequent adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, coinciding with increased transcription in the CEBP and PPARG pathway. Treatment of mature adipocytes with TPhP increased the basal- and insulin stimulated- uptake of the glucose analog 2-[N (-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa1, 3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-NBDG). This effect was ablated by inhibition of PI3K, a member of the insulin signaling pathway. DPhP had no significant effect on cell proliferation and, compared to TPhP, a weaker effect on adipogenic differentiation and on 2-NBDG uptake. Both TPhP and DPhT significantly enhanced the isoproterenol-induced lipolysis, most likely by increasing the expression of lipolytic genes during and after differentiation. This study suggests that TPhP increases adipogenic differentiation, glucose uptake, and lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells through endocrine and noradrenergic mechanisms.

  14. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized using the following commonly used regimens: (1) hypnorm/midazolam repetitive or single injection; (2) ketamine/xylazine; (3) isoflurane; (4) pentobarbital; and (5) A saline injected, nonanesthetized group. Oral glucose was administered at time 0 min and blood glucose measured in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine/xylazine lowered insulin responses and resulted in severe hyperglycemia throughout the experiment; (3) isoflurane did not only alter the insulin secretion but also resulted in severe hyperglycemia; (4) pentobarbital resulted in both increased insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. All four anesthetic regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice.

  15. Altering equine corneal fibroblast differentiation through Smad gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Marlo, Todd L; Giuliano, Elizabeth A; Tripathi, Ratnakar; Sharma, Ajay; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2017-07-06

    To explore the impact of equine corneal fibroblast (ECF) to myofibroblast (ECM) differentiation by altering the expression of the Smad genes either individually or in combination. Specifically, we sought to examine the ECF differentiation after (a) silencing of Smad2, 3, and 4 profibrotic genes individually and (b) overexpression of antifibrotic Smad7 gene and in a combination with pro- and antifibrotic Smad genes. Equine corneal fibroblast primary cultures were generated as previously described. ECFs were transfected with individual plasmids which silenced gene expression of either Smad2, 3, or 4 or in combination with a plasmid overexpressing Smad7 using Lipofectamine 2000™ or Lipofectamine BLOCK-iT™. Smad-transfected clones were then exposed to TGF-β1 to induce differentiation to myofibroblasts. Immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR techniques quantified levels of ECF differentiation to ECM by measuring alpha smooth muscle actin, a known marker of ECM transdifferentiation. Silencing of individual Smad2, 3, or 4 genes or overexpression of Smad7 showed significant inhibition of ECF transdifferentiation (73-83% reduction). Silencing of Smad2 showed the greatest inhibition of ECF transdifferentiation in (a) and was therefore utilized for the combination gene transfer testing. The combination gene transfer consisting of Smad7 overexpression and Smad2 silencing attenuated ECF differentiation significantly; however, the level was not significant compared to the overexpression of Smad7 individually. Using gene transfer technology involving profibrotic Smad silencing, antifibrotic Smad overexpression or its combination is a novel strategy to control TGF-β1-mediated fibrosis in equine fibroblasts. Combination gene therapy was not better than single gene therapy in this study. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  16. Altered cerebral glucose metabolism in an animal model of diabetes insipidus: a micro-PET study.

    PubMed

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Burlet, Arlette; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Boisgard, Raphaël; Coulon, Christine; Paris, Sophie; Marie, Yannick; Donadieu, Jean; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Ribeiro, Maria-Joao

    2007-07-16

    The Brattleboro rat is an animal model of genetically induced central diabetes insipidus. These rats show cognitive and behavioral disorders, but no neurodegenerative disease has been observed. We studied brain glucose uptake, a marker of neuronal activity, in 6 Brattleboro rats, in comparison with 6 matched Long-Evans (LE) control rats. A group of 3 Brattleboro rats and 3 Long-Evans rats was studied in vivo and another group of animals was studied ex vivo. In vivo studies were performed using fluorodeoxyglucose labeled with fluorine 18 ((18)F-FDG) and a dedicated small-animal PET device. At 30 min and 60 min p.i., (18)F-FDG uptake was significantly higher in the frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus and cerebellum of Brattleboro rats than in LE rats when measured by PET in vivo (p<0.05), but only a trend towards higher values was found ex vivo. Our results show for the first time that brain glucose metabolism is modified in Brattleboro rats. This altered brain glucose metabolism in Brattleboro rats may be related to the observed cognitive and behavioral disorders. Functional analyses of brain metabolism are promising to investigate cognitive behavioral disturbances observed in Brattleboro rats and their link to diabetes insipidus.

  17. Exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid alters glucose metabolism in immature rat Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Alves, M G; Neuhaus-Oliveira, A; Moreira, P I; Socorro, S; Oliveira, P F

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 2,4-D, an herbicide used worldwide also known as endocrine disruptor, in Sertoli cell (SC) metabolism. Immature rat SCs were maintained 50h under basal conditions or exposed to 2,4-D (100nM, 10μM and 1mM). SCs exposed to 10μM and 1mM of 2,4-D presented lower intracellular glucose and lactate content. Exposure to 10μM of 2,4-D induced a significant decrease in glucose transporter-3 mRNA levels and phosphofructokinase-1 mRNA levels decreased in cells exposed to 100nM and 10μM of 2,4-D. Exposure to 100nM and 10μM also induced a decrease in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) mRNA levels while the LDH protein levels were only decreased in cells exposed to 1mM of 2,4-D. Exposure to 2,4-D altered glucose uptake and metabolization in SCs, as well as lactate metabolism and export that may result in impaired spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Heterogeneity in multicell spheroids induced by alterations in the external oxygen and glucose concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Freyer, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Multicell tumor spheroids are currently being used as in vitro models for investigations of tumor therapy, based on the concept that spheroids exhibit many of the growth characteristics and cell subpopulations of tumors in vivo. At present, the factors which regulate cell proliferation, clonogenicity and viability in spheroids are unknown, as are the effects of alterations in these critical factors on therapeutic results. The symmetrical structure of the EMT6/Ro spheroid and the ease of manipulating the external environment are key features of this spheroid system which are used to investigate the role of oxygen and glucose in the control of spheroid growth and the development of cell subpopulations. A technique is developed for selectivity dissociating a spheroid population into fractions of cells originating from known locations in the spheroid structure. Characterization of these cell subpopulations demonstrates that outer cells are similar to an exponential cell population, while inner region cells are not proliferating and have a reduced cell volume and clonogenic capacity. Oxygen and glucose concentrations at critical depths in the spheroid were determined. It is concluded that the oxygen and glucose supply to cells in spheroids is critical in determining the initial onset of central necrosis. 217 references, 32 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

  19. Endogenously released GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Tiffany; Schurr, Kathleen; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2017-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from the L cell of the gut in response to oral nutrient delivery. To determine if endogenously released GLP-1 contributes to the incretin effect and postprandial glucose regulation, conscious dogs (n = 8) underwent an acclimation period (t = −60 to −20 min), followed by a basal sampling period (t = −20 to 0 min) and an experimental period (t = 0–320 min). At the beginning of the experimental period, t = 0 min, a peripheral infusion of either saline or GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) antagonist, exendin (9–39) (Ex-9, 500 pmol/kg/min), was started. At t = 30 min, animals consumed a liquid mixed meal, spiked with acetaminophen. All animals were studied twice (± Ex-9) in random fashion, and the experiments were separated by a 1–2-week washout period. Antagonism of the GLP-1R did not have an effect, as indicated by repeated-measures MANOVA analysis of the Δ AUC from t = 45–320 min of arterial plasma glucose, GLP-1, insulin, glucagon, and acetaminophen levels. Therefore, endogenous GLP-1 is not sufficient to alter postprandial glucose regulation in the dog. PMID:21547512

  20. Alterations in glucose and protein metabolism in animals subjected to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Rodnick, K. J.; Azhar, S.; Reaven, G. M.; Dolkas, C. B.

    1992-01-01

    Reduction of physical activity due to disease or environmental restraints, such as total bed rest or exposure to spaceflight, leads to atrophy of skeletal muscle and is frequently accompanied by alterations in food intake and the concentration of metabolic regulatory hormones such as insulin. Hindlimb suspension of laboratory rats, as a model for microgravity, also shows marked atrophy of gravity-dependent muscles along with a reduced gain in body weight. Suspended rats exhibit enhanced sensitivity to insulin-induced glucose uptake when compared with normal control rats and resistance to insulin action when compared with control rats matched similarly for reduced body weight gain. These changes are accompanied by decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in soleus but not plantaris muscle, unchanged glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb and decreased sensitivity but not responsiveness to insulin-induced suppression of net proteolysis in hindlimb skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that loss of insulin sensitivity during muscle atrophy is associated with decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in atrophied soleus muscle along with decreased sensitivity to the effects of insulin on suppressing net protein breakdown but not on enhancing glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb.

  1. Alterations in glucose and protein metabolism in animals subjected to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Rodnick, K. J.; Dolkas, C. B.; Azhar, S.; Reaven, G. M.

    1992-09-01

    Reduction of physical activity due to disease or environmental restraints, such as total bed rest or exposure to spaceflight, leads to atrophy of skeletal muscle and is frequently accompanied by alterations in food intake and the concentration of metabolic regulatory hormones such as insulin. Hindlimb suspension of laboratory rats, as a model for microgravity, also shows marked atrophy of gravity dependent muscles along with a reduced gain in body weight. Suspended rats exhibit enhanced sensitivity to insulin-induced glucose uptake when compared with normal control rats and resistance to insulin action when compared with control rats matched similarly for reduced body weight gain. These changes are accompanied by decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in soleus but not plantaris muscle, unchanged glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb and decreased sensitivity but not responsiveness to insulin-induced suppression of net proteolysis in hindlimb skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that loss of insulin sensitivity during muscle atrophy is associated with decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in atrophied soleus muscle along with decreased sensitivity to the effects of insulin on suppressing net protein breakdown but not on enhancing glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb.

  2. Alterations in glucose and protein metabolism in animals subjected to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Rodnick, K. J.; Azhar, S.; Reaven, G. M.; Dolkas, C. B.

    1992-01-01

    Reduction of physical activity due to disease or environmental restraints, such as total bed rest or exposure to spaceflight, leads to atrophy of skeletal muscle and is frequently accompanied by alterations in food intake and the concentration of metabolic regulatory hormones such as insulin. Hindlimb suspension of laboratory rats, as a model for microgravity, also shows marked atrophy of gravity-dependent muscles along with a reduced gain in body weight. Suspended rats exhibit enhanced sensitivity to insulin-induced glucose uptake when compared with normal control rats and resistance to insulin action when compared with control rats matched similarly for reduced body weight gain. These changes are accompanied by decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in soleus but not plantaris muscle, unchanged glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb and decreased sensitivity but not responsiveness to insulin-induced suppression of net proteolysis in hindlimb skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that loss of insulin sensitivity during muscle atrophy is associated with decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in atrophied soleus muscle along with decreased sensitivity to the effects of insulin on suppressing net protein breakdown but not on enhancing glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb.

  3. High glucose concentrations alter the biomineralization process in human osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, A; Arzate, H; Gil-Chavarría, I; Rojo, R; Moreno-Fierros, L

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) may alter bone remodeling, as osteopenia and osteoporosis are among the complications. Moreover, DM increases the risk and severity of chronic inflammatory periodontal disease, in which bone resorption occurs. Broad evidence suggests that chronic inflammation can contribute to the development of DM and its complications. Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of DM that may contribute to sustained inflammation by increasing proinflammatory cytokines, which are known to cause insulin resistance, via toll-like receptor (TLR)-4-mediated mechanisms. However, the mechanisms by which bone-related complications develop in DM are still unknown. Studies done on the effect of high glucose concentrations on osteoblast functions are contradictory because some suggest increases (although others suggest reductions) in the biomineralization process. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of high glucose levels on biomineralization and inflammation markers in a human osteoblastic cell line. Cells were treated with either physiological 5.5 mM or increasing concentrations of glucose up to 24 mM, and we determined the following: i) the quantity and quality of calcium-deposit crystals in culture and ii) the expression of the following: a) proteins associated with the process of biomineralization, b) the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG), c) cytokines IL1, IL6, IL8, IL10, MCP-1 and TNF alpha, and d) TLR-2, -3, -4 and -9. Our results show that high glucose concentrations (12 mM and particularly 24 mM) alter the biomineralization process in osteoblastic cells and provoke the following: i) a rise in mineralization, ii) an increase in the mRNA expression of RANKL and a decrease of OPG, iii) an increase in the mRNA expression of osteocalcin, bone sialoprotein and the transcription factor Runx2, iv) a diminished quality of the mineral, and v) an increase in the expression of IL1beta, IL6, IL8, MCP-1 and IL10 mRNAs. In addition we

  4. Modulation of polyamine metabolic flux in adipose tissue alters the accumulation of body fat by affecting glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunli; Perez-Leal, Oscar; Barrero, Carlos; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher; Porter, Carl; Merali, Salim

    2014-03-01

    The continued rise in obesity despite public education, awareness and policies indicates the need for mechanism-based therapeutic approaches to help control the disease. Our data, in conjunction with other studies, suggest an unexpected role for the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) in fat homeostasis. Our previous studies showed that deletion of SSAT greatly exaggerates weight gain and that the transgenic overexpression suppresses weight gain in mice on a high-fat diet. This discovery is substantial but the underlying molecular linkages are only vaguely understood. Here, we used a comprehensive systems biology approach, on white adipose tissue (WAT), to discover that the partition of acetyl-CoA towards polyamine catabolism alters glucose homeostasis and hence, fat accumulation. Comparative proteomics and antibody-based expression studies of WAT in SSAT knockout, wild type and transgenic mice identified nine proteins with an increasing gradient across the genotypes, all of which correlate with acetyl-CoA consumption in polyamine acetylation. Adipose-specific SSAT knockout mice and global SSAT knockout mice on a high-fat diet exhibited similar growth curves and proteomic patterns in their WAT, confirming that attenuated consumption of acetyl-CoA in acetylation of polyamines in adipose tissue drives the obese phenotype of these mice. Analysis of protein expression indicated that the identified changes in the levels of proteins regulating acetyl-CoA consumption occur via the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Together, our data suggest that differential expression of SSAT markedly alters acetyl-CoA levels, which in turn trigger a global shift in glucose metabolism in adipose tissue, thus affecting the accumulation of body fat.

  5. Modulation of polyamine metabolic flux in adipose tissue alters the accumulation of body fat by affecting glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunli; Perez-Leal, Oscar; Barrero, Carlos; Zahedi, Kamyar; Soleimani, Manoocher; Porter, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The continued rise in obesity despite public education, awareness and policies indicates the need for mechanism-based therapeutic approaches to help control the disease. Our data, in conjunction with other studies, suggest an unexpected role for the polyamine catabolic enzyme spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT) in fat homeostasis. Our previous studies showed that deletion of SSAT greatly exaggerates weight gain and that the transgenic overexpression suppresses weight gain in mice on a high-fat diet. This discovery is substantial but the underlying molecular linkages are only vaguely understood. Here, we used a comprehensive systems biology approach, on white adipose tissue (WAT), to discover that the partition of acetyl-CoA towards polyamine catabolism alters glucose homeostasis and hence, fat accumulation. Comparative proteomics and antibody-based expression studies of WAT in SSAT knockout, wild type and transgenic mice identified nine proteins with an increasing gradient across the genotypes, all of which correlate with acetyl-CoA consumption in polyamine acetylation. Adipose-specific SSAT knockout mice and global SSAT knockout mice on a high-fat diet exhibited similar growth curves and proteomic patterns in their WAT, confirming that attenuated consumption of acetyl-CoA in acetylation of polyamines in adipose tissue drives the obese phenotype of these mice. Analysis of protein expression indicated that the identified changes in the levels of proteins regulating acetyl-CoA consumption occur via the AMP-activated protein kinase pathway. Together, our data suggest that differential expression of SSAT markedly alters acetyl-CoA levels, which in turn trigger a global shift in glucose metabolism in adipose tissue, thus affecting the accumulation of body fat. PMID:23881108

  6. Immune Alterations in Male and Female Mice after 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreau, Didier; Morton, Darla S.; Foster, Mareva; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), an analog of glucose which inhibits glycolysis by competitive antagonism for phosphohexose isomerase, results in acute periods of intracellular glucoprivation and hyperglycemia resulting in hyperphagia. In addition to these changes in the carbohydrate metabolism, injection of 2-DG results in alterations of both the endocrine and neurological systems as suggested by modifications in oxytocin and glucocorticoid levels and norepinephrine production. Moreover, alterations of the immune response, such as a decrease in the in vitro proliferation of splenocytes after mitogen-stimulation, were observed in mice injected with 2-DG. Sex, genotype and environment are among the factors that may modulate effects of catecholamines and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis on these immune changes. Sexual dimorphism in immune function resulting from the effects of sex hormones on immune effector cells has been shown in both animals and humans. These observations have important implications, especially with regard to higher incidence of many autoimmune diseases in females. Evidence exists that reproductive hormones influence the immune system and increase the risk of immunologically related disorders in both animals and humans. Indeed, immunological responses in stressful situations may also be confounded by fluctuations of sex hormones especially in females. Lymphocyte distribution, cytoldne production, and the ability of lymphocyte to proliferate in vitro were analyzed in male and female mice to determine if sex influenced 2-DG immunomodulation. In addition, the influence of hormones, especially sex hormones, on these changes were evaluated.

  7. Striatal cholinergic functional alterations in hypoxic neonatal rats: role of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Paulose, C S

    2013-10-01

    Molecular processes regulating cholinergic functions play an important role in the control of respiration under hypoxia. Cholinergic alterations and its further complications in respiration due to hypoxic insult in neonatal rats and the effect of glucose, oxygen, and epinephrine resuscitation was evaluated in the present study. Receptor binding and gene expression studies were done in the corpus striatum to analyse the changes in total muscarinic receptors, muscarinic M1, M2, M3 receptors, and the enzymes involved in acetylcholine metabolism, choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase. Neonatal hypoxia decreased total muscarinic receptors with reduced expression of muscarinic M1, M2, and M3 receptor genes. The reduction in acetylcholine metabolism is indicated by the downregulated choline acetyltransferase and upregulated acetyl cholinesterase expression. These cholinergic disturbances were reversed to near control in glucose-resuscitated hypoxic neonates. The adverse effects of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine administration are also reported. The present findings points to the cholinergic alterations due to neonatal hypoxic shock and suggests a proper resuscitation method to ameliorate these striatal changes.

  8. Multifunctional Roles of Enolase in Alzheimer Disease Brain: Beyond Altered Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Bader Lange, Miranda L.

    2015-01-01

    Enolase enzymes are abundantly expressed, cytosolic carbon-oxygen lyases known for their role in glucose metabolism. Recently, enolase has been shown to possess a variety of different regulatory functions, beyond glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, associated with hypoxia, ischemia, and Alzheimer disease (AD). AD is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by elevated oxidative stress and subsequent damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques, and loss of synapse and neuronal cells. It is unclear if development of a hypometabolic environment is a consequence of or contributes to AD pathology, since there is not only a significant decline in brain glucose levels in AD, but also there is an increase in proteomics identified oxidatively modified glycolytic enzymes that are rendered inactive, including enolase. Previously, our laboratory identified α-enolase as one the most frequently up-regulated and oxidatively modified proteins in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), early-onset AD (EOAD), and AD. However, the glycolytic conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate catalyzed by enolase does not directly produce ATP or NADH; therefore it is surprising that, among all glycolytic enzymes, α-enolase was one of only two glycolytic enzymes consistently up-regulated from MCI to AD. These findings suggest enolase is involved with more than glucose metabolism in AD brain, but may possess other functions, normally necessary to preserve brain function. This review examines potential altered function(s) of brain enolase in MCI, EOAD, and AD, alterations that may contribute to the biochemical, pathological, clinical characteristics, and progression of this dementing disorder. PMID:19780894

  9. Heme oxygenase 1 improves glucoses metabolism and kidney histological alterations in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ptilovanciv, Ellen On; Fernandes, Gabryelle S; Teixeira, Luciana C; Reis, Luciana A; Pessoa, Edson A; Convento, Marcia B; Simões, Manuel J; Albertoni, Guilherme A; Schor, Nestor; Borges, Fernanda T

    2013-01-16

    One important concern in the treatment of diabetes is the maintenance of glycemic levels and the prevention of diabetic nephropathy. Inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme thought to have antioxidant and cytoprotective roles. The goal of the present study was to analyze the effect of HO-1 induction in chronically hyperglycemic rats. The hyperglycemic rats were divided into two groups: one group, called STZ, was given a single injection of streptozotocin; and the other group was given a single streptozotocin injection as well as daily injections of hemin, an HO-1 inducer, over 60 days (STZ + HEME). A group of normoglycemic, untreated rats was used as the control (CTL).Body weight, diuresis, serum glucose levels, microalbuminuria, creatinine clearance rate, urea levels, sodium excretion, and lipid peroxidation were analyzed. Histological alterations and immunohistochemistry for HO-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were assessed. After 60 days, the STZ group exhibited an increase in blood glucose, diuresis, urea, microalbuminuria, and sodium excretion. There was no weight gain, and there was a decrease in creatinine clearance in comparison to the CTL group. In the STZ + HEME group there was an improvement in the metabolic parameters and kidney function, a decrease in blood glucose, serum urea, and microalbuminuria, and an increase of creatinine clearance, in comparison to the STZ group.There was glomerulosclerosis, collagen deposition in the STZ rats and increase in iNOS and HO-1 expression. In the STZ + HEME group, the glomerulosclerosis and fibrosis was prevented and there was an increase in the expression of HO-1, but decrease in iNOS expression and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, our data suggest that chronic induction of HO-1 reduces hyperglycemia, improves glucose metabolism and, at least in part, protects the renal tissue from hyperglycemic injury, possibly through the antioxidant activity of HO-1.

  10. Resistance to chemotherapy is associated with altered glucose metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    SONG, KUI; LI, MIN; XU, XIAOJUN; XUAN, LI; HUANG, GUINIAN; LIU, QIFA

    2016-01-01

    Altered glucose metabolism has been described as a cause of chemoresistance in multiple tumor types. The present study aimed to identify the expression profile of glucose metabolism in drug-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and provide potential strategies for the treatment of drug-resistant AML. Bone marrow and serum samples were obtained from patients with AML that were newly diagnosed or had relapsed. The messenger RNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, glucose transporter (GLUT)1, and hexokinase-II was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The levels of LDH and β subunit of human F1-F0 adenosine triphosphate synthase (β-F1-ATPase) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent and western blot assays. The HL-60 and HL-60/ADR cell lines were used to evaluate glycolytic activity and effect of glycolysis inhibition on cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Drug-resistant HL-60/ADR cells exhibited a significantly increased level of glycolysis compared with the drug-sensitive HL-60 cell line. The expression of HIF-1α, hexokinase-II, GLUT1 and LDH were increased in AML patients with no remission (NR), compared to healthy control individuals and patients with complete remission (CR) and partial remission. The expression of β-F1-ATPase in patients with NR was decreased compared with the expression in the CR group. Treatment of HL-60/ADR cells with 2-deoxy-D-glucose or 3-bromopyruvate increased in vitro sensitivity to Adriamycin (ADR), while treatment of HL-60 cells did not affect drug cytotoxicity. Subsequent to treatment for 24 h, apoptosis in these two cell lines showed no significant difference. However, glycolytic inhibitors in combination with ADR increased cellular necrosis. These findings indicate that increased glycolysis and low efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation may contribute to drug resistance. Targeting glycolysis is a viable strategy for modulating chemoresistance in AML. PMID:27347147

  11. Culture adaptation alters transcriptional hierarchies among single human embryonic stem cells reflecting altered patterns of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Paul J; Au-Young, Janice K; Dadi, SriVidya; Keys, David N; Harrison, Neil J; Jones, Mark; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Sherlock, Jon K; Andrews, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    We have used single cell transcriptome analysis to re-examine the substates of early passage, karyotypically Normal, and late passage, karyotypically Abnormal ('Culture Adapted') human embryonic stem cells characterized by differential expression of the cell surface marker antigen, SSEA3. The results confirmed that culture adaptation is associated with alterations to the dynamics of the SSEA3(+) and SSEA3(-) substates of these cells, with SSEA3(-) Adapted cells remaining within the stem cell compartment whereas the SSEA3(-) Normal cells appear to have differentiated. However, the single cell data reveal that these substates are characterized by further heterogeneity that changes on culture adaptation. Notably the Adapted population includes cells with a transcriptome substate suggestive of a shift to a more naïve-like phenotype in contrast to the cells of the Normal population. Further, a subset of the Normal SSEA3(+) cells expresses genes typical of endoderm differentiation, despite also expressing the undifferentiated stem cell genes, POU5F1 (OCT4) and NANOG, whereas such apparently lineage-primed cells are absent from the Adapted population. These results suggest that the selective growth advantage gained by genetically variant, culture adapted human embryonic stem cells may derive in part from a changed substate structure that influences their propensity for differentiation.

  12. Multiple antibiotics produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens HV37a and their differential regulation by glucose.

    PubMed Central

    James, D W; Gutterson, N I

    1986-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HV37a inhibited growth of the fungus Pythium ultimum on potato dextrose agar (PDA). An antibiotic activity produced under these conditions was fractionated and partially characterized. Extracts prepared from the PDA on which HV37a was grown revealed a single peak of antibiotic activity on thin-layer chromatograms. Similar extracts were prepared from mutants of HV37a. Their analysis indicated that the antibiotic observed in thin-layer chromatograms was responsible for fungal inhibition observed on PDA. The production of the PDA antibiotic required the presence of glucose, whereas two other antibiotic activities were produced only on potato agar without added glucose. Two mutants (denoted AfuIa and AfuIb) previously characterized as deficient in fungal inhibition on PDA showed altered regulation of the production of all three antibiotics in response to glucose. These mutants were also deficient in glucose dehydrogenase. Mutants isolated as deficient in glucose dehydrogenase were also deficient in fungal inhibition and were grouped into two classes on the basis of complementation analysis with an AfuI cosmid. Glucose regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis therefore involves at least two components and requires glucose dehydrogenase. PMID:3098168

  13. Ethanol-induced alterations in sup 14 C-glucose utilization: Modulation by brain adenosine in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Anwer, J.; Dar, M.S. )

    1992-02-26

    The possible role of brain adenosine (Ado) in acute ethanol-induced alteration in glucose utilization in the cerebellum and brain stem was investigated. The slices were incubated for 100 min in a glucose medium in Warburg flasks using {sup 14}C-glucose as a tracer. Trapped {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was counted to estimate glucose utilization. Ethanol markedly increased the glucose utilization in both areas of brain. Theophylline, an Ado antagonist, significantly reduced ethanol-induced increase in glucose utilization in both brain areas. Ado agonist CHA significantly accentuated ethanol-induced increase in glucose utilization in both motor areas. Ado agonist CHA significantly accentuated ethanol-induced increase in glucose utilization in both motor areas. Ethanol was still able to produce a smaller but significant increase in glucose utilization in both brain areas when theophylline and CHA were given together, suggesting an additional mechanism. Collectively, the data indicate that ethanol-induced glucose utilization in the cerebellum and brain stem is modulated by brain Ado receptor and by non-adenosinergic mechanism.

  14. Cirsium japonicum flavones enhance adipocyte differentiation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhiyong; Wu, Zhihua; Wu, Mingjiang

    2012-01-01

    Cirsium japonicum flavones have been demonstrated to possess anti-diabetic effects in diabetic rats, but the functional mechanism remains unknown. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays an important role in glucose and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we report the effects of Cirsium japonicum flavones (pectolinarin and 5,7-dihydroxy-6,4-dimethoxy flavone) on PPARγ activation, adipocyte differentiation, and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells. Reporter gene assays and Oil Red O staining showed that Cirsium japonicum flavones induced PPARγ activation and enhanced adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Cirsium japonicum flavones increased the expression of PPARγ target genes, such as adiponectin and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), and enhanced the translocation of intracellular GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. In mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Cirsium japonicum flavones significantly enhanced the basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The flavones-induced effects in 3T3-L1 cells were abolished by the PPARγ antagonist, GW9662, and by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, wortmannin. This study suggests that Cirsium japonicum flavones promote adipocyte differentiation and glucose uptake by inducing PPARγ activation and then modulating the insulin signaling pathway in some way, which could benefit diabetes patients.

  15. Altered glucose metabolism and hypoxic response in alloxan-induced diabetic atherosclerosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yunosuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Zhao, Yan; Iwakiri, Takashi; Yamasaki, Kazuaki; Sugita, Chihiro; Koshimoto, Chihiro; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kawai, Keiichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Asada, Yujiro

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus accelerates atherosclerosis that causes most cardiovascular events. Several metabolic pathways are considered to contribute to the development of atherosclerosis, but comprehensive metabolic alterations to atherosclerotic arterial cells remain unknown. The present study investigated metabolic changes and their relationship to vascular histopathological changes in the atherosclerotic arteries of rabbits with alloxan-induced diabetes. Diabetic atherosclerosis was induced in rabbit ilio-femoral arteries by injecting alloxan (100 mg/kg), injuring the arteries using a balloon, and feeding with a 0.5% cholesterol diet. We histologically assessed the atherosclerotic lesion development, cellular content, pimonidazole positive-hypoxic area, the nuclear localization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and apoptosis. We evaluated comprehensive arterial metabolism by performing metabolomic analyses using capillary electrophoresis-time of flight mass spectrometry. We evaluated glucose uptake and its relationship to vascular hypoxia using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and pimonidazole. Plaque burden, macrophage content, and hypoxic areas were more prevalent in arteries with diabetic, than non-diabetic atherosclerosis. Metabolomic analyses highlighted 12 metabolites that were significantly altered between diabetic and non-diabetic atherosclerosis. A half of them were associated with glycolysis metabolites, and their levels were decreased in diabetic atherosclerosis. The uptake of glucose evaluated as 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in atherosclerotic lesions increased according to increased macrophage content or hypoxic areas in non-diabetic, but not diabetic rabbits. Despite profound hypoxic areas, the nuclear localization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α decreased and the number of apoptotic cells increased in diabetic atherosclerotic lesions. Altered glycolysis metabolism and an impaired response to hypoxia in atherosclerotic lesions under conditions of insulin

  16. Mycorrhizal species differentially alter plant growth and response to herbivory.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Alison E; Bever, James D

    2007-01-01

    Plants simultaneously interact with multiple organisms which can both positively and negatively affect their growth. Herbivores can reduce plant growth through loss of plant biomass and photosynthetic area, while plant mutualists, such as mycorrhizal fungi, can increase plant growth through uptake of essential nutrients. This is the first study examining whether species-specific associations with mycorrhizal fungi alter plant tolerance to herbivory. We grew Plantago lanceolata plants with three species of mycorrhizal fungi previously shown to have differential impacts on plant growth and subjected them to herbivory by the specialist lepidopteran herbivore, Junonia coenia. Association with mycorrhizal fungus Glomus white provided the greatest growth benefit but did not alter plant response to herbivory. Alternatively, association with Archaeospora trappei provided less growth promotion but did lead to tolerance to herbivory in the form of an increased growth rate. Finally, an association with the fungus Scutellospora calospora led to neither plant growth promotion nor tolerance to herbivory. In fact, an association with S. calospora appeared to reduce plant tolerance to herbivory. An association with all three species of mycorrhizae resulted in a pattern of growth similar to that of plants grown only with Glomus white, suggesting that growth promotion by multiple mycorrhizal species is driven by the inclusion of a "super fungus," in this case, Glomus white. This work illustrates that plant response to herbivory depends upon the mycorrhizal fungal mutualist with which a plant is associated.

  17. Differential regulation of baicalin and scutellarin on AMPK and Akt in promoting adipose cell glucose disposal.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le-Le; Xiao, Na; Liu, Jinfeng; Liu, Kang; Liu, Baolin; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2017-02-01

    Baicalin and scutellarin, two flavonoid glucuronic acids isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis, exhibit beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Baicalin and scutellarin are similar in structure except scutellarin has an additional hydroxyl at composition C-4'. In this work, we observed that baicalin and scutellarin promoted glucose disposal in mice and in adipocytes. Baicalin selectively increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), while scutellarin selectively enhanced Akt phosphorylation. Both of them increased AS160 phosphorylation and glucose uptake in basal condition. AMPK inhibitor or knockdown of AMPK by siRNA blocked baicalin-induced AS160 phosphorylation and glucose uptake, but showed no effects on scutellarin. In contrast, Akt inhibitor and knockdown of Akt with siRNA decreased scutellarin-stimulated glucose uptake but had no effects on baicalin. The molecular dynamic simulations analysis showed that the binding energy of baicalin to AMPK (-34.30kcal/mol) was more favorable than scutellarin (-21.27kcal/mol), while the binding energy of scutellarin (-29.81kcal/mol) to Akt was much more favorable than baicalin (4.04kcal/mol). Interestingly, a combined treatment with baicalin and scutellarin acted synergistically to enhance glucose uptake in adipocytes (combination index: 0.94-0.046). In conclusion, baicalin and scutellarin, though structurally similar, promoted glucose disposal in adipocytes by differential regulation on AMPK and Akt activity. Our data provide insight that multicomponent herbal medicines may act synergistically on multiple targets.

  18. Using meta-differential evolution to enhance a calculation of a continuous blood glucose level.

    PubMed

    Koutny, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    We developed a new model of glucose dynamics. The model calculates blood glucose level as a function of transcapillary glucose transport. In previous studies, we validated the model with animal experiments. We used analytical method to determine model parameters. In this study, we validate the model with subjects with type 1 diabetes. In addition, we combine the analytic method with meta-differential evolution. To validate the model with human patients, we obtained a data set of type 1 diabetes study that was coordinated by Jaeb Center for Health Research. We calculated a continuous blood glucose level from continuously measured interstitial fluid glucose level. We used 6 different scenarios to ensure robust validation of the calculation. Over 96% of calculated blood glucose levels fit A+B zones of the Clarke Error Grid. No data set required any correction of model parameters during the time course of measuring. We successfully verified the possibility of calculating a continuous blood glucose level of subjects with type 1 diabetes. This study signals a successful transition of our research from an animal experiment to a human patient. Researchers can test our model with their data on-line at https://diabetes.zcu.cz. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential thermal wave radiometry for noninvasive blood glucose monitoring: feasibility analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telenkov, Sergey A.

    2004-04-01

    Blood glucose monitoring is essential for management of diabetes especially for those patients who requires regular insulin injections. A reliable noninvasive technique may eliminate inconvenience associated with frequent skin puncture to draw blood for measurement by a standard meter. Laser-induced thermal waves in tissue and detection of resulting IR response may provide a valuable approach to development of noninvasive glucose sensor. The present report analyzes radiometric response of tissue at the two wavelengths in mid-IR spectral band with phase-sensitive detection to evaluate feasibility of differential phase radiometry for noninvasive glucose monitoring. Sensitivity of the differential phase method is computed using two models of laser-tissue interaction: homogeneous light absorption and a discrete chromophore heating.

  20. ReishiMax, mushroom based dietary supplement, inhibits adipocyte differentiation, stimulates glucose uptake and activates AMPK

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is a health hazard which is closely associated with various complications including insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes and cancer. In spite of numerous preclinical and clinical interventions, the prevalence of obesity and its related disorders are on the rise demanding an urgent need for exploring novel therapeutic agents that can regulate adipogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated whether a dietary supplement ReishiMax (RM), containing triterpenes and polysaccharides extracted from medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum, affects adipocyte differentiation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells. Methods 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes were differentiated into adipocytes and treated with RM (0-300 μg/ml). Adipocyte differentiation/lipid uptake was evaluated by oil red O staining and triglyceride and glycerol concentrations were determined. Gene expression was evaluated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Glucose uptake was determined with [3H]-glucose. Results RM inhibited adipocyte differentiation through the suppresion of expression of adipogenic transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), sterol regulatory element binding element protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBP-α). RM also suppressed expression of enzymes and proteins responsible for lipid synthesis, transport and storage: fatty acid synthase (FAS), acyl-CoA synthetase-1 (ACS1), fatty acid binding protein-4 (FABP4), fatty acid transport protein-1 (FATP1) and perilipin. RM induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and increased glucose uptake by adipocytes. Conclusion Our study suggests that RM can control adipocyte differentiation and glucose uptake. The health benefits of ReishiMax warrant further clinical studies. PMID:21929808

  1. Glucose and sucrose differentially modify cell proliferation in maize during germination.

    PubMed

    Lara-Núñez, Aurora; García-Ayala, Brendy B; Garza-Aguilar, Sara M; Flores-Sánchez, Jesús; Sánchez-Camargo, Victor A; Bravo-Alberto, Carlos E; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Vázquez-Ramos, Jorge M

    2017-04-01

    Glucose and sucrose play a dual role: as carbon and energy sources and as signaling molecules. In order to address the impact that sugars may have on maize seeds during germination, embryo axes were incubated with or without either of the two sugars. Expression of key cell cycle markers and protein abundance, cell patterning and de novo DNA synthesis in root meristem zones were analyzed. Embryo axes without added sugars in imbibition medium were unable to grow after 7 days; in sucrose, embryo axes developed seminal and primary roots with numerous root hairs, whereas in glucose axes showed a twisted morphology, no root hair formation but callus-like structures on adventitious and primary seminal roots. More and smaller cells were observed with glucose treatment in root apical meristems. de novo DNA synthesis was stimulated more by glucose than by sucrose. At 24 h of imbibition, expression of ZmCycD2;2a and ZmCycD4;2 was increased by sucrose and reduced by glucose. CDKA1;1 and CDKA2;1 expression was stimulated equally by both sugars. Protein abundance patterns were modified by sugars: ZmCycD2 showed peaks on glucose at 12 and 36 h of imbibition whereas sucrose promoted ZmCycD3 protein accumulation. In presence of glucose ZmCycD3, ZmCycD4 and ZmCycD6 protein abundance was reduced after 24 h. Finally, both sugars stimulated ZmCDKA protein accumulation but at different times. Overall, even though glucose appears to act as a stronger mitogen stimulator, sucrose stimulated the expression of more cell cycle markers during germination. This work provides evidence of a differential response of cell cycle markers to sucrose and glucose during maize germination that may affect the developmental program during plantlet establishment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Brain hyperthermia alters local cerebral glucose utilization: a comparison of hyperthermic agents.

    PubMed

    Mickley, G A; Cobb, B L; Farrell, S T

    1997-01-01

    Microwaves have been proposed to alter neural functioning through both thermal and non-thermal mechanisms. We attempted to determine if local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) depends on the type of hyperthermic agent employed. We exposed the heads of rats to two different hyperthermic agents (5.6 GHz microwave exposure or exposure to hot/moist air) to create a 2 degree C rise in midbrain temperature. Other rats were sham exposed and remained normothermic. The 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) autoradiographic method was then used to determine LCGU during a 45-min period of stable hyperthermia. Hyperthermia (created by either hyperthermic agent) caused a general rise in brain glucose utilization. Hot-air exposed rats showed significantly higher LCGUs than microwaved rats in portions of the motor cortex, hypothalamus, lateral lemniscus and the substantia nigra (reticulata). Microwave exposure did not produce significantly higher levels of LCGU (compared to hot-air exposed hyperthermic controls) in any of the 47 brain areas sampled. A time analysis of lateral hypothalamic (LH) temperature during these different heating procedures revealed that microwave exposure produced a more-rapid rise in temperature than did not/moist air. Thus, we wondered if the nuclei-specific differences in LCGU could be explained by localized differences in rate of brain heating during the two hyperthermic treatments. In a second study we carefully matched both the rate of lateral hypothalamic temperature rise and the peak temperatures achieved by our two hyperthermic methods and again measured LH LCGUs. We found that this precise matching eliminated the difference in hypothalamic LCGU previously observed following microwave or hot-air exposure. These data suggest that hyperthermia causes a general rise in brain metabolism and that (as long as steady state and rate of local brain temperature increase are well matched) microwave and hot-air induced hyperthermia produce similar changes in LCGU.

  3. Prenatal androgen treatment alters body composition and glucose homeostasis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Milos; Aird, Fraser; Levine, Jon E; Dunaif, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Prenatal androgen produces many reproductive and metabolic features of polycystic ovary syndrome in female rodents, sheep, and monkeys. We investigated the impact of such prenatal treatment in adult male rats. Pregnant dams received free testosterone (T; aromatizable androgen), dihydrotestosterone (D; nonaromatizable androgen), or vehicle control (C) on embryonic days 16-19. Neither of the prenatal androgen treatments resulted in increased body weight from weaning to age 65 days in males. However, at 65 days, there were significant increases in retroperitoneal (P < 0.001 T versus C; P < 0.05 D versus C), epididymal (P < 0.05 T versus C), and subcutaneous (P < 0.01 T versus C) fat pads in prenatally androgenized males. While both androgens altered body composition, subcutaneous fat depots increased only in T males. T males had elevated glucose levels (P < 0.01) compared to C males. There were no differences among the three groups in insulin sensitivity, circulating lipid and leptin levels, or hepatic triglyceride content. Real-time PCR analysis of insulin signaling pathway genes in retroperitoneal fat revealed a transcriptional downregulation of adipsin and insulin receptor substrate-1 in T and α-1D adrenergic receptor in D compared to C males. We conclude that transient exposure to androgen excess in utero increases body fat in adult male rats. Only T males exhibit increased circulating glucose levels and subcutaneous fat suggesting that these changes may be mediated by aromatization of androgen to estrogen rather than by direct androgenic actions.

  4. Glucose and ethylene signalling pathways converge to regulate trans-differentiation of epidermal transfer cells in Vicia narbonensis cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Andriunas, Felicity A; Zhang, Hui-Ming; Weber, Hans; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2011-12-01

    Transfer cells are specialized transport cells containing invaginated wall ingrowths that provide an amplified plasma membrane surface area with high densities of transporter proteins. They trans-differentiate from differentiated cells at sites where enhanced rates of nutrient transport occur across apo/symplasmic boundaries. Despite their physiological importance, the signal(s) and signalling cascades responsible for initiating their trans-differentiation are poorly understood. In culture, adaxial epidermal cells of Vicia narbonensis cotyledons were induced to trans-differentiate to a transfer cell morphology. Manipulating their intracellular glucose concentrations by transgenic knock-down of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase expression and/or culture on a high-glucose medium demonstrated that glucose functioned as a negative regulator of wall ingrowth induction. In contrast, glucose had no detectable effect on wall ingrowth morphology. The effect on wall ingrowth induction of culture on media containing glucose analogues suggested that glucose acts through a hexokinase-dependent signalling pathway. Elevation of an epidermal cell-specific ethylene signal alone, or in combination with glucose analogues, countered the negative effect of glucose on wall ingrowth induction. Glucose modulated the amplitude of ethylene-stimulated wall ingrowth induction by down-regulating the expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes and an ethylene insensitive 3 (EIN3)-like gene (EIL) encoding a key transcription factor in the ethylene signalling cascade. A model is presented describing the interaction between glucose and ethylene signalling pathways regulating the induction of wall ingrowth formation in adaxial epidermal cells.

  5. Enhanced xylose fermentation capacity related to an altered glucose sensing and repression network in a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    The co-fermentation of glucose and xylose is one of the issues in decreasing the price of biofuel or chemicals produced from lignocellulosic materials. A glucose and xylose co-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained through rational genetic manipulation. Non-rational evolution in xylose was performed, and the xylose utilization efficiency of the engineered strain was significantly enhanced. The results of transcriptome study suggested that Snf1/Mig1-mediated regulation, a part of glucose sensing and repression network, was altered in the evolved strain and might be related to the enhancement of xylose utilization.

  6. Glucose parameters are altered in mouse offspring produced by assisted reproductive technologies and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Scott, Karen A; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Lin, Yanling; Melhorn, Susan J; Krause, Eric G; Woods, Stephen C; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Sakai, Randall R; Tamashiro, Kellie L K

    2010-08-01

    Fortunately, the majority of children conceived through assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) appear healthy; however, metabolic abnormalities, including elevated glucose and increased and altered adipose tissue deposition, have been reported in adolescents. To parse out factors that may be responsible, we investigated the effects of two different ARTs--in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)--as well as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) on glucose clearance, body weight, and body composition of young adult mice. Female and male mice generated through ART weighed more than control (naturally conceived [STOCK]) mice at birth. No differences in body weight were observed in males up to 8 wk of age. ART females took longer than control mice to clear a glucose bolus, with glucose clearance most impaired in SCNT females. IVF females secreted more insulin and had a higher insulin peak 15 min after glucose injection compared with all other groups. Male mice exhibited no differences in glucose clearance, but IVF males required more insulin to do so. SCNT females weighed more than IVF, ICSI, and STOCK females, and they had higher fat content than ICSI females and higher leptin levels than all other groups. These results show that glucose parameters are altered in young adult mice conceived through techniques associated with ART before onset of obesity and may be responsible for its development later in life. The present study suggests that more investigation regarding the long-term effects of manipulations associated with ART is warranted.

  7. In vivo brain glucose measurements: differential normal pulse voltammetry with enzyme-modified carbon fiber microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Netchiporouk, L I; Shram, N F; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Martelet, C; Cespuglio, R

    1996-12-15

    The enzyme glucose oxidase was immobilized on the surface of carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) either by cross-linking in glutaraldehyde vapor or by enzyme entrapment in electropolymerized films of m-phenylenediamine or resorcinol. The cross-linked enzymatic layer was, in the given conditions, covered with an additional membrane of Nafion or cellulose acetate. The prepared glucose sensors were tested using differential normal pulse voltammetry (DNPV, in which the scan comprises successive double pulses ("prepulse and pulse"), the prepulses are of increasing amplitude, and the current measured is the differential of the current existing between each prepulse and pulse). With properly chosen DNPV parameters, the response to glucose presented a peak at a potential of about 1 V versus an Ag/AgC1-reference, owing to the oxidation of enzymatically produced hydrogen peroxide. The calibration curves obtained (peak height/glucose concentration) were linear from 0.3-0.5 up to 1.5-6.5 mM and showed a sensitivity ranging from 1.4 up to 34.5 mA M-1 cm-2, depending on the sensor type. The DNPV response to glucose exhibited an essential insensitivity toward easily oxidizable interfering substances such as ascorbic acid and acetaminophen present at physiological concentrations. Peptides, the interfering species typical of the cerebral medium, were effectively retained by the above additional membranes. Concentration values of glucose in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, determined in vitro from the DNPV peak height, agreed well with those measured by standard procedures. In the anesthetized rat, extracellular brain concentration of glucose was also monitored during administration of either insulin or glucagon. Under such pharmacological conditions, the changes observed in the peak height were in perfect agreement with the known effects induced by both substances.

  8. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Sun, Guangchao; Wilson, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose.

  9. Glucose-ABL1-TOR Signaling Modulates Cell Cycle Tuning to Control Terminal Appressorial Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates growth and development with available nutrients, but how cellular glucose controls TOR function and signaling is poorly understood. Here, we provide functional evidence from the devastating rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae that glucose can mediate TOR activity via the product of a novel carbon-responsive gene, ABL1, in order to tune cell cycle progression during infection-related development. Under nutrient-free conditions, wild type (WT) M. oryzae strains form terminal plant-infecting cells (appressoria) at the tips of germ tubes emerging from three-celled spores (conidia). WT appressorial development is accompanied by one round of mitosis followed by autophagic cell death of the conidium. In contrast, Δabl1 mutant strains undergo multiple rounds of accelerated mitosis in elongated germ tubes, produce few appressoria, and are abolished for autophagy. Treating WT spores with glucose or 2-deoxyglucose phenocopied Δabl1. Inactivating TOR in Δabl1 mutants or glucose-treated WT strains restored appressorium formation by promoting mitotic arrest at G1/G0 via an appressorium- and autophagy-inducing cell cycle delay at G2/M. Collectively, this work uncovers a novel glucose-ABL1-TOR signaling axis and shows it engages two metabolic checkpoints in order to modulate cell cycle tuning and mediate terminal appressorial cell differentiation. We thus provide new molecular insights into TOR regulation and cell development in response to glucose. PMID:28072818

  10. Differential Geometric Analysis of Alterations in MH α-Helices

    PubMed Central

    Hischenhuber, Birgit; Havlicek, Hans; Todoric, Jelena; Höllrigl-Binder, Sonja; Schreiner, Wolfgang; Knapp, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Antigen presenting cells present processed peptides via their major histocompatibility (MH) complex to the T cell receptors (TRs) of T cells. If a peptide is immunogenic, a signaling cascade can be triggered within the T cell. However, the binding of different peptides and/or different TRs to MH is also known to influence the spatial arrangement of the MH α-helices which could itself be an additional level of T cell regulation. In this study, we introduce a new methodology based on differential geometric parameters to describe MH deformations in a detailed and comparable way. For this purpose, we represent MH α-helices by curves. On the basis of these curves, we calculate in a first step the curvature and torsion to describe each α-helix independently. In a second step, we calculate the distribution parameter and the conical curvature of the ruled surface to describe the relative orientation of the two α-helices. On the basis of four different test sets, we show how these differential geometric parameters can be used to describe changes in the spatial arrangement of the MH α-helices for different biological challenges. In the first test set, we illustrate on the basis of all available crystal structures for (TR)/pMH complexes how the binding of TRs influences the MH helices. In the second test set, we show a cross evaluation of different MH alleles with the same peptide and the same MH allele with different peptides. In the third test set, we present the spatial effects of different TRs on the same peptide/MH complex. In the fourth test set, we illustrate how a severe conformational change in an α-helix can be described quantitatively. Taken together, we provide a novel structural methodology to numerically describe subtle and severe alterations in MH α-helices for a broad range of applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23703160

  11. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide receptor knockout mice have altered bone turnover.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ding; Cheng, Hua; Hamrick, Mark; Zhong, Qing; Ding, Ke-Hong; Correa, Daniel; Williams, Sandra; Mulloy, Anthony; Bollag, Wendy; Bollag, Roni J; Runner, Royce R; McPherson, James C; Insogna, Karl; Isales, Carlos M

    2005-12-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone, which is secreted from endocrine cells in the small intestine after meal ingestion. GIP has been shown to affect osteoblastic function in vitro; however, the in vivo effects of GIP on bone remodeling remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of GIP in modulating bone turnover, by evaluating serum markers of bone turnover, bone density, bone morphology, and changes in biomechanical bone strength over time (one to five months) in GIP receptor knockout mice (GIPR-/- mice). The GIPR-/- mice showed a decreased bone size, lower bone mass, altered bone microarchitecture and biomechanical properties, and altered parameters for bone turnover, especially in bone formation. Moreover, the effects of GIP on bone mass were site-specific and compensatory mechanism developed over time and ameliorated the impact of the loss of GIP signaling on bone mass. Further, GIPR-/- mice had earlier age-related changes than wild-type mice in body composition, including bone mass, lean body mass, and fat percentage. In summary, our results indicate that GIP has an anabolic effect on bone mass and bone quality and suggests that GIP may be a hormonal link between nutrient ingestion and utilization.

  12. Prediabetes in obese youth: a syndrome of impaired glucose tolerance, severe insulin resistance, and altered myocellular and abdominal fat partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ram; Dufour, Sylvie; Taksali, Sara E; Tambortlane, William V; Petersen, Kitt F; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Boselli, Linda; Barbetta, Gina; Alle, Karin; Rife, Francis; Savoye, Mary; Dziura, James; Sherwin, Robert; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Impaired glucose tolerance is common among obese adolescents, but the changes in insulin sensitivity and secretion that lead to this prediabetic state are unknown. We investigated whether altered partitioning of myocellular and abdominal fat relates to abnormalities in glucose homoeostasis in obese adolescents with prediabetes. Methods We studied 14 obese children with impaired glucose tolerance and 14 with normal glucose tolerance, of similar ages, sex distribution, and degree of obesity. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed by the euglycaemichyperinsulinaemic clamp and the hyperglycaemic clamp. Intramyocellular lipid was assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and abdominal fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging. Findings Peripheral glucose disposal was significantly lower in individuals with impaired than in those with normal glucose tolerance (mean 35·4 [SE 4·0] vs 60·6 [7·2] μmoles per kg lean body mass per min; p=0·023) owing to a reduction in non-oxidative glucose disposal metabolism (storage). Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance had higher intramyocellular lipid content (3·04 [0·43] vs 1·99 [0·19]%, p=0·03), lower abdominal subcutaneous fat (460 [47] vs 626 [39] cm2, p=0·04), and slightly higher visceral fat than the controls (70 [11] vs 47 [6] cm2, p=0·065), resulting in a higher ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat (0·15 [0·02] vs 0·07 [0·01], p=0·002). Intramyocellular and visceral lipid contents were inversely related to the glucose disposal and non-oxidative glucose metabolism and positively related to the 2 h plasma glucose concentration. Interpretation In obese children and adolescents with prediabetes, intramyocellular and intra-abdominal lipid accumulation is closely linked to the development of severe peripheral insulin resistance. PMID:14511928

  13. Prediabetes in obese youth: a syndrome of impaired glucose tolerance, severe insulin resistance, and altered myocellular and abdominal fat partitioning.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ram; Dufour, Sylvie; Taksali, Sara E; Tamborlane, William V; Petersen, Kitt F; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Boselli, Linda; Barbetta, Gina; Allen, Karin; Rife, Francis; Savoye, Mary; Dziura, James; Sherwin, Robert; Shulman, Gerald I; Caprio, Sonia

    2003-09-20

    Impaired glucose tolerance is common among obese adolescents, but the changes in insulin sensitivity and secretion that lead to this prediabetic state are unknown. We investigated whether altered partitioning of myocellular and abdominal fat relates to abnormalities in glucose homoeostasis in obese adolescents with prediabetes. We studied 14 obese children with impaired glucose tolerance and 14 with normal glucose tolerance, of similar ages, sex distribution, and degree of obesity. Insulin sensitivity and secretion were assessed by the euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp and the hyperglycaemic clamp. Intramyocellular lipid was assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and abdominal fat distribution by magnetic resonance imaging. Peripheral glucose disposal was significantly lower in individuals with impaired than in those with normal glucose tolerance (mean 35.4 [SE 4.0] vs 60.6 [7.2] micromoles per kg lean body mass per min; p=0.023) owing to a reduction in non-oxidative glucose disposal metabolism (storage). Individuals with impaired glucose tolerance had higher intramyocellular lipid content (3.04 [0.43] vs 1.99 [0.19]%, p=0.03), lower abdominal subcutaneous fat (460 [47] vs 626 [39] cm2, p=0.04), and slightly higher visceral fat than the controls (70 [11] vs 47 [6] cm2, p=0.065), resulting in a higher ratio of visceral to subcutaneous fat (0.15 [0.02] vs 0.07 [0.01], p=0.002). Intramyocellular and visceral lipid contents were inversely related to the glucose disposal and non-oxidative glucose metabolism and positively related to the 2 h plasma glucose concentration. In obese children and adolescents with prediabetes, intramyocellular and intra-abdominal lipid accumulation is closely linked to the development of severe peripheral insulin resistance.

  14. High glucose inhibits osteogenic differentiation through the BMP signaling pathway in bone mesenchymal stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juncheng; Wang, Bin; Li, Ying; Wang, Dongsheng; Lingling, E; Bai, Yang; Liu, Hongchen

    2013-01-01

    Patients with diabetes tend to have an increased risk of osteoporosis that may be related to hyperglycemia. In vitro evidence has shown that high glucose can affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Tissue regeneration depends mainly on MSCs. However, the exact mechanisms involved in high glucose-induced bone loss remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of high glucose on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mice bone MSCs (BMSCs) and determined the specific mechanism of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) in the osteogenic differentiation of mice BMSCs in a high-glucose microenvironment. High glucose (< 25 mM) promoted cell growth but suppressed mineralization. The intracellular BMP-2 level in BMSCs cultured in a high-glucose microenvironment was significantly decreased and suppressed activation of the BMP signaling pathway. Consequently, expression of the osteogenic markers Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin were decreased. Meanwhile, supplementation with ectogenic BMP-2 reversed the cell osteogenic differentiation and osteogenic marker down-regulation under high glucose. Our data indicate that BMP-2 plays an important role in regulating the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs in a high-glucose microenvironment. Thus, it is possible that agents modifying this pathway could be used by BMSCs to promote bone regeneration in high-glucose microenvironments. PMID:27103890

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone exerts antiglucocorticoid action on human preadipocyte proliferation, differentiation, and glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    McNelis, Joanne C.; Manolopoulos, Konstantinos N.; Gathercole, Laura L.; Bujalska, Iwona J.; Stewart, Paul M.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids increase adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, a process underpinned by the local reactivation of inactive cortisone to active cortisol within adipocytes catalyzed by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1). The adrenal sex steroid precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has been shown to inhibit 11β-HSD1 in murine adipocytes; however, rodent adrenals do not produce DHEA physiologically. Here, we aimed to determine the effects and underlying mechanisms of the potential antiglucocorticoid action of DHEA and its sulfate ester DHEAS in human preadipocytes. Utilizing a human subcutaneous preadipocyte cell line, Chub-S7, we examined the metabolism and effects of DHEA in human adipocytes, including adipocyte proliferation, differentiation, 11β-HSD1 expression, and activity and glucose uptake. DHEA, but not DHEAS, significantly inhibited preadipocyte proliferation via cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase independent of sex steroid and glucocorticoid receptor activation. 11β-HSD1 oxoreductase activity in differentiated adipocytes was inhibited by DHEA. DHEA coincubated with cortisone significantly inhibited preadipocyte differentiation, which was assessed by the expression of markers of early (LPL) and terminal (G3PDH) adipocyte differentiation. Coincubation with cortisol, negating the requirement for 11β-HSD1 oxoreductase activity, diminished the inhibitory effect of DHEA. Further consistent with glucocorticoid-opposing effects of DHEA, insulin-independent glucose uptake was significantly enhanced by DHEA treatment. DHEA increases basal glucose uptake and inhibits human preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation, thereby exerting an antiglucocorticoid action. DHEA inhibition of the amplification of glucocorticoid action mediated by 11β-HSD1 contributes to the inhibitory effect of DHEA on human preadipocyte differentiation. PMID:24022868

  16. Ketone bodies alter dinitrophenol-induced glucose uptake through AMPK inhibition and oxidative stress generation in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Amélie; Coderre, Lise

    2007-05-01

    In aerobic conditions, the heart preferentially oxidizes fatty acids. However, during metabolic stress, glucose becomes the major energy source, and enhanced glucose uptake has a protective effect on heart function and cardiomyocyte survival. Thus abnormal regulation of glucose uptake may contribute to the development of cardiac disease in diabetics. Ketone bodies are often elevated in poorly controlled diabetics and are associated with increased cellular oxidative stress. Thus we sought to determine the effect of the ketone body beta-hydroxybutyrate (OHB) on cardiac glucose uptake during metabolic stress. We used 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), an uncoupler of the mitochondrial oxidative chain, to mimic hypoxia in cardiomyocytes. Our data demonstrated that chronic exposure to OHB provoked a concentration-dependent decrease of DNP action, resulting in 56% inhibition of DNP-mediated glucose uptake at 5 mM OHB. This was paralleled by a diminution of DNP-mediated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Chronic exposure to OHB also increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by 1.9-fold compared with control cells. To further understand the role of ROS in OHB action, cardiomyocytes were incubated with H(2)O(2). Our results demonstrated that this treatment diminished DNP-induced glucose uptake without altering activation of the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Incubation with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine partially restored DNP-mediated glucose but not AMPK/p38 MAPK activation. In conclusion, these results suggest that ketone bodies, through inhibition of the AMPK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway and ROS overproduction, regulate DNP action and thus cardiac glucose uptake. Altered glucose uptake in hyperketonemic states during metabolic stress may contribute to diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  17. Ivabradine and metoprolol differentially affect cardiac glucose metabolism despite similar heart rate reduction in a mouse model of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Fanny; Lauzier, Benjamin; Ruiz, Matthieu; Shi, Yanfen; Lachance, Dominic; Rivard, Marie-Eve; Bolduc, Virginie; Thorin, Eric; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2016-10-01

    While heart rate reduction (HRR) is a target for the management of patients with heart disease, contradictory results were reported using ivabradine, which selectively inhibits the pacemaker If current, vs. β-blockers like metoprolol. This study aimed at testing whether similar HRR with ivabradine vs. metoprolol differentially modulates cardiac energy substrate metabolism, a factor determinant for cardiac function, in a mouse model of dyslipidemia (hApoB(+/+);LDLR(-/-)). Following a longitudinal study design, we used 3- and 6-mo-old mice, untreated or treated for 3 mo with ivabradine or metoprolol. Cardiac function was evaluated in vivo and ex vivo in working hearts perfused with (13)C-labeled substrates to assess substrate fluxes through energy metabolic pathways. Compared with 3-mo-old, 6-mo-old dyslipidemic mice had similar cardiac hemodynamics in vivo but impaired (P < 0.001) contractile function (aortic flow: -45%; cardiac output: -34%; stroke volume: -35%) and glycolysis (-24%) ex vivo. Despite inducing a similar 10% HRR, ivabradine-treated hearts displayed significantly higher stroke volume values and glycolysis vs. their metoprolol-treated counterparts ex vivo, values for the ivabradine group being often not significantly different from 3-mo-old mice. Further analyses highlighted additional significant cardiac alterations with disease progression, namely in the total tissue level of proteins modified by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc), whose formation is governed by glucose metabolism via the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, which showed a similar pattern with ivabradine vs. metoprolol treatment. Collectively, our results emphasize the implication of alterations in cardiac glucose metabolism and signaling linked to disease progression in our mouse model. Despite similar HRR, ivabradine, but not metoprolol, preserved cardiac function and glucose metabolism during disease progression. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Circulating soluble CD36 is a novel marker of liver injury in subjects with altered glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Real, Jose-Manuel; Handberg, Aase; Ortega, Francisco; Højlund, Kurt; Vendrell, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo

    2009-06-01

    Liver injury linked to insulin resistance is characterized by mild to moderate increases in aminotransferase activity. A soluble form of CD36 (sCD36) was recently identified in human plasma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships among plasma sCD36, insulin sensitivity (SI) and indicators of liver health. We evaluated a cohort of men from the general population (n=117). As expected, serum (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) were associated positively with body mass index (BMI) and age and negatively with SI (minimal model method). Circulating sCD36 was positively associated with ALT, AST and GGT in subjects with altered glucose tolerance, but not in those with normal glucose tolerance. The difference in the slope of the relationships was significant (P=.01). Age, BMI and triglycerides (but not sCD36) contributed independently to 29% of ALT variance in subjects with normal glucose tolerance. In contrast, SI and sCD36 contributed independently to 39% of ALT variance in subjects with altered glucose tolerance. The correlation between ALT activity and sCD36 was confirmed in an independent, replication study. In summary, circulating sCD36 could represent a novel marker of liver injury in subjects with altered glucose tolerance.

  19. Iron overload alters glucose homeostasis, causes liver steatosis, and increases serum triacylglycerols in rats.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maísa; Silva, Marcelo E; de Paula, Heberth; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of iron overload with a hyperlipidemic diet on the histologic feature of hepatic tissue, the lipid and glycemic serum profiles, and the markers of oxidative damage and stress in a rat model. Twenty-four male Fischer rats, purchased from Experimental Nutrition Laboratory, Federal University of Ouro Preto, were assigned to 4 equal groups, 2 were fed a standard cholesterol-free diet (group C or control and CI or control with iron) containing 8.0% soybean oil and 2 were fed a hyperlipidemic diet (group H or hyperlipidemic and HI or hyperlipidemic with iron) containing 1.0% cholesterol and 25.0% soybean oil. A total of 50 mg of iron was administered to rats in groups CI and HI in 5 equal doses (1 every 3 weeks for a 16-week period) by intraperitoneal injections of 0.1 mL of iron dextran solution (100 g Fe(2+)/L; Sigma, St Louis, Mo). The other rats in groups C and H were treated in a similar manner but with sterile saline (0.1 mL). Irrespective of the diet, iron excess enhanced serum triacylglycerols (P < .05) and reduced serum glucose and glycated hemoglobin levels (P < .05) but did not affect serum cholesterol concentration. Histologic analysis showed steatosis in groups H and to a lesser extent in HI. No significant differences (P > .05) were observed in paraoxonase activities or in serum levels of free or total sulfhydryl radicals, malondialdehyde, or total antioxidants. The findings suggest that iron excess in the rat probably modifies lipid metabolism and, as a consequence, alters glucose homeostasis and increases the level of serum triacylglycerols but not of cholesterol.

  20. Immune alterations in male and female mice after 2-deoxy-D-glucose administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreau, D.; Morton, D. S.; Foster, M.; Swiggett, J. P.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1997-01-01

    Administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) induces acute cellular glucoprivation. In the current study, we examined differences in immune parameters after 2-DG administration in both sexes. Male and female BDF1 mice were injected three times, 48 h apart, either with a saline solution (control group) or with 2-DG in saline (500 mg/kg). Two hours after the last injection, blood and spleens were collected. Plasma levels of interleukin-1beta, and interferon-gamma levels were measured. Additionally, the levels of the specific leukocyte antigens CD3, CD4, CD8, T cell receptor (TCR) alpha/beta, I-Ad, and H-2Ld/H-2Db were evaluated by flow cytometry on both blood and spleen cells. The blastogenic response of leukocytes from both tissues to mitogens was assessed. Levels of glucose, corticosterone, testosterone, progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone were also determined. Increases in the percentage of cells bearing TCR alpha/beta and I-Ad in the blood and H-2Ld/H-2Db in the spleen were observed in the 2-DG-treated group for both sexes. In contrast, higher corticosterone and IL-1beta plasma concentrations, as well as higher percentages of splenocytes bearing TCR alpha/beta and I-Ad, and lower mitogen-induced proliferation of mature T splenocytes (79%) were observed in female but not in male mice injected with 2-DG compared with those injected with saline (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that female mice are more sensitive than male mice to immune alterations induced by 2-DG administration.

  1. Immune alterations in male and female mice after 2-deoxy-D-glucose administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreau, D.; Morton, D. S.; Foster, M.; Swiggett, J. P.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1997-01-01

    Administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) induces acute cellular glucoprivation. In the current study, we examined differences in immune parameters after 2-DG administration in both sexes. Male and female BDF1 mice were injected three times, 48 h apart, either with a saline solution (control group) or with 2-DG in saline (500 mg/kg). Two hours after the last injection, blood and spleens were collected. Plasma levels of interleukin-1beta, and interferon-gamma levels were measured. Additionally, the levels of the specific leukocyte antigens CD3, CD4, CD8, T cell receptor (TCR) alpha/beta, I-Ad, and H-2Ld/H-2Db were evaluated by flow cytometry on both blood and spleen cells. The blastogenic response of leukocytes from both tissues to mitogens was assessed. Levels of glucose, corticosterone, testosterone, progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone were also determined. Increases in the percentage of cells bearing TCR alpha/beta and I-Ad in the blood and H-2Ld/H-2Db in the spleen were observed in the 2-DG-treated group for both sexes. In contrast, higher corticosterone and IL-1beta plasma concentrations, as well as higher percentages of splenocytes bearing TCR alpha/beta and I-Ad, and lower mitogen-induced proliferation of mature T splenocytes (79%) were observed in female but not in male mice injected with 2-DG compared with those injected with saline (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that female mice are more sensitive than male mice to immune alterations induced by 2-DG administration.

  2. SRSF10 Plays a Role in Myoblast Differentiation and Glucose Production via Regulation of Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Cheng, Yuanming; Wang, Zhijia; Liu, Yuguo; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Lina; Chen, Linlin; Xie, Zhiqin; Lu, Yun; Feng, Ying

    2015-11-24

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism of controlling gene expression and protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. We report that the splicing factor SRSF10 functions during striated muscle development, myoblast differentiation, and glucose production both in cells and in mice. A combination of RNA-sequencing and molecular analysis allowed us to identify muscle-specific splicing events controlled by SRSF10 that are critically involved in striated muscle development. Inclusion of alternative exons 16 and 17 of Lrrfip1 is a muscle-specific event that is activated by SRSF10 and essential for myoblast differentiation. On the other hand, in mouse primary hepatocytes, PGC1α is a key target of SRSF10 that regulates glucose production by fasting. SRSF10 represses inclusion of PGC1α exon 7a and facilitates the production of functional protein. The results highlight the biological significance of SRSF10 and regulated alternative splicing in vivo.

  3. Glucose homeostasis can be differentially modulated by varying individual components of a western diet.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Josephine M; Cowan, Samantha P; Andrikopoulos, Sofianos; Morley, Amy L; Ward, Leigh C; Walker, Karen Z; Cooper, Mark E; Coughlan, Melinda T

    2013-07-01

    Chronic overconsumption of a Western diet has been identified as a major risk factor for diabetes, yet precisely how each individual component contributes to defects in glucose homeostasis independent of consumption of other macronutrients remains unclear. Eight-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats were randomized to feeding with one of six semi-pure diets: control, processed (high advanced glycation end products/AGE), high protein, high dextrose (glucose polymer), high in saturated fat (plant origin), or high in saturated fat (animal origin). After chronic feeding for 24 weeks, body composition was determined by bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy and glucose homeostasis was assessed. When compared to the control and high AGE diets, excess consumption of the diet high in saturated fat (animal source) increased body weight and adiposity, and decreased insulin sensitivity, as defined by HOMA IR, impaired skeletal muscle insulin signaling and insulin hypersecretion in the context of increased circulating glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1). Compared to the control diet, chronic consumption of the high AGE, protein or dextrose diet increased fasting plasma glucose, decreased fasting plasma insulin and insulin secretion. These diets also reduced circulating GLP-1 concentrations. These data suggest that individual components of a western diet have differential effects in modulating glucose homeostasis and adiposity. These data provide clear evidence of a link between over-consumption of a western diet and the development of diabetes.

  4. The possible relevance of autoxidative glycosylation in glucose mediated alterations of proteins: an in vitro study on myofibrillar proteins.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Chithra, P; Chandrakasan, G

    1996-01-26

    The present work was carried out to examine the role of glycation and transition metal catalysed autoxidation of sugars in glucose-mediated alterations of myofibrillar proteins. Myofibrils were prepared from rat skeletal muscle and incubated with 1) sugar alone 2) sugar and micromolar concentrations of transition metals (Cu2+ or Fe3+) 3) transition metals alone and the control remained without sugar or transition metals. A significant increase in extent of glycation and decrease in ATPase activity of myofibrils incubated under autoxidative conditions were observed over the other three incubations. Reducing agent 2-mercaptoethanol was highly effective in preventing the alterations induced by glucoxidation, compared to EDTA and aminoguanidine, suggesting the involvement of thiol group oxidation in the reduced function of the protein. Free radical scavengers like catalase, benzoic acid and mannitol were also effective in preventing glucose mediated alterations. Although a high concentration of glucose alone has an insignificant effect on myofibrils in vitro, the results from the present work suggest that glucose in combination with transition metals could lead to functional alterations of myofibrils, and this process by generating free radicals may contribute to the overall complications of diabetes and aging.

  5. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yansong; Xu, Dan; Feng, Jianghua; Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  6. Dietary Capsaicin Improves Glucose Homeostasis and Alters the Gut Microbiota in Obese Diabetic ob/ob Mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun-Xian; Ren, Hui; Gao, Yuan-Feng; Lee, Chong-You; Li, Su-Fang; Zhang, Feng; Li, Long; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Background: The effects of capsaicin on obesity and glucose homeostasis are still controversial and the mechanisms underlying these effects remain largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between the regulation of obesity and glucose homeostasis by dietary capsaicin and the alterations of gut microbiota in obese diabetic ob/ob mice. Methods: The ob/ob mice were subjected to a normal, low-capsaicin (0.01%), or high-capsaicin (0.02%) diet for 6 weeks, respectively. Obesity phenotypes, glucose homeostasis, the gut microbiota structure and composition, short-chain fatty acids, gastrointestinal hormones, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured. Results: Both the low- and high-capsaicin diets failed to prevent the increase in body weight, adiposity index, and Lee's obesity index. However, dietary capsaicin at both the low and high doses significantly inhibited the increase of fasting blood glucose and insulin levels. These inhibitory effects were comparable between the two groups. Similarly, dietary capsaicin resulted in remarkable improvement in glucose and insulin tolerance. In addition, neither the low- nor high-capsaicin diet could alter the α-diversity and β-diversity of the gut microbiota. Taxonomy-based analysis showed that both the low- and high-capsaicin diets, acting in similar ways, significantly increased the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio at the phylum level as well as increased the Roseburia abundance and decreased the Bacteroides and Parabacteroides abundances at the genus level. Spearman's correlation analysis revealed that the Roseburia abundance was negatively while the Bacteroides and Parabacteroides abundances were positively correlated to the fasting blood glucose level and area under the curve by the oral glucose tolerance test. Finally, the low- and high-capsaicin diets significantly increased the fecal butyrate and plasma total GLP-1 levels, but decreased plasma total ghrelin, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6

  7. Frequent alteration of the protein synthesis of enzymes for glucose metabolism in hepatocellular carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takayuki; Inoue, Ken-ichi; Hachiya, Hiroyuki; Shibuya, Norisuke; Shimoda, Mitsugi; Kubota, Keiichi

    2014-09-01

    Cancer cells show enhanced glycolysis and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, even in the presence of sufficient oxygen (aerobic glycolysis). Glycolysis is much less efficient for energy production than oxidative phosphorylation, and the reason why cancer cells selectively use glycolysis remains unclear. Biospecimens were collected from 45 hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Protein samples were prepared through subcellular localization or whole-cell lysis. Protein synthesis was measured by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting. mRNA transcription was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Statistical correlation among immunoblotting data and clinicolaboratory factors were analyzed using SPSS. Enzymes for oxidative phosphorylation (SDHA and SDHB) were frequently decreased (56 and 48 % of patients, respectively) in hepatocellular carcinomas. The lowered amount of the SDH protein complex was rarely accompanied by stabilization of HIF1α and subsequent activation of the hypoxia response. On the other hand, protein synthesis of G6PD and TKT, enzymes critical for pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), was increased (in 45 and 55 % of patients, respectively), while that of ALDOA, an enzyme for mainstream glycolysis, was eliminated (in 55 % of patients). Alteration of protein synthesis was correlated with gene expression for G6PD and TKT, but not for TKTL1, ALDOA, SDHA or SDHB. Augmented transcription and synthesis of PPP enzymes were accompanied by nuclear accumulation of NRF2. Hepatocellular carcinomas divert glucose metabolism to the anabolic shunt by activating transcription factor NRF2.

  8. Whole Grain Products, Fish and Bilberries Alter Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in a Randomized, Controlled Trial: The Sysdimet Study

    PubMed Central

    Lankinen, Maria; Schwab, Ursula; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Paananen, Jussi; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Gylling, Helena; Uusitupa, Matti; Orešič, Matej

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the growing prevalence of type 2 diabetes, new dietary solutions are needed to help improve glucose and lipid metabolism in persons at high risk of developing the disease. Herein we investigated the effects of low-insulin-response grain products, fatty fish, and berries on glucose metabolism and plasma lipidomic profiles in persons with impaired glucose metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings Altogether 106 men and women with impaired glucose metabolism and with at least two other features of the metabolic syndrome were included in a 12-week parallel dietary intervention. The participants were randomized into three diet intervention groups: (1) whole grain and low postprandial insulin response grain products, fatty fish three times a week, and bilberries three portions per day (HealthyDiet group), (2) Whole grain enriched diet (WGED) group, which includes principally the same grain products as group (1), but with no change in fish or berry consumption, and (3) refined wheat breads (Control). Oral glucose tolerance, plasma fatty acids and lipidomic profiles were measured before and after the intervention. Self-reported compliance with the diets was good and the body weight remained constant. Within the HealthyDiet group two hour glucose concentration and area-under-the-curve for glucose decreased and plasma proportion of (n-3) long-chain PUFAs increased (False Discovery Rate p-values <0.05). Increases in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid associated curvilinearly with the improved insulin secretion and glucose disposal. Among the 364 characterized lipids, 25 changed significantly in the HealthyDiet group, including multiple triglycerides incorporating the long chain (n-3) PUFA. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that the diet rich in whole grain and low insulin response grain products, bilberries, and fatty fish improve glucose metabolism and alter the lipidomic profile. Therefore, such a diet may have a beneficial effect

  9. Correlations between magnetic resonance spectroscopy alterations and cerebral ammonia and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients with and without hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Weissenborn, Karin; Ahl, Björn; Fischer‐Wasels, Daniela; van den Hoff, Joerg; Hecker, Hartmut; Burchert, Wolfgang; Köstler, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatic encephalopathy is considered to be mainly caused by increased ammonia metabolism of the brain. If this hypothesis is true, cerebral glucose utilisation, which is considered to represent brain function, should be closely related to cerebral ammonia metabolism. The aim of the present study was to analyse whether cerebral ammonia and glucose metabolism in cirrhotic patients with early grades of hepatic encephalopathy are as closely related as could be expected from current hypotheses on hepatic encephalopathy. Methods 13N‐ammonia and 18F‐fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) were performed in 21 cirrhotic patients with grade 0–1 hepatic encephalopathy. Quantitative values of cerebral ammonia uptake and retention rate and glucose utilisation were derived for several regions of interest and were correlated with the MRS data of the basal ganglia, white matter and frontal cortex. Results A significant correlation between plasma ammonia levels and cerebral ammonia metabolism, respectively, and MRS alterations could be shown only for white matter. In contrast, MRS alterations in all three regions studied were significantly correlated with the glucose utilisation of several brain regions. Cerebral ammonia and glucose metabolism were not correlated. Conclusion Increase of cerebral ammonia metabolism is an important but not exclusive causal factor for the development of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:17660226

  10. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning in an animal model: the effects of altered glucose on morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Penney, D G

    1993-06-11

    An animal model in which the common carotid artery and the jugular vein serving one side of the brain are occluded by indwelling catheters has been used during the past few years to investigate acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. This article reviews the recent research examining the pattern of changes in blood glucose concentration which results from CO exposure, and the manner in which altered glucose concentration alters neurologic outcome and mortality. At present it appears that either greatly depressed glucose or greatly elevated glucose during and/or after CO exposure increases morbidity and mortality. Cyanide (CN) poisoning, in contrast to CO, produces a different pattern of changes in blood glucose and lactate, and unlike CO, fails to slow cardiac AV conduction and ventricular repolarization. Through the use of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopic techniques, cerebral cortical edema and the changes in brain phosphagens have been assessed following CO poisoning in the rat. The published results as well as data from recent pilot studies are discussed in the light of our current understanding of CO toxicology.

  11. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans.

    PubMed

    Butler, Andrew A; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L; Havel, Peter J

    2015-10-05

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations.

  12. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  13. Oral tungstate treatment improves only transiently alteration of glucose metabolism in a new rat model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Vanna; De Tata, Vincenzo; Pocai, Alessandro; Novelli, Michela; Barberà, Albert; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2002-11-01

    It has been shown that tungstate is an effective hypoglycemic agent in several animal models of diabetes. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of oral tungstate treatment in a new experimental diabetic syndrome, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide in adult rats, that shares several features with human type 2 diabetes. Sodium tungstate was administered in the drinking water (2 mg/mL) of control and diabetic rats for 15, 30, 60, and 90 d. Glucose metabolism was explored in vivo by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Insulin secretion and action were assessed in vitro in the isolated perfused pancreas and isolated adipocytes, respectively. Two weeks of tungstate treatment did not modify the moderate hyperglycemia of diabetic rats but reduced their intolerance to glucose, owing to an enhancement of postloading insulin secretion. However, this effect was transient, since it declined after 30 d and vanished after 60 and 90 d of tungstate administration, whereas a trend toward a reduction in basal hyperglycemia was observed on prolonged treatment. Oral tungstate was unable to modify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the isolated perfused pancreas, as well as muscle glycogen levels, hepatic glucose metabolism, and insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in isolated adipocytes. Nevertheless, the decreased insulin content of pancreatic islets of diabetic rats was partially restored on prolonged tungstate treatment. In conclusion, in the STZ-nicotinamide model of diabetes, tungstate was unable to permanently correct the alterations in glucose metabolism, despite some indirect evidence of a trophic effect on beta-cells. The ineffectiveness of tungstate could be related to the absence, in this diabetic syndrome, of relevant metabolic alterations in the liver, which thus appear to constitute the major target of tungstate action.

  14. Diabetes and exposure to peritoneal dialysis solutions alter tight junction proteins and glucose transporters of rat peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Debray-García, Yazmin; Sánchez, Elsa I; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Venegas, Miguel A; Velazquez, Josue; Reyes, José L

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate alterations in tight junction (TJ) proteins and glucose transporters in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells (RPMC) from diabetic rats and after treatment with peritoneal dialysis solutions (PDS) in vitro. Diabetes was induced in female Wistar rats by streptozotocin (STZ)-injection. Twenty-one days after STZ-injection, peritoneal thickness and mesothelial cell morphology were studied by light microscopy and microvilli length and density by atomic force microscopy. RPMC were obtained from healthy and diabetic rats. Mesothelial phenotype, evaluated by cytokeratin and pan-cadherin, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), evaluated by alpha-smooth muscle action (α-SMA) and vimentin, TJ proteins, claudins-1 and -2, and occludin, and glucose transporters, sodium and glucose co-transporters (SGLT) -1 and -2 and facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT) -1 and -2 were analyzed. Also, transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) was measured. Oxidative stress was estimated by measuring reactive oxygen species production, and protein carbonylation, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), nuclear factor erythroid related factor-2 (Nrf-2), and expression of antioxidant enzymes. Peritoneal damage was present 21days after STZ-injection. Diabetes induced changes in TJ and glucose transporters in RPMC together with decreased TER. RPMC from diabetic rats showed oxidative stress, which was enhanced by exposure to PDS. In addition, RPMC from diabetic rats showed early EMT. To our knowledge, this is the first study that shows changes in TJ proteins and glucose transporters of RPMC from diabetic rats. All these alterations might explain the increased peritoneal permeability observed in diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Iris as a reflector for differential absorption low-coherence interferometry to measure glucose level in the anterior chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zeng, Nan; Ji, Yanhong; Li, Yao; Dai, Xiangsong; Li, Peng; Duan, Lian; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    We present a method of glucose concentration detection in the anterior chamber with a differential absorption optical low-coherent interferometry (LCI) technique. Back-reflected light from the iris, passing through the anterior chamber twice, was selectively obtained with the LCI technique. Two light sources, one centered within (1625 nm) and the other centered outside (1310 nm) of a glucose absorption band were used for differential absorption measurement. In the eye model and pig eye experiments, we obtained a resolution glucose level of 26.8 mg/dL and 69.6 mg/dL, respectively. This method has a potential application for noninvasive detection of glucose concentration in aqueous humor, which is related to the glucose concentration in blood.

  16. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens in adult male rats affects hypothalamic regulation of food intake, induces obesity and alters glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Rossetti, María Florencia; Alzamendi, Ana; Castrogiovanni, Daniel; Luque, Enrique H; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2015-02-05

    The absence of phytoestrogens in the diet during pregnancy has been reported to result in obesity later in adulthood. We investigated whether phytoestrogen withdrawal in adult life could alter the hypothalamic signals that regulate food intake and affect body weight and glucose homeostasis. Male Wistar rats fed from conception to adulthood with a high phytoestrogen diet were submitted to phytoestrogen withdrawal by feeding a low phytoestrogen diet, or a high phytoestrogen-high fat diet. Withdrawal of dietary phytoestrogens increased body weight, adiposity and energy intake through an orexigenic hypothalamic response characterized by upregulation of AGRP and downregulation of POMC. This was associated with elevated leptin and T4, reduced TSH, testosterone and estradiol, and diminished hypothalamic ERα expression, concomitant with alterations in glucose tolerance. Removing dietary phytoestrogens caused manifestations of obesity and diabetes that were more pronounced than those induced by the high phytoestrogen-high fat diet intake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Consuming a small-moderate dose of red wine alone can alter the glucose-insulin relationship.

    PubMed

    Kokavec, Anna; Halloran, Mark A

    2010-12-01

    The aim in the present study was to assess the effect of small-moderate red wine ingestion on the level of serum insulin and plasma glucose when nutritional status is varied. Twenty nondiabetic males (19-22 years) participated in the study. In the fasting trial, all participants underwent a 6 h fast prior to consuming 4 standard units of red wine (40 g alcohol) or the equivalent amount of placebo as dealcoholized wine (containing <0.5% alcohol, 0% resveratrol) over a 135 min period. Alternatively, in the feeding trial, participants consumed food for 45 min prior to ingesting 4 standard units of red wine (40 g alcohol) or placebo over 135 min. Serum insulin and plasma glucose were assessed at regular 45 min intervals during all trials. The results showed a significant decrease in the level of serum insulin and no significant change in plasma glucose concentration in the fasting trial. Alternatively, a significant alcohol-induced decrease in plasma glucose and no change in serum insulin occurred when red wine alone was consumed after food. It was concluded that red wine can alter the glucose-insulin relationship and ingesting red wine alone (without food) should not be encouraged in nondiabetic individuals.

  18. Mayaro virus infection alters glucose metabolism in cultured cells through activation of the enzyme 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase.

    PubMed

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Menezes, Maíra M T; Azevedo e Silva, Melissa C; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2004-11-01

    Although it is well established that cellular transformation with tumor virus leads to changes on glucose metabolism, the effects of cell infection by non-transforming virus are far to be completely elucidated. In this study, we report the first evidence that cultured Vero cells infected with the alphavirus Mayaro show several alterations on glucose metabolism. Infected cells presented a two fold increase on glucose consumption, accompanied by an increment in lactate production. This increase in glycolytic flux was also demonstrated by a significant increase on the activity of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase, one of the regulatory enzymes of glycolysis. Analysis of the kinetic parameters revealed that the regulation of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase is altered in infected cells, presenting an increase in Vmax along with a decrease in Km for fructose-6-phosphate. Another fact contributing to an increase in enzyme activity was the decrease in ATP levels observed in infected cells. Additionally, the levels of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, a potent activator of this enzyme, was significantly reduced in infected cells. These observations suggest that the increase in PFK activity may be a compensatory cellular response to the viral-induced metabolic alterations that could lead to an impairment of the glycolytic flux and energy production.

  19. Keratin 8/18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal versus cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulation of hexokinase status and insulin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jasmin; Loranger, Anne; Gilbert, Stéphane; Faure, Robert; Marceau, Normand

    2013-02-15

    As differentiated cells, hepatocytes primarily metabolize glucose for ATP production through oxidative phosphorylation of glycolytic pyruvate, whereas proliferative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells undergo a metabolic shift to aerobic glycolysis despite oxygen availability. Keratins, the intermediate filament (IF) proteins of epithelial cells, are expressed as pairs in a lineage/differentiation manner. Hepatocyte and HCC (hepatoma) cell IFs are made solely of keratins 8/18 (K8/K18), thus providing models of choice to address K8/K18 IF functions in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. Here, we demonstrate distinctive increases in glucose uptake, glucose-6-phosphate formation, lactate release, and glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatocytes and/or hepatoma cells versus their respective IF-containing counterparts. We also show that the K8/K18-dependent glucose uptake/G6P formation is linked to alterations in hexokinase I/II/IV content and localization at mitochondria, with little effect on GLUT1 status. In addition, we find that the insulin-stimulated glycogen formation in normal hepatocytes involves the main PI-3 kinase-dependent signaling pathway and that the K8/K18 IF loss makes them more efficient glycogen producers. In comparison, the higher insulin-dependent glycogen formation in K8/K18 IF-lacking hepatoma cells is associated with a signaling occurring through a mTOR-dependent pathway, along with an augmentation in cell proliferative activity. Together, the results uncover a key K8/K18 regulation of glucose metabolism in normal and cancerous hepatic cells through differential modulations of mitochondrial HK status and insulin-mediated signaling.

  20. Mechanical strain- and high glucose-induced alterations in mesangial cell collagen metabolism: role of TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Riser, B L; Cortes, P; Yee, J; Sharba, A K; Asano, K; Rodriguez-Barbero, A; Narins, R G

    1998-05-01

    Cultured mesangial cells (MC) exposed to cyclic mechanical strain or high glucose levels increase their secretion of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and collagen, suggesting possible mechanisms for the development of diabetic renal sclerosis resulting from intraglomerular hypertension and/or hyperglycemia. This study examines whether glucose interacts with mechanical strain to influence collagen metabolism and whether this change is mediated by TGF-beta. Accordingly, rat MC were grown on flexible-bottom plates in 8 or 35 mM glucose media, subjected to 2 to 5 d of cyclic stretching, and assayed for TGF-beta1 mRNA, TGF-beta1 secretion, and the incorporation of 14C-proline into free or protein-associated hydroxyproline to assess the dynamics of collagen metabolism. Stretching or high glucose exposure increased TGF-beta1 secretion twofold and TGF-beta1 mRNA levels by 30 and 45%, respectively. However, the combination of these stimuli increased secretion greater than fivefold without further elevating mRNA. In 8 mM glucose medium, stretching significantly increased MC collagen synthesis and breakdown, but did not alter accumulation, whereas those stretched in 35 mM glucose markedly increased collagen accumulation. TGF-beta neutralization significantly reduced baseline collagen synthesis, breakdown, and accumulation in low glucose, but had no significant effect on the changes induced by stretch. In contrast, the same treatment of MC in high glucose medium greatly reduced stretch-induced synthesis and breakdown of collagen and totally abolished the increase in collagen accumulation. These results indicate that TGF-beta plays a positive regulatory role in MC collagen synthesis, breakdown, and accumulation. However, in low glucose there is no stretch-induced collagen accumulation, and the effect of TGF-beta is limited to basal collagen turnover. In high glucose media, TGF-beta is a critical mediator of stretch-induced collagen synthesis and catabolism, and

  1. Differential regulation of glucose transporter expression by estrogen and progesterone in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Medina, Rodolfo A; Meneses, Ana Maria; Vera, Juan Carlos; Gúzman, Catherine; Nualart, Francisco; Rodriguez, Federico; de los Angeles Garcia, Maria; Kato, Sumie; Espinoza, Natalia; Monsó, Carolina; Carvajal, Andres; Pinto, Mauricio; Owen, Gareth I

    2004-09-01

    Estrogen replacement therapy and other unopposed estrogen treatments increase the incidence of endometrial abnormalities, including cancer. However, this effect is counteracted by the co-administration of progesterone. In the endometrium, glucose transporter (GLUT) expression and glucose transport are known to fluctuate throughout the menstrual cycle. Here, we determined the effect of estrogen and progesterone on the expression of GLUT1-4 and on the transport of deoxyglucose in Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells. Cells were incubated with estrogen, progesterone or combined estrogen and progesterone for 24 h and the effect on the expression of GLUT1-4 and on deoxyglucose transport was determined. We show that GLUT1 expression is upregulated by estrogen and progesterone individually, but that combined estrogen and progesterone treatment reverses this increase. Hormonal treatments do not affect GLUT2, GLUT3 or GLUT4 expression. Transport studies demonstrate that estrogen increases deoxyglucose transport at Michaelis-Menten constants (Kms) corresponding to GLUT1/4, an effect which disappears when progesterone is added concomitantly. These data demonstrate that different hormonal treatments differentially regulate GLUT expression and glucose transport in this endometrial cancer cell line. This regulation mirrors the role played by estrogen and progesterone on the incidence of cancer in this tissue and suggests that GLUT1 may be utilized by endometrial cancer cells to fuel their demand for increased energy requirement.

  2. Acoustic imprinting leads to differential 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake in the chick forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, V; Scheich, H

    1983-01-01

    This report describes experiments in which successful acoustic imprinting correlates with differential uptake of D-2-deoxy[14C]glucose in particular forebrain areas that are not considered primarily auditory. Newly hatched guinea chicks (Numida meleagris meleagris) were imprinted by playing 1.8-kHz or 2.5-kHz tone bursts for prolonged periods. Those chicks were considered to be imprinted who approached the imprinting stimulus (emitted from a loudspeaker) and preferred it over a new stimulus in a simultaneous discrimination test. In the 2-deoxy-D-glucose experiment all chicks, imprinted and naive, were exposed to 1.8-kHz tone bursts for 1 hr. As shown by the autoradiographic analysis of the brains, neurons in the 1.8-kHz isofrequency plane of the auditory "cortex" (field L) were activated in all chicks, whether imprinted or not. However, in the most rostral forebrain striking differences were found. Imprinted chicks showed an increased 2-deoxy-D-glucose uptake in three areas, as compared to naive chicks: (i) the lateral neostriatum and hyperstriatum ventrale, (ii) a medial magnocellular field (medial neostriatum/hyperstriatum ventrale), and (iii) the most dorsal layers of the hyperstriatum. Based on these findings we conclude that these areas are involved in the processing of auditory stimuli once they have become meaningful by experience. Images PMID:6574519

  3. Fat intake leads to differential response of rat adipocytes to glucose, insulin and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Diaz, Diego F; Campion, Javier; Arellano, Arianna V; Milagro, Fermin I; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria J; Martinez, J Alfredo

    2012-04-01

    Antioxidant-based treatments have emerged as novel and interesting approaches to counteract fat accumulation in obesity and associated metabolic disturbances. Adipocytes from rats that were fed on chow or high-fat diet (HFD) for 50 d were isolated (primary adipocytes) and incubated (72 h) on low (LG; 5.6 mmol/L) or high (HG; 25 mmol/L) glucose levels, in the presence or absence of 1.6 nmol/L insulin and 200 μmol/L vitamin C (VC). Adipocytes from HFD-fed animals presented lower insulin-induced glucose uptake, lower lactate and glycerol release, and lower insulin-induced secretion of some adipokines as compared with controls. HG treatment restored the blunted response to insulin regarding apelin secretion in adipocytes from HFD-fed rats. VC treatment inhibited the levels of nearly all variables, irrespective of the adipocytes' dietary origin. The HG treatment reduced adipocyte viability, and VC protected from this toxic effect, although more drastically in control adipocytes. Summing up, in vivo chow or HFD intake determines a differential response to insulin and glucose treatments that appears to be dependent on the insulin-resistance status of the adipocytes, while VC modifies some responses from adipocytes independently of the previous dietary intake of the animals.

  4. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response. PMID:17476345

  5. Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2007-05-01

    Tumors require a constant influx of myelomonocytic cells to support the angiogenesis and stroma remodeling needed for their growth. This is mediated by tumor-derived factors, which cause sustained myelopoiesis and the accumulation and functional differentiation of myelomonocytic cells, most of which are macrophages, at the tumor site. An important side effect of the accumulation and functional differentiation of these cells is that they can induce lymphocyte dysfunction. A complete understanding of the complex interplay between neoplastic and myelomonocytic cells might offer novel targets for therapeutic intervention aimed at depriving tumor cells of important growth support and enhancing the antitumor immune response.

  6. Phosphorylated S6K1 (Thr389) is a molecular adipose tissue marker of altered glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Ortega, Francisco; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sabater, Mònica; Ricart, Wifredo; Zorzano, Antonio; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Molecular tissue markers of altered glucose metabolism will be useful as potential targets for antidiabetic drugs. S6K1 is a downstream signal of insulin action. We aimed to evaluate (pThr389)S6K1 and total S6K1 levels in human and rat fat depots as candidate markers of altered glucose metabolism. (pThr389)S6K1 and total S6K1 levels were measured using enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA) in 49 adipose tissue samples from subjects with morbid obesity and in 18 peri-renal white adipose tissue samples from rats. The effects of high glucose and rosiglitazone have been explored in human preadipocytes. (pThr389)S6K1/(total)S6K1 in subcutaneous adipose tissue was significantly increased subjects with Type 2 diabetes (0.78 ± 0.26 vs. 0.55 ± 0.14, P=.02) and associated with fasting glucose (r=0.46, P=.04) and glycated hemoglobin (r=0.63, P=.02) in SAT. Similar associations with fasting glucose (r=0.43, P=.03) and IRS1 (r=-0.41, P=.04) gene expression were found in visceral adipose tissue. In addition, rat experiments confirmed the higher (pThr389)S6K1/totalS6K1 levels in adipose tissue in association with obesity-associated metabolic disturbances. (pThr389)S6K1/totalS6K1 was validated using western blot in rat adipose tissue. Both ELISA and western blot data significantly correlated (r=0.85, P=.005). In human preadipocytes, high glucose medium led to increased (pThr389)S6K1/total S6K1 levels in comparison with normal glucose medium, which was significantly decreased under rosiglitazone administration. In conclusion, in human and rat adipose tissue, phosphorylated S6K1 is a marker for increased glucose levels.

  7. Inhibition of sweet chemosensory receptors alters insulin responses during glucose ingestion in healthy adults: a randomized crossover interventional study.

    PubMed

    Karimian Azari, Elnaz; Smith, Kathleen R; Yi, Fanchao; Osborne, Timothy F; Bizzotto, Roberto; Mari, Andrea; Pratley, Richard E; Kyriazis, George A

    2017-04-01

    Background: Glucose is a natural ligand for sweet taste receptors (STRs) that are expressed on the tongue and in the gastrointestinal tract. Whether STRs directly contribute to the regulation of glucose homeostasis in response to glucose ingestion is unclear.Objective: We sought to determine the metabolic effects of the pharmacologic inhibition of STRs in response to an oral glucose load in healthy lean participants.Design: Ten healthy lean participants with a body mass index (in kg/m(2)) of 22.4 ± 0.8 were subjected to an oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) on 4 separate days with the use of a randomized crossover design. Ten minutes before the 75-g OGTT, participants consumed a preload solution of either 300 parts per million (ppm) saccharin or water with or without the addition of 500 ppm lactisole, a human-specific inhibitor of STRs. When present, lactisole was included in both the preload and OGTT solutions. We assessed plasma responses of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2, gastric inhibitory peptide, acetaminophen, and 3-O-methylglucose. With the use of mathematical modeling, we estimated gastric emptying, glucose absorption, β-cell function, insulin sensitivity and clearance, and the portal insulin:glucagon ratio.Results: The addition of lactisole to the OGTT caused increases in the plasma responses of insulin (P = 0.012), C-peptide (P = 0.004), and the insulin secretory rate (P = 0.020) compared with the control OGTT. The addition of lactisole also caused a slight reduction in the insulin sensitivity index independent of prior saccharin consumption (P < 0.025). The ingestion of saccharin before the OGTT did not alter any of the measured variables but eliminated the effects of lactisole on the OGTT.Conclusion: The pharmacologic inhibition of STRs in the gastrointestinal tract alters insulin responses during an oral glucose challenge in lean healthy participants. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT

  8. Effects of high glucose on mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yuming; Schilling, Tatjana; Benisch, Peggy; Zeck, Sabine; Meissner-Weigl, Jutta; Schneider, Doris; Limbert, Catarina; Seufert, Jochen; Kassem, Moustapha; Schuetze, Norbert; Jakob, Franz Ebert, Regina

    2007-11-09

    High glucose (HG) concentrations impair cellular functions and induce apoptosis. Exposition of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to HG was reported to reduce colony forming activity and induce premature senescence. We characterized the effects of HG on human MSC in vitro using telomerase-immortalized MSC (hMSC-TERT) and primary MSC (hMSC). HG (25 mM) enhanced hMSC-TERT proliferation in long-term studies in contrast to hMSC where proliferation was unchanged. Thioredoxin-interacting protein, which is involved in apoptosis regulation, was stimulated by glucose in hMSC-TERT. However, apoptosis was not influenced by HG in both cell types. MSC treatment with HG favored osteogenic differentiation. MSC are resistant to HG toxicity, depending on the stemness of MSC. Proliferation and osteogenic differentiation are stimulated by HG. Effects of HG on the transient amplifying compartment of MSC may differ from those in mature cells. Further research is needed to unravel the molecular mechanisms of HG resistance of MSC.

  9. Differential Responses of Plasma Adropin Concentrations To Dietary Glucose or Fructose Consumption In Humans

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Andrew A.; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Siebert, Emily A.; Medici, Valentina; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Havel, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Adropin is a peptide hormone encoded by the Energy Homeostasis Associated (ENHO) gene whose physiological role in humans remains incompletely defined. Here we investigated the impact of dietary interventions that affect systemic glucose and lipid metabolism on plasma adropin concentrations in humans. Consumption of glucose or fructose as 25% of daily energy requirements (E) differentially affected plasma adropin concentrations (P < 0.005) irrespective of duration, sex or age. Glucose consumption reduced plasma adropin from 3.55 ± 0.26 to 3.28 ± 0.23 ng/ml (N = 42). Fructose consumption increased plasma adropin from 3.63 ± 0.29 to 3.93 ± 0.34 ng/ml (N = 45). Consumption of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as 25% E had no effect (3.43 ± 0.32 versus 3.39 ± 0.24 ng/ml, N = 26). Overall, the effect of glucose, HFCS and fructose on circulating adropin concentrations were similar to those observed on postprandial plasma triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, increases in plasma adropin levels with fructose intake were most robust in individuals exhibiting hypertriglyceridemia. Individuals with low plasma adropin concentrations also exhibited rapid increases in plasma levels following consumption of breakfasts supplemented with lipids. These are the first results linking plasma adropin levels with dietary sugar intake in humans, with the impact of fructose consumption linked to systemic triglyceride metabolism. In addition, dietary fat intake may also increase circulating adropin concentrations. PMID:26435060

  10. Growth differentiation factor 15 increases following oral glucose ingestion: effect of meal composition and obesity.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Kasses, Dominik; Tugendsam, Christina; Riedl, Michaela; Peric, Slobodan; Prager, Gerhard; Krebs, Michael; Promintzer-Schifferl, Miriam; Clodi, Martin; Luger, Anton; Vila, Greisa

    2016-12-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a cardiovascular biomarker belonging to the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. Increased GDF15 concentrations are associated with insulin resistance, diabetes and obesity. We investigated the physiological effects of meal composition and obesity on the regulation of systemic GDF15 levels. Lean (n = 8) and obese (n = 8) individuals received a carbohydrate- or fat-rich meal, a 75 g oral glucose load (OGTT) or short-term fasting. OGTTs were performed in severely obese patients (n = 6) pre- and post-bariatric surgery. Circulating serum GDF15 concentrations were studied in lean and obese individuals in response to different meals, OGTT or short-term fasting, and in severely obese patients pre- and post-bariatric surgery. Regulation of GDF15 mRNA levels and protein release were evaluated in the human hepatic cell line HepG2. GDF15 concentrations steadily decrease during short-term fasting in lean and obese individuals. Carbohydrate- and fat-rich meals do not influence GDF15, whereas an OGTT leads to a late increase in GDF15 levels. The positive effect of OGTT on GDF15 levels is also preserved in severely obese patients, pre- and post-bariatric surgery. We further studied the regulation of GDF15 mRNA levels and protein release in HepG2, finding that glucose and insulin independently stimulate both GDF15 transcription and secretion. In summary, high glucose and insulin peaks upregulate GDF15 transcription and release. The nutrient-induced increase in GDF15 levels depends on rapid glucose and insulin excursions following fast-digesting carbohydrates, but not on the amount of calories taken in. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  11. Glucose or Altered Ceramide Biosynthesis Mediate Oxygen Deprivation Sensitivity Through Novel Pathways Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ladage, Mary L; King, Skylar D; Burks, David J; Quan, Daniel L; Garcia, Anastacia M; Azad, Rajeev K; Padilla, Pamela A

    2016-10-13

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes display metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperglycemia, increased free fatty acids, insulin resistance, and altered ceramide levels, that contribute to vascular dysfunctions and compromised oxygen delivery. Caenorhabditis elegans fed a glucose-supplemented diet or with altered ceramide metabolism, due to a hyl-2 mutation, are sensitive to oxygen deprivation (anoxia). Our experiments showed that the combination of these factors further decreased the anoxia survival. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed to assess how a glucose-supplemented diet and/or a hyl-2 mutation altered the transcriptome. Comparison analysis of transcripts associated with anoxia-sensitive animals [hyl-2(tm2031) mutation or a glucose diet] revealed 199 common transcripts encoded by genes with known or predicted functions involving innate immunity, cuticle function (collagens), or xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system. Use of RNA interference (RNAi) to target gene products of the xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system (UDP-glycosyltransferase and Cytochrome p450 genes; ugt-15, ugt-18, ugt-19, ugt-41, ugt-63, cyp-13A12, cyp-25A1, and cyp-33C8) increased anoxia survival in wild-type animals fed a standard diet. Anoxia sensitivity of the hyl-2(tm2031) animals was suppressed by RNAi of cyp-25A1 or cyp-33C8 genes. A glucose diet fed to the P0 hermaphrodite decreased the anoxia survival of its F1 embryos; however, the RNAi of ugt-63 and cyp-33C8 suppressed anoxia sensitivity. These studies provide evidence that the detoxification system impacts oxygen deprivation responses and that C. elegans can be used to model the conserved detoxification system.

  12. Glucose or Altered Ceramide Biosynthesis Mediate Oxygen Deprivation Sensitivity Through Novel Pathways Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ladage, Mary L.; King, Skylar D.; Burks, David J.; Quan, Daniel L.; Garcia, Anastacia M.; Azad, Rajeev K.; Padilla, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes display metabolic abnormalities, such as hyperglycemia, increased free fatty acids, insulin resistance, and altered ceramide levels, that contribute to vascular dysfunctions and compromised oxygen delivery. Caenorhabditis elegans fed a glucose-supplemented diet or with altered ceramide metabolism, due to a hyl-2 mutation, are sensitive to oxygen deprivation (anoxia). Our experiments showed that the combination of these factors further decreased the anoxia survival. RNA-sequencing analysis was performed to assess how a glucose-supplemented diet and/or a hyl-2 mutation altered the transcriptome. Comparison analysis of transcripts associated with anoxia-sensitive animals [hyl-2(tm2031) mutation or a glucose diet] revealed 199 common transcripts encoded by genes with known or predicted functions involving innate immunity, cuticle function (collagens), or xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system. Use of RNA interference (RNAi) to target gene products of the xenobiotic and endobiotic phase I and II detoxification system (UDP-glycosyltransferase and Cytochrome p450 genes; ugt-15, ugt-18, ugt-19, ugt-41, ugt-63, cyp-13A12, cyp-25A1, and cyp-33C8) increased anoxia survival in wild-type animals fed a standard diet. Anoxia sensitivity of the hyl-2(tm2031) animals was suppressed by RNAi of cyp-25A1 or cyp-33C8 genes. A glucose diet fed to the P0 hermaphrodite decreased the anoxia survival of its F1 embryos; however, the RNAi of ugt-63 and cyp-33C8 suppressed anoxia sensitivity. These studies provide evidence that the detoxification system impacts oxygen deprivation responses and that C. elegans can be used to model the conserved detoxification system. PMID:27507791

  13. Early alterations in soleus GLUT-4, glucose transport, and glycogen in voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Halseth, Amy E.

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running (WR) by juvenile female rats was used as a noninterventional model of soleus muscle functional overload to study the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity by the glucose transporter (GLUT-4 isoform) protein level and glycogen concentration. Soleus total protein content was significantly greater (+18%;P greater than 0.05) than in age-matched controls after 1 wk of WR, and this hypertrophic response continued in weeks 2-4 (+24-32%). GLUT-4 protein was 39% greater than in controls in 1-wk WR soleus, and this adaptation was accompanied by a similar increase in in vitro insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity(+29%). After 2 and 4 wk of WR, however, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity had returned to control levels, despite a continued elevation (+25-28%) of GLUT-4 protein. At these two time points, glycogen concentration was significantly enhanced in WR soleus (+21-42%), which coincided with significant reductions in glycogen synthase activity ratios (-23 to-41%). These results indicate that, in this model of soleus muscle functional overload, the GLUT-4 protein level may initially regulate insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in the absence of changes in other modifying factors. However,this regulation of glucose transport activity by GLUT-4 protein may be subsequently overridden by elevated glycogen concentration.

  14. Foregut exclusion disrupts intestinal glucose sensing and alters portal nutrient and hormonal milieu.

    PubMed

    Pal, Atanu; Rhoads, David B; Tavakkoli, Ali

    2015-06-01

    The antidiabetes effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) are well-known, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Isolating the proximal small intestine, and in particular its luminal glucose sensors, from the nutrient stream has been proposed as a critical change, but the pathways involved are unclear. In a rodent model, we tested the effects of isolating and then stimulating a segment of proximal intestine using glucose analogs to examine their impact on glucose absorption (Gabsorp) and hormone secretion after a glucose bolus into the distal jejunum. Analogs selective for sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT) family members and the sweet taste receptor were tested, and measurements of the portosystemic gradient were used to determine Gabsorp and hormone secretion, including GLP-1. Proximal intestinal isolation reduced Gabsorp and GLP-1 secretion. Stimulation of the glucose-sensing protein SGLT3 increased Gabsorp and GLP-1 secretion. These effects were abolished by vagotomy. Sweet taste receptor stimulation only increased GLP-1 secretion. This study suggests a novel role for SGLT3 in coordinating intestinal function, as reflected by the concomitant modulation of Gabsorp and GLP-1 secretion, with these effects being mediated by the vagus nerve. Our findings provide potential mechanistic insights into foregut exclusion in RYGB and identify SGLT3 as a possible antidiabetes therapeutic target.

  15. Early alterations in soleus GLUT-4, glucose transport, and glycogen in voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Halseth, Amy E.

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary wheel running (WR) by juvenile female rats was used as a noninterventional model of soleus muscle functional overload to study the regulation of insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity by the glucose transporter (GLUT-4 isoform) protein level and glycogen concentration. Soleus total protein content was significantly greater (+18%;P greater than 0.05) than in age-matched controls after 1 wk of WR, and this hypertrophic response continued in weeks 2-4 (+24-32%). GLUT-4 protein was 39% greater than in controls in 1-wk WR soleus, and this adaptation was accompanied by a similar increase in in vitro insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity(+29%). After 2 and 4 wk of WR, however, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity had returned to control levels, despite a continued elevation (+25-28%) of GLUT-4 protein. At these two time points, glycogen concentration was significantly enhanced in WR soleus (+21-42%), which coincided with significant reductions in glycogen synthase activity ratios (-23 to-41%). These results indicate that, in this model of soleus muscle functional overload, the GLUT-4 protein level may initially regulate insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity in the absence of changes in other modifying factors. However,this regulation of glucose transport activity by GLUT-4 protein may be subsequently overridden by elevated glycogen concentration.

  16. Endometrial metaplasias and reactive changes: a spectrum of altered differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Alina; Preda, Ovidiu; Nogales, Francisco F

    2011-02-01

    Endometrial metaplasias and changes (EMCs) are conditions frequently overlooked and misdiagnosed. The aim of this review is to update current issues and provide a classification with a practical clinicopathological approach. Hormonal or irritative stimuli are the main inducing factors of EMCs, although some metaplasias have a mutational origin. EMCs vary from reactive, degenerative lesions to those able to associate with malignancy or those having a preneoplastic potential. The most common types of EMCs are ciliated tubal metaplasia (CTM) and mucinous metaplasia (MM), which occur in simple and complex glands, and possibly these architectural changes hold the same prognostic significance as they do in hyperplastic endometrioid lesions. Immunohistochemically, CTM is positive for LhS28, bcl-2, PAX2 and p16(INK4A). Complex CTM is likely to be a precursor of ciliated endometrioid-type carcinomas. MMs should be evaluated architecturally, taking into account that their atypicality is minimal. The differentiation between complex MM and mucinous carcinoma may be extremely difficult. Surface complex, papillary MM in endometrial polyps can be considered as benign. Intestinal-type endometrial MM is rare and its presence should prompt further investigation of associated lesions in the endocervix. Endometrial squamous metaplasia (ESS) is often linked to chronic irritative situations. It should be differentiated from secondary involvement by a human papilomavirus-related cervical lesion. Morular metaplasia is a mutational phenomenon with a distinct phenotype that helps to differentiate it from ESS. Morules are benign, hormonally inert structures that are often markers of complex endometrioid glandular architecture, and they are associated with an attenuated malignancy. Endometrial reactive changes are commonly associated with desquamation or hormonal imbalance. The frequent, p16(INK4A) positive, benign surface papillary syncytial change may be misdiagnosed, in some cases, as

  17. Changing climate cues differentially alter zooplankton dormancy dynamics across latitudes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Natalie T; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    In seasonal climates, dormancy is a common strategy that structures biodiversity and is necessary for the persistence of many species. Climate change will likely alter dormancy dynamics in zooplankton, the basis of aquatic food webs, by altering two important hatching cues: mean temperatures during the ice-free season, and mean day length when lakes become ice free. Theory suggests that these changes could alter diversity, hatchling abundances and phenology within lakes, and that these responses may diverge across latitudes due to differences in optimal hatching cues and strategies. To examine the role of temperature and day length on hatching dynamics, we collected sediment from 25 lakes across a 1800 km latitudinal gradient and exposed sediment samples to a factorial combination of two photoperiods (12 and 16 h) and two temperatures (8 and 12 °C) representative of historical southern (short photoperiod, warm) and northern (long photoperiod, cool) lake conditions. We tested whether sensitivity to these hatching cues varies by latitudinal origin and differs among taxa. Higher temperatures advanced phenology for all taxa, and these advances were greatest for cladocerans followed by copepods and rotifers. Although phenology differed among taxa, the effect of temperature did not vary with latitude. The latitudinal origin of the egg bank influenced egg abundance and hatchling abundance and diversity, with these latter effects varying with taxa, temperature and photoperiod. Copepod hatchling abundances peaked at mid-latitudes in the high temperature and long photoperiod treatments, whereas hatchling abundances of other zooplankton were greatest at low latitudes and high temperature. The overall diversity of crustacean zooplankton (copepods and cladocerans) also reflected distinct responses of each taxa to our treatments, with the greatest diversity occurring at mid-latitudes (~56 °N) in the shorter photoperiod treatment. Our results demonstrate that hatching cues

  18. Altered Glucose Homeostasis and Hepatic Function in Obese Mice Deficient for Both Kinin Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Carlos C.; Haro, Anderson; Russo, Fernanda J. V. P.; Schadock, Ines; Almeida, Sandro S.; Ribeiro, Rosane A.; Vanzela, Emerielle C.; Lanzoni, Valeria P.; Barros, Flavio C.; Moraes, Milton R.; Mori, Marcelo A.; Bacurau, Reury F. P.; Wurtele, Martin; Boschero, Antônio C.; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Bader, Michael; Pesquero, Joao B.; Araujo, Ronaldo C.

    2012-01-01

    The Kallikrein-Kinin System (KKS) has been implicated in several aspects of metabolism, including the regulation of glucose homeostasis and adiposity. Kinins and des-Arg-kinins are the major effectors of this system and promote their effects by binding to two different receptors, the kinin B2 and B1 receptors, respectively. To understand the influence of the KKS on the pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM), we generated an animal model deficient for both kinin receptor genes and leptin (obB1B2KO). Six-month-old obB1B2KO mice showed increased blood glucose levels. Isolated islets of the transgenic animals were more responsive to glucose stimulation releasing greater amounts of insulin, mainly in 3-month-old mice, which was corroborated by elevated serum C-peptide concentrations. Furthermore, they presented hepatomegaly, pronounced steatosis, and increased levels of circulating transaminases. This mouse also demonstrated exacerbated gluconeogenesis during the pyruvate challenge test. The hepatic abnormalities were accompanied by changes in the gene expression of factors linked to glucose and lipid metabolisms in the liver. Thus, we conclude that kinin receptors are important for modulation of insulin secretion and for the preservation of normal glucose levels and hepatic functions in obese mice, suggesting a protective role of the KKS regarding complications associated with obesity and T2DM. PMID:22829877

  19. Increased adipose tissue heme levels and exportation are associated with altered systemic glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ortega, Francisco; Becerril, Sara; Sabater-Masdeu, Mònica; Latorre, Jessica; Ricart, Wifredo; Frühbeck, Gema; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2017-07-13

    Iron status is known to be associated with the physiology of adipose tissue (AT). We aimed to investigate AT heme and expression of heme exporter (FLVCR1) in association with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Substantial amounts of FLVCR1 mRNA and protein levels were detected in AT, being significantly increased in subjects with T2D, and positively correlated with fasting glucose, fasting triglycerides and with circulating markers of iron stores (serum ferritin, blood hemoglobin and hematocrit). In both visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous AT (SAT), increased heme levels were found in subjects with T2D. Reinforcing these associations, FLVCR1 mRNA levels were positively linked to fasting glucose in an independent cohort. Longitudianlly, the percent change of FLVCR1 positively correlated with the percent change in fasting glucose (r = 0.52, p = 0.03) after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss. High-fat diet-induced weight gain in rats did not result in significant changes in AT Flvcr1 mRNA but, remarkably, the expression of this gene positively correlated with fasting glucose and negatively with insulin sensitivity (QUICKI). Altogether, these findings showed a direct association between FLVCR1 mRNA levels and hyperglycemia, suggesting that increased adipose tissue heme exportation might disrupt, or is the consequence of, impaired systemic glucose metabolism during the progression to T2D.

  20. Antitumor and chemosensitizing action of dichloroacetate implicates modulation of tumor microenvironment: A role of reorganized glucose metabolism, cell survival regulation and macrophage differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ajay; Kant, Shiva; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2013-11-15

    Targeting of tumor metabolism is emerging as a novel therapeutic strategy against cancer. Dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK), has been shown to exert a potent tumoricidal action against a variety of tumor cells. The main mode of its antineoplastic action implicates a shift of glycolysis to oxidative metabolism of glucose, leading to generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates. However, the effect of DCA on tumor microenvironment, which in turn regulates tumor cell survival; remains speculative to a large extent. It is also unclear if DCA can exert any modulatory effect on the process of hematopoiesis, which is in a compromised state in tumor-bearing hosts undergoing chemotherapy. In view of these lacunas, the present study was undertaken to investigate the so far unexplored aspects with respect to the molecular mechanisms of DCA-dependent tumor growth retardation and chemosensitization. BALB/c mice were transplanted with Dalton's lymphoma (DL) cells, a T cell lymphoma of spontaneous origin, followed by administration of DCA with or without cisplatin. DCA-dependent tumor regression and chemosensitization to cisplatin was found to be associated with altered repertoire of key cell survival regulatory molecules, modulated glucose metabolism, accompanying reconstituted tumor microenvironment with respect to pH homeostasis, cytokine balance and alternatively activated TAM. Moreover, DCA administration also led to an alteration in the MDR phenotype of tumor cells and myelopoietic differentiation of macrophages. The findings of this study shed a new light with respect to some of the novel mechanisms underlying the antitumor action of DCA and thus may have immense clinical applications. - Highlights: • DCA modulates tumor progression and chemoresistance. • DCA alters molecules regulating cell survival, glucose metabolism and MDR. • DCA reconstitutes biophysical and cellular composition of tumor microenvironment.

  1. Alterations to mTORC1 signaling in the skeletal muscle differentially affect whole-body metabolism.

    PubMed

    Guridi, Maitea; Kupr, Barbara; Romanino, Klaas; Lin, Shuo; Falcetta, Denis; Tintignac, Lionel; Rüegg, Markus A

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central node in a network of signaling pathways controlling cell growth and survival. This multiprotein complex integrates external signals and affects different nutrient pathways in various organs. However, it is not clear how alterations of mTORC1 signaling in skeletal muscle affect whole-body metabolism. We characterized the metabolic phenotype of young and old raptor muscle knock-out (RAmKO) and TSC1 muscle knock-out (TSCmKO) mice, where mTORC1 activity in skeletal muscle is inhibited or constitutively activated, respectively. Ten-week-old RAmKO mice are lean and insulin resistant with increased energy expenditure, and they are resistant to a high-fat diet (HFD). This correlates with an increased expression of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and a downregulation of genes involved in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Ten-week-old TSCmKO mice are also lean, glucose intolerant with a decreased activation of protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) targets that regulate glucose transporters in the muscle. The mice are resistant to a HFD and show reduced accumulation of glycogen and lipids in the liver. Both mouse models suffer from a myopathy with age, with reduced fat and lean mass, and both RAmKO and TSCmKO mice develop insulin resistance and increased intramyocellular lipid content. Our study shows that alterations of mTORC1 signaling in the skeletal muscle differentially affect whole-body metabolism. While both inhibition and constitutive activation of mTORC1 induce leanness and resistance to obesity, changes in the metabolism of muscle and peripheral organs are distinct. These results indicate that a balanced mTORC1 signaling in the muscle is required for proper metabolic homeostasis.

  2. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  3. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  4. Differentiation of plant graviperceiving and graviresponding cells in altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordyum, E. L.; Martyn, G. G.; Shevchenko, G. V.; Kozeko, L. Ye.; Artemenko, O. A.

    2005-08-01

    A main goal of our work was to compare the anatomy and ultrastructure of a root cap, including statocytes (graviperceiving cells), and a root proper meristem and elongation zone (graviresponding cells) of Beta vulgaris seedlings grown in the control and under clinorotation as a root apex is a very convenient model for the study of plant cell gravisensitivity. The comparison of the ultrastructure and topography of cell organelles clearly showed the differences in growth by elongation and differentiation in time and space between statocytes and cortex cells of the distal elongation zone (DEZ), in dependence on their main functions. A root graviperceptive apparatus develops under clinorotation but it does not function. DEZ cells reveal the highest metabolism activity in both variants that can underlie their specific physiological properties and provide cell rapid growth in the central elongation zone.

  5. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Charles F; Acosta, André L; Dorneles, Andressa L; Dos Santos, Patrick D S; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-08-17

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies.

  6. Queens become workers: pesticides alter caste differentiation in bees

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Charles F.; Acosta, André L.; Dorneles, Andressa L.; dos Santos, Patrick D. S.; Blochtein, Betina

    2016-01-01

    Bees are important for the world biodiversity and economy because they provide key pollination services in forests and crops. However, pesticide use in crops has adversely affected (decreased) queen production because of increased mortality among larvae. Here, we demonstrated that in vitro-reared queens of a neotropical social bee species (Plebeia droryana) also showed high larval mortality after exposure to an organophosphate pesticide (chlorpyrifos) via larval food. Moreover, most of the surviving larvae that were destined to develop into queens became workers more likely because they ate less food than expected without pesticide skewing thus caste differentiation in this bee species. This adverse effect has not been previously reported for any other social insects, such as honeybees or bumblebees. Queens are essential for breeding and colony growth. Therefore, if our data are applicable to other pantropical social bee species across the globe, it is likely that these bees are at a serious risk of failure to form new colonies. PMID:27530246

  7. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  8. Alteration of cardiac glucose metabolism in association to low birth weight: experimental evidence in lambs with left ventricular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kimberley C W; Lim, Chin H; McMillen, I Caroline; Duffield, Jaime A; Brooks, Doug A; Morrison, Janna L

    2013-11-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction that results in low birth weight (LBW) has been linked to the onset of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. An altered transition from a fetal to an adult energy metabolism phenotype, with increased reliance on glucose rather than fatty acids for energy production, could help explain this connection. We have therefore investigated cardiac metabolism in relation to left ventricular hypertrophy in LBW lambs, at 21days after birth. The expression of regulatory molecules involved in cardiac glucose and fatty acid metabolism was measured using real-time PCR and Western blotting. A section of the left ventricle was fixed for Periodic Acid Schiff staining to determine tissue glycogen content. There was increased abundance of insulin signalling pathway proteins (phospho-insulin receptor, insulin receptor and phospho-Akt) and the glucose transporter (GLUT)-1, but no change in GLUT-4 or glycogen content in the heart of LBW compared to ABW lambs. There was, however, increased abundance of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK-4) in LBW compared to ABW lambs. There were no significant changes in the mRNA expression of components of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor regulatory complex or proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism. We concluded that LBW induced left ventricular hypertrophy was associated with increased GLUT-1 and PDK-4, suggesting increased glucose uptake, but decreased efficacy for the conversion of glucose to ATP. A reduced capacity for energy conversion could have significant implications for vulnerability to cardiovascular disease in adults who are born LBW. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential development of glucose intolerance and pancreatic islet adaptation in multiple diet induced obesity models.

    PubMed

    Omar, Bilal; Pacini, Giovanni; Ahrén, Bo

    2012-09-28

    The C57BL/6 mouse fed a high fat diet is a common and valuable model in experimental studies of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Different high fat diets are used and in order to determine which diet produces a model most accurately resembling human T2D, they need to be compared head-to-head. Four different diets, the 60% high fat diet (HFD) and the 58% high fat-high sucrose Surwit diet (HFHS) and their respective controls, were compared in C57BL/6J mice using glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT) and the euglycemic clamp. Mice fed a HFD gained more weight than HFHS fed mice despite having similar energy intake. Both high fat diet models were glucose intolerant after eight weeks. Mice fed the HFD had elevated basal insulin, which was not seen in the HFHS group. The acute insulin response (AIR) was unchanged in the HFD group, but slightly increased in the HFHS diet group. The HFHS diet group had a threefold greater total insulin secretion during the IVGTT compared to its control, while no differences were seen in the HFD group. Insulin sensitivity was decreased fourfold in the HFD group, but not in the HFHS diet group. The HFD and HFHS diet models show differential effects on the development of insulin resistance and beta cell adaptation. These discrepancies are important to acknowledge in order to select the appropriate diet for specific studies.

  10. Slowly digestible starch diets alter proximal glucosidase activity and glucose absorption

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sucrase-isomaltase (Si) and maltase-glucoamylase (Mgam) are mucosal glucosidases required for digestion of starch to glucose. Ablation of maltase-Mgam reduces in vivo starch digestion. We tested whether slowly digestible starch diets induce changes in glucosidase activities. Rice starch was encaps...

  11. Chronic levodopa treatment alters basal and dopamine agonist-stimulated cerebral glucose utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Engber, T.M.; Susel, Z.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N. )

    1990-12-01

    The effect of chronic levodopa administration on the functional activity of the basal ganglia and its output regions was evaluated by means of the 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) autoradiographic technique in rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway. The rates of local cerebral glucose utilization were studied under basal conditions as well as in response to challenge with a selective D1 or D2 dopamine-receptor agonist. Levodopa (100 mg/kg/d, i.p.) was administered for 19 d either continuously via infusion with an osmotic pump or intermittently by twice-daily injections. Following a 3-d washout, glucose utilization was found to be decreased by both levodopa regimens in the nucleus accumbens; intermittent levodopa also decreased glucose utilization in the entopeduncular nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, ventrolateral thalamus, ventromedial thalamus, ventroposterolateral thalamus, and lateral habenula. In control (lesioned and treated chronically with saline) rats, the D1 agonist SKF 38393 (5 mg/kg, i.v.) increased 2-DG uptake in the substantia nigra pars reticulata and entopeduncular nucleus ipsilateral to the lesion by 84% and 56%, respectively. Both continuous and intermittent levodopa blunted the SKF 38393-induced elevation in glucose metabolism in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, while intermittent levodopa also attenuated the increase in the entopeduncular nucleus. The D2 agonist quinpirole (0.4 mg/kg, i.v.) did not increase glucose utilization in any brain region in control animals; following intermittent levodopa treatment, however, quinpirole increased 2-DG uptake by 64% in the subthalamic nucleus and by 39% in the deep layers of the superior colliculus on the ipsilateral side.

  12. Dietary patterns in men and women are simultaneously determinants of altered glucose metabolism and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Langsetmo, Lisa; Barr, Susan I; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Berger, Claudie; Kovacs, Christopher S; Josse, Robert G; Adachi, Jonathan D; Hanley, David A; Prior, Jerilynn C; Brown, Jacques P; Morin, Suzanne N; Davison, Kenneth S; Goltzman, David; Kreiger, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that diet would have direct effects on glucose metabolism with direct and indirect effects on bone metabolism in a cohort of Canadian adults. We assessed dietary patterns (Prudent [fruit, vegetables, whole grains, fish, and legumes] and Western [soft drinks, potato chips, French fries, meats, and desserts]) from a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used fasting blood samples to measure glucose, insulin, homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (a bone formation marker), and serum C-terminal telopeptide (CTX; a bone resorption marker). We used multivariate regression models adjusted for confounders and including/excluding body mass index. In a secondary analysis, we examined relationships through structural equations models. The Prudent diet was associated with favorable effects on glucose metabolism (lower insulin and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (lower CTX in women; higher 25OHD and lower parathyroid hormone in men). The Western diet was associated with deleterious effects on glucose metabolism (higher glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR) and bone metabolism (higher bone-specific alkaline phosphatase and lower 25OHD in women; higher CTX in men). Body mass index adjustment moved point estimates toward the null, indicating partial mediation. The structural equation model confirmed the hypothesized linkage with strong effects of Prudent and Western diet on metabolic risk, and both direct and indirect effects of a Prudent diet on bone turnover. In summary, a Prudent diet was associated with lower metabolic risk with both primary and mediated effects on bone turnover, suggesting that it is a potential target for reducing fracture risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolism of Fructooligosaccharides in Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III via Differential Gene Transcription and Alteration of Cell Membrane Fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Guozhong

    2015-01-01

    Although fructooligosaccharides (FOS) can selectively stimulate the growth and activity of probiotics and beneficially modulate the balance of intestinal microbiota, knowledge of the molecular mechanism for FOS metabolism by probiotics is still limited. Here a combined transcriptomic and physiological approach was used to survey the global alterations that occurred during the logarithmic growth of Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III using FOS or glucose as the sole carbon source. A total of 363 genes were differentially transcribed; in particular, two gene clusters were induced by FOS. Gene inactivation revealed that both of the clusters participated in the metabolism of FOS, which were transported across the membrane by two phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and were subsequently hydrolyzed by a β-fructofuranosidase (SacA) in the cytoplasm. Combining the measurements of the transcriptome- and membrane-related features, we discovered that the genes involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids (FAs) were repressed in cells grown on FOS; as a result, the FA profiles were altered by shortening of the carbon chains, after which membrane fluidity increased in response to FOS transport and utilization. Furthermore, incremental production of acetate was observed in both the transcriptomic and the metabolic experiments. Our results provided new insights into gene transcription, the production of metabolites, and membrane alterations that could explain FOS metabolism in L. plantarum. PMID:26319882

  14. Physical Inactivity Differentially Alters Dietary Oleate and Palmitate Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bergouignan, Audrey; Trudel, Guy; Simon, Chantal; Chopard, Angèle; Schoeller, Dale A.; Momken, Iman; Votruba, Susanne B.; Desage, Michel; Burdge, Graham C.; Gauquelin-Koch, Guillemette; Normand, Sylvie; Blanc, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— Obesity and diabetes are characterized by the incapacity to use fat as fuel. We hypothesized that this reduced fat oxidation is secondary to a sedentary lifestyle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— We investigated the effect of a 2-month bed rest on the dietary oleate and palmitate trafficking in lean women (control group, n = 8) and the effect of concomitant resistance/aerobic exercise training as a countermeasure (exercise group, n = 8). Trafficking of stable isotope–labeled dietary fats was combined with muscle gene expression and magnetic resonance imaging–derived muscle fat content analyses. RESULTS— In the control group, bed rest increased the cumulative [1-13C]oleate and [d31]palmitate appearance in triglycerides (37%, P = 0.009, and 34%, P = 0.016, respectively) and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) (37%, P = 0.038, and 38%, P = 0.002) and decreased muscle lipoprotein lipase (P = 0.043) and fatty acid translocase CD36 (P = 0.043) mRNA expressions. Plasma NEFA-to-triglyceride ratios for [1-13C]oleate and [d31]palmitate remained unchanged, suggesting that the same proportion of tracers enters the peripheral tissues after bed rest. Bed rest did not affect [1-13C]oleate oxidation but decreased [d31]palmitate oxidation by −8.2 ± 4.9% (P < 0.0001). Despite a decreased spontaneous energy intake and a reduction of 1.9 ± 0.3 kg (P = 0.001) in fat mass, exercise training did not mitigate these alterations but partially maintained fat-free mass, insulin sensitivity, and total lipid oxidation in fasting and fed states. In both groups, muscle fat content increased by 2.7% after bed rest and negatively correlated with the reduction in [d31]palmitate oxidation (r2 = 0.48, P = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS— While saturated and monounsaturated fats have similar plasma trafficking and clearance, physical inactivity affects the partitioning of saturated fats toward storage, likely leading to an accumulation of palmitate in muscle fat. PMID:19017764

  15. Global Loss of Bmal1 Expression Alters Adipose Tissue Hormones, Gene Expression and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kennaway, David John; Varcoe, Tamara Jayne; Voultsios, Athena; Boden, Michael James

    2013-01-01

    The close relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and poor metabolic status is becoming increasingly evident, but role of adipokines is poorly understood. Here we investigated adipocyte function and the metabolic status of mice with a global loss of the core clock gene Bmal1 fed either a normal or a high fat diet (22% by weight). Bmal1 null mice aged 2 months were killed across 24 hours and plasma adiponectin and leptin, and adipose tissue expression of Adipoq, Lep, Retn and Nampt mRNA measured. Glucose, insulin and pyruvate tolerance tests were conducted and the expression of liver glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme mRNA determined. Bmal1 null mice displayed a pattern of increased plasma adiponectin and plasma leptin concentrations on both control and high fat diets. Bmal1 null male and female mice displayed increased adiposity (1.8 fold and 2.3 fold respectively) on the normal diet, but the high fat diet did not exaggerate these differences. Despite normal glucose and insulin tolerance, Bmal1 null mice had increased production of glucose from pyruvate, implying increased liver gluconeogenesis. The Bmal1 null mice had arrhythmic clock gene expression in epigonadal fat and liver, and loss of rhythmic transcription of a range of metabolic genes. Furthermore, the expression of epigonadal fat Adipoq, Retn, Nampt, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 and liver Pfkfb3 mRNA were down-regulated. These results show for the first time that global loss of Bmal1, and the consequent arrhythmicity, results in compensatory changes in adipokines involved in the cellular control of glucose metabolism. PMID:23750248

  16. Adolescents with Mild Stunting Show Alterations in Glucose and Insulin Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    da Luz Santos, Carla Danusa; Clemente, Ana Paula Grotti; Martins, Vinicius José Baccin; Albuquerque, Maria Paula; Sawaya, Ana Lydia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate glucose and insulin profiles in adolescents with mild stunting and overweight in order to assess the possibility of increased predisposition to diabetes. Subjects and Methods. The study population consisted of 66 pubertal adolescents classified as mildly stunted (height-for-age z scores ≥−2 and <−1) or of normal stature, as well as overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) or normal weight. Beta-cell function and insulin resistance were evaluated according to the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Results. In the group with mild stunting, glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR levels were significantly higher in overweight adolescents compared with those of normal weight, whereas HOMA-B levels were significantly lower. Adolescents with mild stunting showed significantly higher accumulations of body and abdominal fat than their normal stature counterparts. Conclusions. The presence of mild stunting was associated with higher levels of glucose and insulin, diminished function of beta cells, and increased insulin resistance. These results reinforce the need for intervention in adolescents with mild stunting. PMID:21318152

  17. Glucose metabolite patterns as markers of functional differentiation in freshly isolated and cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissel, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the mammary gland of non-ruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lacation. By measuring the incorporation of glucose carbon from (U-/sup 14/C)glucose into intermediary metabolitees and metabolic products in mammary epithelia cells from virgin, pregnant, and lacating mice, we domonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate are important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells isolated from pregnant mice and cultured on collagen gels have a pattern similar to that of their freshly isolated counter-parts. When isolated from lacating mice, the metabolite patterns of cells cultured on collagen gels are different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  18. GLUCOSE METABOLITE PATTERNS AS MARKERS OF FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN FRESHLY ISOLATED AND CULTURED MOUSE MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Emerman, J.T.; Bartley, J.C.; Bissell, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    In the mammary gland of nonruminant animals, glucose is utilized in a characteristic and unique way during lactation. We have measured the incorporation of glucose carbon from [U-{sup 14}C] glucose into intermediary metabolites and metabolic products in mammary epithelial cells from virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice and demonstrate that glucose metabolite patterns can be used to recognize stages of differentiated function. For these cells, the rates of synthesis of glycogen and lactose, the ratio of lactate to alanine, and the ratio of citrate to malate were important parameters in identifying the degree of expression of differentiation. We further show that these patterns can be used as markers to determine the differentiated state of cultured mammary epithelial cells. Cells maintained on plastic substrates lose their distinctive glucose metabolite patterns while those on floating collagen gels do not. Cells from pregnant mice have a pattern similar to freshly isolated cells from pregnant mice. The pattern of cells from lactating mice is different from that of the cells of origin, and resembles that of the cells from pregnant mice. Our findings suggest that the floating collagen gels under the culture conditions used in these experiments provide an environment for the functional expression of the pregnant state, while additional factors are needed for the expression of the lactating state.

  19. Association of Urinary Metal Profiles with Altered Glucose Levels and Diabetes Risk: A Population-Based Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Cui, Xiuqing; Liu, Bing; Liu, Chuanyao; Xiao, Yang; Lu, Wei; Guo, Huan; He, Meian; Zhang, Xiaomin; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Weihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated heavy metals and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels were both associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. However, studies on the associations of heavy metals and essential elements with altered FPG and diabetes risk were limited or conflicting. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential associations of heavy metals and essential trace elements with FPG and diabetes risk among general Chinese population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate the associations of urinary concentrations of 23 metals with FPG, impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and diabetes among 2242 community-based Chinese adults in Wuhan. We used the false discovery rate (FDR) method to correct for multiple hypothesis tests. Results After adjusting for potential confounders, urinary aluminum, titanium, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, strontium, molybdenum, cadmium, antimony, barium, tungsten and lead were associated with altered FPG, IFG or diabetes risk (all P< 0.05); arsenic was only dose-dependently related to diabetes (P< 0.05). After additional adjustment for multiple testing, titanium, copper, zinc, selenium, rubidium, tungsten and lead were still significantly associated with one or more outcomes (all FDR-adjusted P< 0.05). Conclusions Our results suggest that multiple metals in urine are associated with FPG, IFG or diabetes risk. Because the cross-sectional design precludes inferences about causality, further prospective studies are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:25874871

  20. Differential cysteine labeling and global label-free proteomics reveals an altered metabolic state in skeletal muscle aging.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Brian; Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Smith, Neil T; Brownridge, Philip; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2014-11-07

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054.

  1. Differential Cysteine Labeling and Global Label-Free Proteomics Reveals an Altered Metabolic State in Skeletal Muscle Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054. PMID:25181601

  2. Gestational diabetes alters the fetal heart rate variability during an oral glucose tolerance test: a fetal magnetocardiography study.

    PubMed

    Fehlert, E; Willmann, K; Fritsche, L; Linder, K; Mat-Husin, H; Schleger, F; Weiss, M; Kiefer-Schmidt, I; Brucker, S; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2016-12-28

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) potentially harms the child before birth. We previously found GDM to be associated with developmental changes in the central nervous system. We now hypothesise that GDM may also impact on the fetal autonomic nervous system under metabolic stress like an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). We measured heart rate variability (HRV) of mothers and fetuses during a three-point OGTT using fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG). Measurements were performed in the fMEG Centre in Tübingen. After exclusion of 23 participants, 13 pregnant women with GDM and 36 pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance were examined. All women underwent the same examination setting with OGTT during which fMCG was recorded three times. Parameters of heart rate variability were measured. Compared with mothers with normal glucose regulation, mothers with GDM showed increased heart rate but no significant differences of maternal HRV. In contrast, HRV in fetuses of mothers with GDM differed from those in the metabolically healthy group regarding standard deviation normal to normal beat (SDNN) (P = 0.012), low-frequency band (P = 0.008) and high-frequency band (P = 0.031). These HRV parameters exhibit a decrease only in GDM fetuses during the second hour of the OGTT. These results show an altered response of the fetal autonomic nervous system to metabolic stress in GDM-complicated pregnancies. Hence, disturbances in maternal glucose metabolism might not only impact on the central nervous system of the fetus but may also affect the fetal autonomic nervous system. Metabolic stress reveals a different response of fetal autonomic nervous system in GDM-complicated pregnancies. © 2016 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  3. Regionally selective alterations in local cerebral glucose utilization evoked by charybdotoxin, a blocker of central voltage-activated K+-channels.

    PubMed

    Cochran, S M; Harvey, A L; Pratt, J A

    2001-11-01

    The quantitative [14C]-2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic technique was employed to investigate the effect of charybdotoxin, a blocker of certain voltage-activated K+ channels, on functional activity, as reflected by changes in local rates of cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain. Intracerebroventricular administration of charybdotoxin, at doses below those producing seizure activity, produced a heterogeneous effect on glucose utilization throughout the brain. Out of the 75 brain regions investigated, 24 displayed alterations in glucose utilization. The majority of these changes were observed with the intermediate dose of charybdotoxin administered (12.5 pmol), with the lower (6.25 pmol) and higher (25 pmol) doses of charybdotoxin producing a much more restricted pattern of change in glucose utilization. In brain regions which displayed alterations in glucose at all doses of charybdotoxin administered, no dose dependency in terms of the magnitude of change was observed. The 21 brain regions which displayed altered functional activity after administration of 12.5 pmol charybdotoxin were predominantly limited to the hippocampus, limbic and motor structures. In particular, glucose utilization was altered within three pathways implicated within learning and memory processes, the septohippocampal pathway, Schaffer collaterals within the hippocampus and the Papez circuit. The nigrostriatal pathway also displayed altered local cerebral glucose utilization. These data indicate that charybdotoxin produces alterations in functional activity within selected pathways in the brain. Furthermore the results raise the possibility that manipulation of particular subtypes of Kv1 channels in the hippocampus and related structures may be a means of altering cognitive processes without causing global changes in neural activity throughout the brain.

  4. Effects of High Glucose on Cell Viability and Differentiation in Primary Cultured Schwann Cells: Potential Role of ERK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Liang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia is considered to be the major factor in the development and progression of DPN. Because of the contribution of Schwann cells (SCs) to the pathology of DPN, we investigated the effects of high glucose on cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation in primary cultured SCs. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and Hoechst staining showed that high glucose inhibited SCs proliferation and increased apoptosis ratio in time and concentration dependent manner. Western blot and real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the major myelin proteins and genes expressions including P0, MAG and Krox-20, were downregulated time dependently in SCs exposed to high glucose from 48 to 96 h. To further elucidate the underlying pathogenic mechanisms, we also explored the role of ERK signaling pathway in high glucose induced SC injury, which has been proved to drive demyelination of peripheral nerves. The western blot analysis showed that compared with control group phosphorylation level of ERK was increased by 14.3 % in SCs exposed to high glucose for 72 h (P < 0.01). Using immunocytochemistry analysis, we observed that the ERK specific inhibitor U0126 blocked the ERK activation induced by high glucose and reversed the inhibitory effect of high glucose on P0 expression. Taken together, these results suggest that high glucose can cause damage in primary cultured SCs and may exert the inhibitory effect on SC differentiation and myelination through ERK signaling activation.

  5. Flavonoids have differential effects on glucose absorption in rats (Rattus norvegicus) and American robins (Turdis migratorius).

    PubMed

    Skopec, Michele M; Green, Adam K; Karasov, William H

    2010-02-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that small birds rely largely on non-mediated intestinal absorption of glucose through the paracellular pathway, while non-flying mammals rely on mediated absorption across the enterocyte membranes by using glucose transporters SGLT-1 and GLUT-2. Relying on non-mediated transport of glucose may decrease its absorption rate at low glucose concentrations but may release small birds from the effects of glucose transport inhibitors. We evaluated transport by using flavonoids known to inhibit glucose transport in vitro. Quercetin, isoquercetrin, and phloridzin were tested in rats (Rattus norvegicus) and robins (Turdis migratirius), and naringenin, naringenin-7-glucoside, genistein, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), and phloretin were used only in rats. By using a pharmacokinetic approach that involves serial blood collection and area under the curve calculations, we determined the bioavailability of 3-0-methyl D-glucose, the non-metabolized analogue of D-glucose. Six of the eight flavonoids tested in rats significantly decreased the absorption of 3-0-methyl D-glucose, while none of the flavonoids tested in robins significantly decreased the bioavailability of 3-0-methyl D-glucose. We conclude that flavonoids effectively decrease glucose absorption in rats, which rely on mediated absorption of glucose, but that flavonoids do not have an effect in robins, which rely on non-mediated absorption of glucose.

  6. Altered glycaemia differentially modulates efflux transporter expression and activity in hCMEC/D3 cell line.

    PubMed

    Sajja, Ravi K; Cucullo, Luca

    2015-06-26

    The unique phenotype of blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelium is partly maintained by abundant expression of ATP-binding cassette superfamily of efflux transporters that strictly restrict the CNS access to toxic substances including xenobiotics in circulation. Previously, we have shown that diabetes-related altered glycemic conditions differentially affect and compromise BBB integrity. However, the impact of diabetes on BBB efflux transporters is less understood. In this study, we examined the effects of single or repeated episodes of hypo-and hyperglycemia on major BBB efflux transporters expression/function in human cerebromicrovascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3). Cells were exposed to normal (5.5 mM), hypo (2.2 mM) or hyper (25 or 35 mM)-glycemic media containing D-glucose for 12h (acute) or two 3h episodes/day of hypo- or hyperglycemia with an intercalated 2h normalglycemic exposure for 3 days ("glycemic variability", see Methods). Acute hypoglycemic exposure (12h) up-regulated BBB endothelial mRNA and protein expression of P-glycoprotein, BCRP and other multidrug resistance associated proteins (MRP1 and 4) paralleled by an increase in transporter-specific efflux activity (∼ 2-fold vs. control). Although, 12h hyperglycemia did not affect the efflux transporter expression (except for MRP4), a significant increase in BCRP activity was observed. By contrast, DNA microarray data revealed that repeated hyperglycemic episodes (but not hypoglycemia) significantly up-regulate P-glycoprotein expression and activity. Thus, this study suggests a differential impact of altered glycemic conditions on major BBB drug efflux transporters expression/function, sensitive to the length of exposure (acute vs. repeated), with an implication for altered CNS drug disposition in diabetic population.

  7. Maternal Obesity Enhances White Adipose Tissue Differentiation and Alters Genome-Scale DNA Methylation in Male Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Borengasser, Sarah J.; Zhong, Ying; Kang, Ping; Lindsey, Forrest; Ronis, Martin J. J.; Badger, Thomas M.; Gomez-Acevedo, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    The risk of obesity (OB) in adulthood is strongly influenced by maternal body composition. Here we examined the hypothesis that maternal OB influences white adipose tissue (WAT) transcriptome and increases propensity for adipogenesis in the offspring, prior to the development of OB, using an established model of long-term metabolic programming. Employing an overfeeding-based rat model, in which exposure to OB is limited to preconception and gestation alone, we conducted global transcriptomic profiling in WAT, and gene/protein expression analysis of lipogenic and adipogenic pathways and examined adipogenic differentiation of WAT stromal-vascular cells ex vivo. Using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing we also evaluated genome-scale changes in DNA methylation in offspring WAT. Maternal OB led to extensive changes in expression of genes (±1.8-fold, P ≤ .05), revealing a distinct up-regulation of lipogenic pathways in WAT. mRNA expression of a battery of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1-regulated genes was increased in OB-dam offspring, which were confirmed by immunoblotting. In conjunction with lipogenic gene expression, OB-dam offspring showed increased glucose transporter-4 mRNA/protein expression and greater AKT phosphorylation following acute insulin challenge, suggesting sensitization of insulin signaling in WAT. Offspring of OB dams also exhibited increased in vivo expression of adipogenic regulators (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, CCAAT enhancer binding protein α [C/EBP-α] and C/EBP-β), associated with greater ex vivo differentiation of WAT stromal-vascular cells. These transcriptomic changes were associated with alterations in DNA methylation of CpG sites and CGI shores, proximal to developmentally important genes, including key pro-adipogenic factors (Zfp423 and C/EBP-β). Our findings strongly suggest that the maternal OB in utero alters adipocyte commitment and differentiation via epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:23959936

  8. Iron, glucose and intrinsic factors alter sphingolipid composition as yeast cells enter stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Lester, Robert L; Withers, Bradley R; Schultz, Megan A; Dickson, Robert C

    2013-04-01

    Survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, like most microorganisms, requires switching from a rapidly dividing to a non-dividing or stationary state. To further understand how cells navigate this switch, we examined sphingolipids since they are key structural elements of membranes and also regulate signaling pathways vital for survival. During and after the switch to a non-dividing state there is a large increase in total free and sphingolipid-bound long chain-bases and an even larger increase in free and bound C20-long-chain bases, which are nearly undetectable in dividing cells. These changes are due to intrinsic factors including Orm1 and Orm2, ceramide synthase, Lcb4 kinase and the Tsc3 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase as well as extrinsic factors including glucose and iron. Lowering the concentration of glucose, a form of calorie restriction, decreases the level of LCBs, which is consistent with the idea that reducing the level of some sphingolipids enhances lifespan. In contrast, iron deprivation increases LCB levels and decreases long term survival; however, these phenomena may not be related because iron deprivation disrupts many metabolic pathways. The correlation between increased LCBs and shorter lifespan is unsupported at this time. The physiological rise in LCBs that we observe may serve to modulate nutrient transporters and possibly other membrane phenomena that contribute to enhanced stress resistance and survival in stationary phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Iron, Glucose and Intrinsic Factors Alter Sphingolipid Composition as Yeast Cells Enter Stationary Phase

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Robert L.; Withers, Bradley R.; Schultz, Megan A.; Dickson, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Survival of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, like most microorganisms, requires switching from a rapidly dividing to a non-dividing or stationary state. To further understand how cells navigate this switch, we examined sphingolipids since they are key structural elements of membranes and also regulate signaling pathways vital for survival. During and after the switch to a non-dividing state there is a large increase in total free and sphingolipid-bound long chain-bases and an even larger increase in free and bound C20-long-chain bases, which are nearly undetectable in dividing cells. These changes are due to intrinsic factors including Orm1 and Orm2, ceramide synthase, Lcb4 kinase and the Tsc3 subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase as well as extrinsic factors including glucose and iron. Lowering the concentration of glucose, a form of calorie restriction, decreases the level of LCBs, which is consistent with the idea that reducing the level of some sphingolipids enhances lifespan. In contrast, iron deprivation increases LCB levels and decreases long term survival; however, these phenomena may not be related because iron deprivation disrupts many metabolic pathways. The correlation between increased LCBs and shorter lifespan is unsupported at this time. The physiological rise in LCBs that we observe may serve to modulate nutrient transporters and possibly other membrane phenomena that contribute to enhanced stress resistance and survival in stationary phase. PMID:23286903

  10. Diglycosyl diselenides alter redox homeostasis and glucose consumption of infective African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Franco, Jaime; Sardi, Florencia; Szilágyi, László; Kövér, Katalin E; Fehér, Krisztina; Comini, Marcelo A

    2017-08-12

    With the aim to develop compounds able to target multiple metabolic pathways and, thus, to lower the chances of drug resistance, we investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity and selectivity of a series of symmetric diglycosyl diselenides and disulfides. Of 18 compounds tested the fully acetylated forms of di-β-D-glucopyranosyl and di-β-D-galactopyranosyl diselenides (13 and 15, respectively) displayed strong growth inhibition against the bloodstream stage of African trypanosomes (EC50 0.54 μM for 13 and 1.49 μM for 15) although with rather low selectivity (SI < 10 assayed with murine macrophages). Nonacetylated versions of the same sugar diselenides proved to be, however, much less efficient or completely inactive to suppress trypanosome growth. Significantly, the galactosyl (15), and to a minor extent the glucosyl (13), derivative inhibited glucose catabolism but not its uptake. Both compounds induced redox unbalance in the pathogen. In vitro NMR analysis indicated that diglycosyl diselenides react with glutathione, under physiological conditions, via formation of selenenylsulfide bonds. Our results suggest that non-specific cellular targets as well as actors of the glucose and the redox metabolism of the parasite may be affected. These molecules are therefore promising leads for the development of novel multitarget antitrypanosomal agents. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Methyl-ß-cyclodextrin alters adipokine gene expression and glucose metabolism in swine adipose tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine if metabolic stress as induced by methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MCD) can alter cytokine expression in neonatal swine adipose tissue explants. Subcutaneous adipose tissue explants (100 ± 10 mg) were prepared from 21 day old pigs. Explants were incubated in medium 199 s...

  12. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase in vascular smooth muscle cells: differentiation-dependent expression and role in glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    El Hadri, Khadija; Moldes, Marthe; Mercier, Nathalie; Andreani, Marise; Pairault, Jacques; Feve, Bruno

    2002-01-01

    Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) derived from rat aortic media were used to examine semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) expression during their differentiation process. In a defined serum-free medium permissive for in vitro VSMC differentiation, there was a large increase in SSAO mRNA and protein levels and in the related enzyme activity during the course of cell culture. This pattern of expression was concomitant with that of some smooth muscle-specific mRNA markers of differentiation. mRNAs in differentiated cultured VSMCs were comparable to those detected in total aorta and media. Pharmacological properties of SSAO present in VSMCs were similar to enzyme activities previously described in the aortic wall. In this model, we also demonstrated that methylamine, a physiological substrate of SSAO, activated 2-deoxyglucose transport in a time- and dose-dependent manner. This methylamine effect was reproduced by other SSAO substrates and was prevented by the SSAO inhibitor semicarbazide. It was antagonized in the presence of catalase, suggesting that SSAO-activated glucose transport was mediated through H(2)O(2) production. In addition, methylamine promoted glucose transporter 1 accumulation at the cell surface. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time the differentiation-dependent expression of SSAO in VSMCs and its role in the regulation of VSMC glucose uptake.

  13. Cigarette smoke alters primary human bronchial epithelial cell differentiation at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Schamberger, Andrea C; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A; Mise-Racek, Nikica; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2015-02-02

    The differentiated human airway epithelium consists of different cell types forming a polarized and pseudostratified epithelium. This is dramatically altered in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by basal and goblet cell hyperplasia, and squamous cell metaplasia. The effect of cigarette smoke on human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) differentiation remains to be elucidated. We analysed whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) affected primary (p)HBEC differentiation and function. pHBEC were differentiated at the air-liquid interface (ALI) and differentiation was quantified after 7, 14, 21, or 28 days by assessing acetylated tubulin, CC10, or MUC5AC for ciliated, Clara, or goblet cells, respectively. Exposure of differentiating pHBEC to CSE impaired epithelial barrier formation, as assessed by resistance measurements (TEER). Importantly, CSE exposure significantly reduced the number of ciliated cells, while it increased the number of Clara and goblet cells. CSE-dependent cell number changes were reflected by a reduction of acetylated tubulin levels, an increased expression of the basal cell marker KRT14, and increased secretion of CC10, but not by changes in transcript levels of CC10, MUC5AC, or FOXJ1. Our data demonstrate that cigarette smoke specifically alters the cellular composition of the airway epithelium by affecting basal cell differentiation in a post-transcriptional manner.

  14. GPR17 gene disruption does not alter food intake or glucose homeostasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mastaitis, Jason; Min, Soo; Elvert, Ralf; Kannt, Aimo; Xin, Yurong; Ochoa, Francisca; Gale, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, David M.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 17 (GPR17) was recently reported to be a Foxo1 target in agouti-related peptide (AGRP) neurons. Intracerebroventricular injection of GPR17 agonists induced food intake, whereas administration of an antagonist to the receptor reduced feeding. These data lead to the conclusion that pharmacological modulation of GPR17 has therapeutic potential to treat obesity. Here we report that mice deficient in Gpr17 (Gpr17−/−) have similar food intake and body weight compared with their wild-type littermates. Gpr17−/− mice have normal hypothalamic Agrp mRNA expression, AGRP plasma levels, and metabolic rate. GPR17 deficiency in mice did not affect glucose homeostasis or prevent fat-induced insulin resistance. These data do not support a role for GPR17 in the control of food intake, body weight, or glycemic control. PMID:25624481

  15. INCREASED LEVELS OF SUPEROXIDE AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE MEDIATE THE DIFFERENTIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY OF CANCER CELLS VS. NORMAL CELLS TO GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Aykin-Burns, Nùkhet; Ahmad, Iman M.; Zhu, Yueming; Oberley, Larry W.; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells, relative to normal cells, demonstrate increased sensitivity to glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity. To determine if oxidative stress mediated by O2•− and hydroperoxides contributed to the differential susceptibility of human epithelial cancer cells to glucose deprivation, oxidation of dihydroethidine (DHE; for O2•−) and 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CDCFH2; for hydroperoxides) were measured in human colon and breast cancer cells (HT29, HCT116, SW480, MB231) and compared to normal human cells (FHC, 33Co, HMEC). Cancer cells showed significant increases in DHE (2–20 fold) and CDCFH2 (1.8–10 fold) oxidation, relative to normal cells that were more pronounced in the presence of the mitochondrial electron transport chain blocker, antimycin A. Furthermore, HCT116 and MB231 cells were more susceptible to glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress, relative to 33Co and HMEC. HT-29 cells were also more susceptible to 2-deoxyglucose-(2DG)-induced cytotoxicity, relative to FHC. Over expression of manganese superoxide dismutase and mitochondrially targeted catalase significantly protected HCT116 and MB231 cells from glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress, as well as protecting HT-29 cells from 2DG-induced cytotoxicity. These results show cancer cells (relative to normal cells) demonstrate increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, i.e. O2•− and H2O2) that contribute to differential susceptibility to glucose deprivation-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. These studies support the hypotheses that cancer cells increase glucose metabolism to compensate for excess metabolic production of ROS as well as that inhibition of glucose and hydroperoxide metabolism may provide a biochemical target for selectively enhancing cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in human cancer cells. PMID:18937644

  16. Alterations in Hepatic Glucose and Energy Metabolism as a Result of Calorie and Carbohydrate Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Jeffrey D.; Weis, Brian; Davis, Jeannie; Satapati, Santhosh; Merritt, Matthew; Malloy, Craig R.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrate-restriction is a common weight-loss approach that modifies hepatic metabolism by increasing gluconeogenesis and ketosis. Because little is known regarding the effect of carbohydrate-restriction on the origin of gluconeogenic precursors (gluconeogenesis from glycerol (GNGglycerol) and lactate/amino acids (GNGPEP)) or its consequence to hepatic energy homeostasis, we studied these parameters in a group of overweight/obese subjects undergoing weight-loss via dietary restriction. We used 2H and 13C tracers and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure the sources of hepatic glucose and TCA cycle flux in weight-stable subjects(n=7) and subjects following carbohydrate-(n=7) or calorie-restriction(n=7). The majority of hepatic glucose production in carbohydrate-restricted subjects came from GNGPEP. The contribution of glycerol to gluconeogenesis was similar in all groups despite evidence of increased fat oxidation in carbohydrate-restricted subjects. A strong correlation between TCA cycle flux and GNGPEP was found, though the reliance on TCA cycle energy production for gluconeogenesis was attenuated in subjects undergoing carbohydrate restriction. Together, these data imply that the TCA cycle is the energetic patron of gluconeogenesis. However, the relationship between these two pathways is modified by carbohydrate restriction, suggesting an increased reliance of the hepatocyte on energy generated outside of the TCA cycle when GNGPEP is maximal. In conclusion, carbohydrate-restriction modifies hepatic gluconeogenesis by increasing reliance on substrates like lactate or amino acids but not glycerol. This modification is associated with a reorganization of hepatic energy metabolism suggestive of enhanced hepatic β-oxidation. PMID:18925642

  17. Differential expression of genes related to glucose metabolism in domesticated pigs and wild boar.

    PubMed

    He, Dafang; Ma, Jideng; Long, Keren; Wang, Xun; Li, Xuewei; Jiang, Anan; Li, Mingzhou

    2017-08-01

    Glucose metabolism is a basic biological process that shows substantial variation within and between species. Using pig as a model organism, we investigated differences in glucose metabolic genes in seven tissues from domesticated pigs (Rongchang pig and Tibetan pig, meanwhile, the Tibetan pig just as a special case of the domesticated pig under plateau condition) and wild boar. We found large differences in the expression of genes involved in multiple aspects of glucose metabolism, including genes associated with glucose transport, gluconeogenesis, and glycolysis. In addition, we identified microRNAs (miRNAs) that may be involved in the divergence of glucose metabolism in pig. A combined analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression indicated that some miRNA:mRNA pairs showed ab facto function in it. Our results provide a valuable resource for further determination of miRNA regulatory roles in pig glucose metabolism and reveal the divergence of glucose metabolism in pigs under domestication.

  18. Inhibition of GSK-3 induces differentiation and impaired glucose metabolism in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Krishnendu; Cao, Ying; Gaisina, Irina N.; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Dutta, Shamit K.; Wang, Enfeng; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is a key regulator of numerous cellular processes ranging from glycogen metabolism to cell cycle regulation and proliferation. Consistent with its involvement in many pathways, it has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various human diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, bipolar disorder, inflammation and cancer. Consequently it is recognized as an attractive target for the development of new drugs. In the present study, we investigated the effect of both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of GSK-3 in two different renal cancer cell lines. We have shown potent anti-proliferative activity of 9-ING-41, a maleimide-based GSK-3 inhibitor. The anti-proliferative activity is most likely caused by G0–G1 and G2-M phase arrest as evident from cell cycle analysis. We have established that inhibition of GSK-3 imparted a differentiated phenotype in renal cancer cells. We have also shown that GSK-3 inhibition induced autophagy, likely as a result of imbalanced energy homeostasis caused by impaired glucose metabolism. Additionally, we have demonstrated the antitumor activity of 9-ING-41 in two different subcutaneous xenograft RCC tumor models. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing autophagy induction due to GSK-3 inhibition in renal cancer cells. PMID:24327518

  19. The flavanone homoeriodictyol increases SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake but decreases serotonin release in differentiated Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoi, Julia Katharina; Holik, Ann-Katrin; Geissler, Katrin; Hans, Joachim; Friedl, Barbara; Liszt, Kathrin; Krammer, Gerhard E.; Ley, Jakob P.; Somoza, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Flavanoids and related polyphenols, among them hesperitin, have been shown to modulate cellular glucose transport by targeting SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 transport proteins. We aimed to investigate whether homoeriodictyol, which is structurally related to hesperitin, affects glucose uptake in differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model for the intestinal barrier. The results revealed that, in contrast to other polyphenols, the flavanon homoeriodictyol promotes glucose uptake by 29.0 ± 3.83% at a concentration of 100 μM. The glucose uptake stimulating effect was sensitive to phloridzin, but not to phloretin, indicating an involvement of the sodium-coupled glucose transporter SGLT-1, but not of sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUT). In addition, in contrast to the increased extracellular serotonin levels by stimulation with 500 mM D-(+)-glucose, treatment with 100 μM homoeriodictyol decreased serotonin release by –48.8 ± 7.57% in Caco-2 cells via a phloridzin-sensitive signaling pathway. Extracellular serotonin levels were also reduced by –57.1 ± 5.43% after application of 0.01 μM homoeriodictyol to human neural SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that homoeriodictyol affects both the glucose metabolism and the serotonin system in Caco-2 cells via a SGLT-1-meditated pathway. Furthermore, the results presented here support the usage of Caco-2 cells as a model for peripheral serotonin release. Further investigations may address the value of homoeriodictyol in the treatment of anorexia and malnutrition through the targeting of SGLT-1. PMID:28192456

  20. The flavanone homoeriodictyol increases SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake but decreases serotonin release in differentiated Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lieder, Barbara; Hoi, Julia Katharina; Holik, Ann-Katrin; Geissler, Katrin; Hans, Joachim; Friedl, Barbara; Liszt, Kathrin; Krammer, Gerhard E; Ley, Jakob P; Somoza, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    Flavanoids and related polyphenols, among them hesperitin, have been shown to modulate cellular glucose transport by targeting SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 transport proteins. We aimed to investigate whether homoeriodictyol, which is structurally related to hesperitin, affects glucose uptake in differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model for the intestinal barrier. The results revealed that, in contrast to other polyphenols, the flavanon homoeriodictyol promotes glucose uptake by 29.0 ± 3.83% at a concentration of 100 μM. The glucose uptake stimulating effect was sensitive to phloridzin, but not to phloretin, indicating an involvement of the sodium-coupled glucose transporter SGLT-1, but not of sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUT). In addition, in contrast to the increased extracellular serotonin levels by stimulation with 500 mM D-(+)-glucose, treatment with 100 μM homoeriodictyol decreased serotonin release by -48.8 ± 7.57% in Caco-2 cells via a phloridzin-sensitive signaling pathway. Extracellular serotonin levels were also reduced by -57.1 ± 5.43% after application of 0.01 μM homoeriodictyol to human neural SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that homoeriodictyol affects both the glucose metabolism and the serotonin system in Caco-2 cells via a SGLT-1-meditated pathway. Furthermore, the results presented here support the usage of Caco-2 cells as a model for peripheral serotonin release. Further investigations may address the value of homoeriodictyol in the treatment of anorexia and malnutrition through the targeting of SGLT-1.

  1. Pregnancy induces molecular alterations reflecting impaired insulin control over glucose oxidative pathways that only in women with a family history of Type 2 diabetes last beyond pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, M; Mostert, M; Seardo, M A; Bussolino, S; Alberto, G; Lupino, E; Ramondetti, C; Buccinnà, B; Rinaudo, M T

    2009-01-01

    In circulating lymphomonocytes (CLM) of patients with Type 2 diabetes (DM2) pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), the major determinant of glucose oxidative breakdown, is affected by a cohort of alterations reflecting impaired insulin stimulated glucose utilization. The cohort is also expressed, although incompletely, in 40% of healthy young subjects with a DM2-family history (FH). Pregnancy restrains glucose utilization in maternal peripheral tissues to satisfy fetal requirements. Here we explore whether pregnant women develop the PDH alterations and, if so, whether there are differences between women with and without FH (FH+, FH-). Ten FH+ and 10 FH- were evaluated during pregnancy (12-14, 24-26, and 37-39 weeks) and 1 yr after (follow-up) for fasting plasma glucose and insulin as well as body mass index (BMI), and for the PDH alterations. Twenty FH- and 20 FH+ non-pregnant women served as controls. All FH+ and FH- controls exhibited normal clinical parameters and 8 FH+ had an incomplete cohort of PDH alterations. In FH- and FH+ pregnant women at 12-14 weeks clinical parameters were normal; from 24-26 weeks, with unvaried glucose, insulin and BMI rose more in FH- and only in the latter recovered the 12-14 weeks values at follow-up. In all FH-, the cohort of PDH alterations was incomplete at 24-26 weeks, complete at 37-39 weeks, and absent at follow-up but complete from 12-14 weeks including follow-up in all FH+. In FH-, the cohort is an acquired trait restricted to pregnancy signaling transiently reduced insulin-stimulated glucose utilization; in FH+, instead, it unveils the existence of an inherited DM2-related background these women all have, that is awakened by pregnancy and as such lastingly impairs insulin-stimulated glucose utilization.

  2. High tissue glucose alters intersomitic blood vessels in zebrafish via methylglyoxal targeting the VEGF receptor signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Jörgens, Kristina; Stoll, Sandra J; Pohl, Jennifer; Fleming, Thomas H; Sticht, Carsten; Nawroth, Peter P; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Kroll, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia causes micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose concentrations lead to increased formation of the highly reactive dicarbonyl methylglyoxal (MG), yet the early consequences of MG for development of vascular complications in vivo are poorly understood. In this study, zebrafish were used as a model organism to analyze early vascular effects and mechanisms of MG in vivo. High tissue glucose increased MG concentrations in tg(fli:EGFP) zebrafish embryos and rapidly induced several additional malformed and uncoordinated blood vessel structures that originated out of existing intersomitic blood vessels (ISVs). However, larger blood vessels, including the dorsal aorta and common cardinal vein, were not affected. Expression silencing of MG-degrading enzyme glyoxalase (glo) 1 elevated MG concentrations and induced a similar vascular hyperbranching phenotype in zebrafish. MG enhanced phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 2 and its downstream target Akt/protein kinase B (PKB). Pharmacological inhibitors for VEGF receptor 2 and Akt/PKB as well as MG scavenger aminoguanidine and glo1 activation prevented MG-induced hyperbranching of ISVs. Taken together, MG acts on smaller blood vessels in zebrafish via the VEGF receptor signaling cascade, thereby describing a new mechanism that can explain vascular complications under hyperglycemia and elevated MG concentrations. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  3. Altered glucose metabolism and preserved energy charge and neuronal structures in the brain of mouse intermittently exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Furong; Xie, Shengnan; Guo, Miao; Fang, Haixia; Li, Xin; Yin, Juanjuan; Lu, Guowei; Li, Yaohua; Ji, Xunming; Yu, Shun

    2011-09-01

    The key for an animal to survive prolonged hypoxia is to avoid rapid decline in ATP levels in vital organs such as the brain. This can be well achieved by a very few of hypoxia-tolerant animals such as freshwater turtles and newborn animals, since these animals can substantially suppress their metabolic levels by coordinated regulation of ATP-producing and ATP-demanding pathways. However, most animals, especially adult mammals, can only tolerate a short period of hypoxia since they are unable to maintain constant ATP levels and energy charge in vital organs during prolonged hypoxic exposure. Here, we described a special mouse model, in which a hypoxia intolerant adult mouse gradually built up an ability to survive prolonged hypoxia after intermittent hypoxic exposures. This increased ability was accompanied by reductions in body temperature and O(2) consumption as well as transient variations in blood pCO(2), pO(2) and pH. The glucose and energy metabolism in the brain of the mouse altered similarly to those reported in the brain of hypoxic turtles. Activities of phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase, the two rate-limiting enzymes controlling the rate of glycolysis decreased to baseline levels after a short period of increase. In contrast, the activity of complex I, the major enzyme complex controlling oxidative phosphorylation, was kept inhibited. These alterations in the ATP-producing pathway suggest the occurrence of reverse Pasteur effect, indicating that the animal had entered a hypometabolic state favoring maintenance of ATP level and energy charge in hypoxic conditions. In supporting this idea, the ATP levels and energy charge as well as neuronal structures in the brain were well preserved. This study provides evidence for a possibility that a hypoxic intolerant animal can build up an ability to survive prolonged hypoxia through regulation of its glucose and energy metabolism after an appropriate hypoxic training, which deserves further investigation

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis alters the differentiation of monocytes into macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Diana; Barrera, Luis F; Rojas, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that in vitro infection of human monocytes by Mycobacterium tuberculosis affected monocyte to macrophage differentiation. Despite the low bacterial load used, M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes had fewer granules, displayed a reduced number of cytoplasmic projections and decreased HLA class II, CD68, CD86 and CD36 expression compared to cells differentiated in the absence of mycobacteria. Infected cells produced less IL-12p70, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-6 and high IL-1β in response to lipopolysaccharide and purified protein M. tuberculosis-derived. Reduced T-cell proliferative response and IFN-γ secretion in response to phytohemagglutinin and culture filtrate proteins from M. tuberculosis was also observed in infected cells when compared to non-infected ones. The ability of monocytes differentiated in the presence of M. tuberculosis to control mycobacterial growth in response to IFN-γ stimulation was attenuated, as determined by bacterial plate count; however, they had a similar ability to uptake fluorescent M. tuberculosis and latex beads compared to non-infected cells. Recombinant IL-1β partially altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages; however, treating M. tuberculosis-infected monocytes with IL-1RA did not reverse the effects of infection during differentiation. The results indicated that M. tuberculosis infection altered monocyte differentiation into macrophages and affected their ability to respond to innate stimuli and activate T-cells.

  5. Transient high glucose causes persistent epigenetic changes and altered gene expression during subsequent normoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    El-Osta, Assam; Brasacchio, Daniella; Yao, Dachun; Pocai, Alessandro; Jones, Peter L.; Roeder, Robert G.; Cooper, Mark E.; Brownlee, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The current goal of diabetes therapy is to reduce time-averaged mean levels of glycemia, measured as HbA1c, to prevent diabetic complications. However, HbA1c only explains <25% of the variation in risk of developing complications. Because HbA1c does not correlate with glycemic variability when adjusted for mean blood glucose, we hypothesized that transient spikes of hyperglycemia may be an HbA1c–independent risk factor for diabetic complications. We show that transient hyperglycemia induces long-lasting activating epigenetic changes in the promoter of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) subunit p65 in aortic endothelial cells both in vitro and in nondiabetic mice, which cause increased p65 gene expression. Both the epigenetic changes and the gene expression changes persist for at least 6 d of subsequent normal glycemia, as do NF-κB–induced increases in monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression. Hyperglycemia-induced epigenetic changes and increased p65 expression are prevented by reducing mitochondrial superoxide production or superoxide-induced α-oxoaldehydes. These results highlight the dramatic and long-lasting effects that short-term hyperglycemic spikes can have on vascular cells and suggest that transient spikes of hyperglycemia may be an HbA1c–independent risk factor for diabetic complications. PMID:18809715

  6. Anterior-posterior and lateral hemispheric alterations in cortical glucose utilization in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Friedland, T.F.; Budinger, T.F.; Jaqust, W.J.; Yano, Y.; Huesman, R.H.; Knittel, B.; Koss, E.; Ober, B.A.

    1984-01-01

    The anatomical and chemical features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not distributed evenly throughout the brain. However, the nature of this focality has not been well established in vivo. Dynamic studies using the Donner 280-Crystal Positron Tomograph with (F-18)2-fluorodeoxyglucose were performed in 17 subjects meeting current research criteria for AD, and in 7 healthy age-matched control subjects. Glucose metabolic rates in the temporal-parietal cortex are 27% lower in AD than in controls. Ratios of activity density reveal consistently lower metabolic rates in temporal-parietal than frontal cortex in the AD group, while healthy aged subjects have equal metabolic rates in the two areas. Similar findings have been reported by other laboratories. A major finding is a striking lateral asymmetry of cortical metabolism in AD which does not favor either hemisphere. (The asymmetry is 13% in the AD group, 3% in controls, p<.005.) This has not been previously reported in AD. The consistency with which anterior-posterior metabolic differences are found in AD suggests that the focality of the metabolic changes may be used to develop a noninvasive diagnostic test for the disorder. The metabolic asymmetry in AD may be compared to the clinical and pathological asymmetry found in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and may represent an additional link between AD and the subacute spongiform encephalopathies.

  7. Altered cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in patients with liver disease and minimal encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, A.H.; Yap, E.W.; Rhoades, H.M.; Wong, W.H. )

    1991-03-01

    We measured CBF and the CMRglc in normal controls and in patients with severe liver disease and evidence for minimal hepatic encephalopathy using positron emission tomography. Regions were defined in frontal, temporal, parietal, and visual cortex; the thalamus; the caudate; the cerebellum; and the white matter along with a whole-slice value obtained at the level of the thalamus. There was no difference in whole-slice CBF and CMRglc values. Individual regional values were normalized to the whole-slice value and subjected to a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. When normalized CBF and CMRglc values for regions were compared between groups, significant differences were demonstrated (F = 5.650, p = 0.00014 and F = 4.58, p = 0.0073, respectively). These pattern differences were due to higher CBF and CMRglc in the cerebellum, thalamus, and caudate in patients and lower values in the cortex. Standardized coefficients extracted from a discriminant function analysis permitted correct group assignment for 95.5% of the CBF studies and for 92.9% of the CMRglc studies. The similarity of the altered pattern of cerebral metabolism and flow in our patients to that seen in rats subjected to portacaval shunts or ammonia infusions suggests that this toxin may alter flow and metabolism and that this, in turn, causes the clinical expression of encephalopathy.

  8. DNA Demethylation Rescues the Impaired Osteogenic Differentiation Ability of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells in High Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Chen, Tian; Sun, Wenhua; Yuan, Zongyi; Yu, Mei; Chen, Guoqing; Guo, Weihua; Xiao, Jingang; Tian, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, characterized by abnormally high blood glucose levels, gives rise to impaired bone remodeling. In response to high glucose (HG), the attenuated osteogenic differentiation capacity of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) is associated with the loss of alveolar bone. Recently, DNA methylation was reported to affect osteogenic differentiation of stem cells in pathological states. However, the intrinsic mechanism linking DNA methylation to osteogenic differentiation ability in the presence of HG is still unclear. In this study, we found that diabetic rats with increased DNA methylation levels in periodontal ligaments exhibited reduced bone mass and density. In vitro application of 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, to decrease DNA methylation levels in hPDLSCs, rescued the osteogenic differentiation capacity of hPDLSCs under HG conditions. Moreover, we demonstrated that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway was activated during this process and, under HG circumstances, the 5-aza-dC-rescued osteogenic differentiation capacity was blocked by Dickkopf-1, an effective antagonist of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrate for the first time that suppression of DNA methylation is able to facilitate the osteogenic differentiation capacity of hPDLSCs exposed to HG, through activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:27273319

  9. The research of differential reference electrode arrayed flexible IGZO glucose biosensor based on microfluidic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Syun; Chou, Jung-Chuan; Liao, Yi-Hung; Chen, Ruei-Ting; Huang, Min-Siang; Wu, Tong-Yu

    2017-03-01

    This study used a fast, simple, and low-cost method to fabricate arrayed flexible glucose biosensor, and the glucose biosensor was integrated with microfluidic framework for investigating sensing characteristics of glucose biosensor at the dynamic conditions. The indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) was adopted as sensing membrane and it was deposited on aluminum electrodes / polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by the radio frequency sputtering system. Then, we utilized screen-printed technology to accomplish miniaturization of glucose biosensor. Finally, the glucose sensing membrane was composed of glucose oxidase (GOx) and nafion, which was dropped on IGZO sensing membrane to complete glucose biosensor. According to the experimental results, we found that optimal sensing characteristics of arrayed flexible IGZO glucose biosensor at the dynamic conditions were better than at the static conditions. The optimal average sensitivity and linearity of the arrayed flexible IGZO glucose biosensor were 7.255 mV/mM and 0.994 at 20 µL/min flow rate, respectively.

  10. Surface Curvature Differentially Regulates Stem Cell Migration and Differentiation via Altered Attachment Morphology and Nuclear Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Maike; Blanquer, Sébastien B. G.; Haimi, Suvi P.; Korus, Gabriela; Dunlop, John W. C.; Duda, Georg N.; Grijpma, Dirk. W.

    2016-01-01

    Signals from the microenvironment around a cell are known to influence cell behavior. Material properties, such as biochemical composition and substrate stiffness, are today accepted as significant regulators of stem cell fate. The knowledge of how cell behavior is influenced by 3D geometric cues is, however, strongly limited despite its potential relevance for the understanding of tissue regenerative processes and the design of biomaterials. Here, the role of surface curvature on the migratory and differentiation behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) has been investigated on 3D surfaces with well‐defined geometric features produced by stereolithography. Time lapse microscopy reveals a significant increase of cell migration speed on concave spherical compared to convex spherical structures and flat surfaces resulting from an upward‐lift of the cell body due to cytoskeletal forces. On convex surfaces, cytoskeletal forces lead to substantial nuclear deformation, increase lamin‐A levels and promote osteogenic differentiation. The findings of this study demonstrate a so far missing link between 3D surface curvature and hMSC behavior. This will not only help to better understand the role of extracellular matrix architecture in health and disease but also give new insights in how 3D geometries can be used as a cell‐instructive material parameter in the field of biomaterial‐guided tissue regeneration. PMID:28251054

  11. Surface Curvature Differentially Regulates Stem Cell Migration and Differentiation via Altered Attachment Morphology and Nuclear Deformation.

    PubMed

    Werner, Maike; Blanquer, Sébastien B G; Haimi, Suvi P; Korus, Gabriela; Dunlop, John W C; Duda, Georg N; Grijpma, Dirk W; Petersen, Ansgar

    2017-02-01

    Signals from the microenvironment around a cell are known to influence cell behavior. Material properties, such as biochemical composition and substrate stiffness, are today accepted as significant regulators of stem cell fate. The knowledge of how cell behavior is influenced by 3D geometric cues is, however, strongly limited despite its potential relevance for the understanding of tissue regenerative processes and the design of biomaterials. Here, the role of surface curvature on the migratory and differentiation behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) has been investigated on 3D surfaces with well-defined geometric features produced by stereolithography. Time lapse microscopy reveals a significant increase of cell migration speed on concave spherical compared to convex spherical structures and flat surfaces resulting from an upward-lift of the cell body due to cytoskeletal forces. On convex surfaces, cytoskeletal forces lead to substantial nuclear deformation, increase lamin-A levels and promote osteogenic differentiation. The findings of this study demonstrate a so far missing link between 3D surface curvature and hMSC behavior. This will not only help to better understand the role of extracellular matrix architecture in health and disease but also give new insights in how 3D geometries can be used as a cell-instructive material parameter in the field of biomaterial-guided tissue regeneration.

  12. Altered TNF-Alpha, Glucose, Insulin and Amino Acids in Islets Langerhans Cultured in a Microgravity Model System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of a microgravity model system upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-1 17,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS, 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS. TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity model system (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  13. Aerobic glucose fermentation by Trypanosoma cruzi axenic culture amastigote-like forms during growth and differentiation to epimastigotes.

    PubMed

    Engel, J C; Franke de Cazzulo, B M; Stoppani, A O; Cannata, J J; Cazzulo, J J

    1987-11-01

    Axenic culture amastigote-like forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, grown at 28 degrees C, reach a stationary phase after two generations, and differentiate to epimastigotes, which then resume growth. Axenic culture amastigotes readily ferment glucose to succinate and acetate, and do not excrete NH3; they have high activities of hexokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and very low citrate synthase activity; cytochrome o is absent, and cytochrome b-like is present at a very low level. Epimastigotes catabolize glucose and produce succinate and acetate at a considerably lower rate; they exhibit lower levels of hexokinase and carboxykinase, and much higher levels of citrate synthase and cytochromes o and b-like. They catabolize amino acids, as shown by excretion of NH3 to the medium. The results suggest that axenic culture amastigotes have an essentially glycolytic metabolism, and they acquire the ability to oxidize substrates such as amino acids only after differentiation to epimastigotes.

  14. A not cytotoxic nickel concentration alters the expression of neuronal differentiation markers in NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ceci, Claudia; Barbaccia, Maria Luisa; Pistritto, Giuseppa

    2015-03-01

    Nickel, a known occupational/environmental hazard, may cross the placenta and reach appreciable concentrations in various fetal organs, including the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether nickel interferes with the process of neuronal differentiation. Following a 4 week treatment with retinoic acid (10μM), the human teratocarcinoma-derived NTera2/D1 cell line (NT2 cells) terminally differentiate into neurons which recapitulate many features of human fetal neurons. The continuous exposure of the differentiating NT2 cells to a not cytotoxic nickel concentration (10μM) increased the expression of specific neuronal differentiation markers such as neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2). Furthermore, nickel exposure increased the expression of hypoxia-inducible-factor-1α (HIF-1α) and induced the activation of the AKT/PKB kinase pathway, as shown by the increase of P(Ser-9)-GSK-3β, the inactive form of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Intriguingly, by the end of the fourth week the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein, a marker of dopaminergic neurons, was lower in nickel-treated than in control cultures. Thus, likely by partially mimicking hypoxic conditions, a not-cytotoxic nickel concentration appears to alter the process of neuronal differentiation and hinder the expression of the dopaminergic neuronal phenotype. Taken together, these results suggest that nickel, by altering normal brain development, may increase susceptibility to neuro-psychopathology later in life.

  15. Chitosan-assisted differentiation of porcine adipose tissue-derived stem cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting clusters

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Bing-Hsien; Wong, Shiu-Chung; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Chang, Yun-Tsui; Chou, Han-Yi E.

    2017-01-01

    The unique advantage of easy access and abundance make the adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) a promising system of multipotent cells for transplantation and regenerative medicine. Among the available sources, porcine ADSCs (pADSCs) deserve especial attention due to the close resemblance of human and porcine physiology, as well as for the upcoming availability of humanized porcine models. Here, we report on the isolation and conversion of pADSCs into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells. We used the stromal-vascular fraction of the dorsal subcutaneous adipose from 9-day-old male piglets to isolate pADSCs, and subjected the cells to an induction scheme for differentiation on chitosan-coated plates. This one-step procedure promoted differentiation of pADSCs into pancreatic islet-like clusters (PILC) that are characterized by the expression of a repertoire of pancreatic proteins, including pancreatic and duodenal homeobox (Pdx-1), insulin gene enhancer protein (ISL-1) and insulin. Upon glucose challenge, these PILC secreted high amounts of insulin in a dose-dependent manner. Our data also suggest that chitosan plays roles not only to enhance the differentiation potential of pADSCs, but also to increase the glucose responsiveness of PILCs. Our novel approach is, therefore, of great potential for transplantation-based amelioration of type 1 diabetes. PMID:28253305

  16. Chitosan-assisted differentiation of porcine adipose tissue-derived stem cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting clusters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Yu; Chen, Chih-Chien; Lin, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Bing-Hsien; Wong, Shiu-Chung; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Chang, Yun-Tsui; Chou, Han-Yi E; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2017-01-01

    The unique advantage of easy access and abundance make the adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) a promising system of multipotent cells for transplantation and regenerative medicine. Among the available sources, porcine ADSCs (pADSCs) deserve especial attention due to the close resemblance of human and porcine physiology, as well as for the upcoming availability of humanized porcine models. Here, we report on the isolation and conversion of pADSCs into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells. We used the stromal-vascular fraction of the dorsal subcutaneous adipose from 9-day-old male piglets to isolate pADSCs, and subjected the cells to an induction scheme for differentiation on chitosan-coated plates. This one-step procedure promoted differentiation of pADSCs into pancreatic islet-like clusters (PILC) that are characterized by the expression of a repertoire of pancreatic proteins, including pancreatic and duodenal homeobox (Pdx-1), insulin gene enhancer protein (ISL-1) and insulin. Upon glucose challenge, these PILC secreted high amounts of insulin in a dose-dependent manner. Our data also suggest that chitosan plays roles not only to enhance the differentiation potential of pADSCs, but also to increase the glucose responsiveness of PILCs. Our novel approach is, therefore, of great potential for transplantation-based amelioration of type 1 diabetes.

  17. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  18. Ameliorating effect of Semecarpus anacardium Linn. nut milk extract on altered glucose metabolism in high fat diet STZ induced type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Haseena Banu Hedayathullah; Vinayagam, Kaladevi Siddhi; Palanivelu, Shanthi; Panchanadham, Sachdanandam

    2012-12-01

    To explore the protective effect of the drug Semecarpus anacardium (S. anacardium)on altered glucose metabolism in diabetic rats. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was induced by feeding rats with high fat diet followed by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (35 mg/kg b.w.). Seven days after STZ induction, diabetic rats received nut milk extract of S. anacardium Linn. nut milk extract orally at a dosage of 200 mg/kg daily for 4 weeks. The effect of nut milk extract of S. anacardium on blood glucose, plasma insulin, glucose metabolising enzymes and GSK were studied. Treatment with SA extract showed a significant reduction in blood glucose levels and increase in plasma insulin levels and also increase in HOMA - β and decrease in HOMA -IR. The drug significantly increased the activity of glycolytic enzymes and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and increased the glycogen content in liver of diabetic rats while reducing the activities of gluconeogenic enzymes. The drug also effectively ameliorated the alterations in GSK-3 mRNA expression. Overall, the present study demonstrates the possible mechanism of glucose regulation of S. anacardium suggestive of its therapeutic potential for the management of diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-10-08

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure.

  20. Arsenic trioxide alters the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cell into cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Cebral, Elisa; Fassina, Lorenzo; Alberto Redi, Carlo; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic increases myocardial infarction mortality in young adulthood, suggesting that exposure during foetal life correlates with cardiac alterations emerging later. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of arsenic trioxide (ATO) cardiomyocytes disruption during their differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells. Throughout 15 days of differentiation in the presence of ATO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 μM) we analysed: the expression of i) marker genes of mesoderm (day 4), myofibrillogenic commitment (day 7) and post-natal-like cardiomyocytes (day 15); ii) sarcomeric proteins and their organisation; iii) Connexin 43 and iv) the kinematics contractile properties of syncytia. The higher the dose used, the earlier the stage of differentiation affected (mesoderm commitment, 1.0 μM). At 0.5 or 1.0 μM the expression of cardiomyocyte marker genes is altered. Even at 0.1 μM, ATO leads to reduction and skewed ratio of sarcomeric proteins and to a rarefied distribution of Connexin 43 cardiac junctions. These alterations contribute to the dysruption of the sarcomere and syncytium organisation and to the impairment of kinematic parameters of cardiomyocyte function. This study contributes insights into the mechanistic comprehension of cardiac diseases caused by in utero arsenic exposure. PMID:26447599

  1. Differential alterations of intracellular [Ca2+] dynamics induced by cocaine and methylphenidate in thalamocortical ventrobasal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rozas, José L.; Goitia, Belén; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The ventrobasal (VB) thalamus relay nucleus processes information from rodents’ whiskers, projecting to somatosensory cortex. Cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) have been described to differentially alter intrinsic properties of, and spontaneous GABAergic input to, VB neurons. Here we studied using bis-fura 2 ratiometric fluorescence the effects of cocaine and MPH on intracellular [Ca2+] dynamics at the soma and dendrites of VB neurons. Cocaine increased baseline fluorescence in VB somatic and dendritic compartments. Peak and areas of fluorescence amplitudes were reduced by cocaine binge treatment in somas and dendrites at different holding potentials. MPH binge treatment did not alter ratiometric fluorescence at either somatic or dendritic levels. These novel cocaine-mediated blunting effects on intracellular [Ca2+] might account for alterations in the capacity of thalamocortical neurons to maintain gamma band oscillations, as well as their ability to integrate synaptic afferents. PMID:28920083

  2. Differential regulation of glucose transport activity in yeast by specific cAMP signatures.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Clara; Haerizadeh, Farzad; Sadoine, Mayuri S C; Chermak, Diane; Frommer, Wolf B

    2013-06-15

    Successful colonization and survival in variable environments require a competitive advantage during the initial growth phase after experiencing nutrient changes. Starved yeast cells anticipate exposure to glucose by activating the Hxt5p (hexose transporter 5) glucose transporter, which provides an advantage during early phases after glucose resupply. cAMP and glucose FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) sensors were used to identify three signalling pathways that co-operate in the anticipatory Hxt5p activity in glucose-starved cells: as expected the Snf1 (sucrose nonfermenting 1) AMP kinase pathway, but, surprisingly, the sugar-dependent G-protein-coupled Gpr1 (G-protein-coupled receptor 1)/cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) pathway and the Pho85 (phosphate metabolism 85)/Plc (phospholipase C) 6/7 pathway. Gpr1/cAMP/PKA are key elements of a G-protein-coupled sugar response pathway that produces a transient cAMP peak to induce growth-related genes. A novel function of the Gpr1/cAMP/PKA pathway was identified in glucose-starved cells: during starvation the Gpr1/cAMP/PKA pathway is required to maintain Hxt5p activity in the absence of glucose-induced cAMP spiking. During starvation, cAMP levels remain low triggering expression of HXT5, whereas cAMP spiking leads to a shift to the high capacity Hxt isoforms.

  3. Cardiac-Specific Disruption of GH Receptor Alters Glucose Homeostasis While Maintaining Normal Cardiac Performance in Adult Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Jara, Adam; Liu, Xingbo; Sim, Don; Benner, Chance M; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Qian, Yanrong; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kim, Jason K; Kopchick, John J

    2016-05-01

    GH is considered necessary for the proper development and maintenance of several tissues, including the heart. Studies conducted in both GH receptor null and bovine GH transgenic mice have demonstrated specific cardiac structural and functional changes. In each of these mouse lines, however, GH-induced signaling is altered systemically, being decreased in GH receptor null mice and increased in bovine GH transgenic mice. Therefore, to clarify the direct effects GH has on cardiac tissue, we developed a tamoxifen-inducible, cardiac-specific GHR disrupted (iC-GHRKO) mouse line. Cardiac GH receptor was disrupted in 4-month-old iC-GHRKO mice to avoid developmental effects due to perinatal GHR gene disruption. Surprisingly, iC-GHRKO mice showed no difference vs controls in baseline or postdobutamine stress test echocardiography measurements, nor did iC-GHRKO mice show differences in longitudinal systolic blood pressure measurements. Interestingly, iC-GHRKO mice had decreased fat mass and improved insulin sensitivity at 6.5 months of age. By 12.5 months of age, however, iC-GHRKO mice no longer had significant decreases in fat mass and had developed glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Furthermore, investigation via immunoblot analysis demonstrated that iC-GHRKO mice had appreciably decreased insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation, specifically in heart and liver, but not in epididymal white adipose tissue. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in circulating IGF-1 levels in 12.5-month-old iC-GHRKO mice. These data indicate that whereas the disruption of cardiomyocyte GH-induced signaling in adult mice does not affect cardiac function, it does play a role in systemic glucose homeostasis, in part through modulation of circulating IGF-1.

  4. Differential responses of intestinal glucose transporter mRNA transcripts to levels of dietary sugars.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Hase, K; Takagi, T; Fujii, T; Taketani, Y; Minami, H; Oka, T; Nakabou, Y

    1993-10-01

    Dietary sugars are known to stimulate intestinal glucose transport activity, but the specific signals involved are unknown. The Na(+)-dependent glucose co-transporter (SGLT1), the liver-type facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT2) and the intestinal-type facilitative glucose transporter (GLUT5) are all expressed in rat jejunum [Miyamoto, Hase, Taketani, Minami, Oka, Nakabou and Hagihira (1991) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 181, 1110-1117]. In the present study we have investigated the effects of dietary sugars on these glucose transporter genes. A high-glucose diet stimulated glucose transport activity and increased the levels of SGLT1 and GLUT2 mRNAs in rat jejunum. 3-O-Methylglucose, D-galactose, D-fructose, D-mannose and D-xylose can mimic the regulatory effect of glucose on the SGLT1 mRNA level in rat jejunum. However, only D-galactose and D-fructose increased the levels of GLUT2 mRNA. The GLUT5 mRNA level was increased significantly only by D-fructose. Our results suggest that the increase in intestinal transport activity in rats caused by dietary glucose is due to an increase in the levels of SGLT1 and GLUT2 mRNAs, and that these increases in mRNA may be caused by an enhancement of the transcriptional rate. Furthermore, for expression of the SGLT1 gene, the signal need not be a metabolizable or transportable substrate whereas, for expression of the GLUT2 gene, metabolism of the substrate in the liver may be necessary for signalling. Only D-fructose is an effective signal for expression of the GLUT5 gene.

  5. Divergent mechanisms for the insulin resistant and hyperresponsive glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted and refed rats. Alterations in both glucose transporter number and intrinsic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, B B; Simpson, I A; Cushman, S W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of fasting and refeeding on the glucose transport response to insulin in isolated rat adipose cells have been examined using 3-O-methylglucose transport in intact cells and cytochalasin B binding and Western blotting in subcellular membrane fractions. After a 72-h fast, basal glucose transport activity decreases slightly and insulin-stimulated activity decreases greater than 85%. Following 48 h of fasting, insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity is diminished from 3.9 +/- 0.5 to 1.3 +/- 0.3 fmol/cell per min (mean +/- SEM). Similarly, the concentrations of glucose transporters are reduced with fasting in both the plasma membranes from insulin-stimulated cells from 38 +/- 5 to 18 +/- 3 pmol/mg of membrane protein and the low density microsomes from basal cells from 68 +/- 8 to 34 +/- 9 pmol/mg of membrane protein. Ad lib. refeeding for 6 d after a 48-h fast results in up to twofold greater maximally insulin-stimulated glucose transport activity compared with the control level (7.1 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.5 +/- 0.2 fmol/cell per min), before returning to baseline at 10 d. However, the corresponding concentration of glucose transporters in the plasma membranes is restored only to the control level (45 +/- 5 vs. 50 +/- 5 pmol/mg of membrane protein). Although the concentration of glucose transporters in the low density microsomes of basal cells remains decreased, the total number is restored to the control level due to an increase in low density microsomal protein. Thus, the insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose cells from fasted rats can be explained by a decreased translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane due to a depleted intracellular pool. In contrast, the insulin hyperresponsive glucose transport observed with refeeding appears to result from (a) a restored translocation of glucose transporters to the plasma membrane from a repleted intracellular pool and (b) enhanced plasma membrane glucose transporter intrinsic activity

  6. Gene expression related to the differentiation of osteoblastic cells is altered by microgravity.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, G; Nys, G; Stockmans, I; Bouillon, R

    1998-05-01

    Bone loss is observed after exposure to weightlessness in both astronauts and inflight animals. Histological and biochemical studies on rats have shown a decrease in bone formation, probably as a result of altered osteoblast function. To investigate whether microgravity alters osteoblast differentiation in vitro, the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 was used as a model. MG-63 cells can be induced to differentiate by treating the cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 (10(-7) mol/L) and transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGFbeta2) (10 ng/mL). The message level of differentiation-related genes was quantitated via competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), both in untreated and hormone-treated cells cultured under microgravity for 9 days aboard the unmanned Foton 10 spaceflight, and compared to ground and inflight unit-gravity cultures. At microgravity, gene expression for collagen Ialpha1 following treatment was reduced to 51% of unit-gravity levels (p < 0.05). The amount of alkaline phosphatase messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) following treatment at microgravity increased by only a factor of 5 compared to the tenfold increase at unit gravity (p < 0.02). The osteocalcin message level in treated cells cultured at microgravity was only 19% of the level found in cells grown at unit gravity (p < 0.02). In conclusion, microgravity reduces the differentiation of osteoblastic MG-63 cells in response to systemic hormones and growth factors.

  7. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  8. Type 2 diabetes alters metabolic and transcriptional signatures of glucose and amino acid metabolism during exercise and recovery.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jakob S; Zhao, Xinjie; Irmler, Martin; Liu, Xinyu; Hoene, Miriam; Scheler, Mika; Li, Yanjie; Beckers, Johannes; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Pedersen, Bente K; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang; Plomgaard, Peter; Weigert, Cora

    2015-08-01

    The therapeutic benefit of physical activity to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes is commonly accepted. However, the impact of the disease on the acute metabolic response is less clear. To this end, we investigated the effect of type 2 diabetes on exercise-induced plasma metabolite changes and the muscular transcriptional response using a complementary metabolomics/transcriptomics approach. We analysed 139 plasma metabolites and hormones at nine time points, and whole genome expression in skeletal muscle at three time points, during a 60 min bicycle ergometer exercise and a 180 min recovery phase in type 2 diabetic patients and healthy controls matched for age, percentage body fat and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2). Pathway analysis of differentially regulated genes upon exercise revealed upregulation of regulators of GLUT4 (SLC2A4RG, FLOT1, EXOC7, RAB13, RABGAP1 and CBLB), glycolysis (HK2, PFKFB1, PFKFB3, PFKM, FBP2 and LDHA) and insulin signal mediators in diabetic participants compared with controls. Notably, diabetic participants had normalised rates of lactate and insulin levels, and of glucose appearance and disappearance, after exercise. They also showed an exercise-induced compensatory regulation of genes involved in biosynthesis and metabolism of amino acids (PSPH, GATM, NOS1 and GLDC), which responded to differences in the amino acid profile (consistently lower plasma levels of glycine, cysteine and arginine). Markers of fat oxidation (acylcarnitines) and lipolysis (glycerol) did not indicate impaired metabolic flexibility during exercise in diabetic participants. Type 2 diabetic individuals showed specific exercise-regulated gene expression. These data provide novel insight into potential mechanisms to ameliorate the disturbed glucose and amino acid metabolism associated with type 2 diabetes.

  9. Differential cognitive effects of energy drink ingredients: caffeine, taurine, and glucose.

    PubMed

    Giles, Grace E; Mahoney, Caroline R; Brunyé, Tad T; Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Kanarek, Robin B

    2012-10-01

    Energy drinks containing caffeine, taurine, and glucose may improve mood and cognitive performance. However, there are no studies assessing the individual and interactive effects of these ingredients. We evaluated the effects of caffeine, taurine, and glucose alone and in combination on cognitive performance and mood in 24-hour caffeine-abstained habitual caffeine consumers. Using a randomized, double-blind, mixed design, 48 habitual caffeine consumers (18 male, 30 female) who were 24-hour caffeine deprived received one of four treatments (200 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 200 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine), on each of four separate days, separated by a 3-day wash-out period. Between-participants treatment was a glucose drink (50 g glucose, placebo). Salivary cortisol, mood and heart rate were measured. An attention task was administered 30-minutes post-treatment, followed by a working memory and reaction time task 60-minutes post-treatment. Caffeine enhanced executive control and working memory, and reduced simple and choice reaction time. Taurine increased choice reaction time but reduced reaction time in the working memory tasks. Glucose alone slowed choice reaction time. Glucose in combination with caffeine, enhanced object working memory and in combination with taurine, enhanced orienting attention. Limited glucose effects may reflect low task difficulty relative to subjects' cognitive ability. Caffeine reduced feelings of fatigue and increased tension and vigor. Taurine reversed the effects of caffeine on vigor and caffeine-withdrawal symptoms. No effects were found for salivary cortisol or heart rate. Caffeine, not taurine or glucose, is likely responsible for reported changes in cognitive performance following consumption of energy drinks, especially in caffeine-withdrawn habitual caffeine consumers.

  10. Original Research: Polyphenols extracted from grape powder induce lipogenesis and glucose uptake during differentiation of murine preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Sheida; DiMarco, Nancy M

    2016-10-01

    Assessing the effects of grapes and grape powder extracted polyphenols on lipogenesis and glucose uptake in adipocytes may clarify the risk/benefit of recommending them to individuals with obesity and insulin resistance. We investigated the effect of grape powder extracted polyphenols (GPEP) on intracellular fat accumulation and glucose uptake during differentiation of 3T3-F442A preadipocytes. Total polyphenols were extracted and measured based on gallic acid equivalents (GAE). There were 2167 mg of GAE polyphenols in 100 g of grape powder. 3T3-F442A cells were incubated with GPEP, extracted from 125-500 µg GP/mL of media, until day 8 of differentiation when the cells were collected for different assays. AdipoRed™ assay and Oil Red O staining showed that GPEP induced, in a dose-dependent manner, an increase in intracellular triacylglycerol (TAG) content of adipocytes. Concomitantly, grape powder extracted polyphenols increased, in a dose-dependent manner, glucose uptake by 3T3-F442A cells, and there was a strong positive correlation between glucose uptake and the amount of TAG accumulation (r = 0.826, n = 24, P ≤ 0.001). No changes in cell viability was measured by Trypan Blue staining, suggesting that these effects were independent of cytotoxicity. Western-blot showed that GPEP upregulated protein level of glucose transport protein 4 (GLUT4), p-PKB/Akt, and p-AMPK in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. LY294002 (10 µmol/L), a phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase inhibitor (PI3K), reversed the effects of grape powder extracted polyphenols on cellular lipid content and glucose uptake. Furthermore, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that GPEP increased mRNA expression of GLUT4, fatty acid synthase, lipoprotein lipase, adiponectin, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, while it decreased mRNA expression of leptin and Insig-1. Our results indicate that GPEP may induce adipocyte differentiation via upregulation of GLUT4, PI3K and

  11. Alcohol induced epigenetic alterations to developmentally crucial genes regulating neural stemness and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Kylee J.; Carnahan, Mindy N.; Muller, Daria; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Golding, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background From studies using a diverse range of model organisms, we now acknowledge that epigenetic changes to chromatin structure provide a plausible link between environmental teratogens and alterations in gene expression leading to disease. Observations from a number of independent laboratories indicate ethanol has the capacity to act as a powerful epigenetic disruptor and potentially derail the coordinated processes of cellular differentiation. In this study, we sought to examine whether primary neurospheres cultured under conditions maintaining stemness were susceptible to alcohol-induced alterations of the histone code. We focused our studies on trimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 and trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27, as these are two of the most prominent post-translational histone modifications regulating stem cell maintenance and neural differentiation. Methods Primary neurosphere cultures were maintained under conditions promoting the stem cell state and treated with ethanol for five days. Control and ethanol treated cellular extracts were examined using a combination of quantitative RT-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation techniques. Results We find that the regulatory regions of genes controlling both neural precursor cell identity and processes of differentiation exhibited significant declines in the enrichment of the chromatin marks examined. Despite these widespread changes in chromatin structure, only a small subset of genes including Dlx2, Fabp7, Nestin, Olig2, and Pax6 displayed ethanol induced alterations in transcription. Unexpectedly, the majority of chromatin modifying enzymes examined including members of the Polycomb Repressive Complex displayed minimal changes in expression and localization. Only transcripts encoding Dnmt1, Uhrf1, Ehmt1, Ash2l, Wdr5, and Kdm1b exhibited significant differences. Conclusions Our results indicate primary neurospheres maintained as stem cells in vitro are susceptible to alcohol-induced perturbation of the

  12. Selective estrogen receptor modulators differentially alter the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles.

    PubMed

    Rodenas, M C; Cabas, I; García-Alcázar, A; Meseguer, J; Mulero, V; García-Ayala, A

    2016-05-01

    17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), a synthetic estrogen used in oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, tamoxifen (Tmx), a selective estrogen-receptor modulator used in hormone replacement therapy, and G1, a G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) selective agonist, differentially increased the hepatic vitellogenin (vtg) gene expression and altered the immune response in adult gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) males. However, no information exists on the effects of these compounds on the immune response of juveniles. This study aims, for the first time, to investigate the effects of the dietary intake of EE2, Tmx or G1 on the immune response of gilthead seabream juveniles and the capacity of the immune system of the specimens to recover its functionality after ceasing exposures (recovery period). The specimens were immunized with hemocyanin in the presence of aluminium adjuvant 1 (group A) or 120 (group B) days after the treatments ceased (dpt). The results indicate that EE2 and Tmx, but not G1, differentially promoted a transient alteration in hepatic vtg gene expression. Although all three compounds did not affect the production of reactive oxygen intermediates, they inhibited the induction of interleukin-1β (il1b) gene expression after priming. Interestingly, although Tmx increased the percentage of IgM-positive cells in both head kidney and spleen during the recovery period, the antibody response of vaccinated fish varied depending on the compound used and when the immunization was administered. Taken together, our results suggest that these compounds differentially alter the capacity of fish to respond to infection during ontogeny and, more interestingly, that the adaptive immune response remained altered to an extent that depends on the compound.

  13. An analogue of atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) modulates glucose metabolism in human differentiated adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Aguilera, Concepción María; Rupérez, Azahara Iris; Gil, Ángel; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina

    2016-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of C-atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) in human adipose-derived stem cells differentiated into adipocytes over 10 days (1 μM for 4 h). The intracellular cAMP, cGMP and protein kinase A levels were determined by ELISA and gene and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively, in the presence or absence of C-ANP4-23. The levels of lipolysis and glucose uptake were also determined. C-ANP4-23 treatment significantly increased the intracellular cAMP levels and the gene expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and protein kinase, AMP-activated, alpha 1 catalytic subunit (AMPK). Western blot showed a significant increase in GLUT4 and phosphor-AMPKα levels. Importantly, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished these effects. Additionally, C-ANP4-23 increased glucose uptake by 2-fold. Our results show that C-ANP4-23 enhances glucose metabolism and might contribute to the development of new peptide-based therapies for metabolic diseases.

  14. Maraviroc reduces cytokine expression and secretion in human adipose cells without altering adipogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Delfín, Julieta; Domingo, Pere; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2013-03-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is a drug approved for use as part of HAART in treatment-experienced HIV-1 patients with CCR5-tropic virus. Despite the current concerns on the alterations in adipose tissue that frequently appear in HIV-infected patients under HAART, there is no information available on the effects of MVC on adipose tissue. Here we studied the effects of MVC during and after the differentiation of human adipocytes in culture, and compared the results with the effects of efavirenz (EFV). We measured the acquisition of adipocyte morphology; the gene expression levels of markers for mitochondrial toxicity, adipogenesis and inflammation; and the release of adipokines and cytokines to the medium. Additionally, we determined the effects of MVC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in adipocytes. Unlike EFV-treated pre-adipocytes, MVC-treated pre-adipocytes showed no alterations in the capacity to differentiate into adipocytes and accumulated lipids normally. Consistent with this, there were no changes in the mRNA levels of PPARγ or SREBP-1c, two master regulators of adipogenesis. In addition, MVC caused a significant decrease in the gene expression and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas EFV had the opposite effect. Moreover, MVC lowered inflammation-related gene expression and inhibited the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory genes in differentiated adipocytes. We conclude that MVC does not alter adipocyte differentiation but rather shows anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting the expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Collectively, our results suggest that MVC may minimize adverse effects on adipose tissue development, metabolism, and inflammation, and thus could be a potentially beneficial component of antiretroviral therapy.

  15. Genetic engineering to enhance the Ehrlich pathway and alter carbon flux for increased isobutanol production from glucose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takashi; Tezuka, Hironori; Ishii, Jun; Matsuda, Fumio; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-05-31

    The production of higher alcohols by engineered bacteria has received significant attention. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has considerable potential as a producer of higher alcohols because of its capacity to naturally fabricate fusel alcohols, in addition to its robustness and tolerance to low pH. However, because its natural productivity is not significant, we considered a strategy of genetic engineering to increase production of the branched-chain higher alcohol isobutanol, which is involved in valine biosynthesis. Initially, we overexpressed 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in S. cerevisiae to enhance the endogenous activity of the Ehrlich pathway. We then overexpressed Ilv2, which catalyzes the first step in the valine synthetic pathway, and deleted the PDC1 gene encoding a major pyruvate decarboxylase with the intent of altering the abundant ethanol flux via pyruvate. Through these engineering steps, along with modification of culture conditions, the isobutanol titer of S. cerevisiae was elevated 13-fold, from 11 mg/l to 143 mg/l, and the yield was 6.6 mg/g glucose, which is higher than any previously reported value for S. cerevisiae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered glucose and lipid homeostasis in liver and adipose tissue pre-dispose inducible NOS knockout mice to insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kanuri, Babu Nageswararao; Kanshana, Jitendra S.; Rebello, Sanjay C.; Pathak, Priya; Gupta, Anand P.; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Dikshit, Madhu

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of diet induced obesity and KO mice models, nitric oxide is implied to play an important role in the initiation of dyslipidemia induced insulin resistance. However, outcomes using iNOS KO mice have so far remained inconclusive. The present study aimed to assess IR in iNOS KO mice after 5 weeks of LFD feeding by monitoring body composition, energy homeostasis, insulin sensitivity/signaling, nitrite content and gene expressions changes in the tissues. We found that body weight and fat content in KO mice were significantly higher while the respiratory exchange ratio (RER), volume of carbon dioxide (VCO2), and heat production were lower as compared to WT mice. Furthermore, altered systemic glucose tolerance, tissue insulin signaling, hepatic gluconeogenesis, augmented hepatic lipids, adiposity, as well as gene expression regulating lipid synthesis, catabolism and efflux were evident in iNOS KO mice. Significant reduction in eNOS and nNOS gene expression, hepatic and adipose tissue nitrite content, circulatory nitrite was also observed. Oxygen consumption rate of mitochondrial respiration has remained unaltered in KO mice as measured using extracellular flux analyzer. Our findings establish a link between the NO status with systemic and tissue specific IR in iNOS KO mice at 5 weeks. PMID:28106120

  17. Oxidative Stress in Mouse Sperm Impairs Embryo Development, Fetal Growth and Alters Adiposity and Glucose Regulation in Female Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Michelle; McPherson, Nicole O.; Fullston, Tod; Spillane, Marni; Sandeman, Lauren; Kang, Wan Xian; Zander-Fox, Deirdre L.

    2014-01-01

    Paternal health cues are able to program the health of the next generation however the mechanism for this transmission is unknown. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are increased in many paternal pathologies, some of which program offspring health, and are known to induce DNA damage and alter the methylation pattern of chromatin. We therefore investigated whether a chemically induced increase of ROS in sperm impairs embryo, pregnancy and offspring health. Mouse sperm was exposed to 1500 µM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which induced oxidative damage, however did not affect sperm motility or the ability to bind and fertilize an oocyte. Sperm treated with H2O2 delayed on-time development of subsequent embryos, decreased the ratio of inner cell mass cells (ICM) in the resulting blastocyst and reduced implantation rates. Crown-rump length at day 18 of gestation was also reduced in offspring produced by H2O2 treated sperm. Female offspring from H2O2 treated sperm were smaller, became glucose intolerant and accumulated increased levels of adipose tissue compared to control female offspring. Interestingly male offspring phenotype was less severe with increases in fat depots only seen at 4 weeks of age, which was restored to that of control offspring later in life, demonstrating sex-specific impacts on offspring. This study implicates elevated sperm ROS concentrations, which are common to many paternal health pathologies, as a mediator of programming offspring for metabolic syndrome and obesity. PMID:25006800

  18. Operant licking for intragastric sugar infusions: Differential reinforcing actions of glucose, sucrose and fructose in mice.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony; Ackroff, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Intragastric (IG) flavor conditioning studies in rodents indicate that isocaloric sugar infusions differ in their reinforcing actions, with glucose and sucrose more potent than fructose. Here we determined if the sugars also differ in their ability to maintain operant self-administration by licking an empty spout for IG infusions. Food-restricted C57BL/6J mice were trained 1 h/day to lick a food-baited spout, which triggered IG infusions of 16% sucrose. In testing, the mice licked an empty spout, which triggered IG infusions of different sugars. Mice shifted from sucrose to 16% glucose increased dry licking, whereas mice shifted to 16% fructose rapidly reduced licking to low levels. Other mice shifted from sucrose to IG water reduced licking more slowly but reached the same low levels. Thus IG fructose, like water, is not reinforcing to hungry mice. The more rapid decline in licking induced by fructose may be due to the sugar's satiating effects. Further tests revealed that the Glucose mice increased their dry licking when shifted from 16% to 8% glucose, and reduced their dry licking when shifted to 32% glucose. This may reflect caloric regulation and/or differences in satiation. The Glucose mice did not maintain caloric intake when tested with different sugars. They self-infused less sugar when shifted from 16% glucose to 16% sucrose, and even more so when shifted to 16% fructose. Reduced sucrose self-administration may occur because the fructose component of the disaccharide reduces its reinforcing potency. FVB mice also reduced operant licking when tested with 16% fructose, yet learned to prefer a flavor paired with IG fructose. These data indicate that sugars differ substantially in their ability to support IG self-administration and flavor preference learning. The same post-oral reinforcement process appears to mediate operant licking and flavor learning, although flavor learning provides a more sensitive measure of sugar reinforcement. Copyright © 2015

  19. Operant licking for intragastric sugar infusions: differential reinforcing actions of glucose, sucrose and fructose in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Anthony; Ackroff, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Intragastric (IG) flavor conditioning studies in rodents indicate that isocaloric sugar infusions differ in their reinforcing actions, with glucose and sucrose more potent than fructose. Here we determined if the sugars also differ in their ability to maintain operant self-administration by licking an empty spout for IG infusions. Food-restricted C57BL/6J mice were trained 1 h/day to lick a food-baited spout, which triggered IG infusions of 16% sucrose. In testing, the mice licked an empty spout, which triggered IG infusions of different sugars. Mice shifted from sucrose to 16% glucose increased dry licking, whereas mice shifted to 16% fructose rapidly reduced licking to low levels. Other mice shifted from sucrose to IG water reduced licking more slowly but reached the same low levels. Thus IG fructose, like water, is not reinforcing to hungry mice. The more rapid decline in licking induced by fructose may be due to the sugar's satiating effects. Further tests revealed that the Glucose mice increased their dry licking when shifted from 16% to 8% glucose, and reduced their dry licking when shifted to 32% glucose. This may reflect caloric regulation and/or differences in satiation. The Glucose mice did not maintain caloric intake when tested with different sugars. They self-infused less sugar when shifted from 16% glucose to 16% sucrose, and even more so when shifted to 16% fructose. Reduced sucrose self-administration may occur because the fructose component of the disaccharide reduces its reinforcing potency. FVB mice also reduced operant licking when tested with 16% fructose, yet learned to prefer a flavor paired with IG fructose. These data indicate that sugars differ substantially in their ability to support IG self-administration and flavor preference learning. The same post-oral reinforcement process appears to mediate operant licking and flavor learning, although flavor learning provides a more sensitive measure of sugar reinforcement. PMID:26485294

  20. Radiation-Induced Alterations of Osteogenic and Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruet-Hennequart, Séverine; Drougard, Carole; Shaw, Georgina; Legendre, Florence; Demoor, Magali; Barry, Frank; Lefaix, Jean-Louis; Galéra, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    While human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), either in the bone marrow or in tumour microenvironment could be targeted by radiotherapy, their response is poorly understood. The oxic effects on radiosensitivity, cell cycle progression are largely unknown, and the radiation effects on hMSCs differentiation capacities remained unexplored. Here we analysed hMSCs viability and cell cycle progression in 21% O2 and 3% O2 conditions after medical X-rays irradiation. Differentiation towards osteogenesis and chondrogenesis after irradiation was evaluated through an analysis of differentiation specific genes. Finally, a 3D culture model in hypoxia was used to evaluate chondrogenesis in conditions mimicking the natural hMSCs microenvironment. The hMSCs radiosensitivity was not affected by O2 tension. A decreased number of cells in S phase and an increase in G2/M were observed in both O2 tensions after 16 hours but hMSCs released from the G2/M arrest and proliferated at day 7. Osteogenesis was increased after irradiation with an enhancement of mRNA expression of specific osteogenic genes (alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin). Osteoblastic differentiation was altered since matrix deposition was impaired with a decreased expression of collagen I, probably through an increase of its degradation by MMP-3. After induction in monolayers, chondrogenesis was altered after irradiation with an increase in COL1A1 and a decrease in both SOX9 and ACAN mRNA expression. After induction in a 3D culture in hypoxia, chondrogenesis was altered after irradiation with a decrease in COL2A1, ACAN and SOX9 mRNA amounts associated with a RUNX2 increase. Together with collagens I and II proteins decrease, associated to a MMP-13 expression increase, these data show a radiation-induced impairment of chondrogenesis. Finally, a radiation-induced impairment of both osteogenesis and chondrogenesis was characterised by a matrix composition alteration, through inhibition of synthesis and/or increased degradation

  1. Simulated microgravity alters multipotential differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells in association with reduced telomerase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lianwen; Gan, Bo; Fan, Yubo; Xie, Tian; Hu, Qinghua; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    Microgravity is one of the most important characteristics in space flight. Exposure to microgravity results in extensive physiological changes in humans. Bone loss is one of the changes with serious consequences; however, the mechanism retains unclear. As the origin of osteoprogenitors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may play an important role in it. After cultured under simulated microgravity (in a rotary cell culture system, RCCS), MSCs were stained using oil red O to identify adipocytes. The mRNA level of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) γ2 was determined by RT-PCR. Otherwise, MSCs were induced to osteogenic differentiation after microgravity culture, and then the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was determined by PNPP and the content of osteocalcin (OC) by ELISA. Furthermore, the telomerase activity in MSCs was measured by TRAP. The results showed that simulated microgravity inhibited osteoblastic differentiation and induced adipogenic differentiation accompanied by the change of gene expression of BMP-2 and PPARγ2 in MSCs. Meanwhile, the telomerase activity decreased significantly in MSCs under simulated microgravity. The reduced bone formation in space flight may partly be due to the altered potential differentiation of MSCs associated with telomerase activity which plays a key role in regulating the lifespan of cell proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, telomerase activation/replacement may act as a potential countermeasure for microgravity-induced bone loss.

  2. Alteration of protein prenylation promotes spermatogonial differentiation and exhausts spermatogonial stem cells in newborn mice

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Fan; Jiang, Chen; Wang, Xiu-Xing; Zhu, Rui-Lou; Wang, Qiang; Yao, Bing; Li, Chao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis in adulthood depends on the successful neonatal establishment of the spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) pool and gradual differentiation during puberty. The stage-dependent changes in protein prenylation in the seminiferous epithelium might be important during the first round of spermatogenesis before sexual maturation, but the mechanisms are unclear. We have previous found that altered prenylation in Sertoli cells induced spermatogonial apoptosis in the neonatal testis, resulting in adult infertility. Now we further explored the role of protein prenylation in germ cells, using a conditional deletion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (Ggpps) in embryonic stage and postmeiotic stage respectively. We observed infertility of Ggpps−/− Ddx4-Cre mice that displayed a Sertoli-cell-only syndrome phenotype, which resulted from abnormal spermatogonial differentiation and SSC depletion during the prepubertal stage. Analysis of morphological characteristics and cell-specific markers revealed that spermatogonial differentiation was enhanced from as early as the 7th postnatal day in the first round of spermatogenesis. Studies of the molecular mechanisms indicated that Ggpps deletion enhanced Rheb farnesylation, which subsequently activated mTORC1 and facilitated spermatogonial differentiation. In conclusion, the prenylation balance in germ cells is crucial for spermatogonial differentiation fate decision during the prepubertal stage, and the disruption of this process results in primary infertility. PMID:27374985

  3. In vivo and in vitro studies of cartilage differentiation in altered gravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montufar-Solis, D.; Duke, P. J.; D'Aunno, D.

    The in vivo model our laboratory uses for studies of cartilage differentiation in space is the rat growth plate. Differences between missions, and in rat age and recovery times, provided differing results from each mission. However, in all missions, proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes in the epiphyseal plate of spaceflown rats was altered as was matrix organization. In vitro systems, necessary complements to in vivo work, provide some advantages over the in vivo situation. In vitro, centrifugation of embryonic limb buds suppressed morphogenesis due to precocious differentiation, and changes in the developmental pattern suggest the involvement of Hox genes. In space, embryonic mouse limb mesenchyme cells differentiating in vitro on IML-1 had smoother membranes and lacked matrix seen in controls. Unusual formations, possibly highly ruffled membranes, were found in flight cultures. These results, coupled with in vivo centrifugation studies, show that in vivo or in vitro, the response of chondrocytes to gravitational changes follows Hert's curve as modified by Simon, i.e. decreased loading decreases differentiation, and increased loading speeds it up, but only to a point. After that, additional increases again slow down chondrogenesis.

  4. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, Vanessa R.; Oliveira, Pedro F.; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A.; Alves, Marco G.; Silva, Branca M.

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  5. Impact of elvitegravir on human adipocytes: Alterations in differentiation, gene expression and release of adipokines and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Moure, Ricardo; Domingo, Pere; Gallego-Escuredo, José M; Villarroya, Joan; Gutierrez, Maria Del Mar; Mateo, Maria G; Domingo, Joan C; Giralt, Marta; Villarroya, Francesc

    2016-08-01

    Elvitegravir is a recently developed integrase inhibitor used for antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection. Secondary effects, including disturbances in lipid metabolism and, ultimately, in adipose tissue distribution and function, are common concerns associated with antiretroviral treatments. Here, we provide the first study of the effects of elvitegravir (in comparison with efavirenz, a non-nucleoside analog inhibitor of reverse transcriptase; and raltegravir, another integrase inhibitor) on human adipocyte differentiation, gene expression and secretion of adipokines and cytokines. Elvitegravir impaired adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism in human SGBS adipocytes in a concentration-dependent manner (delaying acquisition of adipocyte morphology and reducing the expression of adipogenesis marker genes such as PPARγ, glucose transporter GLUT4, lipoprotein lipase, and the adipokines adiponectin and leptin). Compared with efavirenz, the effects of elvitegravir were similar but tended to occur at higher concentrations than those elicited by efavirenz, or were somewhat less intense than those caused by efavirenz at similar concentration. Elvitegravir tended to cause a more moderate induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines than efavirenz. Efavirenz induced a marked concentration-dependent increase in interleukin-8 expression and release whereas elvitregravir had little effect. Raltegravir had totally neutral actions of adipogenesis, adipocyte metabolism-related gene expression and release of adipokines and cytokines. In conclusion, elvitegravir alters adipocyte differentiation and function and promotes induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines similarly to efavirenz, but several effects were less intense. Further assessment of lipid metabolism and adipose tissue function in patients administered elvitegravir-based regimes is advisable considering that totally neutral effects of elvitegravir on lipid homeostasis cannot be anticipated from the current study in vitro.

  6. Differential expression of glucose transporters in rabbit placenta: effect of hypercholesterolemia in dams.

    PubMed

    Kevorkova, Olha; Ethier-Chiasson, Maude; Lafond, Julie

    2007-03-01

    Low birth weight is observed in rabbit offspring when maternal hypercholesterolemia is induced during gestation, but the related etiology is still unknown. Glucose is one of the most important substances during fetal development, and defect in glucose supply to fetus was related to pathophysiological mechanisms in intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the impact of maternal hypercholesterolemia during rabbit gestation on the glucose metabolism and the routing of glucose transporters (SLC2 and SLC5 [previously known as GLUT and SGLT]) in placenta. In this study, maternal and offspring serum levels of glucose and insulin were evaluated for control and hypercholesterolemic groups, and the mRNA and protein expressions of placental SLCs were quantified by real-time RT-PCR and Western immunoblot, respectively. Our data demonstrate that maternal hypercholesterolemia during gestation: 1) induces offspring hypoglycemia; 2) does not modify the genetic and protein expressions of SLC2A1 and SLC2A4 (previously GLUT1 and GLUT4) in total placental extract; 3) downregulates the placental SLC5A1 (previously SGLT1) protein expression without affecting its mRNA levels; 4) impairs the translocation of SLC2A1 but not SLC2A4 from cytoplasmatic pool to the cell membrane surface. Then we assume that reduction of offspring birth weight in presence of maternal hypercholesterolemia may be related to the offspring's hypoglycemia and the reduction of the cell surface expression of placental SLC2A1.

  7. FOXA1 deletion in luminal epithelium causes prostatic hyperplasia and alteration of differentiated phenotype.

    PubMed

    DeGraff, David J; Grabowska, Magdalena M; Case, Tom C; Yu, Xiuping; Herrick, Mary K; Hayward, William J; Strand, Douglas W; Cates, Justin M; Hayward, Simon W; Gao, Nan; Walter, Michael A; Buttyan, Ralph; Yi, Yajun; Kaestner, Klaus H; Matusik, Robert J

    2014-07-01

    The forkhead box (Fox) superfamily of transcription factors has essential roles in organogenesis and tissue differentiation. Foxa1 and Foxa2 are expressed during prostate budding and ductal morphogenesis, whereas Foxa1 expression is retained in adult prostate epithelium. Previous characterization of prostatic tissue rescued from embryonic Foxa1 knockout mice revealed Foxa1 to be essential for ductal morphogenesis and epithelial maturation. However, it is unknown whether Foxa1 is required to maintain the differentiated status in adult prostate epithelium. Here, we employed the PBCre4 transgenic system and determined the impact of prostate-specific Foxa1 deletion in adult murine epithelium. PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) mouse prostates showed progressive florid hyperplasia with extensive cribriform patterning, with the anterior prostate being most affected. Immunohistochemistry studies show mosaic Foxa1 KO consistent with PBCre4 activity, with Foxa1 KO epithelial cells specifically exhibiting altered cell morphology, increased proliferation, and elevated expression of basal cell markers. Castration studies showed that, while PBCre4/Foxa1(loxp/loxp) prostates did not exhibit altered sensitivity in response to hormone ablation compared with control prostates, the number of Foxa1-positive cells in mosaic Foxa1 KO prostates was significantly reduced compared with Foxa1-negative cells following castration. Unexpectedly, gene expression profile analyses revealed that Foxa1 deletion caused abnormal expression of seminal vesicle-associated genes in KO prostates. In summary, these results indicate Foxa1 expression is required for the maintenance of prostatic cellular differentiation.

  8. Expression of liver fatty acid binding protein alters growth and differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, F; Atshaves, B P; Starodub, O; Boedeker, A L; Smith, R R; Roths, J B; Foxworth, W B; Kier, A B

    2001-03-01

    Although expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) modulates cell growth, it is not known if L-FABP also alters cell morphology and differentiation. Therefore, pluripotent embryonic stem cells were transfected with cDNA encoding L-FABP and a series of clones expressing increasing levels of L-FABP were isolated. Untransfected ES cells, as well as ES cells transfected only with empty vector, spontaneously differentiated from rounded adipocyte-like to fibroblast-like morphology, concomitant with marked reduction in expression of stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA-1). These changes in morphology and expression of SSEA-1 were greatest in ES cell clones expressing L-FABP above a threshold level. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed that L-FABP was primarily localized in a diffuse-cytosolic pattern along with a lesser degree of punctate L-FABP expression in the nucleus. Nuclear localization of L-FABP was preferentially increased in clones expressing higher levels of L-FABP. In summary, L-FABP expression altered ES cell morphology and expression of SSEA-1. Taken together with the fact that L-FABP was detected in the nucleus, these data suggested that L-FABP may play a more direct, heretofore unknown, role in regulating ES cell differentiation by acting in the nucleus as well as cytoplasm.

  9. Taurine Protected Against the Impairments of Neural Stem Cell Differentiated Neurons Induced by Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Liu, Huazhen; Gu, Zeyun; Liu, Sining; Ji, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Cell transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) is a promising approach for neurological recovery both structurally and functionally. However, one big obstacle is to promote differentiation of NSCs into neurons and the followed maturation. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the protective effect of taurine on the differentiation of NSCs and subsequent maturation of their neuronal lineage, when exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The results suggested that taurine (5-20 mM) promoted the viability and proliferation of NSCs, and it protected against 8 h of OGD induced impairments. Furthermore, 20 mM taurine promoted NSCs to differentiate into neurons after 7 days of culture, and it also protected against the suppressive impairments of 8 h of OGD. Consistently, taurine (20 mM) promoted the neurite sprouting and outgrowth of the NSC differentiated neurons after 14 days of differentiation, which were significantly inhibited by OGD (8 h). At D21, the mushroom spines and spine density were promoted or restored by 20 mM taurine. Taken together, the enhanced viability and proliferation of NSCs, more differentiated neurons and the promoted maturation of neurons by 20 mM taurine support its therapeutic application during stem cell therapy to enhance neurological recovery. Moreover, it protected against the impairments induced by OGD, which may highlight its role for a more direct therapeutic application especially in an ischemic stroke environment.

  10. Differentiating unipolar and bipolar depression by alterations in large-scale brain networks.

    PubMed

    Goya-Maldonado, Roberto; Brodmann, Katja; Keil, Maria; Trost, Sarah; Dechent, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    Misdiagnosing bipolar depression can lead to very deleterious consequences of mistreatment. Although depressive symptoms may be similarly expressed in unipolar and bipolar disorder, changes in specific brain networks could be very distinct, being therefore informative markers for the differential diagnosis. We aimed to characterize specific alterations in candidate large-scale networks (frontoparietal, cingulo-opercular, and default mode) in symptomatic unipolar and bipolar patients using resting state fMRI, a cognitively low demanding paradigm ideal to investigate patients. Networks were selected after independent component analysis, compared across 40 patients acutely depressed (20 unipolar, 20 bipolar), and 20 controls well-matched for age, gender, and education levels, and alterations were correlated to clinical parameters. Despite comparable symptoms, patient groups were robustly differentiated by large-scale network alterations. Differences were driven in bipolar patients by increased functional connectivity in the frontoparietal network, a central executive and externally-oriented network. Conversely, unipolar patients presented increased functional connectivity in the default mode network, an introspective and self-referential network, as much as reduced connectivity of the cingulo-opercular network to default mode regions, a network involved in detecting the need to switch between internally and externally oriented demands. These findings were mostly unaffected by current medication, comorbidity, and structural changes. Moreover, network alterations in unipolar patients were significantly correlated to the number of depressive episodes. Unipolar and bipolar groups displaying similar symptomatology could be clearly distinguished by characteristic changes in large-scale networks, encouraging further investigation of network fingerprints for clinical use. Hum Brain Mapp 37:808-818, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Alcohol alters DNA methylation patterns and inhibits neural stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feng C; Balaraman, Yokesh; Teng, MingXiang; Liu, Yunlong; Singh, Rabindra P; Nephew, Kenneth P

    2011-04-01

    Potential epigenetic mechanisms underlying fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) include alcohol-induced alterations of methyl metabolism, resulting in aberrant patterns of DNA methylation and gene expression during development. Having previously demonstrated an essential role for epigenetics in neural stem cell (NSC) development and that inhibiting DNA methylation prevents NSC differentiation, here we investigated the effect of alcohol exposure on genome-wide DNA methylation patterns and NSC differentiation. Neural stem cells in culture were treated with or without a 6-hour 88 mM ("binge-like") alcohol exposure and examined at 48 hours, for migration, growth, and genome-wide DNA methylation. The DNA methylation was examined using DNA-methylation immunoprecipitation followed by microarray analysis. Further validation was performed using Independent Sequenom analysis.   Neural stem cell differentiated in 24 to 48 hours with migration, neuronal expression, and morphological transformation. Alcohol exposure retarded the migration, neuronal formation, and growth processes of NSC, similar to treatment with the methylation inhibitor 5-aza-cytidine. When NSC departed from the quiescent state, a genome-wide diversification of DNA methylation was observed-that is, many moderately methylated genes altered methylation levels and became hyper- and hypomethylated. Alcohol prevented many genes from such diversification, including genes related to neural development, neuronal receptors, and olfaction, while retarding differentiation. Validation of specific genes by Sequenom analysis demonstrated that alcohol exposure prevented methylation of specific genes associated with neural development [cut-like 2 (cutl2), insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1), epidermal growth factor-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (Efemp1), and SRY-box-containing gene 7 (Sox 7)]; eye development, lens intrinsic membrane protein 2 (Lim 2); the epigenetic mark Smarca2 (SWI/SNF related, matrix

  12. Cocoa and Whey Protein Differentially Affect Markers of Lipid and Glucose Metabolism and Satiety.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Caroline L; Foegeding, E Allen; Harris, G Keith

    2016-03-01

    Food formulation with bioactive ingredients is a potential strategy to promote satiety and weight management. Whey proteins are high in leucine and are shown to decrease hunger ratings and increase satiety hormone levels; cocoa polyphenolics moderate glucose levels and slow digestion. This study examined the effects of cocoa and whey proteins on lipid and glucose metabolism and satiety in vitro and in a clinical trial. In vitro, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were treated with 0.5-100 μg/mL cocoa polyphenolic extract (CPE) and/or 1-15 mM leucine (Leu) and assayed for lipid accumulation and leptin production. In vivo, a 6-week clinical trial consisted of nine panelists (age: 22.6 ± 1.7; BMI: 22.3 ± 2.1) consuming chocolate-protein beverages once per week, including placebo, whey protein isolate (WPI), low polyphenolic cocoa (LP), high polyphenolic cocoa (HP), LP-WPI, and HP-WPI. Measurements included blood glucose and adiponectin levels, and hunger ratings at baseline and 0.5-4.0 h following beverage consumption. At levels of 50 and 100 μg/mL, CPE significantly inhibited preadipocyte lipid accumulation by 35% and 50%, respectively, and by 22% and 36% when combined with 15 mM Leu. Leu treatment increased adipocyte leptin production by 26-37%. In the clinical trial, all beverages significantly moderated blood glucose levels 30 min postconsumption. WPI beverages elicited lowest peak glucose levels and HP levels were significantly lower than LP. The WPI and HP beverage treatments significantly increased adiponectin levels, but elicited no significant changes in hunger ratings. These trends suggest that combinations of WPI and cocoa polyphenols may improve markers of metabolic syndrome and satiety.

  13. Predictive Control of the Blood Glucose Level in Type I Diabetic Patient Using Delay Differential Equation Wang Model.

    PubMed

    Esna-Ashari, Mojgan; Zekri, Maryam; Askari, Masood; Khalili, Noushin

    2017-01-01

    Because of increasing risk of diabetes, the measurement along with control of blood sugar has been of great importance in recent decades. In type I diabetes, because of the lack of insulin secretion, the cells cannot absorb glucose leading to low level of glucose. To control blood glucose (BG), the insulin must be injected to the body. This paper proposes a method for BG level regulation in type I diabetes. The control strategy is based on nonlinear model predictive control. The aim of the proposed controller optimized with genetics algorithms is to measure BG level each time and predict it for the next time interval. This merit causes a less amount of control effort, which is the rate of insulin delivered to the patient body. Consequently, this method can decrease the risk of hypoglycemia, a lethal phenomenon in regulating BG level in diabetes caused by a low BG level. Two delay differential equation models, namely Wang model and Enhanced Wang model, are applied as controller model and plant, respectively. The simulation results exhibit an acceptable performance of the proposed controller in meal disturbance rejection and robustness against parameter changes. As a result, if the nutrition of the person decreases instantly, the hypoglycemia will not happen. Furthermore, comparing this method with other works, it was shown that the new method outperforms previous studies.

  14. Differential subnetwork of chemokines/cytokines in human, mouse, and rat brain cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Du, Yang; Deng, Wenjun; Wang, Zixing; Ning, MingMing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yiming; Lo, Eng H; Xing, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    Mice and rats are the most commonly used animals for preclinical stroke studies, but it is unclear whether targets and mechanisms are always the same across different species. Here, we mapped the baseline expression of a chemokine/cytokine subnetwork and compared responses after oxygen-glucose deprivation in primary neurons, astrocytes, and microglia from mouse, rat, and human. Baseline profiles of chemokines (CX3CL1, CXCL12, CCL2, CCL3, and CXCL10) and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNFα) showed significant differences between human and rodents. The response of chemokines/cytokines to oxygen-glucose deprivation was also significantly different between species. After 4 h oxygen-glucose deprivation and 4 h reoxygenation, human and rat neurons showed similar changes with a downregulation in many chemokines, whereas mouse neurons showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. For astrocytes, subnetwork response patterns were more similar in rats and mice compared to humans. For microglia, rat cells showed an upregulation in all chemokines/cytokines, mouse cells had many down-regulated genes, and human cells showed a mixed response with up- and down-regulated genes. This study provides proof-of-concept that species differences exist in chemokine/cytokine subnetworks in brain cells that may be relevant to stroke pathophysiology. Further investigation of differential gene pathways across species is warranted.

  15. Predictive Control of the Blood Glucose Level in Type I Diabetic Patient Using Delay Differential Equation Wang Model

    PubMed Central

    Esna-Ashari, Mojgan; Zekri, Maryam; Askari, Masood; Khalili, Noushin

    2017-01-01

    Because of increasing risk of diabetes, the measurement along with control of blood sugar has been of great importance in recent decades. In type I diabetes, because of the lack of insulin secretion, the cells cannot absorb glucose leading to low level of glucose. To control blood glucose (BG), the insulin must be injected to the body. This paper proposes a method for BG level regulation in type I diabetes. The control strategy is based on nonlinear model predictive control. The aim of the proposed controller optimized with genetics algorithms is to measure BG level each time and predict it for the next time interval. This merit causes a less amount of control effort, which is the rate of insulin delivered to the patient body. Consequently, this method can decrease the risk of hypoglycemia, a lethal phenomenon in regulating BG level in diabetes caused by a low BG level. Two delay differential equation models, namely Wang model and Enhanced Wang model, are applied as controller model and plant, respectively. The simulation results exhibit an acceptable performance of the proposed controller in meal disturbance rejection and robustness against parameter changes. As a result, if the nutrition of the person decreases instantly, the hypoglycemia will not happen. Furthermore, comparing this method with other works, it was shown that the new method outperforms previous studies. PMID:28487828

  16. [Effects of drynaria total flavonoid on osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells at different glucose concentrations: experiment with rats].

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiao-chun; Zhu, Dan-hua; Pang, Tian-jiao; Sun, Liao; Ye, Li-hong; Lu, Hong-yun; Yin, Dai-chan; Xie, Dan-hong

    2010-10-19

    To study the effects of drynaria total flavonoid on osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) at different glucose concentrations. BMSCs of SD rats were isolated, cultivated in vitro, and divided into 6 groups to be induced to differentiate into osteoblasts under different conditions: (1) low glucose control group, (2) high glucose control group, (3) low glucose classical induction group (sodium glycerophosphate+vitamin C+dexamethasone), (4) high glucose classical induction group (sodium glycerophosphate+vitamin C+dexamethasone), (5) low glucose+drynaria total flavonoid group, and (6) high glucose with drynaria total flavonoid group. Alkaline phosphate (ALP) test kit was used to examine the level of ALP. The ALP staining positive rate was examined with modified calcium cobalt method. Alizarin red staining was adopted to observe the number of calcium nodes. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect type I collagen level. Advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) were tested by ELISA. The A value indicating the ALP activity, ALP staining positive rate, calcium node number, and type I collagen expression score of the low glucose+drynaria total flavonoid group were (0.439±0.024), 48.7%, (9.75±1.71) nodes/HP, and (2.21±0.07) respectively, all significantly higher than those of the sodium glycerophosphate+vitamin C+dexamethasone [(0.385±0.029), 35.0%, (6.25±0.96) nodes/HP, and (1.93±0.13) respectively, all P<0.05]. The A value, ALP staining positive rate, calcium node number, and type I collagen expression score of the high glucose with drynaria total flavonoid group were (0.352±0.022), 25.3%, (4.50±1.29)/HP, and (1.70±0.03) respectively, all significantly higher than those of the sodium glycerophosphate+vitamin C+dexamethasone [(0.139±0.013), 22.7%, (3.25±1.50)/HP, and (1.28±0.27) respectively, all P<0.05]. The AGE expression levels of the high glucose classical induction group and high glucose+drynaria total flavonoid group

  17. Alterations in blood glucose and plasma glucagon concentrations during deep brain stimulation in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens in rats.

    PubMed

    Diepenbroek, Charlene; van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Eggels, Leslie; Rijnsburger, Merel; Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Kalsbeek, Andries; Denys, Damiaan; Fliers, Eric; Serlie, Mireille J; la Fleur, Susanne E

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is an effective therapy for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and is currently under investigation as a treatment for eating disorders. DBS of this area is associated with altered food intake and pharmacological treatment of OCD is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Therefore we examined if DBS of the NAc-shell (sNAc) influences glucose metabolism. Male Wistar rats were subjected to DBS, or sham stimulation, for a period of 1 h. To assess the effects of stimulation on blood glucose and glucoregulatory hormones, blood samples were drawn before, during and after stimulation. Subsequently, all animals were used for quantitative assessment of Fos immunoreactivity in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) using computerized image analysis. DBS of the sNAc rapidly increased plasma concentrations of glucagon and glucose while sham stimulation and DBS outside the sNAc were ineffective. In addition, the increase in glucose was dependent on DBS intensity. In contrast, the DBS-induced increase in plasma corticosterone concentrations was independent of intensity and region, indicating that the observed DBS-induced metabolic changes were not due to corticosterone release. Stimulation of the sNAc with 200 μA increased Fos immunoreactivity in the LHA compared to sham or 100 μA stimulated animals. These data show that DBS of the sNAc alters glucose metabolism in a region- and intensity- dependent manner in association with neuronal activation in the LHA. Moreover, these data illustrate the need to monitor changes in glucose metabolism during DBS-treatment of OCD patients.

  18. Translational attenuation differentially alters the fate of disease-associated fibulin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Balch, William E.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in fibulin proteins that cause cellular secretion deficiencies are linked to a variety of diseases, ranging from retinopathies to cutis laxa (CL). One secretion-deficient fibulin mutant, R345W fibulin-3, causes the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese by increased endoplasmic reticulum retention and/or extracellular misfolding. Herein, we report that small-molecule activation of the PERK arm of the unfolded protein response partially rescues R345W secretion deficiencies through translational attenuation mediated by eIF2α phosphorylation. Enhanced mutant fibulin-3 secretion can also be achieved by activation of a PERK-independent eIF2α kinase through arsenite treatment and is independent of activating transcription factor 4 signaling and protein translation. However, this translational attenuation strategy was unsuccessful for enhancing the secretion deficiencies of fibulin-5 mutants associated with age-related macular degeneration or CL. While lowered growth temperature enhanced the secretion of mutants associated with CL (C217R and S227P), these effects were not mediated through translational attenuation. In stark contrast to the situation with fibulin-3, protein translation was required for efficient wild-type and mutant fibulin-5 secretion. These data suggest that alteration of specific cellular signaling pathways and proteostasis network components can differentially influence fibulin fate, a hypothesis that could be exploited as a therapy for fibulin-related diseases.—Hulleman, J. D., Balch, W. E., Kelly, J. W. Translational attenuation differentially alters the fate of disease-associated fibulin proteins. PMID:22872678

  19. Alcohol-induced epigenetic alterations to developmentally crucial genes regulating neural stemness and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Kylee J; Carnahan, Mindy N; Muller, Daria; Miranda, Rajesh C; Golding, Michael C

    2013-07-01

    From studies using a diverse range of model organisms, we now acknowledge that epigenetic changes to chromatin structure provide a plausible link between environmental teratogens and alterations in gene expression leading to disease. Observations from a number of independent laboratories indicate that ethanol (EtOH) has the capacity to act as a powerful epigenetic disruptor and potentially derail the coordinated processes of cellular differentiation. In this study, we sought to examine whether primary neurospheres cultured under conditions maintaining stemness were susceptible to alcohol-induced alterations in the histone code. We focused our studies on trimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 and trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27, as these are 2 of the most prominent posttranslational histone modifications regulating stem cell maintenance and neural differentiation. Primary neurosphere cultures were maintained under conditions promoting the stem cell state and treated with EtOH for 5 days. Control and EtOH-treated cellular extracts were examined using a combination of quantitative RT-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation techniques. We find that the regulatory regions of genes controlling both neural precursor cell identity and processes of differentiation exhibited significant declines in the enrichment of the chromatin marks examined. Despite these widespread changes in chromatin structure, only a small subset of genes including Dlx2, Fabp7, Nestin, Olig2, and Pax6 displayed EtOH-induced alterations in transcription. Unexpectedly, the majority of chromatin-modifying enzymes examined including members of the Polycomb Repressive Complex displayed minimal changes in expression and localization. Only transcripts encoding Dnmt1, Uhrf1, Ehmt1, Ash2 l, Wdr5, and Kdm1b exhibited significant differences. Our results indicate that primary neurospheres maintained as stem cells in vitro are susceptible to alcohol-induced perturbation of the histone code and errors in the epigenetic

  20. Effect of garlic (Allium sativum) on nickel II or chromium VI induced alterations of glucose homeostasis and hepatic antioxidant status under sub-chronic exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Amrita; Dhara, Prakash C; Dhundasi, Salim A; Das, Kusal K

    2009-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has a profound effect in reducing plasma glucose and increasing serum insulin in diabetic rats. We studied the effect of a garlic extract on nickel- or chromium-induced alteration of plasma glucose and hepatic glycogen levels and anti-oxidant status in rats. Adult male albino rats (n=36) divided into six groups of six animals each were treated as follows: Group I, untreated controls; Group II, fresh aqueous homogenate of garlic; Group III, nickel sulfate; Group IV, nickel sulfate + garlic; Group V, potassium dichromate; Group VI, potassium dichromate + garlic. In Groups IV and VI, the simultaneous administration of garlic abrogated a significant nickel- or chromium-induced increase in plasma glucose and decrease in liver glycogen. Nickel and chromium alone also increased lipid peroxide (LPO) and decreased glutathione levels, as well as the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Simultaneous garlic administration significantly reduced the LPO level and remarkably improved SOD activity. Hence, we postulate that the administration of garlic can prevent nickel II- or chromium VI-induced alterations in blood glucose homeostasis while exerting a hepatoprotective effect on glycogen levels and antioxidant status in male albino rats.

  1. Amelioration of hypoxia-induced striatal 5-HT(2A) receptor, 5-HT transporter and HIF1 alterations by glucose, oxygen and epinephrine in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Anju, T R; Paulose, C S

    2011-09-20

    Alterations in neurotransmitters and its receptors expression induce brain injury during neonatal hypoxic insult. Molecular processes regulating the serotonergic receptors play an important role in the control of respiration under hypoxic insult. The present study focused on the serotonergic regulation of neonatal hypoxia and its resuscitation methods. Receptor binding assays and gene expression studies were done to evaluate the changes in 5HT(2A) receptors and its transporter in the corpus striatum of hypoxic neonatal rats and hypoxic rats resuscitated with glucose, oxygen and epinephrine. Total 5HT and 5HT(2A) receptor number was increased in hypoxic neonates along with an up regulation of 5HT(2A) receptor and 5HT transporter gene. The enhanced striatal 5HT(2A) receptors modulate the ventilatory response to hypoxia. Immediate glucose resuscitation was found to ameliorate the receptor and transporter alterations. Hypoxia induced ATP depletion mediated reduction in blood glucose levels can be encountered by glucose administration and oxygenation helps in overcoming the anaerobic condition. The adverse effect of immediate oxygenation and epinephrine supplementation was also reported. This has immense clinical significance in establishing a proper resuscitation for the management of neonatal hypoxia.

  2. Glucose concentration alters dissolved oxygen levels in liquid cultures of Beauveria bassiana and affects formation and bioefficacy of blastospores.

    PubMed

    Mascarin, Gabriel Moura; Jackson, Mark A; Kobori, Nilce Naomi; Behle, Robert W; Dunlap, Christopher A; Delalibera Júnior, Ítalo

    2015-08-01

    The filamentous fungus Beauveria bassiana is an economically important pathogen of numerous arthropod pests and is able to grow in submerged culture as filaments (mycelia) or as budding yeast-like blastospores. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dissolved oxygen and high glucose concentrations on blastospore production by submerged cultures of two isolates of B. bassiana, ESALQ1432 and GHA. Results showed that maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels coupled with high glucose concentrations enhanced blastospore yields by both isolates. High glucose concentrations increased the osmotic pressure of the media and coincided with higher dissolved oxygen levels and increased production of significantly smaller blastospores compared with blastospores produced in media with lower concentrations of glucose. The desiccation tolerance of blastospores dried to less than 2.6 % moisture was not affected by the glucose concentration of the medium but was isolate dependent. Blastospores of isolate ESALQ1432 produced in media containing 140 g glucose L(-1) showed greater virulence toward whitefly nymphs (Bemisia tabaci) as compared with blastospores produced in media containing 40 g glucose L(-1). These results suggest a synergistic effect between glucose concentration and oxygen availability on changing morphology and enhancing the yield and efficacy of blastospores of B. bassiana, thereby facilitating the development of a cost-effective production method for this blastospore-based bioinsecticide.

  3. Homeostatic effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by monosodium glutamate administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Chagas, Pietro M; da Rocha, Juliana T; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Carvalho, Nélson R; Soares, Félix A; da Luz, Sônia C Almeida; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a group of metabolic alterations considered a worldwide public health problem. Organic selenium compounds have been reported to have many different pharmacological actions, such as anti-hypercholesterolemic and anti-hyperglycemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2, an organic selenium compound, in a model of obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration in rats. The rats were treated during the first ten postnatal days with MSG and received (p-ClPhSe)2 (10 mg/kg, intragastrically) from 45th to 51 th postnatal day. Glucose, lipid and lactate levels were determined in plasma of rats. Glycogen levels and activities of tyrosine aminotransferase, hexokinase, citrate synthase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) were determined in livers of rats. Renal G-6-Pase activity was also determined. The purine content [Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate] and mitochondrial functionality in the liver were also investigated. p-(ClPhSe)2 did not alter the reduction in growth performance and in the body weight caused by MSG but reduced epididymal fat deposition of rats. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored glycemia, triglycerides, cholesterol and lactate levels as well as the glucose metabolism altered in rats treated with MSG. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and the decrease in citrate synthase activity and ATP and ADP levels caused by MSG in rats. In summary, (p-ClPhSe)2 had homeostatic effects on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by MSG administration to rats.

  4. Altered goblet cell differentiation and surface mucus properties in Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajah, Jay R; Yildiz, Hasan; Carlson, Taylor; Thomas, Alyssa R; Steiger, Casey; Pieretti, Alberto; Zukerberg, Lawrence R; Carrier, Rebecca L; Goldstein, Allan M

    2014-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC) leads to significant mortality and morbidity, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. Changes in the colonic epithelium related to goblet cells and the luminal mucus layer have been postulated to play a key role. Here we show that the colonic epithelium of both aganglionic and ganglionic segments are altered in patients and in mice with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Structurally, goblet cells were altered with increased goblet cell number and reduced intracellular mucins in the distal colon of biopsies from patients with HSCR. Endothelin receptor B (Ednrb) mutant mice showed increased goblet cell number and size and increased cell proliferation compared to wild-type mice in aganglionic segments, and reduced goblet cell size and number in ganglionic segments. Functionally, compared to littermates, Ednrb-/- mice showed increased transepithelial resistance, reduced stool water content and similar chloride secretion in the distal colon. Transcript levels of goblet cell differentiation factors SPDEF and Math1 were increased in the distal colon of Ednrb-/- mice. Both distal colon from Ednrb mice and biopsies from HSCR patients showed reduced Muc4 expression as compared to controls, but similar expression of Muc2. Particle tracking studies showed that mucus from Ednrb-/- mice provided a more significant barrier to diffusion of 200 nm nanoparticles as compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest that aganglionosis is associated with increased goblet cell proliferation and differentiation and subsequent altered surface mucus properties, prior to the development of inflammation in the distal colon epithelium. Restoration of normal goblet cell function and mucus layer properties in the colonic epithelium may represent a therapeutic strategy for prevention of HAEC.

  5. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia. PMID:25248834

  6. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-12-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia.

  7. Leishmania donovani Infection Induces Anemia in Hamsters by Differentially Altering Erythropoiesis in Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Lafuse, William P.; Story, Ryan; Mahylis, Jocelyn; Gupta, Gaurav; Varikuti, Sanjay; Steinkamp, Heidi; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmania donovani is a parasite that causes visceral leishmaniasis by infecting and replicating in macrophages of the bone marrow, spleen, and liver. Severe anemia and leucopenia is associated with the disease. Although immune defense mechanisms against the parasite have been studied, we have a limited understanding of how L. donovani alters hematopoiesis. In this study, we used Syrian golden hamsters to investigate effects of L. donovani infection on erythropoiesis. Infection resulted in severe anemia and leucopenia by 8 weeks post-infection. Anemia was associated with increased levels of serum erythropoietin, which indicates the hamsters respond to the anemia by producing erythropoietin. We found that infection also increased numbers of BFU-E and CFU-E progenitor populations in the spleen and bone marrow and differentially altered erythroid gene expression in these organs. In the bone marrow, the mRNA expression of erythroid differentiation genes (α-globin, β-globin, ALAS2) were inhibited by 50%, but mRNA levels of erythroid receptor (c-kit, EpoR) and transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, FOG1) were not affected by the infection. This suggests that infection has a negative effect on differentiation of erythroblasts. In the spleen, erythroid gene expression was enhanced by infection, indicating that the anemia activates a stress erythropoiesis response in the spleen. Analysis of cytokine mRNA levels in spleen and bone marrow found that IFN-γ mRNA is highly increased by L. donovani infection. Expression of the IFN-γ inducible cytokine, TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), was also up-regulated. Since TRAIL induces erythroblasts apoptosis, apoptosis of bone marrow erythroblasts from infected hamsters was examined by flow cytometry. Percentage of erythroblasts that were apoptotic was significantly increased by L. donovani infection. Together, our results suggest that L. donovani infection inhibits erythropoiesis in the bone marrow by cytokine

  8. Glimepiride promotes osteogenic differentiation in rat osteoblasts via the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in a high glucose microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Pan; Gu, Bin; Xiong, Wei; Tan, Baosheng; Geng, Wei; Li, Jun; Liu, Hongchen

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that glimepiride enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts and led to activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Recent genetic evidence shows that endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays an important role in bone homeostasis. In this study, we further elucidated the roles of eNOS, PI3K and Akt in bone formation by osteoblasts induced by glimepiride in a high glucose microenvironment. We demonstrated that high glucose (16.5 mM) inhibits the osteogenic differentiation potential and proliferation of rat osteoblasts. Glimepiride activated eNOS expression in rat osteoblasts cultured with two different concentrations of glucose. High glucose-induced osteogenic differentiation was significantly enhanced by glimepiride. Down-regulation of PI3K P85 levels by treatment with LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) led to suppression of P-eNOS and P-AKT expression levels, which in turn resulted in inhibition of RUNX2, OCN and ALP mRNA expression in osteoblasts induced by glimepiride at both glucose concentrations. ALP activity was partially inhibited by 10 µM LY294002. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glimepiride-induced osteogenic differentiation of osteoblasts occurs via eNOS activation and is dependent on the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in a high glucose microenvironment.

  9. Differential inputs from chemosensory appendages mediate feeding responses to glucose in wild-type and glucose-averse German cockroaches, Blattella germanica.

    PubMed

    Wada-Katsumata, Ayako; Silverman, Jules; Schal, Coby

    2011-09-01

    Glucose is a universal phagostimulant in many animal species, including the cockroach Blattella germanica. However, some natural populations of B. germanica have been found that are behaviorally deterred from eating glucose. In dose-response studies, glucose was a powerful phagostimulant for wild-type cockroaches, but it strongly deterred feeding in a glucose-averse strain. Both strains, however, exhibited identical dose-response curves to other phagostimulants and deterrents. As a lead to electrophysiological and molecular genetics studies to investigate the mechanisms that underlie glucose-aversion, we used 2 assay paradigms to delineate which chemosensory appendages on the head contribute to the reception of various phagostimulatory and deterrent chemicals. Both simultaneous dual stimulation of the antenna and mouthparts of the insects and 2-choice preference tests in surgically manipulated insects showed that the glucose-averse behavior could be elicited through the gustatory systems of the antennae and mouthparts. The paraglossae alone were sufficient for maximum sensitivity to both phagostimulants and deterrents, including glucose as a deterrent in the glucose-averse strain. In addition to the paraglossae, the labial palps were more important than the maxillary palps in the reception of deterrents (caffeine in both strains and glucose in the glucose-averse strain). The maxillary palps, on the other hand, played a more important role in the reception of phagostimulants (fructose in both strains and glucose in the wild-type strain). Our results suggest that distinct inputs from the chemosensory system mediate opposite feeding responses to glucose in the wild-type and glucose-averse strains.

  10. Giant Oyster Mushroom Pleurotus giganteus (Agaricomycetes) Enhances Adipocyte Differentiation and Glucose Uptake via Activation of PPARγ and Glucose Transporters 1 and 4 in 3T3-L1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Paravamsivam, Puvaneswari; Heng, Chua Kek; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abdul; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; M, Ravishankar Ram; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2016-01-01

    The edible mushroom Pleurotus giganteus was tested for its effect on adipocyte differentiation and glucose uptake activity in 3T3-L1 cells. The basidiocarps of P. giganteus were soaked in methanol to obtain a crude methanol extract and then fractionated to obtain an ethyl acetate extract. In this study, cell proliferation was measured using an MTT assay, lipid accumulation using an Oil Red O assay, and glucose uptake using a fluorescence glucose uptake assay. Gene expression was measured via real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis with TaqMan primer. Ethyl acetate extract significantly enhanced adipogenic differentiation and glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes via the expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, and phos-phatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. Glucose uptake was facilitated by the highly expressed glucose transporters Glut1 and Glut4. Taken together, these results suggest that P. giganteus ethyl acetate extract has an insulin-sensitizing effect on adipocytes and has potential as an adjuvant for the management of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Spermatozoa from patients with seminal alterations exhibit a differential micro-ribonucleic acid profile.

    PubMed

    Salas-Huetos, Albert; Blanco, Joan; Vidal, Francesca; Godo, Anna; Grossmann, Mark; Pons, Maria Carme; F-Fernández, Silvia; Garrido, Nicolás; Anton, Ester

    2015-09-01

    To compare the microRNA (miRNA) expression profile in spermatozoa from three infertile populations vs. a group of fertile men. Evaluation of the expression level of 736 miRNAs in human spermatozoa using TaqMan quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. University research facility. Semen samples with a single seminal alteration were collected from infertile individuals: asthenozoospermic (n = 10), teratozoospermic (n = 10), and oligozoospermic (n = 10). None. Correlation of the expression level of each miRNA with seminal parameters, age, and chromosome instability; clustering of the individuals according to their miRNA expression profiles and influence of the seminogram, age, chromosome instability, and assisted reproductive technology outcome in the clustering; analysis of the differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) in each infertile population; genome annotation of these DE-miRNAs; and ontological analysis of their predicted targets. The hsa-miR-34b-3p correlated with age, the hsa-miR-629-3p with sperm motility, and the hsa-miR-335-5p, hsa-miR-885-5p, and hsa-miR-152-3p with sperm concentration. The individuals clustered into two groups, and only the seminogram was differentially distributed. We identified 32 DE-miRNAs in the asthenozoospermic group, 19 in the teratozoospermic group, and 18 in the oligozoospermic group. The up-regulated miRNAs presented an enriched localization in introns, affecting relevant genes for spermatogenesis. The predicted targets of the DE-miRNAs contained critical genes associated to infertility, and their ontological analysis revealed significantly associated functions related to the seminal alterations of each group. Spermatozoa from patients with seminal alterations exhibit a differential miRNA profile. This provides new evidence that miRNAs have an essential role in spermatogenesis, contributing to the mechanisms involved in human fertility. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine

  12. Differential effects of temperature and glucose on glycogenolytic enzymes in tissues of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Mark T; Rodnick, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    The pathways and regulatory mechanisms of glycogenolysis remain relatively unexplored in non-mammalian vertebrates, especially poikilotherms. We studied the temperature sensitivity and inhibition of glycogenolytic enzymes in liver, ventricle, and white muscle of rainbow trout acclimated to 14 °C. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and acid α-glucosidase (GAA) activities were measured in homogenates of tissues at physiological temperatures (4, 14, and 24 °C), and in the presence of allosteric inhibitor, glucose. Higher GP versus GAA activity in all three tissues suggested a predominance of phosphorolytic glycogenolysis over the lysosomal glucosidic pathway. GP activities at 14 °C were ~2-fold higher in the ventricle and white muscle versus the liver and selectively increased by AMP in striated muscle. Conversely, the activities of GAA and lysosomal marker acid phosphatase were 8- to 10-fold higher in the liver compared with the ventricle and white muscle. Thermal sensitivity (Q10) was increased for GP in all tissues below 14 °C and decreased in striated muscle in the absence of AMP above 14 °C. GAA had lower Q10 values than GP below 14 °C, and, unlike GP, Q10s for GAA were not different between tissues or affected by temperature. Both GP (in the absence of AMP) and GAA were inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner, with the lowest IC50 values observed in the white muscle (1.4 and 6.3 mM, respectively). In conclusion, despite comparatively low kinetic potential, lysosomal GAA might facilitate glycogenolysis at colder body temperatures in striated muscle and intracellular glucose could limit phosphorolytic and glucosidic glycogenolysis in multiple tissues of the rainbow trout.

  13. Reducing dietary fat from a meal increases the bioavailability of exogenous carbohydrate without altering plasma glucose concentration

    PubMed Central

    Knuth, Nicolas D.; Shrivastava, Cara R.; Horowitz, Jeffrey F.

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to determine the acute glycemic and endocrine responses to the reduction of fat content from a meal. On three separate occasions, nine overweight subjects (body mass index = 30 ± 1 kg/m2; 5 men, 4 women) consumed 1) a control meal (∼800 kcal; 100 g of carbohydrate, 31 g of fat, and 30 g of protein), 2) a low-fat meal (∼530 kcal; 100 g of carbohydrate, 1 g of fat, and 30 g of protein), or 3) a low-fat meal plus lipid infusion [same meal as low-fat meal, but the total energy provided was the same as control (800 kcal), with the “missing” fat (∼30 g) provided via an intravenous lipid infusion]. All three meals contained [13C]glucose (3 mg/kg body wt) to assess the bioavailability of ingested glucose. During the 5-h period after each meal, we measured the recovery of [13C]glucose in plasma, plasma glucose, and insulin concentrations. We also measured plasma concentration of the gastrointestinal peptides: glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36). The recovery of the ingested [13C]glucose in the hour after ingestion was greater (P < 0.05) after the low-fat than after the control meal [area under the curve (AUC): 1,206 ± 252 and 687 ± 161 μM·h, respectively]. However, removing dietary fat from the meal did not affect the plasma concentration of glucose or insulin. Importantly, [13C]glucose recovery was not different during the low-fat and lipid infusion trials (AUC: 1,206 ± 252 and 1,134 ± 247 μM·h, respectively), indicating that the accelerated delivery of exogenous glucose found after removing fat from the meal is due exclusively to the reduction of fat in the gastrointestinal tract. In parallel with these findings, the reduction in fat calories from the meal reduced plasma concentration of GIP, GLP-1, and PYY3-36. In summary, these data suggest that removing fat from the diet expedited exogenous glucose delivery into the systemic circulation

  14. (18)F-FDG-PET imaging of rat spinal cord demonstrates altered glucose uptake acutely after contusion injury.

    PubMed

    von Leden, Ramona E; Selwyn, Reed G; Jaiswal, Shalini; Wilson, Colin M; Khayrullina, Guzal; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2016-05-16

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in an acute reduction in neuronal and glial cell viability, disruption in axonal tract integrity, and prolonged increases in glial activity and inflammation, all of which can influence regional metabolism and glucose utilization. To date, the understanding of glucose uptake and utilization in the injured spinal cord is limited. Positron emission tomography (PET)-based measurements of glucose uptake may therefore serve as a novel biomarker for SCI. This study aimed to determine the acute and sub-acute glucose uptake pattern after SCI to determine its potential as a novel non-invasive tool for injury assessment and to begin to understand the glucose uptake pattern following acute SCI. Briefly, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to moderate contusion SCI, confirmed by locomotor function and histology. PET imaging with [(18)F] Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was performed prior to injury and at 6 and 24h and 15days post-injury (dpi). FDG-PET imaging revealed significantly depressed glucose uptake at 6h post-injury at the lesion epicenter that returned to sham/naïve levels at 24h and 15 dpi after moderate injury. FDG uptake at 15 dpi was likely influenced by a combination of elevated glial presence and reduced neuronal viability. These results show that moderate SCI results in acute depression in glucose uptake followed by an increase in glucose uptake that may be related to neuroinflammation. This acute and sub-acute uptake, which is dependent on cellular responses, may represent a therapeutic target.

  15. Differential behaviour of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in two morphological forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Lupiañez, J A; Adroher, F J; Vargas, A M; Osuna, A

    1987-01-01

    1. Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.1.1.49) of two morphological forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, epimastigotes and metacyclics, are reported. 2. The kinetic behaviour and some of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme in both forms were studied. The enzymes showed a simple Michaelis-Menten kinetic. 3. The activity in epimastigote forms was alway higher than the metacyclic ones. At subsaturating concentrations of substrate was almost 10-fold higher, whereas at saturating concentrations was about 2-fold higher. 4. In epimastigote forms the specific activity and Km values, at pH 7.5 and 37 degrees C, was found to be 142 mUnits x mg-1 of protein and 0.23 mM, respectively. 5. In the same conditions, the specific activity and Km values in metacyclic forms was 75 mUnits x mg-1 of protein and 1.06 mM, respectively. 6. A possible role in the carbohydrate metabolism of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in both forms of Trypanosoma cruzi is discussed.

  16. Altered miR-29 Expression in Type 2 Diabetes Influences Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Massart, Julie; Sjögren, Rasmus J O; Lundell, Leonidas S; Mudry, Jonathan M; Franck, Niclas; O'Gorman, Donal J; Egan, Brendan; Zierath, Juleen R; Krook, Anna

    2017-07-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important regulators of glucose and lipid metabolism in several tissues; however, their role in skeletal muscle remains poorly characterized. We determined the effects of the miR-29 family on glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and insulin responsiveness in skeletal muscle. We provide evidence that miR-29a and miR-29c are increased in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes and are decreased following endurance training in healthy young men and in rats. In primary human skeletal muscle cells, inhibition and overexpression strategies demonstrate that miR-29a and miR-29c regulate glucose uptake and insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism. We identified that miR-29 overexpression attenuates insulin signaling and expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase. Moreover, miR-29 overexpression reduces hexokinase 2 expression and activity. Conversely, overexpression of miR-29 by electroporation of mouse tibialis anterior muscle decreased glucose uptake and glycogen content in vivo, concomitant with decreased abundance of GLUT4. We also provide evidence that fatty acid oxidation is negatively regulated by miR-29 overexpression, potentially through the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α expression. Collectively, we reveal that miR-29 acts as an important regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism and lipid oxidation, with relevance to human physiology and type 2 diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. A bile salt-resistant derivative of Bifidobacterium animalis has an altered fermentation pattern when grown on glucose and maltose.

    PubMed

    Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Hernández-Barranco, Ana; Margolles, Abelardo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G

    2005-11-01

    The growth of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis IPLA 4549 and its derivative with acquired resistance to bile, B. animalis subsp. lactis 4549dOx, was evaluated in batch cultures with glucose or the glucose disaccharide maltose as the main carbon source. The acquisition of bile salt resistance caused a change in growth pattern for both sugars, which mainly resulted in a preferential use of maltose compared to glucose, whereas the mother strain used both carbohydrates in a similar way. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses were performed to determine the amounts of glucose consumption and organic acid and ethanol formation from glucose by buffered resting cells taken at different points during growth. Resting cells of the bile-adapted strain generally consumed less glucose than those of the nonadapted one but showed an enhanced production of ethanol and higher acetic acid-to-lactic acid as well as formic acid-to-lactic acid ratios. These findings suggest a shift in the catabolism of carbohydrates promoted by the acquisition of bile resistance that may cause changes in the redox potential and improvements in the cellular ATP yield.

  18. Aqueous glucose measurement using differential absorption-based frequency domain optical coherence tomography at wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1625 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Pauline; Manoj, Murali; Sujatha, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Rao, Suresh R.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a combination of differential absorption technique and frequency domain optical coherence tomography for detection of glucose, which is an important analyte in medical diagnosis of diabetes. Differential absorption technique is used to detect glucose selectively in the presence of interfering species especially water and frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) helps to obtain faster acquisition of depth information. Two broadband super-luminescent diode (SLED) sources with centre wavelengths 1586 nm (wavelength range of 1540 to 1640 nm) and 1312 nm (wavelength range of 1240 to 1380 nm) and a spectral width of ≍ 60 nm (FWHM) are used. Preliminary studies on absorption spectroscopy using various concentrations of aqueous glucose solution gave promising results to distinguish the absorption characteristics of glucose at two wavelengths 1310 nm (outside the absorption band of glucose) and 1625 nm (within the absorption band of glucose). In order to mimic the optical properties of biological skin tissue, 2% and 10% of 20% intralipid with various concentrations of glucose (0 to 4000 mg/dL) was prepared and used as sample. Using OCT technique, interference spectra were obtained using an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution of 0.5 nm. Further processing of the interference spectra provided information on reflections from the surfaces of the cuvette containing the aqueous glucose sample. Due to the absorption of glucose in the wavelength range of 1540 nm to 1640 nm, a trend of reduction in the intensity of the back reflected light was observed with increase in the concentration of glucose.

  19. [Effects of FGF-21 on Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in High Glucose Environment].

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Chen, Cheng; An, Zhen-Mei; Li, Yu-Jue; Zhang, Mei; He, He; Li, Shuang-Qing

    2016-09-01

    To determine the effect of fibroblast growth factor-21(FGF-21)on the osteogenic differention of human bone mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) exposed to a hyperglycemia condition in vitro. hBMSCs were isolated from adult bone marrows, and identified by Alizarin red and oil red O staining. The expressions of immunophenotype were analysed using flow cytometry (CD105, CD90, CD73, CD44).HBMSCs were divided into control group[glucose (Glu) concentration of 5.5 mmol/L], Glu A, B, C groups(Glu 16.5, 25, 40 mmol/L), FGF-21 group (Glu 5.5mmol/ L+ FGF-21 ),Glu B+ FGF-21 group, and Glu B +FGF-21+cell mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocker (PD98059, SP600125 ,and SB203580) groups. The effect of FGF-21 on the differentiation of hBMSCs was detected using indicators as follows: alkaline phosphatase(ALP)on day 14, mRNA expressions ofALP, osteocalcin(OCN)and Runx2, protein expressions and phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein kinase(P38) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases(JNK) on day 21. hBMSCs differentiated into osteoblast cells and lipocyte. The hBMSCs were identified by flow cytometry.Compared with control group, significant increases of ALP mRNA, OCN mRNA and Runx2mRNA levels, as well as phosphorylation of ERK, P38 and JNK were observed in Glu A, B, C groups.Compared with Glu B group, ALP, OCN and Runx2 mRNA levels, and phosphorylation of ERK, P38 and JNK were decreased in Glu B+FGF-21 group .Compared with Glu B+FGF-21 group, ALP and Runx2 mRNA levels, and phosphorylation of ERK, JNK and P38 were decreased in Glu B +FGF-21 +MAPK blocker groups. High glucose could promote the biomineralization of hBMSCs. FGF-21 in high glucose environment could inhibit the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs.

  20. Altered proliferation and differentiation properties of primary mammary epithelial cells from BRCA1 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Burga, Laura N; Tung, Nadine M; Troyan, Susan L; Bostina, Mihnea; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A; Fountzilas, Helena; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Miron, Alexander; Yassin, Yosuf A; Lee, Bernard T; Wulf, Gerburg M

    2009-02-15

    Female BRCA1 mutation carriers have a nearly 80% probability of developing breast cancer during their life-time. We hypothesized that the breast epithelium at risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers harbors mammary epithelial cells (MEC) with altered proliferation and differentiation properties. Using a three-dimensional culture technique to grow MECs ex vivo, we found that the ability to form colonies, an indication of clonality, was restricted to the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1-positive fraction in MECs but not in HCC1937 BRCA1-mutant cancer cells. Primary MECs from BRCA1 mutation carriers (n = 9) had a 28% greater ability for clonal growth compared with normal controls (n = 6; P = 0.006), and their colonies were significantly larger. Colonies in controls and BRCA1 mutation carriers stained positive for BRCA1 by immunohistochemistry, and 79% of the examined single colonies from BRCA1 carriers retained heterozygosity for BRCA1 (ROH). Colonies from BRCA1 mutation carriers frequently showed high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (71% EGFR positive versus 44% in controls) and were negative for estrogen receptor (ERalpha; 32% ER negative, 44% mixed, 24% ER positive versus 90% ER positive in controls). Expression of CK14 and p63 were not significantly different. Microarray studies revealed that colonies from BRCA1-mutant PMECs anticipate expression profiles found in BRCA1-related tumors, and that the EGFR pathway is up-regulated. We conclude that BRCA1 haploinsufficiency leads to an increased ability for clonal growth and proliferation in the PMECs of BRCA1 mutation carriers, possibly as a result of EGFR pathway activation. These altered growth and differentiation properties may render BRCA1-mutant PMECs vulnerable to transformation and predispose to the development of ER-negative, EGFR-positive breast cancers.

  1. Altered Proliferation and Differentiation Properties of Primary Mammary Epithelial Cells from BRCA1 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Burga, Laura N.; Tung, Nadine M.; Troyan, Susan L.; Bostina, Mihnea; Konstantinopoulos, Panagiotis A.; Fountzilas, Helena; Spentzos, Dimitrios; Miron, Alexander; Yassin, Yosuf A.; Lee, Bernard T.; Wulf, Gerburg M.

    2011-01-01

    Female BRCA1 mutation carriers have a nearly 80% probability of developing breast cancer during their life-time. We hypothesized that the breast epithelium at risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers harbors mammary epithelial cells (MEC) with altered proliferation and differentiation properties. Using a three-dimensional culture technique to grow MECs ex vivo, we found that the ability to form colonies, an indication of clonality, was restricted to the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1–positive fraction in MECs but not in HCC1937 BRCA1-mutant cancer cells. Primary MECs from BRCA1 mutation carriers (n = 9) had a 28% greater ability for clonal growth compared with normal controls (n= 6; P = 0.006), and their colonies were significantly larger. Colonies in controls and BRCA1 mutation carriers stained positive for BRCA1 by immunohistochemistry, and 79% of the examined single colonies from BRCA1 carriers retained heterozygosity for BRCA1 (ROH). Colonies from BRCA1 mutation carriers frequently showed high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression (71% EGFR positive versus 44% in controls) and were negative for estrogen receptor (ERα; 32% ER negative, 44% mixed, 24% ER positive versus 90% ER positive in controls). Expression of CK14 and p63 were not significantly different. Microarray studies revealed that colonies from BRCA1-mutant PMECs anticipate expression profiles found in BRCA1-related tumors, and that the EGFR pathway is up-regulated. We conclude that BRCA1 haploin-sufficiency leads to an increased ability for clonal growth and proliferation in the PMECs of BRCA1 mutation carriers, possibly as a result of EGFR pathway activation. These altered growth and differentiation properties may render BRCA1-mutant PMECs vulnerable to transformation and predispose to the development of ER-negative, EGFR-positive breast cancers. PMID:19190334

  2. Differential Functional Connectivity Alterations of Two Subdivisions within the Right dlPFC in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, Julian; Mathys, Christian; Hoffstaedter, Felix; Südmeyer, Martin; Cieslik, Edna C.; Rubbert, Christian; Hartmann, Christian J.; Eickhoff, Claudia R.; Reetz, Kathrin; Grefkes, Christian; Michely, Jochen; Turowski, Bernd; Schnitzler, Alfons; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2017-01-01

    Patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) often show impairments in executive function (EF) like decision-making and action control. The right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) has been strongly implicated in EF in healthy subjects and has repeatedly been reported to show alterations related to EF impairment in PD. Recently, two key regions for cognitive action control have been identified within the right dlPFC by co-activation based parcellation. While the posterior region is engaged in rather basal EF like stimulus integration and working memory, the anterior region has a more abstract, supervisory function. To investigate whether these functionally distinct subdivisions of right dlPFC are differentially affected in PD, we analyzed resting-state functional connectivity (FC) in 39 PD patients and 44 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Patients were examined both after at least 12 h withdrawal of dopaminergic drugs (OFF) and under their regular dopaminergic medication (ON). We found that only the posterior right dlPFC subdivision shows FC alterations in PD, while the anterior part remains unaffected. PD-related decreased FC with posterior right dlPFC was found in the bilateral medial posterior parietal cortex (mPPC) and left dorsal premotor region (PMd) in the OFF state. In the medical ON, FC with left PMd normalized, while decoupling with bilateral mPPC remained. Furthermore, we observed increased FC between posterior right dlPFC and the bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) in PD in the ON state. Our findings point to differential disturbances of right dlPFC connectivity in PD, which relate to its hierarchical organization of EF processing by stronger affecting the functionally basal posterior aspect than the hierarchically higher anterior part. PMID:28611616

  3. Altered walking strategy and increased unsteadiness in participants with impaired glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetes relates to small-fibre neuropathy but not vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Almurdhi, M M; Brown, S J; Bowling, F L; Boulton, A J M; Jeziorska, M; Malik, R A; Reeves, N D

    2017-06-01

    To investigate alterations in walking strategy and dynamic sway (unsteadiness) in people with impaired glucose tolerance and people with Type 2 diabetes in relation to severity of neuropathy and vitamin D levels. A total of 20 people with Type 2 diabetes, 20 people with impaired glucose tolerance and 20 people without either Type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (control group) underwent gait analysis using a motion analysis system and force platforms, and detailed assessment of neuropathy and serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D levels. Ankle strength (P = 0.01) and power (P = 0.003) during walking and walking speed (P = 0.008) were preserved in participants with impaired glucose tolerance but significantly lower in participants with Type 2 diabetes compared with control participants; however, step width (P = 0.005) and dynamic medio-lateral sway (P = 0.007) were significantly higher and posterior maximal movement (P = 0.000) was lower in participants with impaired glucose tolerance, but preserved in those with Type 2 diabetes compared with the control group. Dynamic medio-lateral sway correlated with corneal nerve fibre length (P = 0.001) and corneal nerve branch density (P = 0.001), but not with vibration perception threshold (P = 0.19). Serum 25 hydroxy-vitamin D levels did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.10) and did not correlate with any walking variables or measures of dynamic sway. Early abnormalities in walking strategy and dynamic sway were evident in participants with impaired glucose tolerance, whilst there was a reduction in ankle strength, power and walking speed in participants with Type 2 diabetes. Unsteadiness correlated with small-, but not large-fibre neuropathy and there was no relationship between vitamin D levels and walking variables. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  4. Comparative evaluation of in vitro and in vivo high glucose-induced alterations in voltage-gated tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel: Effects attenuated by sodium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Kharatmal, S B; Singh, J N; Sharma, S S

    2015-10-01

    Glucose uptake in neurons depends on their cellular/physiological activity and the extracellular concentration of glucose around the cell. High concentration of extra-cellular glucose, as under hyperglycemic conditions or pathological condition in diabetes, may persist for extended periods of time in neurons and trigger cellular damage by altering voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), the exact mechanism of which remains unclear. Therefore, we hypothesized that high glucose may directly affect kinetics of the VGSCs in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. DRG neurons were exposed to normal glucose (NG: 5.5 mM) and high glucose (HG: 30 mM) for 24 h. In another set of experiments, diabetic DRG neurons were also isolated from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Effects of sodium channel blockers on nociceptive parameters and tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) Na(+) channel kinetics were elucidated by whole-cell patch-clamp in HG exposure and diabetes-induced rat DRG neurons. HG exposure and diabetes-induced DRG neurons demonstrated significant increase in TTX-R Na(+) current (INa) densities in comparison to the control. Both HG-exposed and diabetic DRG neurons demonstrated similar biophysical characteristics of INa. Lidocaine and tetracaine significantly decreased TTX-R INa density in a concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. Steady-state fast inactivation of INa was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction whereas voltage-dependent activation was shifted in the rightward direction. Diabetic rats treated with lidocaine and tetracaine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly improved thermal hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia and motor nerve conduction velocity with a significant inhibition of TTX-R INa density as compared to the diabetic control. These results suggest that HG exposure increases the TTX-R Na(+) channel activity sensitive to Na(+) channel blockers, lidocaine and tetracaine. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Differentiation with elaidate tends to impair insulin-dependent glucose uptake and GLUT4 translocation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kenichi; Nehashi, Kana; Oshima, Toshiyuki; Ohkura, Naoki; Atsumi, Gen-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance is associated with a quality of dietary fatty acids such as saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Dietary fatty acids also include transform of unsaturated fatty acids and intake of transform of oleate (elaidate) is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the roles of elaidate in insulin responsiveness. We show here that elaidate impairs insulin-dependent glucose uptake in adipocytes. Differentiation with 10 μM elaidate, which is close to physiological plasma concentration, reduces insulin-dependent glucose uptake. Furthermore, insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation is disturbed in adipocytes differentiated with elaidate. In addition, analysis of lipolysis and gene expression shows that deteriorative effects of elaidate on insulin responsiveness are limited but not general. Thus, our findings reveal that differentiation with elaidate tends to affect insulin-dependent glucose uptake through alternation of GLUT4 translocation from cytosol to the plasma membrane.

  6. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L.; Han, Jessica H.; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H.; Bussey, Kimberly J.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2016-01-01

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an ‘epigenetic’ drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat’s differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action. PMID:27503568

  7. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment.

  8. Altered Pathway Analyzer: A gene expression dataset analysis tool for identification and prioritization of differentially regulated and network rewired pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Abhinav; Ali, Shakir; Gupta, Dinesh

    2017-01-01

    Gene connection rewiring is an essential feature of gene network dynamics. Apart from its normal functional role, it may also lead to dysregulated functional states by disturbing pathway homeostasis. Very few computational tools measure rewiring within gene co-expression and its corresponding regulatory networks in order to identify and prioritize altered pathways which may or may not be differentially regulated. We have developed Altered Pathway Analyzer (APA), a microarray dataset analysis tool for identification and prioritization of altered pathways, including those which are differentially regulated by TFs, by quantifying rewired sub-network topology. Moreover, APA also helps in re-prioritization of APA shortlisted altered pathways enriched with context-specific genes. We performed APA analysis of simulated datasets and p53 status NCI-60 cell line microarray data to demonstrate potential of APA for identification of several case-specific altered pathways. APA analysis reveals several altered pathways not detected by other tools evaluated by us. APA analysis of unrelated prostate cancer datasets identifies sample-specific as well as conserved altered biological processes, mainly associated with lipid metabolism, cellular differentiation and proliferation. APA is designed as a cross platform tool which may be transparently customized to perform pathway analysis in different gene expression datasets. APA is freely available at http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/APA. PMID:28084397

  9. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway by oxidative stress mediates high glucose-induced increase of adipogenic differentiation in primary rat osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Yang, Jian-Hong

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of osteopenia and bone fracture that may be related to hyperglycemia. However, the mechanisms accounting for diabetic bone disorder are unclear. Here, we showed that high glucose significantly promoted the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat primary osteoblasts. Most importantly, we reported for the first time that ROS induced by high glucose increased alkaline phosphatase activity, inhibited type I collagen (collagen I) protein level and cell mineralization, as well as gene expression of osteogenic markers including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), collagen I, and osteocalcin, but promoted lipid droplet formation and gene expression of adipogenic markers including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), and adipsin, which were restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger. Moreover, high glucose-induced oxidative stress activated PI3K/Akt pathway to inhibited osteogenic differentiation but stimulated adipogenic differentiation. In contrast, NAC and a PI3K inhibitor, LY-294002, reversed the down-regulation of osteogenic markers and the up-regulation of adipogenic markers as well as the activation of Akt under high glucose. These results indicated that oxidative stress played a key role in high glucose-induced increase of adipogenic differentiation, which contributed to the inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. This process was mediated by PI3K/Akt pathway in rat primary osteoblasts. Hence, suppression of oxidative stress could be a potential therapeutic approach for diabetic osteopenia.

  10. The Constitutive, Glucose-Repression-Insensitive Mutation of the Yeast MAL4 Locus Is an Alteration of the MAL43 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Maureen J.; Michels, Corinne A.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations resulting in constitutive production of maltase have been identified at each of the five MAL loci of Saccharomyces yeasts. Here we examine a dominant constitutive, glucose-repression-insensitive allele of the MAL4 locus (MAL4-C). Our results demonstrate that MAL4-C is an alteration in the MAL43 gene, which encodes the positive regulator of the MAL structural genes, and that its product is trans-acting. The MAL43 gene from the MAL4-C strain was cloned and integrated into a series of nonfermenting strains lacking a functional regulatory gene but carrying copies of the maltose permease and maltase structural genes. Expression of the maltase structural gene was both constitutive and insensitive to glucose repression in these transformants. The MAL4-C allele also results in constitutive expression of the unlinked MAL12 gene (encoding maltase) in this strain. In addition, the cloned MAL43 gene was shown to be dominant to the wild-type MAL63 gene. We also show that most of the glucose repression insensitivity of strains carrying the MAL4-C allele results from alteration of MAL43. PMID:3036644

  11. X-ray induced alterations in the differentiation and mineralization potential of murine preosteoblastic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yueyuan; Lau, Patrick; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine E.; Reitz, Günther

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) on murine preosteoblastic cell differentiation, we directed OCT-1 cells to the osteoblastic lineage by treatment with a combination of β-glycerophosphate (β-GP), ascorbic acid (AA), and dexamethasone (Dex). In vitro mineralization was evaluated based on histochemical staining and quantification of the hydroxyapatite content of the extracellular bone matrix. Expression of mRNA encoding Runx2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), osteocalcin (OCN), and p21CDKN1A was analyzed. Exposure to IR reduced the growth rate and diminished cell survival of OCT-1 cells under standard conditions. Notably, calcium content analysis revealed that deposition of mineralized matrix increased significantly under osteogenic conditions after X-ray exposure in a time-dependent manner. In this study, higher radiation doses exert significant overall effects on TGF-β1, OCN, and p21CDKN1A gene expression, suggesting that gene expression following X-ray treatment is affected in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, we verified that Runx2 was suppressed within 24 h after irradiation at 2 and 4 Gy. Although further studies are required to verify the molecular mechanism, our observations strongly suggest that treatment with IR markedly alters the differentiation and mineralization process of preosteoblastic cells.

  12. Endospanin1 affects oppositely body weight regulation and glucose homeostasis by differentially regulating central leptin signaling.

    PubMed

    Vauthier, Virginie; Roujeau, Clara; Chen, Patty; Sarkis, Chamsy; Migrenne, Stéphanie; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro; Rouillé, Yves; Foretz, Marc; Mallet, Jacques; Launay, Jean-Marie; Magnan, Christophe; Jockers, Ralf; Dam, Julie

    2017-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) is a major integration center for energy and glucose homeostasis that responds to leptin. Resistance to leptin in the ARC is an important component of the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Recently, we showed that Endospanin1 (Endo1) is a negative regulator of the leptin receptor (OBR) that interacts with OBR and retains the receptor inside the cell, leading to a decreased activation of the anorectic STAT3 pathway. Endo1 is up-regulated in the ARC of high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice, and its silencing in the ARC of lean and obese mice prevents and reverses the development of obesity.

  13. Phloretin promotes adipocyte differentiation in vitro and improves glucose homeostasis in vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adipocyte dysfunction is associated with many metabolic diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes. Previous studies found that phloretin promotes 3T3-L1 cells differentiation, but the underlying mechanisms for phloretin's effects on adipogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we demo...

  14. Altered Transcriptional Control Networks with Trans-Differentiation of Isogenic Mutant-KRas NSCLC Models

    PubMed Central

    Haley, John A.; Haughney, Elizabeth; Ullman, Erica; Bean, James; Haley, John D.; Fink, Marc Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The capacity of cancer cells to undergo epithelial mesenchymal trans-differentiation has been implicated as a factor driving metastasis, through the acquisition of enhanced migratory/invasive cell programs and the engagement of anti-apoptotic mechanisms promoting drug and radiation resistance. Our aim was to define molecular signaling changes associated with mesenchymal trans-differentiation in two KRas mutant NSCLC models. We focused on central transcription and epigenetic regulators predicted to be important for mesenchymal cell survival. Experimental design: We have modeled trans-differentiation and cancer stemness in inducible isogenic mutant-KRas H358 and A549 non-small cell lung cell backgrounds. As expected, our models show mesenchymal-like tumor cells acquire novel mechanisms of cellular signaling not apparent in their epithelial counterparts. We employed large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomic, proteomic, protein–protein interaction, RNA-Seq, and network function prediction approaches to dissect the molecular events associated with the establishment and maintenance of the mesenchymal state. Results: Gene-set enrichment and pathway prediction indicated BMI1, KDM5B, RUNX2, MYC/MAX, NFκB, LEF1, and HIF1 target networks were significantly enriched in the trans-differentiation of H358 and A549 NSCLC models. Physical overlaps between multiple networks implicate NR4A1 as an overlapping control between TCF and NFκB pathways. Enrichment correlations also indicated marked decrease in cell cycling, which occurred early in the EMT process. RNA abundance time course studies also indicated early expression of epigenetic and chromatin regulators within 8–24 h, including CITED4, RUNX3, CMBX1, and SIRT4. Conclusion: Multiple transcription and epigenetic pathways where altered between epithelial and mesenchymal tumor cell states, notably the polycomb repressive complex-1, HP1γ, and BAF/Swi-Snf. Network analysis suggests redundancy in the activation

  15. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    Background The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. Results We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Conclusion Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains. PMID:18412983

  16. Adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 transiently delayed high-fat diet-induced obesity by altering glucose, lipid and energy metabolism of male mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a well-known master controller of the cellular adaptive antioxidant and detoxification response. Recent studies demonstrated altered glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in mice with a global Nrf2 knockout. In the present study, we aim to determine the effects of an adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 (ASAN) on diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male mice. The 6-week-old adipose-specific Nrf2 knockout (NK) and its Nrf2 control (NC) mice were fed with either control diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. NK mice exhibited transiently delayed body weight (BW) growth from week 5 to week 11 of HFD feeding, higher daily physical activity levels and preferential use of fat over carbohydrates as a source of energy at week 8 of the CD-feeding period. After 14 weeks of feeding, NK mice showed comparable results with NC mice with respect to the overall BW and body fat content, but exhibited reduced blood glucose, reduced number but increased size of adipocytes, accompanied with elevated expression of many genes and proteins in the visceral fat related to glucose, lipid and energy metabolism (e.g. Fgf21, Pgc1a). These results indicated that NRF2 is an important mediator for glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in adipose tissue, and ASAN could have beneficial effect for prevention of DIO during the early development of mice.

  17. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transcriptional response of ADH-genes to glucose stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Elbing, Karin; Andrade-Garda, José Manuel; Sjögreen, Björn; Forootan, Amin; Kubista, Mikael

    2008-04-16

    The large sensitivity, high reproducibility and essentially unlimited dynamic range of real-time PCR to measure gene expression in complex samples provides the opportunity for powerful multivariate and multiway studies of biological phenomena. In multiway studies samples are characterized by their expression profiles to monitor changes over time, effect of treatment, drug dosage etc. Here we perform a multiway study of the temporal response of four yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different glucose uptake rates upon altered metabolic conditions. We measured the expression of 18 genes as function of time after addition of glucose to four strains of yeast grown in ethanol. The data are analyzed by matrix-augmented PCA, which is a generalization of PCA for 3-way data, and the results are confirmed by hierarchical clustering and clustering by Kohonen self-organizing map. Our approach identifies gene groups that respond similarly to the change of nutrient, and genes that behave differently in mutant strains. Of particular interest is our finding that ADH4 and ADH6 show a behavior typical of glucose-induced genes, while ADH3 and ADH5 are repressed after glucose addition. Multiway real-time PCR gene expression profiling is a powerful technique which can be utilized to characterize functions of new genes by, for example, comparing their temporal response after perturbation in different genetic variants of the studied subject. The technique also identifies genes that show perturbed expression in specific strains.

  18. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Conde, Vanessa R; Oliveira, Pedro F; Nunes, Ana R; Rocha, Cátia S; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A; Alves, Marco G; Silva, Branca M

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression.

  19. Adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 transiently delayed high-fat diet-induced obesity by altering glucose, lipid and energy metabolism of male mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Le; Dasuri, Kalavathi; Fernandez-Kim, Sun-Ok; Bruce-Keller, Annadora J; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (NRF2) is a well-known master controller of the cellular adaptive antioxidant and detoxification response. Recent studies demonstrated altered glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in mice with a global Nrf2 knockout. In the present study, we aim to determine the effects of an adipose-specific ablation of Nrf2 (ASAN) on diet-induced obesity (DIO) in male mice. The 6-week-old adipose-specific Nrf2 knockout (NK) and its Nrf2 control (NC) mice were fed with either control diet (CD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 14 weeks. NK mice exhibited transiently delayed body weight (BW) growth from week 5 to week 11 of HFD feeding, higher daily physical activity levels and preferential use of fat over carbohydrates as a source of energy at week 8 of the CD-feeding period. After 14 weeks of feeding, NK mice showed comparable results with NC mice with respect to the overall BW and body fat content, but exhibited reduced blood glucose, reduced number but increased size of adipocytes, accompanied with elevated expression of many genes and proteins in the visceral fat related to glucose, lipid and energy metabolism (e.g. Fgf21, Pgc1a). These results indicated that NRF2 is an important mediator for glucose, lipid and energy metabolism in adipose tissue, and ASAN could have beneficial effect for prevention of DIO during the early development of mice. PMID:28078004

  20. High-throughput sperm differential proteomics suggests that epigenetic alterations contribute to failed assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    Azpiazu, Rubén; Amaral, Alexandra; Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Guimerà, Marta; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Balasch, Juan; Oliva, Rafael

    2014-06-01

    Are there quantitative alterations in the proteome of normozoospermic sperm samples that are able to complete IVF but whose female partner does not achieve pregnancy? Normozoospermic sperm samples with different IVF outcomes (pregnancy versus no pregnancy) differed in the levels of at least 66 proteins. The analysis of the proteome of sperm samples with distinct fertilization capacity using low-throughput proteomic techniques resulted in the detection of a few differential proteins. Current high-throughput mass spectrometry approaches allow the identification and quantification of a substantially higher number of proteins. This was a case-control study including 31 men with normozoospermic sperm and their partners who underwent IVF with successful fertilization recruited between 2007 and 2008. Normozoospermic sperm samples from 15 men whose female partners did not achieve pregnancy after IVF (no pregnancy) and 16 men from couples that did achieve pregnancy after IVF (pregnancy) were included in this study. To perform the differential proteomic experiments, 10 no pregnancy samples and 10 pregnancy samples were separately pooled and subsequently used for tandem mass tags (TMT) protein labelling, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identification and peak intensity relative protein quantification. Bioinformatic analyses were performed using UniProt Knowledgebase, DAVID and Reactome. Individual samples (n = 5 no pregnancy samples; n = 6 pregnancy samples) and aliquots from the above TMT pools were used for western blotting. By using TMT labelling and LC-MS/MS, we have detected 31 proteins present at lower abundance (ratio no pregnancy/pregnancy < 0.67) and 35 at higher abundance (ratio no pregnancy/pregnancy > 1.5) in the no pregnancy group. Bioinformatic analyses showed that the proteins with differing abundance are involved in chromatin assembly and lipoprotein metabolism (P values < 0

  1. IL-1β irreversibly inhibits tenogenic differentiation and alters metabolism in injured tendon-derived progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Yu, Bin; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2015-08-07

    Tendon injuries are common, and the damaged tendon often turns into scar tissue and never completely regains the original biomechanical properties. Previous studies have reported that the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β are remarkably up-regulated in injured tendons. To examine how IL-1β impacts tendon repair process, we isolated the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) from mouse injured Achilles tendons and studied the effects of IL-1β on the inTPCs in vitro. IL-1β treatment strongly reduced expression of tendon cell markers such as scleraxis and tenomodulin, and also down-regulated gene expression of collagen 1, collagen 3, biglycan and fibromodulin in inTPCs. Interestingly, IL-1β stimulated lactate production with increases in hexokinase II and lactate dehydrogenase expression and a decrease in pyruvate dehydrogenase. Inhibition of lactate production restored IL-1β-induced down-regulation of collagen1 and scleraxis expression. Furthermore, IL-1β significantly inhibited adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation of inTPCs. Interestingly, inhibition of tenogenic and adipogenic differentiation was not recovered after removal of IL-1β while chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation abilities were not affected. These findings indicate that IL-1β strongly and irreversibly impairs tenogenic potential and alters glucose metabolism in tendon progenitors appearing in injured tendons. Inhibition of IL-1β may be beneficial for maintaining function of tendon progenitor cells during the tendon repair process.

  2. Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    Yarmolinsky, James; Mueller, Noel T.; Duncan, Bruce B.; Bisi Molina, Maria del Carmen; Goulart, Alessandra C.; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Observational studies have reported fairly consistent inverse associations between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes, but this association has been little investigated with regard to lesser degrees of hyperglycemia and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Additionally, the association between coffee consumption and diabetes has been rarely investigated in South American populations. We examined the cross-sectional relationships of coffee intake with newly diagnosed diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion, in a large Brazilian cohort of middle-aged and elderly individuals. Methods We used baseline data from 12,586 participants of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes. Analysis of covariance was used to assess coffee intake in relation to two-hour glucose from an oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, fasting and –2-hour postload insulin and measures of insulin sensitivity. Results We found an inverse association between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes, after adjusting for multiple covariates [23% and 26% lower odds of diabetes for those consuming coffee 2–3 and >3 times per day, respectively, compared to those reporting never or almost never consuming coffee, (p = .02)]. An inverse association was also found for 2-hour postload glucose [Never/almost never: 7.57 mmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 7.48 mmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 7.22 mmol/L, >3 times/day: 7.12 mol/L, p<0.0001] but not with fasting glucose concentrations (p = 0.07). Coffee was additionally associated with 2-hour postload insulin [Never/almost never: 287.2 pmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 280.1 pmol/L, 2–3 times/day: 275.3 pmol/L, >3 times/day: 262.2 pmol/L, p = 0.0005) but not with fasting insulin concentrations (p = .58). Conclusion Our present study provides

  3. Coffee Consumption, Newly Diagnosed Diabetes, and Other Alterations in Glucose Homeostasis: A Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    PubMed

    Yarmolinsky, James; Mueller, Noel T; Duncan, Bruce B; Bisi Molina, Maria Del Carmen; Goulart, Alessandra C; Schmidt, Maria Inês

    2015-01-01

    Observational studies have reported fairly consistent inverse associations between coffee consumption and risk of type 2 diabetes, but this association has been little investigated with regard to lesser degrees of hyperglycemia and other alterations in glucose homeostasis. Additionally, the association between coffee consumption and diabetes has been rarely investigated in South American populations. We examined the cross-sectional relationships of coffee intake with newly diagnosed diabetes and measures of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion, in a large Brazilian cohort of middle-aged and elderly individuals. We used baseline data from 12,586 participants of the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine associations between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes. Analysis of covariance was used to assess coffee intake in relation to two-hour glucose from an oral glucose tolerance test, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin, fasting and -2-hour postload insulin and measures of insulin sensitivity. We found an inverse association between coffee consumption and newly diagnosed diabetes, after adjusting for multiple covariates [23% and 26% lower odds of diabetes for those consuming coffee 2-3 and >3 times per day, respectively, compared to those reporting never or almost never consuming coffee, (p = .02)]. An inverse association was also found for 2-hour postload glucose [Never/almost never: 7.57 mmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 7.48 mmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 7.22 mmol/L, >3 times/day: 7.12 mol/L, p<0.0001] but not with fasting glucose concentrations (p = 0.07). Coffee was additionally associated with 2-hour postload insulin [Never/almost never: 287.2 pmol/L, ≤1 time/day: 280.1 pmol/L, 2-3 times/day: 275.3 pmol/L, >3 times/day: 262.2 pmol/L, p = 0.0005) but not with fasting insulin concentrations (p = .58). Our present study provides further evidence of a protective effect of

  4. An acute oral dose of caffeine does not alter glucose kinetics during prolonged dynamic exercise in trained endurance athletes.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Bosman, M J; Tarnopolsky, M A

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated the possible influence of oral caffeine administration on endogenous glucose production and energy substrate metabolism during prolonged endurance exercise. Twelve trained endurance athletes [seven male, five female; peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) = 65.5 ml.kg-1.min-1] performed 60 min of cycle ergometry at 65% VO2peak twice, once after oral caffeine administration (6 mg.kg-1) (CAF) and once following consumption of a placebo (PLA). CAF and PLA were administered in a randomized double-blind manner 75 min prior to exercise. Plasma glucose kinetics were determined with a primed-continuous infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose. No differences in oxygen consumption (VO2), and carbon dioxide production (VCO2) were observed between CAF and PLA, at rest or during exercise. Blood glucose concentrations were similar between the two conditions at rest and also during exercise. Exercise did lead to an increase in serum free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations for both conditions; however, no differences were observed between CAF and PLA. Both the plasma glucose rate of appearance (Ra) and disappearance (Rd) increased at the onset of exercise (P < 0.05), but were not affected by CAF, as compared to PLA. CAF did lead to a higher plasma lactate concentration during exercise (P < 0.05). It was concluded that an acute oral dose of caffeine does not influence plasma glucose kinetics or energy substrate oxidation during prolonged exercise in trained endurance athletes. However, CAF did lead to elevated plasma lactate concentrations. The exact mechanism of the increase in plasma lactate concentrations remains to be determined.

  5. Alterations in Cytosolic Glucose-Phosphate Metabolism Affect Structural Features and Biochemical Properties of Starch-Related Heteroglycans1[W

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Joerg; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Alpers, Jessica; Szkop, Michal; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Steup, Martin

    2008-01-01

    The cytosolic pools of glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) and glucose-6-phosphate are essential intermediates in several biosynthetic paths, including the formation of sucrose and cell wall constituents, and they are also linked to the cytosolic starch-related heteroglycans. In this work, structural features and biochemical properties of starch-related heteroglycans were analyzed as affected by the cytosolic glucose monophosphate metabolism using both source and sink organs from wild-type and various transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants. In leaves, increased levels of the cytosolic phosphoglucomutase (cPGM) did affect the cytosolic heteroglycans, as both the glucosyl content and the size distribution were diminished. By contrast, underexpression of cPGM resulted in an unchanged size distribution and an unaltered or even increased glucosyl content of the heteroglycans. Heteroglycans prepared from potato tubers were found to be similar to those from leaves but were not significantly affected by the level of cPGM activity. However, external glucose or Glc-1-P exerted entirely different effects on the cytosolic heteroglycans when added to tuber discs. Glucose was directed mainly toward starch and cell wall material, but incorporation into the constituents of the cytosolic heteroglycans was very low and roughly reflected the relative monomeric abundance. By contrast, Glc-1-P was selectively taken up by the tuber discs and resulted in a fast increase in the glucosyl content of the heteroglycans that quantitatively reflected the level of the cytosolic phosphorylase activity. Based on 14C labeling experiments, we propose that in the cytosol, glucose and Glc-1-P are metabolized by largely separated paths. PMID:18805950

  6. Improved Glucose Homeostasis in Obese Mice Treated With Resveratrol Is Associated With Alterations in the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Sung, Miranda M; Kim, Ty T; Denou, Emmanuel; Soltys, Carrie-Lynn M; Hamza, Shereen M; Byrne, Nikole J; Masson, Grant; Park, Heekuk; Wishart, David S; Madsen, Karen L; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Dyck, Jason R B

    2017-02-01

    Oral administration of resveratrol is able to improve glucose homeostasis in obese individuals. Herein we show that resveratrol ingestion produces taxonomic and predicted functional changes in the gut microbiome of obese mice. In particular, changes in the gut microbiome were characterized by a decreased relative abundance of Turicibacteraceae, Moryella, Lachnospiraceae, and Akkermansia and an increased relative abundance of Bacteroides and Parabacteroides Moreover, fecal transplantation from healthy resveratrol-fed donor mice is sufficient to improve glucose homeostasis in obese mice, suggesting that the resveratrol-mediated changes in the gut microbiome may play an important role in the mechanism of action of resveratrol. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. Fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells according to differentiation stage and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Seong-Il; Ko, Hee-Chul; Shin, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyo-Min; Hong, Youn-Suk; Lee, Nam-Ho; Kim, Se-Jae

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} Fucoxanthin enhances 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at an early stage. {yields} Fucoxanthin inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation at intermediate and late stages. {yields} Fucoxanthin attenuates glucose uptake by inhibiting the phosphorylation of IRS in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes. {yields} Fucoxanthin exerts its anti-obesity effect by inhibiting the differentiation of adipocytes at both intermediate and late stages, as well as glucose uptake in mature adipocytes. -- Abstract: Progression of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation is divided into early (days 0-2, D0-D2), intermediate (days 2-4, D2-D4), and late stages (day 4 onwards, D4-). In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoxanthin, isolated from the edible brown seaweed Petalonia binghamiae, on adipogenesis during the three differentiation stages of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. When fucoxanthin was applied during the early stage of differentiation (D0-D2), it promoted 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, as evidenced by increased triglyceride accumulation. At the molecular level, fucoxanthin increased protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and aP2, and adiponectin mRNA expression, in a dose-dependent manner. However, it reduced the expression of PPAR{gamma}, C/EBP{alpha}, and SREBP1c during the intermediate (D2-D4) and late stages (D4-D7) of differentiation. It also inhibited the uptake of glucose in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes by reducing the phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). These results suggest that fucoxanthin exerts differing effects on 3T3-L1 cells of different differentiation stages and inhibits glucose uptake in mature adipocytes.

  8. Differential Off-line LC-NMR (DOLC-NMR) Metabolomics To Monitor Tyrosine-Induced Metabolome Alterations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Richard; Frank, Oliver; Hofmann, Thomas

    2017-04-19

    A novel differential off-line LC-NMR approach (DOLC-NMR) was developed to capture and quantify nutrient-induced metabolome alterations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Off-line coupling of HPLC separation and (1)H NMR spectroscopy supported by automated comparative bucket analyses, followed by quantitative (1)H NMR using ERETIC 2 (electronic reference to access in vivo concentrations), has been successfully used to quantitatively record changes in the metabolome of S. cerevisiae upon intervention with the aromatic amino acid l-tyrosine. Among the 33 metabolites identified, glyceryl succinate, tyrosol acetate, tyrosol lactate, tyrosol succinate, and N-acyl-tyrosine derivatives such as N-(1-oxooctyl)-tyrosine are reported for the first time as yeast metabolites. Depending on the chain length, N-(1-oxooctyl)-, N-(1-oxodecanyl)-, N-(1-oxododecanyl)-, N-(1-oxomyristinyl)-, N-(1-oxopalmityl)-, and N-(1-oxooleoyl)-l-tyrosine imparted a kokumi taste enhancement above their recognition thresholds ranging between 145 and 1432 μmol/L (model broth). Finally, carbon module labeling (CAMOLA) and carbon bond labeling (CABOLA) experiments with (13)C6-glucose as the carbon source confirmed the biosynthetic pathway leading to the key metabolites; for example, the aliphatic side chain of N-(1-oxooctyl)-tyrosine could be shown to be generated via de novo fatty acid biosynthesis from four C2-carbon modules (acetyl-CoA) originating from glucose.

  9. Alterations in Factors Involved in Differentiation and Barrier Function in the Epithelium in Oral and Genital Lichen Planus.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Karin; Ebrahimi, Majid; Nylander, Elisabet; Wahlin, Ylva Britt; Nylander, Karin

    2017-02-08

    Lichen planus is a chronic recurrent inflammatory disease affecting both skin and mucosa, mainly in oral and/or genital regions. Keratinocytes go through a well-regulated process of proliferation and differentiation, alterations in which may result in defects in the protective epithelial barrier. Long-term barrier impairment might lead to chronic inflammation. In order to broaden our understanding of the differentiation process in mucosal lichen planus, we mapped the expression of 4 factors known to be involved in differentiation. Biopsies were collected from oral and genital lichen planus lesions and normal controls. Altered expression of all 4 factors in epithelium from lichen planus lesions was found, clearly indicating disturbed epithelial differentiation in lichen planus lesions.

  10. Differential sensitivity of growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin release from perifused mouse hypothalamic fragments in response to glucose deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Frohman, L A

    1993-06-01

    The effects of glucose deficiency on growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) release from mouse hypothalamic fragments were investigated using an in vitro perifusion system. Fragments were perifused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution (KRB) containing 5.6 mM glucose for 3 h followed by reduced glucose concentrations in KRB for the next 2 h. GRH release was simulated by 0.7-2.8 mM glucose in an inverse concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, SRIH release was not stimulated by glucose at concentrations of 2.8 and 1.4 mM; only at 0.7 mM was there a modest stimulation of SRIH release that was comparable to the effect of 2.8 mM glucose on GRH release. The maximal stimulation of GRH and SRIH release by 0.7 mM glucose was 221 and 150%, respectively, of controls. Glucose concentrations of 11.2 and 22.4 mM inhibited GRH release but did not alter SRIH release. The glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; 5.6-39.2 mM) also stimulated GRH release in a dose-dependent manner, and SRIH release was less sensitive to 2-DG than was GRH. The maximal stimulation of GRH and SRIH release by 39.2 mM 2-DG was 190 and 147%, respectively, of controls. Increases in GRH and SRIH release stimulated by 30 mM KCl 1 h after exposure to low glucose or 2-DG were not significantly different from those after exposure to 5.6 mM glucose. However, the SRIH response to K(+)-induced depolarization was much greater than that of GRH. The glucose intermediate pyruvate (4.9 and 9.8 mM) partially inhibited both GRH and SRIH release induced by 0.7 mM glucose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Perturbation of the interaction between Gal4p and Gal80p of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL switch results in altered responses to galactose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Das Adhikari, Akshay Kumar; Qureshi, Mohd Tanvir; Kar, Rajesh Kumar; Bhat, Paike Jayadeva

    2014-10-01

    In S. cerevisiae, following the Whole Genome Duplication (WGD), GAL1-encoded galactokinase retained its signal transduction function but lost basal expression. On the other hand, its paralogue GAL3, lost kinase activity but retained its signalling function and basal expression, thus making it indispensable for the rapid induction of the S. cerevisiae GAL switch. However, a gal3Δ strain exhibits delayed growth kinetics due to the redundant signalling function of GAL1. The subfunctionalization between the paralogues GAL1 and GAL3 is due to expression divergence and is proposed to be due to the alteration in the Upstream Activating Sequences (UASG ). We demonstrate that the GAL switch becomes independent of GAL3 by altering the interaction between Gal4p and Gal80p without altering the configuration of UASG . In addition to the above, the altered switch of S. cerevisiae loses ultrasensitivity and stringent glucose repression. These changes caused an increase in fitness in the disaccharide melibiose at the expense of a decrease in fitness in galactose. The above altered features of the ScGAL switch are similar to the features of the GAL switch of K. lactis that diverged from S. cerevisiae before the WGD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Alterations in Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [U-13C]Glucose Metabolism in a Chronic Epilepsy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form of adult epilepsy and shows high resistance to treatment. Increasing evidence has suggested that metabolic dysfunction contributes to the development of seizures, with previous studies indicating impairments in brain glucose metabolism. Here we aim to elucidate which pathways involved in glucose metabolism are impaired, by tracing the hippocampal metabolism of injected [U-13C]glucose (i.p.) during the chronic stage of the pilocarpine-status epilepticus mouse model of epilepsy. The enrichment of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were quantified in hippocampal extracts using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectroscopy, along with the measurement of the activities of enzymes in each pathway. We show that there is reduced incorporation of 13C in the intermediates of glycolysis, with the percentage enrichment of all downstream intermediates being highly correlated with those of glucose 6-phosphate. Furthermore, the activities of all enzymes in this pathway including hexokinase and phosphofructokinase were unaltered, suggesting that glucose uptake is reduced in this model without further impairments in glycolysis itself. The key findings were 33% and 55% losses in the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, respectively, along with reduced 13C enrichment in TCA cycle intermediates. This lower 13C enrichment is best explained in part by the reduced enrichment in glycolytic intermediates, whereas the reduction of key TCA cycle enzyme activity indicates that TCA cycling is also impaired in the hippocampal formation. Together, these data suggest that multitarget approaches may be necessary to restore metabolism in the epileptic brain. PMID:28303258

  13. The RUNX2 Transcription Factor Negatively Regulates SIRT6 Expression to Alter Glucose Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Choe, Moran; Brusgard, Jessica L; Chumsri, Saranya; Bhandary, Lekhana; Zhao, Xianfeng Frank; Lu, Song; Goloubeva, Olga G; Polster, Brian M; Fiskum, Gary M; Girnun, Geoffrey D; Kim, Myoung Sook; Passaniti, Antonino

    2015-10-01

    Activation of genes promoting aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. The RUNX2 transcription factor mediates breast cancer (BC) metastasis to bone and is regulated by glucose availability. But, the mechanisms by which it regulates glucose metabolism and promotes an oncogenic phenotype are not known. RUNX2 expression in luminal BC cells correlated with lower estrogen receptor-α (ERα) levels, anchorage-independent growth, expression of glycolytic genes, increased glucose uptake, and sensitivity to glucose starvation, but not to inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Conversely, RUNX2 knockdown in triple-negative BC cells inhibited mammosphere formation and glucose dependence. RUNX2 knockdown resulted in lower LDHA, HK2, and GLUT1 glycolytic gene expression, but upregulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase-A1 (PDHA1) mRNA and enzymatic activity, which was consistent with lower glycolytic potential. The NAD-dependent histone deacetylase, SIRT6, a known tumor suppressor, was a critical regulator of these RUNX2-mediated metabolic changes. RUNX2 expression resulted in elevated pAkt, HK2, and PDHK1 glycolytic protein levels that were reduced by ectopic expression of SIRT6. RUNX2 also repressed mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates (OCR), a measure of oxidative phosphorylation (respiration). Overexpression of SIRT6 increased respiration in RUNX2-positive cells, but knockdown of SIRT6 in cells expressing low RUNX2 decreased respiration. RUNX2 repressed SIRT6 expression at both the transcriptional and post-translational levels and endogenous SIRT6 expression was lower in malignant BC tissues or cell lines that expressed high levels of RUNX2. These results support a hypothesis whereby RUNX2-mediated repression of the SIRT6 tumor suppressor regulates metabolic pathways that promote BC progression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prenatal Food Restriction with Postweaning High-fat Diet Alters Glucose Metabolic Function in Adult Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Di; Kou, Hao; Zhang, Li; Guo, Yu; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal food restriction (PFR) with postweaning high-fat diet (HFD) on glucose metabolic function in adult offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were given PFR treatment from gestational day 11 to spontaneous delivery. All pups were fed by HFD after weaning. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was conducted at postnatal week (PW) 20. Rats were decapitated in PW24 to collect liver and pancreas, and expression of hepatic insulin signaling genes were then quantified. Body weight from PW4 to PW24 in PFR males was lower than those in control males, whereas there was no distinct difference between females. However, body weight gain rates were higher from PW16 to PW24 in PFR males and females. Fasting serum glucose presented no changes, whereas fasting serum insulin decreased in PW20 in PFR pups. Moreover, glucose intolerance only appeared in PFR males, whereas no changes were shown in PFR females in relative values. Serum insulin increased in both PFR groups after OGTT. Remarkable pathological changes were also found in islets from PFR rats. There was an increase in the hepatic mRNA expression of IR in PFR females and of Glut2 in PFR males. PFR with postweaning HFD induced a catch-up growth in body weight, especially in PFR females. Serum insulin decreased in both PFR groups in fasting status. Insulin resistance after OGTT only existed in PFR males, whereas PFR females showed no obvious changes in glucose metabolism. Copyright © 2017 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Alterations in Cytosolic and Mitochondrial [U-(13)C]Glucose Metabolism in a Chronic Epilepsy Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Tanya S; Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Hodson, Mark P; Borges, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is a common form of adult epilepsy and shows high resistance to treatment. Increasing evidence has suggested that metabolic dysfunction contributes to the development of seizures, with previous studies indicating impairments in brain glucose metabolism. Here we aim to elucidate which pathways involved in glucose metabolism are impaired, by tracing the hippocampal metabolism of injected [U-(13)C]glucose (i.p.) during the chronic stage of the pilocarpine-status epilepticus mouse model of epilepsy. The enrichment of (13)C in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle were quantified in hippocampal extracts using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy, along with the measurement of the activities of enzymes in each pathway. We show that there is reduced incorporation of (13)C in the intermediates of glycolysis, with the percentage enrichment of all downstream intermediates being highly correlated with those of glucose 6-phosphate. Furthermore, the activities of all enzymes in this pathway including hexokinase and phosphofructokinase were unaltered, suggesting that glucose uptake is reduced in this model without further impairments in glycolysis itself. The key findings were 33% and 55% losses in the activities of pyruvate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, respectively, along with reduced (13)C enrichment in TCA cycle intermediates. This lower (13)C enrichment is best explained in part by the reduced enrichment in glycolytic intermediates, whereas the reduction of key TCA cycle enzyme activity indicates that TCA cycling is also impaired in the hippocampal formation. Together, these data suggest that multitarget approaches may be necessary to restore metabolism in the epileptic brain.

  16. Regional homogeneity alterations differentiate between tremor dominant and postural instability gait difficulty subtypes of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Siming; Wang, Min; Zhang, Li; Yuan, Yongsheng; Tong, Qing; Ding, Jian; Wang, Jianwei; Xu, Qinrong; Zhang, Kezhong

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can be classified into the tremor dominant (TD) subtype and the postural instability gait difficulty (PIGD) subtype, which present with different clinical courses and prognoses. However, the symptom-specific intrinsic neural mechanisms underlying the subtypes of PD still remain elusive. In the current study, we utilized resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) combined with the regional homogeneity (ReHo) method to investigate the modulations of neural activity in 13 patients with predominantly PIGD (p-PIGD) and 15 patients with predominantly TD (p-TD) in the resting state. Compared with healthy controls, the p-PIGD and the p-TD groups both displayed ReHo changes in the default mode network (DMN). By contrast, the p-TD group exhibited more ReHo alterations in the cerebellum involved in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical (CTC) loops, whilst the p-PIGD group in extensive cortical and sub-cortical areas, including the frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, limbic lobes, basal ganglia and thalamus, which are involved in the striatal-thalamo-cortical (STC) loops. Direct comparison between the two groups showed significant ReHo alterations in the primary visual cortex. Our findings underscore the differential involvement of the STC and CTC circuits underlying the two subtypes of PD. Moreover, relatively widespread neural activity abnormality, especially in the motor-related regions as well as the visual network, is apparently a characteristic feature of PIGD symptoms. This study could shed light on the underlying pathophysiology and clinical heterogeneity of PD presentation.

  17. The five glucose-6-phosphatase paralogous genes are differentially regulated by insulin alone or combined with high level of amino acids and/or glucose in trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucie, Marandel; Weiwei, Dai; Stéphane, Panserat; Sandrine, Skiba-Cassy

    2016-04-01

    A recent analysis of the newly sequenced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome suggested that duplicated gluconeogenic g6pc paralogues, fixed in this genome after the salmonid-specific 4th whole genome duplication, may have a role in the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in this carnivorous species. This should be due to the sub- or neo-functionalization of their regulation. In the present short communication we thus addressed the question of the regulation of these genes by insulin, hormone involved in the glucose homeostasis, and its interaction with glucose and amino acids in vitro. The stimulation of trout hepatocytes with insulin revealed an atypical up-regulation of g6pcb2 ohnologues and confirmed the sub- or neo-functionalization of the five g6pc genes at least at the regulatory level. Intriguingly, when hepatocytes were cultured with high levels of glucose and/or AAs in presence of insulin, most of the g6pc paralogues were up-regulated. It strongly suggested a cross-talk between insulin and nutrients for the regulation of these genes. Moreover these results strengthened the idea that g6pc duplicated genes may significantly contribute to the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout via their atypical regulation by insulin alone or in interaction with nutrients. These findings open new perspectives to better understand in vivo glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high carbohydrate diet.

  18. Altered mammary gland differentiation and progesterone receptor expression in rats fed soy and whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, J Craig; Hakkak, Reza; Ronis, Martin J J; Badger, Thomas M

    2002-11-01

    dietary protein alters the phenotype of mammary epithelia in the TEBs. The SPI- and WPH-dependent changes in mammary differentiation may contribute to the reduced sensitivity to DMBA-induced mammary cancer in rats fed these proteins.

  19. Translational attenuation differentially alters the fate of disease-associated fibulin proteins.

    PubMed

    Hulleman, John D; Balch, William E; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2012-11-01

    Mutations in fibulin proteins that cause cellular secretion deficiencies are linked to a variety of diseases, ranging from retinopathies to cutis laxa (CL). One secretion-deficient fibulin mutant, R345W fibulin-3, causes the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese by increased endoplasmic reticulum retention and/or extracellular misfolding. Herein, we report that small-molecule activation of the PERK arm of the unfolded protein response partially rescues R345W secretion deficiencies through translational attenuation mediated by eIF2α phosphorylation. Enhanced mutant fibulin-3 secretion can also be achieved by activation of a PERK-independent eIF2α kinase through arsenite treatment and is independent of activating transcription factor 4 signaling and protein translation. However, this translational attenuation strategy was unsuccessful for enhancing the secretion deficiencies of fibulin-5 mutants associated with age-related macular degeneration or CL. While lowered growth temperature enhanced the secretion of mutants associated with CL (C217R and S227P), these effects were not mediated through translational attenuation. In stark contrast to the situation with fibulin-3, protein translation was required for efficient wild-type and mutant fibulin-5 secretion. These data suggest that alteration of specific cellular signaling pathways and proteostasis network components can differentially influence fibulin fate, a hypothesis that could be exploited as a therapy for fibulin-related diseases.

  20. Altered Chondrocyte Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Homeostasis in a Zebrafish Model for Mucolipidosis II

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Sias, Christina; Steet, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a pediatric disorder caused by defects in the biosynthesis of mannose 6-phosphate, the carbohydrate recognition signal responsible for targeting certain acid hydrolases to lysosomes. The mechanisms underlying the developmental defects of ML-II are largely unknown due in part to the lack of suitable animal models. To overcome these limitations, we developed a model for ML-II in zebrafish by inhibiting the expression of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, the enzyme that initiates mannose 6-phosphate biosynthesis. Morphant embryos manifest craniofacial defects, impaired motility, and abnormal otolith and pectoral fin development. Decreased mannose phosphorylation of several lysosomal glycosidases was observed in morphant lysates, consistent with the reduction in phosphotransferase activity. Investigation of the craniofacial defects in the morphants uncovered striking changes in the timing and localization of both type II collagen and Sox9 expression, suggestive of an accelerated chondrocyte differentiation program. Accumulation of type II collagen was also noted within misshapen cartilage elements at later stages of development. Furthermore, we observed abnormal matrix formation and calcium deposition in morphant otoliths. Collectively, these data provide new insight into the developmental pathology of ML-II and suggest that altered production and/or homeostasis of extracellular matrix proteins are integral to the disease process. These findings highlight the potential of the zebrafish system in studying lysosomal disease pathogenesis. PMID:19834066

  1. Differential tinnitus-related neuroplastic alterations of cortical thickness and surface area.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Liem, Franziskus; Kleinjung, Tobias; Weidt, Steffi; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Structural neuroimaging techniques have been used to identify cortical and subcortical regions constituting the neuroarchitecture of tinnitus. One recent investigation used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to analyze a sample of tinnitus patients (TI, n = 257) (Schecklmann et al., 2013). A negative relationship between individual distress and cortical volume (CV) in bilateral auditory regions was observed. However, CV has meanwhile been identified as a neuroanatomical measurement that confounds genetically distinct neuroanatomical traits, namely cortical thickness (CT) and cortical surface area (CSA). We performed a re-analysis of the identical sample using the automated FreeSurfer surface-based morphometry (SBM) approach (Fischl, 2012). First, we replicated the negative correlation between tinnitus distress and bilateral supratemporal gray matter volume. Second, we observed a negative correlation for CSA in the left periauditory cortex and anterior insula. Furthermore, we noted a positive correlation between tinnitus duration and CT in the left periauditory cortex as well as a negative correlation in the subcallosal anterior cingulate, a region collated to the serotonergic circuit and germane to inhibitory functions. In short, the results elucidate differential neuroanatomical alterations of CSA and CT for the two independent tinnitus-related psychological traits distress and duration. Beyond this, the study provides further evidence for the distinction and specific susceptibility of CSA and CT within the context of neuroplasticity of the human brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. White-throated sparrows alter songs differentially in response to chorusing anurans and other background noise.

    PubMed

    Lenske, Ariel K; La, Van T

    2014-06-01

    Animals can use acoustic signals to attract mates and defend territories. As a consequence, background noise that interferes with signal transmission has the potential to reduce fitness, especially in birds that rely on song. While much research on bird song has investigated vocal flexibility in response to urban noise, weather and other birds, the possibility of inter-class acoustic competition from anurans has not been previously studied. Using sound recordings from central Ontario wetlands, we tested if white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicolis) make short-term changes to their singing behaviour in response to chorusing spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), as well as to car noise, wind and other bird vocalizations. White-throated sparrow songs that were sung during the spring peeper chorus were shorter with higher minimum frequencies and narrower bandwidths resulting in reduced frequency overlap. Additionally, sparrows were less likely to sing when car noise and the vocalizations of other birds were present. These patterns suggest that birds use multiple adjustment strategies. This is the first report to demonstrate that birds may alter their songs differentially in response to different sources of noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  3. Prenatal methamphetamine differentially alters myocardial sensitivity to ischemic injury in male and female adult hearts.

    PubMed

    Rorabaugh, Boyd R; Seeley, Sarah L; Bui, Albert D; Sprague, Lisanne; D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2016-02-15

    Methamphetamine is one of the most common illicit drugs abused during pregnancy. The neurological effects of prenatal methamphetamine are well known. However, few studies have investigated the potential effects of prenatal methamphetamine on adult cardiovascular function. Previous work demonstrated that prenatal cocaine exposure increases sensitivity of the adult heart to ischemic injury. Methamphetamine and cocaine have different mechanisms of action, but both drugs exert their effects by increasing dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus the goal of this study was to determine whether prenatal methamphetamine also worsens ischemic injury in the adult heart. Pregnant rats were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or saline throughout pregnancy. When pups reached 8 wk of age, their hearts were subjected to ischemia and reperfusion by means of a Langendorff isolated heart system. Prenatal methamphetamine had no significant effect on infarct size, preischemic contractile function, or postischemic recovery of contractile function in male hearts. However, methamphetamine-treated female hearts exhibited significantly larger infarcts and significantly elevated end-diastolic pressure during recovery from ischemia. Methamphetamine significantly reduced protein kinase Cε expression and Akt phosphorylation in female hearts but had no effect on these cardioprotective proteins in male hearts. These data indicate that prenatal methamphetamine differentially affects male and female sensitivity to myocardial ischemic injury and alters cardioprotective signaling proteins in the adult heart. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Capillary flow of blood in a microchannel with differential wetting for blood plasma separation and on-chip glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Maria, M Sneha; Rakesh, P E; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2016-09-01

    We report capillary flow of blood in a microchannel with differential wetting for the separation of a plasma from sample blood and subsequent on-chip detection of glucose present in a plasma. A rectangular polydimethylsiloxane microchannel with hydrophilic walls (on three sides) achieved by using oxygen plasma exposure enables capillary flow of blood introduced at the device inlet through the microchannel. A hydrophobic region (on all four sides) in the microchannel impedes the flow of sample blood, and the accumulated blood cells at the region form a filter to facilitate the separation of a plasma. The modified wetting property of the walls and hence the device performance could be retained for a few weeks by covering the channels with deionised water. The effects of the channel cross-section, exposure time, waiting time, and location and length of the hydrophobic region on the volume of the collected plasma are studied. Using a channel cross-section of 1000 × 400 μm, an exposure time of 2 min, a waiting time of 10 min, and a hydrophobic region of width 1.0 cm located at 10 mm from the device inlet, 450 nl of plasma was obtained within 15 min. The performance of the device was found to be unaffected (provides 450 nl of plasma in 15 min) even after 15 days. The purification efficiency and plasma recovery of the device were measured and found to be comparable with that obtained using the conventional centrifugation process. Detection of glucose at different concentrations in whole blood of normal and diabetic patients was performed (using 5 μl of sample blood within 15 min) to demonstrate the compatibility of the device with integrated detection modules.

  5. Partial Inhibition of Adipose Tissue Lipolysis Improves Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity Without Alteration of Fat Mass

    PubMed Central

    Girousse, Amandine; Tavernier, Geneviève; Valle, Carine; Moro, Cedric; Mejhert, Niklas; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Houssier, Marianne; Roussel, Balbine; Besse-Patin, Aurèle; Combes, Marion; Mir, Lucile; Monbrun, Laurent; Bézaire, Véronic; Prunet-Marcassus, Bénédicte; Waget, Aurélie; Vila, Isabelle; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Louche, Katie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Mairal, Aline; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Galitzky, Jean; Holm, Cecilia; Mouisel, Etienne; Thalamas, Claire; Viguerie, Nathalie; Sulpice, Thierry; Burcelin, Rémy; Arner, Peter; Langin, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet–fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity. PMID:23431266

  6. Partial inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity without alteration of fat mass.

    PubMed

    Girousse, Amandine; Tavernier, Geneviève; Valle, Carine; Moro, Cedric; Mejhert, Niklas; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Houssier, Marianne; Roussel, Balbine; Besse-Patin, Aurèle; Combes, Marion; Mir, Lucile; Monbrun, Laurent; Bézaire, Véronic; Prunet-Marcassus, Bénédicte; Waget, Aurélie; Vila, Isabelle; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Louche, Katie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Mairal, Aline; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Galitzky, Jean; Holm, Cecilia; Mouisel, Etienne; Thalamas, Claire; Viguerie, Nathalie; Sulpice, Thierry; Burcelin, Rémy; Arner, Peter; Langin, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet-fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity.

  7. Alteration of carbohydrates metabolism and midgut glucose absorption in Gromphadorhina portentosa after subchronic exposure to imidacloprid and fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Sawczyn, Tomasz; Dolezych, Bogdan; Klosok, Marcin; Augustyniak, Maria; Stygar, Dominika; Buldak, Rafal J; Kukla, Michal; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Karcz-Socha, Iwona; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that following exposure to insecticides, changes take place in the metabolism of carbohydrates and absorption in the midgut of insects. The Madagascar hissing cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa) was chosen for the experiment as a model organism, due to it being easy to breed and its relatively large alimentary tract, which was important when preparing the microperfusion midgut bioassay. In each group of cockroaches treated with imidacloprid and fenitrothion, absorption of glucose, expressed as the area under the curve (AUC), was elevated compared to the control group. Glucose in the hemolymph of the examined insects was present in a vestigial amount, often below the threshold of determination, so the determinable carbohydrate indices were: hemolymph trehalose concentration and fat body glycogen content. The level of trehalose found in the hemolymph of insects when exposed to fenitrothion, and irrespective of the level of concentration mixed into food, were significantly lower when comparing to the control samples. Imidacloprid acted analogically with one exception at the concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1) dry food where trehalose concentration did not differ from the control values. Coupling with fat body glycogen concentration was less visible and appeared only at the concentrations of 5 and 10 mg imidacloprid·kg(-1) dry food. As described in this study changes in the sugar distribution and midgut glucose absorption indicate that insects cover the increased energy needs induced by insecticides; also at the gastrointestinal tract level. The result indicates that the midgut glucose absorption parameters could be considered as a non-specific biomarker of insecticide toxicity.

  8. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  9. Transgenerational Glucose Intolerance of Tumor Necrosis Factor with Epigenetic Alteration in Rat Perirenal Adipose Tissue Induced by Intrauterine Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Su, Rina; Yan, Jie; Yang, Huixia

    2016-01-01

    Changes in DNA methylation may play a role in the genetic mechanism underlying glucose intolerance in the offspring of mothers with diabetes. Here, we established a rat model of moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin to detect glucose and lipid metabolism of first-generation (F1) and second-generation (F2) offspring. Moderate intrauterine hyperglycemia induced high body weight in F1 and F2 offspring of diabetic mothers. F1 offspring had impaired glucose tolerance and abnormal insulin level. Additionally, F1 and F2 offspring that were exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia had impaired insulin secretion from the islets. The tumor necrosis factor (Tnf) gene was upregulated in perirenal adipose tissue from F1 offspring and relatively increased in F2 offspring. Both F1 and F2 offspring showed similar hypomethylation level at the −1952 site of Tnf. We confirmed that DNA methylation occurs in offspring exposed to intrauterine hyperglycemia and that the DNA methylation is intergenerational and inherited. PMID:26881249

  10. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations. PMID:27312339

  11. Soluble epoxide hydrolase deficiency alters pancreatic islet size and improves glucose homeostasis in a model of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Luria, Ayala; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Xi, Yannan; Shieh, Guang-Jong; Liu, Hsin-Chen; Inoue, Hiromi; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Imig, John D; Haj, Fawaz G; Hammock, Bruce D

    2011-05-31

    Visceral obesity has been defined as an important element of the metabolic syndrome and contributes to the development of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Increasing endogenous levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are known for their analgesic, antihypertensive, and antiinflammatory effects. The availability of EETs is limited primarily by the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, EPHX2), which metabolizes EETs to their less active diols. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that EETs are involved in glucose regulation and in retarding the development of insulin resistance. To address the role of EETs in regulating glucose homeostasis and insulin signaling, we used mice with targeted gene deletion of sEH (Ephx2-null mice) and a subsequent study with a selective sEH inhibitor. When wild-type mice are fed a high fat diet, insulin resistance develops. However, knockout or inhibition of sEH activity resulted in a significant decrease in plasma glucose. These findings are characterized by enhancement of tyrosyl phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate 1, and their downstream cascade. In addition, pancreatic islets were larger when sEH was disrupted. This effect was associated with an increase in vasculature. These observations were supported by pharmacological inhibition of sEH. These data suggest that an increase in EETs due to sEH-gene knockout leads to an increase in the size of islets and improved insulin signaling and sensitivity.

  12. Characterization of a FGF19 variant with altered receptor specificity revealed a central role for FGFR1c in the regulation of glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hongfei; Baribault, Helene; Vonderfecht, Steven; Lemon, Bryan; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Gardner, Jonitha; Lee, Ki Jeong; Gupte, Jamila; Mookherjee, Paramita; Wang, Minghan; Sheng, Jackie; Wu, Xinle; Li, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes and associated metabolic conditions have reached pandemic proportions worldwide, and there is a clear unmet medical need for new therapies that are both effective and safe. FGF19 and FGF21 are distinctive members of the FGF family that function as endocrine hormones. Both have potent effects on normalizing glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and therefore, represent attractive potential next generation therapies for combating the growing epidemics of type 2 diabetes and obesity. The mechanism responsible for these impressive metabolic effects remains unknown. While both FGF19 and FGF21 can activate FGFRs 1c, 2c, and 3c in the presence of co-receptor βKlotho in vitro, which receptor is responsible for the metabolic activities observed in vivo remains unknown. Here we have generated a variant of FGF19, FGF19-7, that has altered receptor specificity with a strong bias toward FGFR1c. We show that FGF19-7 is equally efficacious as wild type FGF19 in regulating glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism in both diet-induced obesity and leptin-deficient mouse models. These results are the first direct demonstration of the central role of the βKlotho/FGFR1c receptor complex in glucose and lipid regulation, and also strongly suggest that activation of this receptor complex alone might be sufficient to achieve all the metabolic functions of endocrine FGF molecules.

  13. Mouse embryonic stem cells irradiated with γ-rays differentiate into cardiomyocytes but with altered contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Rebuzzini, Paola; Fassina, Lorenzo; Mulas, Francesca; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Redi, Carlo Alberto; Di Liberto, Riccardo; Magenes, Giovanni; Adjaye, James; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Garagna, Silvia

    2013-08-30

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) for their derivation from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst represent a valuable in vitro model to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on early embryonic cellular response. Following irradiation, both human and mouse ESCs (mESCs) maintain their pluripotent status and the capacity to differentiate into embryoid bodies and to form teratomas. Although informative of the maintenance of a pluripotent status, these studies never investigated the capability of irradiated ESCs to form specific differentiated phenotypes. Here, for the first time, 5Gy-irradiated mESCs were differentiated into cardiomyocytes, thus allowing the analysis of the long-term effects of ionizing radiations on the differentiation potential of a pluripotent stem cell population. On treated mESCs, 96h after irradiation, a genome-wide expression analysis was first performed in order to determine whether the treatment influenced gene expression of the surviving mESCs. Microarrays analysis showed that only 186 genes were differentially expressed in treated mESCs compared to control cells; a quarter of these genes were involved in cellular differentiation, with three main gene networks emerging, including cardiogenesis. Based on these results, we differentiated irradiated mESCs into cardiomyocytes. On day 5, 8 and 12 of differentiation, treated cells showed a significant alteration (qRT-PCR) of the expression of marker genes (Gata-4, Nkx-2.5, Tnnc1 and Alpk3) when compared to control cells. At day 15 of differentiation, although the organization of sarcomeric α-actinin and troponin T proteins appeared similar in cardiomyocytes differentiated from either mock or treated cells, the video evaluation of the kinematics and dynamics of the beating cardiac syncytium evidenced altered contractile properties of cardiomyocytes derived from irradiated mESCs. This alteration correlated with significant reduction of Connexin 43 foci. Our results indicate that mESCs populations

  14. Extracellular Protease Inhibition Alters the Phenotype of Chondrogenically Differentiating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) in 3D Collagen Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sejin; Li, Yuk Yin; Chan, Barbara Pui

    2016-01-01

    Matrix remodeling of cells is highly regulated by proteases and their inhibitors. Nevertheless, how would the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) be affected, when the balance of the matrix remodeling is disturbed by inhibiting matrix proteases, is incompletely known. Using a previously developed collagen microencapsulation platform, we investigated whether exposing chondrogenically differentiating MSCs to intracellular and extracellular protease inhibitors will affect the extracellular matrix remodeling and hence the outcomes of chondrogenesis. Results showed that inhibition of matrix proteases particularly the extracellular ones favors the phenotype of fibrocartilage rather than hyaline cartilage in chondrogenically differentiating hMSCs by upregulating type I collagen protein deposition and type II collagen gene expression without significantly altering the hypertrophic markers at gene level. This study suggests the potential of manipulating extracellular proteases to alter the outcomes of hMSC chondrogenesis, contributing to future development of differentiation protocols for fibrocartilage tissues for intervertebral disc and meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:26760956

  15. Altered bone marrow lymphopoiesis and interleukin-6-dependent inhibition of thymocyte differentiation contribute to thymic atrophy during Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Carbajosa, Sofía; Gea, Susana; Chillón-Marinas, Carlos; Poveda, Cristina; Maza, Mª Carmen; Fresno, Manuel; Gironès, Núria

    2017-01-28

    Thymic atrophy occurs during infection being associated with apoptosis of double positive (DP) and premature exit of DP and double negative (DN) thymocytes. We observed for the first time that a significant bone marrow aplasia and a decrease in common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) preceded thymic alterations in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. In addition, depletion of the DN2 stage was previous to the DN1, indicating an alteration in the differentiation from DN1 to DN2 thymocytes. Interestingly, infected mice deficient in IL-6 expression showed higher numbers of DP and CD4+ thymocytes than wild type infected mice, while presenting similar percentages of DN1 thymocytes. Moreover, the drop in late differentiation stages of DN thymocytes was partially abrogated in comparison with wild type littermates. Thus, our results suggest that thymic atrophy involves a drop in CLPs production in bone marrow and IL-6-dependent and independent mechanisms that inhibits the differentiation of DN thymocytes.

  16. Sugar alters the level of serum insulin and plasma glucose and the serum cortisol:DHEAS ratio in female migraine sufferers.

    PubMed

    Kokavec, Anna; Crebbin, Susan J

    2010-12-01

    Early work has highlighted that a large percentage of migraineurs may have an altered glucidic methabolis due to carbohydrate-induced hyperinsulinism. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sucrose on biomarkers of energy metabolism and utilization in migraineous females. A total of 16 participants (8 = Migraine, 8 = Non-migraine) at the mid-point of their menstrual cycle underwent a 15-h fast prior to ingesting 75 g sucrose dissolved in 175 g water. Blood sampling for the assessment of serum insulin, serum cortisol and serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and plasma glucose was conducted upon arrival at 09:00 h and then at regular 15-min intervals across a 150-min experimental period. The results showed a significant alteration in serum insulin and plasma glucose following sucrose ingestion in the migraine and non-migraine groups. In addition, significant group differences were observed in the level of serum insulin, serum DHEAS, and the cortisol:DHEAS ratio with migraine participants on average recording a higher sucrose-induced serum insulin level and lower DHEAS level and cortisol:DHEAS ratio when group data was compared. It was concluded that while sucrose consumption may potentiate serum insulin in migraineurs this does not result in the development of sucrose-induced hypoglycemia in migraine or non-migraine participants.

  17. Differential Effects of Various Typical and Atypical Antipsychotics on Plasma Glucose and Insulin Levels in the Mouse: Evidence for the Involvement of Sympathetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Savoy, Yvette E.; Ashton, Michael A.; Miller, Matthew W.; Nedza, Frank M.; Spracklin, Douglas K.; Hawthorn, Mark H.; Rollema, Hans; Matos, F. Fatima; Hajos-Korcsok, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic treatment has been associated with serious metabolic adverse events, such as glucose dysregulation and development of type 2 diabetes. As part of our studies on possible underlying mechanisms, we investigated the acute effects of various typical and atypical antipsychotics on plasma glucose and insulin in FVB/N mice, a strain that showed a more pronounced hyperglycemic response to clozapine than C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. Acute administration of high doses of clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, perphenazine, or chlorpromazine significantly increased plasma glucose by 100%–140% above basal levels without significant effects on insulin levels. In contrast, risperidone reduced plasma glucose (−30%) and markedly enhanced plasma insulin levels. Doses of ziprasidone that gave 50-fold higher free plasma concentrations than therapeutic plasma levels, as well as high doses of aripiprazole and haloperidol, did not significantly alter either glucose or insulin levels. Clozapine- and olanzapine-induced hyperglycemia occurred at free plasma concentrations that were within, or one order of magnitude above, the range of therapeutic plasma levels. Pretreatment with either the ganglionic blocker hexamethonium, or the α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist yohimbine, blocked the clozapine- and chlorpromazine-induced increase in glucose levels. Taken together, these results suggest that typical and atypical antipsychotics with known metabolic liability produce acute hyperglycemia in mice and that this effect is likely driven by activation of the sympathetic autonomic nervous system via a central mechanism. PMID:18703666

  18. Heterologous expression of yeast Hxt2 in Arabidopsis thaliana alters sugar uptake, carbon metabolism and gene expression leading to glucose tolerance of germinating seedlings.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Chacón, Daniel; Cordoba, Elizabeth; Olivera, Teresa; Sánchez, Sobeida; Coello, Patricia; León, Patricia; Tiessen, Axel; Martínez-Barajas, Eleazar

    2010-04-01

    The hexose transporter 2 gene (Hxt2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the 35S promoter. Several independent transgenic lines were selected after confirming single gene insertion by southern blot analysis in the T4 generation. Northern blots revealed the presence of heterologous transcript. Radiolabeling experiments revealed an increased rate of incorporation of the non-metabolizable analog 3-O-methyl-[U-14C]-glucose. This confirmed that the yeast Hxt2 transporter was functional in Arabidopsis. No phenotypic changes at the vegetative and reproductive stages could be detected in the transgenic lines when compared to wild type plants. Shortly after germination some differences in development and glucose signaling were observed. Transgenic seedlings cultivated in liquid medium or on solid agar plates were able to grow with 3% glucose (producing bigger plants and longer roots), while development of wild type plants was delayed under those conditions. Metabolite analysis revealed that the Hxt2 transgenic lines had higher rates of sugar utilization. Transcriptional profiling showed that particular genes were significantly up- or down-regulated. Some transcription factors like At1g27000 were repressed, while others, such as At3g58780, were induced. The mRNA from classical sugar signaling genes such as STP1, Hxk1, and ApL3 behaved similarly in transgenic lines and wild type lines. Results suggest that the Hxt2 transgene altered some developmental processes related to the perception of high carbon availability after the germination stage. We conclude that the developmental arrest of wild type plants at 3% glucose not only depends on Hxk1 as the only sugar sensor but might also be influenced by the route of hexose transport across the plasma membrane.

  19. High glucose stimulates adipogenic and inhibits osteogenic differentiation in MG-63 cells through cAMP/protein kinase A/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiaolin; Zheng, Jiaqiang; Yang, Jianhong

    2010-05-01

    Patients with diabetes tend to have an increased incidence of osteoporosis that may be related to hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of high glucose on differentiation of human osteoblastic MG-63 cells and involved intracellular signal transduction pathways. Here, we showed that high glucose suppressed the cell growth, mineralization, and expression of osteogenic markers including Runx2, collagen I, osteocalcin, osteonectin, but inversely promoted expression of adipogenic markers including PPARgamma, aP2, resistin, and adipsin. Moreover, high glucose significantly increased the intracellular cAMP level in a time-dependent manner and induced ERK1/2 activation. Meanwhile, supplementation of H89, a specific inhibitor of PKA, and PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MAPK/ERK kinase, reversed the cell growth inhibition, the down-regulation of osteogenic markers and the up-regulation of adipogenic markers as well as the activation of ERK under high glucose. These results indicate that high glucose can increase adipogenic and inhibit osteogenic differentiation by activating cAMP/PKA/ERK pathway in MG-63 cells, thereby providing further insight into the molecular mechanism of diabetic osteoporosis.

  20. Fuzzy cognitive map in differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination: A nursing approach

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes Lopes, Maria Helena Baena; Ortega, Neli Regina Siqueira; Silveira, Paulo Sérgio Panse; Massad, Eduardo; Higa, Rosângela; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop a decision support system to discriminate the diagnoses of alterations in urinary elimination, according to the nursing terminology of NANDA International (NANDA-I). Methods A fuzzy cognitive map (FCM) was structured considering six possible diagnoses: stress urinary incontinence, reflex urinary incontinence, urge urinary incontinence, functional urinary incontinence, total urinary incontinence and urinary retention; and 39 signals associated with them. The model was implemented in Microsoft Visual C++® Edition 2005 and applied in 195 real cases. Its performance was evaluated through the agreement test, comparing its results with the diagnoses determined by three experts (nurses). The sensitivity and specificity of the model were calculated considering the expert’s opinion as a gold standard. In order to compute the Kappa’s values we considered two situations, since more than one diagnosis was possible: the overestimation of the accordance in which the case was considered as concordant when at least one diagnoses was equal; and the underestimation of the accordance, in which the case was considered as discordant when at least one diagnosis was different. Results The overestimation of the accordance showed an excellent agreement (kappa = 0.92, p < 0.0001); and the underestimation provided a moderate agreement (kappa = 0.42, p < 0.0001). In general the FCM model showed high sensitivity and specificity, of 0.95 and 0.92, respectively, but provided a low specificity value in determining the diagnosis of urge urinary incontinence (0.43) and a low sensitivity value to total urinary incontinence (0.42). Conclusions The decision support system developed presented a good performance compared to other types of expert systems for differential diagnosis of alterations in urinary elimination. Since there are few similar studies in the literature, we are convinced of the importance of investing in this kind of modeling, both from the theoretical and from

  1. Sex-specific alterations in glucose homeostasis and metabolic parameters during ageing of caspase-2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, C H; Nikolic, A; Kentish, S J; Shalini, S; Hatzinikolas, G; Page, A J; Dorstyn, L; Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    Gender-specific differences are commonly found in metabolic pathways and in response to nutritional manipulation. Previously, we identified a role for caspase-2 in age-related glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism using male caspase-2-deficient (Casp2−/−) mice. Here we show that the resistance to age-induced glucose tolerance does not occur in female Casp2−/− mice and it appears to be independent of insulin sensitivity in males. Using fasting (18 h) as a means to further investigate the role of caspase-2 in energy and lipid metabolism, we identified sex-specific differences in the fasting response and lipid mobilization. In aged (18–22 months) male Casp2−/− mice, a significant decrease in fasting liver mass, but not total body weight, was observed while in females, total body weight, but not liver mass, was reduced when compared with wild-type (WT) animals. Fasting-induced lipolysis of adipose tissue was enhanced in male Casp2−/− mice as indicated by a significant reduction in white adipocyte cell size, and increased serum-free fatty acids. In females, white adipocyte cell size was significantly smaller in both fed and fasted Casp2−/− mice. No difference in fasting-induced hepatosteatosis was observed in the absence of caspase-2. Further analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) indicated that female Casp2−/− mice may have enhanced fatty acid recycling and metabolism with expression of genes involved in glyceroneogenesis and fatty acid oxidation increased. Loss of Casp2 also increased fasting-induced autophagy in both male and female liver and in female skeletal muscle. Our observations suggest that caspase-2 can regulate glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism in a tissue and sex-specific manner. PMID:27551503

  2. α-Mangostin Improves Glucose Uptake and Inhibits Adipocytes Differentiation in 3T3-L1 Cells via PPARγ, GLUT4, and Leptin Expressions

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Muhammad; Mohamed Amiroudine, Mohamed Zaffar Ali; Tengku Zakaria, Tengku Muhamad Faris Syafiq; Ichwan, Solachuddin J. A.; Kaderi, Mohd Arifin; Ahmed, Qamar Uddin; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been often associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. The development of obesity is also accompanied by significant differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. In this study, we investigated the activity of α-mangostin, a major xanthone component isolated from the stem bark of G. malaccensis, on glucose uptake and adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells focusing on PPARγ, GLUT4, and leptin expressions. α-Mangostin was found to inhibit cytoplasmic lipid accumulation and adipogenic differentiation. Cells treated with 50 μM of α-mangostin reduced intracellular fat accumulation dose-dependently up to 44.4% relative to MDI-treated cells. Analyses of 2-deoxy-D-[3H] glucose uptake activity showed that α-mangostin significantly improved the glucose uptake (P < 0.05) with highest activity found at 25 μM. In addition, α-mangostin increased the amount of free fatty acids (FFA) released. The highest glycerol release level was observed at 50 μM of α-mangostin. qRT-PCR analysis showed reduced lipid accumulation via inhibition of PPARγ gene expression. Induction of glucose uptake and free fatty acid release by α-mangostin were accompanied by increasing mRNA expression of GLUT4 and leptin. These evidences propose that α-mangostin might be possible candidate for the effective management of obesity in future. PMID:25873982

  3. Sexual differentiation of the brain: a model for drug-induced alterations of the reproductive system

    SciTech Connect

    Gorski, R.A.

    1986-12-01

    The process of the sexual differentiation of the brain represents a valuable model system for the study of the chemical modification of the mammalian brain. Although there are numerous functional and structural sex differences in the adult brain, these are imposed on an essentially feminine or bipotential brain by testicular hormones during a critical phase of perinatal development in the rat. It is suggested that a relatively marked structural sex difference in the rat brain, the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA), is a morphological signature of the permanent or organizational action of estradiol derived from the aromatization of testicular testosterone. The SDN-POA of the male rat is severalfold larger in volume and is composed of more neurons than that of the female. The observation that the mitotic formation of the neurons of the SDN-POA is specifically prolonged has enabled us to identify the time course and pathway of neuronal migration into the nucleus. Study of the development of the SDN-POA suggests that estradiol in the male increases the number of neurons which survive a phase of neuronal death by exerting a neurite growth promoting action and/or a direct neuronotrophic action. Finally, although it is clear that gonadal hormones have dramatic permanent effects on the brain during perinatal development, even after puberty and in adulthood gonadal steroids can alter neuronal structure and, perhaps as a corollary to this, have permanent effects on reproductive function. Although the brain may be most sensitive to gonadal hormones or exogenous chemical factors during perinatal development, such as sensitivity does not appear limited to this period.

  4. Altered patterns of gene duplication and differential gene gain and loss in fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Amy J; Conant, Gavin C; Brown, Douglas E; Carbone, Ignazio; Dean, Ralph A

    2008-01-01

    Background Duplication, followed by fixation or random loss of novel genes, contributes to genome evolution. Particular outcomes of duplication events are possibly associated with pathogenic life histories in fungi. To date, differential gene gain and loss have not been studied at genomic scales in fungal pathogens, despite this phenomenon's known importance in virulence in bacteria and viruses. Results To determine if patterns of gene duplication differed between pathogens and non-pathogens, we identified gene families across nine euascomycete and two basidiomycete species. Gene family size distributions were fit to power laws to compare gene duplication trends in pathogens versus non-pathogens. Fungal phytopathogens showed globally altered patterns of gene duplication, as indicated by differences in gene family size distribution. We also identified sixteen examples of gene family expansion and five instances of gene family contraction in pathogenic lineages. Expanded gene families included those predicted to be important in melanin biosynthesis, host cell wall degradation and transport functions. Contracted families included those encoding genes involved in toxin production, genes with oxidoreductase activity, as well as subunits of the vacuolar ATPase complex. Surveys of the functional distribution of gene duplicates indicated that pathogens show enrichment for gene duplicates associated with receptor and hydrolase activities, while euascomycete pathogens appeared to have not only these differences, but also significantly more duplicates associated with regulatory and carbohydrate binding functions. Conclusion Differences in the overall levels of gene duplication in phytopathogenic species versus non-pathogenic relatives implicate gene inventory flux as an important virulence-associated process in fungi. We hypothesize that the observed patterns of gene duplicate enrichment, gene family expansion and contraction reflect adaptation within pathogenic life

  5. Altering Work to Rest Ratios Differentially Influences Fatigue Indices During Repeated Sprint Ability Testing.

    PubMed

    La Monica, Michael B; Fukuda, David H; Beyer, Kyle S; Hoffman, Mattan W; Miramonti, Amelia A; Riffe, Josh J; Baker, Kayla M; Fragala, Maren S; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the influence of recovery time on fatigue indices, performance (total work [TW], peak power [PP], and mean power [MP]), and oxygen consumption during repeated sprint ability (RSA) on a cycle ergometer. Eight recreationally-trained men performed 3 RSA protocols consisting of 10 × 6 s sprints with 12 s, 18 s, and 24 s rest intervals between each sprint. Fatigue indices were determined as percent decrement (%Dec) and rate of decline using either a log transform method or standard slope approach for TW, PP, and MP during respective RSA protocols. The maximal VO2 value in response to given sprint intervals and the minimal VO2 value in response to given rest periods (VO2 work and VO2 rest, respectively) were recorded. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze all variables. Average VO2 work was not different among rest interval trials. Average VO2 rest with 12 s rest was greater than 18 s and 24 s (2.16 ± 0.17 L · min(-1), 1.91 ± 0.18 L · min(-1), 1.72 ± 0.15 L · min(-1), respectively), while 18 s was greater than 24 s. Average TW and MP were greater with 24 s rest than 12 s (4,604.44 ± 915.98 J vs. 4,305.46 ± 727.17 J, respectively), with no differences between RSA protocols for PP. No differences in %Dec were observed. Both methods of calculating rates of decline per sprint for PP and TW were greater during 12 s than 18 s or 24 s. Since changes were only noted between the 12 s and 24 s protocols, a 6 s differential in rest intervals may not be enough to elicit alterations in TW, PP, MP, or %Dec in RSA performance. Rate of decline may be a more sensitive measure of fatigue than %Dec.

  6. Deficient glucose and glutamine metabolism in Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12 knockout mice contributes to altered visual function

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Laura; Du, Jianhai; Hurley, James B.; Satrústegui, Jorgina; de la Villa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the vision phenotype of mice lacking Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12, the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier mutated in global cerebral hypomyelination (OMIM 612949). Methods We tested overnight dark-adapted control and aralar-deficient mice for the standard full electroretinogram (ERG) response. The metabolic stress of dark-adaptation was reduced by 5 min illumination after which the ERG response was monitored in darkness. We used the electrical response to two identical saturating light flashes (paired-flash stimulation) to isolate the inner retina and photoreceptor responses. Retinal morphology was examined with hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemistry of antibodies against retinal cells, and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) labeling. Results Aralar plays a pivotal role in retina metabolism as aralar provides de novo synthesis pathway for glutamine, protects glutamate from oxidation, and is required for efficient glucose oxidative metabolism. Aralar-deficient mice are not blind as their retinas have light-evoked activity. However, we report an approximate 50% decrease in the ERG amplitude response in the light-evoked activity of dark-adapted retinas from aralar-deficient mice, in spite of normal retina histology. The defective response is partly reversed by exposure to a brief illumination period, which lowers the metabolic stress of dark-adaptation. The metabolic stress and ERG alteration takes place primarily in photoreceptors, but the response to two flashes applied in fast succession also revealed an alteration in synaptic transmission consistent with an imbalance of glutamate and an energy deficit in the inner retina neurons. Conclusions We propose that compromised glucose oxidation and altered glutamine and glutamate metabolism in the absence of aralar are responsible for the phenotype reported. PMID:27746674

  7. Quercetin ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism and improves antioxidant status in postnatally monosodium glutamate-induced metabolic alterations.

    PubMed

    Seiva, Fábio R F; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Braga, Camila Pereira; Amorim, João Paulo A; Fernandes, Ana Angélica H

    2012-10-01

    We reported the effects of quercetin on metabolic and hormonal profile as well as serum antioxidant activities in a model of MSG (monosodium glutamate)-induced obesity. Rats were divided into 4 groups: MSG group, submitted to neonatal treatment with high doses of MSG, administrated subcutaneously during 10 days, from 2 day-old; control groups, which received the same volume of saline. After completing 30 day-old, these groups were subdivided into 4 groups: control and MSG groups treated and non-treated with quercetin at doses of 75 mg/kg body weight (i.p.) over 42 days. BW gain and food consumption were higher in MSG treated rats and quercetin significantly reduced BW by 25%. While MSG increased triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and fractions, and reduced HDL concentrations, administration of quercetin normalized HDL-cholesterol and reduced others lipids. Insulin, leptin, glucose and creatinine levels were raised in MSG-treated rats and reduced after quercetin treatment. Alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities were lower after MSG-quercetin combination compared to rats given only MSG. MSG-quercetin combination augmented total protein and urea levels as well as glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in contrast to MSG-treated animals. Quercetin normalized serum lipid and glucose profile and minimized the MSG-related toxic effects, which was associated to its antioxidant properties.

  8. Altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism in internet game overusers: a 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Sang Hee; Bang, Seong Ae; Yoon, Eun Jin; Cho, Sang Soo; Kim, Sang Eun

    2010-03-01

    Internet game overuse is an emerging disorder and features diminished impulse control and poor reward-processing. In an attempt to understand the neurobiological bases of Internet game overuse, we investigated the differences in regional cerebral glucose metabolism at resting state between young individuals with Internet game overuse and those with normal use using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography study. Twenty right-handed male participants (9 normal users: 24.7+/-2.4 years of age, 11 overusers: 23.5+/-2.9 years of age) participated. A trait measure of impulsivity was also completed after scanning. Internet game overusers showed greater impulsiveness than the normal users and there was a positive correlation between the severity of Internet game overuse and impulsiveness. Imaging data showed that the overusers had increased glucose metabolism in the right middle orbitofrontal gyrus, left caudate nucleus, and right insula, and decreased metabolism in the bilateral postcentral gyrus, left precentral gyrus, and bilateral occipital regions compared to normal users. Internet game overuse may be associated with abnormal neurobiological mechanisms in the orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, and sensory regions, which are implicated in impulse control, reward processing, and somatic representation of previous experiences. Our results support the idea that Internet game overuse shares psychological and neural mechanisms with other types of impulse control disorders and substance/non-substance-related addiction.

  9. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

  10. Arsenic inhibits stem cell differentiation by altering the interplay between the Wnt3a and Notch signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Lisa J.; Liu, Jui-Tung; League, Ryan E.

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people are exposed to arsenic through their drinking water and food, but the mechanisms by which it impacts embryonic development are not well understood. Arsenic exposure during embryogenesis is associated with neurodevelopmental effects, reduced weight gain, and altered locomotor activity, and in vitro data indicates that arsenic exposure inhibits stem cell differentiation. This study investigated whether arsenic disrupted the Wnt3a signaling pathway, critical in the formation of myotubes and neurons, during the differentiation in P19 mouse embryonic stem cells. Cells were exposed to 0, 0.1, or 0.5 μM arsenite, with or without exogenous Wnt3a, for up to 9 days of differentiation. Arsenic exposure alone inhibits the differentiation of stem cells into neurons and skeletal myotubes, and reduces the expression of both β-catenin and GSK3β mRNA to ~55% of control levels. Co-culture of the arsenic-exposed cells with exogenous Wnt3a rescues the morphological phenotype, but does not alter transcript, protein, or phosphorylation status of GSK3β or β-catenin. However, arsenic exposure maintains high levels of Hes5 and decreases the expression of MASH1 by 2.2-fold, which are anti- and pro-myogenic and neurogenic genes, respectively, in the Notch signaling pathway. While rescue with exogenous Wnt3a reduced Hes5 levels, MASH1 levels stay repressed. Thus, while Wnt3a can partially rescue the inhibition of differentiation from arsenic, it does so by also modulating Notch target genes rather than only working through the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. These results indicate that arsenic alters the interplay between multiple signaling pathways, leading to reduced stem cell differentiation. PMID:27158593

  11. Early maternal undernutrition programs increased feed intake, altered glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, and liver function in aged female offspring

    PubMed Central

    George, Lindsey A.; Zhang, Liren; Tuersunjiang, Nuermaimaiti; Ma, Yan; Long, Nathan M.; Uthlaut, Adam B.; Smith, Derek T.; Nathanielsz, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance and obesity are components of the metabolic syndrome that includes development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes with advancing age. The thrifty phenotype hypothesis suggests that offspring of poorly nourished mothers are predisposed to the various components of the metabolic syndrome due to adaptations made during fetal development. We assessed the effects of maternal nutrient restriction in early gestation on feeding behavior, insulin and glucose dynamics, body composition, and liver function in aged female offspring of ewes fed either a nutrient-restricted [NR 50% National Research Council (NRC) recommendations] or control (C: 100% NRC) diet from 28 to 78 days of gestation, after which both groups were fed at 100% of NRC from day 79 to lambing and through lactation. Female lambs born to NR and C dams were reared as a single group from weaning, and thereafter, they were fed 100% NRC recommendations until assigned to this study at 6 yr of age. These female offspring were evaluated by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, followed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition analysis prior to and after ad libitum feeding of a highly palatable pelleted diet for 11 wk with automated monitoring of feed intake (GrowSafe Systems). Aged female offspring born to NR ewes demonstrated greater and more rapid feed intake, greater body weight gain, and efficiency of gain, lower insulin sensitivity, higher insulin secretion, and greater hepatic lipid and glycogen content than offspring from C ewes. These data confirm an increased metabolic “thriftiness” of offspring born to NR mothers, which continues into advanced age, possibly predisposing these offspring to metabolic disease. PMID:22277936

  12. Downregulation of putative UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase gene alters flower coloring in Phalaenopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Huei; Hsu, Chi-Yin; Cheng, Hao-Yun; Chang, Hsiang; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Ger, Mang-Jye

    2011-06-01

    Anthocyanin is the primary pigment contributing to red, violet, and blue flower color formation. The solubility of anthocyanins is enhanced by UDP glucose: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UFGT) through transfer of the glucosyl moiety from UDP-glucose to 3-hydroxyl group to produce the first stable pigments. To assess the possibility that UFGT is involved in the flower color formation in Phalaenopsis, the transcriptional activities of PeUFGT3, and other flower color-related genes in developing red or white flower buds were examined using RT-PCR analysis. In contrast with chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and anthocyanidin synthase genes, PeUFGT3 transcriptional activity was higher expressed in the red color of Phalaenopsis cultivars. In the red labellum of Phalaenopsis 'Luchia Lady', PeUFGT3 also showed higher expression levels than that in the white perianth. PeUFGT3 was predominantly expressed in the red region of flower among various Phalaenopsis cultivars. To investigate the role of PeUFGT3 in red flower color formation, PeUFGT3 was specifically knocked down using RNA interference technology via virus inducing gene silencing in Phalaenopsis. The PeUFGT3-suppressed Phalaenopsis exhibited various levels of flower color fading that was well correlated with the extent of reduced level of PeUFGT3 transcriptional activity. Furthermore, there was a significant decrease in anthocyanin content in the PeUFGT3-suppressed Phalaenopsis flowers. The decrease of anthocyanin content due to PeUFGT3 gene silencing possibly caused the faded flower color in PeUFGT3-suppressed Phalaenopsis. Consequently, these results suggested that the glycosylation-related gene PeUFGT3 plays a critical role in red color formation in Phalaenopsis.

  13. Differentiation alters stem cell nuclear architecture, mechanics, and mechano-sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P; Thorpe, Stephen D; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Baker, Brendon M; Yang, Michael T; Chen, Christopher S; Lee, David A; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-11-30

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is mediated by soluble and physical cues. In this study, we investigated differentiation-induced transformations in MSC cellular and nuclear biophysical properties and queried their role in mechanosensation. Our data show that nuclei in differentiated bovine and human MSCs stiffen and become resistant to deformation. This attenuated nuclear deformation was governed by restructuring of Lamin A/C and increased heterochromatin content. This change in nuclear stiffness sensitized MSCs to mechanical-loading-induced calcium signaling and differentiated marker expression. This sensitization was reversed when the 'stiff' differentiated nucleus was softened and was enhanced when the 'soft' undifferentiated nucleus was stiffened through pharmacologic treatment. Interestingly, dynamic loading of undifferentiated MSCs, in the absence of soluble differentiation factors, stiffened and condensed the nucleus, and increased mechanosensitivity more rapidly than soluble factors. These data suggest that the nucleus acts as a mechanostat to modulate cellular mechanosensation during differentiation.

  14. Ginseng Extracts Restore High-Glucose Induced Vascular Dysfunctions by Altering Triglyceride Metabolism and Downregulation of Atherosclerosis-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-huen; Law, Betty Yuen-kwan; Chu, John Man-tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-man; Jiang, Zhi-hong; Lau, Chi-wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-wan; Ying-kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions. PMID:24194784

  15. Ginseng extracts restore high-glucose induced vascular dysfunctions by altering triglyceride metabolism and downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-Huen; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan; Chu, John Man-Tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-Man; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-Wan; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  16. Differential effects of ibogaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in drug-naive and morphine-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Levant, Beth; Pazdernik, Thomas L

    2004-04-02

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic indole alkaloid, has been proposed as a treatment for addiction to opioids and other drugs of abuse. The mechanism for its putative anti-addictive effects is unknown. In this study, the effects of ibogaine on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) were determined in freely moving, drug-naive, or morphine-dependent adult, male, Sprague-Dawley rats using the [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method. Morphine-dependent rats were treated with increasing doses of morphine (5-25 mg/kg, s.c., b.i.d.) and then maintained at 25 mg/kg (b.i.d.) for 4-7 days. For the 2-DG procedure, rats were injected with saline or ibogaine (40 mg/kg, i.p.). 2-DG was administered 1 h after administration of ibogaine. The rate of LCGU was determined by quantitative autoradiography in 46 brain regions. In drug-naive animals, ibogaine produced significant increases in LCGU in the parietal, cingulate, and occipital cortices and cerebellum compared to controls consistent with its activity as a hallucinogen and a tremorogen. Morphine-dependent rats had only minor alterations in LCGU at the time assessed in this experiment. However, in morphine-dependent animals, ibogaine produced a global decrease in LCGU that was greatest in brain regions such as the lateral and medial preoptic areas, nucleus of the diagonal band, nucleus accumbens shell, inferior colliculus, locus coeruleus, and flocculus compared to morphine-dependent animals treated with saline. These findings indicate that ibogaine produces distinctly different effects on LCGU in drug-naive and morphine-dependent rats. This suggests that different mechanisms may underlie ibogaine's hallucinogenic and anti-addictive effects.

  17. Diet-induced hyperinsulinemia differentially affects glucose and protein metabolism: a high-throughput metabolomic approach in rats.

    PubMed

    Etxeberria, U; de la Garza, A L; Martínez, J A; Milagro, F I

    2013-09-01

    Metabolomics is a high-throughput tool that quantifies and identifies the complete set of biofluid metabolites. This "omics" science is playing an increasing role in understanding the mechanisms involved in disease progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a nontargeted metabolomic approach could be applied to investigate metabolic differences between obese rats fed a high-fat sucrose (HFS) diet for 9 weeks and control diet-fed rats. Animals fed with the HFS diet became obese, hyperleptinemic, hyperglycemic, hyperinsulinemic, and resistant to insulin. Serum samples of overnight-fasted animals were analyzed by (1)H NMR technique, and 49 metabolites were identified and quantified. The biochemical changes observed suggest that major metabolic processes like carbohydrate metabolism, β-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, Kennedy pathway, and folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism were altered in obese rats. The circulating levels of most amino acids were lower in obese animals. Serum levels of docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, unsaturated n-6 fatty acids, and total polyunsaturated fatty acids also decreased in HFS-fed rats. The circulating levels of urea, six water-soluble metabolites (creatine, creatinine, choline, acetyl carnitine, formate, and allantoin), and two lipid compounds (phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelin) were also significantly reduced by the HFS diet intake. This study offers further insight of the possible mechanisms implicated in the development of diet-induced obesity. It suggests that the HFS diet-induced hyperinsulinemia is responsible for the decrease in the circulating levels of urea, creatinine, and many amino acids, despite an increase in serum glucose levels.

  18. Diet, age, and prior injury status differentially alter behavioral outcomes following concussion in rats.

    PubMed

    Mychasiuk, Richelle; Hehar, Harleen; van Waes, Linda; Esser, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion affects a large portion of the population and although many of these individuals recover completely, a small subset of people experience lingering symptomology and poor outcomes. Little is known about the factors that affect individual susceptibility or resilience to poor outcomes after mTBI and there are currently no biomarkers to delineate mTBI diagnosis or prognosis. Based upon the growing literature associated with caloric intake and altered neurological aging and the ambiguous link between repetitive mTBI and progressive neurodegeneration, the current study was designed to examine the effect of a high fat diet (HFD), developmental age, and repetitive mTBI on behavioral outcomes following a mTBI. In addition, telomere length was examined before and after experimental mTBI. Sprague Dawley rats were maintained on a HFD or standard rat chow throughout life (including the prenatal period) and then experienced an mTBI/concussion at P30, P30 and P60, or only at P60. Behavioral outcomes were examined using a test battery that was administered between P61-P80 and included; beam-walking, open field, elevated plus maze, novel context mismatch, Morris water task, and forced swim task. Animals with a P30 mTBI often demonstrated lingering symptomology that was still present during testing at P80. Injuries at P30 and P60 rarely produced cumulative effects, and in some tests (i.e., beam walking), the first injury may have protected the brain from the second injury. Exposure to the high fat diet exacerbated many of the behavioral deficits associated with concussion. Finally, telomere length was shortened following mTBI and was influenced by the animal's dietary intake. Diet, age at the time of injury, and the number of prior concussion incidents differentially contribute to behavioral deficits and may help explain individual variations in susceptibility and resilience to poor outcomes following an mTBI. Copyright © 2014

  19. Syndromic deafness mutations at Asn 14 differentially alter the open stability of Cx26 hemichannels

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Helmuth A.; Slavi, Nefeli; Srinivas, Miduturu

    2016-01-01

    Connexin 26 (Cx26) is a transmembrane protein that forms hexameric hemichannels that can function when unopposed or dock to form intercellular gap junction channels. Aberrantly functioning unopposed hemichannels are a common feature of syndromic deafness associated with mutations in Cx26. In this study, we examine two different mutations at the same position in the N-terminal domain of Cx26, N14K and N14Y, which have been reported to produce different phenotypes in patients. We find that both N14K and N14Y, when expressed alone or together with wild-type (WT) Cx26, result in functional hemichannels with widely disparate functional properties. N14K currents are robust, whereas N14Y currents are small. The two mutants also exhibit opposite shifts in voltage-dependent loop gating, such that activation of N14K and N14Y is shifted in the hyperpolarizing and depolarizing directions, respectively. Deactivation kinetics suggests that N14K stabilizes and N14Y destabilizes the open state. Single N14K hemichannel recordings in low extracellular Ca2+ show no evidence of stable closing transitions associated with loop gating, and N14K hemichannels are insensitive to pH. Together, these properties cause N14K hemichannels to be particularly refractory to closing. Although we find that the unitary conductance of N14K is indistinguishable from WT Cx26, mutagenesis and substituted cysteine accessibility studies suggest that the N14 residue is exposed to the pore and that the differential properties of N14K and N14Y hemichannels likely result from altered electrostatic interactions between the N terminus and the cytoplasmic extension of TM2 in the adjacent subunit. The combined effects that we observe on loop gating and pH regulation may explain the unusual buccal cutaneous manifestations in patients carrying the N14K mutation. Our work also provides new considerations regarding the underlying molecular mechanism of loop gating, which controls hemichannel opening in the plasma

  20. Choline and methionine differentially alter methyl carbon metabolism in bovine neonatal hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Tawny L.

    2017-01-01

    Intersections in hepatic methyl group metabolism pathways highlights potential competition or compensation of methyl donors. The objective of this experiment was to examine the expression of genes related to methyl group transfer and lipid metabolism in response to increasing concentrations of choline chloride (CC) and DL-methionine (DLM) in primary neonatal hepatocytes that were or were not exposed to fatty acids (FA). Primary hepatocytes isolated from 4 neonatal Holstein calves were maintained as monolayer cultures for 24 h before treatment with CC (61, 128, 2028, and 4528 μmol/L) and DLM (16, 30, 100, 300 μmol/L), with or without a 1 mmol/L FA cocktail in a factorial arrangement. After 24 h of treatment, media was collected for quantification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and cell lysates were collected for quantification of gene expression. No interactions were detected between CC, DLM, or FA. Both CC and DLM decreased the expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A). Increasing CC did not alter betaine-homocysteine S-methyltranferase (BHMT) but did increase 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) expression. Increasing DLM decreased expression of BHMT and MTR, but did not affect MTHFR. Expression of both phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) were decreased by increasing CC and DLM, while carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) was unaffected by either. Treatment with FA decreased the expression of MAT1A, MTR, MTHFR and tended to decrease PEMT but did not affect BHMT and MTTP. Treatment with FA increased CPT1A expression. Increasing CC increased secretion of VLDL and decreased the accumulation of ROS in media. Within neonatal bovine hepatocytes, choline and methionine differentially regulate methyl carbon pathways and suggest that choline may play a critical role in

  1. Protein restriction during gestation alters histone modifications at the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) promoter region and induces GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shasha; Rollet, Michelle; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy is an intrauterine factor that results in alteration of the offspring genome and associates with disease risk in the offspring. We investigated the impact of a maternal low-protein (LP) diet on the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in offspring skeletal muscle. GLUT4 is an insulin-regulated glucose transporter involved in insulin sensitivity and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle cells. We observed sex-dependent GLUT4 mRNA expression and increased GLUT4 protein content in female pup skeletal muscle with maternal LP. Analysis of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of increased skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression in offspring rats revealed the regulatory mechanisms involved. The protein level of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which has been known as an activator of GLUT4 transcription via the ability to carry out specific binding to the GLUT4 MEF2 binding sequence, increased in female pups whose mothers were fed a LP diet. Modifications of chromatin structure, including acetylated histone H3, acetylated histone H4 and di-methylated histone H3 at lysine 4, were detected at a significantly increased level at the GLUT4 promoter region in female pup muscle following a maternal LP diet. Glycogen content was also detected as up-regulated, accompanied by increased glycogen synthase in LP female offspring muscle. These results document that maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces GLUT4 expression in female offspring skeletal muscle but not in males, which may indicate sex-dependent adaptation of glucose metabolism to a maternal LP diet.

  2. Prenatal exposure to urban air nanoparticles in mice causes altered neuronal differentiation and depression-like responses.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Bortolato, Marco; Godar, Sean C; Sander, Thomas K; Iwata, Nahoko; Pakbin, Payam; Shih, Jean C; Berhane, Kiros; McConnell, Rob; Sioutas, Constantinos; Finch, Caleb E; Morgan, Todd E

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that excessive exposure to traffic-derived air pollution during pregnancy may increase the vulnerability to neurodevelopmental alterations that underlie a broad array of neuropsychiatric disorders. We present a mouse model for prenatal exposure to urban freeway nanoparticulate matter (nPM). In prior studies, we developed a model for adult rodent exposure to re-aerosolized urban nPM which caused inflammatory brain responses with altered neuronal glutamatergic functions. nPMs are collected continuously for one month from a local freeway and stored as an aqueous suspension, prior to re-aerosolization for exposure of mice under controlled dose and duration. This paradigm was used for a pilot study of prenatal nPM impact on neonatal neurons and adult behaviors. Adult C57BL/6J female mice were exposed to re-aerosolized nPM (350 µg/m(3)) or control filtered ambient air for 10 weeks (3×5 hour exposures per week), encompassing gestation and oocyte maturation prior to mating. Prenatal nPM did not alter litter size, pup weight, or postnatal growth. Neonatal cerebral cortex neurons at 24 hours in vitro showed impaired differentiation, with 50% reduction of stage 3 neurons with long neurites and correspondingly more undifferentiated neurons at Stages 0 and 1. Neuron number after 24 hours of culture was not altered by prenatal nPM exposure. Addition of exogenous nPM (2 µg/ml) to the cultures impaired pyramidal neuron Stage 3 differentiation by 60%. Adult males showed increased depression-like responses in the tail-suspension test, but not anxiety-related behaviors. These pilot data suggest that prenatal exposure to nPM can alter neuronal differentiation with gender-specific behavioral sequelae that may be relevant to human prenatal exposure to urban vehicular aerosols.

  3. Identification of plant extracts with potential antidiabetic properties: effect on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), adipocyte differentiation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kathrine B; Minet, Ariane; Svenstrup, Henrik; Grevsen, Kai; Zhang, Hongbin; Schrader, Eva; Rimbach, Gerald; Wein, Silvia; Wolffram, Siegfried; Kristiansen, Karsten; Christensen, Lars P

    2009-09-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are insulin sensitizing drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes. The primary target of the TZDs is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma, a key regulator of adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. Currently prescribed TZDs are full PPARgamma agonists, and their use is associated with several side effects. Partial PPARgamma agonists appear to be associated with fewer side effects but may still confer the desired insulin sensitizing action. Extracts from common medicinal/food plants were tested in a screening platform comprising a series of bioassays, including tests for PPARgamma, alpha and delta transactivation, adipocyte differentiation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, allowing identification of plants containing potentially interesting PPAR agonists. Twenty-two plant extracts out of 133 were found to increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and 18 extracts were found to activate PPARgamma, 3 to activate PPARalpha and gamma, 6 to activate PPARdelta and gamma, and 9 to activate PPARgamma, alpha and delta. Among the 24 different plant species tested in the platform, 50% were shown to contain compounds capable of activating PPARgamma and stimulating insulin-dependent glucose uptake with no or little effect on adipocyte differentiation warranting further studies and characterization.

  4. Long-term testosterone treatment during pregnancy does not alter insulin or glucose profile in a sheep model of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Recabarren, Monica; Carrasco, Albert; Sandoval, Daniel; Diaz, Felipe; Sir-Petermann, Teresa; Recabarren, Sergio E

    2017-09-07

    The administration of testosterone to pregnant sheep to resemble fetal programming of the polycystic ovary syndrome could alter other hormones/factors of maternal origin with known effects on fetal growth. Hence, we studied the weekly profile of insulin, progesterone and glucose during a treatment with testosterone propionate given biweekly from weeks 5 to 17 of pregnancy (term at 21 weeks) and checked the outcome of their fetuses at 17 weeks of gestation after C-section. Control dams were only exposed to the vehicle of the hormone. The testosterone administration did not cause any significant change in the maternal weekly profile of insulin, progesterone or glucose concentration, although the plasma levels of testosterone in the treated dams were inversely correlated to the levels of progesterone. Testosterone treatment also induced an inverse correlation between mean maternal insulin levels and fetal insulin levels; however, the fetal zoometric parameters, body weight, or insulin levels did not differ between exposed and not exposed fetuses. Therefore, treatment with testosterone during pregnancy does not cause significant impact on insulin levels in the mother, leading to less effect on the programming of fetal growth.

  5. Dietary Fatty Acids Differentially Associate with Fasting Versus 2-Hour Glucose Homeostasis: Implications for The Management of Subtypes of Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guess, Nicola; Perreault, Leigh; Kerege, Anna; Strauss, Allison; Bergman, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Over-nutrition has fuelled the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes, but the role of individual macronutrients to the diabetogenic process is not well delineated. We aimed to examine the impact of dietary fatty acid intake on fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose concentrations, as well as tissue-specific insulin action governing each. Normoglycemic controls (n = 15), athletes (n = 14), and obese (n = 23), as well as people with prediabetes (n = 10) and type 2 diabetes (n = 11), were queried about their habitual diet using a Food Frequency Questionnaire. All subjects were screened by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and studied using the hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp with infusion of 6,62H2-glucose. Multiple regression was performed to examine relationships between dietary fat intake and 1) fasting plasma glucose, 2) % suppression of endogenous glucose production, 3) 2-hour post-OGTT plasma glucose, and 4) skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (glucose rate of disappearance (Rd) and non-oxidative glucose disposal (NOGD)). The %kcal from saturated fat (SFA) was positively associated with fasting (β = 0.303, P = 0.018) and 2-hour plasma glucose (β = 0.415, P<0.001), and negatively related to % suppression of hepatic glucose production (β = -0.245, P = 0.049), clamp Rd (β = -0.256, P = 0.001) and NOGD (β = -0.257, P = 0.001). The %kcal from trans fat was also negatively related to clamp Rd (β = -0.209, P = 0.008) and NOGD (β = -0.210, P = 0.008). In contrast, the %kcal from polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) was negatively associated with 2-hour glucose levels (β = -0.383, P = 0.001), and positively related to Rd (β = 0.253, P = 0.007) and NOGD (β = 0.246, P = 0.008). Dietary advice to prevent diabetes should consider the underlying pathophysiology of the prediabetic state. PMID:26999667

  6. Tungsten Promotes Sex-Specific Adipogenesis in the Bone by Altering Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Grant, Michael P; Wu, Ting Hua; Flores Molina, Manuel; Plourde, Dany; Kelly, Alexander D R; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Lemaire, Maryse; Schlezinger, Jennifer J; Mwale, Fackson; Mann, Koren K

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring metal that increasingly is being incorporated into industrial goods and medical devices, and is recognized as an emerging contaminant. Tungsten preferentially and rapidly accumulates in murine bone in a concentration-dependent manner; however the effect of tungsten deposition on bone biology is unknown. Other metals alter bone homeostasis by targeting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation, thus, we investigated the effects of tungsten on MSCsin vitroandin vivoIn vitro, tungsten shifted the balance of MSC differentiation by enhancing rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis, which correlated with an increase in adipocyte content in the bone of tungsten-exposed, young, male mice. Conversely, tungsten inhibited osteogenesis of MSCsin vitro; however, we found no evidence that tungsten inhibited osteogenesisin vivo Interestingly, two factors known to influence adipogenesis are sex and age of mice. Both female and older mice have enhanced adipogenesis. We extended our study and exposed young female and adult (9-month) male and female mice to tungsten for 4 weeks. Although tungsten accumulated to a similar extent in young female mice, it did not promote adipogenesis. Interestingly, tungsten did not accumulate in the bone of older mice; it was undetectable in adult male mice, and just above the limit of detect in adult female mice. Surprisingly, tungsten enhanced adipogenesis in adult female mice. In summary, we found that tungsten alters bone homeostasis by altering differentiation of MSCs, which could have significant implications for bone quality, but is highly dependent upon sex and age.

  7. Alternate Immersion in an External Glucose Solution Differentially Affects Blood Sugar Values in Older Versus Younger Zebrafish Adults.

    PubMed

    Connaughton, Victoria P; Baker, Cassandra; Fonde, Lauren; Gerardi, Emily; Slack, Carly

    2016-04-01

    Recently, zebrafish have been used to examine hyperglycemia-induced complications (retinopathy and neuropathy), as would occur in individuals with diabetes. Current models to induce hyperglycemia in zebrafish include glucose immersion and streptozotocin injections. Both are effective, although neither is reported to elevate blood sugar values for more than 1 month. In this article, we report differences in hyperglycemia induction and maintenance in young (4-11 months) versus old (1-3 years) zebrafish adults. In particular, older fish immersed in an alternating constant external glucose solution (2%) for 2 months displayed elevated blood glucose levels for the entire experimental duration. In contrast, younger adults displayed only transient hyperglycemia, suggesting the fish were acclimating to the glucose exposure protocol. However, modifying the immersion protocol to include a stepwise increasing glucose concentration (from 1% → 2%→3%) resulted in maintained hyperglycemia in younger zebrafish adults for up to 2 months. Glucose-exposed younger fish collected after 8 weeks of exposure also displayed a significant decrease in wet weight. Taken together, these data suggest different susceptibilities to hyperglycemia in older and younger fish and that stepwise increasing glucose concentrations of 1% are required for maintenance of hyperglycemia in younger adults, with higher concentrations of glucose resulting in greater increases in blood sugar values.

  8. Prenatal Exposure to Sodium Arsenite Alters Placental Glucose 1, 3, and 4 Transporters in Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Torres, Daniela Sarahí; González-Horta, Carmen; Del Razo, Luz María; Infante-Ramírez, Rocío; Ramos-Martínez, Ernesto; Levario-Carrillo, Margarita; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure induces a decrease in glucose type 4 transporter (GLUT4) expression on the adipocyte membrane, which may be related to premature births and low birth weight infants in women exposed to iAs at reproductive age. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) exposure on GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 protein expression and on placental morphology. Female Balb/c mice (n = 15) were exposed to 0, 12, and 20 ppm of NaAsO2 in drinking water from 8th to 18th day of gestation. Morphological changes and GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 expression were evaluated in placentas by immunohistochemical and image analysis and correlated with iAs and arsenical species concentration, which were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. NaAsO2 exposure induced a significant decrease in fetal and placental weight (P < 0.01) and increases in infarctions and vascular congestion. Whereas GLUT1 expression was unchanged in placentas from exposed group, GLUT3 expression was found increased. In contrast, GLUT4 expression was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in placentas from females exposed to 12 ppm. The decrease in placental GLUT4 expression might affect the provision of adequate fetal nutrition and explain the low fetal weight observed in the exposed groups. PMID:26339590

  9. Hepatic 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 involvement in alterations of glucose metabolism produced by acidotic stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Altuna, M E; Mazzetti, M B; Rago, L F; San Martín de Viale, L C; Damasco, M C

    2009-12-01

    11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSDs) enzymes regulate the activity of glucocorticoids in target organs. HSD1, one of the two existing isoforms, locates mainly in CNS, liver and adipose tissue. HSD1 is involved in the pathogenesis of diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, arterial hypertension and the Metabolic Syndrome. The stress produced by HCl overload triggers metabolic acidosis and increases liver HSD1 activity associated with increased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, a regulatory enzyme of gluconeogenesis that is activated by glucocorticoids, with increased glycaemia and glycogen breakdown. The aim of this study was to analyze whether the metabolic modifications triggered by HCl stress are due to increased liver HSD1 activity. Glycyrrhetinic acid, a potent HDS inhibitor, was administered subcutaneously (20 mg/ml) to stressed and unstressed four months old maleSprague Dawley rats to investigate changes in liver HSD1, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PECPK) and glycogen phosphorylase activities and plasma glucose levels. It was observed that all these parameters increased in stressed animals, but that treatment with glycyrrhetinic acid significantly reduced their levels. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the involvement of HSD1 in stress induced carbohydrate disturbances and could contribute to the impact of HSD1 inhibitors on carbohydrate metabolism and its relevance in the study of Metabolic Syndrome Disorder and non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGENS: LOW DOSES OF VINCLOZOLIN ALTER SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION OF THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In humans and rodents, exposure to antiandrogenic chemicals during sexual differentiation can produce malformations of the reproductive tract. Perinatal administration of 100 or 200 mg vinclozolin (V) kg-1 day-1 during sexual differentiation in rats induces female-like anogenital...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL ANTIANDROGENS: LOW DOSES OF VINCLOZOLIN ALTER SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION OF THE MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In humans and rodents, exposure to antiandrogenic chemicals during sexual differentiation can produce malformations of the reproductive tract. Perinatal administration of 100 or 200 mg vinclozolin (V) kg-1 day-1 during sexual differentiation in rats induces female-like anogenital...

  12. Short-term alterations in carbohydrate energy intake in humans. Striking effects on hepatic glucose production, de novo lipogenesis, lipolysis, and whole-body fuel selection.

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, J M; Neese, R A; Turner, S; Dare, D; Hellerstein, M K

    1995-01-01

    Short-term alterations in dietary carbohydrate (CHO) energy are known to alter whole-body fuel selection in humans, but the metabolic mechanisms remain unknown. We used stable isotope-mass spectrometric methods with indirect calorimetry in normal subjects to quantify the metabolic response to six dietary phases (5 d each), ranging from 50% surplus CHO (+50% CHO) to 50% deficient CHO (-50% CHO), and 50% surplus fat (+50% fat). Fasting hepatic glucose production (HGP) varied by > 40% from deficient to surplus CHO diets (1.78 +/- 0.08 vs 2.43 +/- 0.09 mg/kg per min, P < 0.01). Increased HGP on surplus CHO occurred despite significantly higher serum insulin concentrations. Lipolysis correlated inversely with CHO intake as did the proportion of whole-body lipolytic flux oxidized. Fractional de novo hepatic lipogenesis (DNL) increased more than 10-fold on surplus CHO and was unmeasurable on deficient CHO diets; thus, the preceding 5-d CHO intake could be inferred from DNL. Nevertheless, absolute hepatic DNL accounted for < 5g fatty acids synthesized per day even on +50% CHO. Whole-body CHO oxidation increased sixfold and fat oxidation decreased > 90% on surplus CHO diets. CHO oxidation was highly correlated with HGP (r2= 0.60). HGP could account for 85% of fasting CHO oxidation on +25% CHO and 67% on +50% CHO diets. Some oxidation of intracellular CHO stores was therefore also occurring. +50% fat diet had no effects on HGP, DNL, or fuel selection. We conclude that altered CHO intake alters HGP specifically and in a dose-dependent manner, that HGP may mediate the effects of CHO on whole-body fuel selection both by providing substrate and by altering serum insulin concentrations, that altered lipolysis and tissue oxidation efficiency contribute to changes in fat oxidation, and that surplus CHO is not substantially converted by the liver to fat as it spares fat oxidation, but that fractional DNL may nevertheless be a qualitative marker of recent CHO intake. Images PMID

  13. Msx2 alters the timing of retinal ganglion cells fate commitment and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shao-Yun; Wang, Jian-Tao

    2010-05-14

    Timing of cell fate commitment determines distinct retinal cell types, which is believed to be controlled by a tightly coordinated regulatory program of proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation. Although homeobox protein Msx2 could induce apoptosis of optic vesicle, it is unclear whether Msx2 regulates differentiation and cell fate commitment of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In this study, we show that overexpression of Msx2 transiently suppressed the expression of Cyclin D1 and blocked cell proliferation. Meanwhile, overexpression of Msx2 delayed the expression of RGC-specific differentiation markers (Math5 and Brn3b), which showed that Msx2 could affect the timing of RGCs fate commitment and differentiation by delaying the timing of cell cycle exit of retinal progenitors. These results indicate Msx2 possesses dual regulatory functions in controlling cell cycle progression of retinal RPCs and timing of RGCs differentiation.

  14. Role of Adiantum philippense L. on Glucose Uptake in Isolated Pancreatic Cells and Inhibition of Adipocyte Differentiation in 3T3-L1 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Paul, Tania; Apte, Kishori G; Parab, Pradeep B; Das, Biswadeep

    2017-07-01

    Adiantum philippense (AP) is a pteridophyte that shows antihyperglycemic activity in vivo diabetic model, but the mechanism of action is unknown. AP was found to play a pivotal role in minimizing the high blood glucose in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Simultaneously, it was observed that it could maintain the normal lipid profile even in diabetic condition. To investigate its insulin-like activity along with its inhibitory role on adipocyte differentiation became the objective of our present study. Glucose uptake potential of this fern was done in isolated pancreatic islets and inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was assessed in 3T3-L1 cell line. Before this, the cytotoxic concentration was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay on L929 cell line. To determine its role in lipid metabolism, the oil droplets produced in adipocytes were stained with Oil 'O' red staining, and triglyceride levels of various drug treatments were measured spectrophotometrically. This fern extract was found to be actively utilizing glucose in the glucose uptake assay. Moreover, it was also involved in inhibiting differentiation of pro-adipocyte to adipocyte in the 3T3-L1 cell lines. The percentage inhibition as obtained from the absorbance showed that the ethanolic extract at the concentration of 200 μg/ml showed 32.48% inhibition. All the above-mentioned parameters when appraised indicated that this fern could be used as an alternative medicine in managing diabetes associated with obesity. Adiantum phillippense (AP) is a pteridophyte that can work as antihyperglycemic agent by minimizing some adverse effects produced by diabetes. Diabetes produces oxidative stress, hampers normal glucose uptake in the pancreas, promotes adipocyte differentiation, and leads to obesity, and as a result, it generates catastrophic effect to the normal cells. The present study has shown that ethanolic extract of AP gives better protection rate against H(2) O(2

  15. ER stress in adipocytes inhibits insulin signaling, represses lipolysis, and alters the secretion of adipokines without inhibiting glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Spinas, G A; Niessen, M

    2010-08-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the intra-cellular site, where secreted and membrane proteins are synthesized. ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) contribute to insulin resistance and the development of diabetes in obesity. It was shown previously in hepatocytes that the UPR activates c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), which phosphorylates insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins on serine residues thereby inhibiting insulin signal transduction. Here we describe how ER stress affects insulin signaling and the biological function of adipocytes. In addition to inhibition of IRS we found that ER stress downregulates the expression of the insulin receptor. Concomitantly, insulin-induced activation of Akt/PKB and of ERK1/2 was strongly inhibited. Ectopic expression of IRS1 or IRS2 strongly counteracted the inhibitory effect of ER stress on insulin signaling while pharmacological inhibition of JNK with SP600125 resulted only in a mild improvement. ER stress decreased the secretion of the adipokines adiponectin and leptin, but strongly increased secretion of IL-6. ER stress inhibited expression and insulin-induced phosphorylation of AS160, reduced lipolysis but did not inhibit glucose transport. Finally, supernatants collected from 3T3-L1 adipocytes undergoing ER stress improved or impaired proliferation when used to condition the culture medium of INS-1E beta-cells dependent on the degree of ER stress. It appears that ER stress in adipocytes might initially lead to changes resembling early prediabetic stages, which at least in part support the regulation of systemic energy homeostasis. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  16. Eucommia bark (Du-Zhong) improves diabetic nephropathy without altering blood glucose in type 1-like diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Ho-Shan; Liu, I-Min; Niu, Chiang-Shan; Ku, Po-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Tien; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Background Eucommia bark, Eucommia ulmoides Oliver barks (Du-Zhong in Mandarin), is an herb used for renal dysfunction in Chinese traditional medicine. In an attempt to develop this herb as a treatment for diabetic nephropathy (DN), we investigated the effects of Du-Zhong on renal dysfunction in type 1-like diabetic rats. Methods Streptozotocin (STZ) was used to induce type 1-like diabetes in rats (STZ-diabetic rats). In addition to hyperglycemia, STZ-diabetic rats showed significant nephropathy, including higher plasma levels of blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and renal fibrosis. Western blot analysis of renal cortical tissue was applied to characterize the changes in potential signals related to nephropathy. Results Oral administration of Du-Zhong (1 g/kg/day) to STZ-diabetic rats for 20 days not only decreased the plasma levels of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine but also improved renal fibrosis, whereas the plasma glucose level was not changed. The higher expressions of protein levels of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and connective tissue growth factor in diabetic rats were markedly attenuated by Du-Zhong. The increased phosphorylation of Smad2/3 in STZ-diabetic rats was also reduced by Du-Zhong. However, Du-Zhong cannot reverse the hyperglycemia-induced overproduction of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in the diabetic kidney. Conclusion Oral administration of Du-Zhong improves STZ-induced DN in rats by inhibiting TGF-β/Smad signaling and suppressing TGF-β/connective tissue growth factor expression. Therefore, active principle from Du-Zhong is suitable to develop as new agent for DN in the future. PMID:27041999

  17. Chronic High Glucose and Pyruvate Levels Differentially Affect Mitochondrial Bioenergetics and Fuel-stimulated Insulin Secretion from Clonal INS-1 832/13 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Isabel; Sharoyko, Vladimir V.; Malmgren, Siri; Andersson, Lotta E.; Spégel, Peter; Nicholls, David G.; Mulder, Hindrik

    2014-01-01

    Glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells is a well established pathogenetic process in type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that metabolism-derived reactive oxygen species perturb the β-cell transcriptional machinery. Less is known about altered mitochondrial function in this condition. We used INS-1 832/13 cells cultured for 48 h in 2.8 mm glucose (low-G), 16.7 mm glucose (high-G), or 2.8 mm glucose plus 13.9 mm pyruvate (high-P) to identify metabolic perturbations. High-G cells showed decreased responsiveness, relative to low-G cells, with respect to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, plasma membrane depolarization, and insulin secretion, when stimulated acutely with 16.7 mm glucose or 10 mm pyruvate. In contrast, high-P cells were functionally unimpaired, eliminating chronic provision of saturating mitochondrial substrate as a cause of glucotoxicity. Although cellular insulin content was depleted in high-G cells, relative to low-G and high-P cells, cellular functions were largely recovered following a further 24-h culture in low-G medium. After 2 h at 2.8 mm glucose, high-G cells did not retain increased levels of glycolytic or TCA cycle intermediates but nevertheless displayed increased glycolysis, increased respiration, and an increased mitochondrial proton leak relative to low-G and high-P cells. This notwithstanding, titration of low-G cells with low protonophore concentrations, monitoring respiration and insulin secretion in parallel, showed that the perturbed insulin secretion of high-G cells could not be accounted for by increased proton leak. The present study supports the idea that glucose-induced disturbances of stimulus-secretion coupling by extramitochondrial metabolism upstream of pyruvate, rather than exhaustion from metabolic overload, underlie glucotoxicity in insulin-producing cells. PMID:24356960

  18. Differential effects of 3 classes of antidiabetic drugs on olanzapine-induced glucose dysregulation and insulin resistance in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Boyda, Heidi N.; Procyshyn, Ric M.; Tse, Lurdes; Hawkes, Erin; Jin, Chen Helen; Pang, Catherine C.Y.; Honer, William G.; Barr, Alasdair M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The second-generation antipsychotic drug olanzapine is an effective pharmacological treatment for psychosis. However, use of the drug is commonly associated with a range of metabolic side effects, including glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. These symptoms have been accurately modelled in rodents. Methods We compared the effects of 3 distinct classes of antidiabetic drugs, metformin (100 and 500 mg/kg, oral), rosiglitazone (6 and 30 mg/kg, oral) and glyburide (2 and 10 mg/kg, oral), on olanzapine-induced metabolic dysregulation. After acutely treating female rats with lower (7.5 mg/kg) or higher (15 mg/kg) doses of olanzapine, we assessed glucose intolerance using the glucose tolerance test and measured insulin resistance using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance equation. Results Both doses of olanzapine caused pronounced glucose dysregulation and insulin resistance, which were significantly reduced by treatment with metformin and rosiglitazone; however, glucose tolerance did not fully return to control levels. In contrast, glyburide failed to reverse the glucose intolerance caused by olanzapine despite increasing insulin levels. Limitations We evaluated a single antipsychotic drug, and it is unknown whether other antipsychotic drugs are similarly affected by antidiabetic treatments. Conclusion The present study indicates that oral hypoglycemic drugs that influence hepatic glucose metabolism, such as metformin and rosiglitazone, are more effective in regulating olanzapine-induced glucose dysregulation than drugs primarily affecting insulin release, such as glyburide. The current model may be used to better understand the biological basis of glucose dysregulation caused by olanzapine and how it can be reversed. PMID:22640703

  19. Race-specific molecular alterations correlate with differential outcomes for black and white endometrioid endometrial cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Nicholas W; Dubil, Elizabeth A; Wang, Guisong; Hood, Brian L; Oliver, Julie M; Litzi, Tracy A; Gist, Glenn D; Mitchell, David A; Blanton, Brian; Phippen, Neil T; Tian, Chunqiao; Zahn, Christopher M; Cohn, David E; Havrilesky, Laura J; Berchuck, Andrew; Shriver, Craig D; Darcy, Kathleen M; Hamilton, Chad A; Conrads, Thomas P; Maxwell, G Larry

    2017-06-27

    The objective of this study was to identify molecular alterations associated with disease outcomes for white and black patients with endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). EEC samples from black (n = 17) and white patients (n = 13) were analyzed by proteomics (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) and transcriptomics (RNA-seq). Coordinate alterations were validated with RNA-seq data from black (n = 49) and white patients (n = 216). Concordantly altered candidates were further tested for associations with race-specific progression-free survival (PFS) in black (n = 64) or white patients (n = 267) via univariate and multivariate Cox regression modeling and log-rank testing. Discovery analyses revealed significantly altered candidate proteins and transcripts between black and white patients, suggesting modulation of tumor cell viability in black patients and cell death signaling in black and white patients. Eighty-nine candidates were validated as altered between these patient cohorts, and a subset significantly correlated with differential PFS. White-specific PFS candidates included serpin family A member 4 (SERPINA4; hazard ratio [HR], 0.89; Wald P value = .02), integrin subunit α3 (ITGA3; HR, 0.76; P = .03), and Bet1 Golgi vesicular membrane trafficking protein like (BET1L; HR, 0.48; P = .04). Black-specific PFS candidates included family with sequence similarity 228 member B (FAM228B; HR, 0.13; P = .001) and HEAT repeat containing 6 (HEATR6; HR, 4.94; P = .047). Several candidates were also associated with overall survival (SERPINA4 and ITGA3) as well as PFS independent of disease stage, grade and myometrial invasion (SERPINA4, BET1L and FAM228B). This study has identified and validated molecular alterations in tumors from black and white EEC patients, including candidates significantly associated with altered disease outcomes within these patient cohorts. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Alteration of microRNA expression of human dental pulp cells during odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qimei; Wang, Runfu; Jiang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Ling, Junqi

    2012-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play momentous roles in various biological processes including cell differentiation. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) during odontogenic differentiation. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of miRNAs in the primary culture of hDPCs when incubated in odontogenic medium. The potential characteristics of hDPCs were investigated by miRNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Bioinformatics (ie, target prediction, Gene Ontology analysis, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes mapping tools) were applied for predicting the complementary target genes of miRNAs and their biological functions. A total of 22 miRNAs were differentially expressed in which 12 miRNAs up-regulated and 10 miRNAs down-regulated in differentiated hDPCs compared with the control. The target genes of differential miRNAs were predicted to associate with several biological functions and signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the Wnt signaling pathway. The differential expression miRNAs may be involved in governing hDPC odontogenic differentiation, thus contributing to the future investigations of regulatory mechanisms in reparative dentin formation and dental pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Differentiation alters stem cell nuclear architecture, mechanics, and mechano-sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P; Thorpe, Stephen D; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Baker, Brendon M; Yang, Michael T; Chen, Christopher S; Lee, David A; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is mediated by soluble and physical cues. In this study, we investigated differentiation-induced transformations in MSC cellular and nuclear biophysical properties and queried their role in mechanosensation. Our data show that nuclei in differentiated bovine and human MSCs stiffen and become resistant to deformation. This attenuated nuclear deformation was governed by restructuring of Lamin A/C and increased heterochromatin content. This change in nuclear stiffness sensitized MSCs to mechanical-loading-induced calcium signaling and differentiated marker expression. This sensitization was reversed when the ‘stiff’ differentiated nucleus was softened and was enhanced when the ‘soft’ undifferentiated nucleus was stiffened through pharmacologic treatment. Interestingly, dynamic loading of undifferentiated MSCs, in the absence of soluble differentiation factors, stiffened and condensed the nucleus, and increased mechanosensitivity more rapidly than soluble factors. These data suggest that the nucleus acts as a mechanostat to modulate cellular mechanosensation during differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18207.001 PMID:27901466

  2. The altered glucose metabolism in tumor and a tumor acidic microenvironment associated with extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer and monocarboxylate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofeng; Yu, Xiaozhou; Dai, Dong; Song, Xiuyu; Xu, Wengui

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer, also knowns as cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147) or basigin, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein that is involved in numerous physiological and pathological functions, especially in tumor invasion and metastasis. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) catalyze the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates such as L-lactate across the plasma membrane to preserve the intracellular pH and maintain cell homeostasis. As a chaperone to some MCT isoforms, CD147 overexpression significantly contributes to the metabolic transformation of tumor. This overexpression is characterized by accelerated aerobic glycolysis and lactate efflux, and it eventually provides the tumor cells with a metabolic advantage and an invasive phenotype in the acidic tumor microenvironment. This review highlights the roles of CD147 and MCTs in tumor cell metabolism and the associated molecular mechanisms. The regulation of CD147 and MCTs may prove to be with a therapeutic potential for tumors through the metabolic modification of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27009812

  3. Competitive (AP7) and non-competitive (MK-801) NMDA receptor antagonists differentially alter glucose utilization in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, D.W.; Lee, S.J.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of D,L-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7), a competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, on regional brain metabolism were studied in unanesthetized, freely moving rats by using the quantitative {sup 14}C2-deoxyglucose autoradiographic procedure. AP7 (338 or 901 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent decrease of metabolic activity throughout most of the regions studied including sensory, motor, and limbic cortices. In contrast, MK-801 (0.1 or 1.0 mg/kg) resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of metabolic activity in sensory cortices, and an increase in limbic regions such as the hippocampal stratum lacunosum moleculare and entorhinal cortex. MK-801 also produced a biphasic response in agranular motor cortex, whereby the low dose increased while the high dose decreased labeling. In addition, MK-801 produced heterogeneous effects on regional cerebral metabolism in sensory cortices. Metabolic activity decreased in layer IV relative to layer Va following MK-801 treatment in primary somatosensory (SI) and visual (VI) cortices, suggesting a shift in activity from afferent fibers innervating layer IV to those innervating layer Va. MK-801 administration also decreased metabolic activity in granular SI relative to dysgranular SI, and in VI relative to secondary visual cortex (VII), thus providing a relative sparing of activity in dysgranular SI and VII. Thus, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist suppressed activity from extrinsic neocortical sources, enhancing relative intracortical activity and stimulating limbic regions, while the competitive NMDA antagonist depressed metabolic activity in all cortical regions.

  4. Effects of altered glucose supply and adiposity on expression of hypothalamic energy balance regulatory genes in late gestation growth restricted ovine fetuses.

    PubMed

    Adam, C L; Bake, T; Findlay, P A; Milne, J S; Aitken, R P; Wallace, J M

    2011-11-01

    Intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR) predisposes obesity in adulthood. This may be due to altered fetal nutrition causing sustained changes within the developing hypothalamic energy balance regulatory system. Using our established ovine model of IUGR, 130-day singleton fetuses (term=147 days) were obtained from growing adolescent mothers on control dietary intake (C), high intake (H) or H with growth hormone administration during either early (H+early GH) or late gestation (H+late GH) (n=6/group). GH increased maternal glycemia for the duration of treatment. H and H+early GH fetuses showed IUGR compared with C fetuses; body weight was partially restored in H+late GH fetuses, with 40% increased adiposity. In the fetal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript mRNA (anorexigenic) was decreased in H fetuses and correlated across all groups with total fetal liver glycogen. Neuropeptide Y, agouti-related peptide (orexigenic) and proopiomelanocortin (anorexigenic) mRNAs were not different between groups. Insulin receptor mRNA in the ARC was increased in H, H+early GH and H+late GH fetuses and correlated negatively with fetal plasma insulin. Leptin receptor mRNA in the ARC correlated positively with fetal plasma leptin concentration and fetal fat content. Therefore, in IUGR fetuses, a key anorexigenic neuropeptide is sensitive to altered glucose supply and the hypothalamic leptin-signaling pathway is altered prenatally by increased adiposity and leptinemia. These changes could impact on postnatal energy balance regulation. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Alterations in superoxide dismutase and catalase in Fusarium oxysporum during starvation-induced differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kono, Y; Yamamoto, H; Takeuchi, M; Komada, H

    1995-07-20

    Vegetative hyphae of Fusarium oxysporum differentiate into chlamydospore by triggering with carbon-starvation. The current changes in the cellular detoxifying defenses against superoxide and hydrogen peroxide: superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were examined. Although there was a little change in catalase, a dramatic change in SOD was observed during the differentiation. In vegetative hyphae of F. oxysporum f. sp. raphani, three isozymes of SOD, all of which were not inhibited by hydrogen peroxide and cyanide, were present whereas in chlamydospore an isoenzyme, which was inhibited by hydrogen peroxide but not by cyanide, was present. Thus, as differentiation proceeded, Mn-type SOD disappeared and an Fe-type SOD appeared. The results suggest that the Fe-type SOD is specifically expressed during chlamydospore formation and that active intermediates of oxygen and/or its scavenging enzymes participate in the differentiation of Fusarium oxysporum.

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF NEURAL BIOMARKERS OF ALTERED SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE***

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sexual differentiation of the brain occurs during late gestation through the early postnatal period. The development of the phenotypical male brain is dependent on the aromatization of circulating testosterone to estradiol. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) duri...

  7. Identification of neural biomarkers of altered sexual differentiation following gestational exposure###

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sexual differentiation of the brain occurs during late gestation through the early postnatal period. The development of the phenotypical male brain is dependent on the aromatization of circulating testosterone to estradiol. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) duri...

  8. Identification of neural biomarkers of altered sexual differentiation following gestational exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sexual differentiation of the brain occurs during late gestation through the early postnatal period. The development of the phenotypical male brain is dependent on the aromatization of circulating testosterone to estradiol. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during...

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF NEURAL BIOMARKERS OF ALTERED SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION FOLLOWING GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE***

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sexual differentiation of the brain occurs during late gestation through the early postnatal period. The development of the phenotypical male brain is dependent on the aromatization of circulating testosterone to estradiol. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) duri...

  10. Identification of neural biomarkers of altered sexual differentiation following gestational exposure###

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sexual differentiation of the brain occurs during late gestation through the early postnatal period. The development of the phenotypical male brain is dependent on the aromatization of circulating testosterone to estradiol. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) duri...

  11. Identification of neural biomarkers of altered sexual differentiation following gestational exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sexual differentiation of the brain occurs during late gestation through the early postnatal period. The development of the phenotypical male brain is dependent on the aromatization of circulating testosterone to estradiol. Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during...

  12. Altered expression of ganglioside GM3 molecular species and a potential regulatory role during myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Go, Shinji; Go, Shiori; Veillon, Lucas; Ciampa, Maria Grazia; Mauri, Laura; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken; Prinetti, Alessandro; Sonnino, Sandro; Inokuchi, Jin-Ichi

    2017-04-28

    Gangliosides (sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids) help regulate many important biological processes, including cell proliferation, signal transduction, and differentiation, via formation of functional microdomains in plasma membranes. The structural diversity of gangliosides arises from both the ceramide moiety and glycan portion. Recently, differing molecular species of a given ganglioside are suggested to have distinct biological properties and regulate specific and distinct biological events. Elucidation of the function of each molecular species is important and will provide new insights into ganglioside biology. Gangliosides are also suggested to be involved in skeletal muscle differentiation; however, the differential roles of ganglioside molecular species remain unclear. Here we describe striking changes in quantity and quality of gangliosides (particularly GM3) during differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblast cells and key roles played by distinct GM3 molecular species at each step of the process. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. BMP4-mediated brown fat-like changes in white adipose tissue alter glucose and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shu-Wen; Tang, Yan; Li, Xi; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, You-You; Huang, Hai-Yan; Xue, Rui-Dan; Yu, Hao-Yong; Guo, Liang; Gao, Hui-Di; Liu, Yan; Sun, Xia; Li, Yi-Ming; Jia, Wei-Ping; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2013-02-26

    Expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) in adipocytes of white adipose tissue (WAT) produces "white adipocytes" with characteristics of brown fat and leads to a reduction of adiposity and its metabolic complications. Although BMP4 is known to induce commitment of pluripotent stem cells to the adipocyte lineage by producing cells that possess the characteristics of preadipocytes, its effects on the mature white adipocyte phenotype and function were unknown. Forced expression of a BMP4 transgene in white adipocytes of mice gives rise to reduced WAT mass and white adipocyte size along with an increased number of a white adipocyte cell types with brown adipocyte characteristics comparable to those of beige or brite adipocytes. These changes correlate closely with increased energy expenditure, improved insulin sensitivity, and protection against diet-induced obesity and diabetes. Conversely, BMP4-deficient mice exhibit enlarged white adipocyte morphology and impaired insulin sensitivity. We identify peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC1α) as the target of BMP signaling required for these brown fat-like changes in WAT. This effect of BMP4 on WAT appears to extend to human adipose tissue, because the level of expression of BMP4 in WAT correlates inversely with body mass index. These findings provide a genetic and metabolic basis for BMP4's role in altering insulin sensitivity by affecting WAT development.

  14. Differential D-glucose requirements of the general amino-acid permease and protein synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. ellipsoideus.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, R; Ferreras, J M; Muñoz, R; Arias, F J; Rojo, M A; Girbés, T

    1990-01-01

    The dependence of the general aminoacid permease and protein synthesis on the availability of D-glucose as energy source was studied. Stimulation by the sugar was immediate once added to the cell suspensions and seems to be mediated by energy derived directly from glycolysis. The general aminoacid permease was saturated linearly with D-glucose whereas protein synthesis was saturated sigmoidealy requiring much higher concentration of the sugar than the general aminoacid permease.

  15. Characterization of the avian GLUT1 glucose transporter: differential regulation of GLUT1 and GLUT3 in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, P; Kang, H Y; Mylott, D; Robbins, P J; White, M K

    1995-01-01

    Vertebrate cells that are transformed by oncogenes such as v-src or are stimulated by mitogens have increased rates of glucose uptake. In rodent cells, the mechanisms whereby glucose transport is up-regulated are well understood. Stimulation of glucose transport involves an elevation in mRNA encoding the GLUT1 glucose transporter that is controlled at the levels of both transcription and mRNA stability. Cloning and sequencing of chicken GLUT1 cDNA showed that it shares 95% amino acid sequence similarity to mammalian GLUT1s. Nevertheless, unlike mammalian GLUT1 mRNA, it was not induced by v-src, serum addition, or treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Rather, the induction of glucose transport in chicken embryo fibroblasts by v-src, serum, and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate was associated with induction of GLUT3 mRNA level and GLUT3 transcription. Rat fibroblasts were also found to express both GLUT1 and GLUT3 isoforms, but v-src induced GLUT1 and not GLUT3. This suggests that animal cells require both a basal and an upregulatable glucose transporter and that these functions have been subsumed by different GLUT isoforms in avian and mammalian cells. Images PMID:8589457

  16. Neuroendocrine tumors show altered expression of chondroitin sulfate, glypican 1, glypican 5, and syndecan 2 depending on their differentiation grade.

    PubMed

    García-Suárez, Olivia; García, Beatriz; Fernández-Vega, Iván; Astudillo, Aurora; Quirós, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are found throughout the body and are important as they give rise to distinct clinical syndromes. Glycosaminoglycans, in proteoglycan (PG) form or as free chains, play vital roles in every step of tumor progression. Analyzing tumor samples with different degrees of histological differentiation we determined the existence of important alterations in chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains. Analysis of the transcription of the genes responsible for the production of CS showed a decline in the expression of some genes in poorly differentiated compared to well-differentiated tumors. Using anti-CS antibodies, normal stroma was always negative whereas tumoral stroma always showed a positive staining, more intense in the highest grade carcinomas, while tumor cells were negative. Moreover, certain specific cell surface PGs experienced a drastic decrease in expression depending on tumor differentiation. Syndecan 2 levels were very low or undetectable in healthy tissues, increasing significantly in well-differentiated tumors, and decreasing in poorly differentiated NETs, and its expression levels showed a positive correlation with patient survival. Glypican 5 appeared overexpressed in high-grade tumors with epithelial differentiation, and not in those that displayed a neuroendocrine phenotype. In contrast, normal neuroendocrine cells were positive for glypican 1, displaying intense staining in cytoplasm and membrane. Low-grade NETs had increased expression of this PG, but this reduced as tumor grade increased, its expression correlating positively with patient survival. Whilst elevated glypican 1 expression has been documented in different tumors, the downregulation in high-grade tumors observed in this work suggests that this proteoglycan could be involved in cancer development in a more complex and context-dependent manner than previously thought.

  17. Neuroendocrine Tumors Show Altered Expression of Chondroitin Sulfate, Glypican 1, Glypican 5, and Syndecan 2 Depending on Their Differentiation Grade

    PubMed Central

    García-Suárez, Olivia; García, Beatriz; Fernández-Vega, Iván; Astudillo, Aurora; Quirós, Luis M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are found throughout the body and are important as they give rise to distinct clinical syndromes. Glycosaminoglycans, in proteoglycan (PG) form or as free chains, play vital roles in every step of tumor progression. Analyzing tumor samples with different degrees of histological differentiation we determined the existence of important alterations in chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains. Analysis of the transcription of the genes responsible for the production of CS showed a decline in the expression of some genes in poorly differentiated compared to well-differentiated tumors. Using anti-CS antibodies, normal stroma was always negative whereas tumoral stroma always showed a positive staining, more intense in the highest grade carcinomas, while tumor cells were negative. Moreover, certain specific cell surface PGs experienced a drastic decrease in expression depending on tumor differentiation. Syndecan 2 levels were very low or undetectable in healthy tissues, increasing significantly in well-differentiated tumors, and decreasing in poorly differentiated NETs, and its expression levels showed a positive correlation with patient survival. Glypican 5 appeared overexpressed in high-grade tumors with epithelial differentiation, and not in those that displayed a neuroendocrine phenotype. In contrast, normal neuroendocrine cells were positive for glypican 1, displaying intense staining in cytoplasm and membrane. Low-grade NETs had increased expression of this PG, but this reduced as tumor grade increased, its expression correlating positively with patient survival. Whilst elevated glypican 1 expression has been documented in different tumors, the downregulation in high-grade tumors observed in this work suggests that this proteoglycan could be involved in cancer development in a more complex and context-dependent manner than previously thought. PMID:24570896

  18. Alterations in local cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (LCMRGlc) in childhood epilepsies as determined with FDG and PET

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, M.E.; Chugani, H.T.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Engel, Jr.

    1985-05-01

    The authors investigated LCMRGlc in Lennox-Gastant Syndrome (LGS) (n=15), infantile spasm (IS) (n=14) and Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS) (n=5). In children with LGS, 3 distinct metabolic patterns are seen interically: 1) unilateral focal hypometabolism in frontal or temporal lobes, 2) unilateral diffuse hypometabolism, and 3) bilateral diffuse hypometabolism. Therapeutic implications of this classification are: surgical resection in focal (i.e., as for partial epilepsy), corpus callosotomy in diffuse unilateral, and elimination of surgery for those with bilateral diffuse hypometabolism. Babies with idiopathic IS showed symmetrical hypometabolism of lenticular nuclei and midbrain/brain stem compared to cortex and is characterized by slightly better prognosis. In contrast, babies with symtomatic IS had additional CMRGlc disturbances such as bilateral assymetric and multi focal hypometabolism in infant with neurofibromatosis; right parieto-occipital hypometabolims in infant with tuberous sclerosis; intense hypermetabolism of hypothalamus (34.5 vs 3.18 ..mu..moles/-min/100g in other regions) in another where x-ray CT showed only obstructive hydrocephalus. Findings support classical notion of subcortical involvement in this disorder. In SWS, PET showed marked hypometabolism in affected hemisphere in older children, while a 9 month old showed increased LCMRGlc unilaterally (40-50 vs 28-44 ..mu.. moles/min/100g contralateral) with cross cerebellar hypermetabolism (48-50 vs 27-31 ..mu.. moles/min/100g) with no behavioral or EEG evidence of seizure during study. PET studies of LCMRGlc appear sensitive and useful in classifying heterogeneous syndromes into subtypes regarding differential therapy and prognosis, and provide more comprehensive identification of sites of disturbance for investigating mechanisms of these disorders.

  19. Differential melatonin alterations in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of patients with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Bumb, J M; Enning, F; Mueller, J K; van der List, Till; Rohleder, C; Findeisen, P; Noelte, I; Schwarz, E; Leweke, F M

    2016-07-01

    Melatonin, which plays an important role for regulation of circadian rhythms and the sleep/wake cycle has been linked to the pathophysiology of major depressive and bipolar disorder. Here we investigated melatonin levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum of depression and bipolar patients to elucidate potential differences and commonalities in melatonin alterations across the two disorders. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, CSF and serum melatonin levels were measured in 108 subjects (27 healthy volunteers, 44 depressed and 37 bipolar patients). Covariate adjusted multiple regression analysis was used to investigate group differences in melatonin levels. In CSF, melatonin levels were significantly decreased in bipolar (P<0.001), but not major depressive disorder. In serum, we observed a significant melatonin decrease in major depressive (P=0.003), but not bipolar disorder. No associations were found between serum and CSF melatonin levels or between melatonin and measures of symptom severity or sleep disruptions in either condition. This study suggests the presence of differential, body fluid specific alterations of melatonin levels in bipolar and major depressive disorder. Further, longitudinal studies are required to explore the disease phase dependency of melatonin alterations and to mechanistically explore the causes and consequences of site-specific alterations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hyperhomocysteinemia-induced oxidative stress differentially alters proteasome composition and activities in heart and aorta.

    PubMed

    Derouiche, Faouzia; Bôle-Feysot, Christine; Naïmi, Dalila; Coëffier, Moïse

    2014-09-26

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is associated with cardiovascular diseases and is thought to induce endogenous oxidative stress and causes many cellular damages. Proteasome that degrades oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins can regulate the cellular response to oxidative stress. We aimed to investigate whether hyperhomocysteinemia induces oxidative stress and alters proteasome function and composition in heart and aorta tissues of rat. To create hyperhomocysteinemia, male Wistar rats (Pasteur Institute-Algiers) were received daily intraperitoneal injections of dl-homocysteine (0.6-1.2μM/g body weight) for 3weeks. Biomarkers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT)) were first measured by biochemical methods and tissue damages by histological sections. Proteasome activities were quantitated using fluorogenic synthetic peptides; ubiquitinated proteins and proteasome subunits expression were then evaluated by SDS PAGE and Western blot analysis. We showed increased MDA and PC but decreased SOD and CAT levels both in plasma, heart and aorta accompanied by histological changes. A significant decrease of proteasome activities was observed in heart, whereas proteasome activity was not affected in aorta. However proteasome composition was altered in both tissues, as the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. Data demonstrated an alteration of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in hyperhomocysteinemia as a result of accumulating oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins in response to oxidative stress. Further studies must be conducted to better understanding mechanisms responsible of proteasome alterations in hyperhomocysteinemia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tungsten Promotes Sex-Specific Adipogenesis in the Bone by Altering Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Grant, Michael P.; Wu, Ting Hua; Flores Molina, Manuel; Plourde, Dany; Kelly, Alexander D. R.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Lemaire, Maryse; Schlezinger, Jennifer J.; Mwale, Fackson; Mann, Koren K.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring metal that increasingly is being incorporated into industrial goods and medical devices, and is recognized as an emerging contaminant. Tungsten preferentially and rapidly accumulates in murine bone in a concentration-dependent manner; however the effect of tungsten deposition on bone biology is unknown. Other metals alter bone homeostasis by targeting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation, thus, we investigated the effects of tungsten on MSCs in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, tungsten shifted the balance of MSC differentiation by enhancing rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis, which correlated with an increase in adipocyte content in the bone of tungsten-exposed, young, male mice. Conversely, tungsten inhibited osteogenesis of MSCs in vitro; however, we found no evidence that tungsten inhibited osteogenesis in vivo. Interestingly, two factors known to influence adipogenesis are sex and age of mice. Both female and older mice have enhanced adipogenesis. We extended our study and exposed young female and adult (9-month) male and female mice to tungsten for 4 weeks. Although tungsten accumulated to a similar extent in young female mice, it did not promote adipogenesis. Interestingly, tungsten did not accumulate in the bone of older mice; it was undetectable in adult male mice, and just above the limit of detect in adult female mice. Surprisingly, tungsten enhanced adipogenesis in adult female mice. In summary, we found that tungsten alters bone homeostasis by altering differentiation of MSCs, which could have significant implications for bone quality, but is highly dependent upon sex and age. PMID:26865663

  2. L-4F Differentially Alters Plasma Levels of Oxidized Fatty Acids Resulting in more Anti-Inflammatory HDL in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Satoshi; Grijalva, Victor; Navab, Mohamad; Van Lenten, Brian J.; Wagner, Alan C.; Anantharamaiah, G.M.; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.

    2011-01-01

    To determine in vivo if L-4F differentially alters plasma levels of oxidized fatty acids resulting in more anti-inflammatory HDL. Injecting L-4F into apoE null mice resulted in a significant reduction in plasma levels of 15-HETE, 5-HETE, 13-HODE and 9-HODE. In contrast, plasma levels of 20-HETE were not reduced and plasma levels of 14,15-EET, which are derived from the cytochrome P450 pathway, were elevated after injection of L-4F. Injection of 13(S)-HPODE into wild-type C57BL/6J mice caused an increase in plasma levels of 13-HODE and 9-HODE and was accompanied by a significant loss in the anti-inflammatory properties of HDL. The response of atherosclerosis resistant C3H/HeJ mice to injection of 13(S)-HPODE was similar but much more blunted. Injection of L-4F at a site different from that at which the 13(S)-HPODE was injected resulted in significantly lower plasma levels of 13-HODE and 9-HODE and significantly less loss of HDL anti-inflammatory properties in both strains. i) L-4F differentially alters plasma levels of oxidized fatty acids in vivo. ii) The resistance of the C3H/HeJ strain to atherosclerosis may in part be mediated by a reduced reaction of this strain to these potent lipid oxidants. L-4F differentially alters plasma levels of oxidized fatty acids in mice and the resistance of C3H/HeJ mice to atherosclerosis may be mediated by a reduced reaction of this strain to these potent lipid oxidants. PMID:20642447

  3. Connecting differential responses of native and invasive riparian plants to climate change and environmental alteration.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Neal E; Richardson, Curtis J; Ho, Mengchi

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is predicted to impact river systems in the southeastern United States through alterations of temperature, patterns of precipitation and hydrology. Future climate scenarios for the southeastern United States predict (1) surface water temperatures will warm in concert with air temperature, (2) storm flows will increase and base flows will decrease, and (3) the annual pattern of synchronization between hydroperiod and water temperature will be altered. These alterations are expected to disturb floodplain plant communities, making them more vulnerable to establishment of invasive species. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate whether native and invasive riparian plant assemblages respond differently to alterations of climate and land use. To study the response of riparian wetlands to watershed and climate alterations, we utilized an existing natural experiment imbedded in gradients of temperature and hydrology-found among dammed and undammed rivers. We evaluated a suite of environmental variables related to water temperature, hydrology, watershed disturbance, and edaphic conditions to identify the strongest predictors of native and invasive species abundances. We found that native species abundance is strongly influenced by climate-driven variables such as temperature and hydrology, while invasive species abundance is more strongly influenced by site-specific factors such as land use and soil nutrient availability. The patterns of synchronization between plant phenology, annual hydrographs, and annual water temperature cycles may be key factors sustaining the viability of native riparian plant communities. Our results demonstrate the need to understand the interactions between climate, land use, and nutrient management in maintaining the species diversity of riparian plant communities. Future climate change is likely to result in diminished competitiveness of native plant species, while the competitiveness of invasive species will increase

  4. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis alters sulfated glycosaminoglycans deposition during chondrogenic differentiation in ATDC5 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Yutaka; Kozawa, Eiji; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Arai, Eisuke; Futamura, Naohisa; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Ishiguro, Naoki; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    In chondrogenic differentiation, expression and collaboration of specific molecules, such as aggrecan and type II collagen, in extracellular matrix (ECM) are crucial. However, few studies have clarified the roles of hyaluronan (HA) in proteoglycan aggregation during chondrogenic differentiation. We assessed the roles of HA in sulfated glycosaminoglycans deposition during chondrogenic differentiation by means of 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), an HA synthase inhibitor, using ATDC5 cells. ATDC5 cells were treated with 0.5 mM 4-MU for 7 or 21 days after induction of chondrogenic differentiation with insulin. Depositions of sulfated glycosaminoglycans were evaluated with Alcian blue staining. mRNA expression of ECM molecules was determined using real-time RT-PCR. The deposition of aggrecan and versican was investigated with immunohistochemical staining using specific antibodies. Effects of 4-MU on HA concentrations were analyzed by HA binding assay. 4-MU suppressed the positivity of Alcian blue staining, although this delay was reversible. Interestingly, stronger positivity of Alcian blue staining was observed at day 21 in cultures with 4-MU discontinuation than in the control. 4-MU significantly increased the mRNA expression of aggrecan, versican, and type II collagen, which was consistent with increased deposition of aggrecan and versican. The HA concentration in ECM and cell-associated region was significantly suppressed with 4-MU treatment. We conclude that the inhibition of HA synthesis slows sulfated glycosaminoglycans deposition during chondrogenic differentiation despite the increased deposition of other ECM molecules. Transient starvation of HA with 4-MU accelerates chondrogenic ECM formation, suggesting its potential to stimulate chondrogenic differentiation with adequate use.

  5. Ethanol alters proliferation and differentiation of normal and chromosomally abnormal human embryonic stem cell-derived neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Malini; Gerwe, Brian A; Scharer, Christopher D; Sahasranaman, Vanita; Eilertson, Carmen D; Nash, Rachel J; Usta, Sümeyra Naz; Kelly, Shasmine; Rose, Matthew; Peraza, Rene; Arumugham, Jagan; Stewart, Bethany; Stice, Steven L; Nash, Rodney J

    2013-06-01

    Ethanol is a powerful substance and, when consumed during pregnancy, has significant psychoactive and developmental effects on the developing fetus. These abnormalities include growth retardation, neurological deficits, and behavioral and cognitive deficiencies, commonly referred to as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. The effect of ethanol has been reported to affect cellular development on the embryonic level, however, not much is known about mutations contributing to the influence of ethanol. The purpose of our study was to determine if mutation contribute to changes in differentiation patterning, cell-cycle regulatory gene expression, and DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells after ethanol exposure. We exposed human embryonic stem cells (with and without know DNA mutations) to a low concentration (20 mM) of ethanol and measured neurosphere proliferation and differentiation, glial protein levels, expression of various cell-cycle genes, and DNA methylation. Ethanol altered cell-cycle gene expression between the two cell lines; however, gene methylation was not affected in ether lines.

  6. Cyclophilin A enhances macrophage differentiation and lipid uptake in high glucose conditions: a cellular mechanism for accelerated macro vascular disease in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Surya; Vinitha, Anandan; Kartha, Cheranellore Chandrasekharan

    2016-11-03

    Vascular disease in diabetes is initiated by monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, transmigration and formation of foam cells. Increasing clinical evidence supports a role for the secretory protein, cyclophilin A in diabetic vascular disease. The means by which cyclophilin A contributes to vascular lesion development in diabetes is however largely unknown. In this study we investigated using THP1 cells and human monocytes whether cyclophilin A under hyperglycemic conditions, functions in the inflammatory cascade as a chemoattractant and increases lipid uptake by formation of foam cells invitro. We developed an invitro model of monocytes cultured in 20 mm glucose (high glucose) equivalent to 360 mg/dL of plasma glucose levels. These monocytes were then differentiated into macrophages using PMA and subsequently transformed to lipid laden foam cells using oxidized low density lipoproteins in the presence and absence of cyclophilin A. This cellular model was used to study monocyte to macrophage differentiation, transmigration and foam cell formation. A similar cellular model using siRNA mediated transient elimination of the cyclophilin A gene as well as chemical inhibitors were used to further confirm the role of cyclophilin A in the differentiation and foam cell formation process. Cyclophilin A effectively increased migration of high glucose treated monocytes to the endothelial cell monolayer (p < 0.0001). In the presence of cyclophilin A, differentiated macrophages, when treated with oxLDL had a 36 percent increase in intracellular lipid accumulation (p = 0.01) when compared to cells treated with oxLDL alone. An increased flux of reactive oxygen species was also observed (p = 0.01). Inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, MCP-1 and cyclophilin A were significantly increased. Silencing cyclophilin A in THP-1 cells and human monocytes using siRNA or chemical inhibitor, TMN355 resulted in decrease in lipid uptake by 65-75% even after exposure to oxidized LDL

  7. Distinct Neuroblastoma-associated Alterations of PHOX2B Impair Sympathetic Neuronal Differentiation in Zebrafish Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenchao; Paw, Barry H.; Stewart, Rodney A.; George, Rani E.

    2013-01-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations and deletions in PHOX2B, a key regulator of autonomic neuron development, predispose to neuroblastoma, a tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. To gain insight into the oncogenic mechanisms engaged by these changes, we used zebrafish models to study the functional consequences of aberrant PHOX2B expression in the cells of the developing sympathetic nervous system. Allelic deficiency, modeled by phox2b morpholino knockdown, led to a decrease in the terminal differentiation markers th and dbh in sympathetic ganglion cells. The same effect was seen on overexpression of two distinct neuroblastoma-associated frameshift mutations, 676delG and K155X - but not the R100L missense mutation - in the presence of endogenous Phox2b, pointing to their dominant-negative effects. We demonstrate that Phox2b is capable of regulating itself as well as ascl1, and that phox2b deficiency uncouples this autoregulatory mechanism, leading to inhibition of sympathetic neuron differentiation. This effect on terminal differentiation is associated with an increased number of phox2b+, ascl1+, elavl3− cells that respond poorly to retinoic acid. These findings suggest that a reduced dosage of PHOX2B during development, through either a heterozygous deletion or dominant-negative mutation, imposes a block in the differentiation of sympathetic neuronal precursors, resulting in a cell population that is likely to be susceptible to secondary transforming events. PMID:23754957

  8. Altered SDF-1-mediated differentiation of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Elena; Avitabile, Daniele; Totta, Pierangela; Straino, Stefania; Spallotta, Francesco; Cencioni, Chiara; Torella, Anna Rita; Rizzi, Roberto; Porcelli, Daniele; Zacheo, Antonella; Vito, Luca Di; Pompilio, Giulio; Napolitano, Monica; Melillo, Guido; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Pesce, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    In diabetic patients and animal models of diabetes mellitus (DM), circulating endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) number is lower than in normoglycaemic conditions and EPC angiogenic properties are inhibited. Stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) plays a key role in bone marrow (BM) c-kit+ stem cell mobilization into peripheral blood (PB), recruitment from PB into ischemic tissues and differentiation into endothelial cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of DM in vivo and in vitro, on murine BM-derived c-kit+ cells and on their response to SDF-1. Acute hindlimb ischemia was induced in streptozotocin-treated DM and control mice; circulating c-kit+ cells exhibited a rapid increase followed by a return to control levels which was significantly faster in DM than in control mice. CXCR4 expression by BM c-kit+ cells as well as SDF-1 protein levels in the plasma and in the skeletal muscle, both before and after the induction of ischemia, were similar between normoglycaemic and DM mice. However, BM-derived c-kit+ cells from DM mice exhibited an impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype in response to SDF-1; this effect was associated with diminished protein kinase phosphorylation. Interestingly, SDF-1 ability to induce differentiation of c-kit+ cells from DM mice was restored when cells were cultured under normoglycaemic conditions whereas c-kit+ cells from normoglycaemic mice failed to differentiate in response to SDF-1 when they were cultured in hyperglycaemic conditions. These results show that DM diminishes circulating c-kit+ cell number following hindlimb ischemia and inhibits SDF-1-mediated AKT phosphorylation and differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype of BM-derived c-kit+ cells. PMID:20196780

  9. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin alters sebaceous gland cell differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ju, Qiang; Fimmel, Sabine; Hinz, Norbert; Stahlmann, Ralf; Xia, Longqing; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2011-04-01

    Chloracne is a characteristic marker of intoxication by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) or related compounds. Decreased lipogenesis is a prominent clinical sign in this disease. However, the activity of dioxins on human sebaceous glands is still unclear. In this study, the effects of TCDD on sebaceous gland differentiation were studied both in human skin samples maintained ex vivo and in cultured SZ95 sebocytes. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) protein expression, the receptor for dioxin, was detected in SZ95 sebocytes. Its expression was markedly inhibited by TCDD. Furthermore, we detected a reduced release of neutral lipids (10(-10) -10(-8) M; P<0.001) and decreased expression of epithelial membrane antigen and keratin 7, all of which are specific markers of sebaceous differentiation. Markedly, increased expression of the keratinocyte differentiation marker keratin 10 and of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor-δ was assessed in SZ95 sebocytes treated with TCDD. To corroborate these in vitro data, an ex vivo sebaceous gland-rich skin culture model was investigated. Obvious shrinkage of sebaceous glands with sebaceous duct hyperplasia and increased expression of keratin 10 in the atrophic sebaceous glands were observed on the 5th day of TCDD treatment. In conclusion, TCDD affects the differentiation of sebaceous gland cells probably by switching human sebaceous into keratinocyte-like differentiation. In addition and together with the results of a parallel study (J Dermatol Sci 58, 2010, 211), we provide evidence that TCDD effects on human sebocytes are mediated through the AhR signalling pathway.

  10. Low-dose dioxins alter gene expression related to cholesterol biosynthesis, lipogenesis, and glucose metabolism through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi Tomita, Shuhei; Ohsaki, Yusuke; Haketa, Keiichi; Tooi, Osamu; Santo, Noriaki; Tohkin, Masahiro; Furukawa, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2008-05-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a common environmental contaminant. TCDD binds and activates the transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), leading to adverse biological responses via the alteration of the expression of various AHR target genes. Although small amounts of TCDD are consumed via contaminated daily foodstuffs and environmental exposures, the effects of low-dose TCDD on gene expression in animal tissues have not been clarified, while a number of genes affected by high-dose TCDD were reported. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed gene expression profiles in livers of C57BL/6N mice that were orally administered relativ